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Sample records for advanced-stage epithelial ovarian

  1. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery. PMID:27679552

  2. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery.

  3. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  4. Impact of underweight after treatment on prognosis of advanced-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Ik; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Tae Hun; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; No, Jae Hong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Yong Beom; Song, Yong Sang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of underweight status on the prognosis of advanced-stage ovarian cancer. A total of 360 patients with stage III-IV epithelial ovarian cancer were enrolled and divided into three groups by body mass indexes (BMIs): underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2)); normal weight to overweight (18.5 kg/m(2) BMI < 27.5 kg/m(2)); obesity (BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m(2)). Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), CA-125, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as a marker reflecting host inflammation and immunity were compared among the three groups according to the three treatment times: at diagnosis; after surgery; and after treatment. Only underweight status after treatment was associated with poor OS in comparison with normal weight to overweight or obesity (mean value, 44.9 versus 78.8 or 67.4 months; P = 0.05); it was also an unfavorable factor for OS (adjusted HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.08-4.85). Furthermore, NLR was higher in patients with underweight than in those with obesity after treatment (median value, 2.15 versus 1.47; P = 0.03), in spite of no difference in CA-125 among the three groups at the three treatment times. In conclusion, underweight status after treatment may be a poor prognostic factor in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer, which accompanies increased host inflammation and decreased immunity.

  5. BRAF Mutation Is Rare in Advanced-Stage Low-Grade Ovarian Serous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Deavers, Michael T.; Mok, Samuel C.; Zu, Zhifei; Sun, Charlotte; Malpica, Anais; Wolf, Judith K.; Lu, Karen H.; Gershenson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas are believed to arise via an adenoma-serous borderline tumor-serous carcinoma sequence. In this study, we found that advanced-stage, low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas both with and without adjacent serous borderline tumor shared similar regions of loss of heterozygosity. We then analyzed 91 ovarian tumor samples for mutations in TP53, BRAF, and KRAS. TP53 mutations were not detected in any serous borderline tumors (n = 30) or low-grade serous carcinomas (n = 43) but were found in 73% of high-grade serous carcinomas (n = 18). BRAF (n = 9) or KRAS (n = 5) mutation was detected in 47% of serous borderline tumors, but among the low-grade serous carcinomas (39 stage III, 2 stage II, and 2 stage I), only one (2%) had a BRAF mutation and eight (19%) had a KRAS mutation. The low frequency of BRAF mutations in advanced-stage, low-grade serous carcinomas, which contrasts with previous findings, suggests that aggressive, low-grade serous carcinomas are more likely derived from serous borderline tumors without BRAF mutation. In addition, advanced-stage, low-grade carcinoma patients with BRAF or KRAS mutation have a better apparent clinical outcome. However, further investigation is needed. PMID:20802181

  6. Selecting the best strategy of treatment in newly diagnosed advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Minig, Lucas; Zorrero, Cristina; Iserte, Pablo Padilla; Poveda, Andres

    2015-12-26

    Although it is assumed that the combination of chemotherapy and radical surgery should be indicated in all newly diagnosed advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients, one of the main raised questions is how to select the best strategy of initial treatment in this group of patients, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery or primary debulking surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The selection criteria to offer one strategy over the other as well as a stepwise patient selection for initial treatment are described. Selecting the best strategy of treatment in newly diagnosed advanced stage ovarian cancer patients is a multifactorial and multidisciplinary decision. Several factors should be taken into consideration: (1) the disease factor, related to the extension and localization of the disease as well as tumor biology; (2) the patient factor, associated with patient age, poor performance status, and co-morbidities; and (3) institutional infrastructure factor, related to the lack of prolonged operative time, an appropriate surgical armamentarium, as well as well-equipped intensive care units with well-trained personnel.

  7. Increased expression of the RIα subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A is associated with advanced stage ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, H M; Cairns, M T; Atkinson, R J; McAleer, S; Harkin, D P; Gilmore, P; Johnston, P G

    1999-01-01

    The primary element in the cAMP signal transduction pathway is the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Expression of the RIα subunit of type I PKA is elevated in a variety of human tumours and cancer cell lines. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic importance of RIα expression in patients with ovarian cancer. We have evaluated the expression of RIα in a panel of human ovarian tumours (n= 40) and five human ovarian cancer cell lines using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The human ovarian cell lines OAW42 and OTN14 express high endogenous levels of RIα mRNA and protein (at significantly higher mRNA levels than high tissue expressors, P< 0.05). The ovarian cell line A2780 expresses low endogenous levels of RIα mRNA and protein (also at higher mRNA levels than low tissue expressors, P< 0.05). Quantitative RT-PCR revealed no significant difference in RIα mRNA expression between different ovarian histological subtypes in this study. No associations were found between RIα mRNA expression and differentiation state. RIα mRNA expression was significantly associated with tumour stage (P= 0.0036), and this remained significant in univariate analysis (P= 0.0002). A trend emerged between RIα mRNA expression levels and overall survival in univariate analysis (P= 0.051), however, by multivariate analysis, stage remained the major determinant of overall survival (P= 0.0001). This study indicates that in ovarian epithelial tumours high RIα mRNA expression is associated with advanced stage disease. RIα expression may be of predictive value in ovarian cancer and may be associated with dysfunctional signalling pathways in this cancer type. 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070893

  8. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  9. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. General Information about Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  11. Characteristics of Long-Term Survivors of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Rosemary D.; Chen, Yingjia S.; Morris, Cyllene R.; Petersen, Megan; Leiserowitz, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics associated with long-term survival forepithelial ovarian cancer patients using the California Cancer Registry. Methods A descriptive analysis of survival of all California residents diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1994 and 2001 was conducted using patients identified through the cancer registry with follow up through 2011. Characteristics of the patients who survived more than 10 years (long-term survivors) were compared to three other cohorts: patients who survived less than 2 years, those who survived at least 2 but no more than 5 years, and those who survived at least 5 but no more than 10 years. Results A total of 3,582 out of 11,541 (31% CI=30.2%, 31.8%) of the patients survived more than 10 years. Younger age, early stage, low-grade, and non-serous histology were significant predictors of long-term survival, but long-term survivors also included women with high-risk cancer. Conclusion Long-term survival is not unusual in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, even in those with high-risk disease. Many of the prognostic factors are well known, but it remains to be determined why some patients with advanced stage high-grade cancers survive longer than others with the same histology. These findings are important for patient counseling. PMID:26244529

  12. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  13. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  14. Cisplatin and Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  15. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. Epigenetic biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gloss, Brian S; Samimi, Goli

    2014-01-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and the 5th leading cause of cancer death in women. Women with ovarian cancer are typically diagnosed at late stage, when the cancer has spread into the peritoneal cavity and complete surgical removal is difficult. The 5-year survival time for patients diagnosed at this stage is 30%, in contrast to a 5-year survival of 90% for patients diagnosed at early stage. Cancer screening and early detection have the potential to greatly decrease the mortality and morbidity from cancer. The emerging field of epigenetics offers a valuable opportunity to identify cancer-specific DNA methylation changes that can be used in the clinic to improve early-stage diagnosis and better predict response in treated patients. To date, numerous DNA methylation aberrations have been identified in epithelial ovarian cancer; here we review some candidate genes and pathways with potential clinical utility as biomarkers for diagnosis and/or prognosis. It has become clear that even with the great promise of DNA methylation biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer, the identification of highly specific, sensitive and robust panels of markers and the standardization of analysis techniques are still required in order to improve detection, treatment and thus patient outcome.

  17. Mayo Clinic experience with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Decker, D G

    1983-08-01

    Clinical investigation of epithelial ovarian cancer must involve the precise definition of the lesion, careful application of new techniques, the objective evaluation of such techniques, the comparison of results in a randomized fashion with prior forms of therapy, careful pathological evaluation of the tumour, and the evaluation of toxicity to the patient. The interdisciplinary team approach to the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer and the development of randomized, prospective trials are essential. Utilizing these two elements, a better integration of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy can be accomplished. Of great importance is the evaluation of response patterns by an observer who is skilled in pelvic examinations and familiar with the natural history of epithelial ovarian cancer. The increasingly important role of surgery in the treatment of this cancer is now more clearly defined. The psychological effects of chemotherapy as well as the response patterns to chemotherapy must be evaluated. During the past 20 years, considerable progress has been made in prolonging the useful, functional life of the patient. The ultimate cure is still a matter for the future and is predicated on more effective combinations of potent chemotherapeutic combinations and a clearer definition of the role of radiation therapy.

  18. Epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Eugenia Maria Chaves De Moraes

    Data from the Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study, a multicenter, population-based, case-control study were used to identify risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer according to tumor behavior, histologic types, as well as p53 expression. Cases were women between 20 to 54 years old diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer from 1980 to 1982. Controls were women selected by random digit dialing. Tumor samples were analyzed for p53 overexpression using immunohistochemistry. Case-case and case-control conditional logistic regression models matched on age and diagnosing centers were used to calculate odds ratios (OR's) and 95% confidence intervals (CI's) for borderline, malignant, mucinous, and nonmucinous tumors, and p53 positive and p53 negative cases. The OR's for high number of lifetime ovulatory cycles (376-533 compared with less than 234) were 3.1 (95% CI 1.6-6.1) for malignant and 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.7) for borderline cases. The high number of ovulatory cycles was also a strong risk factor among nonmucinous cases. OR's for current and recent ex-smokers compared with never smokers were 2.8 (95% CI 1.7-4.8) for mucinous and 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.1) for nonmucinous types. Infertility showed a positive association with borderline ovarian cancer. Family history of ovarian or breast cancer was positively associated with malignant and nonmucinous cases. Parity had an inverse association with malignant ovarian cancer cases. When cases were subdivided by p53 results, the OR for tobacco smoking and p53 positive ovarian cancer was elevated for mucinous (OR = 3.9; 95% CI 0.8-18) at localized stage. Alcohol use showed a positive association with p53 positive malignant cases at advanced stage (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.2) and with p53 positive nonmucinous cases at advanced stage (OR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.4). A positive association between high number of ovulatory cycles and p53 positive malignant cases was observed in cases with localized stage (OR = 6.6; 95% CI 1.0-45) and advanced

  19. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Benign epithelial ovarian tumours-cancer precursors or markers for ovarian cancer risk?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Susan; Green, Adèle; Webb, Penelope

    2006-06-01

    The natural history of the development of epithelial ovarian cancer remains obscure and no effective screening test exists. In several human malignancies progression from benign to invasive tumour occurs, but this sequence has not been established for epithelial ovarian cancer. We have reviewed epidemiological, histopathological and molecular studies of benign epithelial ovarian tumours to assess the evidence for and against such a progression in ovarian cancer. These data suggest that a diagnosis of a benign ovarian cyst or tumour is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer later in life. Current evidence also suggests that benign serous tumours can progress to low-grade serous cancer and that benign mucinous tumours can progress to mucinous cancer. The more common high-grade serous ovarian cancers are likely to arise de novo.

  1. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  2. Elesclomol Sodium and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Molecular pathogenesis and extraovarian origin of epithelial ovarian cancer--shifting the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kurman, Robert J; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Recent morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies have led to the development of a new paradigm for the pathogenesis and origin of epithelial ovarian cancer based on a dualistic model of carcinogenesis that divides epithelial ovarian cancer into 2 broad categories designated types I and II. Type I tumors comprise low-grade serous, low-grade endometrioid, clear cell and mucinous carcinomas, and Brenner tumors. They are generally indolent, present in stage I (tumor confined to the ovary), and are characterized by specific mutations, including KRAS, BRAF, ERBB2, CTNNB1, PTEN, PIK3CA, ARID1A, and PPP2R1A, which target specific cell signaling pathways. Type I tumors rarely harbor TP53 mutations and are relatively stable genetically. Type II tumors comprise high-grade serous, high-grade endometrioid, malignant mixed mesodermal tumors (carcinosarcomas), and undifferentiated carcinomas. They are aggressive, present in advanced stage, and have a very high frequency of TP53 mutations but rarely harbor the mutations detected in type I tumors. In addition, type II tumors have molecular alterations that perturb expression of BRCA either by mutation of the gene or by promoter methylation. A hallmark of these tumors is that they are genetically highly unstable. Recent studies strongly suggest that fallopian tube epithelium (benign or malignant) that implants on the ovary is the source of low-grade and high-grade serous carcinoma rather than the ovarian surface epithelium as previously believed. Similarly, it is widely accepted that endometriosis is the precursor of endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas and, as endometriosis, is thought to develop from retrograde menstruation; these tumors can also be regarded as involving the ovary secondarily. The origin of mucinous and transitional cell (Brenner) tumors is still not well established, although recent data suggest a possible origin from transitional epithelial nests located in paraovarian locations at the

  5. Significantly greater expression of ER, PR, and ECAD in advanced-stage low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Lu, Karen H; Malpica, Anais; Bodurka, Diane C; Shvartsman, Hyun S; Schmandt, Rosemarie E; Thornton, Angela D; Deavers, Michael T; Silva, Elvio G; Gershenson, David M

    2007-10-01

    A 2-tier system that classifies ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) as low grade or high grade is gaining acceptance. Women with low-grade OSC generally have higher 5-year survival rates than do women with high-grade OSC. We examined the expression of various markers to further understand the molecular differences between low-grade and high-grade OSCs: the potential therapeutic targets or prognostic markers Her-2/neu, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor (PR); the metastasis-associated markers cyclin D1 (BCL1), E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2, and MMP-9; and the cell proliferation-associated markers BCL1, Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67), and p53. For this immunohistochemical analysis, we used paraffin-embedded specimens from 47 patients with advanced-stage low-grade OSC and from 49 patients with advanced-stage high-grade OSC. Our results showed that low-grade tumors expressed significantly higher levels of estrogen receptor, PR, and E-cadherin than did high-grade tumors, suggesting the involvement of gonadal steroid hormones, especially in the pathogenesis of low-grade OSC; the PR positivity was also observed in the stromal component of these low-grade tumors. On the other hand, high-grade tumors trended toward increased expression of MMP-9, BCL1, p53, and Ki-67, and robust MMP-9 positivity was observed in the stromal component of these high-grade tumors. These differences may lead to the development of different therapeutic strategies for women with either the low-grade or the high-grade form of OSC.

  6. Sheep stromal-epithelial cell interactions and ovarian tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Wang-Johanning, Feng; Huang, Miao; Liu, Jinsong; Rycaj, Kiera; Plummer, Joshua B; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Satterfield, William C; Johanning, Gary L

    2007-11-15

    Previous studies suggest that underlying ovarian stromal cues may regulate the ovarian surface epithelium. However, little is known about the interaction between ovarian stromal cells (OSC) and ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE) under normal physiologic and pathologic conditions, largely because of the lack of a suitable model. In the current study, the OSC obtained from a sheep were immortalized with SV-40 T/t antigen (designated IOSC) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (designated IOSCH), followed by transfection with the oncogenic allele of the human H-Ras oncogene (designated IOSChR). IOSC cells transfected with H-Ras before immortalization with telomerase were designated IOSCRH. These sheep OSCs were used in both in vitro and in vivo model systems to evaluate mechanisms by which OSCs influence ovarian tumor progression. Normal sheep OSCs were found to inhibit the growth of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 human ovarian cancer cells, but not normal sheep OSE and human OSE cells (hOSE137 cells). In contrast, IOSChR and IOSCRH cells stimulated the growth of normal sheep and human OSE cells, as well as cancer cells. These findings were confirmed by in vivo studies. Our data provide compelling support for the importance of stromal-epithelial cell interactions during tumor progression, and show for the first time that immortalized and transformed OSCs promote growth of ovarian epithelial tumors.

  7. Drugs with potential chemopreventive properties in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer--a nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baandrup, Louise

    2015-07-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis because the disease in the majority of patients is diagnosed at an advanced stage as a result of nonspecific symptoms and lack of efficient screening methods. Because of the poor prognosis of ovarian cancer and the challenge of early detection of the disease, identification of protective factors is important. It has been suggested that some commonly used drugs may have a protective effect against cancer, including ovarian cancer; however, the literature on chemopreventive measures for ovarian cancer is sparse and the results are inconclusive. Most previous studies have substantial methodological constraints, including limited study size and self-reporting of drug use, which introduces potential recall bias and misclassification. This PhD thesis includes a nationwide case-control study to evaluate associations between use of drugs with potential chemopreventive properties and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. The study is nested in the entire Danish female population using data from the following nationwide registries: the Danish Cancer Registry, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Prescription Registry, the Danish National Patient Register, and registries in Statistics Denmark on fertility, education, and income. Information from the included registries is linked by use of the unique personal identification number assigned to all Danish citizens. The cases were all women in Denmark with epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed during 2000-2009 (Paper 1) and 2000-2011 (Papers 2 and 3), identified in the Cancer Registry. Age-matched female population controls were randomly selected from the Civil Registration System by risk-set sampling. We required that cases and controls have no history of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) and that controls not previously have undergone bilateral oophorectomy or salpingo-oophorectomy. The total study population comprised 3741 epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 50,576 controls in

  8. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  9. Antivascular Therapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duhoux, Francois P.; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth largest cancer killer in women. Improved understanding of the molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer has led to the investigation of novel targeted therapies. Ovarian cancer is characterized by an imbalance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors in favor of angiogenesis activation. Various antivascular strategies are currently under investigation in ovarian cancer. They can schematically be divided into antiangiogenic and vascular-disrupting therapies. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these new treatments targeting the tumor vasculature in this disease. Promising activities have been detected in phase II trials, and results of phase III clinical trials are awaited eagerly. PMID:20072701

  10. Possible role of ovarian epithelial inflammation in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ness, R B; Cottreau, C

    1999-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a commonly fatal disease for which prevention strategies have been limited, in part because of a lack of understanding of the underlying biology. This paper reviews the epidemiologic literature in the English language on risk factors and protective factors for ovarian cancer and proposes a novel hypothesis that a common mechanism underlying this disease is inflammation. Previous hypotheses about the causes of ovarian cancer have attributed risk to an excess number of lifetime ovulations or to elevations in steroid hormones. Inflammation may underlie ovulatory events because an inflammatory reaction is induced during the process of ovulation. Additional risk factors for ovarian cancer, including asbestos and talc exposure, endometriosis (i.e., ectopic implantation of uterine lining tissue), and pelvic inflammatory disease, cannot be directly linked to ovulation or to hormones but do cause local pelvic inflammation. On the other hand, tubal ligation and hysterectomy act as protective factors, perhaps by diminishing the likelihood that the ovarian epithelium will be exposed to environmental initiators of inflammation. Inflammation entails cell damage, oxidative stress, and elevations of cytokines and prostaglandins, all of which may be mutagenic. The possibility that inflammation is a pathophysiologic contributor to the development of ovarian cancer suggests a directed approach to future research

  11. Rac1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer: effect on cell EMT and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ruobing; Liao, Gang; Wang, Haixia; Kuang, Jun; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-02-01

    Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rac1) has been implicated in tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, limited information is available regarding the role of rac1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation of rac1 expression with EMT and EOC prognosis. Rac1 protein levels of 150 EOC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Survival analysis was performed to determine the correlation between rac1 expression and survival. Cellular and molecular changes were also examined after rac1 in ovarian cancer cells was silenced in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of rac1 on EMT was investigated by Western blot analysis. Rac1 was highly expressed in EOC. Rac1 overexpression was closely associated with advanced stage based on International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, poor grade, serum Ca-125, and residual tumor size. Survival analyses demonstrated that patients with high rac1 expression levels were more susceptible to early tumor recurrence with very poor prognosis. This study revealed that rac1 downregulation decreased cell EMT and proliferation capability in vitro and in vivo. Rac1 expression possibly altered cell EMT by interacting with p21-activated kinase 1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. The present study showed that rac1 overexpression is associated with cell EMT and poor EOC prognosis. Rac1 possibly plays an important role in predicting EOC metastasis.

  12. Rac1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer: effect on cell EMT and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ruobing; Liao, Gang; Wang, Haixia; Kuang, Jun; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-02-01

    Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rac1) has been implicated in tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, limited information is available regarding the role of rac1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation of rac1 expression with EMT and EOC prognosis. Rac1 protein levels of 150 EOC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Survival analysis was performed to determine the correlation between rac1 expression and survival. Cellular and molecular changes were also examined after rac1 in ovarian cancer cells was silenced in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of rac1 on EMT was investigated by Western blot analysis. Rac1 was highly expressed in EOC. Rac1 overexpression was closely associated with advanced stage based on International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, poor grade, serum Ca-125, and residual tumor size. Survival analyses demonstrated that patients with high rac1 expression levels were more susceptible to early tumor recurrence with very poor prognosis. This study revealed that rac1 downregulation decreased cell EMT and proliferation capability in vitro and in vivo. Rac1 expression possibly altered cell EMT by interacting with p21-activated kinase 1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. The present study showed that rac1 overexpression is associated with cell EMT and poor EOC prognosis. Rac1 possibly plays an important role in predicting EOC metastasis. PMID:25585684

  13. MRI appearances of pure epithelial papillary serous borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, J; Nagaraju, E; Ahmad, S

    2015-04-01

    Borderline epithelial ovarian tumours (BOT) represent 15-20% of all non-benign ovarian epithelial neoplasms. Compared to malignant ovarian tumours, they usually present at a younger age and carry a far superior prognosis. Fertility-conserving surgery is an important treatment option for patients with BOT. Ultrasound and CT are both widely available and play roles in the initial investigation and staging of BOT, respectively. However, lack of soft-tissue contrast limits their ability to characterize BOT. MRI can facilitate recognition of pure epithelial serous BOT (SBOT), including the cystic papillary and surface papillary subtypes. An abundance of hyperintense papillary projections with low signal internal branching and ovarian stroma preservation with a hypointense ovarian capsular margin on T2-weighted imaging are features strongly suggestive of SBOT. In this review we will discuss the general morphological features of SBOT, the benefits and drawbacks of ultrasound and CT in the initial work-up, and the principal MRI features enabling recognition of surface papillary and cystic papillary SBOT.

  14. A distinct molecular profile associated with mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Gardiner-Garden, M; Henshall, S M; Scurry, J P; Scolyer, R A; Smith, A N; Bali, A; Bergh, P Vanden; Baron-Hay, S; Scott, C; Fink, D; Hacker, N F; Sutherland, R L; O'Brien, P M

    2006-01-01

    Mucinous epithelial ovarian cancers (MOC) are clinically and morphologically distinct from the other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. To determine the genetic basis of MOC and to identify potential tumour markers, gene expression profiling of 49 primary ovarian cancers of different histological subtypes was performed using a customised oligonucleotide microarray containing >59 000 probesets. The results show that MOC express a genetic profile that both differs and overlaps with other subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. Concordant with its histological phenotype, MOC express genes characteristic of mucinous carcinomas of varying epithelial origin, including intestinal carcinomas. Differences in gene expression between MOC and other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer were confirmed by RT–PCR and/or immunohistochemistry. In particular, galectin 4 (LGALS4) was highly and specifically expressed in MOC, but expressed at lower levels in benign mucinous cysts and borderline (atypical proliferative) tumours, supporting a malignant progression model of MOC. Hence LGALS4 may have application as an early and differential diagnostic marker of MOC. PMID:16508639

  15. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  16. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  17. An IL6-correlated signature in serous epithelial ovarian cancer associates with growth factor response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most lethal gynecological cancers; the majority of EOC is the serous histotype and diagnosed at advanced stage. IL6 is the cytokine that has been found most frequently associated with carcinogenesis and progression of serous EOCs. IL6 is a growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic factor, and high plasma levels of IL6 in advanced stage EOCs correlate with poor prognosis. The objective of the present study was to identify IL6 co-regulated genes and gene network/s in EOCs. Results We applied bioinformatics tools on 7 publicly available data sets containing the gene expression profiles of 1262 EOC samples. By Pearson's correlation analysis we identified, in EOCs, an IL6-correlated gene signature containing 40 genes mainly associated with proliferation. 33 of 40 genes were also significantly correlated in low malignant potential (LMP) EOCs, while 7 genes, named C5AR1, FPR1, G0S2, IL8, KLF2, MMP19, and THBD were IL6-correlated only in advanced stage EOCs. Among the 40-gene signature EGFR ligand HBEGF, genes of the EGR family members and genes encoding for negative feedback regulators of growth factor signaling were included. The results obtained by Gene Set Enrichment and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses enabled the identification, respectively, of gene sets associated with ‘early growth factor response’ for the 40-gene signature, and a biological network related to ‘thrombosis and cardiovascular disease’ for the 7-gene signature. In agreement with these results, selected genes from the identified signatures were validated in vitro by real time RT-PCR in serous EOC cell lines upon stimulation with EGF. Conclusions Serous EOCs, independently of their aggressiveness, co-regulate IL6 expression together with that of genes associated to growth factor signaling, arguing for the hypothesis that common mechanism/s driven by EGFR ligands characterize both advanced-stage and LMP EOCs. Only advanced-stage EOCs appeared to be

  18. Localisation and expression of aquaporin subtypes in epithelial ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yu-Qun; Yan, Chun-xiao

    2011-09-01

    To characterise AQP subtype localisation and expression in epithelial ovarian tumours, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the localisation and expression of AQP1-9 in 30 benign tumour cases, 30 borderline tumour cases, 50 malignant tumour cases and 20 normal ovarian tissue cases. Multiple AQP subtypes were expressed in epithelial ovarian tumours, with each AQP subtype displaying a different pattern of localisation and expression. AQP1 was mainly expressed in the microvascular endothelium, and AQP 2-9 were mainly expressed in tumour cells. Most AQP subtypes co-localised in the basolateral membranes of the epithelia of benign tumours and plasma membranes of malignant tumour cells. The positive rates for AQP1, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were over 50%, but those for AQP2, 3 and 4 were only 10-40%. The expression of AQP1, 5 and 9 in malignant and borderline tumours was significantly higher than that in benign tumours (P<0.05) and normal ovarian tissue (P<0.05). However, AQP6 expression in ovarian malignant and borderline tumours was significantly lower than that in benign tumours (P<0.01) or normal ovarian tissue (P<0.01). AQP1 expression was increased in cases with ascites volumes greater than 1000 mL (P<0.05), AQP5 expression was greater in cases with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), and more AQP9 expression was observed in G3 cases versus G1 and G2 cases (P<0.01). These results suggest that changes in the distribution and expression of AQP subtypes may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. This study presents a novel avenue of research that could illuminate the mechanism of ovarian carcinogenesis and treatment.

  19. Identification of Epithelial Ovarian Tumor-Specific Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Gregory; Hamp, Timothy J.; Wesselman, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in late stages with few treatment options and poor long-term prognosis. New clinical tools for early detection of ovarian malignancies will significantly help reduce mortality and improve current long-term survival rates. The objective of this work was to identify ovarian tumor-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers that bind to malignant ovarian tumor cells and internalize with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can identify unique tumor biomarkers, can aid in early detection and diagnosis of neoplastic disorders, and can be functionalized by conjugation to small molecules. To identify aptamers from random single-stranded DNA pools (60 bases long), we used whole Cell-SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) to enrich and isolate tumor-specific aptamers that bind to tumor-specific receptors in their native state on the cell surface. Next-Generation sequencing identified seven novel aptamers and detailed analyses of three are described. Aptamers bound to, and were internalized by, target Caov-3 cell populations, but not nontarget nonmalignant ovarian epithelial HOSE 6-3 cells or multiple other epithelial tumor cell lines. Furthermore, aptamers showed unique binding affinities with apparent dissociation constants (Kd) measuring in the submicromolar range supporting their physiological relevance and potential use in clinical applications. PMID:25894736

  20. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Association of a PARK2 Germline Variant and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in a Southern Brazilian Population.

    PubMed

    Klimczak, Phamela Ferreira; Ventury, Danielle Hornung; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Settas, Nikolaos; Machado de Souza, Cleber; Sotomaior, Vanessa Santos

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the eighth most common cancer among women in Brazil and seventh in the world population. OC has a high mortality rate and is difficult to diagnose. Currently, OC detection most often occurs at an advanced stage of the disease due to its silent progression, which contributes to the high mortality rate. Available genetic markers are not considered specifically enough for an initial and definite diagnosis. The association with new genes involved with OC can provide a better understanding of this pathology as well as contribute to the development of a marker scenario, providing an improvement in the treatment and survival of patients. The aim of this study was to examine the potential association between the PARK2 gene and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Accordingly, we conducted a study for which 25 patients and 87 controls were recruited. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed that the four studied tag SNPs (rs2803073, rs6930532, rs1040079, and rs2276201) were independent. Our results using the multivariate analysis between the additive and dominant model demonstrated that tag SNP rs2803073 of PARK2 is associated with susceptibility to EOC (p = 0.018, OR = 0.42). These findings suggest that hereditary variation in the PARK2 gene could influence EOC development mechanisms. PMID:27286703

  2. Periodontal bone loss and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Ana; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Teles, Ricardo P.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory response to pathogenic bacteria in the oral microbiome, is common among adults. It is associated with several medical conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, and potentially with esophageal, lung, oral and pancreatic cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms behind these associations is systemic inflammation, which has also been implicated in ovarian cancer etiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate association between ovarian cancer and periodontal bone loss. Methods The association between periodontal bone loss, a marker of periodontitis, and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer was estimated among 60,560 participants of the prospective Nurses’ Health Study using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Competing risks analysis was used to estimate association by histological subtype. Results We did not observe an increased risk of ovarian cancer among participants with periodontal bone loss (HR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.64–1.15). Among women younger than 69 years, periodontal bone loss was associated with a 40% (HR=0.60, 95% CI: 0.36–0.98) decreased ovarian cancer risk, while there was no association in women older than 69 (HR=1.09, 95% CI: 0.75–1.58), although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p-heterogeneity=0.06). We observed a suggestive decreased risk for serous tumors (HR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.53–1.09). The number of natural teeth and root canals, other metrics of oral health, were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion Our results do not support an increased ovarian cancer risk in women with periodontal bone loss, however there was a significant decrease in risk in women younger than 69. Given the unexpected association between periodontal bone loss and ovarian cancer risk in younger women, further research is warranted. PMID:25837263

  3. ABO blood group and incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Margaret A.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have observed an association between ABO blood group and risk of certain malignancies, including ovarian cancer; however, no prospective studies of the association with ovarian cancer risk are available. Using data from 49,153 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, we examined the association between ABO blood group and incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer. Study participants reported their blood type and Rh factor in 1996, and 234 women were diagnosed with incident ovarian cancer during 10 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ovarian cancer for each blood group category. Compared to women with blood group O, women with blood group AB or B had a non-significant 38% increase in ovarian cancer incidence (95% CI=0.88–2.16 for blood group AB and 0.96–1.99 for blood group B), while blood group A was not associated with risk (RR=0.95, 95% CI=0.70–1.30). Combining blood groups AB and B, we observed a statistically significant positive association with presence versus absence of the B antigen overall (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.06–1.88) and for the serous invasive subtype (RR=1.53, 95% CI=1.08–2.17). In this large, prospective cohort of women, presence of the B antigen was positively associated with ovarian cancer incidence, while blood group A was not associated with risk. Additional studies are needed to confirm this association and to explore the mechanisms through which blood group may influence ovarian cancer risk. PMID:20309936

  4. [Dualistic classification of epithelial ovarian cancer: Is it clinically relevant?].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Genestie, Catherine; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Malignant epithelial tumors (carcinomas) are the most common ovarian cancers and the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Based on their heterogeneous morphology, a dualistic model of carcinogenesis was proposed in 2004. Type I carcinomas, composed of low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell carcinomas and malignant Brenner tumors, were distinct from type II carcinomas (high grade serous, undifferentiated carcinomas and carcinosarcomas). However, clinical studies failed to demonstrate the prognostic value of such a classification. The main reproach to this dualistic model was that it lumped together in type I tumors, heterogeneous lesions such as clear cell and mucinous carcinomas. Recent advances on molecular genetic alterations and precursor lesions favor the classification of ovarian carcinomas as five distinct diseases. The dualistic model of carcinogenesis in type I and II can finally be applied only to serous ovarian carcinomas (low grade and high grade).

  5. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer.

  6. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  7. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3-17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  8. Does Aggressive Surgery Improve Outcomes? Interaction Between Preoperative Disease Burden and Complex Surgery in Patients With Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: An Analysis of GOG 182

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Neil S.; Miller, Austin; Rungruang, Bunja; Richard, Scott D.; Rodriguez, Noah; Bookman, Michael A.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Krivak, Thomas C.; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of disease burden, complex surgery, and residual disease (RD) status on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC) and complete surgical resection (R0) or < 1 cm of RD (MR) after surgical cytoreduction. Patients and Methods Demographic, pathologic, surgical, and outcome data were collected from 2,655 patients with EOC or PPC enrolled onto the Gynecologic Oncology Group 182 study. The effects of disease distribution (disease score [DS]) and complexity of surgery (complexity score [CS]) on PFS and OS were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariable regression analysis. Results Consistent with existing literature, patients with MR had worse prognosis than R0 patients (PFS, 15 v 29 months; P < .01; OS, 41 v 77 months; P < .01). Patients with the highest preoperative disease burden (DS high) had shorter PFS (15 v 23 or 34 months; P < .01) and OS (40 v 71 or 86 months; P < .01) compared with those with DS moderate or low, respectively. This relationship was maintained in the subset of R0 patients with PFS (18.3 v 33.2 months; DS moderate or low: P < .001) and OS (50.1 v 82.8 months; DS moderate or low: P < .001). After controlling for DS, RD, an interaction term for DS/CS, performance status, age, and cell type, CS was not an independent predictor of either PFS or OS. Conclusion In this large multi-institutional sample, initial disease burden remained a significant prognostic indicator despite R0. Complex surgery does not seem to affect survival when accounting for other confounding influences, particularly RD. PMID:25667285

  9. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in epithelial ovarian cancer and functional contribution to cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Carter J.; Zhang, Wa; Hillman, Joanna; Stablewski, Aimee B.; Higgins, Michael J.; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXM1 transcription factor network is frequently activated in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), the most common and lethal subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We used primary human EOC tissues, HGSOC cell lines, mouse and human ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells, and a murine transgenic ovarian cancer model to investigate genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in EOC, and to begin to define its functional contribution to disease pathology. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data indicated that the FOXM1 locus is amplified in ~12% of HGSOC, greater than any other tumor type examined, and that FOXM1 amplification correlates with increased expression and poor survival. In an independent set of primary EOC tissues, FOXM1 expression correlated with advanced stage and grade. Of the three known FOXM1 isoforms, FOXM1c showed highest expression in EOC. In murine OSE cells, combined knockout of Rb1 and Trp53 synergistically induced FOXM1. Consistently, human OSE cells immortalized with SV40 Large T antigen (IOSE-SV) had significantly higher FOXM1 expression than OSE immortalized with hTERT (IOSE-T). FOXM1 was overexpressed in murine ovarian tumors driven by combined Rb1/Trp53 disruption. FOXM1 induction in IOSE-SV cells was partially dependent on E2F1, and FOXM1 expression correlated with E2F1 expression in human EOC tissues. Finally, FOXM1 functionally contributed to cell cycle progression and relevant target gene expression in human OSE and HGSOC cell models. In summary, gene amplification, p53 and Rb disruption, and E2F1 activation drive FOXM1 expression in EOC, and FOXM1 promotes cell cycle progression in EOC cell models. PMID:26243836

  11. Analgesic drug use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Charlotte G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L

    2008-06-15

    Analgesic use may reduce ovarian cancer risk, possibly through antiinflammatory or antigonadotropic effects. The authors conducted a population-based, case-control study in Washington State that included 812 women aged 35-74 years who were diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 2002 and 2005 and 1,313 controls. Use of analgesics, excluding use within the previous year, was assessed via in-person interviews. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall, acetaminophen and aspirin were associated with weakly increased risks of ovarian cancer. These associations were stronger after more than 10 years of use (acetaminophen: odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.6; aspirin: OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.2) and were present for indications of headache, menstrual pain, and other pain/injury. Reduced risk was observed among aspirin users who began regular use within the previous 5 years (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4, 1.0) or used this drug for prevention of heart disease (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0). These results, in the context of prior findings, do not provide compelling evidence of a true increase in risk of ovarian cancer among women who use these drugs. However, they add to the weight of evidence that, in the aggregate, provides little support for the use of analgesic drugs as chemoprevention for this disease.

  12. Is CA72-4 a Useful Biomarker in Differential Diagnosis between Ovarian Endometrioma and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Anastasi, Emanuela; Manganaro, Lucia; Granato, Teresa; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Frati, Luigi; Porpora, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Background. Surgical excision of ovarian endometriomas in patients desiring pregnancy has recently been criticized because of the risk of damage to healthy ovarian tissue and consequent reduction of ovarian reserve. A correct diagnosis in cases not scheduled for surgery is therefore mandatory in order to avoid unexpected ovarian cancer misdiagnosis. Endometriosis is often associated with high levels of CA125. This marker is therefore not useful for discriminating ovarian endometrioma from ovarian malignancy. The aim of this study was to establish if the serum marker CA72-4 could be helpful in the differential diagnosis between ovarian endometriosis and epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. Serums CA125 and CA72-4 were measured in 72 patients with ovarian endometriomas and 55 patients with ovarian cancer. Results. High CA125 concentrations were observed in patients with ovarian endometriosis and in those with ovarian cancer. A marked difference in CA72-4 values was observed between women with ovarian cancer (71.0%) and patients with endometriosis (13.8%) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. This study suggests that CA72-4 determination can be useful to confirm the benign nature of ovarian endometriomas in women with high CA125 levels. PMID:24191126

  13. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  14. Developmentally Restricted Differentiation Antigens Are Targets for Immunotherapy in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Heidi; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Beck, Amy; Miliotto, Anthony; Miller, Austin; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle

    2016-01-01

    Summary Developmentally restricted differentiation antigens or cancer-placental antigens, tastin and bystin, are components of an adhesion molecule that plays a critical role in the implantation of the embryo to the uterus. Cell adhesion molecules have been implicated in the metastasis of carcinomas and could be critical targets for immunotherapy in epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs). Our objectives were to define the expression of tastin and bystin proteins in EOCs. Expression of tastin and bystin mRNA in a panel of human tissues and 70 EOC specimens was investigated using qualitative polymerase chain reaction. Amplification products were confirmed by sequencing. Validation of results was performed using immunohistochemical analysis of tastin and bystin applied on a tissue microarray of 202 EOC tissues. The distribution of tastin and bystin expression and clinicopathologic variables were analyzed. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and statistical significance was determined by performing the logrank test. Expression of tastin and bystin was restricted to placental and testis tissue by qualitative polymerase chain reaction. Of the 70 EOC specimens tested with polymerase chain reaction, 89% and 94% expressed tastin and bystin, respectively. Immunoexpressions of tastin and bystin protein were observed in 69% and 80 % of the ovarian tumors, respectively. Tastin and bystin expression in Stage I/II disease were 66% and 67% compared with 69% and 81% in Stage III/IV disease, respectively. The tissue-restricted expression of tastin and bystin and their abundant expression in EOCs and advanced-stage disease make these developmentally restricted antigens attractive targets for antigen-specific immunotherapy in EOCs. PMID:24071868

  15. Risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Wu, P C; Lang, J H; Ge, W J; Hartge, P; Brinton, L A

    1992-02-01

    A study in Beijing, China of 112 pathologically confirmed epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 224 age-matched community controls enabled evaluation of risk in relation to reproductive, medical, familial, and selected lifestyle factors. An inverse relationship was observed between the number of full-term pregnancies and ovarian cancer risk. Compared to nulliparous women, subjects with one, two, or three full-term pregnancies were at 50%, 70%, or 90% reduced risks, respectively (P for trend less than 0.01). A positive correlation was found between the number of ovulatory years and risk, with a 2.6-fold increased risk for women with 30 or more compared to less than 10 ovulatory years (P for trend less than 0.01). Infertility, as estimated in various ways, was also found to be an important risk factor. When parity was taken into account, age at first pregnancy was not related to ovarian cancer risk. No protective effect was associated with mumps virus infection. In contrast, risk increased significantly as serum mumps virus antibody titres increased (P for trend less than 0.01). An elevated risk was found in women with a history of long-term (greater than 3 months) application of talc-containing dusting powder to the lower abdomen and perineum (Relative risk 3.9, 95% confidence interval: 0.9-10.63). These findings suggest that Chinese women have risk factors similar to those of occidental women.

  16. Kindlin-2 inhibits serous epithelial ovarian cancer peritoneal dissemination and predicts patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Caixia; Du, Juan; Xi, Chenguang; Yu, Yu; Hu, Ajin; Zhan, Jun; Guo, Hongyan; Fang, Weigang; Liu, Congrong; Zhang, Hongquan

    2014-03-28

    Kindlin-2 has been known to promote most cancer progression through regulation of multiple signaling pathways. However, a novel tumor suppressive role of Kindlin-2 was identified in serous epithelial ovarian cancer progression, which sharply contrasts to the tumor promoting roles for Kindlin-2 in most other cancers. While we demonstrated that Kindlin-2 was highly expressed in control tissues, a drastic low expression of Kindlin-2 was found in the tumor tissues of serous epithelial ovarian cancer, especially in the high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer. Importantly, Kindlin-2 inhibited serous epithelial ovarian cancer cell peritoneal dissemination in a mouse model. For clinical relevance, low Kindlin-2 expression correlated with higher tumor grade and older patients. Intriguingly, decreased Kindlin-2 expression predicts poor overall and progression-free survivals in serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Mechanistically, Kindlin-2 induced a mesenchymal to epithelial transition in serous epithelial ovarian cancer cells, at least in part, by up-regulation of estrogen receptor α which was recruited to the promoter of E-cadherin and thereby enhanced the transcription of E-cadherin. Collectively, we concluded that inadequate Kindlin-2 is an independent risk factor for serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

  17. Metadherin, p50, and p65 expression in epithelial ovarian neoplasms: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Giopanou, Ioanna; Bravou, Vasiliki; Papanastasopoulos, Panagiotis; Lilis, Ioannis; Aroukatos, Panagiotis; Papachristou, Dionysios; Kounelis, Sophia; Papadaki, Helen

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB signaling promotes cancer progression in a large number of malignancies. Metadherin, a coactivator of the NF-κB transcription complex, was recently identified to regulate different signaling pathways that are closely related to cancer. We assessed the immunohistochemical expression of p50, p65, and metadherin in 30 ovarian carcinomas, 15 borderline ovarian tumours, and 31 benign ovarian cystadenomas. Ovarian carcinomas exhibited significantly higher expression of all 3 markers compared to benign ovarian tumours. Borderline ovarian tumours demonstrated significantly higher expression for all 3 markers compared to benign cystadenomas. Ovarian carcinomas demonstrated significantly higher expression of p50 and metadherin compared to borderline ovarian tumours, whereas no significant difference was noted in p65 expression between ovarian carcinomas and borderline ovarian tumours. There was a strong correlation with the expression levels of p50, p65, and metadherin, whereas no correlation was observed with either grade or stage. Strong p50, p65, and metadherin expression was associated with a high probability to distinguish ovarian carcinomas over borderline and benign ovarian tumours, as well as borderline ovarian tumours over benign ovarian neoplasms. A gradual increase in the expression of these molecules is noted when moving across the spectrum of ovarian carcinogenesis, from borderline ovarian tumours to epithelial carcinomas.

  18. Dysregulated estrogen receptor signaling in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis leads to ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Laws, Mary J; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Pawar, Sandeep; Haschek, Wanda M; Bagchi, Milan K; Bagchi, Indrani C

    2014-03-01

    The etiology of ovarian epithelial cancer is poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of an appropriate experimental model for studying the onset and progression of this disease. We have created a mutant mouse model in which aberrant estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis leads to ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis. In these mice, termed ERαd/d, the ERα gene was conditionally deleted in the anterior pituitary, but remained intact in the hypothalamus and the ovary. The loss of negative-feedback regulation by estrogen (E) at the level of the pituitary led to increased production of luteinizing hormone (LH) by this tissue. Hyperstimulation of the ovarian cells by LH resulted in elevated steroidogenesis, producing high circulating levels of steroid hormones, including E. The ERαd/d mice exhibited formation of palpable ovarian epithelial tumors starting at 5 months of age with 100% penetrance. By 15 months of age, 80% of ERαd/d mice die. Besides proliferating epithelial cells, these tumors also contained an expanded population of luteinized stromal cells, which acquire the ability to express P450 aromatase and synthesize E locally. In response to the elevated levels of E, the ERα signaling was accentuated in the ovarian epithelial cells of ERαd/d mice, triggering increased ERα-dependent gene expression, abnormal cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. Consistent with these findings, treatment of ERαd/d mice with letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, markedly reduced circulating E and ovarian tumor volume. We have, therefore, developed a unique animal model, which serves as a useful tool for exploring the involvement of E-dependent signaling pathways in ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis.

  19. Overexpression of the β Subunit of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Promotes the Transformation of Human Ovarian Epithelial Cells and Ovarian Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Liu, Guangzhi; Schauer, Isaiah G.; Yang, Gong; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Shiwu; He, Yuanli; Liu, Jinsong

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, however underlying molecular events remain elusive. Expression of human chorionic gonadotropin β subunit (β-hCG) is clinically significant for both trophoblastic and nontrophoblastic cancers; however, whether β-hCG facilitates ovarian epithelial cell tumorigenic potential remains uncharacterized. Immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial T29 and T80 cells stably overexpressing β-hCG were examined for alterations in cell cycle and apoptotic status by flow cytometry, expression of proteins regulating cell cycle and apoptosis by Western blot, proliferation status by MTT assay, anchorage-independent colony formation, and mouse tumor formation. Immunoreactivity for β-hCG was evaluated using mouse xenografts and on human normal ovarian, fallopian tube, endometrium, and ovarian carcinoma tissues. T29 and T80 cells overexpressing β-hCG demonstrated significantly increased proliferation, anchorage-independent colony formation, prosurvival Bcl-XL protein expression, G2-checkpoint progression, elevated cyclins E/D1 and Cdk 2/4/6, and decreased apoptosis. Collectively, these transformational alterations in phenotype facilitated increased xenograft tumorigenesis (P < 0.05). Furthermore, β-hCG immunoreactivity was elevated in malignant ovarian tumors, compared with normal epithelial expression in ovaries, fallopian tube, and endometrium (P < 0.001). Our data indicate that elevated β-hCG transforms ovarian surface epithelial cells, facilitating proliferation, cell cycle progression, and attenuated apoptosis to promote tumorigenesis. Our results further decipher the functional role and molecular mechanism of β-hCG in ovarian carcinoma. β-hCG may contribute to ovarian cancer etiology, which introduces a new therapeutic intervention target for ovarian cancer. PMID:21763678

  20. Intact PTEN Expression by Immunohistochemistry is Associated With Decreased Survival in Advanced Stage Ovarian/Primary Peritoneal High-grade Serous Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bakkar, Rania M; Xie, Su-Su; Urbauer, Diana L; Djordjevic, Bojana; Vu, Kim; Broaddus, Russell R

    2015-11-01

    Ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Optimal surgical debulking and tumor sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy are 2 well-established prognostics for this tumor type. Molecular markers that identify more clinically aggressive tumors would potentially allow for the development of individualized treatment options. PTEN is a key negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. Loss of PTEN expression in endometrial carcinoma is associated with endometrioid histology; women with endometrioid tumors have a better prognosis than those with nonendometrioid tumors. The prognostic and predictive value for PTEN has not been effectively explored in ovarian/peritoneal high-grade serous carcinoma. PTEN immunohistochemistry was assessed in 126 women with Stage III, high-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary/peritoneum treated with surgery and then a platinum-based regimen. Compared with PTEN-negative or PTEN-reduced tumors, positive PTEN immunohistochemistry, detected in 58% of tumors, was associated with decreased pS6 and increased PTEN mRNA levels. Positive PTEN expression was independent of surgical debulking status or platinum sensitivity. PTEN-positive tumors were associated with significantly decreased recurrence-free survival. Importantly, the devised PTEN immunohistochemistry scoring system was reproducible among pathologists.

  1. Treatment of advanced stage ovarian carcinoma with a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and radiosensitizer: report of a pilot study from the National Cancer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, A.S.; Ozols, R.F.; Myers, C.C.; Ostechega, Y.; Young, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Twenty-eight patients with Stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma were treated with combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy employing a unique protocol. Four cycles of cyclophosphamide and hexamethylmelamine alternated with four cycles of concurrent cisplatin, whole abdominal radiotherapy, and intraperitoneal misonidazole. The entire treatment program lasted six months. Clinical complete responses were seen in 50% of the patients with an overall response rate of 61%. Pathologic complete response (PCR) confirmed at second look surgery occurred in 18% of the group (5 patients). Median survival of the entire group was 15.2 months with all PCR's alive NED. This outcome was no different than our previous experience with combination chemotherapy alone. Toxicities seen included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. However, these side effects were manageable. Two non-tumor deaths occurred. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining drug and radiation therapy concurrently in the treatment of ovarian cancer; further research is needed to explore different sequencing and dose levels that could improve the outcome.

  2. Sensitivity and resistance to treatment in the primary management of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Pierre-Emmanuel; Fabbro, Michel; Theillet, Charles; Bibeau, Frédéric; Rouanet, Philippe; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynaecologic malignancy. Despite wide initial sensibility to chemotherapy especially to platinum-based regimens, the vast majority of patients with advanced stages of the disease develop recurrences and subsequent resistance to treatments. Ovarian cancer is actually considered as a heterogeneous disease at the clinical, histological and molecular level. In this review, the mechanisms of intrinsic sensitivity or resistance to treatment, especially to platinum-based chemotherapy are considered with particular reference to the significance of tumour heterogeneity. The molecular features involved in acquired resistance are reviewed and the current hypotheses are discussed. In particular, potential disruptions of the DNA reparation pathways are highlighted.

  3. The comparison of glycosphingolipids isolated from an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line and a nontumorigenic epithelial ovarian cell line using MALDI-MS and MALDI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Rajanayake, Krishani K; Taylor, William R; Isailovic, Dragan

    2016-08-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are important biomolecules, which are linked to many diseases such as GSL storage disorders and cancer. Consequently, the expression of GSLs may be altered in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to apparently healthy cell lines. Here, differential expressions of GSLs in an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 and a nontumorigenic epithelial ovarian cell line T29 were studied using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and MALDI-MS/MS. The isolation of GSLs from SKOV3 and T29 cell lines was carried out using Folch partition. GSLs were successfully detected by MALDI-MS, and structurally assigned by a comparison of their MALDI-MS/MS fragmentation patterns with MS/MS data found in SimLipid database. Additionally, LIPID MAPS was used to assign GSL ion masses in MALDI-MS spectra. Seventeen neutral GSLs were identified in Folch partition lower (chloroform/methanol) phases originating from both cell lines, while five globo series neutral GSLs were identified only in the Folch partition lower phase of SKOV3 cell line. Several different sialylated GSLs were detected in Folch partition upper (water/methanol) phases of SKOV3 and T29 cell lines. Overall, this study demonstrates the alteration and increased glycosylation of GSLs in an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line in comparison to a nontumorigenic epithelial ovarian cell line. PMID:27267063

  4. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  5. Overexpression of TAZ promotes cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyuan; Xie, Jiabin; Huang, Ping; Yang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is dysregulated in multiple types of human cancer, including ovarian cancer. Nuclear expression of yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a downstream transcription coactivator of the Hippo pathway, has been demonstrated to promote tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer and may serve as a poor prognostic indicator. However, transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ), a downstream target of the Hippo pathway and paralog of YAP in mammalian cells, has not been fully investigated in ovarian cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the dysregulation and biological function of TAZ in ovarian cancer. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that TAZ mRNA and protein levels, respectively, were upregulated in ovarian cancer, and a meta-analysis of ovarian cancer microarray datasets identified that increased expression of TAZ mRNA is correlated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. In addition, TAZ-knockdown in ovarian cancer cells demonstrated that TAZ regulates the migration, proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacological disruption of the YAP/TAZ/TEA domain protein complex resulted in a decrease in ovarian cancer cell migration, proliferation and vimentin expression. The results of the present study indicate that the overexpression of TAZ is important in the development and progression of ovarian cancer, and may function as a potential drug target for treatment of this disease entity. PMID:27588129

  6. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  7. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.

  8. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC. PMID:26399219

  9. A targeted genetic association study of epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene; Winham, Stacey J.; Larson, Nicholas; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Sicotte, Hugues; Chien, Jeremy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berchuck, Andrew; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Goodman, Marc T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Bisogna, Maria; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Carney, Michael E.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Kraft, Peter; Larson, Melissa C.; Le, Nhu D.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Lissowska, Jolanta; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Olson, Sara H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Rider, David N.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; van den Berg, David; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Chen, Yian Ann; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified several common susceptibility alleles for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To further understand EOC susceptibility, we examined previously ungenotyped candidate variants, including uncommon variants and those residing within known susceptibility loci. Results At nine of eleven previously published EOC susceptibility regions (2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13), novel variants were identified that were more strongly associated with risk than previously reported variants. Beyond known susceptibility regions, no variants were found to be associated with EOC risk at genome-wide statistical significance (p <5×10−8), nor were any significant after Bonferroni correction for 17,000 variants (p< 3×10-6). Methods A customized genotyping array was used to assess over 17,000 variants in coding, non-coding, regulatory, and known susceptibility regions in 4,973 EOC cases and 5,640 controls from 13 independent studies. Susceptibility for EOC overall and for select histotypes was evaluated using logistic regression adjusted for age, study site, and population substructure. Conclusion Given the novel variants identified within the 2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13 regions, larger follow-up genotyping studies, using imputation where necessary, are needed for fine-mapping and confirmation of low frequency variants that fall below statistical significance. PMID:26848776

  10. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  11. [ULTRASOUND CRITERIA OR THE OPERABILITY AND EFFICACY OF THE TREATMENT OF THE MALIGNANT EPITHELIAL OVARIAN TUMOURS].

    PubMed

    Shkarbun, K D; Shkarbun, L I

    2015-01-01

    In order to isolate the main sonographic criteria of ovarian cancer operability the dynamical U.S. examination was performed on 65 women with epithelial tumors of II-III stages before and during 5 years after treatment beginning, which included (in different combinations) cytoreductive surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Only total 14 (21.5%) relapses were revealed. The U.S. prognostic criteria of the ovarian cancer treatment efficacy with and without neoadjuvant chemotherapy were defined. PMID:27491160

  12. Targeting Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer with Designer Zinc Finger Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Haydee; Wang, Yuhua; Beltran, Adriana S.; Juárez-Moreno, Karla; Yuan, Xinni; Kato, Sumie; Leisewitz, Andrea V.; Cuello Fredes, Mauricio; Licea, Alexei F.; Connolly, Denise C.; Huang, Leaf; Blancafort, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecological malignancies. It is detected at late stages when the disease is spread through the abdominal cavity in a condition known as peritoneal carcinomatosis. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic interventions to target advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Mammary serine protease inhibitor (Maspin) represents an important metastasis suppressor initially identified in breast cancer. Herein we have generated a sequence-specific zinc finger artificial transcription factor (ATF) to up-regulate the Maspin promoter in aggressive ovarian cancer cell lines and to interrogate the therapeutic potential of Maspin in ovarian cancer. We found that although Maspin was expressed in some primary ovarian tumors, the promoter was epigenetically silenced in cell lines derived from ascites. Transduction of the ATF in MOVCAR 5009 cells derived from ascitic cultures of a TgMISIIR-TAg mouse model of ovarian cancer resulted in tumor cell growth inhibition, impaired cell invasion, and severe disruption of actin cytoskeleton. Systemic delivery of lipid-protamine-RNA nanoparticles encapsulating a chemically modified ATF mRNA resulted in inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth in nude mice accompanied with Maspin re-expression in the treated tumors. Gene expression microarrays of ATF-transduced cells revealed an exceptional specificity for the Maspin promoter. These analyses identified novel targets co-regulated with Maspin in human short-term cultures derived from ascites, such as TSPAN12, that could mediate the anti-metastatic phenotype of the ATF. Our work outlined the first targeted, non-viral delivery of ATFs into tumors with potential clinical applications for metastatic ovarian cancers. PMID:22782891

  13. Metabolomic Characterization of Ovarian Epithelial Carcinomas by HRMAS-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ben Sellem, D.; Elbayed, K.; Neuville, A.; Moussallieh, F.-M.; Lang-Averous, G.; Piotto, M.; Bellocq, J.-P.; Namer, I. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. The objectives of the present study are to determine if a metabolomic study by HRMAS-NMR can (i) discriminate between different histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue, (ii) generate statistical models capable of classifying borderline tumors and (iii) establish a potential relationship with patient's survival or response to chemotherapy. Methods. 36 human epithelial ovarian tumor biopsies and 3 healthy ovarian tissues were studied using 1H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis. Results. The results presented in this study demonstrate that the three histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas present an effective metabolic pattern difference. Furthermore, a metabolic signature specific of serous (N-acetyl-aspartate) and mucinous (N-acetyl-lysine) carcinomas was found. The statistical models generated in this study are able to predict borderline tumors characterized by an intermediate metabolic pattern similar to the normal ovarian tissue. Finally and importantly, the statistical model of serous carcinomas provided good predictions of both patient's survival rates and the patient's response to chemotherapy. Conclusions. Despite the small number of samples used in this study, the results indicate that metabolomic analysis of intact tissues by HRMAS-NMR is a promising technique which might be applicable to the therapeutic management of patients. PMID:21577256

  14. Spy1 participates in the proliferation and apoptosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shumin; Liu, Rong; Su, Min; Wei, Yingze; Yang, Shuyun; He, Song; Wang, Xia; Qiang, Fulin; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Shuyang; Zhang, Weiwei; Xu, Pan; Mao, Guoxin

    2016-02-01

    This study focused on determining the role of Spy1 in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Speedy is a novel cell cycle protein capable of promoting cell proliferation. In this study, western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses were performed to detect the expression of Spy1 in ovarian cancer. Spy1 protein levels increased with ovarian cancer grade, and Kaplan-Meier curve showed that overexpression of Spy1 was significantly correlated with reduced patient survival. In vitro, Spy1 depletion in ovarian cell lines led to reduced proliferation according to CCK8 and plate colony assays. The expression of Spy1 was positively related to pThr187-p27. Flow cytometry revealed that the reduced expression of Spy1 induced the apoptosis of the EOC cells. In summary, our findings suggested that Spy1 may be a novel independent prognostic predictor of survival for ovarian patients.

  15. The Extracellular Matrix in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer – A Piece of a Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Angela; Howell, Viive M.; Colvin, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an integral component of both the normal and tumor microenvironment. ECM composition varies between tissues and is crucial for maintaining normal function and homeostasis. Dysregulation and aberrant deposition or loss of ECM components is implicated in ovarian cancer progression. The mechanisms by which tumor cells induce ECM remodeling to promote a malignant phenotype are yet to be elucidated. A thorough understanding of the role of the ECM in ovarian cancer is needed for the development of effective biomarkers and new therapies. PMID:26579497

  16. Preoperative Lymphocyte-Monocyte Ratio Is a Predictor of Suboptimal Cytoreduction in Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Wankyu; Kim, Hong-Bae; Lee, Yong Joo; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Kim, Heungyeol

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) is a predictor of suboptimal cytoreduction in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Preoperative clinico-pathologic and hematologic parameters were reviewed in a total of 154 patients with EOC submitted to primary cytoreductive surgery. Patients were categorized into two different groups according to the results of cytoreductive surgery: optimal and suboptimal cytoreduction. Continuous variables were categorized into two groups using the best cutoff points selected on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for suboptimal cytoreduction. Results: Based on data collected from the 154 patients, 133 (86.4%) and 21 (13.6%) patients presented with stage III and IV disease, respectively. One hundred seventeen (76.0%) patients had serous adenocarcinoma, and 92 (59.7%) had histologic tumor grade 3. The optimal and suboptimal cytoreduction groups included 96 (62.3%) and 58 patients (37.7%), respectively. The best LMR cutoff point for suboptimal cytoreduction was 3.75. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age, cancer antigen 125, white blood cell count, and LMR were found to be the strongest predictors for suboptimal cytoreduction (P=0.0037, 0.0249, 0.0062, and 0.0015, respectively). Conclusion: Preoperative LMR is an independent predictor of suboptimal cytoreduction. It provides additional prognostic information beyond the biological parameters of the tumor. PMID:27698915

  17. Preoperative Lymphocyte-Monocyte Ratio Is a Predictor of Suboptimal Cytoreduction in Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Wankyu; Kim, Hong-Bae; Lee, Yong Joo; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Kim, Heungyeol

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) is a predictor of suboptimal cytoreduction in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Preoperative clinico-pathologic and hematologic parameters were reviewed in a total of 154 patients with EOC submitted to primary cytoreductive surgery. Patients were categorized into two different groups according to the results of cytoreductive surgery: optimal and suboptimal cytoreduction. Continuous variables were categorized into two groups using the best cutoff points selected on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for suboptimal cytoreduction. Results: Based on data collected from the 154 patients, 133 (86.4%) and 21 (13.6%) patients presented with stage III and IV disease, respectively. One hundred seventeen (76.0%) patients had serous adenocarcinoma, and 92 (59.7%) had histologic tumor grade 3. The optimal and suboptimal cytoreduction groups included 96 (62.3%) and 58 patients (37.7%), respectively. The best LMR cutoff point for suboptimal cytoreduction was 3.75. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age, cancer antigen 125, white blood cell count, and LMR were found to be the strongest predictors for suboptimal cytoreduction (P=0.0037, 0.0249, 0.0062, and 0.0015, respectively). Conclusion: Preoperative LMR is an independent predictor of suboptimal cytoreduction. It provides additional prognostic information beyond the biological parameters of the tumor.

  18. DNA methylation changes in epithelial ovarian cancer histotypes

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Cunningham, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer has not improved, and despite histological differences, treatment is similar for all cases. Understanding the molecular basis for ovarian cancer risk and prognosis is fundamental, and to this end much has been gleaned about genetic changes contributing to risk, and to a lesser extent, survival. There’s considerable evidence for genetic differences between the four pathologically defined histological subtypes; however, the contribution of epigenetics is less well documented. In this report, we review alterations in DNA methylation in ovarian cancer, focusing on histological subtypes, and studies examining the roles of methylation in determining therapy response. As epigenetics is making its way into clinical care, we review the application of cell free DNA methylation to ovarian cancer diagnosis and care. Finally, we comment on recurrent limitations in the DNA methylation literature for ovarian cancer, which can and should be addressed to mature this field. PMID:26363302

  19. Talcum powder, chronic pelvic inflammation and NSAIDs in relation to risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Melissa A; Green, Adèle C; Nagle, Christina M; Webb, Penelope M

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been proposed as the possible causal mechanism that explains the observed association between certain risk factors, such as the use of talcum powder (talc) in the pelvic region and epithelial ovarian cancer. To address this issue we evaluated the potential role of chronic local ovarian inflammation in the development of the major subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. Factors potentially linked to ovarian inflammation were examined in an Australia-wide case-control study comprising 1,576 women with invasive and low malignant potential (LMP) ovarian tumours and 1,509 population-based controls. We confirmed a statistically significant increase in ovarian cancer risk associated with use of talc in the pelvic region (adjusted odds ratio 1.17, 95% CI: 1.01-1.36) that was strongest for the serous and endometrioid subtypes although the latter was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratios 1.21, 95% CI 1.03-1.44 and 1.18, 95% CI 0.81-1.70, respectively). Other factors potentially associated with ovarian inflammation (pelvic inflammatory disease, human papilloma virus infection and mumps) were not associated with risk but, like others, we found an increased risk of endometrioid and clear cell ovarian cancer only among women with a history of endometriosis. Regular use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was inversely associated with risk of LMP mucinous ovarian tumours only. We conclude that on balance chronic inflammation does not play a major role in the development of ovarian cancer.

  20. Overexpression of Notch3 and pS6 Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Human Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Rongna; Yu, Xiaolin; Huang, Genhua; Tan, Buzhen

    2016-01-01

    Notch3 and pS6 play important roles in tumor angiogenesis. To assess the expression of Notch3 and pS6 in Chinese ovarian epithelial cancer patients, a ten-year follow-up study was performed in ovarian epithelial cancer tissues from 120 specimens of human ovarian epithelial cancer, 30 specimens from benign ovarian tumors, and 30 samples from healthy ovaries by immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the expression of Notch3 and pS6 was higher in ovarian epithelial cancer than in normal ovary tissues and in benign ovarian tumor tissues (p < 0.01). In tumor tissues, Notch3 expression and pS6 expression were negatively associated with age (p > 0.05) but positively associated with clinical stage, pathological grading, histologic type, lymph node metastasis, and ascites (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). A follow-up survey of 64 patients with ovarian epithelial cancer showed that patients with high Notch3 and pS6 expression had a shorter survival time (p < 0.01), in which the clinical stage (p < 0.05) and Notch3 expression (p < 0.01) played important roles. In conclusion, Notch3 and pS6 are significantly related to ovarian epithelial cancer development and prognosis, and their combination represents a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in ovarian tumor angiogenesis. PMID:27445438

  1. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  2. Hemodynamic Consequences of Malignant Ascites in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Surgery∗

    PubMed Central

    Hunsicker, Oliver; Fotopoulou, Christina; Pietzner, Klaus; Koch, Mandy; Krannich, Alexander; Sehouli, Jalid; Spies, Claudia; Feldheiser, Aarne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Malignant ascites (MA) is most commonly observed in patients scheduled for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) surgery and is supposed as a major risk factor promoting perioperative hemodynamic deterioration. We aimed to assess the hemodynamic consequences of MA on systemic circulation in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery. This study is a predefined post-hoc analysis of a randomized controlled pilot trial comparing intravenous solutions within a goal-directed algorithm to optimize hemodynamic therapy in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery. Ascites was used to stratify the EOC patients prior to randomization in the main study. We analyzed 2 groups according to the amount of ascites (NLAS: none or low ascites [<500 mL] vs HAS: high ascites group [>500 mL]). Differences in hemodynamic variables with respect to time were analyzed using nonparametric analysis for longitudinal data and multivariate generalized estimating equation adjusting the analysis for the randomized study groups of the main study. A total of 31 patients in the NLAS and 16 patients in the HAS group were analyzed. Although cardiac output was not different between groups suggesting a similar circulatory blood flow, the HAS group revealed higher heart rates and lower stroke volumes during surgery. There were no differences in pressure-based hemodynamic variables. In the HAS group, fluid demands, reflected by the time to reindication of a fluid challenge after preload optimization, increased steadily, whereas stroke volume could not be maintained at baseline resulting in hemodynamic instability after 1.5 h of surgery. In contrast, in the NLAS group fluid demands were stable and stroke volume could be maintained during surgery. Clinically relevant associations of the type of fluid replacement with hemodynamic consequences were particularly observed in the HAS group, in which transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was associated to an improved circulatory flow and reduced

  3. Tubal ligation, hysterectomy, and epithelial ovarian cancer in the New England Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Megan S.; Murphy, Megan A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Titus, Linda J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Terry, Kathryn L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have observed that tubal ligation and hysterectomy are associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer; however little is known about whether these associations vary bysurgical characteristics, individual characteristics, or tumor histology. We used logistic regression to examine tubal ligation, simple hysterectomy, and hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy in relation to risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the New England Case-Control study. Our primary analysis included 2,265 cases and 2,333 controls. Overall, tubal ligation was associated with a lower risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (OR: 0.82, 95%CI: 0.68-0.97), especially for endometrioid tumors (OR=0.45, 95%CI: 0.29-0.69). The inverse association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer risk was stronger for women who had undergone the procedure at the time of last delivery (OR=0.60, 95%CI: 0.42-0.84) rather than at a later time (OR=0.93, 95%CI: 0.75-1.15). Overall, simple hysterectomy was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (OR: 1.09, 95%CI: 0.83, 1.42), although it was associated with a non-significant decreased risk of ovarian cancer among women who underwent the procedure at age 45 or older (RR: 0.64, 95%CI: 0.40, 1.02) or within the last 10 years (OR=0.65, 95%CI: 0.38, 1.13). Overall, women who had a hysterectomy with a unilateral oophorectomy had significantly lower risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.65, 95%CI: 0.45-0.94). In summary, tubal ligation and hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy were inversely associated with ovarian cancer risk in a large population-based case-control study. Additional research is necessary to understand the potential biologic mechanisms by which these procedures may reduce ovarian cancer risk. PMID:23650079

  4. CSIOVDB: a microarray gene expression database of epithelial ovarian cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Yang, He; Ye, Jieru; Low, Jeffrey; Choolani, Mahesh; Tan, David Shao Peng; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju

    2015-12-22

    Databases pertaining to various diseases provide valuable resources on particular genes of interest but lack the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status. CSIOVDB is a transcriptomic microarray database of 3,431 human ovarian cancers, including carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum, and metastasis to the ovary. The database also comprises stroma and ovarian surface epithelium from normal ovary tissue, as well as over 400 early-stage ovarian cancers. This unique database presents the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status for each ovarian cancer sample, with major ovarian cancer histologies (clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, low-grade serous, serous) represented. Clinico-pathological parameters available include tumor grade, surgical debulking status, clinical response and age. The database has 1,868 and 1,516 samples with information pertaining to overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively. The database also provides integration with the copy number, DNA methylation and mutation data from TCGA. CSIOVDB seeks to provide a resource for biomarker and therapeutic target exploration for ovarian cancer research. PMID:26549805

  5. CSIOVDB: a microarray gene expression database of epithelial ovarian cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Yang, He; Ye, Jieru; Low, Jeffrey; Choolani, Mahesh; Tan, David Shao Peng; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju

    2015-12-22

    Databases pertaining to various diseases provide valuable resources on particular genes of interest but lack the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status. CSIOVDB is a transcriptomic microarray database of 3,431 human ovarian cancers, including carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum, and metastasis to the ovary. The database also comprises stroma and ovarian surface epithelium from normal ovary tissue, as well as over 400 early-stage ovarian cancers. This unique database presents the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status for each ovarian cancer sample, with major ovarian cancer histologies (clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, low-grade serous, serous) represented. Clinico-pathological parameters available include tumor grade, surgical debulking status, clinical response and age. The database has 1,868 and 1,516 samples with information pertaining to overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively. The database also provides integration with the copy number, DNA methylation and mutation data from TCGA. CSIOVDB seeks to provide a resource for biomarker and therapeutic target exploration for ovarian cancer research.

  6. Vaccine Therapy and IDO1 Inhibitor INCB024360 in Treating Patients With Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer Who Are in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-17

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  7. Expression of Poly (Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase and p53 in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Their Role in Prognosis and Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Heidi; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Beck, Amy; Miller, Austin; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle

    2016-01-01

    Summary PARP, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, is a damage-sensing protein, which is essential for the repair of DNA single-strand breaks. PARP and p53 function synergistically in repairing DNA damage and suppressing chromosomal rearrangements. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of PARP and p53 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to correlate their expression with clinicopathologic characteristics. PARP and p53 were evaluated using immunohistochemistry applied on a tissue microarray of 189 EOC and their expressions were correlated to clinicopathologic variables, including the age of diagnosis, stage, grade, histologic type, optimal debulking, progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS). PARP and p53 expressions were shown in 61% and 54% of cases, respectively. PARP-positive tumors are more likely to have higher grade (P = 0.03) and complete response to initial first-line chemotherapy (P = 0.009). Patients with positive p53 staining are more likely to be at the advanced stage disease (P = 0.004). Finally, there were no significant associations between PARP and p53 expression and no differences in progression-free survival and OS for PARP or p53 expressions. The overexpression of PARP and p53 in high grade, and advanced stage tumors indicated that these 2 markers might serve as an indicator of aggressive disease behavior. Additional studies are warranted to evaluate the role of PARP and PARP inhibitors in the setting of adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:21293287

  8. Topographical investigations of human ovarian-carcinoma polymorphic epithelial mucin by scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, C J; Sekowski, M; Davies, M C; Jackson, D E; Price, M R; Tendler, S J

    1992-01-01

    Human polymorphic epithelial mucin is a high-molecular-mass glycoprotein that associates to provide protection to the epithelial-cell surface and may afford the malignant cell a selective advantage for growth. The scanning-tunnelling-microscopy micrographs obtained in the present study identify the purified human ovarian-carcinoma polymorphic epithelial mucin glycoproteins as rod-shaped molecules of mixed length. The dimensions of the individual molecules range from 25 to 45 nm in length and are 3-4 nm in width. The images further suggest that lateral association of the rods occurs. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1567366

  9. Cytokines and Prognostic Factors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Millena Prata; Martins-Filho, Agrimaldo; Silveira, Thales Parenti; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and delayed diagnosis. Inflammation is a risk factor for ovarian cancer, and the inflammatory response is involved in almost all stages of tumor development. Immunohistochemical staining in stroma and epithelium of a panel of cytokines in benign and malignant ovarian neoplasm was evaluated. In addition, immunostaining was related to prognostic factors in malignant tumors. METHOD The study group comprised 28 ovarian benign neoplasias and 28 ovarian malignant neoplasms. A panel of cytokines was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (Th1: IL-2 and IL-8; Th2: IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10; and TNFR1). Chi-square test with Yates’ correction was used, which was considered significant if less than 0.05. RESULTS TNFR1, IL-5, and IL-10 had more frequent immunostaining 2/3 in benign neoplasms compared with malignant tumors. Malignant tumors had more frequent immunostaining 2/3 for IL-2 in relation to benign tumors. The immunostaining 0/1 of IL 8 was more frequent in the stroma of benign neoplasms compared with malignant neoplasms. Evaluation of the ovarian cancer stroma showed that histological grade 3 was significantly correlated with staining 2/3 for IL-2 (P = 0.004). Women whose disease-free survival was less than 2.5 years had TNFR1 stromal staining 2/3 (P = 0.03) more frequently. CONCLUSION IL-2 and TNFR1 stromal immunostaining are related prognostic factors in ovarian cancer and can be the target of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27512342

  10. Dihydroartiminisin inhibits the growth and metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Buchu; Hu, Ke; Li, Shu; Zhu, Jing; Gu, Liying; Shen, Haoran; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shisan; Di, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroartiminisin (DHA), the active component of a Chinese herb (Artemisia annua), has been utilised as an anti-malarial drug since ancient China. DHA has also been shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer in vitro. However, the capacity of DHA to inhibit the development of ovarian cancer is still unclear. The adhesion, invasion, and migration of human ovarian cancer cell line (HO8910PM) was determined following DHA treatment in vitro, using Matrigel coated plate, transwell membrane chamber, and wound healing models, respectively. A mouse ovarian cancer model was established by orthotopic inoculation of HO8910PM cell line in nude mice. The growth and metastasis in vivo was determined 8 weeks post-implantation in response to DHA treatment. The expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was evaluated using Western blotting. The expression of Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and infiltration of macrophages were determined, using immunohistochemistry. DHA inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with decreased expression of pFAK and MMP-2, but not MMP-9. DHA inhibited metastasis significantly in vivo, associated with reduced vWF expression and macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, DHA inhibits the development of ovarian cancer, in part via down-regulating pFAK, MMP-2, vWF and macrophage infiltration. PMID:22025319

  11. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Response to microtubule-interacting agents in primary epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer constitutes nearly 4% of all cancers among women and is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the Western world. Standard first line adjuvant chemotherapy treatments include Paclitaxel (Taxol) and platinum-based agents. Taxol, epothilone B (EpoB) and discodermolide belong to a family of anti-neoplastic agents that specifically interferes with microtubules and arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Despite initial success with chemotherapy treatment, many patients relapse due to chemotherapy resistance. In vitro establishment of primary ovarian cancer cells provides a powerful tool for better understanding the mechanisms of ovarian cancer resistance. We describe the generation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells derived from ascites fluids of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Chemosensitivity of these cell lines to Taxol, EpoB and discodermolide was tested, and cell cycle analysis was compared to that of immortalized ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and Hey. The relationship between drug resistance and αβ-tubulin and p53 status was also investigated. Results All newly generated primary cancer cells were highly sensitive to the drugs. αβ-tubulin mutation was not found in any primary cell lines tested. However, one cell line that harbors p53 mutation at residue 72 (Arg to Pro) exhibits altered cell cycle profile in response to all drug treatments. Immortalized ovarian cancer cells respond differently to EpoB treatment when compared to primary ovarian cancer cells, and p53 polymorphism suggests clinical significance in the anti-tumor response in patients. Conclusions The isolation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells from ovarian cancer patients’ specimens contribute to further understanding the nature of drug resistance to microtubule interacting agents (MIAs) currently used in clinical settings. PMID:23574945

  13. Primary Human Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Cells Broadly Express HER2 at Immunologically-Detectable Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanitis, Evripidis; Dangaj, Denarda; Hagemann, Ian S.; Song, De-Gang; Best, Andrew; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael; Coukos, George; Powell, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The breadth of HER2 expression by primary human ovarian cancers remains controversial, which questions its suitability as a universal antigen in this malignancy. To address these issues, we performed extensive HER2 expression analysis on a wide panel of primary tumors as well as established and short-term human ovarian cancer cell lines. Conventional immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of multiple tumor sites in 50 cases of high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas revealed HER2 overexpression in 29% of evaluated sites. However, more sensitive detection methods including flow cytometry, western blot analysis and q-PCR revealed HER2 expression in all fresh tumor cells derived from primary ascites or solid tumors as well as all established and short-term cultured cancer cell lines. Cancer cells generally expressed HER2 at higher levels than that found in normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Accordingly, genetically-engineered human T cells expressing an HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognized and reacted against all established or primary ovarian cancer cells tested with minimal or no reactivity against normal OSE cells. In conclusion, all human ovarian cancers express immunologically-detectable levels of HER2, indicating that IHC measurement underestimates the true frequency of HER2-expressing ovarian cancers and may limit patient access to otherwise clinically meaningful HER2-targeted therapies. PMID:23189165

  14. NPPB is a Novel Candidate Biomarker Expressed by Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts In Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Grun, Barbara; Lee, Nathan; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Kan, Jenny; Swenson, Steve; Lin, Yvonne G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Millstein, Joshua; Gayther, Simon A

    2014-01-01

    Most solid tumours contain cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that support tumourigenesis and malignant progression. However the cellular origins of CAFs in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) remain poorly understood, and their utility as a source of clinical biomarkers for cancer diagnosis has not been explored in great depth. Here, we report establishing in vitro and in vivo models of CAFs in ovarian cancer development. Normal ovarian fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells cultured in the presence of EOC cells acquired a CAF-like phenotype, and promoted EOC cell migration in vitro. CAFs also promoted ovarian cancer growth in vivo in both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal murine xenograft assays. Molecular profiling of CAFs identified gene expression signatures that were highly enriched for extracellular and secreted proteins. We identified novel candidate CAF specific biomarkers for ovarian cancer including NPPB, which was expressed in the stroma of 60% primary ovarian cancer tissues (n=145) but not in the stroma of normal ovaries (n=4). NPPB is a secreted protein that was also elevated in the blood of 50% of women with ovarian cancer (n=8). Taken together these data suggest that the tumor stroma is a novel source of biomarkers, including NPPB, that may be of clinical utility for detection of EOC. PMID:25047817

  15. SSRI use and clinical outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Desiré K; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Ramirez, Edgardo; Matsuo, Koji; Zimmerman, Bridget; Zand, Behrouz; Shinn, Eileen; Goodheart, Michael J; Bender, David; Thaker, Premal H; Ahmed, Amina; Penedo, Frank J; DeGeest, Koen; Mendez, Luis; Domann, Frederick; Sood, Anil K; Lutgendorf, Susan K

    2016-05-31

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is common among ovarian cancer patients. We examined the effect of SSRIs on survival and progression in ovarian cancer patients and effects of 5-HT on ovarian cancer cell (OCC) proliferation. Ovarian cancer patients from a 6-site study between 1994 and 2010 were included. Cox proportional hazards models were used for multivariate analysis. SSRI use was associated with decreased time to disease recurrence (HR 1.3, CI 1.0-1.6, p=0.03), but not overall survival (HR 1.1, CI 0.9-1.3, p=0.56). Compared to normal ovarian cells, most OCCs had elevated 5-HT2A receptor mRNA expression (up to 1600 fold greater expression). Clonogenic survival increased in cells treated with 10 uM (1.6 fold, p<0.001) and 20uM (1.9 fold, p=0.018) 5-HT. Mice receiving 5-HT injections had increases in tumor weight (p=0.07) and nodules (p=0.08) with increased Ki67 expression. Injections with sertraline doubled mean tumor weight in mice (p=0.16). 5-HT and sertraline both increased Ki67 expression in mouse tumors (p < 0.001).Patients using SSRIs had significantly decreased time to disease progression. It is possible that SSRIs alter serotonin levels in the tumor microenvironment, resulting in activation of proliferation pathways. Further characterization of serotonergic pathways in ovarian cancer is recommended to demonstrate safety of these medications. PMID:27121207

  16. Nuclear medicine for imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Shahhosseini, Roza; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Usually, the diagnosis of cancer at an early stage is important to facilitate proper treatment and survival. Nuclear medicine has been successfully used in the diagnosis, staging, therapy and monitoring of cancers. Single-photon emission computed tomography and PET-based companion imaging agents are in development for use as a companion diagnostic tool for patients with ovarian cancer. The present review discusses the basic and clinical studies related to the use of radiopharmaceuticals in the diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer, focusing on their utility and comparing them with other imaging techniques such as computed tomography and MRI.

  17. Evidence for differential viral oncolytic efficacy in an in vitro model of epithelial ovarian cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jessica G; Valdes, Yudith Ramos; Barrett, John W; Bell, John C; Stojdl, David; McFadden, Grant; McCart, J Andrea; DiMattia, Gabriel E; Shepherd, Trevor G

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is unique among most carcinomas in that metastasis occurs by direct dissemination of malignant cells traversing throughout the intraperitoneal fluid. Accordingly, we test new therapeutic strategies using an in vitro three-dimensional spheroid suspension culture model that mimics key steps of this metastatic process. In the present study, we sought to uncover the differential oncolytic efficacy among three different viruses-Myxoma virus, double-deleted vaccinia virus, and Maraba virus-using three ovarian cancer cell lines in our metastasis model system. Herein, we demonstrate that Maraba virus effectively infects, replicates, and kills epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in proliferating adherent cells and with slightly slower kinetics in tumor spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia viruses infect and kill adherent cells to a much lesser extent than Maraba virus, and their oncolytic potential is almost completely attenuated in spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia are able to infect and spread throughout spheroids, but are blocked in the final stages of the lytic cycle, and oncolytic-mediated cell killing is reactivated upon spheroid reattachment. Alternatively, Maraba virus has a remarkably reduced ability to initially enter spheroid cells, yet rapidly infects and spreads throughout spheroids generating significant cell killing effects. We show that low-density lipoprotein receptor expression in ovarian cancer spheroids is reduced and this controls efficient Maraba virus binding and entry into infected cells. Taken together, these results are the first to implicate the potential impact of differential viral oncolytic properties at key steps of ovarian cancer metastasis.

  18. Increased risk of concurrent primary malignancies in patients diagnosed with a primary malignant epithelial ovarian tumor.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, Catharina C; Vooijs, G Peter; Bulten, Johan; van Dijck, Jos A A M; Verbeek, Andre L M

    2007-03-01

    Ovarian cancer and second malignant neoplasms are found to occur rather frequently in the same patient. From a clinical perspective, it is important to have quantitative information on concurrent malignancies in the same year of diagnosis of the epithelial ovarian cancer. In this population-based study, we used data from the Netherlands Nationwide Network for Registry of histo- and cytopathology (PALGA) and the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Data of the ovarian cancer as well as data on previous or later cancers were obtained. Age-specific cancer rates from the NCR were used to calculate expected numbers of cancer. Between 1987 and 1993, histopathology reports were identified of 4577 patients with primary epithelial malignant or primary borderline malignant ovarian cancers and its longitudinal data. As the database may lack detailed information on histopathology, a recent sample of 789 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1996-2003 was comprehensively studied as well. In the eventual data analysis of 5366 patients, 244 cases (4.5%) of concurrent primary malignancy were reported in the same year that the malignant epithelial ovarian tumor had been diagnosed against 51 expected. The observed vs expected ratio was 4.8 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) (4.3-5.5). For cancer of the uterus/endometrium the observed vs expected ratio was 62.3 (95% CI 52.5-73.5). For skin, breast, colorectal, urinary bladder, renal and cervical cancer the ratio was also larger than unity. The elevated risk of concurrent cancer may lead to clinical screening protocols. The findings on endometrial cancer may prompt research on common etiologies and biomarkers.

  19. Ovarian surface epithelial neoplasms in the pediatric population: incidence, histologic subtype, and natural history.

    PubMed

    Hazard, Florette K; Longacre, Teri A

    2013-04-01

    Surface epithelial neoplasms account for a small but significant proportion of pediatric ovarian tumors. The overall incidence, prevalence of histologic subtypes, and natural history of these neoplasms has not been thoroughly evaluated. A retrospective review of the pathology archives of Stanford University School of Medicine yielded 69 surface epithelial ovarian tumors in 64 pediatric patients 18 years of age or younger from 1974 to 2010. Tumors comprised benign (57.8%), borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) (37.5%), and malignant (4.7%) subgroups and exhibited serous, mucinous, and mixed histology; there were no clear cell, pure endometrioid, or transitional (Brenner) tumors. In addition, no high-grade carcinomas were identified. Clinical follow-up data were available in a subset of patients (maximum follow-up, 22 y). Similar numbers of recurrences were found in each of the 3 subgroups. However, overall survival was 100% for benign and borderline/LMP tumors and 50% for carcinomas. The type of surgical management and the use of chemotherapy varied; 2 patients with borderline/LMP tumors were treated by sterilizing procedures and/or chemotherapy. These data suggest that surface epithelial neoplasms comprise a small but significant proportion of ovarian tumors in the pediatric population, and they exhibit a marked preponderance for benign, borderline, and low-grade malignant subgroups. In contrast to their adult counterpart, high-grade serous carcinoma in children is extraordinarily rare and not seen in this series. Given this difference, uniform treatment modalities with consideration for ovarian conservation and fertility preservation should be rigorously adopted in any pediatric patient with a suspected ovarian surface epithelial neoplasm.

  20. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Avian prostatic acid phosphatase: estrogen regulation in the oviduct and epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyocheol; Lim, Whasun; Bae, Seung-Min; Bazer, Fuller W; Choi, Youngsok; Song, Gwonhwa

    2014-07-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) is a glycoprotein that is mainly synthesized and secreted by glandular epithelial cells (GE) of the prostate, and it is well known as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Although ACPP was used as prognostic/diagnostic indicator and studied to elucidate regulatory mechanism(s) during several decades in humans, its role is not clearly understood. Gene profiling data using a chicken DNA microarray revealed that ACPP increased significantly during remodeling and recrudescence of the oviduct in response to estrogen. Thus, in this study, we investigated the expression and hormonal regulation of ACPP gene in the reproductive tracts of chickens. ACPP was specifically detected in the luminal cells (LE) and GE of chicken oviduct, and diethylstilbestrol (a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen) stimulated its expression during development of the oviduct. In addition, ACPP mRNA and protein were localized to LE and GE during the regeneration phase of the oviduct of laying hens during induced molting. Furthermore, ACPP mRNA and protein were abundant in GE of ovarian carcinoma, but not in normal ovaries. Moreover, strong expression of ACPP protein was detected in epithelial cells of cancerous ovaries from women. Collectively, results of the present study are the first to show that ACPP is a novel estrogen-stimulated gene in the oviductal epithelial cells of the chicken and that its expression increases significantly in epithelial cells of ovarian carcinoma, which indicates that it may be a candidate biomarker for diagnosis of epithelia-derived ovarian cancer in women. PMID:24829029

  3. Overexpression of MACC1 and the association with hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONGYU; ZHANG, HUI; ZHAO, SHUJUN; SHI, YUN; YAO, JUNGE; ZHANG, YANYAN; GUO, HUANHUAN; LIU, XINGSUO

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is a gene that has been newly identified by a genome-wide search for differentially expressed genes in human colon cancer tissues, metastases and normal tissues. MACC1 exerts an important role in colon cancer metastasis through upregulation of the c-Met proto-oncogene. The tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by the c-Met oncogene exhibits the unusual property of mediating the invasive growth of epithelial cells upon binding with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). MACC1 has been investigated with regard to colon carcinoma and MACC1 expression is associated with metastasis in various types of human cancer. However, the value of MACC1 as a potential biomarker for ovarian cancer remains unknown, although the c-Met/HGF receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues. To investigate the role of MACC1 in epithelial ovarian tumors, the expression levels of MACC1 mRNA in ovarian tumor specimens were analyzed together with the prognostic significance. MACC1 protein expression was also detected in the epithelial ovarian tissue specimens, and the effects of MACC1 overexpression on ovarian cancer migration, invasion and prognosis were evaluated. Due to the close association between MACC1 and c-Met expression levels in colon cancer, the expression levels of HGF/c-Met in the ovarian specimens were also examined to determine whether such a correlation is also present in epithelial ovarian cancer. A total of 92 epithelial ovarian tissue samples were used to assess the expression levels of MACC1 mRNA and protein using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical methods, respectively. The serum levels of MACC1 protein expression in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that MACC1 may be important in the malignant progression of epithelial ovarian tumors, in particular for early stage patients. Thus, MACC

  4. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Ramus, Susan J.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Narod, Steven A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68–0.90, p = 5.59 × 10−4]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1, may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways. PMID:26807442

  5. MiR-101 suppresses the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by targeting ZEB1 and ZEB2 in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Cogdell, David; Hu, Limei; Yang, Da; Sood, Anil K; Xue, Fengxia; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy; the majority of patients succumb to the disease within 5 years of diagnosis. The poor survival rate is attributed to diagnosis at advanced stage, when the tumor has metastasized. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a necessary step toward metastatic tumor progression. Through integrated computational analysis, we recently identified a master microRNA (miRNA) network that includes miR-101 and regulates EMT in ovarian carcinoma. In the present study, we characterized the functions of miR-101. Using reporter gene assays, we demonstrated that miR-101 suppressed the expression of the E-cadherin repressors ZEB1 and ZEB2 by directly targeting the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of both ZEB1 and ZEB2. Introduction of miR-101 significantly inhibited EMT and cell migration and invasion. Introducing cDNAs of ZEB1 and ZEB2 without 3'UTR abrogated miR-101-induced EMT alteration, respectively. Our findings showed that miR-101 represents a redundant mechanism for the miR-200 family that regulates EMT through two major E-cadherin transcriptional repressors.

  6. miR-101 suppresses the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by targeting ZEB1 and ZEB2 in ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FEI; COGDELL, DAVID; HU, LIMEI; YANG, DA; SOOD, ANIL K.; XUE, FENGXIA; ZHANG, WEI

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy; the majority of patients succumb to the disease within 5 years of diagnosis. The poor survival rate is attributed to diagnosis at advanced stage, when the tumor has metastasized. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a necessary step toward metastatic tumor progression. Through integrated computational analysis, we recently identified a master microRNA (miRNA) network that includes miR-101 and regulates EMT in ovarian carcinoma. In the present study, we characterized the functions of miR-101. Using reporter gene assays, we demonstrated that miR-101 suppressed the expression of the E-cadherin repressors ZEB1 and ZEB2 by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR) of both ZEB1 and ZEB2. Introduction of miR-101 significantly inhibited EMT and cell migration and invasion. Introducing cDNAs of ZEB1 and ZEB2 without 3′UTR abrogated miR-101-induced EMT alteration, respectively. Our findings showed that miR-101 represents a redundant mechanism for the miR-200 family that regulates EMT through two major E-cadherin transcriptional repressors. PMID:24677166

  7. Norepinephrine Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and DNA Damage in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pooja R; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Theruvathu, Jacob; Mitra, Sankar A; Boldogh, Istvan; Sowers, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the role of norepinephrine (NE) on DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in ovarian surface epithelial cells. Method Non-tumorigenic, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells were treated with NE, bleomycin, and bleomycin followed by NE. The comet assay was performed on each treatment group to determine the amount of single and double-strand breaks induced by treatments. ROS levels for each treatment group were measured using the H2DCF-DA fluorescence assay. Finally, RNA transcripts were measured for each treatment group with regards to the expression of DNA repair and oxidative stress genes. Results The mean tail moment of untreated cells was significantly greater than that of cells treated with NE (p=0.02). The mean tail moment of cells treated with bleomycin was significantly greater than that of cells treated with bleomycin followed by NE (p<0.01). Treatment with NE resulted in significantly less ROS generation than in untreated cells (p<0.01). NE treatment after hydrogen peroxide treatment resulted in a noticeable decrease in ROS generation. Genes associated with oxidative stress were upregulated in cells treated with bleomycin, however this upregulation was blunted when bleomycin-treated cells were treated subsequently with NE. Conclusion NE is associated with decreased DNA damage and ROS production in ovarian surface epithelial cells. This effect is protective in the presence of the oxidative-damaging agent bleomycin. These results suggest an additional physiologic role for the stress hormone NE, in protecting ovarian surface epithelial cells from oxidative stress. PMID:26167254

  8. Diurnal Cortisol and Survival in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schrepf, Andrew; Thaker, Premal H.; Goodheart, Michael J.; Bender, David; Slavich, George M.; Dahmoush, Laila; Penedo, Frank; DeGeest, Koen; Mendez, Luis; Lubaroff, David M.; Cole, Steven W.; Sood, Anil K.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) deregulation is commonly observed in cancer patients, but its clinical significance is not well understood. We prospectively examined the association between HPA activity, tumor-associated inflammation, and survival in ovarian cancer patients prior to treatment. Materials and Methods Participants were 113 women with ovarian cancer who provided salivary cortisol for three days prior to treatment for calculation of cortisol slope, variability, and night cortisol. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to examine associations between cortisol and survival in models adjusting for disease stage, tumor grade, cytoreduction and age. On a subsample of 41 patients with advanced disease ascites fluid was assayed for levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and correlated with cortisol variables. Results Each cortisol measure was associated with decreased survival time, adjusting for covariates (all p<.041). A one standard deviation increase in night cortisol was associated with a 46% greater likelihood of death. Patients in the high night cortisol group survived an estimated average of 3.3 years compared to 7.3 years for those in the low night cortisol group. Elevated ascites IL-6 was associated with each cortisol measure (all r >.36, all p<.017). Discussion Abnormal cortisol rhythms assessed prior to treatment are associated with decreased survival in ovarian cancer and increased inflammation in the vicinity of the tumor. HPA abnormalities may reflect poor endogenous control of inflammation, dysregulation caused by tumor-associated inflammation, broad circadian disruption, or some combination of these factors. Nocturnal cortisol may have utility as a non-invasive measure of HPA function and/or disease severity. PMID:25647344

  9. Recent progress in the treatment of epithelial ovarian malignancy.

    PubMed

    Berek, J S; Hacker, N F; Lagasse, L D

    1982-10-01

    Improved surgical and chemotherapeutic management has ensured that more than half the patients with advanced ovarian cancer will be clinically free of disease shortly after treatment begins. Aggressive cytoreductive surgical treatment and combination cytotoxic chemotherapy have appreciably prolonged survival and have induced cures in some women with metastatic disease. An increasing number of women are being seen with small residual disease at second-look laparotomy, and intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents is being investigated for these patients. Specific immunotherapies, including monoclonal antibodies raised against patients' own tumor cells, are also being investigated. During the next five years we may see significant improvement in the cure rate for this disease.

  10. Targeted agents in epithelial ovarian cancer: review on emerging therapies and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Lokadasan, Rajitha; James, Francis V; Narayanan, Geetha; Prabhakaran, Pranab K

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains a clinical challenge and there is a need to optimise the currently available treatment and to urgently develop new therapeutic strategies. Recently, there has been improved understanding of the molecular characteristics and tumour microenvironment of ovarian cancers. This has facilitated the development of various targeted agents used concurrently with chemotherapy or as maintenance. Most of the studies have explored the tumour angiogenesis pathways. In phase-III trials, bevacizumab showed a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival, although there was no improvement in overall survival in selected high-risk cases. Although several multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors were found to be useful, the toxicity and survival benefit has to be weighed. Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been another marvellous molecule found to be effective in breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA)-positive ovarian cancers. Several newer molecules targeting Her 2, Wee tyrsine kinases, PIP3/AKT/mTR-signalling pathways, folate receptors are under development and may provide additional opportunities in the future. This article focuses on the targeted agents that have successfully paved the way in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer and the newer molecules that may offer therapeutic opportunities in the future. PMID:27110282

  11. Uncertainty in the Utility of Immunohistochemistry in Mismatch Repair Protein Expression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Copppola, Domenico; Nicosia, Santo V.; Doty, Andrea; Sellers, Thomas A; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, Jimmy; Thompson, Zachary; Galeb, Sanja; McLaughlin, John; Narod, Steven A; Schildkraut, Joellen; Pal, Tuya

    2014-01-01

    Background Utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer but remains incompletely defined in ovarian cancer. We evaluated MMR protein expression in three population-based samples of epithelial ovarian cancers. Methods IHC staining was performed on full section (FS) or tissue microarray (TMA) slides for MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 expression. Results Of 487 cases, 147 and 340 were performed through FS and TMA, respectively. Overall, Loss of Expression (LoE) of at least one MMR protein was observed in 12.7% based on an expression score of ≤3 (on a scale of 9). Notably, LoE was significantly higher in TMAs (17.9%) compared to FS cases (0.7%) (p <0.001). Conclusions A substantial proportion of epithelial ovarian cancers have a loss of MMR protein expression. Protein expression results vary significantly by the tissue sampling methodology utilized, raising concerns about the clinical utility of this test for ovarian tumors. PMID:23155266

  12. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  13. [The expression of MKP-1 and p-ERK(1/2) in primary ovarian epithelial tumor tissues].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Wei; Gan, Ning Yue; Zhang, Wei Jiang

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the expression of mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and phosphorylation extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERK(1/2)) in primary ovarian epithelial tumor tissues, and provide experiment's foundation on the new treatment in ovarian cancer. Expression of MKP-1 and p-ERK(1/2) in tissues from 64 patients with primary ovarian epithelial tumor, 35 patients with ovarian epithelial bordline tumor, 32 patients with ovarian epithelial benign tumor and 26 normal ovarian tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. Western-blot was also used for detecting the expression of MKP-1 and p-ERK(1/2) protein in these tissues. Immunohistochemistry and Western-blot assay showed that the expression of MKP-1 was gradually decreased in normal ovarian tissues, benign tumor, bordline tumor and carcinoma respectively, and there were significant differences among them (P < 0.01). The MKP-1 expression level in the carcinoma tissues of stage III/IV patients was significantly lower than that of stage I/II patients. However, the expression of p-ERK(1/2) was gradually increased in normal ovarian tissues, benign tumor, bordline tumor and carcinoma respectively, and there were also significant differences among them (P < 0.01), the p-ERK(1/2) expression level in the carcinoma tissues of stage III/IV patients was significantly higher than that of stage I/II patients. Expression of MKP-1 and p-ERK(1/2) in same ovarian carcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry and Western-blot assay showed significant negative correlation (r = -0.90, P < 0.01 and r = -0.78, P < 0.01 respectively). The expression changes of MKP-1 and ERKs may play a role in the development of ovarian carcinoma. The abnormal expression of MKP-1 and p-ERK(1/2) probably assists in promoting the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma.

  14. Erlotinib Plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Ovarian Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  15. FT-IR Microspectrometry Reveals the Variation of Membrane Polarizability due to Epigenomic Effect on Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Morris M. H.; Huang, Pei-Yu; Lee, Yao-Chang; Fang, Yuang-Chuen; Chan, Michael W. Y.; Lee, Cheng-I

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, as well as other cancers, is primarily caused by methylation at cytosines in CpG islands, but the current marker for ovarian cancer is low in sensitivity and failed in early-stage detection. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is powerful in analysis of functional groups within molecules, and infrared microscopy illustrates the location of specific groups within single cells. In this study, we applied HPLC and FT-IR microspectrometry to study normal epithelial ovarian cell line immortalized ovarian surface epithelium (IOSE), two epithelial ovarian cell lines (A2780 and CP70) with distinct properties, and the effect of a cancer drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza) without labeling. Our results reveal that inhibition of methylation on cytosine with 5-aza initiates the protein expression. Furthermore, paraffin-adsorption kinetic study allows us to distinguish hypermethylated and hypomethyated cells, and this assay can be a potential diagnosis method for cancer screening. PMID:25299694

  16. FT-IR microspectrometry reveals the variation of membrane polarizability due to epigenomic effect on epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Morris M H; Huang, Pei-Yu; Lee, Yao-Chang; Fang, Yuang-Chuen; Chan, Michael W Y; Lee, Cheng-I

    2014-10-08

    Ovarian cancer, as well as other cancers, is primarily caused by methylation at cytosines in CpG islands, but the current marker for ovarian cancer is low in sensitivity and failed in early-stage detection. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is powerful in analysis of functional groups within molecules, and infrared microscopy illustrates the location of specific groups within single cells. In this study, we applied HPLC and FT-IR microspectrometry to study normal epithelial ovarian cell line immortalized ovarian surface epithelium (IOSE), two epithelial ovarian cell lines (A2780 and CP70) with distinct properties, and the effect of a cancer drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza) without labeling. Our results reveal that inhibition of methylation on cytosine with 5-aza initiates the protein expression. Furthermore, paraffin-adsorption kinetic study allows us to distinguish hypermethylated and hypomethyated cells, and this assay can be a potential diagnosis method for cancer screening.

  17. Lysophosphatidic Acid Initiates Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and Induces β-Catenin-mediated Transcription in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Burkhalter, Rebecca J.; Westfall, Suzanne D.; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which influences metastatic success. Mutation-dependent activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in gain of mesenchymal phenotype and loss of differentiation in several solid tumors; however, similar mutations are rare in most EOC histotypes. Nevertheless, evidence for activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in EOC has been reported, and immunohistochemical analysis of human EOC tumors demonstrates nuclear staining in all histotypes. This study addresses the hypothesis that the bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), prevalent in the EOC microenvironment, functions to regulate EMT in EOC. Our results demonstrate that LPA induces loss of junctional β-catenin, stimulates clustering of β1 integrins, and enhances the conformationally active population of surface β1 integrins. Furthermore, LPA treatment initiates nuclear translocation of β-catenin and transcriptional activation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes resulting in gain of mesenchymal marker expression. Together these data suggest that LPA initiates EMT in ovarian tumors through β1-integrin-dependent activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, providing a novel mechanism for mutation-independent activation of this pathway in EOC progression. PMID:26175151

  18. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (< 1 g) and early stage (≤ stage II) masses to prevent rapid progression to late stages and ultimately death. The second challenge is differentiating malignant from benign tissue to avoid costly and invasive surgeries (19.5 surgeries are required to find 1 cancer even with multiple screenings). First-line diagnostic tests such as ultrasound and serum marker tests (e.g. CA-125) aid in diagnosis but they lack the sensitivity and specificity required to overcome both challenges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a second-line diagnostic aided by gadolinium based contrast agents (CAs), offers higher resolution pictures for classifying indeterminate ovarian masses. But as currently practiced, MRI still lacks the sensitivity and specificity required to alter patient outcomes. In this work we develop a new paradigm for EOC diagnosis that targets the prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  1. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  2. Neutrophil Granulocytes in Ovarian Cancer - Induction of Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal-Transition and Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christine; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Meyer, Anne-Sophie; Hübner, Katrin; Rom, Joachim; Sohn, Christof; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Hänsch, G. Maria; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is a highly aggressive malignoma with a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is frequently seen, raising the question of their impact on tumor development. In that context, effects of PMN on human ovarian cancer cells were assessed. Methods: Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells were incubated with human PMN, lysate of PMN, or neutrophil elastase. Morphological alterations were observed by time-lapse video-microscopy, and the underlying molecular mechanism was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Functional alternations were assessed by an in vitro wound healing assay. In parallel, a large cohort of n=334 primary OvCa tissue samples of various histological subtypes was histologically evaluated. Results: Co-cultivation of cancer cells with either PMN or PMN lysate causes a change of the polygonal epithelial phenotype of the cells towards a spindle shaped morphology, causing a cribriform cell growth. The PMN-induced alteration could be attributed to elastase, a major protease of PMN. Elastase-induced shape change was most likely due to the degradation of membranous E-cadherin, which results in loss of cell contacts and polarity. Moreover, in response to elastase, epithelial cytokeratins were downmodulated, in parallel with a nuclear translocation of β-catenin. These PMN-elastase induced alterations of cells are compatible with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the cancer cells. Following EMT, the cells displayed a more migratory phenotype. In human biopsies, neutrophil infiltration was seen in 72% of the cases. PMN infiltrates were detected preferentially in areas with low E-cadherin expression. Conclusion: PMN in the microenvironment of OvCa can alter tumor cells towards a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. PMID:27053953

  3. TGFβ signaling regulates epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in ovarian cancer ascites-derived spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rafehi, Samah; Ramos Valdes, Yudith; Bertrand, Monique; McGee, Jacob; Préfontaine, Michel; Sugimoto, Akira; DiMattia, Gabriel E; Shepherd, Trevor G

    2016-03-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) serves as a key mechanism driving tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis in many carcinomas. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling is implicated in several steps during cancer pathogenesis and acts as a classical inducer of EMT. Since epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells have the potential to switch between epithelial and mesenchymal states during metastasis, we predicted that modulation of TGFβ signaling would significantly impact EMT and the malignant potential of EOC spheroid cells. Ovarian cancer patient ascites-derived cells naturally underwent an EMT response when aggregating into spheroids, and this was reversed upon spheroid re-attachment to a substratum. CDH1/E-cadherin expression was markedly reduced in spheroids compared with adherent cells, in concert with an up-regulation of several transcriptional repressors, i.e., SNAI1/Snail, TWIST1/2, and ZEB2. Treatment of EOC spheroids with the TGFβ type I receptor inhibitor, SB-431542, potently blocked the endogenous activation of EMT in spheroids. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with SB-431542 upon re-attachment enhanced the epithelial phenotype of dispersing cells and significantly decreased cell motility and Transwell migration. Spheroid formation was significantly compromised by exposure to SB-431542 that correlated with a reduction in cell viability particularly in combination with carboplatin treatment. Thus, our findings are the first to demonstrate that intact TGFβ signaling is required to control EMT in EOC ascites-derived cell spheroids, and it promotes the malignant characteristics of these structures. As such, we show the therapeutic potential for targeted inhibition of this pathway in ovarian cancer patients with late-stage disease. PMID:26647384

  4. Modulation of redox signaling promotes apoptosis in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Diamond, Michael P.; Abu-Soud, Husam M.; Munkarah, Adnan R.; Saed, Ghassan M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells are known to be resistant to apoptosis through a mechanism that may involve alteration in their redox balance. NADPH oxidase is a major source of intracellular superoxide, which is converted to the less toxic product by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Superoxide contributes to hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α stabilization. We sought to determine the effects of inhibiting the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) on apoptosis of EOC cells. Methods Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an irreversible ROS inhibitor, was used to inhibit the generation of ROS in EOC cell lines, SKOV-3 and MDAH-2774, followed by assessment of apoptosis, NADPH oxidase, SOD3 and HIF-1α expression. A combination of immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation/western blot, and real-time RT-PCR were utilized to evaluate the expression of these enzymes in EOC cells as well as normal ovarian tissue and ovarian cancer tissue specimens. Results DPI treatment significantly induced apoptosis in both EOC cell lines as evident by increased caspase-3 activity and TUNEL assay. Additionally, both EOC cell lines were found to express NADPH oxidase, HIF-1α, and SOD3, which were highly sensitive to DPI treatment. DPI treatment resulted in reduced NADPH oxidase, SOD3 and HIF-1α levels. Furthermore, ovarian cancer tissues were found to manifest higher NADPH oxidase levels as compared to normal ovarian tissues. Conclusions These data suggest that lowering oxidative stress, possibly through the inhibition of NADPH oxidase, induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells and may serve as a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:21620448

  5. Snail promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasiveness in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Lou; Zhao, Xue-Min; Shuai, Zhi-Feng; Li, Chun-Yan; Bai, Qing-Yang; Yu, Xiu-Wen; Wen, Qiu-Ting

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports with respect to the study on the epithelium-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) mediated by Snail in the ovarian cancer. This study detected the expression of Snail and related EMT markers in the ovarian cancer tissues, and explored the possible molecular mechanism of EMT mediated by Snail in the metastasis of ovarian cancer. The patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer according to the pathology were recruited in this study during 2010-2014. The carcinoma tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma were surgically obtained from patients. The genes of E-cadherin, β-catenin, Fibronectin and N-cadherin were detected using the RT-PCR. The 64 patients were recruited and diagnosed as ovarian cancer by pathological examination. The expression levels of Snail, Fibronectin and N-cadherin in the stage III and IV were higher than those in the stage I and II, respectively (all P < 0.05). However, the expression levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin decreased along with the stage developed (trend test, both P < 0.05), respectively. The expression of Snail was positively correlated with the expression of Fibronectin, N-cadherin, but negatively correlated with the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin. The number of A2780 cells entering into the lower compartment in the group of carcinoma tissue were significantly higher than that in the group of normal tissue after transfected with Snail expression vector. While, the invasion ability of A2780 significantly reduced after RNAi-Snail. The correlation between Snail and invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer and epithelial-mesenchymal transition based on tissue and cell levels, and to some extent explored the molecular mechanism of the EMT process mediated by Snail. PMID:26221280

  6. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Yijing; Tang, Huijuan; Guo, Yan; Guo, Jing; Huang, Bangxing; Fang, Fang; Cai, Jing Wang, Zehua

    2015-09-10

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs.

  7. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  8. CCL18 from tumor‐cells promotes epithelial ovarian cancer metastasis via mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Tang, Yong; Yu, Hongjing; Yin, Qiaoyun; Li, Mengdi; Shi, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Danrong

    2015-01-01

    CCL18 is a chemotactic cytokine involved in the pathogenesis and progression of various disorders, including cancer. Previously, our results showed high levels of CCL18 in the serum of epithelial ovarian carcinoma patients suggesting its potential as a circulating biomarker. In this study, we determined that CCL18 expression was up‐regulated in ovarian carcinoma compared with adjacent tissue and was expressed in carcinoma cells in the tumor and not in normal ovarian epithelial cells by laser capture microdissection coupled with real‐time RT‐PCR. Moreover, correlation analysis showed that the CCL18 level was positively correlated with the metastasis of patients with ovarian cancer. Survival analysis also revealed that an increased level of CCL18 was associated with worse survival time in ovarian cancer patients. Over‐expression of CCL18 led to enhanced migration and invasion of the Skov3 ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, proteomics analysis demonstrated that CCL18‐mediated ovarian cancer invasiveness was strongly correlated with the mTORC2 pathway. These findings suggest that the CCL18 chemokine has an important role in chemokine‐mediated tumor metastasis, and may serve as a potential predictor for poor survival outcomes for ovarian cancer. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26457987

  9. OCT4 mediates FSH-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasion through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Fang, Chi; Zhang, Zhenbo; Feng, Youji; Xi, Xiaowei

    2015-06-01

    Our previous study showed that Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) expression was upregulated and significantly associated with histological grade through the analysis of OCT4 expression in 159 ovarian cancer tissue samples, and OCT4 mediated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced anti-apoptosis in epithelial ovarian cancer. Nevertheless, whether OCT4 participates in FSH-induced invasion in ovarian cancer is still unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to define whether FSH-induced ovarian cancer invasion is mediated by OCT4. In present study, we showed that FSH induced not only the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasive phenotype but also the upregulation of OCT4 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in epithelial ovarian cancer cells. In addition, the expression of FSH receptor (FSHR) was upregulated by FSH induction, and knockdown of FSHR inhibited FSH-stimulated OCT4 expression. ERK1/2 signaling pathway participated in the enhanced expression of OCT4 and Snail induced by FSH. We further showed that the activated expression of Snail and N-cadherin, the suppressed expression of E-cadherin and the morphological change of the cells stimulated by FSH were blocked by OCT4-specific small interfering RNA. Moreover, our results showed that OCT4 mediated the increase in invasive capacity induced by FSH in ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, our work reveals that OCT4 is an essential mediator in FSH-induced EMT and invasion in epithelial ovarian cancer and may act as a potential therapeutic target.

  10. Vitamin D postpones the progression of epithelial ovarian cancer induced by 7, 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhi; Hu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Hemei; Hou, Yongfeng; Zhang, Zengli; Zhou, Guangming; Li, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system, and the prevention and treatment of ovarian carcinoma are still far from optimal. Epidemiological studies reported that ovarian cancer risk was inversely associated with low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)]. Therefore, this study focuses on exploring the chemoprevention of vitamin D on epithelial ovarian cancer induced by 7, 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene (DMBA). Methods The mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells were isolated from estrus mice by mild trypsinization and maintained in completed culture medium by repeated passaging. The malignant transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells was induced by DMBA in vitro. DMBA was directly injected into the bursa of mouse ovary to produce optimized in vivo ovarian cancer model. Results The results indicate that 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 may delay malignant transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells induced by DMBA and significantly decreased the colony formation rate from 18.4% to 3.2% (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between incidence of DMBA-induced tumor and 25-hydroxy vitamin D level (R2=0.978, P<0.05). Vitamin D3 can delay the progression of ovarian cancer induced by DMBA, and the administration of vitamin D3 during the whole process worked more effectively than the administration only during tumor initiation or promotion. Moreover, we found the vitamin D3 increased the expression of E-cadherin and vitamin D receptor while it decreased the expression of β-catenin. Conclusion We succeeded in establishment of epithelial ovarian cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. The DMBA-implanted model in mice yields high incidence and specificity of epithelial derived tumors. We also found that vitamin D delays the progression of ovarian cancer. However, spontaneous epithelial ovarian carcinoma models are still to be explored for testing the preventive effects of vitamin D on epithelial ovarian

  11. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Can primary optimal cytoreduction be predicted in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer preoperatively?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Prediction of optimal cytoreduction in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian caner preoperatively. Methods Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer who underwent surgery for the first time from Jan. to June 2008 at gynecologic oncology ward of TUMS (Tehran University of Medical Sciences) were eligible for this study. The possibility of predicting primary optimal cytoreduction considering multiple variables was evaluated. Variables were peritoneal carcinomatosis, serum CA125, ascites, pleural effusion, physical status and imaging findings. Univariate comparisons of patients underwent suboptimal cytoreduction carried out using Fisher's exact test for each of the potential predictors. The wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare variables between patients with optimal versus suboptimal cytoreduction. Results 41 patients met study inclusion criteria. Statistically significant association was noted between peritoneal carcinomatosis and suboptimal cytoreduction. There were no statistically significant differences between physical status, pleural effusion, imaging findings, serum CA125 and ascites of individuals with optimal cytoreduction compared to those with suboptimal cytoreduction. Conclusions Because of small populations in our study the results are not reproducible in alternate populations. Only the patient who is most unlikely to undergo optimal cytoreduction should be offered neoadjuvant chemotherapy, unless her medical condition renders her unsuitable for primary surgery. PMID:20170515

  13. STAT3 polymorphisms may predict an unfavorable response to first-line platinum-based therapy for women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Fulp, William J; Reid, Brett M; Chen, Zhihua; Georgeades, Christina; Cheng, Jin Q; Magliocco, Anthony; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression and therapeutic response. We hypothesized that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSC-related genes may predict an initial therapeutic response for women newly diagnosed with EOC. A nested case-control design was used to study 361 women with advanced-stage serous EOC treated with surgery followed by first-line platinum-based combination therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center or as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas Study. "Cases" included 102 incomplete responders (IRs) and "controls" included 259 complete clinical responders (CRs) to therapy. Using Illumina genotyping arrays and imputation, DNA samples were evaluated for 5,509 SNPs in 24 ovarian CSC-related genes. We also evaluated the overall significance of each CSC gene using the admixture maximum likelihood (AML) test, and correlated genotype with EOC tumor tissue expression. The strongest SNP-level associations with an IR to therapy were identified for correlated (r(2) > 0.80) SNPs within signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) [odds ratio (OR), 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32-3.78; p = 0.0027], after adjustment for age, population stratification, grade and residual disease. At the gene level, STAT3 was significantly associated with an IR to therapy (pAML = 0.006). rs1053004, a STAT3 SNP in a putative miRNA-binding site, was associated with STAT3 expression (p = 0.057). This is the first study to identify germline STAT3 variants as independent predictors of an unfavorable therapeutic response for EOC patients. Findings suggest that STAT3 genotype may identify high-risk women likely to respond more favorably to novel therapeutic combinations that include STAT3 inhibitors. PMID:26264211

  14. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Annika; Richter, Rolf; Dragun, Duska; Heidecke, Harald; Dechend, Ralf; Muller, Dominik N.; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected. PMID:27660742

  15. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Annika; Richter, Rolf; Dragun, Duska; Heidecke, Harald; Dechend, Ralf; Muller, Dominik N.; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected.

  16. Detection of epithelial ovarian cancer using 1H-NMR-based metabonomics.

    PubMed

    Odunsi, Kunle; Wollman, Robert M; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hutson, Alan; McCann, Susan E; Tammela, Jonathan; Geisler, John P; Miller, Gregory; Sellers, Thomas; Cliby, William; Qian, Feng; Keitz, Bernadette; Intengan, Marilyn; Lele, Shashikant; Alderfer, James L

    2005-02-20

    Currently available serum biomarkers are insufficiently reliable to distinguish patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) from healthy individuals. Metabonomics, the study of metabolic processes in biologic systems, is based on the use of (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistics for biochemical data generation and interpretation and may provide a characteristic fingerprint in disease. In an effort to examine the utility of the metabonomic approach for discriminating sera from women with EOC from healthy controls, we performed (1)H-NMR spectroscopic analysis on preoperative serum specimens obtained from 38 patients with EOC, 12 patients with benign ovarian cysts and 53 healthy women. After data reduction, we applied both unsupervised Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and supervised Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) for pattern recognition. The sensitivity and specificity tradeoffs were summarized for each variable using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In addition, we analyzed the regions of NMR spectra that most strongly influence separation of sera of EOC patients from healthy controls. PCA analysis allowed correct separation of all serum specimens from 38 patients with EOC (100%) from all of the 21 premenopausal normal samples (100%) and from all the sera from patients with benign ovarian disease (100%). In addition, it was possible to correctly separate 37 of 38 (97.4%) cancer specimens from 31 of 32 (97%) postmenopausal control sera. SIMCA analysis using the Cooman's plot demonstrated that sera classes from patients with EOC, benign ovarian cysts and the postmenopausal healthy controls did not share multivariate space, providing validation for the class separation. ROC analysis indicated that the sera from patients with and without disease could be identified with 100% sensitivity and specificity at the (1)H-NMR regions 2.77 parts per million (ppm) and 2.04 ppm from the origin (AUC of ROC curve = 1

  17. Overexpression of piRNA Pathway Genes in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Shu Ly; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Oehler, Martin K.; De Arao Tan, Izza M. D.; Russell, Darryl; Grützner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway for germ cell maintenance, genome integrity, DNA methylation and retrotransposon control raises possible roles of this pathway in cancer. Indeed aberrant expression of human PIWI orthologs and Maelstrom has been observed in various cancers. In this study we explored the expression and function of piRNA pathway genes in human ovarian cancer, based on our recent work, which showed widespread expression of piRNA pathway genes in the mammalian. Our work shows that PIWIL1 and MAEL expression is significantly increased in malignant EOC (n = 25) compared to benign tumor tissues (n = 19) and normal ovarian tissue (n = 8). The expression of PIWIL3 is lower in malignant and benign tissues when compared to normal ovary. Sequencing of PIWIL1 transcript revealed that in many tumors deletion of exon 17 leads to the introduction of a premature stop codon in the PIWI domain, likely due to a splicing error. In situ hybridization on tumor sections revealed that L1, PIWIL1, 2 and MAEL are specifically expressed in epithelial cells (cancerous cells) of EOC. Furthermore, PIWIL2 and MAEL are co-expressed in the stromal cells adjacent to tumor cells. Since PIWIL1 and MAEL are up regulated in malignant EOC and expressed in the epithelial cells, we investigated if these two genes affect invasiveness of ovarian cancer cell lines that do not normally express these genes. PIWIL1 and MAEL were transiently over expressed in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, followed by real-time measurements of cell invasiveness. Surprisingly both PIWIL1 and MAEL over expression decreased the invasiveness of SKOV3 cells. Our findings support a growing body of evidence that shows that genes in this pathway are upregulated in cancer. In ovarian cancer we show for the first time that Piwil1 transcript may often be abnormal result in non functional product. In contrast to what has been observed in other cell types, we found that PIWIL1 and

  18. Characterization of the specificity by immunohistology of a monoclonal antibody to a novel epithelial antigen of ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Mariani-Costantini, R; Agresti, R; Colnaghi, M I; Ménard, S; Andreola, S; Rilke, F

    1985-08-01

    An immunohistological study, using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method, was carried out to define the reactivity profile of a murine monoclonal antibody, MOv2, which recognizes a novel glycoprotidic antigen associated with ovarian epithelial tumors. Among the primary ovarian tumors tested, MOv2 immunostained 93% of mucinous and 75% of serous cystadenomas, 100% of mucinous, 81% of serous and 73% of endometrioid carcinomas. Undifferentiated and clear cell tumors revealed more limited reactivity with the antibody, whereas ovarian sex cord-stromal and germinal tumors were immunonegative. Positive reactions were also documented in omental metastases from primary ovarian carcinomas. No immunoreactivity was detected in normal ovarian epithelium, whereas the cells lining Walthard's nests adjacent to the fallopian tubes and a variety of normal epithelia were consistently immunolabeled. These included the lining epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract, bronchi and endocervix, and the epithelium of salivary, biliary and pancreatic ducts and sweat glands. To a lesser extent, positive reactions were detected in other surface epithelia, such as squamous and transitional epithelia. Among tumors other than ovarian, MOv2 consistently reacted with adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas from different sites, most notably breast, lung and gastrointestinal tract, and with transitional cell carcinomas. In contrast, no staining was demonstrated in non-epithelial malignancies. The antigen defined by MOv2 may be operationally useful as a marker of epithelial lineage in tumor histopathology. Its pattern of immunohistochemical distribution indicates that an antigenic phenotype shared by normal surface epithelia and non-ovarian carcinomas is strongly associated with common epithelial neoplasms of the ovaries.

  19. Recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer: a case-control study, systematic review, and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Bain, Christopher J; Jordan, Susan J; Nagle, Christina M; Green, Adèle C; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2007-11-01

    It remains unclear whether physical activity is associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk. We therefore examined the association between recreational physical activity and risk of ovarian cancer in a national population-based case-control study in Australia. We also systematically reviewed all the available evidence linking physical activity with ovarian cancer to provide the best summary estimate of the association. The case-control study included women ages 18 to 79 years with a new diagnosis of invasive (n=1,269) or borderline (n=311) epithelial ovarian cancer identified through a network of clinics, physicians, and state cancer registries throughout Australia. Controls (n=1,509) were randomly selected from the national electoral roll and were frequency matched to cases by age and state. For the systematic review, we identified eligible studies using Medline, the ISI Science Citation Index, and manual review of retrieved references, and included all case-control or cohort studies that permitted assessment of an association between physical activity (recreational/occupational/sedentary behavior) and histologically confirmed ovarian cancer. Meta-analysis was restricted to the subset of these studies that reported on recreational physical activity. In our case-control study, we observed weakly inverse or null associations between recreational physical activity and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer overall. There was no evidence that the effects varied by tumor behavior or histologic subtype. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis, which gave summary estimates of 0.79 (95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.85) for case-control studies and 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.57-1.17) for cohort studies for the risk of ovarian cancer associated with highest versus lowest levels of recreational physical activity. Thus, pooled results from observational studies suggest that a modest inverse association exists between level of recreational physical activity and

  20. Expression of transcription factor AP-2α predicts survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, M A; Kellokoski, J K; Moisio, K I; Mitchell, P J; Saarikoski, S; Syrjänen, K; Kosma, V-M

    2000-01-01

    The 52-kDa activator protein (AP)-2 is a DNA-binding transcription factor which has been reported to have growth inhibitory effects in cancer cell lines and in human tumours. In this study the expression of AP-2α was analysed in 303 epithelial ovarian carcinomas by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with a polyclonal AP-2α antibody and its mRNA status was determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The immunohistochemical expression of AP-2α was correlated with clinicopathological variables, p21/WAF1 protein expression and survival. In normal ovaries, epithelial cells expressed AP-2α protein only in the cytoplasm. In carcinomas nuclear AP-2α expression was observed in 28% of the cases although cytoplasmic expression was more common (51%). The expression of AP-2α varied according to the histological subtype and differentiation. AP-2α and p21/WAF1 expressions did not correlate with each other. Both in univariate (P = 0.002) and multivariate analyses (relative risks (RR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13–2.18, P = 0.007) the high cytoplasmic AP-2α expression favoured the overall survival. In contrast, the nuclear AP-2α expression combined with low cytoplasmic expression increased the risk of dying of ovarian cancer (RR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.13–3.83, P = 0.018). The shift in the expression pattern of AP-2α (nuclear vs cytoplasmic) in carcinomas points out to the possibility that this transcription factor may be used by oncogenes in certain histological subtypes. Based on the mRNA analyses, the incomplete expression and translation of AP-2α in ovarian cancer may be due to post-transcriptional regulation. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10864206

  1. Potent organo-osmium compound shifts metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Jessica M.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Munro, Alison F.; Fu, Ying; Pizarro, Ana M.; Garnett, Mathew J.; McDermott, Ultan; Carragher, Neil O.; Sadler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The organometallic “half-sandwich” compound [Os(η6-p-cymene)(4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethylaniline)I]PF6 is 49× more potent than the clinical drug cisplatin in the 809 cancer cell lines that we screened and is a candidate drug for cancer therapy. We investigate the mechanism of action of compound 1 in A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Whole-transcriptome sequencing identified three missense mutations in the mitochondrial genome of this cell line, coding for ND5, a subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) in the electron transport chain. ND5 is a proton pump, helping to maintain the coupling gradient in mitochondria. The identified mutations correspond to known protein variants (p.I257V, p.N447S, and p.L517P), not reported previously in epithelial ovarian cancer. Time-series RNA sequencing suggested that osmium-exposed A2780 cells undergo a metabolic shunt from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, where defective machinery, associated with mutations in complex I, could enhance activity. Downstream events, measured by time-series reverse-phase protein microarrays, high-content imaging, and flow cytometry, showed a dramatic increase in mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage with up-regulation of ATM, p53, and p21 proteins. In contrast to platinum drugs, exposure to this organo-osmium compound does not cause significant apoptosis within a 72-h period, highlighting a different mechanism of action. Superoxide production in ovarian, lung, colon, breast, and prostate cancer cells exposed to three other structurally related organo-Os(II) compounds correlated with their antiproliferative activity. DNA damage caused indirectly, through selective ROS generation, may provide a more targeted approach to cancer therapy and a concept for next-generation metal-based anticancer drugs that combat platinum resistance. PMID:26162681

  2. Patient-derived xenograft models to improve targeted therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clare L; Becker, Marc A; Haluska, Paul; Samimi, Goli

    2013-12-04

    Despite increasing evidence that precision therapy targeted to the molecular drivers of a cancer has the potential to improve clinical outcomes, high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) patients are currently treated without consideration of molecular phenotype, and predictive biomarkers that could better inform treatment remain unknown. Delivery of precision therapy requires improved integration of laboratory-based models and cutting-edge clinical research, with pre-clinical models predicting patient subsets that will benefit from a particular targeted therapeutic. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are renewable tumor models engrafted in mice, generated from fresh human tumors without prior in vitro exposure. PDX models allow an invaluable assessment of tumor evolution and adaptive response to therapy. PDX models have been applied to pre-clinical drug testing and biomarker identification in a number of cancers including ovarian, pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancers. These models have been shown to be biologically stable and accurately reflect the patient tumor with regards to histopathology, gene expression, genetic mutations, and therapeutic response. However, pre-clinical analyses of molecularly annotated PDX models derived from high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC) remain limited. In vivo response to conventional and/or targeted therapeutics has only been described for very small numbers of individual HG-SOC PDX in conjunction with sparse molecular annotation and patient outcome data. Recently, two consecutive panels of epithelial OC PDX correlate in vivo platinum response with molecular aberrations and source patient clinical outcomes. These studies underpin the value of PDX models to better direct chemotherapy and predict response to targeted therapy. Tumor heterogeneity, before and following treatment, as well as the importance of multiple molecular aberrations per individual tumor underscore some of the important issues addressed in PDX models.

  3. Potent organo-osmium compound shifts metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Munro, Alison F; Fu, Ying; Pizarro, Ana M; Garnett, Mathew J; McDermott, Ultan; Carragher, Neil O; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    The organometallic "half-sandwich" compound [Os(η(6)-p-cymene)(4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethylaniline)I]PF6 is 49× more potent than the clinical drug cisplatin in the 809 cancer cell lines that we screened and is a candidate drug for cancer therapy. We investigate the mechanism of action of compound 1 in A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Whole-transcriptome sequencing identified three missense mutations in the mitochondrial genome of this cell line, coding for ND5, a subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) in the electron transport chain. ND5 is a proton pump, helping to maintain the coupling gradient in mitochondria. The identified mutations correspond to known protein variants (p.I257V, p.N447S, and p.L517P), not reported previously in epithelial ovarian cancer. Time-series RNA sequencing suggested that osmium-exposed A2780 cells undergo a metabolic shunt from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, where defective machinery, associated with mutations in complex I, could enhance activity. Downstream events, measured by time-series reverse-phase protein microarrays, high-content imaging, and flow cytometry, showed a dramatic increase in mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage with up-regulation of ATM, p53, and p21 proteins. In contrast to platinum drugs, exposure to this organo-osmium compound does not cause significant apoptosis within a 72-h period, highlighting a different mechanism of action. Superoxide production in ovarian, lung, colon, breast, and prostate cancer cells exposed to three other structurally related organo-Os(II) compounds correlated with their antiproliferative activity. DNA damage caused indirectly, through selective ROS generation, may provide a more targeted approach to cancer therapy and a concept for next-generation metal-based anticancer drugs that combat platinum resistance.

  4. Potent organo-osmium compound shifts metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Munro, Alison F; Fu, Ying; Pizarro, Ana M; Garnett, Mathew J; McDermott, Ultan; Carragher, Neil O; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    The organometallic "half-sandwich" compound [Os(η(6)-p-cymene)(4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethylaniline)I]PF6 is 49× more potent than the clinical drug cisplatin in the 809 cancer cell lines that we screened and is a candidate drug for cancer therapy. We investigate the mechanism of action of compound 1 in A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Whole-transcriptome sequencing identified three missense mutations in the mitochondrial genome of this cell line, coding for ND5, a subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) in the electron transport chain. ND5 is a proton pump, helping to maintain the coupling gradient in mitochondria. The identified mutations correspond to known protein variants (p.I257V, p.N447S, and p.L517P), not reported previously in epithelial ovarian cancer. Time-series RNA sequencing suggested that osmium-exposed A2780 cells undergo a metabolic shunt from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, where defective machinery, associated with mutations in complex I, could enhance activity. Downstream events, measured by time-series reverse-phase protein microarrays, high-content imaging, and flow cytometry, showed a dramatic increase in mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage with up-regulation of ATM, p53, and p21 proteins. In contrast to platinum drugs, exposure to this organo-osmium compound does not cause significant apoptosis within a 72-h period, highlighting a different mechanism of action. Superoxide production in ovarian, lung, colon, breast, and prostate cancer cells exposed to three other structurally related organo-Os(II) compounds correlated with their antiproliferative activity. DNA damage caused indirectly, through selective ROS generation, may provide a more targeted approach to cancer therapy and a concept for next-generation metal-based anticancer drugs that combat platinum resistance. PMID:26162681

  5. Inflammatory markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor subtypes: the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopolou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; de Mesquita, H.Bas Bueno; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Sánchez, Soledad; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Sànchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Castaño, José María Huerta; Ardanaz, Eva; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merrit, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an etiologic role for inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis and heterogeneity between tumor subtypes and anthropometric indices. Prospective studies on circulating inflammatory markers and epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) have predominantly investigated overall risk; data characterizing risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis) and anthropometric indices are sparse. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics. A total of 754 eligible EOC cases were identified; two controls (n=1,497) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression to assess associations. Results CRP and IL-6 were not associated with overall EOC risk. However, consistent with prior research, CRP >10 vs. CRP ≤1 mg/L was associated with higher overall EOC risk (OR=1.67 [1.03 - 2.70]). We did not observe significant associations or heterogeneity in analyses by tumor characteristics. In analyses stratified by waist circumference, inflammatory markers were associated with higher risk among women with higher waist circumference; no association was observed for women with normal waist circumference: (e.g., IL-6: waist ≤80: ORlog2=0.97 [0.81 - 1.16]; waist >88: ORlog2=1.78 [1.28 - 2.48], pheterogeneity ≤0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that high CRP is associated with increased risk of overall EOC, and that IL-6 and CRP may be associated with EOC risk among women with higher adiposity. Impact Our data add to global evidence that ovarian carcinogenesis may be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:25855626

  6. Critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving epithelial ovarian cancer platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Kovalenko, Olga; Singh, Sareena; Armstrong, Amy; Redline, Raymond; Resnick, Kimberly; Zanotti, Kristine; Waggoner, Steven; DiFeo, Analisa

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is the major barrier to treating epithelial ovarian cancer. To improve patient outcomes, it is critical to identify the underlying mechanisms that promote platinum resistance. Emerging evidence supports the concept that platinum-based therapies are able to eliminate the bulk of differentiated cancer cells, but are unable to eliminate cancer initiating cells (CIC). To date, the relevant pathways that regulate ovarian CICs remain elusive. Several correlative studies have shown that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is associated with poor outcomes in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). However, the functional relevance of these findings remain to be delineated. We have uncovered that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is a critical driver of HGSOC chemotherapy resistance, and targeted inhibition of this pathway, which eliminates CICs, represents a novel and effective treatment for chemoresistant HGSOC. Here we show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated in ovarian CICs, and targeted inhibition of β-catenin potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased CIC tumor sphere formation. Furthermore, the Wnt/β-catenin specific inhibitor iCG-001 potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased stem-cell frequency in platinum resistant cells. Taken together, our data is the first report providing evidence that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway maintains stem-like properties and drug resistance of primary HGSOC PDX derived platinum resistant models, and therapeutic targeting of this pathway with iCG-001/PRI-724, which has been shown to be well tolerated in Phase I trials, may be an effective treatment option. PMID:26125441

  7. Critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving epithelial ovarian cancer platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Kovalenko, Olga; Singh, Sareena; Armstrong, Amy; Redline, Raymond; Resnick, Kimberly; Zanotti, Kristine; Waggoner, Steven; DiFeo, Analisa

    2015-09-15

    Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is the major barrier to treating epithelial ovarian cancer. To improve patient outcomes, it is critical to identify the underlying mechanisms that promote platinum resistance. Emerging evidence supports the concept that platinum-based therapies are able to eliminate the bulk of differentiated cancer cells, but are unable to eliminate cancer initiating cells (CIC). To date, the relevant pathways that regulate ovarian CICs remain elusive. Several correlative studies have shown that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is associated with poor outcomes in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). However, the functional relevance of these findings remain to be delineated. We have uncovered that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is a critical driver of HGSOC chemotherapy resistance, and targeted inhibition of this pathway, which eliminates CICs, represents a novel and effective treatment for chemoresistant HGSOC. Here we show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated in ovarian CICs, and targeted inhibition of β-catenin potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased CIC tumor sphere formation. Furthermore, the Wnt/β-catenin specific inhibitor iCG-001 potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased stem-cell frequency in platinum resistant cells. Taken together, our data is the first report providing evidence that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway maintains stem-like properties and drug resistance of primary HGSOC PDX derived platinum resistant models, and therapeutic targeting of this pathway with iCG-001/PRI-724, which has been shown to be well tolerated in Phase I trials, may be an effective treatment option. PMID:26125441

  8. Amplification and overexpression of aurora kinase A (AURKA) in immortalized human ovarian epithelial (HOSE) cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, C M; Man, C; Jin, Y; Jin, C; Guan, X Y; Wang, Q; Wan, T S K; Cheung, A L M; Tsao, S W

    2005-07-01

    Immortalization is an early and essential step of human carcinogenesis. Amplification of chromosome 20q has been shown to be a common event in immortalized cells and cancers. We have previously reported that gain and amplification of chromosome 20q is a non-random and common event in immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells. The chromosome 20q harbors genes including TGIF2 (20q11.2-q12), AIB1 (20q12), PTPN1 (20q13.1), ZNF217 (20q13.2), and AURKA (20q13.2-q13.3), which were previously reported to be amplified and overexpressed in ovarian cancers. Some of these genes may be involved in immortalization of HOSE cells and represent crucial premalignant changes in ovarian surface epithelium. Investigation of the involvement of these genes was examined in four pairs of pre-crisis (preimmortalized) and post-crisis (immortalized) HOSE cells. Overexpression of AURKA (Aurora kinase A), also known as BTAK and STK15, by both real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) and Western blotting was detected in all the four immortalized HOSE cells examined while overexpression of AIB1 and ZNF217 was observed in two of four immortalized HOSE cells examined. Overexpression of TGIF2 and PTPN1 was not significant in our immortalized HOSE cell systems. The degree of overexpression of AURKA was shown to be closely associated with the amplification of chromosome 20q in immortalized HOSE cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with labeled P1 artificial clone (PAC) confirmed the amplification of the chromosomal region (20q13.2-13.3) where AURKA resides. DNA amplification of AURKA was also confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. Our study showed that amplification and overexpression of AURKA is a common and significant event during immortalization of HOSE cells and may represent an important premalignant change in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  9. Polymorphisms in Stromal Genes and Susceptibility to Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Webb, Penelope M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dale, Laura C.; Lambrechts, Diether; Amant, Frederic; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M.; Kaye, Stanley B.; Paul, James; Bützow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Song, Honglin; Krüger Kjær, Susanne; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vermeulen, Sita H. H. M.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vachon, Celine M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen L.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Kelemen, Linda E.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among Caucasians were estimated with odds ratios (OR) among 397 cases and 920 controls in two U.S.-based studies (discovery set), 436 cases and 1,098 controls in Australia (replication set 1) and a consortium of 15 studies comprising 1,668 cases and 4,249 controls (replication set 2). The discovery set and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (Pheterogeneity≥0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; Ptrend = 0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically homogeneous (Pheterogeneity≥0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; Ptrend≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (Pheterogeneity≤0.03), which precluded combining. In post-hoc analyses, interactions were observed between each variant and recruitment period (Pinteraction≤0.003), age at diagnosis (Pinteraction = 0.04), and year of diagnosis (Pinteraction = 0.05) in the five studies with available information (1,044 cases, 2,469 controls). We conclude that variants in DCN and LUM are not directly associated with sEOC, and that confirmation of possible effect modification of the variants by non-genetic factors is required. PMID:21637745

  10. Ursolic acid inhibits the proliferation of human ovarian cancer stem-like cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Wenjing; Qian, Lin; Zhang, Qiuwan; Lai, Dongmei; Qi, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death among all gynecological cancers. Increasing evidence suggests that human ovarian cancer stem-like cells could be enriched under serum-free culture conditions. In the present study, SKOV3 ovarian epithelial cancer cells were cultured for sphere cells. Ursolic acid (UA) with triterpenoid compounds exist widely in food, medicinal herbs and other plants. Evidence shows that UA has anticancer activities in human ovarian cancer cells, but he role of UA in ovarian cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effects of UA in combination with cisplatin in ovarian CSCs (in vitro and in vivo), along with the molecular mechanism of action. Treatment with UA at various concentrations was examined in combination with cisplatin in human ovarian CSCs. MTT assay and flow cytometry were used for cell viability and apoptosis analysis, and qRT-PCR for stem cell markers and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers for mRNA expression. Transwell assay was employed to observe the migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells and SKOV3 sphere cells after treatment. Moreover, athymic BALB/c-nu nude mice were injected with SKOV3 sphere cells to obtain a xenograft model for in vivo studies. The results showed that CSCs possessed mesenchymal characteristics and EMT ability, and the growth of SKOV3 and sphere cells was significantly inhibited by UA. Transplanted tumors were significantly reduced after injection of UA and UA plus cisplatin. Furthermore, we found that UA could play a role in enhancing the sensitivity of CSCs to cisplatin resistance. Our findings suggested that UA is involved in EMT mechanism to affect the proliferation and apoptosis of human ovarian cancer stem-like cells and it is a potent anti-ovarian cancer agent. PMID:26323892

  11. Ursolic acid inhibits the proliferation of human ovarian cancer stem-like cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Wenjing; Qian, Lin; Zhang, Qiuwan; Lai, Dongmei; Qi, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death among all gynecological cancers. Increasing evidence suggests that human ovarian cancer stem-like cells could be enriched under serum-free culture conditions. In the present study, SKOV3 ovarian epithelial cancer cells were cultured for sphere cells. Ursolic acid (UA) with triterpenoid compounds exist widely in food, medicinal herbs and other plants. Evidence shows that UA has anticancer activities in human ovarian cancer cells, but he role of UA in ovarian cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effects of UA in combination with cisplatin in ovarian CSCs (in vitro and in vivo), along with the molecular mechanism of action. Treatment with UA at various concentrations was examined in combination with cisplatin in human ovarian CSCs. MTT assay and flow cytometry were used for cell viability and apoptosis analysis, and qRT-PCR for stem cell markers and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers for mRNA expression. Transwell assay was employed to observe the migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells and SKOV3 sphere cells after treatment. Moreover, athymic BALB/c-nu nude mice were injected with SKOV3 sphere cells to obtain a xenograft model for in vivo studies. The results showed that CSCs possessed mesenchymal characteristics and EMT ability, and the growth of SKOV3 and sphere cells was significantly inhibited by UA. Transplanted tumors were significantly reduced after injection of UA and UA plus cisplatin. Furthermore, we found that UA could play a role in enhancing the sensitivity of CSCs to cisplatin resistance. Our findings suggested that UA is involved in EMT mechanism to affect the proliferation and apoptosis of human ovarian cancer stem-like cells and it is a potent anti-ovarian cancer agent.

  12. Imaging of peritoneal deposits in ovarian cancer: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekhara, Sheragaru Hanumanthappa; Triveni, Gowramma Sannanaik; Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    As per incidence, ovarian carcinoma is the second most common gynaecological malignancy in women. In spite of advanced technology, patient awareness and effective screening methods, epithelial ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage (stage III). Surgical debulking of disease is mainstay of improving the patient survival even in advanced stages. Thus exact delineation of cancer spread in the abdominal cavity guides the surgeon prior to the surgery, help them to decide resectability of lesion and plan for further need of other surgical speciality or need of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Imaging particularly well-planned contrast-enhanced computed tomography answers most of the queries raised by the treating surgeon. The aim of this article is to review the way ovarian carcinoma spread in the peritoneal cavity and to stress the accurate interpretation of cancer deposits on imaging which can help the treating team to reach optimal management of patients. PMID:27247717

  13. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) gene variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) risk

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y. Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E.; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Narod, Steven A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to EOC risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. Methods We screened 1254 SNPs in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (p<0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A p-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 was considered statistically significant. Results In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.07–1.25, p=0.0003, FDR=0.19), while F8 rs7053448 (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.27–2.24, p=0.0003, FDR=0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.27–2.24, p=0.0003, FDR=0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR=0.79, 95%CI=0.69–0.90, p=0.0005, FDR=0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. Conclusion These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC. PMID:26399219

  14. Metabolic Determinants and Anthropometric Indicators Impact Clinical-pathological Features in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Di Lauro, Luigi; Conti, Laura; Mandoj, Chiara; Antenucci, Anna; Digiesi, Giovanna; Sergi, Domenico; Amodio, Antonella; Marchetti, Paolo; Sperati, Francesca; Valle, Mario; Garofalo, Alfredo; Vizza, Enrico; Corrado, Giacomo; Vincenzoni, Cristina; Tomao, Federica; Kayal, Ramy; Marsella, Annalise; Carosi, Mariantonia; Antoniani, Barbara; Giordano, Antonio; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Barba, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the last twenty years, the efforts of the scientific community devoted to the comprehension and treatment of ovarian cancer have remained poorly remunerative, with the case-fatality ratio of this disease remaining disappointedly high. Limited knowledge of the basic principles regulating ovarian carcinogenesis and factors impacting the course of disease may significantly impair our ability to intervene in early stages and lessen our expectations in terms of treatment outcomes. In the present study, we sought to assess whether metabolic factors and anthropometric indicators, i.e., pre-treatment fasting glucose and body mass index, are associated with renown cancer related prognostic factors such as tumour stage and grade at diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Study participants were 147 women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer and treated with platinum based regimens and/or surgery at the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute of Rome, Italy. Glucose levels were assessed at the institutional laboratories on venous blood collected in overnight fasting conditions and prior to any therapeutic procedure. Stage was coded according to the FIGO staging system based on the results of the diagnostic workup, while tumour grade was locally assessed by an expert pathologist. Participants' characteristics were descriptively analyzed for the overall study population and in a subgroup of 70 patients for whom data on body mass index (BMI) were available. FIGO stage and grade were compared by categories of pre-treatment fasting glucose defined upon the median value, i.e., 89 mg/dl. The association of interest was tested in regression models including BMI. Results: For the overall study population, patients in the lowest category of fasting glucose were significantly more likely to exhibit a FIGO stage III-IV at diagnosis compared with their counterpart in the highest glucose category (81.3 vs 66.7%, p: 0.021). Subgroup analysis in 70 patients with BMI data

  15. Potential Application of Curcumin and Its Analogues in the Treatment Strategy of Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terlikowska, Katarzyna M.; Witkowska, Anna M.; Zujko, Malgorzata E.; Dobrzycka, Bozena; Terlikowski, Slawomir J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings on the molecular basis of ovarian cancer development and progression create new opportunities to develop anticancer medications that would affect specific metabolic pathways and decrease side systemic toxicity of conventional treatment. Among new possibilities for cancer chemoprevention, much attention is paid to curcumin—A broad-spectrum anticancer polyphenolic derivative extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L. According to ClinicalTrials.gov at present there are no running pilot studies, which could assess possible therapeutic benefits from curcumin supplementation to patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, the goal of this review was to evaluate potential preclinical properties of curcumin and its new analogues on the basis of in vivo and in vitro ovarian cancer studies. Curcumin and its different formulations have been shown to display multifunctional mechanisms of anticancer activity, not only in platinum-resistant primary epithelial ovarian cancer, but also in multidrug resistant cancer cells/xenografts models. Curcumin administered together with platinum-taxane chemotherapeutics have been reported to demonstrate synergistic effects, sensitize resistant cells to drugs, and decrease their biologically effective doses. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that curcumin, due to its long-term safety and an excellent profile of side effects should be considered as a beneficial support in ovarian cancer treatment strategies, especially in patients with platinum-resistant primary epithelial recurrent ovarian cancer or multidrug resistant disease. Although the prospect of curcumin and its formulations as anticancer agents in ovarian cancer treatment strategy appears to be challenging, and at the same time promising, there is a further need to evaluate its effectiveness in clinical studies. PMID:25429431

  16. CD44 variant 6 is correlated with peritoneal dissemination and poor prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tjhay, Francisca; Motohara, Takeshi; Tayama, Shingo; Narantuya, Dashdemberel; Fujimoto, Koichi; Guo, Jianying; Sakaguchi, Isao; Honda, Ritsuo; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2015-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumor initiation and metastasis in several types of human cancer. However, the contribution of ovarian CSCs to peritoneal metastasis remains unresolved. The cell adhesion molecule CD44 has been identified as a major marker for CSCs in solid tumors, including epithelial ovarian cancer. CD44 exists as a standard form (CD44s) and also as numerous variant isoforms (CD44v) generated by alternative mRNA splicing. Here we show that disseminated ovarian tumors in the pelvic peritoneum contain highly enriched CD44v6-positive cancer cells, which drive tumor metastasis and are responsible for tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Clinically, an increased number of CD44v6-positive cancer cells in primary tumors was associated with a shortened overall survival in stage III-IV ovarian cancer patients. Furthermore, a subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cancer cells manifested the ability to initiate tumor metastasis in the pelvic peritoneum in an in vivo mouse model, suggesting that CD44v6-positive cells show the potential to serve as metastasis-initiating cells. Thus, the peritoneal disseminated metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer is initiated by the CD44v6-positive subpopulation, and CD44v6 expression is a biomarker for the clinical outcome of advanced ovarian cancer patients. Given that a distinct subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cancer cells plays a critical role in peritoneal metastasis, definitive treatment should target this subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cells in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  17. ABCA Transporter Gene Expression and Poor Outcome in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hedditch, Ellen L.; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J.; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T.; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K.; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D.; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. Methods The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA–mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the “A” subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e−6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Conclusions Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor

  18. Cancer stem cells from epithelial ovarian cancer patients privilege oxidative phosphorylation, and resist glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ciminale, Vincenzo; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Guzzo, Giulia; Rasola, Andrea; Frasson, Chiara; Nardo, Giorgia; Zulato, Elisabetta; Nicoletto, Maria Ornella; Manicone, Mariangela

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the metabolic profile of cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated from patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. CSC overexpressed genes associated with glucose uptake, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and fatty acid β-oxidation, indicating higher ability to direct pyruvate towards the Krebs cycle. Consistent with a metabolic profile dominated by OXPHOS, the CSC showed higher mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elevated membrane potential, and underwent apoptosis upon inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The CSC also had a high rate of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity, which is not typical of cells privileging OXPHOS over glycolysis, and may rather reflect the PPP role in recharging scavenging enzymes. Furthermore, CSC resisted in vitro and in vivo glucose deprivation, while maintaining their CSC phenotype and OXPHOS profile. These observations may explain the CSC resistance to anti-angiogenic therapies, and indicate this peculiar metabolic profile as a possible target of novel treatment strategies. PMID:24946808

  19. Cancer stem cells from epithelial ovarian cancer patients privilege oxidative phosphorylation, and resist glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Pastò, Anna; Bellio, Chiara; Pilotto, Giorgia; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Guzzo, Giulia; Rasola, Andrea; Frasson, Chiara; Nardo, Giorgia; Zulato, Elisabetta; Nicoletto, Maria Ornella; Manicone, Mariangela; Indraccolo, Stefano; Amadori, Alberto

    2014-06-30

    We investigated the metabolic profile of cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated from patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. CSC overexpressed genes associated with glucose uptake, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and fatty acid β-oxidation, indicating higher ability to direct pyruvate towards the Krebs cycle. Consistent with a metabolic profile dominated by OXPHOS, the CSC showed higher mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elevated membrane potential, and underwent apoptosis upon inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The CSC also had a high rate of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity, which is not typical of cells privileging OXPHOS over glycolysis, and may rather reflect the PPP role in recharging scavenging enzymes. Furthermore, CSC resisted in vitro and in vivo glucose deprivation, while maintaining their CSC phenotype and OXPHOS profile. These observations may explain the CSC resistance to anti-angiogenic therapies, and indicate this peculiar metabolic profile as a possible target of novel treatment strategies. PMID:24946808

  20. Interferometric detection of early markers for epithelial ovarian cancer and prognostic markers for acute lymphocytic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, P.; Zhao, M.; Wang, X.; Nolte, D. D.

    2010-02-01

    We are developing fluorescence-free interferometric biosensors for the early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and prognosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We can detect potential early markers for EOC (CA125, human epididymus protein 4, osteopontin) spiked into serum as well as elevated CA125 in EOC patient serum. For ALL prognosis we are focusing on three intracellular protein markers (p73, p57/Kip2, and p15/Ink4b), the down-regulation of any two being indicative of a more aggressive cancer. We have detected p15 and p57 spiked into buffer and are preparing to test positive and negative control lysates from bone marrow biopsies.

  1. Toward an integrative analysis of the tumor microenvironment in ovarian epithelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Serio, Ryan N

    2012-08-01

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas are heterogeneous malignancies exhibiting great diversity in histological phenotypes as well as genetic and epigenetic aberrations. A general early event in tumorigenesis is regional dissemination into the peritoneal cavity. Initial spread to the peritoneum is made possible by cooperative signaling between a wide array of molecules constituting the tissue microenvironment in the coelomic epithelium. Changes in the activity of key microenvironmental components not constitutively expressed in normal tissue, including several disclosed adhesion molecules, growth factors, proteases, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), coordinate the transition. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and subsequent cell surface interactions enable transformation by promoting chromosomal instability (CIN) and stimulating several common signal transduction cascades to prepare the tissue for harboring and facilitating growth, angiogenesis and metastasis of the developing tumor. PMID:22109660

  2. Epidemiological overview, advances in diagnosis, prevention, treatment and management of epithelial ovarian cancer in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores; Espinosa-Romero, Raquel; Muñoz, Wendy Rosemary; Mendoza-Martínez, Roberto; Villar-Álvarez, Susana Del; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis; Isla-Ortiz, David; Márquez-Manríquez, Juan Pablo; Apodaca-Cruz, Ángel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has been underdiagnosed because it does not have a specific clinical presentation, and the signs and symptoms are similar to the irritable bowel syndrome and pelvic inflammatory disease. EOC is less common than breast and cervical cancer, but it is more lethal. On the whole, EOC has an early dissemination to peritoneal cavity, which delays a timely diagnosis and increases the rate of advanced diagnosed disease. The diagnosis usually surprises the women and the primary care physician. Therefore, it is necessary to count on prevention and early diagnosis programs. EOC has 80% response to surgical treatment, but nearly 70% of the patients may relapse in five years. The objectives of this document are presenting a summary of the EOC epidemiology and comment about advancements in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this cancer. That will raise awareness about the importance of this disease. PMID:27557390

  3. Toward an integrative analysis of the tumor microenvironment in ovarian epithelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Serio, Ryan N

    2012-08-01

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas are heterogeneous malignancies exhibiting great diversity in histological phenotypes as well as genetic and epigenetic aberrations. A general early event in tumorigenesis is regional dissemination into the peritoneal cavity. Initial spread to the peritoneum is made possible by cooperative signaling between a wide array of molecules constituting the tissue microenvironment in the coelomic epithelium. Changes in the activity of key microenvironmental components not constitutively expressed in normal tissue, including several disclosed adhesion molecules, growth factors, proteases, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), coordinate the transition. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and subsequent cell surface interactions enable transformation by promoting chromosomal instability (CIN) and stimulating several common signal transduction cascades to prepare the tissue for harboring and facilitating growth, angiogenesis and metastasis of the developing tumor.

  4. Optimizing Ventana chromogenic dual in-situ hybridization for mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dual in-situ hybridization (DISH) assay is a relatively new assay for evaluating Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) genomic amplification. Optimization protocol for the assay is not yet well established, especially for archival tissues. Although there is a recommended nominal protocol, it is not suited for formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples that were archived for long periods. Findings In a study on local population of mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer, we developed a series of optimization protocols based on the age of samples to improve success of the DISH assay. A decision workflow was generated to facilitate individualization of further optimization protocols. The optimizations were evaluated on 92 whole tissue sections of FFPE mucinous ovarian tumors dating from 1990 to 2011. Overall, 79 samples were successfully assayed for DISH using the series of optimization protocols. We found samples older than 1 year required further optimization beyond the nominal protocol recommended. Thirteen samples were not further assayed after first DISH assay due to inadequately preserved nuclear morphology with no ISH signals throughout the tissue section. Conclusion The study revealed age of samples and storage conditions were major factors in successful DISH assays. Samples that were ten years or less in age, and archived in-house were successfully optimized, whereas older samples, which were also archived off-site, have a higher frequency of unsuccessful optimizations. The study provides practical and important guidelines for the new DISH assay which can facilitate successful HER2 evaluation in ovarian cancers and possibly other cancers as well. PMID:24373486

  5. Characterization of DOK1, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Ghani, Karim; Têtu, Bernard; Bairati, Isabelle; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2011-10-01

    In attempt to discover novel aberrantly hypermethylated genes with putative tumor suppressor function in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we applied expression profiling following pharmacologic inhibition of DNA methylation in EOC cell lines. Among the genes identified, one of particular interest was DOK1, or downstream of tyrosine kinase 1, previously recognized as a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for leukemia and other human malignancies. Using bisulfite sequencing, we determined that a 5'-non-coding DNA region (located at nt -1158 to -850, upstream of the DOK1 translation start codon) was extensively hypermethylated in primary serous EOC tumors compared with normal ovarian specimens; however, this hypermethylation was not associated with DOK1 suppression. On the contrary, DOK1 was found to be strongly overexpressed in serous EOC tumors as compared to normal tissue and importantly, DOK1 overexpression significantly correlated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) values of serous EOC patients. Ectopic modulation of DOK1 expression in EOC cells and consecutive functional analyses pointed toward association of DOK1 expression with increased EOC cell migration and proliferation, and better sensitivity to cisplatin treatment. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses were also confirmative for DOK1 association with EOC cell migration and proliferation. These analyses were also indicative for DOK1 protective role in EOC tumorigenesis, linked to DOK1-mediated induction of some tumor suppressor factors and its suppression of pro-metastasis genes. Taken together, our findings are suggestive for a possible tumor suppressor role of DOK1 in EOC; however its implication in enhanced EOC cell migration and proliferation restrain us to conclude that DOK1 represents a true TSG in EOC. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of DOK1 and other members of the DOK gene family in ovarian

  6. Local estrogen metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer suggests novel targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xia; Wu, Xuan; Hillier, Stephen G; Fegan, K Scott; Critchley, Hilary O D; Mason, J Ian; Sarvi, Sana; Harlow, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) accounts for about 90% of malignant ovarian tumors, and estrogen is often implicated in disease progression. We therefore compared the potential for gating of estrogen action via pre-receptor metabolism in normal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), EOC and selected EOC cell lines (SKOV3 and PEO1). Steroid sulphatase (STS), estrogen sulfotransferase (EST), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases 2 (17BHSD2) and 5 (17BHSD5) mRNAs, proteins and enzymatic activities were all detectable in primary cell cultures of OSE and EOC, whereas aromatase and 17BHSD1 expression was negligible. qRT-PCR assay on total mRNA revealed significantly higher EST mRNA expression in OSE compared to EOC (P<0.05). Radioenzymatic measurements confirmed reduced sulfoconjugation (neutralization) of free estrogen in EOC relative to OSE. OSE cells were more effective at converting free [(3)H]-E1 to [(3)H]-E1S or [(3)H]-E2S, while EOC cell lines mainly converted [(3)H]-E1 to [(3)H]-E2 with minimal formation of [(3)H]-E1S or [(3)H]-E2S. IL1α treatment suppressed EST (P<0.01) and 17BHSD2 (P<0.001) mRNA levels in OSE and stimulated STS mRNA levels (P<0.001) in cancer (SKOV3) cells. These results show that estrogen is differentially metabolized in OSE and EOC cells, with E2 'activation' from conjugated estrogen predominating in EOC. Inflammatory cytokines may further augment the local production of E2 by stimulating STS and suppressing EST. We conclude that local estrogen metabolism may be a target for EOC treatment.

  7. Myeloperoxidase Serves as a Redox Switch that Regulates Apoptosis in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saed, Ghassan M.; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Jiang, Zhong L.; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Diamond, Michael P.; Abu-Soud, Husam M.; Munkarah, Adnan R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Resistance to apoptosis is a key feature of cancer cells and is believed to be regulated by nitrosonium ion (NO+)-induced S-nitrosylation of key enzymes. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is utilized by MPO to generated NO+. We sought to investigate the expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and iNOS in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and determine their effect on S-nitrosylation of caspase-3 and its activity as well as apoptosis. Methods MPO and iNOS expression were determined using immunofluorescence in SKOV-3 and MDAH-2774 and EOC tissue sections. S-nitrosylation of caspase-3 and its activity, levels of MPO and iNOS, as well as apoptosis, were evaluated in the EOC cells before and after silencing MPO or iNOS genes with specific siRNA probes utilizing real-time RT-PCR, ELISA, and TUNEL assays. Results MPO and iNOS are expressed in EOC cell lines and in over 60% of invasive EOC cases with no expression in normal ovarian epithelium. Indeed, silencing of MPO or iNOS gene expression resulted in decreased S-nitrosylation of caspase-3, increased caspase-3 activity, and increased apoptosis but with a more significant effect when silencing MPO. Conclusion MPO and iNOS are co-localized to the same cells in EOC but not in the normal ovarian epithelium. Silencing of either MPO or iNOS significantly induced apoptosis, highlighting their role as a redox switch that regulates apoptosis in EOC. Understanding the mechanisms by which MPO functions as a redox switch in regulating apoptosis in EOC may lead to future diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions. PMID:19962178

  8. Identification of six new susceptibility loci for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Ramus, Susan J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Lee, Andrew; Shen, Howard C; Beesley, Jonathan; Lawrenson, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Janet M; Spindler, Tassja J; Lin, Yvonne G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Li, Qiyuan; Coetzee, Simon; Hazelett, Dennis; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Garcia, Maria Jose; Komenaka, Ian; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Ganschow, Pamela; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Platte, Radka; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Meindl, Alfons; Engel, Christoph; Sutter, Christian; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Kirk, Judy; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Piedmonte, Marion; O'Malley, David M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Collée, J Margriet; Rookus, Matti A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Hamann, Ute; Isaccs, Claudine; Tischkowitz, Marc; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian G; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Plante, Marie; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pankratz, Vernon S; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Szabo, Csilla I; Kauff, Noah; Vijai, Joseph; Aghajanian, Carol A; Pfeiler, Georg; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads; Bojesen, Anders; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Soller, Maria; Liljegren, Annelie; Arver, Brita; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lu, Karen H; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Lele, Shashi; Wilkens, Lynne R; Goodman, Marc T; Thompson, Pamela J; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Modugno, Francesmary; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Orsulic, Sandra; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Hogdall, Estrid; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Woo, Yin-Ling; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Bruinsma, Fiona; Giles, Graham G; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Concannon, Patrick; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Krakstad, Camilla; Salvesen, Helga B; Tangen, Ingvild L; Bjorge, Line; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Kellar, Melissa; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Cybulski, Cezary; Yang, Hannah; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Baker, Helen; Song, Honglin; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Ian; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Whittemore, Alice S; Rothstein, Joseph H; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Ji, Bu-Tian; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rosen, Barry; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Chen, Ann; Lin, Hui-Yi; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Sellers, Thomas A; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chen, Zhihua; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Harrington, Patricia; Lee, Alice W; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Coetzee, Gerry; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Timorek, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Freedman, Matt; Noushmehr, Houtan; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Gayther, Simon; Pharoah, Paul P; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2015-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility alleles. The pattern of association at these loci is consistent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers who are at high risk of EOC. After imputation to 1000 Genomes Project data, we assessed associations of 11 million genetic variants with EOC risk from 15,437 cases unselected for family history and 30,845 controls and from 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers (3,096 with ovarian cancer), and we combined the results in a meta-analysis. This new study design yielded increased statistical power, leading to the discovery of six new EOC susceptibility loci. Variants at 1p36 (nearest gene, WNT4), 4q26 (SYNPO2), 9q34.2 (ABO) and 17q11.2 (ATAD5) were associated with EOC risk, and at 1p34.3 (RSPO1) and 6p22.1 (GPX6) variants were specifically associated with the serous EOC subtype, all with P < 5 × 10(-8). Incorporating these variants into risk assessment tools will improve clinical risk predictions for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  9. Stemness and chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells under shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Carman K. M.; Li, Shan-Shan; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Sy, Samuel K. H.; Ren, Yong; Shum, Ho Cheung; Wong, Alice S. T.

    2016-01-01

    One of greatest challenges to the successful treatment of cancer is drug resistance. An exciting approach is the eradication of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, little is known about key signals regulating the formation and expansion of CSCs. Moreover, lack of a reliable predictive preclinical model has been a major obstacle to discover new cancer drugs and predict their clinical activity. Here, in ovarian cancer, a highly chemoresistant tumor that is rapidly fatal, we provide the first evidence demonstrating the causal involvement of mechanical stimulus in the CSC phenotype using a customizable microfluidic platform and three-dimensional spheroids, which most closely mimic tumor behavior. We found that ovarian cancer cells significantly acquired the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and CSC markers and a remarkable chemoresistance to clinically relevant doses of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and paclitaxel when grown under fluid shear stress, which corroborates with the physiological attainable levels in the malignant ascites, but not under static condition. Furthermore, we uncovered a new link of microRNA-199a-3p, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and multidrug transporter activation in shear stress-induced CSC enrichment. Our findings shed new light on the significance of hydrodynamics in cancer progression, emphasizing the need of a flow-informed framework in the development of therapeutics. PMID:27245437

  10. Identification of six new susceptibility loci for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Ramus, Susan J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Lee, Andrew; Shen, Howard C; Beesley, Jonathan; Lawrenson, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Janet M; Spindler, Tassja J; Lin, Yvonne G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Li, Qiyuan; Coetzee, Simon; Hazelett, Dennis; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Garcia, Maria Jose; Komenaka, Ian; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Ganschow, Pamela; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Platte, Radka; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Meindl, Alfons; Engel, Christoph; Sutter, Christian; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Kirk, Judy; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Piedmonte, Marion; O'Malley, David M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Collée, J Margriet; Rookus, Matti A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Hamann, Ute; Isaccs, Claudine; Tischkowitz, Marc; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian G; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Plante, Marie; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pankratz, Vernon S; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Szabo, Csilla I; Kauff, Noah; Vijai, Joseph; Aghajanian, Carol A; Pfeiler, Georg; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads; Bojesen, Anders; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Soller, Maria; Liljegren, Annelie; Arver, Brita; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lu, Karen H; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Lele, Shashi; Wilkens, Lynne R; Goodman, Marc T; Thompson, Pamela J; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Modugno, Francesmary; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Orsulic, Sandra; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Hogdall, Estrid; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Woo, Yin-Ling; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Bruinsma, Fiona; Giles, Graham G; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Concannon, Patrick; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Krakstad, Camilla; Salvesen, Helga B; Tangen, Ingvild L; Bjorge, Line; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Kellar, Melissa; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Cybulski, Cezary; Yang, Hannah; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Baker, Helen; Song, Honglin; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Ian; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Whittemore, Alice S; Rothstein, Joseph H; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Ji, Bu-Tian; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rosen, Barry; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Chen, Ann; Lin, Hui-Yi; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Sellers, Thomas A; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chen, Zhihua; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Harrington, Patricia; Lee, Alice W; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Coetzee, Gerry; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Timorek, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Freedman, Matt; Noushmehr, Houtan; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Gayther, Simon; Pharoah, Paul P; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2015-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility alleles. The pattern of association at these loci is consistent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers who are at high risk of EOC. After imputation to 1000 Genomes Project data, we assessed associations of 11 million genetic variants with EOC risk from 15,437 cases unselected for family history and 30,845 controls and from 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers (3,096 with ovarian cancer), and we combined the results in a meta-analysis. This new study design yielded increased statistical power, leading to the discovery of six new EOC susceptibility loci. Variants at 1p36 (nearest gene, WNT4), 4q26 (SYNPO2), 9q34.2 (ABO) and 17q11.2 (ATAD5) were associated with EOC risk, and at 1p34.3 (RSPO1) and 6p22.1 (GPX6) variants were specifically associated with the serous EOC subtype, all with P < 5 × 10(-8). Incorporating these variants into risk assessment tools will improve clinical risk predictions for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:25581431

  11. Aspirin, Nonaspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug, and Acetaminophen Use and Risk of Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Pooled Analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods We analyzed pooled data from 12 population-based case–control studies of ovarian cancer, including 7776 case patients and 11843 control subjects accrued between 1992 and 2007. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of medication use with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were estimated in individual studies using logistic regression and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Associations between frequency, dose, and duration of analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer were also assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84 to 0.99). Results were similar but not statistically significant for nonaspirin NSAIDs, and there was no association with acetaminophen. In seven studies with frequency data, the reduced risk was strongest among daily aspirin users (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.67 to 0.96). In three studies with dose information, the reduced risk was strongest among users of low dose (<100mg) aspirin (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.83), whereas for nonaspirin NSAIDs, the reduced risk was strongest for high dose (≥500mg) usage (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.64 to 0.91). Conclusions Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, especially among daily users of low-dose aspirin. These findings suggest that the same aspirin regimen proven to protect against cardiovascular events and several cancers could reduce the risk of ovarian cancer 20% to 34% depending on frequency and dose of use. PMID:24503200

  12. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. Pinin interacts with C-terminal binding proteins for RNA alternative splicing and epithelial cell identity of human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanli; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Choi, Pui-Wah; Liu, Minghua; Yang, Junzheng; Singh, Margit; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R.; Muto, Michael G.; Tsui, Stephen KW; Sugrue, Stephen P.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Unlike many other human solid tumors, ovarian tumors express many epithelial markers at a high level for cell growth and local invasion. The phosphoprotein Pinin plays a key role in epithelial cell identity. We showed that clinical ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines express a high level of Pinin when compared with normal ovarian tissues and immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. Pinin co-localized and physically interacted with transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding proteins, CtBP1 and CtBP2, in the nuclei of cancer cells. Knockdown of Pinin in ovarian cancer cells resulted in specific reduction of CtBP1 protein expression, cell adhesion, anchorage-independent growth, and increased drug sensitivity. Whole transcriptomic comparison of next-generation RNA sequencing data between control ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer cell lines with respective knockdown of Pinin, CtBP1, and CtBP2 expression also showed reduced expression of CtBP1 mRNA in the Pinin knockdown cell lines. The Pinin knockdown cell lines shared significant overlap of differentially expressed genes and RNA splicing aberrations with CtBP1 knockdown and in a lesser degree with CtBP2 knockdown cancer cells. Hence, Pinin and CtBP are oncotargets that closely interact with each other to regulate transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing and promote cell adhesion and other epithelial characteristics of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26871283

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms and a synchronized examination of plasma and tissue expression in epithelial ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Bhaskari, J; Premalata, C S; Shilpa, V; Rahul, B; Pallavi, V R; Ramesh, G; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed six genetic polymorphisms of the VEGF-A gene and correlated the genetic data with plasma and tissue expression of VEGF-A in epithelial ovarian carcinomas. A total of 130 cases including 95 malignant carcinomas, 17 low malignant potential and 18 benign tumours were studied. rs699947, rs833061, rs1570360, rs2010963, rs1413711 and rs3025039 were studied by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Plasma levels of VEGF-A were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and tissue expression of VEGF-A by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Four polymorphisms of the above excluding rs699947 and rs3025039 showed significant association with malignancy, and we observed the presence of positive correlation between haplotype CCGGCC and increased expression of VEGF-A in both plasma and tissues which also correlated with poor prognosis and recurrence suggesting a probable increase in resistance to treatment in such carriers. Highly upregulated tissue expression of VEGF-A was seen in all epithelial ovarian carcinomas with intensity of expression increasing from benign to malignant cases. ELISA data from our study showed an increase in circulating levels of VEGF-A in malignancies. VEGF-A plasma levels can be employed as a biomarker for high-grade malignancy in epithelial ovarian cancers alongside tissue expression and CA-125 levels. This study is unique due to the fact that a simultaneous analysis of plasma and tissue expression has been demonstrated and is a first such study in epithelial ovarian cancers and representing the Indian population (South-east Asian) synchronized with genetic polymorphism data as well. PMID:26264619

  15. miR-200c Regulation of Metastases in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Role in Epithelial and Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Siti A.; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Among the gynecological malignancies, ovarian cancer is the most fatal due to its high mortality rate. Most of the identified cases are epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with five distinct subtypes: high-grade serous carcinoma, low-grade serous carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, endometrioid carcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Lack of an early diagnostic approach, high incidence of tumor relapse and the heterogenous characteristics between each EOC subtypes contribute to the difficulties in developing precise intervention and therapy for the patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNAs that have been shown to function as tumor suppressors or oncomiRs. The miR-200 family, especially miR-200c, has been shown to be implicated in the metastasis and invasion of ovarian carcinoma due to its functional regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This mini review is aimed to summarize the recent findings of the miR-200c functional role as well as its validated targets in the metastasis cascade of ovarian cancer, with a focus on EMT regulation. The potential of this miRNA in early diagnosis and its dual expression status are also discussed.

  16. miR-200c Regulation of Metastases in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Role in Epithelial and Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Siti A; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Among the gynecological malignancies, ovarian cancer is the most fatal due to its high mortality rate. Most of the identified cases are epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with five distinct subtypes: high-grade serous carcinoma, low-grade serous carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, endometrioid carcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Lack of an early diagnostic approach, high incidence of tumor relapse and the heterogenous characteristics between each EOC subtypes contribute to the difficulties in developing precise intervention and therapy for the patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNAs that have been shown to function as tumor suppressors or oncomiRs. The miR-200 family, especially miR-200c, has been shown to be implicated in the metastasis and invasion of ovarian carcinoma due to its functional regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This mini review is aimed to summarize the recent findings of the miR-200c functional role as well as its validated targets in the metastasis cascade of ovarian cancer, with a focus on EMT regulation. The potential of this miRNA in early diagnosis and its dual expression status are also discussed.

  17. miR-200c Regulation of Metastases in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Role in Epithelial and Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Siti A.; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Among the gynecological malignancies, ovarian cancer is the most fatal due to its high mortality rate. Most of the identified cases are epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with five distinct subtypes: high-grade serous carcinoma, low-grade serous carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, endometrioid carcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Lack of an early diagnostic approach, high incidence of tumor relapse and the heterogenous characteristics between each EOC subtypes contribute to the difficulties in developing precise intervention and therapy for the patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNAs that have been shown to function as tumor suppressors or oncomiRs. The miR-200 family, especially miR-200c, has been shown to be implicated in the metastasis and invasion of ovarian carcinoma due to its functional regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This mini review is aimed to summarize the recent findings of the miR-200c functional role as well as its validated targets in the metastasis cascade of ovarian cancer, with a focus on EMT regulation. The potential of this miRNA in early diagnosis and its dual expression status are also discussed. PMID:27601996

  18. miR-200c Regulation of Metastases in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Role in Epithelial and Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Siti A; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Among the gynecological malignancies, ovarian cancer is the most fatal due to its high mortality rate. Most of the identified cases are epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with five distinct subtypes: high-grade serous carcinoma, low-grade serous carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, endometrioid carcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Lack of an early diagnostic approach, high incidence of tumor relapse and the heterogenous characteristics between each EOC subtypes contribute to the difficulties in developing precise intervention and therapy for the patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNAs that have been shown to function as tumor suppressors or oncomiRs. The miR-200 family, especially miR-200c, has been shown to be implicated in the metastasis and invasion of ovarian carcinoma due to its functional regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This mini review is aimed to summarize the recent findings of the miR-200c functional role as well as its validated targets in the metastasis cascade of ovarian cancer, with a focus on EMT regulation. The potential of this miRNA in early diagnosis and its dual expression status are also discussed. PMID:27601996

  19. Variation in NF-κB signaling pathways and survival in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Block, Matthew S; Charbonneau, Bridget; Vierkant, Robert A; Fogarty, Zachary; Bamlet, William R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cramer, Daniel; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen; Menon, Usha; Kjaer, Susanne K; Levine, Douglas A; Gronwald, Jacek; Culver, Hoda Anton; Whittemore, Alice S; Karlan, Beth Y; Lambrechts, Diether; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B; Fasching, Peter A; Campbell, Ian; Goodman, Marc T; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Hays, Laura E; Lurie, Galina; Eccles, Diana; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Claus K; Lundvall, Lene; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Paddock, Lisa E; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Ziolkowska-Seta, Izabela; Brinton, Louise A; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Lester, Jenny; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Menkiszak, Janusz; Jensen, Allan; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Berchuck, Andrew; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Van Den Berg, David; Terry, Kathryn L; Vitonis, Allison F; Ramirez, Starr M; Rider, David N; Knutson, Keith L; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M; Doherty, Jennifer A; Johnatty, Sharon E; deFazio, Anna; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kalli, Kimberly R; Fridley, Brooke L; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L

    2014-07-01

    Survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is influenced by the host immune response, yet the key genetic determinants of inflammation and immunity that affect prognosis are not known. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor family plays an important role in many immune and inflammatory responses, including the response to cancer. We studied common inherited variation in 210 genes in the NF-κB family in 10,084 patients with invasive EOC (5,248 high-grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous) from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Associations between genotype and overall survival were assessed using Cox regression for all patients and by major histology, adjusting for known prognostic factors and correcting for multiple testing (threshold for statistical significance, P < 2.5 × 10(-5)). Results were statistically significant when assessed for patients of a single histology. Key associations were with caspase recruitment domain family, member 11 (CARD11) rs41324349 in patients with mucinous EOC [HR, 1.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41-2.35; P = 4.13 × 10(-6)] and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13B (TNFRSF13B) rs7501462 in patients with endometrioid EOC (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.82; P = 2.33 × 10(-5)). Other associations of note included TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) rs17250239 in patients with high-grade serous EOC (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77-0.92; P = 6.49 × 10(-5)) and phospholipase C, gamma 1 (PLCG1) rs11696662 in patients with clear cell EOC (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26-0.73; P = 4.56 × 10(-4)). These associations highlight the potential importance of genes associated with host inflammation and immunity in modulating clinical outcomes in distinct EOC histologies. PMID:24740199

  20. Perineal talc exposure and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the Central Valley of California.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul K; Riordan, Deborah G; Cress, Rosemary D; Young, Heather A

    2004-11-10

    Perineal talc use has been suggested as a possible risk factor for ovarian cancer based on its structural similarity to asbestos, a known human carcinogen. A population-based epidemiologic case-control study of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) was conducted in 22 counties of Central California that comprise the reporting area for 2 regional cancer registries. Telephone interviews were conducted with 256 cases diagnosed in the years 2000-2001 and 1,122 controls frequency-matched on age and ethnicity. The interview obtained information on demographic factors, menstrual and reproductive experience, exogenous hormone use, surgical history and family history of cancer. Questions on perineal talc use included frequency of use, duration of use and specific years when talc was used. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived from unconditional logistic regression. The OR for ever use of talc was 1.37 (CI = 1.02-1.85) compared to never users. However, no dose response association was found. Tubal ligation (TL) modified the effect of talc on EOC such that women with TL had an OR of 0.88 (CI = 0.46-1.68) associated with perineal talc use, whereas women with no TL had an OR of 1.54 (CI = 1.10-2.16). Talc use and EOC risk was highest in women with serous invasive tumors (OR = 1.77; CI = 1.12-2.81). This study provides some support for the hypothesis that perineal talc use is associated with an increased risk of EOC.

  1. Wnt5a Suppresses Epithelial Ovarian Cancer by Promoting Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Bitler, Benjamin G.; Nicodemus, Jasmine P.; Li, Hua; Cai, Qi; Wu, Hong; Hua, Xiang; Li, Tianyu; Birrer, Michael J.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Cairns, Paul; Zhang, Rugang

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the US. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics for this disease. Cellular senescence is an important tumor suppression mechanism that has recently been suggested as a novel mechanism to target for developing cancer therapeutics. Wnt5a is a non-canonical Wnt ligand that plays a context-dependent role in human cancers. Here, we investigate the role of Wnt5a in regulating senescence of EOC cells. We demonstrate that Wnt5a is expressed at significantly lower levels in human EOC cell lines and in primary human EOCs (n = 130) compared with either normal ovarian surface epithelium (n = 31; p = 0.039) or fallopian tube epithelium (n = 28; p < 0.001). Notably, a lower level of Wnt5a expression correlates with tumor stage (p = 0.003) and predicts shorter overall survival in EOC patients (p = 0.003). Significantly, restoration of Wnt5a expression inhibits the proliferation of human EOC cells both in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic EOC mouse model. Mechanistically, Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling and induces cellular senescence by activating the histone repressor A (HIRA)/promyelocytic leukemia (PML) senescence pathway. In summary, we show that loss of Wnt5a predicts poor outcome in EOC patients and Wnt5a suppresses the growth of EOC cells by triggering cellular senescence. We suggest that strategies to drive senescence in EOC cells by reconstituting Wnt5a signaling may offer an effective new strategy for EOC therapy. PMID:21816908

  2. Risk Factors and Indications for 30-Day Readmission After Primary Surgery for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    AlHilli, Mariam; Langstraat, Carrie; Tran, Christine; Martin, Janice; Weaver, Amy; McGree, Michaela; Mariani, Andrea; Cliby, William; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify patients at risk for postoperative morbidities, we evaluated indications and factors associated with 30-day readmission after epithelial ovarian cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing primary surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer between January 2, 2003, and December 29, 2008, were evaluated. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fit to identify factors associated with 30-day readmission. A parsimonious multivariable model was identified using backward and stepwise variable selection. Results In total, 324 (60.2%) patients were stage III and 91 (16.9%) were stage IV. Of all 538 eligible patients, 104 (19.3%) were readmitted within 30 days. Cytoreduction to no residual disease was achieved in 300 (55.8%) patients, and 167 (31.0%) had measurable disease (≤1 cm residual disease). The most common indications for readmission were surgical site infection (SSI; 21.2%), pleural effusion/ascites management (14.4%), and thromboembolic events (12.5%). Multivariate analysis identified American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (odds ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–2.89; P = 0.007), ascites [1.76 (1.11–2.81); P = 0.02], and postoperative complications during initial admission [grade 3–5 vs none, 2.47 (1.19–5.16); grade 1 vs none, 2.19 (0.98–4.85); grade 2 vs none, 1.28 (0.74–2.21); P = 0.048] to be independently associated with 30-day readmission (c-index = 0.625). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the sole predictor of readmission for SSI (odds ratio, 3.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–4.33; P = 0.04). Conclusions Clinically significant risk factors for 30-day readmission include American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher, ascites and postoperative complications at initial admission. The SSI and pleural effusions/ascites are common indications for readmission. Systems can be developed to predict patients needing outpatient management, improve care, and reduce

  3. Epigenetic alteration of p16 and retinoic acid receptor beta genes in the development of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Rahul; Kumar, Sandeep Sriram; Vaderhobli, Shilpa; Premalata, Chennagiri S; Pallavi, Venkateshaiah Reddihalli; Ramesh, Gawari; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2014-09-01

    Silencing of tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes by promoter hypermethylation is one of the major events in ovarian carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed aberrant promoter methylation of p16 and RAR-β genes in 134 epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), 23 low malignant potential (LMP) tumors, 26 benign cystadenomas, and 15 normal ovarian tissues. Methylation was investigated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and the results were confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Relative gene expression of p16 and RAR-β was done using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) on 51 EOC cases, 9 LMP tumors, and 7 benign cystadenomas with 5 normal ovarian tissues. Aberrant methylation for p16 and RAR-β was present in 43 % (58/134) and 31 % (41/134) in carcinoma cases, 22 % (05/23) and 52 % (12/23) in LMP tumors, and 42 % (11/26) and 69 % (18/26) in benign cystadenomas. No methylation was observed in any of the normal ovarian tissues. The mRNA expression level of p16 and RAR-β was significantly downregulated in EOC and LMP tumors than the corresponding normal tissues whereas the expression level was normal in benign cystadenomas for p16 and slightly reduced for RAR-β. A significant correlation of p16 promoter methylation was observed with reduced gene expression in EOC. For RAR-β, no significant correlation was observed between promoter methylation and gene expression. Our results suggest that epigenetic alterations of p16 and RAR-β have an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis and that mechanism along with methylation plays a significant role in downregulation of RAR-β gene in ovarian cancer.

  4. Expression of Gab1 Is Associated with Poor Prognosis of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Liu, Ruilei

    2016-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 (Grb2) can act as the scaffold protein recruiting other molecules to the stimulated receptors. Grb2-associated binding protein 1 (Gab1) is involved in cell proliferation, and its expression may enhance the carcinogenesis and cancer progression. However, the function of Gab1 remains to be investigated. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal malignancy in the female reproductive system with increasing incidence and unsatisfied overall survival (OS). We investigated the expression of Gab1 in EOC tissues and the correlations between Gab1 expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with EOC using Spearman rank test. The staining results were evaluated based on both the percentage of Gab1-positive tumor cells and the staining intensity for Gab1 expression. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards analysis were used to compare the postoperative OS between EOC patients with high Gab1 expression and those with low Gab1 expression. The high expression of Gab1 was positively correlated with advanced FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis of EOC. Univariate analysis showed that advanced FIGO stage, pathological grade, lymph node metastasis or Gab1 expression were associated with poor OS. Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed that Gab1 expression could be an independent prognostic factor for the poor OS of EOC patients (P = 0.042). We propose that Gab1 expression is correlated with poor prognosis of EOC patients and may act as an independent prognostic indicator. PMID:27302321

  5. Use of ChemoFx® for Identification of Effective Treatments in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Scott; Wells, Alan; Connor, Joseph; Price, Fredric

    2015-01-01

    Selection of appropriate chemotherapy, including identification of platinum resistance, is critical to effective management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). ChemoFx®, a multiple treatment marker (chemoresponse assay), has been developed to address this challenge and to improve outcomes in patients with advanced EOC. While much work has been done that has demonstrated the analytical validity of this assay, more recent studies have highlighted the unique clinical benefits offered by the assay. A prospective, multicenter trial has shown an increase in overall survival (OS) of 14 months and an increase in progression-free survival (PFS) by 3 months in patients with recurrent EOS treated by a “sensitive” therapy based on ChemoFx results. Along with other studies showing similar gains in OS and PFS, ChemoFx has been shown to be both a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with recurrent EOC where current treatment options are sorely lacking. In addition to these clinical benefits, economic analyses have shown that ChemoFx is a cost-effective intervention. Current guidelines and technology assessments relating to ChemoFx are largely outdated and refer primarily to metrics of analytical validity. Thus, in addition to analytical validity, the clinical validity, clinical utility and economic impact of ChemoFx are reviewed herein, including published literature, technology assessments by independent parties, and regulatory approvals of this marker. PMID:26213638

  6. MiR-143 targets CTGF and exerts tumor-suppressing functions in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lufei; He, Jin; Xu, Hongmei; Xu, Longjie; Li, Na

    2016-01-01

    A series of recent studies suggested that miR-143 might involve in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of various cancer types. However, the biological function and underlying mechanisms of miR-143 in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the miR-143 expression and its clinical diagnosis significance in patients suffering EOC and to analyze its role and underlying molecular mechanism in EOC. Our result showed that the expression levels of miR-143 were downregulated in EOC tissues and cell lines, was associated with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, pathological grade and lymph node metastasis (all P < 0.01) . Overexpression of miR-143 significantly inhibited EOC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, computational algorithm combined with luciferase reporter assays identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as the direct target of miR-143 in EOC cells. The expression level of CTGF was significantly increased in EOC tissues, was inversely correlated with miR-143 expression in clinical EOC tissues. Knockdown of CTGF mimicked the suppression effect induced by miR-143 overexpression. Restoration of CTGF expression partially reversed the suppression effect induced by miR-143 overexpression. These results suggested that miR-143 inhibited EOC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, at least in part, via suppressing CTGF expression. PMID:27398154

  7. Guidance of Signaling Activations by Cadherins and Integrins in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roggiani, Francesca; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Rea, Katia; Tomassetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest tumor among gynecological cancer in the industrialized countries. The EOC incidence and mortality have remained unchanged over the last 30 years, despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment. In order to develop novel and more effective therapeutic approaches, the molecular mechanisms involved in EOC progression have been thoroughly investigated in the last few decades. At the late stage, peritoneal metastases originate from the attachment of small clusters of cancer cells that shed from the primary site and carried by the ascites adhere to the abdominal peritoneum or omentum. This behavior suggests that cell–cell or cell–matrix adhesion mechanisms regulate EOC growth and dissemination. Complex downstream signalings, which might be influenced by functional cross-talk between adhesion molecules and co-expressed and activated signaling proteins, can affect the proliferation/survival and the migration/invasion of EOC cells. This review aimed to define the impact of the mechanisms of cell–cell, through cadherins, and cell–extracellular matrix adhesion, through integrins, on the signaling cascades induced by membrane receptors and cytoplasmic proteins known to have a role in the proliferation, migration and invasion of EOC cells. Finally, some novel approaches using peptidomimetic ligands to cadherin and integrins are summarized. PMID:27563880

  8. Does Aquaporin-1 expression have clinical significance in serous epithelial ovarian cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Takal, Mustafa Kemal; Baykal, Cem; Başer, Eralp; Kaya, Mustafa Derda; Dursun, Polat; Özen, Özlem; Haberal, Asuman Nihan; Ayhan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) expression and clinicopathological variables in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Material and Methods Serous EOC cases treated in our institution between January 2007 and December 2009 were included in the study. A semi-quantitative immunohistochemical method was used to determine AQP1 expression levels, intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) and AQP1/IMD ratios. The relationship between these parameters and clinicopathological variables were assessed. P values less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 55 cases of serous EOC were included in the study. AQP1 was strongly expressed in the membranes of microvessels and small vessels within all tumor tissues. In a few cases, AQP1 expression was also observed in the membrane of interstitial cells and in individual tumor cells. A positive correlation was detected between preoperative CA125 levels and the expression of AQP1 (R: 0.277, p<0.05). AQP1 expression was similar between FIGO stage I–II and FIGO stage III–IV cases (p > 0.05). A significant relationship did not exist between AQP1 expression and FIGO stage, lymph node metastasis or ascites volume (p>0.05). Conclusion In this study, AQP1 expression did not have a significant association with important clinicopathological variables in serous EOC. Future studies are needed to determine AQP1 expression in other histological types of EOC. PMID:24592091

  9. MicroRNA-520g promotes epithelial ovarian cancer progression and chemoresistance via DAPK2 repression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yunyan; Xiang, Jiandong; Zhou, Dongmei; Wang, Li; Xu, Huali; Yang, Xiaoming; Du, Na; Zhang, Meng; Yan, Qin; Xi, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The lack of efficient tumor progression and chemoresistance indicators leads to high mortality in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Dysregulated miR-520g expression is involved in these processes in hepatic and colorectal cancers. In this study, we found that miR-520g expression gradually increased across normal, benign, borderline and EOC tissues. High miR-520g expression promoted tumor progression and chemoresistance to platinum-based chemotherapy, and reduced survival in EOC patients. miR-520g upregulation increased EOC cell proliferation, induced cell cycle transition and promoted cell invasion, while miR-520g downregulation inhibited tumor-related functions. In vivo, overexpression or downregulation of miR-520g respectively generated larger or smaller subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. Death-associated protein kinase 2 (DAPK2) was a direct target of miR-520g. In 116 EOC tissue samples, miR-520g expression was significantly lower following DAPK2 overexpression. DAPK2 overexpression or miR-520g knockdown reduced EOC cell proliferation, invasion, wound healing and chemoresistance. This study suggests that miR-520g contributes to tumor progression and drug resistance by post-transcriptionally downregulating DAPK2, and that miR-520g may be a valuable therapeutic target in patients with EOC. PMID:27049921

  10. Periostin in tumor microenvironment is associated with poor prognosis and platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Jan, Yi-Hua; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hao; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Twu, Nae-Fang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Hsiao, Michael; Huang, Chi-Ying F.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between tumor microenvironment and cancer that causes chemoresistance remains unclear. By analyzing public available microarray datasets, we identified that periostin (POSTN) was overexpressed in cancer stroma in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed overexpression of stromal POSTN is a powerful independent poor prognostic predictor for EOC patients. Furthermore, patients with high levels of stromal POSTN tend to have higher percentage of cisplatin resistance compared to those with low levels of stromal POSTN. Moreover, we found POSTN treatment can induce cisplatin resistant and activate AKT pathway in A2780 cells in vitro. Inhibition of AKT activity by AKT inhibitor MK-2206 abolished POSTN-induced AKT activation and cisplatin resistance in vitro. Taken together, we found high POSTN expression in cancer microenvironment is correlated with poor prognosis in EOC patients and associated with platinum resistance. The effect of POSTN in cancer stroma cells may activate AKT pathway in tumor and AKT inhibitor can be beneficial to augment the efficacy of existing cancer therapeutics. PMID:26716408

  11. Randomized comparison of cisplatin plus epirubicin or doxorubicin for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. A multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Homesley, H D; Harry, D S; O'Toole, R V; Hoogstraten, B; Franklin, E W; Cavanagh, D; Nahhas, W A; Smith, J J; Lovelace, J V

    1992-04-01

    Stage III and IV epithelial ovarian cancer patients were prospectively randomized to receive eight courses of 60 mg/m2 of cisplatin plus either 75 mg/m2 of epirubicin (62 patients) or 60 mg/m2 of doxorubicin (54 patients). Clinical response rates for cisplatin/epirubicin of 42% [15% complete response (CR) and 27% partial response (PR)] and for cisplatin/doxorubicin of 55% (24% CR and 31% PR) were not statistically different (p = 0.14). The negative second look rate was 35% (10/29) for cisplatin/doxorubicin and 17% (5/30) for cisplatin/epirubicin (p = 0.12). The progression-free interval for cisplatin/epirubicin (13 months) was not statistically different (p = 0.09) from that for cisplatin/doxorubicin (19 months). The median survivals for cisplatin/epirubicin (756 days) and cisplatin/doxorubicin (739 days) were similar (p = 0.70). Cardiotoxicity was greater for the cisplatin/doxorubicin group (p = 0.0003). With similar survival and less cardiotoxicity, the cisplatin/epirubicin regimen had the more favorable therapeutic index.

  12. MiR-143 targets CTGF and exerts tumor-suppressing functions in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lufei; He, Jin; Xu, Hongmei; Xu, Longjie; Li, Na

    2016-01-01

    A series of recent studies suggested that miR-143 might involve in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of various cancer types. However, the biological function and underlying mechanisms of miR-143 in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the miR-143 expression and its clinical diagnosis significance in patients suffering EOC and to analyze its role and underlying molecular mechanism in EOC. Our result showed that the expression levels of miR-143 were downregulated in EOC tissues and cell lines, was associated with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, pathological grade and lymph node metastasis (all P < 0.01) . Overexpression of miR-143 significantly inhibited EOC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, computational algorithm combined with luciferase reporter assays identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as the direct target of miR-143 in EOC cells. The expression level of CTGF was significantly increased in EOC tissues, was inversely correlated with miR-143 expression in clinical EOC tissues. Knockdown of CTGF mimicked the suppression effect induced by miR-143 overexpression. Restoration of CTGF expression partially reversed the suppression effect induced by miR-143 overexpression. These results suggested that miR-143 inhibited EOC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, at least in part, via suppressing CTGF expression. PMID:27398154

  13. AEG-1 as a predictor of sensitivity to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Jin, Xin; Song, Hongtao; Meng, Fanling

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) plays a critical role in tumor progression and chemoresistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of AEG-1 in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) who underwent debulking surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Materials and methods The protein expression of AEG-1 was analyzed using immunohistochemistry in 162 patients with EOC. The relationship between AEG-1 expression and chemotherapy resistance was assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses with covariate adjustments. Results High AEG-1 expression was significantly associated with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, serum cancer antigen-125 concentration, histological grade, the presence of residual tumor after the interval debulking surgery, and lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, AEG-1 expression was significantly higher in NAC-resistant disease than in NAC-sensitive disease (P<0.05). Multivariate analyses indicated that elevated AEG-1 expression predicted poor survival. Conclusion Our findings indicate that AEG-1 may be a potential new biomarker for predicting chemoresistance and poor prognoses in patients with EOC. PMID:27143933

  14. Personal and environmental characteristics related to epithelial ovarian cancer. II. Exposures to talcum powder, tobacco, alcohol, and coffee.

    PubMed

    Whittemore, A S; Wu, M L; Paffenbarger, R S; Sarles, D L; Kampert, J B; Grosser, S; Jung, D L; Ballon, S; Hendrickson, M

    1988-12-01

    Vaginal exposures to talc and other particulates may play an etiologic role in epithelial ovarian cancer. Surgical sterilization may protect against ovarian cancer by blocking entry of such particulates into the peritoneal cavity. The authors assessed histories of talcum powder use, tubal sterilization, and hysterectomy with ovarian conservation in 188 women in the San Francisco Bay Area with epithelial ovarian cancers diagnosed in 1983-1985 and in 539 control women. To investigate the roles of blood-borne environmental exposures on ovarian cancer risk, they assessed lifetime consumption of coffee, tobacco, and alcohol in these women. Of the 539 controls, 280 were hospitalized women without overt cancer, and 259 were chosen from the general population by random digit telephone dialing. Ninety-seven (52%) of the cancer patients habitually used talcum powder on the perineum, compared with 247 (46%) of the controls. Adjusted for parity, the relative risk (RR) = 1.40, p = 0.06. There were no statistically significant trends with increasing frequency or duration of talc use, and patients did not differ from controls in use of talc on sanitary pads and/or contraceptive diaphragms. Fewer ovarian cancer patients (7%) than controls (13%) reported prior fallopian tube ligation (RR, adjusted for parity, = 0.56, p = 0.06), and fewer patients (20%) than controls (28%) reported prior hysterectomy (RR = 0.66, p = 0.05). The protective effect of hysterectomy was confined to those who underwent this surgery 10 or more years prior to interview and to those who had not undergone prior tubal sterilization. Consumption of cigarettes and alcohol did not differ between cases and controls. By contrast, 11 (6%) cases never regularly consumed coffee, compared with 31 (11%) hospital controls and 26 (10%) population controls (RR, adjusted for smoking, = 2.2, p = 0.03, for the comparison using all controls). Overall, ovarian cancer risk among women who had drunk coffee for more than 40 years

  15. ZNF300P1 Encodes a lincRNA that regulates cell polarity and is epigenetically silenced in type II epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified that the CpG island-associated promoter of the novel lincRNA ZNF300P1 (also known as LOC134466) is frequently hypermethylated and silenced in ovarian cancer tissues. However, the function of ZNF300P1 was unknown. In this report we demonstrate that ZNF300P1 is involved in the regulation of key cell cycle and cell motility networks in human ovarian surface epithelial cells, and may play a role in promoting metastasis in ovarian cancer cells. Methods We applied methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on whole genome promoter tiling arrays and Sequenom assays to examine methylation status of ZNF300P1 in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, as well as in normal ovarian and ovarian tumor tissues. Transcript profiling was used to investigate the effects of ZNF300P1 suppression in ovarian cancer cells. We utilized siRNA knockdown in normal ovarian surface epithelial cells and performed cellular proliferation, migration and adhesion assays to validate and explore the profiling results. Results We demonstrate that ZNF300P1 is methylated in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Loss of ZNF300P1 results in decreased cell proliferation and colony formation. In addition, knockdown of the ZNF300P1 transcript results in aberrant and less persistent migration in wound healing assays due to a loss of cellular polarity. Using an ex vivo peritoneal adhesion assay, we also reveal a role for ZNF300P1 in the attachment of ovarian cancer cells to peritoneal membranes, indicating a potential function of ZNF300P1 expression in metastasis of ovarian cancer cells to sites within the peritoneal cavity. Conclusion Our findings further support ZNF300P1 as frequently methylated in ovarian cancer and reveal a novel function for ZNF300P1 lincRNA expression in regulating cell polarity, motility, and adhesion and loss of expression may contribute to the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24393131

  16. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about ovarian cancer? What is ovarian cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... section . Other cancers that are similar to epithelial ovarian cancer Primary peritoneal carcinoma Primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) is ...

  17. Common Genetic Variation In Cellular Transport Genes and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chornokur, Ganna; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Qu, Xiaotao; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Jim, Heather S. L.; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Mellissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Narod, Steven A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contributes to EOC risk. Methods In total, DNA samples were obtained from 14,525 case subjects with invasive EOC and from 23,447 controls from 43 sites in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Two hundred seventy nine SNPs, representing 131 genes, were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium iSelect BeadChip as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNP analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression under a log-additive model, and the FDR q<0.2 was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons. Results The most significant evidence of an association for all invasive cancers combined and for the serous subtype was observed for SNP rs17216603 in the iron transporter gene HEPH (invasive: OR = 0.85, P = 0.00026; serous: OR = 0.81, P = 0.00020); this SNP was also associated with the borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.021). Other genes significantly associated with EOC histological subtypes (p<0.05) included the UGT1A (endometrioid), SLC25A45 (mucinous), SLC39A11 (low malignant potential), and SERPINA7 (clear cell carcinoma). In addition, 1785 SNPs in six genes (HEPH, MGST1, SERPINA, SLC25A45, SLC39A11 and UGT1A) were imputed from the 1000 Genomes Project and examined for association with INV EOC in white-European subjects. The most significant imputed SNP was rs117729793 in SLC39A11 (per allele, OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.5-4.35, p = 5.66x10-4). Conclusion These results, generated on a large cohort of women, revealed associations

  18. Expression and prognostic significance of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR) has previously been associated with a favourable prognosis in a few cancer forms, but its expression and relationship with clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of PIGR expression in EOC. Methods After an initial screening in the Human Protein Atlas portal, a validated antibody was selected for extended analysis of immunohistochemical PIGR expression in tissue microarrays with tumours from 154 incident cases of EOC from two pooled prospective population-based cohorts. Subsets of corresponding benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 38) and omental metastases (n = 33) were also analysed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were applied to examine the impact of PIGR expression on overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer-specific survival (OCSS). Results PIGR expression was significantly higher in fallopian tubes compared to primary tumours and metastases (p < 0.001) and lower in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to other carcinomas (p < 0.001). PIGR expression was significantly associated with lower grade (p = 0.001), mucinous histological subtype (p = 0.002), positive progesterone receptor expression (p = 0.009) and negative or low Ki-67 expression (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly improved OS (p = 0.013) and OCSS (p = 0.009) for patients with tumours displaying high expression of PIGR. These associations were confirmed in unadjusted Cox regression analysis (HR = 0.48; 95% CI 0.26-0.87; p = 0.015 for OS and HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.82; p = 0.011 for OCSS) but did not remain significant after adjustment for age, grade and clinical stage. Conclusions This study provides a first demonstration of PIGR expression in human fallopian tubes, primary EOC

  19. Variation in NF-κB Signaling Pathways and Survival in Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Block, Matthew S.; Charbonneau, Bridget; Vierkant, Robert A.; Fogarty, Zachary; Bamlet, William R.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cramer, Daniel; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen; Menon, Usha; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Levine, Douglas A.; Gronwald, Jacek; Culver, Hoda Anton; Whittemore, Alice S.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V.; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Campbell, Ian; Goodman, Marc T.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Hays, Laura E.; Lurie, Galina; Eccles, Diana; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M.; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Paddock, Lisa E.; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Ziolkowska-Seta, Izabela; Brinton, Louise A.; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Lester, Jenny; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Menkiszak, Janusz; Jensen, Allan; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Berchuck, Andrew; Wu, Anna H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Terry, Kathryn L.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Ramirez, Starr M.; Rider, David N.; Knutson, Keith L.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Johnatty, Sharon E.; deFazio, Anna; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2014-01-01

    Survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is influenced by the host immune response, yet the key genetic determinants of inflammation and immunity that impact prognosis are not known. The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor family plays an important role in many immune and inflammatory responses, including the response to cancer. We studied common inherited variation in 210 genes in the NF-κB family in 10,084 patients with invasive EOC (5,248 high grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous) from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Associations between genotype and overall survival were assessed using Cox regression for all patients and by major histology, adjusting for known prognostic factors and correcting for multiple testing (threshold for statistical significance—p < 2.5×10−5). Results were statistically significant when assessed for patients of a single histology. Key associations were with CARD11 (caspase recruitment domain family, member 11) rs41324349 in patients with mucinous EOC (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.41–2.35, p=4.13×10−6) and TNFRSF13B (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13B) rs7501462 in patients with endometrioid EOC (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.56–0.82, p=2.33×10−5). Other associations of note included TRAF2 (TNF receptor-associated factor 2) rs17250239 in patients with high-grade serous EOC (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77–0.92, p=6.49×10−5) and PLCG1 (phospholipase C, gamma 1) rs11696662 in patients with clear cell EOC (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.26–0.73, p=4.56×10−4). These associations highlight the potential importance of genes associated with host inflammation and immunity in modulating clinical outcomes in distinct EOC histologies. PMID:24740199

  20. Identification of novel candidate biomarkers of epithelial ovarian cancer by profiling the secretomes of three-dimensional genetic models of ovarian carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Worthington, Jenny; Spindler, Tassja J; O'Brien, Darragh; Lee, Janet M; Spain, Georgia; Sharifian, Maryam; Wang, Guisong; Darcy, Kathleen M; Pejovic, Tanja; Sowter, Heidi; Timms, John F; Gayther, Simon A

    2015-10-15

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is still considered the most lethal gynecological malignancy and improved early detection of ovarian cancer is crucial to improving patient prognoses. To address this need, we tested whether candidate EOC biomarkers can be identified using three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models. We quantified changes in the abundance of secreted proteins in a 3D genetic model of early-stage EOC, generated by expressing CMYC and KRAS(G) (12) (V) in TERT-immortalized normal ovarian epithelial cells. Cellular proteins were labeled in live cells using stable isotopic amino acid analogues, and secreted proteins identified and quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty-seven and 55 proteins were differentially expressed by CMYC and CMYC+KRAS(G) (12) (V) expressing cells respectively (p < 0.05; >2-fold). We evaluated expression of the top candidate biomarkers in ∼210 primary EOCs: CHI3L1 and FKBP4 are both expressed by >96% of primary EOCs, and FASN and API5 are expressed by 86 and 75% of cases. High expression of CHI3L1 and FKBP4 was associated with worse patient survival (p = 0.042 and p = 0.002, respectively). Expression of LGALS3BP was positively associated with recurrence (p = 0.0001) and suboptimal debulking (p = 0.018) suggesting that these proteins may be novel prognostic biomarkers. Furthermore, within early stage tumours (I/II), high expression of API5, CHI3L1 and FASN was associated with high tumour grade (p = 3 × 10(-4) , p = 0.016, p = 0.010, respectively). We show in vitro cell biology models of early-stage cancer development can be used to identify novel candidate biomarkers for disease, and report the identification of proteins that represent novel potential candidate diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for this highly lethal disease.

  1. Sam68 is Overexpressed in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lijuan; Che, Hailuo; Li, Mingmei; Li, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest gynecological malignancy, and evidence is accumulating on how molecular markers may be associated with the origin and process of EOC. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis, of 68 kD), is a K homology domain RNA-binding protein that has been investigated as a risk factor in multiple types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the Sam68 gene in the pathogenesis of EOC. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR methods were performed to examine Sam68 expression in EOC tissue specimens. The association of Sam68 expression with clinic-pathologic variables of EOC was evaluated. Then gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies were adopted to examine the regulation of Sam68 on the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells using CCK-8 and colony forming assays. RESULTS Sam68 was overexpressed in both mRNA and protein levels in EOC tumor tissue (n=152) in an association with malignant factors of EOC such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumor size (cm), histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In vitro results demonstrated that Sam68 overexpression was upregulated while Sam68 knockdown downregulated the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells via regulation of cell growth and colony formation. CONCLUSIONS Sam68 was overexpressed in EOC tissue in association with such cancer malignant factors of FIGO stage, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis, and also positively regulated the proliferation of EOC cells. Our research suggests that Sam68 might accelerate cell cycle progression, and present as a prognostic marker for EOC. PMID:27623016

  2. Clinical governance network for clinical audit to improve quality in epithelial ovarian cancer management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer. Several hospitals throughout the region provide primary treatment for these patients and it is well know that treatment quality is correlated to the hospital that delivers. The aim of this study was to investigate the management and treatment of EOC in a Region of the North Italy (Emilia-Romagna, Italy). Methods A multidisciplinary group made up of 11 physicians and 3 biostatisticians was formed in 2009 to perform clinical audits in order to identify quality indicators and to develop Region-wide workup in accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM). The rationale was that, by setting up an oncogynecology network so as to achieve the best clinical practice, critical points would decrease or even be eliminated. Analysis of cases was based on the review of the medical records. Results 614 EOC patients treated between 2007 and 2008 were identified. We found only 2 high-volume hospitals (≥ 21 patients/year), 3 medium-volume hospitals (11–20 operated patients/year), and 7 low-volume hospitals (≤ 10 operated patients /year). Only 222 patients (76.3%) had a histological diagnosis, FIGO surgical staging was reported only in 206 patients (70.9%) but not all standard surgical procedures were always performed, residual disease were not reported in all patients. No standard number of neoadjuvant chemotherapy cycles was observed. Conclusions The differences in terms of treatments provided led the multidisciplinary group to identify reference centers, to promote centralization, to ensure uniform and adequate treatment to patients treated in regional centers and to promote a new audit involving all regional hospitals to a complete review of the all the EOC patients. PMID:23547941

  3. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10–7). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r 2 with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11–1.24, P = 1.1×10−7). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10−8). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r 2 = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10-8). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  4. Sam68 is Overexpressed in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijuan; Che, Hailuo; Li, Mingmei; Li, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest gynecological malignancy, and evidence is accumulating on how molecular markers may be associated with the origin and process of EOC. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis, of 68 kD), is a K homology domain RNA-binding protein that has been investigated as a risk factor in multiple types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the Sam68 gene in the pathogenesis of EOC. Material/Methods Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR methods were performed to examine Sam68 expression in EOC tissue specimens. The association of Sam68 expression with clinic-pathologic variables of EOC was evaluated. Then gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies were adopted to examine the regulation of Sam68 on the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells using CCK-8 and colony forming assays. Results Sam68 was overexpressed in both mRNA and protein levels in EOC tumor tissue (n=152) in an association with malignant factors of EOC such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumor size (cm), histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In vitro results demonstrated that Sam68 overexpression was upregulated while Sam68 knockdown downregulated the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells via regulation of cell growth and colony formation. Conclusions Sam68 was overexpressed in EOC tissue in association with such cancer malignant factors of FIGO stage, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis, and also positively regulated the proliferation of EOC cells. Our research suggests that Sam68 might accelerate cell cycle progression, and present as a prognostic marker for EOC. PMID:27623016

  5. Dietary fat and fatty acid intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk: evidence from epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Rui; Wu, Qi-Jun; Gong, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Luo

    2015-01-01

    The associations between dietary fat and fatty acid (FA) intakes and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk have been inconsistent in previous studies. We conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to evaluate these associations. We identified relevant studies by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases. We used random-effects models to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, the search yielded 20 studies (1 pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies, 5 cohorts, and 14 case-control studies). The summary RR for EOC for the highest versus lowest categories of total dietary fat intake was 1.12 (95%CI= 0.95–1.33; I2 = 77.4%; n = 14). The RRs were not significant when fats were divided into plant-based fats (RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.77–1.13; n = 6), animal-based fats (RR = 1.15, 95%CI = 0.95–1.39; n = 8), dairy-based fats (RR = 1.02, 95%CI = 0.88–1.18; n = 3), saturated FAs (RR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.93–1.17; n = 12), monounsaturated FAs (RR = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.84–1.13; n = 10), polyunsaturated FAs (RR = 0.96, 95%CI = 0.81–1.12; n = 10), and trans-unsaturated FAs (RR = 1.15, 95%CI = 0.98–1.36; n = 3). Similar non-significant results were also observed in most of the subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The findings of this meta-analysis suggest a lack of evidence for associations between dietary fat and FA intakes and EOC risk. Further analyses should be conducted to assess the associations with other types of fat, and the results should be stratified by tumor invasiveness and EOC histology. PMID:26515595

  6. Wine drinking and epithelial ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Seung; Shouten, Leo J.; Larsson, Susanna C.; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Yong Beom; Ju, Woong; Park, Noh Hyun; Song, Yong Sang; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kang, Soon-Beom

    2010-01-01

    Objective Wine has been the focus in the prevention of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) development because resveratrol abundant in wine has anti-carcinogenic properties. However, epidemiologic results have been heterogenous in the chemopreventive effect of wine on the development of EOC. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis for comparing EOC risk between wine and never drinkers using previous related studies. Methods After extensive search of the literature between January 1986 and December 2008, we analyzed 10 studies (3 cohort and 7 case control studies) with 135,871 women, who included 65,578 of wine and 70,293 of never drinkers. Results In all studies, there was no significant difference in EOC risk between wine and never drinkers (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.38; random effects). When we performed re-analysis according to the study design, 3 cohort and 7 case control studies showed that there were also no significant differences in EOC risk between wine and never drinkers, respectively (OR, 1.44 and 1.04; 95% CI, 0.74 and 2.82 and 0.88 to 1.22; random effects). In sub-analyses using 2 case-control studies, EOC risk was not different between former and never drinkers (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.44; fixed effect), and between current and former drinkers (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.41 to 1.34; random effects). Conclusion Although resveratrol, abundantly found in wine, is a promising naturally occurring compound with chemopreventive properties on EOC in preclinical studies, this meta-analysis suggests the epidemiologic evidence shows no association between wine drinking and EOC risk. PMID:20613902

  7. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on platinum resistance in stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanlin; Lee, Maria; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It remains controversial whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) induces chemoresistance in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) compared with primary debulking surgery (PDS). The aim of this study was to compare platinum-resistant recurrence following treatment with NACT-IDS or PDS in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 341 patients who underwent PDS or NACT-IDS for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIC or IV EOC between March 1990 and December 2010. Risk factors of platinum resistance, including NACT, postoperative residual tumor size, and various clinicopathological factors, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure overall survival (OS). Of 341 patients, 58 (17.0%) underwent NACT-IDS and 283 (83.0%) were treated with PDS. Twenty-nine (50.0%) patients developed platinum-resistant disease at first relapse after NACT-IDS and 99 (35.0%) patients recurred after PDS (P = 0.033). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, NACT-IDS and postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm were risk factors for platinum-resistant recurrence (adjusted odds ratios 2.950 and 2.915; 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 1.572–5.537 and 1.780–4.771, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively). Postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm and platinum-resistant disease were significantly correlated with shorter OS (adjusted hazard ratios 1.579 and 4.078; 95% CI 1.193–2.089 and 3.074–5.412, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively), whereas NACT-IDS did not extend OS. NACT-IDS increases the risk of platinum-resistant recurrence in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. PMID:27603388

  8. Linalool-Incorporated Nanoparticles as a Novel Anticancer Agent for Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Hee Dong; Cho, Young-Jae; Cho, Sung Keun; Byeon, Yeongseon; Jeon, Hat Nim; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K; Shin, Byung Cheol; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Jeong-Won

    2016-04-01

    Although cytotoxic chemotherapy is widely used against epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), adverse side effects and emergence of resistance can limit its utility. Therefore, new drugs with systemic delivery platforms are urgently needed for this disease. In this study, we developed linalool-incorporated nanoparticles (LIN-NP) as a novel anticancer agent. We prepared LIN-NPs by the self-assembly water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion method. LIN-NP-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis was assessed in EOC cells, and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as the mechanism of action was evaluated. In addition, therapeutic efficacy of LIN-NP was assessed in cell lines and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models for EOC. LIN-NPs had significant cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity against EOC cells, including A2780, HeyA8, and SKOV3ip1. LIN-NP treatment increased apoptosis in EOC cells through ROS generation and a subsequent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in caspase-3 levels. In addition, 100 mg/kg LIN-NPs significantly decreased tumor weight in the HeyA8 (P < 0.001) and SKOV3ip1 (P = 0.006) in vivo models. Although treatment with 50 mg/kg LIN-NP did not decrease tumor weight compared with the control group, combination treatment with paclitaxel significantly decreased tumor weight compared with paclitaxel alone in SKOV3ip1 xenografts (P = 0.004) and the patient-derived xenograft model (P = 0.020). We have developed LIN-NPs that induce ROS generation as a novel anticancer agent for EOC. These findings have broad applications for cancer therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 618-27. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Association between polymorphisms in xenobiotic detoxification-related genes with prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Carron, Juliana; Brito, Angelo Borsarelli Carvalho; Torelli, Ana Carolina Mourão; Oliveira, Cristiane; Derchain, Sophie Françoise Mauricette; Lima, Carmen Silvia Passos; Lourenço, Gustavo Jacob

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether GSTM1 and GSTT1 (presents or nulls), GSTP1 c.313A>G and NQO2 c.-102A>C polymorphisms, involved in xenobiotic detoxification pathways, alter outcomes of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. DNA from 84 EOC patients diagnosed at the University of Campinas Academic Hospital from January 1995 and July 2007 was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assays. The prognostic impact of genotypes of polymorphisms on progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) of EOC patients was examined using the Kaplan-Meier probability estimates and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) regression analyses. The significant results of Cox analyses were validated using a bootstrap resampling study (1000 replications). At 60 months of follow-up, lower OS was seen in patients with GSTT1 null genotype (50.0 vs. 76.7 %, P = 0.02) compared with the other genotype (Kaplan-Meier estimate). This outcome remained the same in univariate Cox analysis (HR 2.22, P = 0.02). After multivariate Cox analysis, patients with GSTT1 null (HR 2.11, P = 0.04, P bootstrap = 0.04) and NQO2 AA (HR 2.13, P = 0.03, P bootstrap = 0.04) genotypes were under greater risks of progressing to death when compared with those with others genotypes. Our data suggest, for the first time, that inherited abnormalities in xenobiotic detoxification pathway related to GSTT1 and NQO2 c.-102A>C polymorphisms act as independent prognostic factors for OS of EOC patients. PMID:27586145

  10. RUNX3 and CAMK2N1 hypermethylation as prognostic marker for epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Häfner, Norman; Steinbach, Daniel; Jansen, Lars; Diebolder, Herbert; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer consists of surgery plus platinum-taxane based chemotherapy. Neither prognostic nor predictive serum or tissue markers except BRCA1/2 mutations are available thus precluding individualized treatment. Aim of this study is the identification and validation of DNA-methylation markers with prognostic value. Genome-wide array analyses were used to determine methylation patterns in groups of serous EOC with different outcome (PFS < vs. > 3 years, each n = 6) but comparable clinical parameters. Two hundred and twenty differentially methylated regions in tumor tissue of patients with short vs. long PFS (106 hypo- and 114 hypermethylated regions) were identified. Thirty-five of 37 selected CpG islands were validated by MSP using the same samples as for microarray analyses. Six of these regions were analyzed by targeted next-generation bisulfite-sequencing confirming array and MSP results. Validation experiments with an enlarged patient group of Type II EOC samples (PFS <3 years n = 30; >3 years n = 18) revealed the CpG island of RUNX3 as significantly more often methylated in patients with short PFS (10/30 vs. 0/18; p < 0.01). Marker combinations with significantly different methylation frequencies in patient groups reached an increased sensitivity with equal specificity (RUNX3+CAMK2N1; sens 40%; spec 100%; p < 0.01). RUNX3/CAMK2N1 methylation-positive patients of the array-independent subset (n = 36) showed a significantly lower PFS (p < 0.01) but no other difference in clinical parameters compared to methylation-negative patients. Genome-wide methylation analyses reliably identified markers of potentially prognostic value. Hypermethylation of RUNX3/CAMK2N1 is associated with poor clinical outcome in Type II EOC, also after macroscopic complete resection. PMID:26175272

  11. Early pregnancy sex steroids and maternal risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Helena; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Grankvist, Kjell; Lakso, Hans-Åke; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pukkala, Eero; Lehtinen, Matti; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Well-established associations between reproductive characteristics and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) support an involvement of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC. Limited prior studies have evaluated circulating androgens and risk of EOC, and estrogens and progesterone have been investigated in only one prior study. Further, there is little data on potential heterogeneity in the association between circulating hormones and EOC by histologic subgroup. Therefore, we conducted a nested case-control study within the Finnish Maternity Cohort and the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort to investigate the associations between circulating pre-diagnostic sex steroid concentrations with the histologic subtypes of EOC. We identified 1,052 EOC cases among cohort members diagnosed after recruitment (1975-2008) and before March 2011. Up to three controls were individually matched to each case (n=2,694). Testosterone, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), progesterone, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured in serum samples collected during the last pregnancy before EOC diagnosis. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI]. Associations between hormones and EOC differed by tumor histology and invasiveness. Sex steroid concentrations were not associated with invasive serous tumors, however, doubling of testosterone and 17-OHP concentration was associated with ~40% increased risk of borderline serous tumors. A doubling of androgen concentrations was associated with a 50% risk increase for mucinous tumors. Risk of endometrioid tumors increased with higher estradiol concentrations (OR: 1.89 [1.20-2.98]). This large prospective study in pregnant women supports a role of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC arising in the ovaries. PMID:25270324

  12. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on platinum resistance in stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanlin; Lee, Maria; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-09-01

    It remains controversial whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) induces chemoresistance in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) compared with primary debulking surgery (PDS). The aim of this study was to compare platinum-resistant recurrence following treatment with NACT-IDS or PDS in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 341 patients who underwent PDS or NACT-IDS for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIC or IV EOC between March 1990 and December 2010. Risk factors of platinum resistance, including NACT, postoperative residual tumor size, and various clinicopathological factors, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure overall survival (OS).Of 341 patients, 58 (17.0%) underwent NACT-IDS and 283 (83.0%) were treated with PDS. Twenty-nine (50.0%) patients developed platinum-resistant disease at first relapse after NACT-IDS and 99 (35.0%) patients recurred after PDS (P = 0.033). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, NACT-IDS and postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm were risk factors for platinum-resistant recurrence (adjusted odds ratios 2.950 and 2.915; 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 1.572-5.537 and 1.780-4.771, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively). Postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm and platinum-resistant disease were significantly correlated with shorter OS (adjusted hazard ratios 1.579 and 4.078; 95% CI 1.193-2.089 and 3.074-5.412, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively), whereas NACT-IDS did not extend OS.NACT-IDS increases the risk of platinum-resistant recurrence in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. PMID:27603388

  13. Three-dimensional culture sensitizes epithelial ovarian cancer cells to EZH2 methyltransferase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Amatangelo, Michael D.; Garipov, Azat; Li, Hua; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Speicher, David W.; Zhang, Rugang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of EZH2 methyltransferase activity have been demonstrated to selectively suppress the growth of diffused large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells with gain-of-function mutations in EZH2, while exhibiting very limited effects on the growth of DLBCL cells with wild-type EZH2. Given that EZH2 is often overexpressed but not mutated in solid tumors, it is important to investigate the determinants of sensitivity of solid tumor cells to EZH2 inhibitors. In the current study, we show that three-dimensional (3D) culture of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells that overexpress EZH2 sensitizes these cells to EZH2 methyltransferase inhibition. Treatment of EOC cells with GSK343, a specific inhibitor of EZH2 methyltransferase, decreases the level of H3K27Me3, the product of EZH2’s enzymatic activity. However, GSK343 exhibited limited effects on the growth of EOC cells in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture. In contrast, GSK343 significantly suppressed the growth of EOC cells cultured in 3D matrigel extracellular matrix (ECM), which more closely mimics the tumor microenvironment in vivo. Notably, GSK343 induces apoptosis of EOC cells in 3D but not 2D culture. In addition, GSK343 significantly inhibited the invasion of EOC cells. In summary, we show that the 3D ECM sensitizes EOC cells to EZH2 methyltransferase inhibition, which suppresses cell growth, induces apoptosis and inhibits invasion. Our findings imply that in EZH2 wild-type solid tumors, the ECM tumor microenvironment plays an important role in determining sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition and suggest that targeting the ECM represents a novel strategy for enhancing EZH2 inhibitor efficacy. PMID:23759589

  14. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.

  15. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  16. Desmocollin 3 mediates follicle stimulating hormone-induced ovarian epithelial cancer cell proliferation by activating the EGFR/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Wang, Jing; Li, Wen-Ping; Jin, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is associated with the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. We sought to explore whether desmocollin 3 (Dsc3) mediates FSH-induced ovarian epithelial cancer cell proliferation and whether the EGFR/Akt signaling pathway may be involved in this process. Dsc3 positivity in ovarian tissue specimens from 72 patients was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The positive expression rates of Dsc3 were similar in ovarian cancer tissues (24/31:77.4%) and borderline ovarian tumor tissues (18/22:81.8%) (P>0.05), but were significantly higher in these cancerous tissues than in benign ovarian cyst tissues (3/19:15.8%) (P<0.05). Consistently, the expression of Dsc3 in four out of five ovarian cancer cells (HO8910, Skov3ip, Skov and Hey cells, but not ES-2 and in borderline ovarian MCV152 tumor cells was higher than in the immortalized ovarian epithelial cell line, Moody. FSH up-regulated the expression of Dsc3 and EGFR in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, a converse relationship between the expression of Dsc3, EFGR and PI3K/Akt signaling was elucidated using RNA interference and PI3K/Akt inhibitor in the absence and presence of FSH. A role for these proteins in FSH-induced cell proliferation was verified, highlighting their interdependence in mediating ovarian cancer cell function. These results suggest that Dsc3 can mediate FSH-induced ovarian cancer cell proliferation by activating the EGFR/Akt signaling pathway.

  17. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1: potential stratification factor and therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianying; Gui, Ting; Qian, Qiuhong; Li, Lei; Shen, Keng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer, a vexing challenge for clinical management, still lacks biomarkers for early diagnosis, precise stratification, and prognostic evaluation of patients. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1), a member of the polycomb group of proteins, engages in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and stem cell renewal. In addition, BMI1, as a cancer stem-cell marker, participates in tumorigenesis through various pathways. Rewardingly, recent studies have also revealed a relationship between BMI1 expression and the clinical grade/stage, therapy response, and survival outcome in a majority of human malignancies, including epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, BMI1 might serve as a potential stratification factor and treatment target for epithelial ovarian cancer, pending evidence from further investigations. PMID:27578986

  18. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1: potential stratification factor and therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianying; Gui, Ting; Qian, Qiuhong; Li, Lei; Shen, Keng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer, a vexing challenge for clinical management, still lacks biomarkers for early diagnosis, precise stratification, and prognostic evaluation of patients. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1), a member of the polycomb group of proteins, engages in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and stem cell renewal. In addition, BMI1, as a cancer stem-cell marker, participates in tumorigenesis through various pathways. Rewardingly, recent studies have also revealed a relationship between BMI1 expression and the clinical grade/stage, therapy response, and survival outcome in a majority of human malignancies, including epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, BMI1 might serve as a potential stratification factor and treatment target for epithelial ovarian cancer, pending evidence from further investigations. PMID:27578986

  19. Fatal Ifosfamide-Induced Metabolic Encephalopathy in Patients with Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shin, You-Jung; Kim, Ji-Young; Moon, Jei-Won; You, Rae-Mi; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) toxicity has been reported in approximately 10-30% of patients receiving intravenous infusions of ifosfamide. Encephalopathy is a rare but serious CNS adverse reaction in these patients, and although usually transient and reversible, may cause persistent neurological dysfunction or death. Clinical features range from fatigue and confusion to coma and death. Although methylene blue can be used to treat ifosfamide-induced neurotoxicity, including encephalopathy, its mechanism of action remains poorly defined. We describe here two patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer who experienced fatal encephalopathy following ifosfamide/mesna treatment. PMID:22247713

  20. Functional Polymorphisms in the TERT Promoter Are Associated with Risk of Serous Epithelial Ovarian and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Johnatty, Sharon E.; Dunning, Alison M.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Li, Jun; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lu, Yi; Rider, David N.; Palmieri, Rachel T.; Stutz, Michael D.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Nickels, Stefan; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dörk, Thilo; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Marees, Tamara; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E.; Campbell, Ian; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Pharoah, Paul D.; Investigators, kConFab; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Wiangnon, Surapon; Macgregor, Stuart; Easton, Douglas F.; Reddel, Roger R.; Goode, Ellen L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variation at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus at 5p15.33 is associated with susceptibility to several cancers, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We have carried out fine-mapping of this region in EOC which implicates an association with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the TERT promoter. We demonstrate that the minor alleles at rs2736109, and at an additional TERT promoter SNP, rs2736108, are associated with decreased breast cancer risk, and that the combination of both SNPs substantially reduces TERT promoter activity. PMID:21949822

  1. Talc use, variants of the GSTM1, GSTT1, and NAT2 genes, and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gates, Margaret A; Tworoger, Shelley S; Terry, Kathryn L; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Rosner, Bernard; De Vivo, Immaculata; Cramer, Daniel W; Hankinson, Susan E

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests a possible association between genital use of talcum powder and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer; however, the biological basis for this association is not clear. We analyzed interactions between talc use and genes in detoxification pathways [glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1), and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2)] to assess whether the talc/ovarian cancer association is modified by variants of genes potentially involved in the response to talc. Our analysis included 1,175 cases and 1,202 controls from a New England-based case-control study and 210 cases and 600 controls from the prospective Nurses' Health Study. We genotyped participants for the GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletions and three NAT2 polymorphisms. We used logistic regression to analyze the main effect of talc use, genotype, and gene-talc interactions in each population and pooled the estimates using a random-effects model. Regular talc use was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk in the combined study population (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.14-1.63; P(trend) < 0.001). Independent of talc, the genes examined were not clearly associated with risk. However, the talc/ovarian cancer association varied by GSTT1 genotype and combined GSTM1/GSTT1 genotype. In the pooled analysis, the association with talc was stronger among women with the GSTT1-null genotype (P(interaction) = 0.03), particularly in combination with the GSTM1-present genotype (P(interaction) = 0.03). There was no clear evidence of an interaction with GSTM1 alone or NAT2. These results suggest that women with certain genetic variants may have a higher risk of ovarian cancer associated with genital talc use. Additional research is needed on these interactions and the underlying biological mechanisms.

  2. Dub3 expression correlates with tumor progression and poor prognosis in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Shu, Bin; Xi, Tao; Su, Ning; Liu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Dub3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme. It is highly expressed in tumor-derived cell lines and has an established role in tumor proliferation. However, the role of Dub3 in human ovarian cancer remains unclear. Expression of Dub3 was evaluated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The relationship between Dub3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. Using RNA interference, the effects of Dub3 on cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated in ovarian cancer cell line. All normal ovary tissues exhibited very little or no Dub3 immunoreactivity. High levels of Dub3 expression were examined by immunohistochemical analysis in 13.3% of cystadenomas, in 30.0% of borderline tumors, and in 58.9% of ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Dub3 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and clinical staging (P<0.05). Multivariate survival analysis indicated that Dub3 expression was an independent prognostic indicator of the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. Furthermore, the expression of Cdc25A was closely correlated with that of Dub3 in cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of Dub3 could inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and increase cell apoptosis. These data indicate that the Dub3 might be a valuable biomarker for the prediction of ovarian cancer prognosis and Dub3 inhibition might be a potential strategy for ovarian cancer treatment.

  3. Glycomics Laboratory for the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Ovarian cancer is a silent killer with few early symptoms and advanced disease present at the time of diagnosis. This cancer is the most lethal of all gynecologic malignancies with over 20,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The 5 year survival rates for ovarian cancer dramatically improve when the disease is diagnosed at an early stage. |

  4. Inhibition of RUNX2 Transcriptional Activity Blocks the Proliferation, Migration and Invasion of Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachvarova, Magdalena; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the RUNX2 gene as hypomethylated and overexpressed in post-chemotherapy (CT) primary cultures derived from serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients, when compared to primary cultures derived from matched primary (prior to CT) tumors. However, we found no differences in the RUNX2 methylation in primary EOC tumors and EOC omental metastases, suggesting that DNA methylation-based epigenetic mechanisms have no impact on RUNX2 expression in advanced (metastatic) stage of the disease. Moreover, RUNX2 displayed significantly higher expression not only in metastatic tissue, but also in high-grade primary tumors and even in low malignant potential tumors. Knockdown of the RUNX2 expression in EOC cells led to a sharp decrease of cell proliferation and significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as various genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon RUNX2 suppression, while a number of pro-apoptotic genes and some EOC tumor suppressor genes were induced. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the RUNX2 gene in serous EOC progression and suggest that RUNX2 might be a novel EOC therapeutic target. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of RUNX2 and other members of the RUNX gene family in ovarian tumorigenesis. PMID:24124450

  5. Inhibition of RUNX2 transcriptional activity blocks the proliferation, migration and invasion of epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Keita, Mamadou; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the RUNX2 gene as hypomethylated and overexpressed in post-chemotherapy (CT) primary cultures derived from serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients, when compared to primary cultures derived from matched primary (prior to CT) tumors. However, we found no differences in the RUNX2 methylation in primary EOC tumors and EOC omental metastases, suggesting that DNA methylation-based epigenetic mechanisms have no impact on RUNX2 expression in advanced (metastatic) stage of the disease. Moreover, RUNX2 displayed significantly higher expression not only in metastatic tissue, but also in high-grade primary tumors and even in low malignant potential tumors. Knockdown of the RUNX2 expression in EOC cells led to a sharp decrease of cell proliferation and significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as various genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon RUNX2 suppression, while a number of pro-apoptotic genes and some EOC tumor suppressor genes were induced. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the RUNX2 gene in serous EOC progression and suggest that RUNX2 might be a novel EOC therapeutic target. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of RUNX2 and other members of the RUNX gene family in ovarian tumorigenesis.

  6. Gene Set-Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-08-05

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis.

  7. Genomic activation of the EGFR and HER2-neu genes in a significant proportion of invasive epithelial ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Joanna; Teugels, Erik; Bourgain, Claire; Xiangming, Ji; in 't Veld, Peter; Ghislain, Vanessa; Neyns, Bart; De Grève, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background The status of the EGFR and HER2-neu genes has not been fully defined in ovarian cancer. An integrated analysis of both genes could help define the proportion of patients that would potentially benefit from targeted therapies. Methods We determined the tumour mutation status of the entire tyrosine kinase (TK) domain of the EGFR and HER2-neu genes in a cohort of 52 patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer as well as the gene copy number and protein expression of both genes in 31 of these patients by DGGE and direct sequecing, immunohistochemistry and Fluorescent in Situ Hybridisation (FISH). Results The EGFR was expressed in 59% of the cases, with a 2+/3+ staining intensity in 38%. HER2-neu expression was found in 35%, with a 2/3+ staining in 18%. No mutations were found in exons 18–24 of the TK domains of EGFR and HER2-neu. High polysomy of the EGFR gene was observed in 13% of the invasive epthelial cancers and amplification of the HER2-neu gene was found in 10% and correlated with a high expression level by immunohistochemistry. Mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain were not found in the entire TK domain of both genes, but have been found in very rare cases by others. Conclusion Genomic alteration of the HER2-neu and EGFR genes is frequent (25%) in ovarian cancer. EGFR/HER2-neu targeted therapies should be investigated prospectively and specifically in that subset of patients. PMID:18182111

  8. Gene Set−Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:27527159

  9. Migration-inducing gene 7 promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and independently predicts poor prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bihui; Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Cao, Guosheng; Qi, Jin; Lou, Ge; Sheng, Shijie; Kou, Junping; Chen, Kang; Yu, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC) cause more mortality than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. New therapeutic approaches to reduce EOC mortality have been largely unsuccessful due to the poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying EOC proliferation and metastasis. Progress in EOC treatment is further hampered by a lack of reliable prognostic biomarkers for early risk assessment. In this study, we identify that Migration-Inducting Gene 7 (MIG-7) is specifically induced in human EOC tissues but not normal ovaries or ovarian cyst. Ovarian MIG-7 expression strongly correlated with EOC progression. Elevated MIG-7 level at the time of primary cytoreductive surgery was a strong and independent predictor of poor survival of EOC patients. Cell and murine xenograft models showed that MIG-7 was required for EOC proliferation and invasion, and MIG-7 enhanced EOC-associated angiogenesis by promoting the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Inhibiting MIG-7 by RNA interference in grafted EOC cells retarded tumor growth, angiogenesis and improved host survival, and suppressing MIG-7 expression with a small molecule inhibitor D-39 identified from the medicinal plant Liriope muscari mitigated EOC growth and invasion and specifically abrogated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Our data not only reveal a critical function of MIG-7 in EOC growth and metastasis and support MIG-7 as an independent prognostic biomarker for EOC, but also demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of MIG-7 is likely beneficial in the treatment of EOC. PMID:27050277

  10. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancers: is there a role?

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Scott D.; Holtzman, Matthew P.; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Choudry, Mohammad Haroon; Bartlett, David; Huang, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is often used to treat gastrointestinal malignancies and is of interest in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) given the propensity for intraperitoneal spread. The role of HIPEC in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies is not well defined. We sought to describe clinical characteristics and outcomes of our patient population treated with HIPEC. Methods IRB approval was obtained. Patients diagnosed with EOC and treated with HIPEC from January 2007 until December 2013 were identified using a prospectively maintained HIPEC database. Patient charts were abstracted to identify patient demographic information, treatment characteristics, and outcome data. Statistical analysis was descriptive. Results Thirty-four patients were identified. Mean age at diagnosis was 56.5 years. The majority of cases (28, 82%) were of serous histology. The indications for HIPEC administration were as follows: 9% primary treatment, 41% first recurrence, 26% second recurrence, and 24% consolidative therapy in the setting of primary or recurrent disease. The majority of patients (21, 62%) received mitomycin C. The other drugs administered include cisplatin (10, 29%), oxaliplatin (2, 6%), and carboplatin (1, 3%). Mean length of hospital stay was 9 days (range, 3-39 days). The rates of postoperative bacteremia and hematologic toxicity were 6% and 54%, respectively. Seven (21%) patients developed transient renal dysfunction, and this was seen almost exclusively in the patients who received cisplatin. One (3%) additional patient had renal dysfunction that persisted longer than 30 days post-operative but did not go on to require dialysis. There were no perioperative deaths in this cohort. Eleven (32%) patients received additional chemotherapy following HIPEC administration. At a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 3-87 months), eight patients are alive with disease, seven have no evidence of disease, 14 have died of their disease, and five

  11. Subtype Specific Elevated Expression of Hyaluronidase-1 (HYAL-1) in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoffou, Paule Héléna; Edjekouane, Lydia; Meunier, Liliane; Tremblay, André; Provencher, Diane Michèle; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Carmona, Euridice

    2011-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is morphologically heterogeneous being classified as serous, endometrioid, clear cell, or mucinous. Molecular genetic analysis has suggested a role for tumor suppressor genes located at chromosome 3p in serous EOC pathogenesis. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of HYAL1, located at chromosome 3p21.3, in these EOC subtypes, and to investigate its correlation with the expression of steroid hormone receptors. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the mRNA expression of HYAL1, estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ERβ and progesterone receptor (PR) in EOC tumor samples and cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR. We also examined the expression of these genes in a publicly available microarray dataset. HYAL-1 enzyme activity was measured in EOC cell lines and in plasma samples from patients. We found that HYAL1 mRNA expression was elevated in clear cell and mucinous EOC tissue samples, but not in serous and endometrioid samples, normal ovaries or benign tumors. Similar results were obtained by two different techniques and with tissue sample cohorts from two independent institutions. Concordantly, HYAL1 mRNA levels and enzymatic activity were elevated only in EOC cell lines derived from clear cell and mucinous subtypes. We also showed that HYAL1 mRNA was inversely correlated to that of ERα specifically in clear cell and mucinous EOCs. Additionally, ectopic expression of ERα in a clear cell EOC cell line (ER- and PR-negative) induced 50% reduction of HYAL1 mRNA expression, supporting a role of ERα in HYAL1 gene regulation. Significantly, HYAL-1 activity was also high in the plasma of patients with these EOC subtypes. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report showing high HYAL-1 levels in EOC and demonstrating HYAL1 gene repression by ERα. Our results identify Hyaluronidase-1 as a potential target/biomarker for clear cell and mucinous EOCs and especially in tumors with low ERα levels. PMID:21695196

  12. Ampelopsin reduces the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianfeng; Liu, Peishu; Ding, Feng; Yu, Nina; Li, Shihong; Wang, Surong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Sun, Xiangxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yunhe; Li, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Ampelopsin has displayed anticancer activity in several types of cancers. However, no evidence has been reported for the direct effect of ampelopsin on ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, and the underling mechanisms have not yet been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of ampelopsin on the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer. Proliferation and viability of the ovarian cancer cells were detected by MTT assay. Migration and invasion of the cells were detected, respectively, by scratch wound healing assay and Transwell assay. The expression levels of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were detected at the protein level after stimulation with ampelopsin. Then, the expression levels of NF-κB and p-IκBα were detected with western blot analysis. Meanwhile, an inhibitor of NF-κB was used to investigate the effect of ampelopsin. Finally, the expression of Snail was also detected. Proliferation, migration and invasion of the A2780 cells were all inhibited following the application of ampelopsin. Ampelopsin upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated N-cadherin and vimentin in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Ampelopsin also exerted its ability to suppress the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB pathway. Administration of the inhibitor BAY11-7082 confirmed the roles of NF-κB in the expression of EMT markers and its transcription factor. These results demonstrated that ampelopsin inhibited EMT and reduced the invasion of ovarian cancer cells via the NF-κB/Snail pathway. PMID:25502786

  13. Ampelopsin reduces the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianfeng; Liu, Peishu; Ding, Feng; Yu, Nina; Li, Shihong; Wang, Surong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Sun, Xiangxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yunhe; Li, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Ampelopsin has displayed anticancer activity in several types of cancers. However, no evidence has been reported for the direct effect of ampelopsin on ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, and the underling mechanisms have not yet been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of ampelopsin on the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer. Proliferation and viability of the ovarian cancer cells were detected by MTT assay. Migration and invasion of the cells were detected, respectively, by scratch wound healing assay and Transwell assay. The expression levels of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were detected at the protein level after stimulation with ampelopsin. Then, the expression levels of NF-κB and p-IκBα were detected with western blot analysis. Meanwhile, an inhibitor of NF-κB was used to investigate the effect of ampelopsin. Finally, the expression of Snail was also detected. Proliferation, migration and invasion of the A2780 cells were all inhibited following the application of ampelopsin. Ampelopsin upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated N-cadherin and vimentin in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Ampelopsin also exerted its ability to suppress the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB pathway. Administration of the inhibitor BAY11-7082 confirmed the roles of NF-κB in the expression of EMT markers and its transcription factor. These results demonstrated that ampelopsin inhibited EMT and reduced the invasion of ovarian cancer cells via the NF-κB/Snail pathway.

  14. Ellagic Acid and Resveratrol Prevent the Development of Cisplatin Resistance in the Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cell Line A2780

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Laura H.; Hamacher, Alexandra; Proksch, Peter; Kassack, Matthias U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Several studies have shown that natural compounds like resveratrol or ellagic acid have anticancer and antioxidant properties and can stimulate apoptosis in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to elucidate if resveratrol or ellagic acid, respectively, could improve the efficacy of cisplatin in ovarian cancer. Methods. As a cellular resistance model, the epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin-resistant subclone A2780CisR were used. A2780CisR was obtained by intermittent treatment of A2780 with cisplatin for 26 weekly cycles and showed a 4-6-fold increased resistance towards cisplatin compared to A2780. Results. Pretreatment with resveratrol or ellagic acid 48 h prior to treatment with cisplatin showed a moderate enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity in A2780CisR cells (shift factors were 1.6 for ellagic acid and 2.5 for resveratrol). However, intermittent treatment of A2780 with cisplatin for 26 weekly cycles in permanent presence of resveratrol or ellagic acid, respectively, completely prevented the development of cisplatin resistance. The generated cell lines named A2780Resv and A2780Ellag displayed functional characteristics (migration, proliferation, apoptosis, activation of ErbB3, ROS generation) similar to the parental cell line A2780. Conclusion. In conclusion, weekly intermittent treatment cycles of cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells with cisplatin retain cisplatin chemosensitivity in permanent presence of ellagic acid or resveratrol, respectively, whereas clinically relevant cisplatin chemoresistance develops in the absence of ellagic acid or resveratrol. Use of natural phenolic compounds may thus be a promising approach to prevent cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:26918049

  15. Reproductive and other factors and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: an Australian case-control study. Survey of Women's Health Study Group.

    PubMed

    Purdie, D; Green, A; Bain, C; Siskind, V; Ward, B; Hacker, N; Quinn, M; Wright, G; Russell, P; Susil, B

    1995-09-15

    Of the few factors known to be associated with epithelial ovarian cancer, the most consistently observed relate to women's reproductive function, although even here uncertainties remain. We have undertaken a case-control study involving personal interviews with over 1,600 women, the largest of its kind to date, to investigate further the associations between women's reproductive histories and other factors and the development of ovarian cancer. Cases were drawn from women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in 3 Australian states, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, between August 1990 and December 1993, and controls were drawn at random from the electoral roll, stratified by age and geographic region. Trained interviewers administered standard questionnaires to obtain detailed information about women's reproductive and contraceptive histories and other factors of interest, such as smoking and family history of ovarian or other cancer. Findings were based on data from 824 cases and 860 controls and confirmed the reduced risk of ovarian cancer associated with increasing parity and duration of use of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP), hysterectomy and tubal ligation. The strongest association of all was seen with use of the OCP for 10 years or more. An inverse association between ovarian cancer and age at first birth was observed, but this was not statistically significant. There were no associations between development of ovarian cancer and number of incomplete pregnancies, use of hormone replacement therapy or menstrual history. Among other factors considered, education after leaving school was negatively associated and high body mass index, family history of ovarian cancer, use of talc in the abdominal or perineal region and smoking were positively associated with occurrence of ovarian cancer.

  16. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  17. Cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer (SOCceR trial): a multicenter randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvement in treatment for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer is needed. Standard therapy in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer consists of platinum-based chemotherapy. Median overall survival is reported between 18 and 35 months. Currently, the role of surgery in recurrent ovarian cancer is not clear. In selective patients a survival benefit up to 62 months is reported for patients undergoing complete secondary cytoreductive surgery. Whether cytoreductive surgery in recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer is beneficial remains questionable due to the lack of level I-II evidence. Methods/Design Multicentre randomized controlled trial, including all nine gynecologic oncologic centres in the Netherlands and their affiliated hospitals. Eligible patients are women, with first recurrence of FIGO stage Ic-IV platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer or fallopian tube cancer, who meet the inclusion criteria. Participants are randomized between the standard treatment consisting of at least six cycles of intravenous platinum based chemotherapy and the experimental treatment which consists of secondary cytoreductive surgery followed by at least six cycles of intravenous platinum based chemotherapy. Primary outcome measure is progression free survival. In total 230 patients will be randomized. Data will be analysed according to intention to treat. Discussion Where the role of cytoreductive surgery is widely accepted in the initial treatment of ovarian cancer, its value in recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer has not been established so far. A better understanding of the benefits and patients selection criteria for secondary cytoreductive surgery has to be obtained. Therefore the 4th ovarian cancer consensus conference in 2010 stated that randomized controlled phase 3 trials evaluating the role of surgery in platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer are urgently needed. We

  18. 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ Suppresses the Migration of Ovarian Cancer SKOV-3 Cells through the Inhibition of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yong-Feng; Gao, Si-Hai; Wang, Ping; Zhang, He-Mei; Liu, Li-Zhi; Ye, Meng-Xuan; Zhou, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Zeng-Li; Li, Bing-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy due to its high metastatic ability. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is essential during both follicular rupture and epithelium regeneration. However, it may also accelerate the progression of ovarian carcinomas. Experimental studies have found that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D3 [1α,25(OH)₂D₃] can inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ could inhibit the migration of ovarian cancer cells via regulating EMT. We established a model of transient transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1)-induced EMT in human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line SKOV-3 cells. Results showed that, compared with control, 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ not only inhibited the migration and the invasion of SKOV-3 cells, but also promoted the acquisition of an epithelial phenotype of SKOV-3 cells treated with TGF-β1. We discovered that 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ increased the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreased the level of mesenchymal marker, Vimentin, which was associated with the elevated expression of VDR. Moreover, 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ reduced the expression level of transcription factors of EMT, such as slug, snail, and β-catenin. These results indicate that 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ suppresses the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells by inhibiting EMT, implying that 1α,25(OH)₂D₃ might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27548154

  19. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Flowers, Sarah A.; Lindén, Sara K.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Sundfeldt, Karin; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer. Methods In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant) and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes. Results The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline) and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC). Conclusion Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas

  20. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  1. The use of HE4, CA125 and CA72-4 biomarkers for differential diagnosis between ovarian endometrioma and epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endometriosis is frequently associated with high levels of CA125. This marker is therefore not useful for discriminating ovarian endometrioma from ovarian malignancy. The aim of this study was to establish a panel of complementary biomarkers that could be helpful in the differential diagnosis between ovarian endometriosis or other ovarian benign masses and ovarian cancer. Methods Blood samples from 50 healthy women, 17 patients with benign ovarian tumors, 57 patients with ovarian endometrioma and 39 patients with ovarian cancer were analyzed and serum values were measured for the following biomarkers: CA125, HE4 and CA72-4. Results Serum CA125 concentration was elevated in both patients with ovarian endometriosis and ovarian cancer but not in patients with other benign ovarian masses. HE4 was never increased in patients with endometriosis or benign masses whereas it was significantly higher in all patients with ovarian cancer (p < 0.05). A marked difference in CA72-4 values was observed between women with ovarian cancer (67%) and those with endometriosis (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of the study suggest that HE4 and CA72-4 determination is the best approach to confirm the benign nature of ovarian endometrioma in women with high CA125 levels. PMID:23816286

  2. Investigating impact of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Polymorphisms in Epithelial Ovarian Cancers: A Study in the Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Rahul; Chennagiri Srinivasamurthy, Premalata; Venketeshiah Reddihalli, Pallavi; Gawari, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the increasingly incident malignancies that is notorious because of its evasiveness for early diagnosis and high mortality rates. Epithelial ovarian cancers are highly dependent on pathologic vasculature and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is known to be one of the most efficient angiogenic factors. Polymorphisms of the VEGF gene, in this study, were assessed for association with the malignancy and other clinico-pathological factors. 300 case samples and 320 age and mensus status matched controls were inculcated into the study. rs699947, rs833061, rs1570360, rs2010963, rs1413711 and rs3025039 were the six single nucleotide polymorphisms that were scrutinized. Genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. rs 3025039 showed immense promise as a marker for disease aggression and recurrence and a factor for poor prognosis. rs699947 showed least association with the disease and clinico-pathologic factors studied. rs833061, rs 1570360 showed significant association with some clinico-pathological factors such as bilateral affliction of ovaries and post operative CA-125 levels. rs2010963 associated with presence of ascites in higher volumes. The SNPs under consideration showed no formidable linkage in our study samples. A haplotype analysis (excluding rs699947 and rs1413711) revealed 5 frontrunners being present in >85% of the population with TGGC and CGCC associating significantly as protective and risk factors respectively. These haplotypes showed a dose dependent additive effect of their seeming functionality. This study is unique and a first of its kind carried out in the Indian population of South-east Asia. PMID:26158818

  3. Investigating impact of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Polymorphisms in Epithelial Ovarian Cancers: A Study in the Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Janardhan, Bhaskari; Vaderhobli, Shilpa; Bhagat, Rahul; Chennagiri Srinivasamurthy, Premalata; Venketeshiah Reddihalli, Pallavi; Gawari, Ramesh; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the increasingly incident malignancies that is notorious because of its evasiveness for early diagnosis and high mortality rates. Epithelial ovarian cancers are highly dependent on pathologic vasculature and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is known to be one of the most efficient angiogenic factors. Polymorphisms of the VEGF gene, in this study, were assessed for association with the malignancy and other clinico-pathological factors. 300 case samples and 320 age and mensus status matched controls were inculcated into the study. rs699947, rs833061, rs1570360, rs2010963, rs1413711 and rs3025039 were the six single nucleotide polymorphisms that were scrutinized. Genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. rs 3025039 showed immense promise as a marker for disease aggression and recurrence and a factor for poor prognosis. rs699947 showed least association with the disease and clinico-pathologic factors studied. rs833061, rs 1570360 showed significant association with some clinico-pathological factors such as bilateral affliction of ovaries and post operative CA-125 levels. rs2010963 associated with presence of ascites in higher volumes. The SNPs under consideration showed no formidable linkage in our study samples. A haplotype analysis (excluding rs699947 and rs1413711) revealed 5 frontrunners being present in >85% of the population with TGGC and CGCC associating significantly as protective and risk factors respectively. These haplotypes showed a dose dependent additive effect of their seeming functionality. This study is unique and a first of its kind carried out in the Indian population of South-east Asia. PMID:26158818

  4. The RUNX1 transcription factor is expressed in serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma and contributes to cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Mamadou; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the RUNX1 gene as hypomethylated and overexpressed in post-chemotherapy (CT) primary cultures derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients, when compared with primary cultures derived from matched primary (prior to CT) tumors. Here we show that RUNX1 displays a trend of hypomethylation, although not significant, in omental metastases compared with primary EOC tumors. Surprisingly, RUNX1 displayed significantly higher expression not only in metastatic tissue, but also in high-grade primary tumors and even in low malignant potential tumors. The RUNX1 expression levels were almost identical in primary tumors and omental metastases, suggesting that RUNX1 hypomethylation might have a limited impact on its overexpression in advanced (metastatic) stage of the disease. Knockdown of the RUNX1 expression in EOC cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation and induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, RUNX1 suppression significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon RUNX1 suppression, while a number of pro-apoptotic genes and some EOC tumor suppressor genes were induced. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the RUNX1 gene in EOC progression and suggest that RUNX1 might be a novel EOC therapeutic target. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of RUNX1 and other members of the RUNX gene family in ovarian tumorigenesis. PMID:23442798

  5. Prognostic and clinicopathological significance of Cacna2d1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancers: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dandan; Holm, Ruth; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Trope, Claes G; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, in which cancer stem cells (CSC) have been reported to be the driving force of relapse and therapy-resistance. It is therefore important to explore CSC markers in ovarian cancer. This project aimed to explore the correlation between the expression of potential CSC maker Cacna2d1 and clinicopathological parameters in 238 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) samples. Immunohistochemically, positive Cacna2d1 expression was observed in 83.6% (199/238) of the EOC tumors, among which 107 tumors (44.9%) were highly positive and 92 (38.7%) tumors were weakly positive for the Cacna2d1 protein expression. Among the 158 serous carcinomas, the Cacna2d1 positivity was 148 (93.7%), in which 88 (55.7%) were highly positive, and 60 (38.0%) were weakly positive for the Cacna2d1 protein expression. Most strikingly, the Cacna2d1 was specifically expressed in the infiltration front areas of the EOC tumors. Statistical analyses showed that positive expression of Cacna2d1 was significantly associated with advanced FIGO stage (P<0.001), histological subtype (P=0.017) and tumor differentiation (P=0.015). Positive Cacna2d1 protein expression was significantly associated with poor overall survival (OS) and shorter progression free survival (PFS) in both total EOCs and serous carcinomas, although multivariate analyses did not reach statistical significance. In summary, our results suggest Cacna2d1 protein may play a crucial role in promoting aggressive EOC behavior and progression, and Cacna2d1 may serve as a novel predictive prognostic marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in EOCs. PMID:27725913

  6. Heterogeneity of the Mac-1 expression on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with different types of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Szyłło, Krzysztof; Malinowski, Andrzej; Sułowska, Zofia; Nowak, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The expression level of Mac-1 on the surface of neutrophils is an important indicator of neutrophil activation. Under pathological conditions, Mac-1 is believed a key adhesion molecule that facilitates cancer progression and mediates the adhesion of tumour cells to the endothelium of blood vessels. Our previous findings indicated that circulating peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) expressed enhanced levels of Mac-1, which was functionally associated with an increased adhesive function of neutrophils. The objective of the current study was to analyse whether the value of individual components of the differential white cell count, including the neutrophil and lymphocyte ratios, which are markers of blood neutrophil activation, might be associated with certain types of ovarian cancer. We showed the increase in Mac-1 expression along with a parallel decrease of L-selectin and PSGL-1 on peripheral blood neutrophils of patients with EOC of early and advanced FIGO stages, which indicates an activated state of neutrophils in comparison to neutrophils of individuals without cancer. Despite a significant difference between Mac-1 expression in patients with and without cancer, a dramatic increase in Mac-1 expression was observed in the blood of patients with undifferentiated carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC. Moreover, the expression level of Mac-1 correlated with the number of neutrophils in patients with serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated EOC. The results of an ROC analysis demonstrated that the patients with the undifferentiated type of EOC form a distinct group with regard to Mac-1 expression on blood neutrophils. The results suggested a diverse biological cadre of immune cells in patients with undifferentiated ovarian carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC. PMID:26563750

  7. Acid ceramidase (AC)--a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism--correlates with better prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Lars Christian; Karn, Thomas; Holtrich, Uwe; Gätje, Regine; Rody, Achim; Heinrich, Tomas; Ruckhäberle, Eugen; Engels, Knut

    2013-05-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC), a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism, seems to play an important role in cancer progression. The objective of this study was to explore the expression of AC in ovarian cancer and its impact on prognosis. Expression analysis of AC in n=112 ovarian cancer patients was performed by immunohistochemical analysis of primary paraffin-embedded tumor samples. The results were scored on the basis of the staining intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells, resulting in an immunoreactive score from 0 to 12. These results were correlated to clinical and pathologic characteristics and survival. AC expression correlated significantly only with FIGO stage (0.047). In serous carcinoma, low level of AC was independently associated with reduced progression-free survival and overall survival of 12.0 mo [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.78-18.23] versus 18.1 mo (95% CI, 11.61-24.59; P=0.008) and 35.7 mo (95% CI, 22.24-47.16) versus 58.7 mo (95% CI, 36.48-80.91; P=0.032), respectively. In multivariate analysis, AC presents as an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.88; 95% CI, 1.13-3.11; P=0.015). AC is a prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer. Low AC expression can be associated with tumor progression in carcinoma of the ovaries. These results are in contrast to the concept of AC as a promoter for cancer progression. Nevertheless, they are supported by the lately discovered tumor-suppressing function of sphingosine, the enzymatic product of AC.

  8. Heterogeneity of the Mac-1 expression on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with different types of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Szyłło, Krzysztof; Malinowski, Andrzej; Sułowska, Zofia; Nowak, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The expression level of Mac-1 on the surface of neutrophils is an important indicator of neutrophil activation. Under pathological conditions, Mac-1 is believed a key adhesion molecule that facilitates cancer progression and mediates the adhesion of tumour cells to the endothelium of blood vessels. Our previous findings indicated that circulating peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) expressed enhanced levels of Mac-1, which was functionally associated with an increased adhesive function of neutrophils. The objective of the current study was to analyse whether the value of individual components of the differential white cell count, including the neutrophil and lymphocyte ratios, which are markers of blood neutrophil activation, might be associated with certain types of ovarian cancer. We showed the increase in Mac-1 expression along with a parallel decrease of L-selectin and PSGL-1 on peripheral blood neutrophils of patients with EOC of early and advanced FIGO stages, which indicates an activated state of neutrophils in comparison to neutrophils of individuals without cancer. Despite a significant difference between Mac-1 expression in patients with and without cancer, a dramatic increase in Mac-1 expression was observed in the blood of patients with undifferentiated carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC. Moreover, the expression level of Mac-1 correlated with the number of neutrophils in patients with serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated EOC. The results of an ROC analysis demonstrated that the patients with the undifferentiated type of EOC form a distinct group with regard to Mac-1 expression on blood neutrophils. The results suggested a diverse biological cadre of immune cells in patients with undifferentiated ovarian carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC.

  9. Ubiquitin-specific protease 7 expression is a prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer and correlates with lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Yu, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) is a common target of herpesviruses and is important in the DNA damage response, which is also upregulated in several cancers, including prostate, colon, liver, and lung cancers. However, less is known about its expression in ovarian cancer tissues. The role of USP7 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has not yet been investigated. Materials and methods We recruited 141 patients from Linyi People’s Hospital between June 1999 and June 2013, all pathologically diagnosed with primary EOC. Their clinical data were collected, and the expression of USP7 in the tumor tissues was determined using immunohistochemistry. The correlations between USP7 expression and the clinicopathological variables of patients with EOC were assessed using Spearman’s rank correlation test. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to identify the prognosis value of USP7. The function of USP7 in the EOC cells was also detected in vitro. Results Among the 141 cases, USP7 expression was high in 59 EOC samples (41.8%), and was significantly correlated with lymphatic invasion; USP7 can act as independent prognostic indicator for the overall survival (OS) of EOC, and its high expression was associated with poor OS rate. The RNA inteference and overexpression assays indicated that USP7 can positively regulate the ovarian cell vitality and invasion process. Conclusion Patients with EOC expressing high level of USP7 have worse OS compared with those with low USP7 expression. USP7 may be involved in the proliferation and invasion of EOC cells, and USP7 expression can serve as an independent predictor of EOC. PMID:27051296

  10. Prognostic Value of KIF2A and HER2-Neu Overexpression in Patients With Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di; Zhu, Huijun; Ye, Qing; Wang, Chenyi; Xu, Yunzhao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kinesin family member 2A (KIF2A) is a member of Kinesin-13 family and involved in cell migration and cell signaling. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-neu) is implicated in the development of many cancers. Both of these 2 proteins are upstream inducer of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway that plays an important role in the regulation of many cellular events including proliferation, survival, and invasion. We hypothesized that aberrant KIF2A and HER2-neu expression might be associated with aggressive behavior of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To address the prognostic implications of KIF2A and HER2-neu in EOC, we assessed protein levels of KIF2A and HER2-neu in 159 ovarian and fallopian tube tissues (111 carcinomas and 48 normal ovary or fallopian tube tissues) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis on tissue microarray and KIF2A mRNA levels in 35 ovarian and fallopian tube tissues (15 carcinomas and 20 normal ovary or fallopian tube tissues) by real-time PCR. We found that significantly higher KIF2A mRNA expression in EOC tumors than that in normal ovary or fallopian tube tissues. The IHC results showed that protein of KIF2A and HER2-neu was overexpressed in EOC tissues compared with normal ovary or fallopian tube tissues, and KIF2A expression level was significantly associated with lymph nodes, metastasis, ascites cells, and FIGO stage. No correlation between KIF2A and HER2-neu expression was observed. Survival analysis showed that patients with KIF2A and HER2-neu overexpression had a worse overall survival (OS) as compared to patients with low or none expression of the 2 proteins. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that overexpression of KIF2A was an independent prognostic factor for OS. These findings indicate the important role of KIF2A in predicting EOC prognosis. PMID:26937910

  11. Diethylstilbestrol regulates expression of avian apolipoprotein D during regression and recrudescence of the oviduct and epithelial-derived ovarian carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J; Bae, H; Lim, W; Bazer, F W; Song, G

    2015-07-01

    Apolipoprotein D (APOD) is a glycoprotein which is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. It is structurally and functionally similar to the lipocalins which are multiple lipid-binding proteins that transport hydrophobic ligands and other small hydrophobic molecules, including cholesterol and several steroid hormones. Although multiple functions for APOD in various tissues have been reported, its expression, biological function, and hormonal regulation in the female reproductive system are not known. Thus, in this study, we focused on correlations between APOD and estrogen during development, differentiation, regression, and regeneration of the oviduct in chickens and in the development of ovarian carcinogenesis in laying hens. Results of the present study indicated that APOD messenger RNA (mRNA) expression increased (P < 0.001) in the luminal and glandular (GE) epithelia of the chicken oviduct in response to diethylstilbestrol (a nonsteroidal synthetic estrogen). In addition, the expression of APOD mRNA and protein decreased (P < 0.001) as the oviduct regressed during induced molting, and gradually increased (P < 0.001) with abundant expression in GE of the oviduct during recrudescence after molting. Furthermore, APOD mRNA and protein were predominantly localized in GE of cancerous, but not normal ovaries from laying hens. Collectively, results of the present study suggest that APOD is a novel estrogen-stimulated gene in the chicken oviduct which likely regulates growth, differentiation, and remodeling of the oviduct during oviposition cycles. Moreover, up-regulated expression of APOD in epithelial cell-derived ovarian cancerous tissue suggests that it could be a candidate biomarker for early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer in laying hens and in women. PMID:25929245

  12. Early pregnancy IGF-I and placental GH and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Helena; Fortner, Renée T; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Grankvist, Kjell; Pukkala, Eero; Lehtinen, Matti; Lundin, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling may promote ovarian tumor development by exerting mitotic, anti-apoptotic, and pro-angiogenic effects. During pregnancy, maternal production of IGF-I is regulated by placental growth hormone (GH). Parity is an established protective factor for ovarian cancer, however, no prior study has evaluated placental GH and IGF-I in pregnancy and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Prior prospective studies on the association between IGF-I and EOC in non-pregnant populations were inconclusive and did not address associations in subtypes of EOC. Among members of the Finnish Maternity Cohort and the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort we identified 1,045 EOC cases, diagnosed after recruitment (1975-2008) and before March 2011, and 2,658 individually matched controls. Placental GH and IGF-I were measured in serum from the last pregnancy before EOC diagnosis or selection as control. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI] for tertiles and a doubling of hormone concentrations. Higher IGFI was associated with a non-significant decrease in risk for invasive (ORT3 vs. T1: 0.79 [0.62-1.02]; ptrend=0.07) and endometrioid tumors (ORT3 vs. T1: 0.55 [0.28-1.07]; ptrend=0.07). The protective association between higher IGF-I levels and risk of invasive EOC was stronger in analyses limited to women aged <55 years at diagnosis (ORT3 vs. T1: 0.74 [0.57-0.96]; ptrend=0.03). Our study provides the first data on placental GH and IGF-I in pregnancy and EOC risk overall and by subtype. Our data suggest higher IGF-I levels in pregnancy may be associated with lower risk of invasive and endometrioid EOC. PMID:25516257

  13. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II.

    PubMed

    Sakalar, Cagri; Mazumder, Suparna; Johnson, Justin M; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Jaini, Ritika; Aguilar, Robert; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Connolly, Denise C; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2), is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD) and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications.

  14. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Sakalar, Cagri; Mazumder, Suparna; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Jaini, Ritika; Aguilar, Robert; Prasad, Sathyamangla V. Naga; Connolly, Denise C.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2), is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD) and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications. PMID:26618181

  15. Germline polymorphisms in an enhancer of PSIP1 are associated with progression-free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    French, Juliet D.; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Lu, Yi; Beesley, Jonathan; Gao, Bo; Kalimutho, Murugan; Henderson, Michelle J.; Russell, Amanda J.; Kar, Siddhartha; Chen, Xiaoqing; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Sivakumaran, Haran; O'Reilly, Martin; Wang, Chen; Korbie, Darren J.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Pisterer, Jacobus; Hillemanns, Peter; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James M.; Metcalf, Michelle D.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Brennan, Donal; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul; Harnett, Paul; Norris, Murray D.; Haber, Michelle; Goode, Ellen L.; Lee, Jason S.; Khanna, Kum Kum; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Edwards, Stacey L.; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Women with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are usually treated with platinum/taxane therapy after cytoreductive surgery but there is considerable inter-individual variation in response. To identify germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that contribute to variations in individual responses to chemotherapy, we carried out a multi-phase genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1,244 women diagnosed with serous EOC who were treated with the same first-line chemotherapy, carboplatin and paclitaxel. We identified two SNPs (rs7874043 and rs72700653) in TTC39B (best P=7×10−5, HR=1.90, for rs7874043) associated with progression-free survival (PFS). Functional analyses show that both SNPs lie in a putative regulatory element (PRE) that physically interacts with the promoters of PSIP1, CCDC171 and an alternative promoter of TTC39B. The C allele of rs7874043 is associated with poor PFS and showed increased binding of the Sp1 transcription factor, which is critical for chromatin interactions with PSIP1. Silencing of PSIP1 significantly impaired DNA damage-induced Rad51 nuclear foci and reduced cell viability in ovarian cancer lines. PSIP1 (PC4 and SFRS1 Interacting Protein 1) is known to protect cells from stress-induced apoptosis, and high expression is associated with poor PFS in EOC patients. We therefore suggest that the minor allele of rs7874043 confers poor PFS by increasing PSIP1 expression. PMID:26840454

  16. Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

  17. Body size in early life and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: results from the Nurses' Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Baer, H J; Hankinson, S E; Tworoger, S S

    2008-01-01

    Adult body mass index (BMI) has been associated with ovarian cancer risk, but few studies have examined body size earlier in life. We prospectively examined associations of body fatness at ages 5 and 10, BMI at age 18, height, and birthweight with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS: 110 311 women, 735 cases) and Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII: 113 059 women, 137 cases). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was a weak inverse association between average body fatness at ages 5 and 10 and risk in the NHS (RR for heaviest vs most lean=0.81, 95% CI: 0.53–1.24, P for trend=0.04) and a nonsignificant positive association in the NHSII (RR=2.09, 95% CI: 0.98–4.48, P for trend=0.10), possibly due to differences in age and menopausal status. Height was positively associated with risk in both cohorts (RR for ⩾1.75 vs <1.6 m=1.43, 95% CI: 1.05–1.96, P for trend=0.001). Body mass index at the age of 18 years and birthweight were not associated with risk. Further research should examine the biological mechanisms underlying the observed associations. PMID:19034283

  18. Palliative systemic therapy for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer: current options

    PubMed Central

    Elit, Laurie; Hirte, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To review the available systemic treatments for women with recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods A literature review was conducted for recurrent ovarian cancer articles in English, including randomized trials, Phase II trials, or reviews. Results We discuss the efficacy and toxicity outcomes associated with systemic therapy for platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Clearly, platinum-based combination systemic therapy shows a prolonged progression-free interval compared with single-agent chemotherapy with a low toxicity profile. No clear superior management strategy exists for platinum-resistant/refractory disease. Novel targeted antiangiogenic agents (eg, bevacizumab), angiopoeitin inhibitors (eg, AMG 386), and poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors (eg, olaparib) are reviewed. Conclusion Although combination platinum-based chemotherapy has shown benefits for women with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, the optimal treatment strategy for those with platinum-resistant or platinum-refractory disease is not clear. Molecular and genetic targeted therapies may provide opportunities for those women with tumor profiles that show sensitivity for specific agents. PMID:23459506

  19. Trefoil factor 3 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer exerts a minor effect on clinicopathological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hoellen, Friederike; Kostara, Athina; Karn, Thomas; Holtrich, Uwe; El-Balat, Ahmed; Otto, Mike; Rody, Achim; Hanker, Lars C.

    2016-01-01

    The role of trefoil factor 3 (intestinal) (TFF3) has been analyzed in numerous cancers, such as breast and gastrointestinal cancer, and has been associated with poor prognosis. However, the role of TFF3 in ovarian cancers is not clear. Expression analysis of TFF3 in 91 ovarian cancer patients was performed by immunohistochemistry of primary paraffin-embedded tumor samples. The results were scored according to staining intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells resulting in an immune-reactive score (IRS) of 0–12. These results were correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and survival. TFF3 expression in our patient cohort exhibited a tendency towards improved overall and progression-free survival (PFS). In TFF3-positive serous and high-grade serous ovarian cancers, the median PFS was 27.6 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 0–55.7] vs. 15.2 months in TFF3-negative tumors (95% CI: 13.8–16.6) (P=0.183). The median overall survival was 53.9 months in TFF3-positive tumors (95% CI: Non-applicable) vs. 44.4 months in TFF3-negative cases (95% CI: 30.5–58.3) (P=0.36). TFF3 negativity was significantly associated with higher tumor grade (P=0.05). Based on our results, further studies are required in order to elucidate whether survival and chemosensitivity are affected by TFF3 expression in ovarian cancer. PMID:27699037

  20. [HE4, a novel marker for epithelial ovarian cancer: evaluation of analytical performances].

    PubMed

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Roques, Sylvie; Viglianti, Cathy; Fabbro, Michel; Montels, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel marker for ovarian cancer. HE4 exhibits a high sensitivity to detect ovarian cancer and can be used with CA125 as a predictor of malignancy. Additional uses of HE4 are as an aid of monitoring response to therapy for patients with invasive ovarian cancer and as a marker to detect recurrences in the follow-up after treatment of the primary tumor. The HE4 EIA, an enzyme immunoassay for the quantitative determination of HE4 in human serum developed by Fujirebio Diagnostic Inc. (Tokyo, Japan), is now available with a CE-IVD label in Europe (Diasource, Nivelles, Belgium). The aim of the study was to evaluate according to the COFRAC LAB GTA 04 guide, the analytical performance of the test, using 4 standardized samples (target values: 49.8, 140.4, 167.6 and 415.2 pmol/L) and serum samples from patients with ovarian cancer treated in our institution. Intra- and inter-assay precisions showed coefficients of variation less than 10%. The low limit of detection (4 pmol/L) and the limit of quantitation (8 pmol/L) are suitable for clinical samples assessment. The assay mean dilution linearity is 100 +/- 10% (90 to 107% of recovery). Globally, the uncertainty varied from 13.1% (low values) to 28.1% (elevated values). We conclude that the HE4 EIA from Fujirebio Diagnostic Inc. displayed convenient analytical performances that allows its use it clinical practice.

  1. Trefoil factor 3 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer exerts a minor effect on clinicopathological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hoellen, Friederike; Kostara, Athina; Karn, Thomas; Holtrich, Uwe; El-Balat, Ahmed; Otto, Mike; Rody, Achim; Hanker, Lars C.

    2016-01-01

    The role of trefoil factor 3 (intestinal) (TFF3) has been analyzed in numerous cancers, such as breast and gastrointestinal cancer, and has been associated with poor prognosis. However, the role of TFF3 in ovarian cancers is not clear. Expression analysis of TFF3 in 91 ovarian cancer patients was performed by immunohistochemistry of primary paraffin-embedded tumor samples. The results were scored according to staining intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells resulting in an immune-reactive score (IRS) of 0–12. These results were correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and survival. TFF3 expression in our patient cohort exhibited a tendency towards improved overall and progression-free survival (PFS). In TFF3-positive serous and high-grade serous ovarian cancers, the median PFS was 27.6 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 0–55.7] vs. 15.2 months in TFF3-negative tumors (95% CI: 13.8–16.6) (P=0.183). The median overall survival was 53.9 months in TFF3-positive tumors (95% CI: Non-applicable) vs. 44.4 months in TFF3-negative cases (95% CI: 30.5–58.3) (P=0.36). TFF3 negativity was significantly associated with higher tumor grade (P=0.05). Based on our results, further studies are required in order to elucidate whether survival and chemosensitivity are affected by TFF3 expression in ovarian cancer.

  2. MCT1 promotes the cisplatin-resistance by antagonizing Fas in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunxiao; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Chunxia; Chen, Xuejun; Han, Xuechuan; Liu, Xueqin; Ma, Hongyun; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of MCT1 in the development of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer and its possible relationship with Fas. We found the expression of MCT1 was obviously increased both in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer tissue and A2780/CP cells compared with sensitive ovarian cancer tissue and cell lines A2780. And in A2780 cells treated with Cisplatin, the expression of MCT1 increased in a concentration-dependent manner, MCT1 knockdown attenuates cisplatin-induced cell viability. In A2780 and A2780/CP cells transfected with MCT1 siRNA, the activation of several downstream targets of Fas, including FasL and FAP-1 were largely prevented, whereas the expression of Caspase-3 was increased, accompanying with increased abundance of Fas. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence showed that there is interaction between endogenous MCT1 with Fas in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, depletion of MCT1 by shRNA reverses cisplatin-resistance and the expression of Fas. This study showed that down regulation of MCT1 promote the sensibility to Cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell line. And this effect appeared to be mediated via antagonizing the effect of Fas. PMID:26045776

  3. microRNA-181a has a critical role in ovarian cancer progression through the regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Aditya; Lee, Christine; Joseph, Peronne; Marchini, Sergio; Baccarini, Alessia; Kolev, Valentin; Romualdi, Chiara; Fruscio, Robert; Shah, Hardik; Wang, Feng; Mullokandov, Gavriel; Fishman, David; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Rahaman, Jamal; Kalir, Tamara; Redline, Raymond W.; Brown, Brian D.; Narla, Goutham; Difeo, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Effective targets to treat advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and biomarkers to predict treatment response are still lacking because of the complexity of pathways involved in ovarian cancer progression. Here we show that miR-181a promotes TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via repression of its functional target, Smad7. miR-181a and phosphorylated Smad2 are enriched in recurrent compared with matched-primary ovarian tumours and their expression is associated with shorter time to recurrence and poor outcome in patients with EOC. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-181a results in increased cellular survival, migration, invasion, drug resistance and in vivo tumour burden and dissemination. In contrast, miR-181a inhibition via decoy vector suppression and Smad7 re-expression results in significant reversion of these phenotypes. Combined, our findings highlight an unappreciated role for miR-181a, Smad7, and the TGF-β signalling pathway in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

  4. EGF-receptor regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Laurie G; Moss, Natalie M; Stack, M Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is most frequently detected when disease has already disseminated intra-abdominally, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of less than 20% owing to complications of metastasis. Peritoneal ascites is often present, establishing a unique microenvironmental niche comprised of tumor and inflammatory cells, along with a wide range of bioactive soluble factors, several of which stimulate the EGF-receptor (EGFR). Elevated EGFR is associated with less favorable disease outcome in ovarian cancer, related in part to EGFR activation of signaling cascades that lead to enhanced matrix metalloproteinase expression and/or function. The available data suggest that modulating the expression or activity of the EGFR and/or matrix metalloproteinases offers opportunity for targeted intervention in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:19374540

  5. Regulatory T cells, inherited variation, and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L; Maurer, Matthew J; Preston, Claudia C; Moysich, Kirsten B; Goergen, Krista; Hawthorne, Kieran M; Cunningham, Julie M; Odunsi, Kunle; Hartmann, Lynn C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Oberg, Ann L; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-12-01

    The immune system constitutes one of the host factors modifying outcomes in ovarian cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are believed to be a major factor in preventing the immune response from destroying ovarian cancers. Understanding mechanisms that regulate Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could lead to the identification of novel targets aimed at reducing their influence. In this study, we used immunofluorescence-based microscopy to enumerate Tregs, total CD4 T cells, and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells in fresh frozen tumors from over 400 patients with ovarian cancer (>80 % high-grade serous). We sought to determine whether Tregs were associated with survival and genetic variation in 79 genes known to influence Treg induction, trafficking, or function. We used Cox regression, accounting for known prognostic factors, to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with T cell counts and ratios. We found that the ratios of CD8 T cells and total CD4 T cells to Tregs were associated with improved overall survival (CD8/Treg HR 0.84, p = 0.0089; CD4/Treg HR 0.88, p = 0.046) and with genetic variation in IL-10 (p = 0.0073 and 0.01, respectively). In multivariate analyses, the associations between the ratios and overall survival remained similar (IL-10 and clinical covariate-adjusted CD8/Treg HR 0.85, p = 0.031; CD4/Treg HR 0.87, p = 0.093), suggesting that this association was not driven by variation in IL-10. Thus, integration of novel tumor phenotyping measures with extensive clinical and genetic information suggests that the ratio of T cells to Tregs may be prognostic of outcome in ovarian cancer, regardless of inherited genotype in genes related to Tregs. PMID:26298430

  6. Effects of HCG on human epithelial ovarian cancer vasculogenic mimicry formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    GAO, SAINAN; FAN, CHAO; HUANG, HUA; ZHU, CHANGLAI; SU, MIN; ZHANG, YUQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of mortality due to gynecological malignancy, and vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation is correlated with poor prognosis. In a previous study, the present authors observed that human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) could promote VM formation in three-dimensional OVCAR-3 cell cultures. In order to investigate whether HCG could promote VM formation in ovarian cancer in vivo, the role of OVCAR-3 cells overexpressing or depleted of chorionic gonadotropin, beta polypeptide 5 (CGB5, which is the fifth subunit of β-HCG and was identified as the key part of HCG) were injected into nude mice in the present study, while BeWo cells were used as a positive control. The results demonstrated that overexpressed CGB5 promoted xenografts tumor formation in nude mice, and the results of hematoxylin and eosin and cluster of differentiation (CD)34-periodic acid-Schiff dual staining revealed that CGB5 promoted VM formation. Furthermore, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunochemistry staining demonstrated that the expression of the vascular markers CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor and factor VIII was also upregulated in the CGB5-overexpressing xenografts tumors. In addition, the expression of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), the receptor of CGB5, was increased in CGB5-overexpressing cells. In conclusion, CGB5 may promote tumor growth and VM formation via activation of the LHR signal transduction pathway, which may support a novel strategy for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:27347165

  7. Targeting Nrf2 in healthy and malignant ovarian epithelial cells: Protection versus promotion.

    PubMed

    van der Wijst, Monique G P; Huisman, Christian; Mposhi, Archibold; Roelfes, Gerard; Rots, Marianne G

    2015-08-01

    Risk factors indicate the importance of oxidative stress during ovarian carcinogenesis. To tolerate oxidative stress, cells activate the transcription factor Nrf2 (Nfe2l2), the master regulator of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes. Indeed, for most cancers, hyperactivity of Nrf2 is observed, and siRNA studies assigned Nrf2 as therapeutic target. However, the cancer-protective role of Nrf2 in healthy cells highlights the requirement for an adequate therapeutic window. We engineered artificial transcription factors to assess the role of Nrf2 in healthy (OSE-C2) and malignant ovarian cells (A2780). Successful NRF2 up- and downregulation correlated with decreased, respectively increased, sensitivity toward oxidative stress. Inhibition of NRF2 reduced the colony forming potential to the same extent in wild-type and BRCA1 knockdown A2780 cells. Only in BRCA1 knockdown A2780 cells, the effect of Nrf2 inhibition could be enhanced when combined with PARP inhibitors. Therefore, we propose that this combination therapy of PARP inhibitors and Nrf2 inhibition can further improve treatment efficacy specifically in BRCA1 mutant cancer cells without acquiring the side-effects associated with previously studied Nrf2 inhibition combinations with either chemotherapy or radiation. Our findings stress the dual role of Nrf2 in carcinogenesis, while offering approaches to exploit Nrf2 as a potent therapeutic target in ovarian cancer.

  8. Metastatic dissemination of human ovarian epithelial carcinoma is promoted by alpha2beta1-integrin-mediated interaction with type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, D A; Kearns, A; Chilukuri, K; Bafetti, L M; O'Toole, E A; Georgacopoulos, J; Ravosa, M J; Stack, M S

    1998-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of epithelial ovarian carcinoma is thought to be mediated via tumor cell exfoliation into the peritoneal cavity, followed by adhesion to and invasion through the mesothelium which overlies the contents of the peritoneal cavity. In this study, we have utilized short-term primary cultures to analyze the effect of specific extracellular matrix proteins on properties of human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cells which contribute to the invasive phenotype. Analysis of cell:matrix adhesive profiles indicated that ovarian carcinoma cells adhere preferentially to type I collagen. Immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated the presence of the collagen-binding alpha2beta1 integrin in biotin-labeled ovarian carcinoma cell membranes, and cellular adhesion was inhibited by blocking antibodies directed against the alpha2 and beta1 integrin subunits. The alpha2beta1-binding peptide Asp-Gly-Glu-Ala (DGEA) was also moderately effective at blocking adhesion to collagen relative to the control peptide Ala-Gly-Glu-Ala (AGEA). Analysis of cell motility on protein-coated colloidal gold coverslips demonstrated that ovarian carcinoma cells migrate preferentially on type I collagen coated surfaces. Type I collagen promoted migration in a concentration-dependent, saturable manner, with maximal migration observed at a collagen-coating concentration of 50 microg/ml. Migration on collagen was inhibited by antibodies directed against the alpha2 and beta1 integrin subunits and by DGEA peptide, providing evidence for the role of the alpha2beta1 integrin in ovarian carcinoma cell motility. Culturing ovarian carcinoma cells on type I collagen gels led to a significant increase in conversion of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 zymogen to the 66-kD form, suggesting that adhesion to collagen also influences matrix-degrading proteinases. These data suggest that alpha2beta1-integrin-mediated interaction of ovarian carcinoma cells with type I collagen, a protein prevalent both in the

  9. Treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Johnson, Peter W M

    2016-07-01

    There is now good evidence that the escalated BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) is more effective in controlling advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) than the widely used ABVD regimen (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine), but the extra efficacy comes at the expense of both short- and long-term toxicity, and there is debate as to whether overall survival is affected. Baseline prognostic factors have proven of limited utility for determining which patients require more intensive therapy and recent studies have sought to use interim fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) evaluation as a means to guide the modulation of treatment, both upwards and downwards in intensity. These suggest that if treatment starts with ABVD then patients remaining PET-positive after 2 months can be salvaged with escalated BEACOPP in around 65% of cases, but those becoming PET-negative may still experience recurrences in 15%-20%, an event that is more common in those with more advanced disease at presentation. There are early data to suggest that starting with escalated BEACOPP may reduce the rate of recurrence after a negative interim PET to less than 10%. This may be an attractive approach for those with very high-risk features at presentation, but risks overtreating many patients if applied nonselectively. New regimens incorporating antibody-drug conjugates may shift the balance of efficacy and toxicity once again, and further studies are underway to evaluate this. PMID:27496308

  10. Expression of organic cation transporter SLC22A16 in human epithelial ovarian cancer: a possible role of the adriamycin importer.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kyoko; Ito, Kiyoshi; Akahira, Jun-ichi; Sato, Naoko; Onogawa, Tohru; Moriya, Takuya; Unno, Michiaki; Abe, Takaaki; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2007-07-01

    The SLC22A16 is one of the newly isolated organic cation transporters, which is responsible for uptake and transport of adriamycin into cells. Adriamycin is considered to be an active agent for ovarian cancer. Recently, the benefit of adding adriamycin to the current standard regimen, paclitaxel and platinum, is evaluated to improve the outcome of patients with ovarian cancer. Therefore, we examined the expression of SLC22A16 in ovarian cancers. Twelve ovarian carcinoma cell lines were used for immunoblotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to confirm the expression of SLC22A16 mRNA and protein. Five normal ovaries, 12 ovarian adenomas, and 94 ovarian cancer cases were obtained from patients after surgical therapy. The specimens were used for immunohistochemistry. The median value of relative SLC22A16 gene expression in cell lines derived from clear-cell adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that in cell lines from other histologies (P < 0.001). Expression of SLC22A16 protein was also detected in cell lines derived from clear-cell adenocarcinoma. The SLC22A16 immunoreactivity was detected in 15 (16%) of 94 epithelial ovarian cancer, 1 (8.3%) of 12 benign adenomas, but 0 (0%) of 5 normal ovary cases. In ovarian cancer tissues, SLC22A16 immunoreactivity was detected in 2 (5%) of 38 serous adenocarcinoma, 1 (6.7%) of 15 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, 0 (0%) of 14 mucinous adenocarcinoma, and 12 (46.2%) of 26 clear-cell adenocarcinoma (P < 0.0001, clear-cell vs other histologies). In conclusion, SLC22A16 was abundantly expressed in clear-cell adenocarcinoma. Our results suggest that adriamycin-related chemicals that are taken up via SLC22A16 may have the potential to be effective against clear-cell adenocarcinoma.

  11. Variation in cell signaling protein expression may introduce sampling bias in primary epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittermeyer, Gabriele; Malinowsky, Katharina; Beese, Christian; Höfler, Heinz; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Avril, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of cell signaling proteins is used as prognostic and predictive biomarker, variability of protein levels within tumors is not well studied. We assessed intratumoral heterogeneity of protein expression within primary ovarian cancer. Full-length proteins were extracted from 88 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 13 primary high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas with 5-9 samples each. In addition, 14 samples of normal fallopian tube epithelium served as reference. Quantitative reverse phase protein arrays were used to analyze the expression of 36 cell signaling proteins including HER2, EGFR, PI3K/Akt, and angiogenic pathways as well as 15 activated (phosphorylated) proteins. We found considerable intratumoral heterogeneity in the expression of proteins with a mean coefficient of variation of 25% (range 17-53%). The extent of intratumoral heterogeneity differed between proteins (p<0.005). Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the extent of heterogeneity between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated proteins. In comparison, we assessed the variation of protein levels amongst tumors from different patients, which revealed a similar mean coefficient of variation of 21% (range 12-48%). Based on hierarchical clustering, samples from the same patient clustered more closely together compared to samples from different patients. However, a clear separation of tumor versus normal tissue by clustering was only achieved when mean expression values of all individual samples per tumor were analyzed. While differential expression of some proteins was detected independently of the sampling method used, the majority of proteins only demonstrated differential expression when mean expression values of multiple samples per tumor were analyzed. Our data indicate that assessment of established and novel cell signaling proteins as diagnostic or prognostic markers may require sampling of serous ovarian cancers at several distinct

  12. Variation in Cell Signaling Protein Expression May Introduce Sampling Bias in Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beese, Christian; Höfler, Heinz; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Avril, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of cell signaling proteins is used as prognostic and predictive biomarker, variability of protein levels within tumors is not well studied. We assessed intratumoral heterogeneity of protein expression within primary ovarian cancer. Full-length proteins were extracted from 88 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 13 primary high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas with 5–9 samples each. In addition, 14 samples of normal fallopian tube epithelium served as reference. Quantitative reverse phase protein arrays were used to analyze the expression of 36 cell signaling proteins including HER2, EGFR, PI3K/Akt, and angiogenic pathways as well as 15 activated (phosphorylated) proteins. We found considerable intratumoral heterogeneity in the expression of proteins with a mean coefficient of variation of 25% (range 17–53%). The extent of intratumoral heterogeneity differed between proteins (p<0.005). Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the extent of heterogeneity between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated proteins. In comparison, we assessed the variation of protein levels amongst tumors from different patients, which revealed a similar mean coefficient of variation of 21% (range 12–48%). Based on hierarchical clustering, samples from the same patient clustered more closely together compared to samples from different patients. However, a clear separation of tumor versus normal tissue by clustering was only achieved when mean expression values of all individual samples per tumor were analyzed. While differential expression of some proteins was detected independently of the sampling method used, the majority of proteins only demonstrated differential expression when mean expression values of multiple samples per tumor were analyzed. Our data indicate that assessment of established and novel cell signaling proteins as diagnostic or prognostic markers may require sampling of serous ovarian cancers at several

  13. Randomised study of systematic lymphadenectomy in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer macroscopically confined to the pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, A; Benedetti Panici, P; Dell'Anna, T; Landoni, F; Lissoni, A; Pellegrino, A; Rossi, R S; Chiari, S; Campagnutta, E; Greggi, S; Angioli, R; Manci, N; Calcagno, M; Scambia, G; Fossati, R; Floriani, I; Torri, V; Grassi, R; Mangioni, C

    2006-01-01

    No randomised trials have addressed the value of systematic aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy (SL) in ovarian cancer macroscopically confined to the pelvis. This study was conducted to investigate the role of SL compared with lymph nodes sampling (CONTROL) in the management of early stage ovarian cancer. A total of 268 eligible patients with macroscopically intrapelvic ovarian carcinoma were randomised to SL (N=138) or CONTROL (N=130). The primary objective was to compare the proportion of patients with retroperitoneal nodal involvement between the two groups. Median operating time was longer and more patients required blood transfusions in the SL arm than the CONTROL arm (240 vs 150 min, P<0.001, and 36 vs 22%, P=0.012, respectively). More patients in the SL group had positive nodes at histologic examination than patients on CONTROL (9 vs 22%, P=0.007). Postoperative chemotherapy was delivered in 66% and 51% of patients with negative nodes on CONTROL and SL, respectively (P=0.03). At a median follow-up of 87.8 months, the adjusted risks for progression (hazard ratio [HR]=0.72, 95%CI=0.46–1.21, P=0.16) and death (HR=0.85, 95%CI=0.49–1.47, P=0.56) were lower, but not statistically significant, in the SL than the CONTROL arm. Five-year progression-free survival was 71.3 and 78.3% (difference=7.0%, 95% CI=–3.4–14.3%) and 5-year overall survival was 81.3 and 84.2% (difference=2.9%, 95% CI=−7.0–9.2%) respectively for CONTROL and SL. SL detects a higher proportion of patients with metastatic lymph nodes. This trial may have lacked power to exclude clinically important effects of SL on progression free and overall survival. PMID:16940979

  14. Molecular and functional characteristics of ovarian surface epithelial cells transformed by KrasG12D and loss of Pten in a mouse model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mullany, L K; Fan, H-Y; Liu, Z; White, L D; Marshall, A; Gunaratne, P; Anderson, M L; Creighton, C J; Xin, L; Deavers, M; Wong, K-K; Richards, J S

    2011-08-11

    Ovarian cancer is a complex and deadly disease that remains difficult to detect at an early curable stage. Furthermore, although some oncogenic (Kras, Pten/PI3K and Trp53) pathways that are frequently mutated, deleted or amplified in ovarian cancer are known, how these pathways initiate and drive specific morphological phenotypes and tumor outcomes remain unclear. We recently generated Pten(fl/fl); Kras(G12D); Amhr2-Cre mice to disrupt the Pten gene and express a stable mutant form of Kras(G12D) in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. On the basis of histopathologic criteria, the mutant mice developed low-grade ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinomas at an early age and with 100% penetrance. This highly reproducible phenotype provides the first mouse model in which to study this ovarian cancer subtype. OSE cells isolated from ovaries of mutant mice at 5 and 10 weeks of age exhibit temporal changes in the expression of specific Mullerian epithelial marker genes, grow in soft agar and develop ectopic invasive tumors in recipient mice, indicating that the cells are transformed. Gene profiling identified specific mRNAs and microRNAs differentially expressed in purified OSE cells derived from tumors of the mutant mice compared with wild-type OSE cells. Mapping of transcripts or genes between the mouse OSE mutant data sets, the Kras signature from human cancer cell lines and the human ovarian tumor array data sets, documented significant overlap, indicating that KRAS is a key driver of OSE transformation in this context. Two key hallmarks of the mutant OSE cells in these mice are the elevated expression of the tumor-suppressor Trp53 (p53) and its microRNA target, miR-34a-c. We propose that elevated TRP53 and miR-34a-c may exert negatively regulatory effects that reduce the proliferative potential of OSE cells leading to the low-grade serous adenocarcinoma phenotype.

  15. Effects of Kras activation and Pten deletion alone or in combination on MUC1 biology and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixin; Ma, Tianzhou; Brozick, Joan; Babalola, Kathlene; Budiu, Raluca; Tseng, George; Vlad, Anda M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucin1 (MUC1) is an epithelial glycoprotein overexpressed in ovarian cancer and actively involved in tumor cell migration and metastasis. Using novel in vitro and in vivo MUC1-expressing conditional (Cre-loxP) ovarian tumor models, we focus here on MUC1 biology and the roles of Kras activation and Pten deletion during cell transformation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We generated several novel murine ovarian cancer cell lines derived from the ovarian surface epithelia (OSE) of mice with conditional mutations in Kras, Pten or both. In addition, we also generated several tumor-derived new cell lines that reproduce the original tumor phenotype in vivo and mirror late stage metastatic disease. Our results demonstrate that de novo activation of oncogenic Kras does not trigger increased proliferation, cellular transformation or EMT and prevents MUC1 upregulation. In contrast, Pten deletion accelerates cell proliferation, triggers cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo and stimulates MUC1 expression. Ovarian tumor-derived cell lines MKP-Liver and MKP-Lung cells reproduce in vivo EMT and represent the first immune competent mouse model for distant hematogenous spread. Whole genome microarray expression analysis using tumor and OSE-derived cell lines reveals a 121 gene signature associated with EMT and metastasis. When applied to n=542 cases from the ovarian cancer TCGA dataset, the gene signature identifies a patient subset with decreased survival (p=0.04). Using an extensive collection of novel murine cell lines we have identified distinct roles for Kras and Pten on MUC1 and EMT in vivo and in vitro. The data has implications for future design of combination therapies targeting Kras mutations, Pten deletions and MUC1 vaccines. PMID:26973247

  16. Outcomes analysis of an alternative formulation of PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin in recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma during the drug shortage era

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Jessica L; Smith, Ashlee; Zorn, Kristin K; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Kelley, Joseph; Krivak, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    Background In response to the critical shortage of Doxil®, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed temporary importation of non-FDA-approved second-generation liposomal doxorubicin, Lipo-Dox®. Lipo-Dox utilizes a different liposomal particle than Doxil and demonstrates different pharmacokinetic properties. Its use has never been evaluated in a North American population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of Lipo-Dox at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, for patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer who were treated during the Doxil shortage. Methods Patients treated with Lipo-Dox from January 2012 to December 2012 were identified retrospectively. Disease response was defined radiographically by RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) or biochemically by CA-125 level if measurable disease was not present. Survival was defined from the start date of Lipo-Dox until the date of progression or death. Toxicity was assessed by the Gynecologic Oncology Group common toxicity criteria. Results Eighteen patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer who received Lipo-Dox were identified. These patients had a median of three prior treatment regimens. The median number of Lipo-Dox cycles given was 3.5 (range 1–8). No patients had a complete or partial response. Two patients had stable disease over a mean follow-up of 144.5 days. Fourteen patients had progressive disease, with a median time to progression of 82 days. Progression was based on CA-125 in four patients and RECIST in the remainder. Nine patients died from the disease. Conclusion Although this represents a small, pretreated population, there were no clinical responses to Lipo-Dox, raising the question as to whether it is an equivalent substitute for Doxil. Further evaluation is needed, but if confirmed, these findings raise concerns regarding the use of current stocks of Lipo-Dox, as well as the prudence of

  17. Prognostic factors in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. (Gruppo Interregionale Cooperativo di Oncologia Ginecologica (GICOG)).

    PubMed

    Marsoni, S; Torri, V; Valsecchi, M G; Belloni, C; Bianchi, U; Bolis, G; Bonazzi, C; Colombo, N; Epis, A; Favalli, G

    1990-09-01

    The data on 914 patients enrolled in four randomised trials in advanced ovarian cancer, consecutively conducted by the same cooperative group between 1978 and 1986, were analysed with the aims of: (1) determining the impact of selected prognostic variables on survival; (2) finding, from the interaction of favourable prognostic factors and treatment, an approximate estimate of the magnitude of the survival advantage associated with the use of platinum-based combination chemotherapy. The overall 3-year survival in this series of patients is twice that reported historically (22%; 95% CL 18.7-25.4). The proportional hazard regression model was used to perform the analysis on survival. Residual tumour size, age, FIGO stage and cell type were all independent determinants of survival. Differences in survival from the various prognostic groups were impressive with 5-year survival rates ranging from 7 to 62%. However, these differences were not qualitative (i.e. the kinetics of survival were similar for the best and the worst groups) suggesting that current prognostic factors are of little use for selecting 'biologically' different sub-populations. Platinum-based regimens were associated to an overall prolonged median survival, but this benefit was not observable in the subgroup with most favourable prognosis (less than 2 cm residual tumour size). The implications of these observations for clinical research and ovarian cancer patients care are discussed.

  18. Prognostic factors in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. (Gruppo Interregionale Cooperativo di Oncologia Ginecologica (GICOG)).

    PubMed Central

    Marsoni, S.; Torri, V.; Valsecchi, M. G.; Belloni, C.; Bianchi, U.; Bolis, G.; Bonazzi, C.; Colombo, N.; Epis, A.; Favalli, G.

    1990-01-01

    The data on 914 patients enrolled in four randomised trials in advanced ovarian cancer, consecutively conducted by the same cooperative group between 1978 and 1986, were analysed with the aims of: (1) determining the impact of selected prognostic variables on survival; (2) finding, from the interaction of favourable prognostic factors and treatment, an approximate estimate of the magnitude of the survival advantage associated with the use of platinum-based combination chemotherapy. The overall 3-year survival in this series of patients is twice that reported historically (22%; 95% CL 18.7-25.4). The proportional hazard regression model was used to perform the analysis on survival. Residual tumour size, age, FIGO stage and cell type were all independent determinants of survival. Differences in survival from the various prognostic groups were impressive with 5-year survival rates ranging from 7 to 62%. However, these differences were not qualitative (i.e. the kinetics of survival were similar for the best and the worst groups) suggesting that current prognostic factors are of little use for selecting 'biologically' different sub-populations. Platinum-based regimens were associated to an overall prolonged median survival, but this benefit was not observable in the subgroup with most favourable prognosis (less than 2 cm residual tumour size). The implications of these observations for clinical research and ovarian cancer patients care are discussed. PMID:2119684

  19. Intraperitoneal Bortezomib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Ribosomal L22-like1 (RPL22L1) Promotes Ovarian Cancer Metastasis by Inducing Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nan; Wei, Jia; Wang, Yuhui; Yan, Jinyan; Qin, Ying; Tong, Dandan; Pang, Bo; Sun, Donglin; Sun, Haiming; Yu, Yang; Sun, Wenjing; Meng, Xiangning; Zhang, Chunyu; Bai, Jing; Chen, Feng; Geng, Jingshu; Lee, Ki-Young; Fu, Songbin; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Double minute chromosomes (DMs) have important implications for cancer progression because oncogenes frequently amplified on them. We previously detected a functionally undefined gene amplified on DMs, Ribosomal L22-like1 (RPL22L1). The relationship between RPL22L1 and cancer progression is unknown. Here, RPL22L1 was characterized for its role in ovarian cancer (OC) metastasis and its underlying mechanism was examined. DNA copy number and mRNA expression of RPL22L1 in OC cells was analyzed using data obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas and the Gene Expression Omnibus database. An immunohistochemical analysis of clinical OC specimens was performed and the relationships between expression level and clinicopathological factors were evaluated. Additionally, in vivo and in vitro assays were performed to understand the role of RPL22L1 in OC. RPL22L1 expression was higher in OC specimens than in normal tissues, and its expression level was highly positively correlated with invasion and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). RPL22L1 over-expression significantly enhanced intraperitoneal xenograft tumor development in nude mice and promoted invasion and migration in vitro. Additionally, RPL22L1 knockdown remarkably inhibited UACC-1598 cells invasion and migration. Further, RPL22L1 over-expression up-regulated the mesenchymal markers vimentin, fibronectin, and α-SMA, reduced expression of the epithelial markers E-cadherin, α-catenin, and β-catenin. RPL22L1 inhibition reduced expression of vimentin and N-cadherin. These results suggest that RPL22L1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our data showed that the DMs amplified gene RPL22L1 is critical in maintaining the aggressive phenotype of OC and in triggering cell metastasis by inducing EMT. It could be employed as a novel prognostic marker and/or effective therapeutic target for OC. PMID:26618703

  1. EDD enhances cell survival and cisplatin resistance and is a therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Amber; Zheng, Hui; Eblen, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase EDD is overexpressed in recurrent, platinum-resistant ovarian cancers, suggesting a role in tumor survival and/or platinum resistance. EDD knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced apoptosis in A2780ip2, OVCAR5 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells, correlating with loss of the prosurvival protein myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) through a glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta-independent mechanism. SiRNA to EDD or Mcl-1 induced comparable levels of apoptosis in A2780ip2 and ES-2 cells. Stable overexpression of Mcl-1 protected cells from apoptosis following EDD knockdown, accompanied by a loss of endogenous, but not exogenous, Mcl-1 protein, suggesting that EDD regulated Mcl-1 synthesis. Indeed, EDD knockdown induced a 1.87-fold decrease in Mcl-1 messenger RNA and EDD transfection enhanced murine Mcl-1 promoter-driven luciferase expression 5-fold. To separate EDD survival and potential cisplatin resistance functions, we generated EDD shRNA stable cell lines that could survive initial EDD knockdown and showed that these cells were 4- to 21-fold more sensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, transient EDD overexpression in COS-7 cells was sufficient to promote cisplatin resistance 2.4-fold, dependent upon its E3 ligase activity. In vivo, mouse intraperitoneal ES-2 and A2780ip2 xenograft experiments showed that mice treated with EDD siRNA by nanoliposomal delivery [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophatidylcholine (DOPC)] and cisplatin had significantly less tumor burden than those treated with control siRNA/DOPC alone (ES-2, 77.9% reduction, P = 0.004; A2780ip2, 75.9% reduction, P = 0.042) or control siRNA/DOPC with cisplatin in ES-2 (64.4% reduction, P = 0.035), with a trend in A2780ip2 (60.3% reduction, P = 0.168). These results identify EDD as a dual regulator of cell survival and cisplatin resistance and suggest that EDD is a therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. PMID:24379240

  2. Human amniotic epithelial cells can differentiate into granulosa cells and restore folliculogenesis in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian dysfunction frequently occurs in female cancer patients after chemotherapy, but human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) that can differentiate into cell types that arise from all three germ layers may offer promise for restoration of such dysfunction. Previous studies confirmed that hAECs could differentiate into cells that express germ cell-specific markers, but at this time hAECs have not been shown to restore ovarian function. Methods To model premature ovarian failure, hAECs infected with lenti-virus carrying green fluorescent protein were injected into the tail vein of mice sterilized with cyclophosphamide and busulphan. hAECs migrated to the mouse ovaries and overall ovarian function was measured using immunohistochemical techniques. Results Seven days to two months after hAECs transplantation, ovarian cells were morphologically restored in sterilized mice. Hemotoxylin and eosin staining revealed that restored ovarian cells developed follicles at all stages. No follicles were observed in control mice at the same time period. Immunostaining with anti-human antigen antibodies and pre-transplantation labeling with green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that the grafted hAECs survived and migrated to mouse ovary, differentiating into granulosa cells. Furthermore, the ovarian function marker, anti-Müllerian hormone, was evident in treated mouse ovaries after hAEC transplantation. Conclusions Intravenously injected hAECs reached the ovaries of chemotherapy-treated mice and restored folliculogenesis, data which suggest promise for hAECs for promoting reproductive health and improving the quality of life for female cancer survivors. PMID:24406076

  3. High expression of CTHRC1 promotes EMT of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Shanyang; Li, Yang; Pan, Yunping; Feng, Chongjin; Chen, Xinlin; Zhang, Yang; Lin, Millicent; Wang, Liantang; Ke, Zunfu

    2015-01-01

    Collagen triple helix repeat-containing 1 (CTHRC1) is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple malignant tumors. However, the expression characteristics and function of CTHRC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remain unclear. We found that CTHRC1 expression was up-regulated in the paraffin-embedded EOC tissues compared to borderline or benign tumor tissues. CTHRC1 expression was positively correlated with tumor size (p = 0.008), menopause (p = 0.037), clinical stage (p = 0.002) and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001) and was also an important prognostic factor for the overall survival of EOC patients, as revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. CTHRC1 increased the invasive capabilities of EOC cells in vitro by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We showed that ectopic transfection of CTHRC1 in EOC cells up-regulated the expression of EMT markers such as N-cadherin and vimentin, and EMT-associated transcriptional factor Snail. Knockdown of CTHRC1 expression in EOC cells resulted in down-regulation of N-cadherin, vimentin, Snail and translocation of β-catenin. Collectively, CTHRC1 may promote EOC metastasis through the induction of EMT process and serve as a potential biomarker for prognosis as well as a target for therapy. PMID:26452130

  4. Dietary fat intake and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Melissa A; Riboli, Elio; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dossus, Laure; Fagherazzi, Guy; Baglietto, Laura; Fortner, Renée T; Ose, Jennifer; Steffen, Annika; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H; Hjartåker, Anette; Gram, Inger Torhild; Quirós, J Ramón; Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Molina-Montes, Esther; Huerta Castaño, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Chamosa, Saioa; Sonestedt, Emily; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Travis, Ruth C; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Chajes, Veronique; Gunter, Marc J

    2014-10-01

    There are inconsistent and limited data available to assess the relationship between fat intake and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We examined the consumption of total fat, fat sources and fat subtypes in relation to risk of EOC and its major histologic subtypes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition which includes incident invasive (n=1095) and borderline (n=96) EOC. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In multivariate models, we observed no association with consumption of total fat, animal or plant fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, monounsaturated fat, or fatty fish and risk of invasive EOC. There was, however, an increased risk of invasive EOC in the highest category of intake (Quartile 4 vs. Quartile 1) of polyunsaturated fat (HR=1.22, 95% CI=1.02-1.48, P(trend)=0.02). We did not observe heterogeneity in the risk associations in comparisons of serous and endometrioid histologic subtypes. This study does not support an etiological role for total fat intake in relation to EOC risk; however, based on observations of a positive association between intake of polyunsaturated fat and invasive EOC risk in the current and previous studies, this fat subtype warrants further investigation to determine its potential role in EOC development.

  5. Intensive cisplatin/oral etoposide for epithelial ovarian cancer: the Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre experience: too toxic for relapse?

    PubMed

    Gounaris, Ioannis; Iddawela, Mahesh; Parkinson, Christine; Pratt, Jennie; Hatcher, Helen; Basu, Bristi; Tan, Li Tee; Brenton, James D; Earl, Helena M

    2016-03-01

    Intensive cisplatin and oral etoposide for relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), commonly known as the van der Burg (VDB) protocol, has been reported to improve response rates and progression-free survival. We report on all patients with relapsed EOC treated on the VDB protocol at the Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre. From the institutional databases, we identified all patients treated since 2001. We extracted demographic, clinical, treatment, and toxicity data and outcomes. We used Cox regression to identify predictors of survival. A total of 35 patients were treated on the VDB protocol. Toxicity was significant, with grade 3/4 fatigue, nausea and vomiting affecting 46, 46 and 29% of patients, respectively. Six patients had grade 3/4 infection and four (11%) deaths occurred on treatment. Efficacy was encouraging, with a radiological response rate of 43%, a median progression-free survival of 5.8 months and a median overall survival of 14.1 months. No significant difference in efficacy was seen between platinum-resistant and sensitive patients. We report significant activity of the VDB protocol in a routine clinical setting. However, the high rates of serious toxicity and treatment-related deaths among patients treated with palliative intent proved unacceptable. The Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre no longer uses this regimen in women with relapsed EOC.

  6. Prognostic Value of Residual Disease after Interval Debulking Surgery for FIGO Stage IIIC and IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Marianne J; Sonke, Gabe S; Westermann, Anneke M; van Driel, Willemien J; Trum, Johannes W; Kenter, Gemma G; Buist, Marrije R

    2015-01-01

    Although complete debulking surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is more often achieved with interval debulking surgery (IDS) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), randomized evidence shows no long-term survival benefit compared to complete primary debulking surgery (PDS). We performed an observational cohort study of patients treated with debulking surgery for advanced EOC to evaluate the prognostic value of residual disease after debulking surgery. All patients treated between 1998 and 2010 in three Dutch referral gynaecological oncology centres were included. The prognostic value of residual disease after surgery for disease specific survival was assessed using Cox-regression analyses. In total, 462 patients underwent NACT-IDS and 227 PDS. Macroscopic residual disease after debulking surgery was an independent prognostic factor for survival in both treatment modalities. Yet, residual tumour less than one centimetre at IDS was associated with a survival benefit of five months compared to leaving residual tumour more than one centimetre, whereas this benefit was not seen after PDS. Leaving residual tumour at IDS is a poor prognostic sign as it is after PDS. The specific prognostic value of residual tumour seems to depend on the clinical setting, as minimal instead of gross residual tumour is associated with improved survival after IDS, but not after PDS.

  7. c-Yes enhances tumor migration and invasion via PI3K/AKT pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunfeng; Huang, Menghui; Wang, Yingying; Yi, Changying; Deng, Yan; Chen, Yannan; Jiang, Lifei; Wang, Juan; Shen, Qin; Liu, Rong; QinghuaXi

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of c-Yes has been noted to correlation with several human cancers. However, the effects of c-Yes on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) development remain unclear. The aim of this study is going to prove the effects of c-Yes and related mechanisms in proliferation, metastasis and invasion of EOC. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 119 human EOC samples, and the data was correlated with clinic pathologic features. Furthermore, western blot analysis is performed for c-Yes in EOC samples and cell lines to evaluate their protein levels and molecular interaction. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis shows that the strong expression of c-Yes exhibited a significant correlation with poor prognosis in human EOC (P<0.01(⁎)). Meanwhile, we found that knockdown of c-Yes by shRNA inhibited the ability of migration and invasion in EOC cells via the PI3K/AKT pathway. In a word, these results suggested that c-Yes plays an important role in migration and invasion of EOC.

  8. Phase Ib-IIa study to reverse platinum resistance by the use of a hypomethylating agent azacitidine in platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Siqing; Hu, Wei; Iyer, Revathy; Kavanagh, John J.; Coleman, Robert L.; Levenback, Charles F.; Sood, Anil K.; Wolf, Judith K.; Gershenson, David M.; Markman, Maurie; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Bast, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequential treatment with azacitidine can induce re-expression of epigenetically silenced genes through genomic DNA hypomethylation and reverse carboplatin resistance of epithelial ovarian cancer cells. We initiated a phase Ib-IIa clinical trial of this sequential combination of azacitidine and carboplatin in platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Patients with pathologically confirmed intermediate- or high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer who had disease progression within 6 months (resistant, n = 18) or during a platinum-based therapy (refractory, n = 12) were eligible. All patients had measurable disease. Results Thirty patients received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. This regimen produced 1 CR, 3 PR (ORR: 13.8%), and 10 SD among 29 evaluable patients. For those who achieved clinical benefits, the median duration of the treatment was 7.5 months. The median PFS and OS for all patients were 3.7 months and 14 months, respectively. Patients with platinum resistant disease achieved an ORR of 22%, with a median PFS of 5.6 months and a median OS of 23 months. The predominant toxicities were fatigue and myelosuppression. Correlative studies showed that DR4 methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes was decreased during treatment in 3 of 4 objective responders (75%), but in only 5 of 13 non-responders (38%). Conclusions To our knowledge, this study provides the first clinical evidence that a hypomethylating agent may partially reverse platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Further clinical evaluation of hypomethylating agents in combination with carboplatin is warranted. PMID:21472713

  9. Inhibition of growth of OV-1063 human epithelial ovarian cancer xenografts in nude mice by treatment with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist SB-75.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, T; Pinski, J; Halmos, G; Szepeshazi, K; Groot, K; Schally, A V

    1994-01-01

    Female athymic nude mice bearing xenografts of OV-1063 human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line were treated with potent luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonist SB-75 (Cetrorelix; [Ac-D-Nal(2)1, D-Phe(4 CI)2, D-Pal(3)3, D-Cit6, D-Ala10]LH-RH in which Ac-D-Nal(2) = N-acetyl-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine, D-Phe(4CI) = 4-chloro-D-phenylalanine, D-Pal(3) = 3-(3-pyridyl)-D-alanine, and D-Cit = D-Citrulline) or with the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH. In the first experiment, SB-75 and [D-Trp6]LH-RH were administered in the form of microcapsules releasing 60 and 25 micrograms/day, respectively. In the second study, the analogs were given by daily s.c. injections in doses of 100 micrograms/day. In both experiments, tumor growth, as measured by reduction in tumor volume, percentage change in tumor volume, tumor burden, and increase in tumor doubling time, was significantly inhibited by treatment with SB-75 but not with [D-Trp6]LH-RH. Uterine and ovarian weights were reduced and serum LH levels decreased by administration of either analog. Chronic treatment with SB-75 greatly reduced the concentration of receptors for epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I in tumor cell membranes, a phenomenon that might be related to tumor growth inhibition. It is possible that the antitumoral effects of SB-75 on OV-1063 ovarian cancers are exerted not only through the suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis, but also directly. In view of its strong inhibitory effect on the growth of OV-1063 ovarian cancers in vivo, the potent LH-RH antagonist SB-75 might be considered for possible hormonal therapy of advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. PMID:7518926

  10. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot".

    PubMed

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Macgregor, Stuart; Duffy, David L; Spurdle, Amanda B; deFazio, Anna; Gava, Natalie; Webb, Penelope M; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Goodman, Marc T; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J; Wilkens, Lynne R; Ness, Roberta B; Moysich, Kirsten B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Hannah; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Pharoah, Paul D; Song, Honglin; Whitemore, Alice S; Pearce, Celeste L; Stram, Daniel O; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hogdall, Claus; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Moorman, Patricia G; Phelan, Catherine M; Sellers, Thomas A; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Rider, David N; Goode, Ellen L; Haviv, Izhak; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-07-08

    We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n=675) and controls (n=1,162) were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-allele<0.05 in the discovery stage were selected for replication in a subset of five OCAC studies (n=1,233 serous invasive cases; n=3,364 controls). The discovery stage associations in PODXL, ITGA6, and MMP3 were attenuated in the larger replication set (adj. Pper-allele>or=0.5). However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03). Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24) p=0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus.

  11. Low expression of the X-linked ribosomal protein S4 in human serous epithelial ovarian cancer is associated with a poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The X-linked ribosomal protein S4 (RPS4X), which is involved in cellular translation and proliferation, has previously been identified as a partner of the overexpressed multifunctional protein YB-1 in several breast cancer cells. Depletion of RPS4X results in consistent resistance to cisplatin in such cell lines. Methods As platinum-based chemotherapy is a standard first line therapy used to treat patients with ovarian cancer, we evaluated the prognostic value of RPS4X and YB-1 at the protein level in specimen from 192 high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Results Immunohistochemistry studies indicated that high expression of RPS4X was associated with a lower risk of death and later disease progression (HR = 0.713, P = 0.001 and HR = 0.761, P = 0.001, respectively) as compared to low expression of RPS4X. In contrast, YB-1 was not significantly associated with either recurrence or survival time in this cohort. Finally, the depletion of RPS4X with different siRNAs in two different ovarian cancer cell lines reduced their proliferative growth rate but more importantly increased their resistance to cisplatin. Conclusion Altogether, these results suggest that the levels of RPS4X could be a good indicator for resistance to platinum-based therapy and a prognostic marker for ovarian cancer. Our study also showed that RPS4X is an independent prognostic factor in patients with serous epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:23800275

  12. Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and involved in cell proliferation and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qizhi; Fu, Aili; Yang, Shude; He, Xiaoli; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhou, Jiadi; Luan, Xiying; Yu, Wenzheng; Xue, Jiangnan

    2015-03-06

    Previous studies have shown that leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is expressed on most types of hamatopoietic cells and negatively regulate immune response, but the roles of LAIR-1 in tumor of the non-hematopoietic lineage have not been determined. Despite advances in therapy of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), many questions relating to EOC pathogenesis remain unanswered. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of LAIR-1 expression in EOC and explore the possible association between LAIR-1 and cancer. In this study, a tissue microarray containing 78 ovarian cancer cases was stained following a standard immunohistochemical protocol for LAIR-1 and the correlation of LAIR-1 expression with clinicopathologic features was assessed. LAIR-1 was detected to express in tumor cells of ovarian cancer tissues (73.1%) and EOC cell lines COC1 and HO8910, not in normal ovarian tissues. In addition, LAIR-1 expression correlates significantly with tumor grade (p = 0.004). Furthermore, down-regulation of LAIR-1 in HO8910 cells increased cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasion. These data suggest that LAIR-1 has a relevant impact on EOC progression and may be helpful for a better understanding of molecular pathogenesis of cancer. - Highlights: • LAIR-1 is expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer cells. • LAIR-1 expression correlates significantly with tumor grade. • Down-regulation of LAIR-1 expression increased cell proliferation and invasion. • LAIR-1 may be a novel candidate for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  13. GRHL2-miR-200-ZEB1 maintains the epithelial status of ovarian cancer through transcriptional regulation and histone modification

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vin Yee; Tan, Tuan Zea; Tan, Ming; Wong, Meng Kang; Kuay, Kuee Theng; Yang, Zhe; Ye, Jieru; Muller, Julius; Koh, Cheryl M.; Guccione, Ernesto; Thiery, Jean Paul; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a biological process by which polarized epithelial cells convert into a mesenchymal phenotype, has been implicated to contribute to the molecular heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Here we report that a transcription factor—Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) maintains the epithelial phenotype. EOC tumours with lower GRHL2 levels are associated with the Mes/Mesenchymal molecular subtype and a poorer overall survival. shRNA-mediated knockdown of GRHL2 in EOC cells with an epithelial phenotype results in EMT changes, with increased cell migration, invasion and motility. By ChIP-sequencing and gene expression microarray, microRNA-200b/a is identified as the direct transcriptional target of GRHL2 and regulates the epithelial status of EOC through ZEB1 and E-cadherin. Our study demonstrates that loss of GRHL2 increases the levels of histone mark H3K27me3 on promoters and GRHL2-binding sites at miR-200b/a and E-cadherin genes. These findings support GRHL2 as a pivotal gatekeeper of EMT in EOC via miR-200-ZEB1. PMID:26887977

  14. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated miRNAs in ovarian carcinoma, with highlight on the miR-200 family: prognostic value and prospective role in ovarian cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Koutsaki, Maria; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Zaravinos, Apostolos

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short ribonucleic acids found to play a pivotal role in cancer pathogenesis. MiRNAs are crucial in cellular differentiation, growth, stress response, cell death and other fundamental cellular processes, and their involvement in ovarian cancer has been recently shown. They can repress the expression of important cancer-related genes and they can also function both as oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. During epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion and gain migratory and invasive properties. In the ovarian surface epithelium, EMT is considered the key regulator of the post-ovulatory repair process and it can be triggered by a range of environmental stimuli. The aberrant expression of the miR-200 family (miR-200a, miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-141 and miR-429) in ovarian carcinoma and its involvement in ovarian cancer initiation and progression has been well-demonstrated. The miR-200 family members seem to be strongly associated with a pathologic EMT and to have a metastasis suppressive role. MiRNA signatures can accurately distinguish ovarian cancer from the normal ovary and can be used as diagnostic tools to predict the clinical response to chemotherapy. Recent evidence suggests a growing list of new miRNAs (miR-187, miR-34a, miR-506, miRNA-138, miR-30c, miR-30d, miR-30e-3p, miR-370 and miR-106a, among others) that are also implicated in ovarian carcinoma-associated EMT, either enhancing or suppressing it. MiRNA-based gene therapy provides a prospective anti-tumour approach for integrated cancer therapy. The aim of nanotechnology-based delivery approach for miRNA therapy is to overcome challenges in miRNA delivery and to effectively encourage the reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer cells, which may lead to a clinically translatable miRNA-based therapy to benefit ovarian cancer patients.

  15. Advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: toxicity of whole abdominal irradiation after operation, combination chemotherapy, and reoperation

    SciTech Connect

    Schray, M.F.; Martinez, A.; Howes, A.E.; Ballon, S.C.; Podratz, K.C.; Sikic, B.I.; Malkasian, G.D.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-five patients with advanced ovarian cancer have received, as salvage therapy, irradiation consisting of 30 Gy to the entire abdominal contents with partial liver/kidney shielding and boosts to 42 and 51 Gy for the paraaortic/diaphragmatic and pelvic regions, respectively. These patients had received 6 to 25 cycles (median, 11 cycles) of prior combination chemotherapy (included cisplatin in 30), with second-look laparotomy performed in 33; 24 (68%) had three or more laparotomies. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was generally mild. Significant hematologic toxicity (leukocytes less than 2000/mm3; or platelets less than 100,000/mm3) was seen in 19 (54%); platelet suppression occurred in 18 of these 19. Nine patients failed to complete the prescribed course of therapy; in seven, this was secondary to hematologic toxicity. Amount of prior chemotherapy and advanced age correlated with degree of hematologic toxicity. Five patients without evidence of disease (laparotomy confirmed) have developed treatment-related bowel obstruction. No other chronic toxicity of clinical significance has been observed. Seven patients have developed bowel obstruction associated with progressive neoplasm. Irradiation was well tolerated symptomatically, but hematologic toxicity associated with prior chemotherapy prevented its completion in 20% of patients. Clinical manifestations of radiation bowel toxicity have been moderate to date and should be interpreted in the context of the aggressive combined modality program.

  16. Clinical value of morphometric and DNA flow cytometric variables as independent predictors of survival in epithelial ovarian carcinoma: a 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Margot M; van der Wurff, Anneke A M; van de Water, Marije; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M; Feijen, Harrie W H; Vos, Maria Caroline

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this follow-up study is to validate the clinical significance of quantitative morphometric and DNA flow cytometric variables as independent prognostic factors of overall survival and progression-free survival in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Tumor samples were collected from 135 patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma at 3 hospitals in the Netherlands. Evaluated clinico-pathologic variables were age, histologic subtype, differentiation grade, clinical stage [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)], presence of ascites, serum CA-125, and the completeness of debulking surgery. Morphometry and DNA flow cytometric techniques were assessed on each tumor sample to determine the mitotic activity index (MAI), volume percentage epithelium, mean nuclear area (MNA), standard deviation of MNA (SD MNA), nuclear perimeter (NP), and DNA ploidy. Univariate analysis showed that differentiation grade, FIGO stage, presence of ascites, preoperative CA-125 levels, DNA ploidy, and MAI, NP, and MNA were of significant prognostic value. After multivariate analysis (using forward Cox proportional hazard analysis), only differentiation grade and FIGO stage remained significant. From this study, we can conclude that morphometry and DNA flow cytometry are not independent prognosticators and therefore have no clinical value in predicting prognosis in ovarian carcinoma.

  17. New insights in the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer and implications for screening and prevention.

    PubMed

    Nezhat, Farr R; Apostol, Radu; Nezhat, Camran; Pejovic, Tanja

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medicine, ovarian cancer remains the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies. Herein we present the latest information on the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer and its significance for ovarian cancer screening and prevention. A new paradigm for ovarian cancer pathogenesis presupposes 2 distinct types of ovarian epithelial carcinoma with distinct molecular profiles: type I and type II carcinomas. Type I tumors include endometrioid, clear-cell carcinoma, and low-grade serous carcinoma and mostly arise via defined sequence either from endometriosis or from borderline serous tumors, mostly presenting in an early stage. More frequent type II carcinomas are usually high-grade serous tumors, and recent evidence suggests that the majority arise from the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube. Subsequently, high-grade serous carcinomas usually present at advanced stages, likely as a consequence of the rapid peritoneal seeding from the open ends of the fallopian tubes. On the other hand, careful clinical evaluation should be performed along with risk stratification and targeted treatment of women with premalignant conditions leading to type I cancers, most notably endometriosis and endometriomas. Although the chance of malignant transformation is low, an understanding of this link offers a possibility of prevention and early intervention. This new evidence explains difficulties in ovarian cancer screening and helps in forming new recommendations for ovarian cancer risk evaluation and prophylactic treatments.

  18. Gedunin, a novel natural substance, inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Siddharth G; Chen, Ning; Xiong, Yin; Wenham, Robert; Apte, Sachin; Humphrey, Marcia; Cragun, Janiel; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of more active therapeutic compounds is essential if the outcome for patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer is to be improved. Gedunin, an extract of the neem tree, has been used as a natural remedy for centuries in Asia. Recently, gedunin has been shown to have potential in vitro antineoplastic properties; however, its effect on ovarian cancer cells is unknown. We evaluated the in vitro effect of gedunin on SKOV3, OVCAR4, and OVCAR8 ovarian cancer cell lines proliferation, alone and in the presence of cisplatin. Furthermore, we analyzed in vitro gedunin sensitivity data, integrated with genome-wide expression data from 54 cancer cell lines in an effort to identify genes and molecular pathways that underlie the mechanism of gedunin action. In vitro treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with gedunin alone produced up to an 80% decrease in cell proliferation (P < 0.01) and, combining gedunin with cisplatin, demonstrated up to a 47% (P < 0.01) decrease in cell proliferation compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Bioinformatic analysis of integrated gedunin sensitivity and gene expression data identified 52 genes to be associated with gedunin sensitivity. These genes are involved in molecular functions related to cell cycle control, carcinogenesis, lipid metabolism, and molecular transportation. We conclude that gedunin has in vitro activity against ovarian cancer cells and, further, may enhance the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin. The molecular determinants of in vitro gedunin response are complex and may include modulation of cell survival and apoptosis pathways. PMID:19955938

  19. Overexpression of SnoN/SkiL, amplified at the 3q26.2 locus, in ovarian cancers: A role in ovarian pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nanjundan, Meera; Cheng, Kwai Wa; Zhang, Fan; Lahad, John; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Smith-McCune, Karen; Fishman, David; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-07-18

    High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of 235 serous epithelial ovarian cancers demonstrated a regional increase at 3q26.2 encompassing SnoN/SkiL, a coregulator of SMAD/TGF{beta} signaling. SnoN RNA transcripts were elevated in {approx}80% of advanced stage serous epithelial ovarian cancers. In both immortalized normal (TIOSE) and ovarian carcinoma cell lines (OVCA), SnoN RNA levels were increased by TGF{beta} stimulation and altered by LY294002 and JNK II inhibitor treatment suggesting that the PI3K and JNK signaling pathways may regulate TGF{beta}-induced increases in SnoN RNA. In TIOSE, SnoN protein levels were reduced 15min post TGF{beta}-stimulation, likely by proteosome-mediated degradation. In contrast, in OVCA, SnoN levels were elevated 3h post-stimulation potentially as a result of inhibition of the proteosome. To elucidate the role of SnoN in ovarian tumorigenesis, we explored the effects of both increasing and decreasing SnoN levels. In both TIOSE and OVCA, SnoN siRNA decreased cell growth between 20 and 50% concurrent with increased p21 levels. In TIOSE, transient expression of SnoN repressed TGF{beta} induction of PAI-1 promoters with little effect on the p21 promoter or resultant cell growth. In contrast to the effects of transient expression, stable expression of SnoN in TIOSE led to growth arrest through induction of senescence. Collectively, these results implicate SnoN levels in multiple roles during ovarian carcinogenesis: promoting cellular proliferation in ovarian cancer cells and as a positive mediator of cell cycle arrest and senescence in non-transformed ovarian epithelial cells.

  20. Patterns of Müllerian Inhibiting Substance Type II and Candidate Type I Receptors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Basal, E.; Ayeni, T.; Zhang, Q.; Langstraat, C.; Donahoe, P.K.; Pepin, D.; Yin, X.; Leof, E.; Cliby, W.

    2016-01-01

    The MIS pathway is a potential therapeutic target in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC): signaling requires both type II (T2R) and type I receptors (T1R), and results in growth inhibition. MISR2 is expressed in EOC, but the prevalence and relative contributions of candidate T1R remain unknown. We sought to: a) determine expression of T1R in EOC; b) assess impact of T1R expression with clinical outcomes; c) verify MIS-dependent Smad signaling and growth inhibition in primary EOC cell cultures. Tissue microarrays (TMA) were developed for analysis of T1Rs (ALK2/3/6) and MISR2 expression. Primary cell cultures were initiated from ascites harvested at surgery which were used to characterize response to MIS. TMA’s from 311 primary cancers demonstrated the most common receptor combinations were: MISR2+/ALK2+3+6+ (36%); MISR2+/ALK2+3+6- (34%); MISR2-/ALK2+3+6- (18%); and MISR2-/ALK2+3+6+ (6.8%). No differences in overall survival (OS) were noted between combinations. The ALK6 receptor was least often expressed T1R and was associated with lower OS in early stage disease only (p =0.03). Most primary cell cultures expressed MISR2 (14/22 (63.6%)): 95% of these express ALK 2 and ALK3, whereas 54.5% expressed ALK6. MIS-dependent Smad phosphorylation was seen in the majority of cultures (75%). Treatment with MIS led to reduced cell viability at an average of 71% (range: 57–87%) in primary cultures. MIS signaling is dependent upon the presence of both MISR2 and specific T1R. In the majority of EOC, the T1R required for MIS-dependent signaling are present and such cells demonstrate appropriate response to MIS. PMID:26917267

  1. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  2. MicroRNA-183 correlates cancer prognosis, regulates cancer proliferation and bufalin sensitivity in epithelial ovarian caner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huixiao; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Lili; Du, Jing; Wang, Hongying; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background we intended to explore the functional implication of microRNA-183 (miR-183) in predicting clinical prognosis and regulating cancer proliferation and bufalin sensitivity in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods In 75 EOC patients, miR-183 expression was examined, by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), between paired EOC tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and between tumor samples from patients at early clinical stages and those at advanced clinical stages. The association of serum miR-183 and patients' clinicopathological variables were examined. The overall survival (OS) was estimated by Kaplan-Meier model. And the possibility of miR-183 as a prognostic biomarker for EOC was examined by cox proportional hazard regression model. In EOC cell lines SKOV3 and ES-2 cells, lentiviral transduction was conducted to genetically suppress miR-183. The effect of miR-183 downregulation on EOC in vitro growth, bufalin sensitivity and in vivo tumorigenicity were examined. Results MiR-183 was highly expressed in EOC tumors, as well ass in patients at advanced clinical stages. Serum miR-183 was significantly associated with major clinicopathological variables in EOC patients, such as clinical stage and lymph node metastases. High level of serum miR-183 was associated with poor OS in EOC patients, and proved to be a potential biomarker for EOC. In EOC cell lines, functional assays demonstrated that miR-183 downregulation inhibited cancer proliferation, enhanced bufalin sensitivity and reduced tumorigenicity in vivo. Conclusion MiR-183 may be a prognostic biomarker for EOC, and inhibiting miR-183 may have therapeutic effect to inhibit tumor growth in EOC. PMID:27186298

  3. Dietary intake of acrylamide and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

    PubMed

    Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Peeters, Petra H M; Freisling, Heinz; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Baglietto, Laura; Schock, Helena; Fortner, Renée T; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Menéndez, Virginia; Sanchez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Huerta Castaño, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Orfanos, Philippos; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Wirfält, Elisabeth; Stocks, Tanja; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Skeie, Guri; Gram, Inger T; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Acrylamide, classified in 1994 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as "probably carcinogenic" to humans, was discovered in 2002 in some heat-treated, carbohydrate-rich foods. The association between dietary acrylamide intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk (EOC) has been previously studied in one case-control and three prospective cohort studies which obtained inconsistent results and could not further examine histologic subtypes other than serous EOC. The present study was carried out in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) subcohort of women (n = 325,006). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between questionnaire-based acrylamide intake and EOC risk. Acrylamide was energy-adjusted using the residual method and was evaluated both as a continuous variable (per 10 μg/d) and in quintiles; when subgroups by histologic EOC subtypes were analyzed, acrylamide intake was evaluated in quartiles. During a mean follow-up of 11 years, 1,191 incident EOC cases were diagnosed. At baseline, the median acrylamide intake in EPIC was 21.3 μg/d. No associations and no evidence for a dose-response were observed between energy-adjusted acrylamide intake and EOC risk (HR10μg/d,1.02; 95% CI, 0.96-1.09; HRQ5vsQ1, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.76-1.23). No differences were seen when invasive EOC subtypes (582 serous, 118 endometrioid, and 79 mucinous tumors) were analyzed separately. This study did not provide evidence that acrylamide intake, based on food intake questionnaires, was associated with risk for EOC in EPIC. Additional studies with more reliable estimates of exposure based on biomarkers may be needed.

  4. Utility of Serum miR-125b as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Indicator and Its Alliance with a Panel of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zuberi, Mariyam; Khan, Imran; Mir, Rashid; Gandhi, Gauri; Ray, Prakash Chandra; Saxena, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be dysregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and may function as either tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) or as oncogenes. Hypermethylation of miRNA silences the tumour suppressive function of a miRNA or hypermethylation of a TSG regulating that miRNA (or vice versa) leads to its loss of function. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of aberrant microRNA-125b (miR-125b) expression on various clinicopathological features in epithelial ovarian cancer and its association with anomalous methylation of several TSGs. We enrolled 70 newly diagnosed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer, recorded their clinical history and 70 healthy female volunteers. Serum miR-125b levels were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and the methylation status of various TSGs was investigated by methylation specific PCR. ROC curves were constructed to estimate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of miR-125b. The Kaplan-Meier method was applied to compare survival curves. Expression of miR-125b was found to be significantly upregulated (p<0.0001) in comparison with healthy controls. The expression level of miR-125b was found to be significantly associated with FIGO stage, lymph node and distant metastasis. ROC curve for diagnostic potential yielded significant AUC with an equitable sensitivity and specificity. ROC curves for prognosis yielded significant AUCs for histological grade, distal metastasis, lymph node status and survival. The expression of miR-125b also correlated significantly with the hypermethylation of TSGs. Our results indicate that DNA hypermethylation may be involved in the inactivation of miR-125b and miR-125b may function as a potential independent biomarker for clinical outcome in EOC.

  5. Utility of Serum miR-125b as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Indicator and Its Alliance with a Panel of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Rashid; Gandhi, Gauri; Ray, Prakash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be dysregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and may function as either tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) or as oncogenes. Hypermethylation of miRNA silences the tumour suppressive function of a miRNA or hypermethylation of a TSG regulating that miRNA (or vice versa) leads to its loss of function. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of aberrant microRNA-125b (miR-125b) expression on various clinicopathological features in epithelial ovarian cancer and its association with anomalous methylation of several TSGs. We enrolled 70 newly diagnosed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer, recorded their clinical history and 70 healthy female volunteers. Serum miR-125b levels were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and the methylation status of various TSGs was investigated by methylation specific PCR. ROC curves were constructed to estimate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of miR-125b. The Kaplan—Meier method was applied to compare survival curves. Expression of miR-125b was found to be significantly upregulated (p<0.0001) in comparison with healthy controls. The expression level of miR-125b was found to be significantly associated with FIGO stage, lymph node and distant metastasis. ROC curve for diagnostic potential yielded significant AUC with an equitable sensitivity and specificity. ROC curves for prognosis yielded significant AUCs for histological grade, distal metastasis, lymph node status and survival. The expression of miR-125b also correlated significantly with the hypermethylation of TSGs. Our results indicate that DNA hypermethylation may be involved in the inactivation of miR-125b and miR-125b may function as a potential independent biomarker for clinical outcome in EOC. PMID:27092777

  6. Ascites-induced shift along epithelial-mesenchymal spectrum in ovarian cancer cells: enhancement of their invasive behavior partly dependant on αv integrins.

    PubMed

    Carduner, L; Leroy-Dudal, J; Picot, C R; Gallet, O; Carreiras, F; Kellouche, S

    2014-08-01

    At least one-third of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) present ascites at diagnosis and almost all have ascites at recurrence. The presence of ascites, which acts as a dynamic reservoir of active molecules and cellular components, correlates with the OC peritoneal metastasis and is associated with poor prognosis. Since epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in different phases of OC progression, we have investigated the effect of the unique ascitic tumor microenvironment on the EMT status and the behavior of OC cells. The exposure of three OC cell lines to ascites leads to changes in cellular morphologies. Within ascites, OC cells harboring an initial intermediate epithelial phenotype are characterized by marked dislocation of epithelial markers (E-cadherin, ZO-1 staining) while OC cells initially harboring an intermediate mesenchymal phenotype strengthen their mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin). Ascites differentially triggers a dissemination phenotype related to the initial cell features by either allowing the proliferation and the formation of spheroids and the extension of colonies for cells that present an initial epithelial intermediate phenotype, or favoring the migration of cells with a mesenchymal intermediate phenotype. In an ascitic microenvironment, a redeployment of αv integrins into cells was observed and the ascites-induced accentuation of the two different invasive phenotypes (i.e. spheroids formation or migration) was shown to involve αv integrins. Thus, ascites induces a shift toward an unstable intermediate state of the epithelial-mesenchymal spectrum and confers a more aggressive cell behavior that takes on a different pathway based on the initial epithelial-mesenchymal cell features. PMID:24946950

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Bevacizumab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Early transformative changes in normal ovarian surface epithelium induced by oxidative stress require Akt upregulation, DNA damage and epithelial-stromal interaction.

    PubMed

    King, Shelby M; Quartuccio, Suzanne M; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Burdette, Joanna E

    2013-05-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecological malignancy due to detection of cancer at a late stage when the disease has metastasized. One likely progenitor cell type of ovarian cancer is the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), which proliferates rapidly in the presence of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress following ovulation. To determine whether oxidative stress induces DNA damage leading to spontaneous transformative changes in normal OSE, an immortalized mouse OSE cell line (MOSE cells) or normal mouse ovarian organoids were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and loss of contact inhibition was assessed by soft agar assay. In response to H2O2, OSE cells grown in 3D exhibited growth in soft agar but MOSE cells grown on 2D plastic did not, indicating a critical role for epithelial-stromal interactions in neoplastic initiation. Loss of contact inhibition in response to H2O2 correlated with an increase in proliferation, DNA damage and upregulation of the oncogene Akt1. Use of a reactive oxygen species scavenger or Akt inhibitor blocked H2O2-induced proliferation and growth in soft agar. Although parental MOSE cells did not undergo transformation by H2O2, MOSE cells stably overexpressing constitutively active myristoylated Akt or knockdown of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) exhibited loss of contact inhibition and increased proliferation. This study indicates that normal OSE undergo transformative changes induced by oxidative stress and that this process requires Akt upregulation and activation. A 3D model that retains tissue architecture is critical for studying this process and may lead to development of new intervention strategies directed at early stages of ovarian cancer.

  10. Deregulated miR-296/S100A4 axis promotes tumor invasion by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wang; Chen, Jiaqi; Chen, Zhaoying; Chen, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    S100A4 represents an important member of the S100 family of small calcium-binding proteins. Increased expression of S100A4 has been observed in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. The majority of studies of S100A4 are focused on cancer research; however, the oncogenic roles of S100A4 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remain largely unexplored. In this study, S100A4 expression is significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer and associated with the clinical stage of EOC patients. Attenuation of S100A4 expression results in decreased cell mobility and metastatic capacity, whereas overexpression of S100A4 enhanced the invasive ability of EOC cells. Then by an integrated informatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay, we identify that miR-296 is a critical upstream regulator of S100A4. In addition, deregulated miR-296/S100A4 axis facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process as demonstrated by altered expression of EMT-related markers. In conclusion, our study reveals that deregulated miR-296/S100A4 promotes tumor progression in EOC, and provides evidence that miR-296/S100A4 axis-related signaling may represent a potential target for EOC therapy. PMID:27186401

  11. A functional variant in HOXA11-AS, a novel long non-coding RNA, inhibits the oncogenic phenotype of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. Ann; Coppola, Domenico; Reid, Brett M.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Teer, Jamie K.; Berchuck, Andrew; Birrer, Michael J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Gayther, Simon A.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Cheng, Jin Q.

    2015-01-01

    The homeobox A (HOXA) region of protein-coding genes impacts female reproductive system embryogenesis and ovarian carcinogenesis. The 5-prime end of HOXA includes three long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) (HOXA10-AS, HOXA11-AS, and HOTTIP) that are underexplored in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We evaluated whether common genetic variants in these lncRNAs are associated with EOC risk and/or have functional roles in EOC development. Using genome-wide association study data from 1,201 serous EOC cases and 2,009 controls, an exonic variant within HOXA11-AS, rs17427875 (A>T), was marginally associated with reduced serous EOC risk (OR = 0.88 (95% CI: 0.78-1.01, p = 0.06). Functional studies of ectopic expression of HOXA11-AS minor allele T in EOC cells showed decreased survival, proliferation, migration, and invasion compared to common allele A expression. Additionally, stable expression of HOXA11-AS minor allele T reduced primary tumor growth in mouse xenograft models to a greater extent than common allele A. Furthermore, HOXA11-AS expression levels were significantly lower in human EOC tumors than normal ovarian tissues (p < 0.05), suggesting that HOXA11-AS has a tumor suppressor function in EOC which may be enhanced by the T allele. These findings demonstrate for the first time a role for HOXA11-AS in EOC with effects that could be modified by germline variants. PMID:26430965

  12. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Thompson, Pamela J; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H; Flanagan, James M; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  13. Sprouty 2 protein, but not Sprouty 4, is an independent prognostic biomarker for human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Amini, Afshin; Wei, Ai-Qun; Robertson, Gregory; Morris, David L

    2015-08-01

    Sprouty proteins are evolutionary-conserved modulators of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, deregulation of which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of cancer. In the present study, the expression status of Spry2 and Spry4 proteins and its clinical relevance in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) were investigated retrospectively. We examined the immunohistochemical expression of Spry2 and Spry4 in matched tumor and normal tissue samples from 99 patients. The expression of ERK, p-ERK, Ki67, fibroblast growth factor-2, vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 and their correlation with Sprouty homologs were also evaluated. Moreover, the correlation between Spry2 and Spry4 and the clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed along with their predictive value for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Our data indicated significant downregulation of Spry2 and Spry4 in tumor tissues (p < 0.0001). A significant inverse correlation was evident between Spry2 and p-ERK/ERK (p = 0.048), Ki67 (p = 0.011), disease stage (p = 0.013), tumor grade (p = 0.003), recurrence (p < 0.001) and post-treatment ascites (p = 0.001), individually. It was found that Spry2 low-expressing patients had significantly poorer OS (p = 0.002) and DFS (p = 0.004) than those with high expression of Spry2. Multivariate analysis showed that high Spry2 (p = 0.018), low stage (p = 0.049) and no residual tumor (p =0.006) were independent prognostic factors for a better OS. With regard to DFS, high Spry2 (p = 0.044) and low stage (p = 0.046) remained as independent predictors. In conclusion, we report for the first time significant downregulation of Spry2 and Spry4 proteins in human EOC. Spry2 expression was revealed to significantly impact tumor behavior with predictive value as an independent prognostic factor for survival and recurrence.

  14. Plasma long non-coding RNA MALAT1 is associated with distant metastasis in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingjuan; Su, Yongyong; He, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Weian; Wu, Caixia; Zhang, Weibo; Si, Xiaomin; Dong, Bingwei; Zhao, Lianying; Gao, Yufang; Yang, Xiaowen; Chen, Jianhui; Lu, Jian; Qiao, Ximin; Zhang, Yuchen

    2016-01-01

    Human metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a newly identified metastasis-associated long non-coding RNA. In a previous study, it was identified that plasma levels of MALAT1 were significantly increased in gastric cancer patients with metastasis compared with gastric cancer patients without metastasis and healthy control individuals. However, it is unclear whether plasma levels of MALAT1 may act as a biomarker for evaluating the development of metastasis in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In the present study, groups that consisted of 47 patients with EOC and metastasis (EOC/DM), 47 patients with EOC without metastasis (EOC/NDM), and 47 healthy control (HC) individuals were established. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the level of plasma MALAT1 in these groups. The results showed that levels of plasma MALAT1 were significantly increased in the EOC/DM group compared with the EOC/NDM and HC groups (P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that plasma MALAT1 yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.820 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.734–0.905; P<0.001], distinguishing between EOC/DM and EOC/NDM. ROC analysis also yielded an AUC of 0.884 (95% CI, 0.820–0.949; P<0.001), with 89.4% sensitivity and 72.3% specificity for distinguishing between EOC/DM and HC. Furthermore, multivariate analysis indicated that overexpression of MALAT1, differentiation (poor), tumor-node-metastasis stage (IV), lymph node metastasis (N3), peritoneal invasion (present) and higher serum carbohydrate antigen 125 levels were independent predictors of survival (hazard ratio, 3.322; P=0.028) in patients with EOC. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with increased MALAT1 expression had a poorer disease-free survival time. In conclusion, the levels of plasma MALAT1 may act as a valuable biomarker for the diagnosis of metastasis. PMID:27446438

  15. Hemodynamic Consequences of Malignant Ascites in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Surgery*: A Prospective Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hunsicker, Oliver; Fotopoulou, Christina; Pietzner, Klaus; Koch, Mandy; Krannich, Alexander; Sehouli, Jalid; Spies, Claudia; Feldheiser, Aarne

    2015-12-01

    Malignant ascites (MA) is most commonly observed in patients scheduled for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) surgery and is supposed as a major risk factor promoting perioperative hemodynamic deterioration. We aimed to assess the hemodynamic consequences of MA on systemic circulation in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery.This study is a predefined post-hoc analysis of a randomized controlled pilot trial comparing intravenous solutions within a goal-directed algorithm to optimize hemodynamic therapy in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery. Ascites was used to stratify the EOC patients prior to randomization in the main study. We analyzed 2 groups according to the amount of ascites (NLAS: none or low ascites [<500 mL] vs HAS: high ascites group [>500 mL]). Differences in hemodynamic variables with respect to time were analyzed using nonparametric analysis for longitudinal data and multivariate generalized estimating equation adjusting the analysis for the randomized study groups of the main study.A total of 31 patients in the NLAS and 16 patients in the HAS group were analyzed. Although cardiac output was not different between groups suggesting a similar circulatory blood flow, the HAS group revealed higher heart rates and lower stroke volumes during surgery. There were no differences in pressure-based hemodynamic variables. In the HAS group, fluid demands, reflected by the time to reindication of a fluid challenge after preload optimization, increased steadily, whereas stroke volume could not be maintained at baseline resulting in hemodynamic instability after 1.5 h of surgery. In contrast, in the NLAS group fluid demands were stable and stroke volume could be maintained during surgery. Clinically relevant associations of the type of fluid replacement with hemodynamic consequences were particularly observed in the HAS group, in which transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was associated to an improved circulatory flow and reduced

  16. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Anticancer activity of NOB1-targeted shRNA combination with TRAIL in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Xu, Tianmin; Teng, Hong; Cui, Manhua

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based strategy is a promising targeted therapeutic approach for the treatment of ovarian cancer. However, the effectiveness of the treatment remains limited due to the inherent or acquired resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL. Our previously study demonstrated that downregulation of NOB1 (NIN1/RPN12 binding protein 1 homolog) expression by a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery system (Lv/sh-NOB1) suppressed ovarian cancer growth. Here, Lv/sh-NOB1 and TRAIL were combined and tested the effects of this combination on ovarian cancer cells to identify more effective therapeutics against ovarian cancer by several in vitro experiments. Tumor growth ability in SKVO3 xenograft nude mice was also determined to define this combination treatment effect in tumorigenesis in vivo. In vitro assay showed that Lv/sh-NOB1 in combination with TRAIL treatment in ovarian cancer cell synergistically suppressed the proliferation and colony formation, as well as induced cell apoptosis and increased the activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9. In vivo assay showed that Lv/sh-NOB1 combination with TRAIL synergistically suppressed tumor growth of nude mice model. Importantly, we found that downregulation of NOB1 could upregulate DR5 expression and active MAPK pathway, which might contribute to increase sensitivity TRAIL to ovarian cancer cells. These findings suggested that Lv/sh-NOB1 combination with TRAIL treatment may be a potential treatment approach for ovarian cancer.

  18. FBXW12, a novel F box protein-encoding gene, is deleted or methylated in some cases of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    De La Chesnaye, Elsa; Méndez, Juan Pablo; López-Romero, Ricardo; De Los Angeles Romero-Tlalolini, María; Vergara, María Dolores; Salcedo, Mauricio; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal of gynecological malignancies. Due to its lack of early symptoms, detection usually occurs when the tumor is no longer confined to the ovary. We previously identified Fbxw15, a gene encoding an F-box protein in the mouse ovary, and showed that its expression is developmentally regulated. Here we report the molecular analysis of its human homologue, FBXW12 in epithelial ovarian tumors. To search for FBXW12 gene mutations, we PCR-amplified and sequenced the coding region of FBXW12, the gene's 5-untranslated region and the proximal promoter in each of 30 EOC tumors. Promoter methylation was determined by DNA bisulfite conversion, followed by methylation specific PCR. FBXW12 intracellular localization was identified by means of immunohistochemistry. A complete deletion of the gene's coding region, the 5'-UTR and the proximal promoter, was observed in 3 EOC samples. Eight of the remaining 27, had a deletion of the 5'-UTR, and the proximal promoter. FBXW12 mRNA was detected in 2 of the 19 samples without deletions. The methylation specific PCR results demonstrated CpGs methylation in the FBXW12 proximal promoter. Immunohistochemistry assay revealed that within the normal ovary, FBXW12 has an oocyte specific expression, whereas in EOC samples it is present in the ovarian surface epithelium. Our results indicate that the FBXW12 gene is deleted in approximately ten percent of the EOC cases studied; such deletions comprised either the FBXW12 promoter or the mRNA-encoding region. Moreover, FBXW12 could be epigenetically silenced by CpGs methylation in some of these EOC cases.

  19. FBXW12, a novel F box protein-encoding gene, is deleted or methylated in some cases of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnaye, Elsa De La; Méndez, Juan Pablo; López-Romero, Ricardo; Romero-Tlalolini, María de los Angeles; Vergara, María Dolores; Salcedo, Mauricio; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal of gynecological malignancies. Due to its lack of early symptoms, detection usually occurs when the tumor is no longer confined to the ovary. We previously identified Fbxw15, a gene encoding an F-box protein in the mouse ovary, and showed that its expression is developmentally regulated. Here we report the molecular analysis of its human homologue, FBXW12 in epithelial ovarian tumors. To search for FBXW12 gene mutations, we PCR-amplified and sequenced the coding region of FBXW12, the gene’s 5-untranslated region and the proximal promoter in each of 30 EOC tumors. Promoter methylation was determined by DNA bisulfite conversion, followed by methylation specific PCR. FBXW12 intracellular localization was identified by means of immunohistochemistry. A complete deletion of the gene’s coding region, the 5’-UTR and the proximal promoter, was observed in 3 EOC samples. Eight of the remaining 27, had a deletion of the 5’-UTR, and the proximal promoter. FBXW12 mRNA was detected in 2 of the 19 samples without deletions. The methylation specific PCR results demonstrated CpGs methylation in the FBXW12 proximal promoter. Immunohistochemistry assay revealed that within the normal ovary, FBXW12 has an oocyte specific expression, whereas in EOC samples it is present in the ovarian surface epithelium. Our results indicate that the FBXW12 gene is deleted in approximately ten percent of the EOC cases studied; such deletions comprised either the FBXW12 promoter or the mRNA-encoding region. Moreover, FBXW12 could be epigenetically silenced by CpGs methylation in some of these EOC cases. PMID:26617728

  20. Endogenous androgens and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by tumor characteristics in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ose, Jennifer; Fortner, Renée T; Rinaldi, Sabina; Schock, Helena; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dossus, Laure; Fournier, Agnes; Baglietto, Laura; Romieu, Isabelle; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Larrañaga, Nerea; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Sánchez, María-José; Barricarte, Aurelio; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Lund, Eiliv; Kaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunther, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-01-15

    The role of endogenous androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in ovarian carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous disease and there are no prospective data on endogenous androgens and EOC risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage) or the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis (i.e. type I vs. type II, leading to less or more aggressive tumors). We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort evaluating androgens and SHBG and invasive EOC risk by tumor characteristics. Female participants who provided a blood sample and were not using exogenous hormones at blood donation were eligible (n = 183,257). A total of 565 eligible women developed EOC; two controls (n = 1,097) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression models. We observed no association between androgens, SHBG and EOC overall. A doubling of androstenedione reduced risk of serous carcinomas by 21% (odds ratio (OR)log2 = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.64-0.97]). Moreover, associations differed for low-grade and high-grade carcinomas, with positive associations for low-grade and inverse associations for high-grade carcinomas (e.g. androstenedione: low grade: ORlog2 = 1.99 [0.98-4.06]; high grade: ORlog2 = 0.75 [0.61-0.93], phet ≤ 0.01), similar associations were observed for type I/II tumors. This is the first prospective study to evaluate androgens, SHBG and EOC risk by tumor characteristics and type I/II status. Our findings support a possible role of androgens in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional studies exploring this association are needed.

  1. Functional redundancy of the Notch pathway in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda; Félix, Ana; Serpa, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, despite advances in treatment. The most common histological type, high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and although these types of tumors frequently respond to surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, they usually recur. Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is an unusual histological type, which is known to be intrinsically chemoresistant and is associated with poor prognosis in advanced stages. In recent years, genetic alterations and epigenetic modulation of signaling pathways have been reported in OSC and OCCC, including the overexpression of Notch pathway elements and histone deacetylases. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), alter the transcription of genes involved in cell growth, survival and apoptosis, and have become an attractive therapeutic approach. However, no previous work has addressed the effect of HDACis, and in particular vorinostat, on Notch signaling in ovarian cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the modulation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat in ovarian cancer. Using immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the present results revealed that vorinostat activated the Notch pathway in OCCC and OSC cell lines, through different Notch ligands. In OCCC, the activation of the Notch pathway appeared to occur through Delta-like (Dll) ligands 1, 2 and 3, whereas in OSC Dll1 and Jagged 1 and 2 ligands were involved. The activation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat, in OCCC and OSC cell lines, culminated in the increased expression of the same downstream transcription factors, hairy enhancer of split (Hes) 1 and 5, and Hes-related proteins 1 and 2. In conclusion, vorinostat modulates the expression of several downstream targets of the Notch pathway and independent Notch receptors and ligands that are expressed in OSC and OCCC. This

  2. Functional redundancy of the Notch pathway in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda; Félix, Ana; Serpa, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, despite advances in treatment. The most common histological type, high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and although these types of tumors frequently respond to surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, they usually recur. Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is an unusual histological type, which is known to be intrinsically chemoresistant and is associated with poor prognosis in advanced stages. In recent years, genetic alterations and epigenetic modulation of signaling pathways have been reported in OSC and OCCC, including the overexpression of Notch pathway elements and histone deacetylases. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), alter the transcription of genes involved in cell growth, survival and apoptosis, and have become an attractive therapeutic approach. However, no previous work has addressed the effect of HDACis, and in particular vorinostat, on Notch signaling in ovarian cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the modulation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat in ovarian cancer. Using immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the present results revealed that vorinostat activated the Notch pathway in OCCC and OSC cell lines, through different Notch ligands. In OCCC, the activation of the Notch pathway appeared to occur through Delta-like (Dll) ligands 1, 2 and 3, whereas in OSC Dll1 and Jagged 1 and 2 ligands were involved. The activation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat, in OCCC and OSC cell lines, culminated in the increased expression of the same downstream transcription factors, hairy enhancer of split (Hes) 1 and 5, and Hes-related proteins 1 and 2. In conclusion, vorinostat modulates the expression of several downstream targets of the Notch pathway and independent Notch receptors and ligands that are expressed in OSC and OCCC. This

  3. Inhibition of Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma Tumorigenesis and Progression by microRNA 106b Mediated through the RhoC Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Chen, Xi; Xiu, Yin-Ling; Sun, Kai-Xuan; Zhao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal of the gynecological malignancies. Exploring the molecular mechanisms and major factors of invasion and metastasis could have great significance for the treatment and prognosis of EOC. Studies have demonstrated that microRNA 106b (miR-106b) may be a promising therapeutic target for inhibiting breast cancer bone metastasis, but the role of miR-106b in EOC is largely unknown. In this work, miRNA-106b expression was quantified in various ovarian tissues and tumors. Ovarian carcinoma cell lines were transfected with miR-106b, after which, cell phenotype and expression of relevant molecules was assayed. Dual-luciferase reporter assays and xenograft mouse models were also used to investigate miR-106b and its target gene. MiR-106b mRNA expression was found to be significantly higher in normal ovarian tissues and benign tumors than in ovarian carcinomas and borderline tumors (p < 0.01), and was negatively associated with differentiation (Well vs. Por & Mod) and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging (stage I/II vs. stage III/IV) in ovarian carcinoma (p < 0.05). MiR-106b transfection reduced cell proliferation; promoted G1 or S arrest and apoptosis (p < 0.05); suppressed cell migration and invasion (p < 0.05); reduced Ras homolog gene family member C (RhoC), P70 ribosomal S6 kinase (P70S6K), Bcl-xL, Matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2), MMP9 mRNA and protein expression; and induced p53 expression (p < 0.05). Dual-luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-106b directly targets RhoC by binding its 3’UTR. MiR-106b transfection also suppressed tumor development and RhoC expression in vivo in xenograft mouse models. This is the first demonstration that miR-106b may inhibit tumorigenesis and progression of EOC by targeting RhoC. The involvement of miR-106b-mediated RhoC downregulation in EOC aggression may give extended insights into molecular mechanisms underlying cancer aggression. Approaches

  4. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  5. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer Following Surgery and Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-12

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Tumor; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Co action of CFTR and AQP1 increases permeability of peritoneal epithelial cells on estrogen-induced ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) is an iatrogenic complication associated with fertility drugs. It is characterized by increased vascular permeability and substantial fluid shift with accumulation in the body cavity. The pathogenesis of OHSS remains obscure, and no definitive treatments are currently available. Results Using western blot and short-circuit current (Isc) techniques, we investigate the potential coactions of analysis in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and aquaporin 1 (AQP1) on the hyper permeability of body cavity peritoneal epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of OHSS. The rats develop OHSS symptoms, with the up regulation of both CFTR and AQP1 expression and enhanced CFTR channel activity in peritoneal epithelial cells, can also be mimicked by administration of estrogen, alone in ovariectomized rats. Administration of progesterone suppresses CFTR activity, OHSS symptoms as well as CFTR and AQP1 expression. Besides, AQP1 inhibitor, HgCl2, can suppress CFTR channel activity. Therefore, antisera against CFTR or AQP1 to OHSS animals may result in alleviation of the symptom. Conclusion This study confirms the coactions of CFTR and AQP1 play a critical role in the development and progression of increased peritoneal epithelial permeability in severe OHSS. These findings may provide grounds for ameliorating assisted reproduction treatment strategy to reduce the risk of OHSS in in vitro fertilization (IVF). PMID:22928917

  7. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. Insulin-like growth factor I and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by tumour characteristics: results from the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, J; Fortner, R T; Schock, H; Peeters, P H; Onland-Moret, N C; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Weiderpass, E; Gram, I T; Overvad, K; Tjonneland, A; Dossus, L; Fournier, A; Baglietto, L; Trichopoulou, A; Benetou, V; Trichopoulos, D; Boeing, H; Masala, G; Krogh, V; Matiello, A; Tumino, R; Popovic, M; Obón-Santacana, M; Larrañaga, N; Ardanaz, E; Sánchez, M-J; Menéndez, V; Chirlaque, M-D; Travis, R C; Khaw, K-T; Brändstedt, J; Idahl, A; Lundin, E; Rinaldi, S; Kuhn, E; Romieu, I; Gunter, M J; Merritt, M A; Riboli, E; Kaaks, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prospective studies on insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk are inconclusive. Data suggest risk associations vary by tumour characteristics. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) to evaluate IGF-I concentrations and EOC risk by tumour characteristics (n=565 cases). Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate associations. Results: We observed no association between IGF-I and EOC overall or by tumour characteristics. Conclusions: In the largest prospective study to date was no association between IGF-I and EOC risk. Pre-diagnostic serum IGF-I concentrations may not influence EOC risk. PMID:25349976

  9. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an (18)F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an (18)F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of (18)F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([(18)F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [(18)F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  10. Effect of benzophenone-1 and octylphenol on the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway in estrogen receptor expressing ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sam; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Hwang, Kyung-A; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process in embryonic development and cancer progression and metastasis. EMT is influenced by 17β-estradiol (E2), an endogenous estrogen. Benzophenone-1 (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, BP-1) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) are suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) because they can exhibit estrogenic properties. In this study, we examined whether BP-1 and OP can lead to EMT of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). A wound healing assay and western blot assay were conducted to show the effect of BP-1 and OP on the migration of BG-1 cells and protein expression of EMT-related genes. BP-1 (10(-6) M) and OP (10(-6) M) significantly enhanced the migration capability of BG-1 cells by reducing the wounded area in the cell monolayer relative to the control, similar to E2 (10(-9) M). However, when BG-1 cells were co-treated with ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, the uncovered area was maintained at the level of the control. N-cadherin, snail, and slug were increased by BP-1 and OP while E-cadherin was reduced compared to the control. However, this effect was also restored by co-treatment with ICI 182,780. Taken together, these results indicate that BP-1 and OP, the potential EDCs, may have the ability to induce ovarian cancer metastasis via regulation of the expression of EMT markers and migration of ER-expressing BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. PMID:27145024

  11. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an 18F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an 18F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of 18F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester activates pro-apoptotic and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes in ovarian cancer cells A2780 and A2780cis.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Claudia; Braicu, Ovidiu Leonard; Zanoaga, Oana; Jurj, Anca; Pileczki, Valentina; Maralani, Mahafarin; Drigla, Flaviu; Braicu, Cornelia; Budisan, Liviuta; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly aggressive pathology, displaying a poor prognosis and chemoresistance to classical therapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on survival of ovarian cancer cell lines, A2780 (sensitive to cisplatin) and A2780cis (resistant to cisplatin). MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability, while the apoptotic processes were examined by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR. A reduction of cell proliferation and activation of the apoptosis was observed in both cell lines. qRT-PCR evaluation demonstrated the activation of the pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP8, FAS, FADD, p53) in both cell lines. The limited therapeutic effect in A2780 cells is explained by the activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes (ZEB1, ZEB2, or TGFBB1) as displayed by Ingenuity Network analysis. Overall data suggest that CAPE can be used as an alternative in sensitizing cells to chemotherapy. PMID:26838168

  13. Pattern of tissue expression of CA-125 and HE4 in primary epithelial ovarian tumours and correlation with serum CA-125 levels.

    PubMed

    Devan, Shobana Mukunda; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Sthaneshwar, Pavai; Narayanan, Vallikkanu

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess tissue expression of CA-125 and HE4 protein in primary benign and malignant epithelial tumours of the ovary and correlate with serum CA-125 levels. A total of 100 formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded sections of ovarian tumours which included serous adenoma (11), mucinous adenoma (42), serous carcinoma (20), mucinous carcinoma (12) and endometrioid carcinoma (15), histologically diagnosed between 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2012 at the University Malaya Medical Centre, were stained for HE4 (rabbit polyclonal antibody, Abcam, UK) and CA-125 (mouse monoclonal antibody clone: OC125, Cell Marque Corporation, Rocklin, California, USA). Pre-operative serum CA-125 levels were obtained from the laboratory information system. Immunoscore (I score) for HE4 and CA-125 was given based on the intensity of staining and percentage of positive tumour cells and considered significant when it was >50 (intensity of staining multiplied by percentage of positive tumour cells). Serum CA-125 levels were compared with the I score of HE4 and CA-125 in tissues. We noted that the CA-125 levels in serum and tissues were significantly raised in malignant compared to benign ovarian tumours (p value<0.05). Tissue expression of HE4 protein was also significantly raised in malignant tumours compared to benign tumours (p value<0.05). We conclude that HE4 can be a useful tissue immunomarker in addition to CA-125.

  14. Avian SERPINB12 expression in the avian oviduct is regulated by estrogen and up-regulated in epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Jo, Gahee; Lim, Whasun; Bae, Seung-Min; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs) are involved in a variety of biological processes such as blood clotting, angiogenesis, immune system, and embryogenesis. Although, of these, SERPINB12 is identified as the latest member of clade B in humans, little is known of it in chickens. Thus, in this study, we investigated SERPINB12 expression profiles in various tissues of chickens and focused on effects of steroid hormone regulation of its expression. In the chicken oviduct, SERPINB12 mRNA and protein are abundant in the luminal (LE) and glandular (GE) epithelia of the magnum in response to endogenous or exogenous estrogen. Furthermore, SERPINB12 mRNA and protein increase significantly in GE of cancerous ovaries of laying hens with epithelia-derived ovarian cancer. Collectively, these results indicate that SERPINB12 is a novel estrogen-stimulated gene that is up-regulated by estrogen in epithelial cells of the chicken oviduct and that it is a potential biomarker for early detection of ovarian carcinomas in laying hens and women. PMID:25020046

  15. Proliferation of rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cells in culture: Lack of mitogenic response to steroid or gonadotropic hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Toth-Fejel, Suellen; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2002-06-30

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer and approximately 90% of ovarian cancers derive from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), yet the biology of the OSE is poorly understood. Factors associated with increased risk of non-hereditary ovarian cancer include the formation of inclusion cysts, effects of reproductive hormones cytokeratin, vimentin, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, estrogen receptor-a, and progesterone receptor. We show that these cells activate MAP Kinase and proliferate in response to extracellular calcium, as do human and rat OSE. In contrast, the gonadotropic hormones FSH (4-400 IU/L), LH (8.5-850 IU/l), and hCG (10-1000 IU/l) fail to stimulate proliferation. We find that concentrations of progesterone and estrogen normally present in follicles just prior to ovulation ( ~1000 ng/ml) significantly decrease the number of mitotically active RhOSE cells as determined by PCNA labelling, total cell count, and 3H-thymidine uptake, while lower steroid concentrations have no effect.

  16. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Effect of Procyanidin-rich Extract from Natural Cocoa Powder on Cellular Viability, Cell Cycle Progression, and Chemoresistance in Human Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Taparia, Shruti; Khanna, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the last 400 years, cocoa and chocolate have been described as having potential medicinal value, being consumed as a beverage or eaten as food. Concentration–dependant, antiproliferation, and cytotoxic effects of some of their polyphenolic constituents have been demonstrated against various cancers. Such an effect remains to be demonstrated in ovarian cancer Objective: To investigate the effect of cocoa procyanidins against ovarian cancer in vitro using OAW42 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cocoa procyanidins were extracted and enriched from non alkalized cocoa powder. The polyphenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined. Effect on cell viability was determined after the treatment with ≤1000 μg/mL cocoa procyanidin-rich extract on OAW42 and OVCAR3 and normal human dermal fibroblasts. Similarly, chemosensitization effect was determined by pretreating cancer cell lines with extract followed by doxorubicin hydrochloride treatment. The effect of treatment on cell cycle and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was determined using flow cytometry. Results: The cocoa extract showed high polyphenolic content and antioxidant activity. Treatment with extract caused cytotoxicity and chemosensitization in OAW42 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Normal dermal fibroblasts showed an increase in cell viability post treatment with extract. Treatment with extract affected the cell cycle and an increasing percentage of cells in hypodiploid sub-G1/G0 phase was observed. Treatment of OVCAR3 with the extract caused reduction of P-gp expression. Conclusion: Cocoa procyanidins were found to be selectively cytotoxic against epithelial ovarian cancer, interfered with the normal cell cycle and sensitized cells to subsequent chemotherapeutic treatment. Chemosensitization was found to be associated with P-gp reduction in OVCAR3 cells. SUMMARY Among the naturally occurring flavonoids, procyanidins have been shown to be effective against cancersNon alkalized

  18. Epacadostat Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  19. Delayed type hypersensitivity response to recall antigens does not accurately reflect immune competence in advanced stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Kathy; Rinn, Kristine; Disis, Mary L

    2002-07-01

    The development of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens has long been utilized as a measure of immune competence. It is assumed that because patients with advanced stage cancers exhibit multiple immune system defects they may not be responsive to immunization. We pre-selected patients with advanced HER-2/neu (HER2) overexpressing breast and ovarian cancers for enrolment into a phase I trial designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a HER2 peptide vaccine based on the patient's immune competence as assessed by DTH skin testing to common recall antigens (Multitest CMI, Institut Merieux, Lyon, France). At the time of a positive DTH response to tetanus toxoid (tt) peripheral blood was obtained to measure T cell responses to tt. Of 53 patients evaluated, 38 (72%) were not anergic. Among the 15 (28%) who were, seven patients with advanced stage breast cancer were re-tested a median of 26 days (range 12-150 days) after receiving a tt bopster vaccination. Five of the seven had positive DTH responses when re-challenged with tt and six had peripheral blood tetanus specific T cell response with stimulation index >2.0. Thus, the majority of patients studied with advanced stage breast or ovarian cancer were able to mount a DTH response to common recall antigens. Moreover, a negative response by DTH testing to a battery of common recall antigens was not a reflection of the breast cancer patient's ability to mount a cell-mediated immune response to a vaccinated antigen, tt.

  20. Acrylamide and glycidamide hemoglobin adducts and epithelial ovarian cancer: a nested case-control study in non-smoking postmenopausal women from the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Travis, Ruth C.; Freisling, Heinz; Ferrari, Pietro; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fortner, Renée T.; Ose, Jennifer; Boeing, Heiner; Menéndez, Virginia; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Chamosa, Saioa; Huerta Castaño, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Merritt, Melissa A.; Gunter, Marc J.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Papatesta, Eleni-Maria; Klinaki, Eleni; Saieva, Calogero; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Peeters, Petra H.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Vesper, Hubert W.; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Background Acrylamide was classified as ‘probably carcinogenic to humans (group 2A)’ by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the fourth cause of cancer mortality in women. Five epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between EOC risk and dietary acrylamide intake assessed using food frequency questionnaires, and one nested case-control study evaluated hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide (HbAA) and its metabolite glycidamide (HbGA) and EOC risk; the results of these studies were inconsistent. Methods A nested case-control study in non-smoking postmenopausal women (334 cases, 417 controls) was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between HbAA, HbGA, HbAA+HbGA, and HbGA/HbAA and EOC and invasive serous EOC risk. Results No overall associations were observed between biomarkers of acrylamide exposure analyzed in quintiles and EOC risk; however, positive associations were observed between some middle quintiles of HbGA and HbAA+HbGA. Elevated but non-statistically significant ORs for serous EOC were observed for HbGA and HbAA+HbGA (ORQ5vsQ1:1.91, 95%CI:0.96-3.81 and ORQ5vsQ1:1.90, 95%CI:0.94-3.83, respectively); however, no linear dose-response trends were observed. Conclusion This EPIC nested case-control study failed to observe a clear association between biomarkers of acrylamide exposure and the risk of EOC or invasive serous EOC. Impact It is unlikely that dietary acrylamide exposure increases ovarian cancer risk; however, additional studies with larger sample size should be performed to exclude any possible association with EOC risk. PMID:26376083

  1. Gain-of-function microRNA screens identify miR-193a regulating proliferation and apoptosis in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Haruo; Yamada, Yoji; Miyazawa, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a small class of non‑coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, and are considered as new therapeutic targets for treating cancer. In this study, we performed a gain-of-function screen using miRNA mimic library (319 miRNA species) to identify those affecting cell proliferation in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (A2780). We discovered a number of miRNAs that increased or decreased the cell viability of A2780 cells. Pro-proliferative and anti-proliferative miRNAs include oncogenic miR-372 and miR-373, and tumor suppressive miR-124a, miR-7, miR-192 and miR-193a, respectively. We found that overexpression of miR-124a, miR-192, miR-193a and miR‑193b inhibited BrdU incorporation in A2780 cells, indicating that these miRNAs affected the cell cycle. Overexpression of miR‑193a and miR-193b induced an activation of caspase 3/7, and resulted in apoptotic cell death in A2780 cells. A genome‑wide gene expression analysis with miR-193a-transfected A2780 cells led to identification of ARHGAP19, CCND1, ERBB4, KRAS and MCL1 as potential miR-193a targets. We demonstrated that miR-193a decreased the amount of MCL1 protein by binding 3'UTR of its mRNA. Our study suggests the potential of miRNA screens to discover miRNAs as therapeutic tools to treat ovarian cancer.

  2. Low dose abdominal radiation as a docetaxel chemosensitizer for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer: A phase I study of the Gynecologic Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Sill, Michael W.; Buekers, Thomas E.; Walker, Joan L.; Schilder, Jeanne M.; Yamada, S. Diane; Waggoner, Steven E.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Fracasso, Paula M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of whole abdomen radiation as a chemosensitizer of weekly docetaxel for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancers. Patients and methods Women were enrolled on one of three dose levels of docetaxel (20, 25, or 30 mg/m2) administered weekly with concurrent low dose whole abdominal radiation given as 60 cGy bid two days weekly for a total of 6 weeks. Results Thirteen women were enrolled and received 70 weekly treatments of docetaxel in combination with radiation therapy. At the first dose level, docetaxel 25 mg/m2, grade 3 fatigue and thrombocytopenia were observed. At the next dose level, docetaxel 30 mg/m2, grade 3 febrile neutropenia, grade 4 thrombocytopenia with epistaxis and grade 3 diarrhea were observed. Given these dose-limiting toxicities, a lower dose of docetaxel 20 mg/m2 was administered and found to be tolerable. No objective responses were observed among the 10 patients with measurable disease; however, the median progression-free survival (PFS) in all patients was 3.3 months, and 3 of the patients with measurable disease were free of tumor progression after 6 months (30%; 90% Confidence Interval 8.7–61%). Conclusions Twice weekly low dose whole abdomen radiation during weekly docetaxel 20 mg/m2 was well-tolerated. Given the PFS demonstrated in these women with resistant ovarian cancer, further study of whole abdominal radiation and concurrent chemotherapy may be warranted. PMID:21075438

  3. Cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Gareth K; Chang, Jenny; Ziogas, Argyrios

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery (PDS) when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data linked to Medicare claims (SEER-Medicare). Methods Using a Markov model, the cost-effectiveness of PDS was compared to that of NACT. We modeled cost and survival inputs using data from women in the SEER-Medicare database with ovarian cancer treated by either PDS or NACT between 1992 and 2009. Direct and indirect costs were discounted by an annual rate of 3%. Utility weights were obtained from published data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of PDS compared to NACT was calculated. Results In our model, women with stage IIIC EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost for PDS when compared to NACT ($31,945 vs $30,016) but yielded greater quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (1.79 vs 1.69). The ICER was $19,359/QALY gained. Women with stage IV EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost following PDS when compared to NACT ($31,869 vs $27,338) but yielded greater QALYs (1.69 vs 1.66). The ICER was $130,083/QALY gained. A sensitivity analysis showed that for both PDS and NACT the ICER was sensitive to incremental changes in the utility weight. Conclusion PDS is significantly more cost-effective for women with stage IIIC when compared to NACT. In women with stage IV EOC, PDS is also more cost-effective though the QALYs gained are much more costly and exceed a $50,000 willingness to pay. PMID:27536150

  4. Neuropsychological resiliency after treatment for advanced stage neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, S C; Diller, L R

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the neuropsychological functioning of survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma. In all, 16 survivors, diagnosed at a median of 2.8 years, who had received intensive chemotherapy and surgical treatments, were identified; 11 had received myeloablative consolidation therapy, eight with total body irradiation (TBI). All patients were evaluated with a neuropsychological assessment battery at a median age of 8.8 years. Analyses included comparison of the performances of the TBI group vs the no-TBI group; determination of whether the proportion of individuals with impaired or superior performance on each measure exceeded normative expectations; and performance indexes reflecting patterns of performance. Results indicate no significant deleterious impact of TBI and/or presence or absence of myeloablative therapy on neurocognitive and neurobehavioral functioning. For this cohort, resilience to neuropsychological vulnerability was observed, which included the emergence of a profile of full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, and mathematical achievement well above average expectations. We concluded that the results document a lack of neuropsychological morbidity among this cohort of survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma, regardless of the inclusion of TBI. Moreover, a striking pattern of excellent neurocognitive functioning with intact neurobehavioral functioning was observed.

  5. Cell type-specific targeted mutations of Kras and Pten document proliferation arrest in granulosa cells versus oncogenic insult to ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; Paquet, Marilene; Wang, Jinrong; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Richards, JoAnne S

    2009-08-15

    The small G-protein KRAS is crucial for mediating gonadotropin-induced events associated with ovulation. However, constitutive expression of KrasG12D in granulosa cells disrupted normal follicle development leading to the persistence of abnormal follicle-like structures containing nonmitotic cells. To determine what factors mediate this potent effect of KrasG12D, gene profiling analyses were done. We also analyzed KrasG12D;Cyp19-Cre and KrasG12;Pgr-Cre mutant mouse models that express Cre prior to or after the initiation of granulosa cell differentiation, respectively. KrasG12D induced cell cycle arrest in granulosa cells of the KrasG12D;Cyp19-Cre mice but not in the KrasG12D;Pgr-Cre mice, documenting the cell context-specific effect of KrasG12D. Expression of KrasG12D silenced the Kras gene, reduced cell cycle activator genes, and impaired the expression of granulosa cell and oocyte-specific genes. Conversely, levels of PTEN and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased markedly in the mutant granulosa cells. Because disrupting Pten in granulosa cells leads to increased proliferation and survival, Pten was disrupted in the KrasG12D mutant mice. The Pten/Kras mutant mice were infertile but lacked granulosa cell tumors. By contrast, the Ptenfl/fl;KrasG12D;Amhr2-Cre mice developed aggressive ovarian surface epithelial cell tumors that did not occur in the Ptenfl/fl;KrasG12D;Cyp19-Cre or Ptenfl/fl;KrasG12D;Pgr-Cre mouse strains. These data document unequivocally that Amhr2-Cre is expressed in and mediates allelic recombination of oncogenic genes in ovarian surface epithelial cells. That KrasG12D/Pten mutant granulosa cells do not transform but rather undergo cell cycle arrest indicates that they resist the oncogenic insults of Kras/Pten by robust self-protecting mechanisms that silence the Kras gene and elevate PTEN and phosphorylated p38 MAPK.

  6. Frequent loss of PTEN expression is linked to elevated phosphorylated Akt levels, but not associated with p27 and cyclin D1 expression, in primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kurose, K; Zhou, X P; Araki, T; Cannistra, S A; Maher, E R; Eng, C

    2001-06-01

    disruption of PTEN by several mechanisms, allelic loss, intragenic mutation, or epigenetic silencing, all contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis, and that epigenetic silencing is a significant mechanism. The Akt pathway is prominently involved, but clearly not in all cases. Surprisingly, despite in vitro demonstration that p27 and cyclin D1 lies downstream of PTEN and Akt, there was no correlation between p27 and cyclin D1 expression and PTEN or P-Akt status. Thus, in vivo, although PTEN and Akt play a prominent role in ovarian carcinogenesis, p27 and cyclin D1 might not be the primary downstream targets. Alternatively, these observations could also suggest that pathways involving other than Akt, p27 and cyclin D1 that lie downstream of PTEN play roles in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  7. Validating a mouse model of ovarian cancer for early detection through imaging | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Despite advances in treatment strategies, ovarian cancer remains the deadliest gynecological malignancy and the 5th largest cancer killer in women. Located deep in the body, with few early symptoms and no effective screening technique, ovarian cancer has remained stubbornly difficult to understand, much less effectively combat. Ovarian cancer is almost always discovered at an advanced stage. |

  8. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. A phase II randomised clinical trial comparing cisplatin, paclitaxel and ifosfamide with cisplatin, paclitaxel and epirubicin in newly diagnosed advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: long-term survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fruscio, R; Colombo, N; Lissoni, A A; Garbi, A; Fossati, R; Ieda', N; Torri, V; Mangioni, C

    2008-01-01

    To test the feasibility and efficacy of epirubicin and ifosfamide added to first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in a phase II randomised clinical trial. Patients with histologically proven epithelial ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to receive first-line polychemotherapy with cisplatin/paclitaxel/epirubicin (CEP) or cisplatin/paclitaxel/ifosfamide (CIP) for six cycles every 21 days. Two hundred and eight patients were randomised between the two treatment arms and the median number of cycles per patient was six. Toxicity was predominantly haematological with both regimens; however, anaemia, leucopaenia, neutropaenic fever and use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors and transfusion were significantly more frequent in the CIP treatment arm. Response rates were 85% (95% confidence interval (CI) 77–93%) in the CIP arm and 90% (95% CI 84–96%) in the CEP arm; complete response rates were 48 and 52%. After a median follow-up of 82 months, median overall survival (OS) was 51 and 65 months; 5-year survival rates were respectively 43 and 50%. In this clinical trial, both regimens showed good efficacy, but toxicity was heavier with the CIP regimen. Considering that more than 50% of patients were suboptimally debulked after the first surgery, OS seems to be longer than is commonly reported. This unexpected finding might be a consequence of the close surgical surveillance and aggressive chemotherapeutic approach. PMID:18253120

  10. Gene Set-Based Functionome Analysis of Pathogenesis in Epithelial Ovarian Serous Carcinoma and the Molecular Features in Different FIGO Stages

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Ming-Jie; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Serous carcinoma (SC) is the most common subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma and is divided into four stages by the Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system. Currently, the molecular functions and biological processes of SC at different FIGO stages have not been quantified. Here, we conducted a whole-genome integrative analysis to investigate the functions of SC at different stages. The function, as defined by the GO term or canonical pathway gene set, was quantified by measuring the changes in the gene expressional order between cancerous and normal control states. The quantified function, i.e., the gene set regularity (GSR) index, was utilized to investigate the pathogenesis and functional regulation of SC at different FIGO stages. We showed that the informativeness of the GSR indices was sufficient for accurate pattern recognition and classification for machine learning. The function regularity presented by the GSR indices showed stepwise deterioration during SC progression from FIGO stage I to stage IV. The pathogenesis of SC was centered on cell cycle deregulation and accompanied with multiple functional aberrations as well as their interactions. PMID:27275818

  11. Macrophage Blockade Using CSF1R Inhibitors Reverses the Vascular Leakage Underlying Malignant Ascites in Late-Stage Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moughon, Diana L; He, Huanhuan; Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Yaqoob, Madeeha; David, John; Lin, Crystal; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Dorigo, Oliver; Wu, Lily

    2015-11-15

    Malignant ascites is a common complication in the late stages of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) that greatly diminishes the quality of life of patients. Malignant ascites is a known consequence of vascular dysfunction, but current approved treatments are not effective in preventing fluid accumulation. In this study, we investigated an alternative strategy of targeting macrophage functions to reverse the vascular pathology of malignant ascites using fluid from human patients and an immunocompetent murine model (ID8) of EOC that mirrors human disease by developing progressive vascular disorganization and leakiness culminating in massive ascites. We demonstrate that the macrophage content in ascites fluid from human patients and the ID8 model directly correlates with vascular permeability. To further substantiate macrophages' role in the pathogenesis of malignant ascites, we blocked macrophage function in ID8 mice using a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor kinase inhibitor (GW2580). Administration of GW2580 in the late stages of disease resulted in reduced infiltration of protumorigenic (M2) macrophages and dramatically decreased ascites volume. Moreover, the disorganized peritoneal vasculature became normalized and sera from GW2580-treated ascites protected against endothelial permeability. Therefore, our findings suggest that macrophage-targeted treatment may be a promising strategy toward a safe and effective means to control malignant ascites of EOC.

  12. A non-randomized confirmatory study regarding selection of fertility-sparing surgery for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1203).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Toyomi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Kanato, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Takano, Masashi; Baba, Tsukasa; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ushijima, Kimio; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Fertility-sparing treatment has been accepted as a standard treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in stage IA non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. In order to expand an indication of fertility-sparing treatment, we have started a non-randomized confirmatory trial for stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The protocol-defined fertility-sparing surgery is optimal staging laparotomy including unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, peritoneal cytology and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection or biopsy. After fertility-sparing surgery, four to six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin are administered. We plan to enroll 250 patients with an indication of fertility-sparing surgery, and then the primary analysis is to be conducted for 63 operated patients with pathologically confirmed stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The primary endpoint is 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints are other survival endpoints and factors related to reproduction. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000013380. PMID:26059697

  13. Novel high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines that reflect the molecular diversity of both the sporadic and hereditary disease

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Euridice; Portelance, Lise; Arcand, Suzanna L.; Rahimi, Kurosh; Tonin, Patricia N.; Provencher, Diane; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Few cell line models of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have been developed for the high-grade serous (HGS) subtype, which is the most common and lethal form of gynaecological cancer. Here we describe the establishment of six new EOC cell lines spontaneously derived from HGS tumors (TOV2978G, TOV3041G and TOV3291G) or ascites (OV866(2), OV4453 and OV4485). Exome sequencing revealed somatic TP53 mutations in five of the cell lines. One cell line has a novel BRCA1 splice-site mutation, and another, a recurrent BRCA2 nonsense mutation, both of germline origin. The novel BRCA1 mutation induced abnormal splicing, mRNA instability, resulting in the absence of BRCA1 protein. None of the cell lines harbor mutations in KRAS or BRAF, which are characteristic of other EOC subtypes. SNP arrays showed that all of the cell lines exhibited structural chromosomal abnormalities, copy number alterations and regions of loss of heterozygosity, consistent with those described for HGS. Four cell lines were able to produce 3D-spheroids, two exhibited anchorage-independent growth, and three (including the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated cell lines) formed tumors in SCID mice. These novel HGS EOC cell lines and their detailed characterization provide new research tools for investigating the most common and lethal form of EOC. PMID:26622941

  14. Continuous anti-angiogenic therapy after tumor progression in patients with recurrent high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer: phase I trial experience

    PubMed Central

    Janku, Filip; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Naing, Aung; Hong, David; Westin, Shannon; Coleman, Robert L.; Sood, Anil K.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Subbiah, Vivek; Wheler, Jennifer; Zinner, Ralph; Lu, Karen; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Fu, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    High-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (HG-EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy worldwide Once patients develop chemoresistance, effective novel strategies are required to improve prognosis We analyzed characteristics and outcomes of 242 consecutive patients with HG-EOC participating in 94 phase I clinical trials at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Baseline lactate dehydrogenase levels, albumin levels, and number of metastatic sites were independent predictors of overall survival (OS). Receiving more than 1 phase I protocol was associated with improved OS (p < 0.001). Regimens including a chemotherapeutic agent plus bevacizumab or Aurora A kinase inhibitor led to a median progression-free survival (PFS) duration of more than 6 months. Although patients receiving bevacizumab-based regimens in the phase I clinical trials had significantly longer PFS than those receiving other anti-angiogenic therapies (p = 0.017), patients treated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) had significantly longer OS (12.2 months) than those not treated with VEGFR-TKIs (8.6 months, p = 0.015). In conclusion, anti-angiogenic therapy is one of the most important strategies for the treatment of HG-EOC, even in those who have already experienced tumor progression. Therefore, eligible patients with HG-EOC should be encouraged to participate in novel phase I studies of anti-angiogenic therapies, even after disease progression. PMID:27147567

  15. A non-randomized confirmatory study regarding selection of fertility-sparing surgery for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1203).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Toyomi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Kanato, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Takano, Masashi; Baba, Tsukasa; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ushijima, Kimio; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Fertility-sparing treatment has been accepted as a standard treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in stage IA non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. In order to expand an indication of fertility-sparing treatment, we have started a non-randomized confirmatory trial for stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The protocol-defined fertility-sparing surgery is optimal staging laparotomy including unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, peritoneal cytology and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection or biopsy. After fertility-sparing surgery, four to six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin are administered. We plan to enroll 250 patients with an indication of fertility-sparing surgery, and then the primary analysis is to be conducted for 63 operated patients with pathologically confirmed stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The primary endpoint is 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints are other survival endpoints and factors related to reproduction. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000013380.

  16. Carbohydrate antigen expression in primary tumors, metastatic lesions, and serous effusions from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinoma: evidence of up-regulated Tn and Sialyl Tn antigen expression in effusions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Risberg, B; Kristensen, G B; Tropé, C G; Bryne, M

    2000-09-01

    The object of this study was the investigation of carbohydrate antigen expression in malignant epithelial cells and benign mesothelial cells in serous effusions from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinomas. In addition, to compare antigen expression in carcinoma cells in effusions with those of corresponding primary tumors and metastatic lesions. Sections from 63 malignant effusions from ovarian carcinoma patients and 15 reactive effusions were immunohistochemically stained, using 5 monoclonal antibodies for Lewis(y), Sialyl Lewis(x), Tn, and Sialyl Tn antigens. Tissue sections (n = 97) from corresponding primary ovarian carcinomas and metastatic lesions, as well as from 12 malignant mesotheliomas, were additionally stained using the above panel. Staining for the 4 antigens was seen in carcinoma cells in serous effusions in the majority of cases (range = 71% to 85%). In contrast, immunoreactivity was detected in mesothelial cells in only 6% to 23% of the specimens studied (P < .001 for all 5 markers). With the exception of B3 antibody against Lewis(y) antigen, malignant mesotheliomas stained negative, infrequently showing focal immunoreactivity. An up-regulation of Tn and Sialyl Tn expression was detected in carcinoma cells in effusions when compared with both primary tumors (P < .003 and P < .007, respectively) and metastatic lesions (P < .034 and .041, respectively). Cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens can thus be used as an adjunct in the differentiation between malignant epithelial and reactive mesothelial cells. Ovarian carcinoma cells in effusions show up-regulation of Tn and Sialyl Tn, possibly representing a transient phenotypic alteration facilitating metastasis. PMID:11014575

  17. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Ets-1 messenger RNA expression is a novel marker of poor survival in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Reich, R; Goldberg, I; Gotlieb, W H; Kopolovic, J; Berner, A; Ben-Baruch, G; Bryne, M; Nesland, J M

    2001-03-01

    were included (P = 0.007). To our knowledge, this is the first evidence associating Ets-1 mRNA expression and poor survival in human epithelial malignancy. Ets-1 is thus a novel prognostic marker in advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma. The association between Ets-1 mRNA expression and the expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase and angiogenic genes, first documented here in a study of patient material, points to the central role of this transcription factor in tumor progression in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:11297247

  19. Epithelial ovarian cancer: influence of polymorphism at the glutathione S-transferase GSTM1 and GSTT1 loci on p53 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sarhanis, P.; Redman, C.; Perrett, C.; Brannigan, K.; Clayton, R. N.; Hand, P.; Musgrove, C.; Suarez, V.; Jones, P.; Fryer, A. A.; Farrell, W. E.; Strange, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of polymorphism in the glutathione S-transferase GSTM1, GSTT1 and, cytochrome P450, CYP2D6 loci in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer has been assessed in two studies; firstly, a case-control study designed to determine the influence of these genes on susceptibility to this cancer, and secondly, the putative role of these genes in the protection of host cell DNA has been studied by comparing p53 expression in patients with different GSTM1, GSTT1 and CYP2D6 genotypes. The frequencies of GSTM1, GSTT1 and CYP2D6 genotypes in 84 cases and 325 controls were not different. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect p53 expression in 63 of these tumours. Expression was found in 23 tumours. Of the patients demonstrating immunopositivity, 20 (87%) were GSTM1 null. The frequency distributions of GSTM1 genotypes in p53-positive and -negative samples were significantly different (P = 0.002) and those for GSTT1 genotypes approached significance (exact P = 0.057). The proportion of patients with both GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null was also significantly greater in the immunopositive (4/22) than in the immunonegative group (1/40) (P = 0.0493). Single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was used to detect mutations in the 23 tumour samples demonstrating p53 positivity. A shift in electrophoretic mobility of amplified fragments was found in 11 patients (exons 5, 6, 7 and 8) and these exons were sequenced. In eight samples a mutation was found. No SCCP variants were identified in the other 12 immunopositive patients. Sequencing of exons 4-9 of p53 from these tumours resulted in the detection of mutations in two patients (exons 5 and 7). Thus, in 23 patients who demonstrated immunopositivity, p53 mutations were found in nine patients with GSTM1 null (90.0%). In the 13 patients in whom no mutations were identified, 11 were GSTM1 null (84.6%). The data show that overexpression of p53 is associated with the GSTM1 null genotype. We propose the data are

  20. Targeting the EGF Receptor for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeineldin, Reema; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Stack, M. Sharon; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Factors such as the molecular heterogeneity of ovarian tumors and frequent diagnosis at advanced stages hamper effective disease treatment. There is growing emphasis on the identification and development of targeted therapies to disrupt molecular pathways in cancer. The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is one such protein target with potential utility in the management of ovarian cancer. This paper will discuss contributions of EGF receptor activation to ovarian cancer pathogenesis and the status of EGF receptor inhibitors and EGF receptor targeted therapies in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:20066160

  1. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  2. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A New Opportunity in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mittica, Gloria; Genta, Sofia; Aglietta, Massimo; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death for gynecological cancer. The standard treatment for advanced stage is the combination of optimal debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, recurrence is frequent (around 70%) and prognosis is globally poor. New therapeutic agents are needed to improve survival. Since EOC is strongly immunogenic, immune checkpoint inhibitors are under evaluation for their capacity to contrast the “turn off” signals expressed by the tumor to escape the immune system and usually responsible for self-tolerance maintenance. This article reviews the literature on anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, and anti-PD-L2 antibodies in EOC and highlights their possible lines of development. Further studies are needed to better define the prognostic role of the immune checkpoint inhibitors, to identify predictors of response and the optimal clinical setting in EOC. PMID:27447625

  3. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A New Opportunity in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Genta, Sofia; Aglietta, Massimo; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death for gynecological cancer. The standard treatment for advanced stage is the combination of optimal debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, recurrence is frequent (around 70%) and prognosis is globally poor. New therapeutic agents are needed to improve survival. Since EOC is strongly immunogenic, immune checkpoint inhibitors are under evaluation for their capacity to contrast the "turn off" signals expressed by the tumor to escape the immune system and usually responsible for self-tolerance maintenance. This article reviews the literature on anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, and anti-PD-L2 antibodies in EOC and highlights their possible lines of development. Further studies are needed to better define the prognostic role of the immune checkpoint inhibitors, to identify predictors of response and the optimal clinical setting in EOC. PMID:27447625

  4. Quantitative measurement of adiposity using CT images to predict the benefit of bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUNZHI; THAI, THERESA; MOORE, KATHLEEN; DING, KAI; MCMEEKIN, SCOTT; LIU, HONG; ZHENG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to quantitatively measure adiposity-related image features and to test the feasibility of applying multivariate statistical data analysis-based prediction models to generate a novel clinical marker and predict the benefit of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with and without maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. A dataset involving computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 59 patients diagnosed with advanced EOC was retrospectively collected. Among them, 32 patients received maintenance bevacizumab following primary chemotherapy, while 27 did not. A computer-aided detection scheme was developed to automatically segment visceral and subcutaneous fat areas depicted on CT images of abdominal sections, and 7 adiposity-related image features were computed. Upon combining these features with the measured body mass index, multivariate data analyses were performed using three statistical models (multiple linear, logistic and Cox proportional hazards regressions) to analyze the association between the model-generated prediction results and the treatment outcome, including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of the patients. The results demonstrated that applying all three prediction models yielded a significant association between the adiposity-related image features and patients' PFS or OS in the group of the patients who received maintenance bevacizumab (P<0.010), while there was no significant difference when these prediction models were applied to predict both PFS and OS in the group of patients that did not receive maintenance bevacizumab. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the use of a quantitative adiposity-related image feature-based statistical model may generate a novel clinical marker to predict who will benefit among EOC patients receiving maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. PMID:27347200

  5. Phase 1b safety study of farletuzumab, carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in patients with platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth H.; Jelovac, Danijela; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Weil, Susan C.; Schweizer, Charles; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Farletuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to folate receptor alpha, over-expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) but largely absent in normal tissue. Previously, carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin showed superior progression-free survival and an improved therapeutic index compared with carboplatin/paclitaxel in relapsed platinum-sensitive EOC. This study assessed safety of farletuzumab/carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in women with platinum-sensitive recurrent EOC. Methods This multicenter, single-arm study enrolled patients with platinum-sensitive EOC in first or second relapse for treatment with weekly farletuzumab 2.5 mg/kg plus carboplatin AUC5–6 and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin 30 mg/m2 every 4 weeks for 6 cycles. Subsequently, maintenance with single-agent farletuzumab 2.5 mg/kg once weekly or farletuzumab 7.5 mg/kg once every three weeks continued until progression. The primary objective was to assess the safety of farletuzumab/carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. Results Fifteen patients received a median of 12.0 cycles (range, 3–26) of farletuzumab as combination therapy or maintenance, for a median of 45.0 weeks (range 9–95). Farletuzumab/carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin was generally well tolerated, with no farletuzumab-related grades 3–4 adverse events. The most commonly reported adverse events were associated with combination chemotherapy: fatigue (73.3%), nausea (46.7%), and neutropenia (40%). Ten patients had grade ≥3 adverse events, most frequently neutropenia and fatigue. No cardiac toxicity was seen. Best overall responses (RECIST) were a complete response for one patient, partial responses for 10 patients, and stable disease for four patients. Conclusions Farletuzumab plus carboplatin/pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in women with platinum-sensitive EOC demonstrated a safety profile consistent with that of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. PMID

  6. Prognostic impact of human leukocyte antigen class I expression and association of platinum resistance with immunologic profiles in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mariya, Tasuku; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Asano, Takuya; Kuroda, Takafumi; Yasuda, Kazuyo; Mizuuchi, Masahito; Sonoda, Tomoko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most deadly carcinomas in females. Immune systems can recognize EOCs; however, a defect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression is known to be a major mechanism for escape from immune systems, resulting in poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify novel correlations between immunologic responses and other clinical factors. We investigated the expression of immunologic components in 122 cases of EOCs for which surgical operations were performed between 2001 and 2011. We immunohistochemically stained EOC specimens using an anti-pan HLA class I monoclonal antibody (EMR8-5) and anti-CD3, -CD4, and -CD8 antibodies, and we analyzed correlations between immunologic parameters and clinical factors. In multivariate analysis that used the Cox proportional hazards model, independent prognostic factors for overall survival in advanced EOCs included low expression level of HLA class I [risk ratio (RR), 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-3.83; P = 0.046] and loss of intraepithelial cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration (RR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.06-4.20; P = 0.033). Interestingly, almost all platinum-resistant cases showed a significantly low rate of intraepithelial CTL infiltration in the χ(2) test (positive vs. negative: 9.0% vs. 97.7%; P < 0.001). Results from a logistic regression model revealed that low CTL infiltration rate was an independent factor of platinum resistance in multivariate analysis (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.08-13.12; P = 0.037). Platinum-resistant EOCs show poor immunologic responses. The immune escape system of EOCs may be one of the mechanisms of platinum resistance.

  7. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45.

  8. Cytoreductive Surgery plus Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy to Treat Advanced/Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Results from a Retrospective Study on Prospectively Established Database1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-Hua; Ji, Zhong-He; Yu, Yang; Wu, Hai-Tao; Huang, Chao-Qun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Yonemura, Yutaka; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the best standard treatment, optimal cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy, prognosis of advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) remains poor. Recently, CRS plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been developed to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). This study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CRS+HIPEC to treat PC from advanced/recurrent EOC. METHODS: Forty-six PC patients from advanced EOC (group A) or recurrent EOC (group B) were treated by 50 CRS+HIPEC procedures. The primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS); the secondary endpoints were safety profiles. RESULTS: The median OS was 74.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.5-139.5] for group A versus 57.5 months (95% CI 29.8-85.2) for group B (P = .68). The median PFS was not reached for group A versus 8.5 months (95% CI 0-17.5) for group B (P = .034). Better median OS correlated with peritoneal cancer index (PCI) < 20 (76.6 months for PCI ≤ 20 group vs 38.5 months for PCI > 20 group, P = .01), complete cyroreduction (residual disease ≤ 2.5 mm) [79.5 months for completeness of cytoreduction (CC) score 0-1 vs 24.3 months for CC 2-3, P = .00], and sensitivity to platinum (65.3 months for platinum-sensitive group vs 20.0 for platinum-resistant group, P = .05). Serious adverse events occurred in five patients (10.0%). Multivariate analysis identified CC score as the only independent factor for better survival. CONCLUSION: For advanced/recurrent EOC, CRS+HIPEC could improve OS with acceptable safety. PMID:27084429

  9. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45. PMID:26098711

  10. Aquaporin 3 is regulated by estrogen in the chicken oviduct and is involved in progression of epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Lim, W; Bae, H; Song, G

    2016-04-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins that passively deliver water across the plasma membrane to play an important role in maintaining cell shape. Members of the AQP family are distributed in most of the tissues in the human body and perform a variety of functions based on the water homeostasis suitable for each organ. However, there is little known about the expression and regulation of AQP family members in chickens. Therefore, we determined the expression of AQPs in various tissues of chickens. Among 13 isotypes, AQP3 was highly expressed in the chicken oviduct. Expression of AQP3 messenger RNA (mRNA) increased in the magnum (P < 0.001) and isthmus (P < 0.001) of chick oviducts treated with diethylstilbestrol. Consistent with these results, the localization of AQP3 was detected in the glandular and luminal epithelia of the magnum and isthmus of oviducts of diethylstilbestrol-treated chicks. In addition, the pattern of expression of AQP3 changed in an estrogen-dependent manner during the molting period. During the regenerative period of the oviduct after molting, expression of AQP3 mRNA increased coordinately with increasing concentrations of estradiol (P < 0.001), whereas expression of AQP3 mRNA decreased as concentrations of estradiol in plasma decreased in response to induced molting (P < 0.001). Also, expression of the AQP3 increased (P < 0.001) in cancerous ovaries of laying hens. In conclusion, AQP3 does not simply function to transport water into and out of cells but also appears to be closely involved in development of the chicken oviduct, which is regulated by estrogens. Furthermore, our results suggest AQP3 as a new diagnostic for early detection and treatment of epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas. PMID:26808975

  11. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  12. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without sorafenib in the first-line treatment of patients with stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: a randomized phase II study of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, John D; Thompson, Dana S; Bismayer, John A; Gian, Victor G; Merritt, William M; Whorf, Robert C; Finney, Lindsey H; Dudley, B Stephens

    2015-05-01

    This trial compared the efficacy and toxicity of standard first-line treatment with paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/carboplatin plus sorafenib in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. Patients with stage 3 or 4 epithelial ovarian cancer with residual measurable disease or elevated CA-125 levels after maximal surgical cytoreduction were randomized (1:1) to receive treatment with paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2) , 3 h infusion, day 1) and carboplatin (AUC 6.0, IV, day 1) with or without sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily (PO BID). Patients were reevaluated for response after completing 6 weeks of treatment (two cycles); responding or stable patients received six cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients receiving the sorafenib-containing regimen continued sorafenib (400 PO BID) for a total of 52 weeks. Eighty-five patients were randomized and received treatment.Efficacy was similar for patients receiving paclitaxel/carboplatin/sorafenib versus paclitaxel/carboplatin: overall response rates 69% versus 74%; median progression-free survival 15.4 versus 16.3 months; 2 year survival 76% versus 81%. The addition of sorafenib added substantially to the toxicity of the regimen; rash, hand-foot syndrome, mucositis, and hypertension were significantly more common in patients treated with sorafenib. The addition of sorafenib to standard paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve efficacy and substantially increased toxicity in the first-line treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Based on evidence from this study and other completed trials, sorafenib is unlikely to have a role in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  13. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-21

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  14. Racial disparities in advanced stage colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kristin; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Lewin, David N.; Williamson, Grace; Oppenheimer, Stephanie; Ford, Marvella E.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Berger, Franklin G.; Bolick, Susan W.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence and lower survival from colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to European Americans (EA). In the present study, statewide, population-based data from South Carolina Central Cancer Registry (SCCCR) is used to investigate the relationship between race and age on advanced stage CRC survival. Methods The study population was comprised of 3865 advanced pathologically documented colon and rectal adenocarcinoma cases diagnosed between 01 January 1996 and 31 December 2006: 2673 (69%) EA and 1192 (31%) AA. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to generate median survival time and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by race, age, and gender. Factors associated with survival were evaluated by fitting Cox proportional hazards (CPH) regression models to generate Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% CI. Results We observed a significant interaction between race and age on CRC survival (p = 0.04). Among younger patients (< 50 years), AA race was associated with a 1.34 (95% CI 1.06-1.71) higher risk of death compared to EA. Among older patients, we observed a modest increase risk of death among AA men compared to EA (HR 1.16 (95% CI 1.01-1.32) but no difference by race among women (HR 0.94 (95% CI 0.82-1.08)). Moreover, we observed that the disparity in survival has worsened over the past 15 years. Conclusions Future studies that integrate clinical, molecular, and treatment-related data are needed for advancing understanding of the racial disparity in CRC survival, especially for those < 50 years old. PMID:23296454

  15. Elevated β-catenin activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barghout, Samir H; Zepeda, Nubia; Xu, Zhihua; Steed, Helen; Lee, Cheng-Han; Fu, YangXin

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities in women. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents approximately 90% of all ovarian malignancies. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and current chemotherapy regimens are ineffective against advanced EOC due to the development of chemoresistance. It is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to effectively manage this disease. In this study, we examined the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling components in the paired cisplatin-sensitive (A2780s) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cp) EOC cell lines. Our results showed that several negative regulators of Wnt signaling are downregulated, whereas a few Wnt ligands and known Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is more active in A2780cp cells. Further analysis revealed nuclear localization of β-catenin and higher β-catenin transcriptional activity in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. Finally, we demonstrated that chemical inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity by its inhibitor CCT036477 sensitized A2780cp cells to carboplatin, supporting a role for β-catenin in carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells.

  16. Minireview: Human Ovarian Cancer: Biology, Current Management, and Paths to Personalizing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    More than 90% of ovarian cancers have been thought to arise from epithelial cells that cover the ovarian surface or, more frequently, line subserosal cysts. Recent studies suggest that histologically similar cancers can arise from the fimbriae of Fallopian tubes and from deposits of endometriosis. Different histotypes are observed that resemble epithelial cells from the normal Fallopian tube (serous), endometrium (endometrioid), cervical glands (mucinous), and vaginal rests (clear cell) and that share expression of relevant HOX genes which drive normal gynecological differentiation. Two groups of epithelial ovarian cancers have been distinguished: type I low-grade cancers that present in early stage, grow slowly, and resist conventional chemotherapy but may respond to hormonal manipulation; and type II high-grade cancers that are generally diagnosed in advanced stage and grow aggressively but respond to chemotherapy. Type I cancers have wild-type p53 and BRCA1/2, but have frequent mutations of Ras and Raf as well as expression of IGFR and activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Virtually all type II cancers have mutations of p53, and almost half have mutation or dysfunction of BRCA1/2, but other mutations are rare, and oncogenesis appears to be driven by amplification of several growth-regulatory genes that activate the Ras/MAPK and PI3K pathways. Cytoreductive surgery and combination chemotherapy with platinum compounds and taxanes have improved 5-yr survival, but less than 40% of all stages can be cured. Novel therapies are being developed that target high-grade serous cancer cells with PI3Kness or BRCAness as well as the tumor vasculature. Both in silico and animal models are needed that more closely resemble type I and type II cancers to facilitate the identification of novel targets and to predict response to combinations of new agents. PMID:22416079

  17. Validating the impact of a molecular subtype in ovarian cancer on outcomes: a study of the OVCAD Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pils, Dietmar; Hager, Gudrun; Tong, Dan; Aust, Stefanie; Heinze, Georg; Kohl, Maria; Schuster, Eva; Wolf, Andrea; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Ioana; Vergote, Ignace; Cadron, Isabelle; Mahner, Sven; Hofstetter, Gerda; Speiser, Paul; Zeillinger, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Most patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are diagnosed at advanced stage and have a poor prognosis. However, a small proportion of these patients will survive, whereas others will die very quickly. Clinicopathological factors do not allow precise identification of these subgroups. Thus, we have validated a molecular subclassification as new prognostic factor in EOC. One hundred and ninety-four patients with Stage II-IV EOC were characterized by whole-genome expression profiling of tumor tissues and were classified using a published 112 gene set, derived from an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage-directed supervised classification approach. The 194 tumor samples were classified into two subclasses comprising 95 (Subclass 1) and 99 (Subclass 2) tumors. All nine FIGO II tumors were grouped in Subclass 1 (P = 0.001). Subclass 2 (54% of advanced-stage tumors) was significantly correlated with peritoneal carcinomatosis and non-optimal debulking. Patients with Subclass 2 tumors had a worse overall survival for both serous and non-serous histological subtypes, as revealed by univariate analysis (hazard ratios [HR] of 3.17 and 17.11, respectively; P ≤ 0.001) and in models corrected for relevant clinicopathologic parameters (HR 2.87 and 12.42, respectively; P ≤ 0.023). Significance analysis of microarrays revealed 2082 genes that were differentially expressed in advanced-grade serous tumors of both subclasses and the focal adhesion pathway as the most deregulated pathway. In the present validation study, we have shown that, in advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer, two approximately equally large molecular subtypes exist, independent of classical clinocopathological parameters and presenting with highly different whole-genome expression profiles and a markedly different overall survival. Similar results were obtained in a small cohort of patients with non-serous tumors. PMID:22497737

  18. Advanced Stage Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ovary is both Rare and Highly Lethal: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaino, Richard J.; Brady, Mark F.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michael, Helen; Greer, Benjamin; Bookman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary mucinous adenocarcinomas of the ovary are uncommon and their biologic behavior uncertain. Retrospective studies suggest that many mucinous carcinomas diagnosed as primary to the ovary were actually metastatic from another site. A prospective randomized trial provided an opportunity to estimate the frequency of mucinous tumors, diagnostic reproducibility, and clinical outcomes. Methods A phase III trial enrolled 4000 women with stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma, treated by surgical staging and debulking, with randomization to one of five chemotherapeutic arms. Slides and pathology reports classified as primary mucinous carcinoma were reviewed independently by three pathologists. Cases were re-classified as primary or metastatic to the ovary according to two methods. Overall survival (OS) of reclassified groups was compared with each other and with that of patients with serous carcinomas. Results Forty-four cases were classified as mucinous adenocarcinoma at review. Using either method, only about one third were interpreted by the three reviewers as primary mucinous carcinomas. Reproducibility of interpretations among the reviewers was high with unanimity of opinion in 30 of the 44 (68%) cases. The median survival (MS) did not differ significantly between the groups interpreted as primary or metastatic, but the OS was significantly less than that for women with serous carcinoma (14 vs 42 months, p<0.001). Conclusion Advanced stage mucinous carcinoma of the ovary is very rare and is associated with poor OS. Many mucinous adenocarcinomas that are diagnosed as primary ovarian neoplasms appear to be metastatic to the ovary. PMID:20862744

  19. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Roisin E; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R; Danishefsky, Samuel J; Sabbatini, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011-Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient's pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36-68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2-39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability. PMID:27110823

  20. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Roisin E; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R; Danishefsky, Samuel J; Sabbatini, Paul J

    2016-04-22

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011-Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient's pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36-68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2-39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability.

  1. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    O’Cearbhaill, Roisin E.; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K.; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.; Sabbatini, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011–Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient’s pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36–68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2–39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability. PMID:27110823

  2. Prognostic significance of Notch 3 gene expression in ovarian serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang G; Kwon, Young D; Song, Ji A; Back, Min J; Lee, Sun Y; Lee, Chan; Hwang, Yoon Y; An, Hee J

    2010-09-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is an important cell signaling system, which regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and is aberrantly activated in a wide range of cancer, including ovarian cancers. However, it remains unclear as to whether Notch signaling plays a role in the progression and prognosis of ovarian cancer. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of Notch 3, Jagged 1, and Jagged 2 in 98 ovarian epithelial tumors via real-time PCR and in 175 tumors with immunohistochemical analysis, and then correlated their expression levels with clinicopathological parameters and patient survival. In this study, we detected high levels of Notch3 mRNA and protein expression especially in serous ovarian carcinomas compared to their benign counterparts, accompanied by a positive correlation with the expressions of Jagged 1 and Jagged 2. High levels of Notch 3 mRNA expression (>2-fold than that of benign tumor) were noted in 63% of the serous carcinomas (mean level: 17-fold, P = 0.032). Additionally, Notch 3 protein overexpression was significantly associated with advanced stage (P = 0.0008), lymph node (P = 0.001), and distant metastasis (P = 0.003). Notably, high Notch 3 mRNA and protein expressions were correlated with chemoresistance (P = 0.033) and poor overall survival (P = 0.027, P = 0.042) in these patients. Our results indicate that the Notch 3 signaling pathway is involved in the tumor progression of ovarian serous carcinoma, and higher Notch 3 expression may be an independent poor prognostic factor in this subset of tumors.

  3. Methylseleninic acid sensitizes Notch3-activated OVCA429 ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, is usually diagnosed at advanced stage due to invalidated screening test and non-specific symptoms presented. Although carboplatin has been popular for treating ovarian cancer for decades, patients eventually develop resistance to this platinum-c...

  4. Association Between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Hormone Metabolism and DNA Repair Genes and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Results from Two Australian Studies and an Additional Validation Set

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, Jonathan; Jordan, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J.; Kjaer, Suzanne Kruger; Hogdall, Estrid; DiCioccio, Richard A.; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Webb, Penelope M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Although some high-risk ovarian cancer genes have been identified, it is likely that common low penetrance alleles exist that confer some increase in ovarian cancer risk. We have genotyped nine putative functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes involved in steroid hormone synthesis (SRD5A2, CYP19A1, HSB17B1, and HSD17B4) and DNA repair (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRCA2, and RAD52) using two Australian ovarian cancer case-control studies, comprising a total of 1,466 cases and 1,821 controls of Caucasian origin. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using logistic regression. The only SNP we found to be associated with ovarian cancer risk in both of these two studies was SRD5A2 V89L (rs523349), which showed a significant trend of increasing risk per rare allele (P = 0.00002). We then genotyped another SNP in this gene (rs632148; r2 = 0.945 with V89L) in an attempt to validate this finding in an independent set of 1,479 cases and 2,452 controls from United Kingdom, United States, and Denmark. There was no association between rs632148 and ovarian cancer risk in the validation samples, and overall, there was no significant heterogeneity between the results of the five studies. Further analyses of SNPs in this gene are therefore warranted to determine whether SRD5A2 plays a role in ovarian cancer predisposition. PMID:18086758

  5. Population-based study of ovarian cancer in Côte d'Or: prognostic factors and trends in relative survival rates over the last 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this population-based study was to assess independent prognostic factors in ovarian cancer using relative survival (RS) and to investigate changes in RS rates from 1982 to 2005. Methods Data on 748 patients with ovarian cancer were provided by the Côte d'Or gynaecologic cancer registry. The RS was estimated using a generalized linear model with a Poisson error structure. Relative survival and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were described at the following specific time points 1, 3 and 5 years. The effect of prognostic factors on survival was assessed with multivariate analyses of RS. Results The median follow-up was 12 years. The RS rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 81%, 55% and 44%, respectively. As compared with the period 1982-1989, an improvement in survival was found for the period 1998-2005: HR = 0.52[0.40-0.67]. Women who lived in urban areas had better RS: HR = 0.82[0.67-0.99]. Patients with epithelial types of ovarian cancer other than mucinous or endometrioid cancer had worse RS than those with serous histology. Age ≥ 70 years was associated with lower survival. Conclusions Period of diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, histology, place of residence and age were independent prognostic factors for survival in ovarian cancer. An improvement in the survival rate was observed after 1998 but a significant improvement was limited to advanced stage cancers. PMID:21067600

  6. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  7. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  8. Etiology, biology, and epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, T R; Piver, M S

    1994-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer kills more women per year than all other gynecologic cancers combined. Pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation decrease the risk of the disease, whereas risk is increased for women whose family history is consistent with one of the familial ovarian cancer syndromes. Several theories have been postulated concerning the etiology of ovarian cancer, including the incessant ovulation theory and that based on the model of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Chromosomal abnormalities and allele losses have been described in ovarian cancers. Involvement of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes has been investigated as well. Genetic linkage studies are ongoing in families whose history is consistent with one of the familial ovarian cancer syndromes.

  9. Accumulated metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D.; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  10. Accumulated Metabolites of Hydroxybutyric Acid Serve as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Braicu, Elena Ioana

    2016-02-15

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but it is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  11. Origin and molecular pathogenesis of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurman, R J

    2013-12-01

    A new paradigm for the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer has recently been proposed which helps to explain persistent problems in describing the development and diverse morphology of these neoplasms. The paradigm incorporates recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of epithelial 'ovarian' cancer with new insights into the origin of these tumors. Correlated clinicopathologic and molecular genetic studies led to the development of a dualistic model that divides all the various histologic types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas into two broad categories designated 'type I' and 'type II'. The prototypic type I tumor is low-grade serous carcinoma and the prototypic type II tumor is high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs). As the serous tumors comprise ∼70% of all epithelial ovarian tumors and account for the majority of deaths, the serous tumors will be the subject of this review. There are marked differences between the low-grade and high-grade serous tumors. Briefly, the former are indolent, present in stage I (tumor confined to the ovary) and develop from well-established precursors, so-called 'atypical proliferative (borderline) tumors,' which are characterized by specific mutations, including KRAS, BRAF and ERBB2; they are relatively genetically stable. In contrast, HGSCs are aggressive, present in the advanced stage, and develop from intraepithelial carcinomas in the fallopian tube. They harbor TP53 mutations in over 95% of cases, but rarely harbor the mutations detected in the low-grade serous tumors. At the time of diagnosis they demonstrate marked chromosomal aberrations but over the course of the disease these changes remain relatively stable. Along with the recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors, studies have demonstrated that the long sought for precursor of ovarian HGSC appears to develop from an occult intraepithelial carcinoma in the fimbrial region of the fallopian tube designated 'serous tubal

  12. Follow-up of patients who are clinically disease-free after primary treatment for fallopian tube, primary peritoneal, or epithelial ovarian cancer: a Program in Evidence-Based Care guideline adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Le, T.; Kennedy, E.B.; Dodge, J.; Elit, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background A need for follow-up recommendations for survivors of fallopian tube, primary peritoneal, or epithelial ovarian cancer after completion of primary treatment was identified by Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care. Methods We searched for existing guidelines, conducted a systematic review (medline, embase, and cdsr, January 2010 to March 2015), created draft recommendations, and completed a comprehensive review process. Outcomes included overall survival, quality of life, and patient preferences. Results The Cancer Australia guidance document Follow Up of Women with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer was adapted for the Ontario context. A key randomized controlled trial found that the overall survival rate did not differ between asymptomatic women who received early treatment based on elevated serum cancer antigen 125 (ca125) alone and women who waited for the appearance of clinical symptoms before initiating treatment (hazard ratio: 0.98; 95% confidence interval: 0.80 to 1.20; p = 0.85); in addition, patients in the delayed treatment group reported good global health scores for longer. No randomized studies were found for other types of follow-up. We recommend that survivors be made aware of the potential harms and benefits of surveillance, including a discussion of the limitations of ca125 testing. Women could be offered the option of no formal follow-up or a follow-up schedule that is agreed upon by the woman and her health care provider. Education about the most common symptoms of recurrence should be provided. Alternative models of care such as nurse-led or telephone-based follow-up (or both) could be emerging options. Conclusions The recommendations provided in this guidance document have a limited evidence base. Recommendations should be updated as further information becomes available. PMID:27803599

  13. The epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tortolero-Luna, G; Mitchell, M F

    1995-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common cancer of the female reproductive system and the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. In 1995, 26,600 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S., and 14,500 women will die from the disease. Between 1986-1900, the overall age-adjusted incidence was 14.3/100,000 women; mortality was 7.8/100,000 women. Ovarian cancer, rare before age 40, increases steeply thereafter and peaks at ages 65-75. Incidence and mortality rates are higher among white women than among African-American women. Over the last three decades, ovarian cancer incidence has remained stable in high-risk countries, while an increasing trend has been reported in low-risk countries. Despite recent advancements in treatment, the overall five-year survival rates continues to be low (39%). Over 70% of ovarian tumors are diagnosed when regional or distant involvement has already occurred, causing survival rates to remain stable. The etiology of ovarian cancer is poorly understood. Most studies have focused on the epidemiology of invasive epithelial ovarian tumors, while few have explored the epidemiology of epithelial tumors of low malignant potential and nonepithelial tumors. Factors associated with an increased risk for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer include age, race, nulliparity, family history of ovarian cancer, and history of endometrial or breast cancer. Factors associated with a reduced risk are history of one or more full-term pregnancies, use of oral contraceptives, history of breast feeding, tubal ligation, and hysterectomy. Other factors such as infertility drugs, hormone replacement therapy, age at menarche, age at menopause, dietary factors, lactose intolerance, talc use, coffee and alcohol consumption have been suggested, but their role is still inconclusive.

  14. Late metastases of ovarian carcinoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Browde, S; Rabin, S; Murray, J; Nissenbaum, M

    1984-02-01

    In cases of ovarian carcinoma distant metastases are rarely discovered before local spread has become evident. This article reports an unusual case in which renal metastases appeared 9 years after the initial diagnosis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. A discussion of the histological features of the tumour and the spread of ovarian carcinoma is included.

  15. Factors related to advanced stage oral squamous cell carcinoma in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kerdpon, D; Sriplung, H

    2001-04-01

    A critical factor that indicates a poor prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is advanced stage disease. This study, therefore, aimed to identify the factors related to advanced stage (TNM staging III, IV) OSCC in Thailand. There were 161 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and lip (ICD-9 140, 141, 143-5), included in the study. Sixty-two per cent of the patients presented with advanced stage disease. Information on demographic characteristics, risk habits, health-seeking behaviour prior to health care professional (HCP) consultation, tumour characteristics and patient and professional delay was obtained by questionnaire-based interview of the patients. These variables were included as initial variables in a logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced versus early stage OSCC. Having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation significantly increased the risk of advanced stage OSCC (OR 5.77; 95% C.I. 1.25-26.62). Floor of mouth location of tumour was associated with a lower risk of advanced stage disease (OR 0.27; 95% C.I. 0.09-0.82) as was having an ulcer (OR 0.43, 95% C.I. 0.02-0.89). The findings indicate that having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation increased the risk of advanced stage disease. The lower risk of advanced stage OSCC associated with ulcerative tumours and those on the floor of the mouth may be due to their being more readily detected by the patients. PMID:11287274

  16. Anticancer role of MUC1 aptamer-miR-29b chimera in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells through regulation of PTEN methylation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Furong; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Xin; Shan, Nianchun; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-12-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis and advanced ovarian cancer lacks effective therapy. In this study, we seek to establish targeting therapy for ovarian cancer through tumor tissue-specific delivery of miRNA-29b to reexpress PTEN tumor-suppressor gene. A chimera (Chi-29b) was constructed to compose of a mucin 1 (MUC1) aptamer targeting tumor cell surface MUC1 protein and miR-29b inhibiting DNA methyltransferases' expression, subsequently reexpressing PTEN gene. The specificity and efficacy of the chimera delivery were analyzed in OVCAR-3 ovarian tumor cells, and the biological activities of the chimera were identified by the expression of its downstream molecules and cell apoptosis. We demonstrated that Chi-29b chimera can be specifically delivered into OVCAR-3 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Dicer efficiently cleaved the Chi-29b chimera to release miR-29b. Chi-29b chimera downregulated Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b protein levels; induced hypomethylation in PTEN promoter; and upregulated PTEN mRNA and protein expression in OVCAR-3 cells. Importantly, Chi-29b chimera significantly induced apoptosis in OVCAR-3 cells. Our study indicated that Chi-29b chimera can effectively exert antitumor effect through specific delivery of miR-29b into OVCAR-3 tumor cells, subsequently reexpressing PTEN gene and inducing cell apoptosis.

  17. Prenatal exposure to the phytoestrogen daidzein resulted in persistent changes in ovarian surface epithelial cell height, folliculogenesis, and estrus phase length in adult Sprague-Dawley rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Talsness, Chris; Grote, Konstanze; Kuriyama, Sergio; Presibella, Kenia; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Poça, Katia; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Daidzein (DZ), an isoflavone with the potential to interfere with estrogen signaling, is found in soy products, which have gained popularity due to purported beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and skeletal systems and potential antineoplastic properties. However, the ingestion of phytoestrogens has been associated with impaired reproductive function in many species. The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects on the ovaries of rat offspring exposed to DZ or ethinyl estradiol (EE) during prenatal development. Gravid rats were administered either vehicle or 5 or 60 mg DZ/kg body weight/d or 0.002 mg 17-α EE /kg body weight/d on gestational days 6-21. Ovarian-related endpoints were investigated during adulthood in female offspring. The mean cell height of the ovarian surface epithelium was significantly reduced in all treated groups. Alterations in folliculogenesis included increased follicular atresia, a reduction in secondary and tertiary follicle numbers, and cyst formation. An elevated prevalence of a slightly prolonged estrus phase was also observed. The morphological changes to the ovarian surface epithelium are consistent with an antiproliferative effect, while ovarian folliculogenesis was adversely affected. The effects of the high dose DZ were similar to those observed with 17-α EE. PMID:26039681

  18. A common region of deletion on chromosome 17q in both sporadic and familial epithelial ovarian tumors distal to BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, A.K.; Vanderveer, L.; Schultz, D.C.; Altomare, D.A.; Buetow, K.H.; Daly, M.; Getts, L.A.; Masny, A.; Rosenblum, N.

    1994-10-01

    Linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer and studies of allelic deletion in sporadic ovarian tumors have identified a region on chromosome 17q containing a candidate tumor-suppressor gene (referred to as BRCA1) of likely importance in ovarian carcinogenesis. We have examined normal and tumor DNA samples from 32 patients with sporadic and 8 patients with familial forms of the disease, for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 21 loci on chromosome 17 (7 on 17p and 14 on 17q). LOH on 17p was 55% (22/40) for informative 17p13.1 and 17p13.3 markers. When six polymorphic markers flanking the familial breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility locus on 17q12-q21 were used, LOH was 58% (23/40), with one tumor showing telomeric retention. Evaluation of a set of markers positioned telomeric to BRCA1 resulted in the highest degree of LOH, 73% (29/40), indicating that a candidate locus involved in ovarian cancer may reside distal to BRCA1. Five of the tumors demonstrating allelic loss for 17q markers were from individuals with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer. More important, two of these tumors (unique patient number [UPN] 57 and UPN 79) retained heterozygosity for all informative markers spanning the BRCA1 locus but showed LOH at loci distal to but not including the anonymous markers CMM86 (D17S74) and 42D6 (D17S588), respectively. Deletion mapping of seven cases (two familial and five sporadic) showing limited LOH on 17q revealed a common region of deletion, distal to GH and proximal to D17S4, that spans {approximately} 25 cM. These results suggest that a potential tumor-suppressor gene involved in both sporadic and familial ovarian cancer may reside on the distal portion of chromosome 17q and is distinct from the BRCA1 gene. 58 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Ovarian disorders in domestic animals.

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, N J

    1987-01-01

    The histologic appearance of the ovaries and persistence of corpora lutea vary considerably among domestic animals, particularly between spontaneous and induced ovulators. The seasonally polyestrous mare has a variety of unique characteristics in ovarian structure and general reproductive function. Among the anomalies of ovarian development is the bovine freemartin with gonads containing a mixture of male and female elements. A variety of ovarian cysts occur in domestic animals, and persistent corpora lutea with associated reproductive perturbations occur in several species. Ovarian tumors are relatively uncommon in domestic animals, with most examples described in dogs, cats, and horses. These ovarian neoplasms are generally classified as epithelial, germ cell, or sex cord-stromal tumors. PMID:3665869

  20. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  1. Talc and ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartge, P.; Hoover, R.; Lesher, L.P.; McGowan, L.

    1983-01-01

    The potential link between epithelial talc use and ovarian cancer was examined in records of women treated for pathologically confirmed epitherial ovarian cancer. We estimated the relative risk to talc users as 0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4 to 1.1). The estimate was unaffected by adjustment for race, age, and gravidity. Neither women who used talc on their diaphragms nor those who used it as body powder seemed to be at excess risk. Our data thus indicate no overall association between talc use and risk of ovarian cancer. Although a small group of women who specifically reported genital use of body talcum powders showed an excess relative risk, use of talc on a diaphragm, which would be the closest exposure to the ovaries, did not seem to elevate risk.

  2. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Discovery Based on Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at an advanced stage in more than 75% of patients. Early detection has great promise to improve clinical outcomes. Although the advancing proteomic technologies led to the discovery of numerous ovarian cancer biomarkers, no screening method has been recommended for early detection of ovarian cancer. Complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian carcinogenesis is a major obstacle to discover biomarkers. As cancer arises due to accumulation of genetic change, understanding the close connection between genetic changes and ovarian carcinogenesis would provide the opportunity to find novel gene-level ovarian cancer biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the various gene-based biomarkers by genomic technologies, including inherited gene mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential gene expression. In addition, we suggest the strategy to discover novel gene-based biomarkers with recently introduced next generation sequencing. PMID:25337559

  3. Somatic Copy Number Alterations Associated with Japanese or Endometriosis in Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Aikou; Sehouli, Jalid; Yanaihara, Nozomu; Hirata, Yukihiro; Braicu, Ioana; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Takakura, Satoshi; Saito, Misato; Yanagida, Satoshi; Takenaka, Masataka; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Morikawa, Asuka; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kyosuke; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo; Aida, Satoshi; Aoki, Yuko; Ishii, Nobuya; Ochiai, Kazunori; Akiyama, Tetsu; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    When compared with other epithelial ovarian cancers, the clinical characteristics of ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCC) include 1) a higher incidence among Japanese, 2) an association with endometriosis, 3) poor prognosis in advanced stages, and 4) a higher incidence of thrombosis as a complication. We used high resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to identify somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) associated with each of these clinical characteristics of CCC. The Human Genome CGH 244A Oligo Microarray was used to examine 144 samples obtained from 120 Japanese, 15 Korean, and nine German patients with CCC. The entire 8q chromosome (minimum corrected p-value: q = 0.0001) and chromosome 20q13.2 including the ZNF217 locus (q = 0.0078) were amplified significantly more in Japanese than in Korean or German samples. This copy number amplification of the ZNF217 gene was confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). ZNF217 RNA levels were also higher in Japanese tumor samples than in non-Japanese samples (P = 0.027). Moreover, endometriosis was associated with amplification of EGFR gene (q = 0.047), which was again confirmed by Q-PCR and correlated with EGFR RNA expression. However, no SCNAs were significantly associated with prognosis or thrombosis. These results indicated that there may be an association between CCC and ZNF217 amplification among Japanese patients as well as between endometriosis and EGFR gene amplifications. PMID:25658832

  4. High-Dose Estrogen and Clinical Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Induce Growth Arrest, p21, and p53 in Primate Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-06-09

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer affecting women. Hormone-based therapies are variably successful in treating ovarian cancer, but the reasoning behind these therapies is paradoxical. Clinical reagents such as tamoxifen are considered to inhibit or reverse tumor growth by competitive inhibition of the estrogen receptor (ER); however high dose estrogen is as clinically effective as tamoxifen, and it is unlikely that estrogen is acting by blocking ER activity; however, it may be activating a unique function of the ER that is nonmitogenic. For poorly defined reasons, 90% of varian cancers derive from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). In vivo the ER-positive OSE is exposed to high estrogen levels, reaching micromolar concentrations in dominant ovarian follicles. Using cultured OSE cells in vitro, we show that these levels of estradiol (1 ug/ml; {approx}3um) block the actions of serum growth factors, activate the G1 phase retinoblastoma AQ:A checkpoint, and induce p21, an inhibitor of kinases that normally inactivate the retinoblastoma checkpoint. We also show that estradiol increases p53 levels, which may contribute to p21 induction. Supporting the hypothesis that clinical selective ER modulators activate this novel ER function, we find that micromolar doses of tamoxifen and the ''pure antiestrogen'' ICI 182,780 elicit the same effects as estradiol. We propose that, in the context of proliferation, these data clarify some paradoxical aspects of hormone-based therapy and suggest that fuller understanding of normal ER function is necessary to improve therapeutic strategies that target the ER. (J Clin Endocrinol Metab 90: 0000-0000, 2005)

  5. Osteopathic Approach to the Diagnosis of Appendiceal Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma Mimicking Primary Ovarian Malignant Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Martingano, Daniel; Gurm, Hashroop; Oliff, Andrew; Martingano, Francis X; Aglialoro, George

    2016-07-01

    The fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in the United States is ovarian cancer. An estimated 21,980 new cases and 14,270 estimated deaths occurred nationwide in 2014. More than two-thirds of cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed at stage III or IV when the peritoneal cavity or other organs are affected. Primary appendiceal malignant neoplasms may mimic advanced-stage ovarian cancer and can be misdiagnosed because of its presentation as a palpable adnexal mass. The authors describe a 42-year-old woman who was admitted to the department of obstetrics and gynecology to receive treatment for presumed advanced-stage ovarian cancer. She subsequently received a diagnosis of primary pseudomyxoma peritonei metastatic to the ovaries, mimicking a primary ovarian cancer by osteopathic structural examination findings, serum tumor markers, surgical exploration, and histopathologic confirmation. PMID:27367953

  6. Ovarian cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors, or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Katz VL. Benign gynecologic lesions. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson ...

  7. Ovarian Cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... accurate way to tell if a woman has ovarian cancer. For example, some women who do have ovarian cancer have a normal CA-125 level. Also, this ... for women who show signs or symptoms of ovarian cancer or who have genetic mutations that increase the ...

  8. Review of the current role of targeted therapies as maintenance therapies in first and second line treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer; In the light of completed trials.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Taner; Seber, Selcuk; Basaran, Gul

    2016-02-01

    Late and recurrent stage ovarian cancer has a high mortality and low response rate to therapy beyond first line treatment. Although first line platinum/taxane based regimens have a satisfactory response rate eventually in most cases disease recurrence is common and second-line treatments are not curative. Delaying progression or recurrence is the main goal of current ongoing clinical studies by means of establishing an effective maintenance regimen with acceptable toxicity profile. Clearly, the persistence of dormant and drug-resistant cells after front-line treatments results in the inability to cure the disease. Over the past several years, the idea of prolongation of therapy for ovarian cancer has garnered clinical attention and academic debate. As a result of a greater understanding of the molecular pathways involved in carcinogenesis and tumor growth, a large number of potential therapeutic targets have been identified and drugs to block receptors, ligands or pathways are being developed. Currently, numerous clinical trials with targeted agents have just been completed or are ongoing involving patients achieving a complete or durable response after first-line and beyond the first line chemotherapy in order to evaluate the efficacy of different therapeutic approaches in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival. PMID:26603345

  9. HER2 amplification and clinicopathological characteristics in a large Asian cohort of rare mucinous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chay, Wen-Yee; Chew, Sung-Hock; Ong, Whee-Sze; Busmanis, Inny; Li, Xinyun; Thung, Sharyl; Ngo, Lynette; Lim, Sheow-Lei; Lim, Yong-Kuei; Chia, Yin-Nin; Koh, Elisa; Pang, Cindy; Soh, Lay-Tin; Wang, Jin; Ho, Tew-Hong; Tay, Sun-Kuie; Lim-Tan, Soo-Kim; Lim, Kiat-Hon; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Goh, Liang-Kee

    2013-01-01

    Mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis in the advanced stages and responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy. We aim to elucidate the clinicopathological factors and incidence of HER2 expression of this cancer in a large Asian retrospective cohort from Singapore. Of a total of 133 cases, the median age at diagnosis was 48.3 years (range, 15.8-89.0 years), comparatively younger than western cohorts. Most were Chinese (71%), followed by Malays (16%), others (9.0%), and Indians (5%). 24% were noted to have a significant family history of malignancy of which breast and gastrointestinal cancers the most prominent. Majority of the patients (80%) had stage I disease at diagnosis. Information on HER2 status was available in 113 cases (85%). Of these, 31 cases (27.4%) were HER2+, higher than 18.8% reported in western population. HER2 positivity appeared to be lower among Chinese and higher among Malays patients (p = 0.052). With the current standard of care, there was no discernible impact of HER2 status on overall survival. (HR = 1.79; 95% CI, 0.66-4.85; p = 0.249). On the other hand, positive family history of cancer, presence of lymphovascular invasion, and ovarian surface involvements were significantly associated with inferior overall survival on univariate and continued to be statistically significant after adjustment for stage. While these clinical factors identify high risk patients, it is promising that the finding of a high incidence of HER2 in our Asian population may allow development of a HER2 targeted therapy to improve the management of mucinous ovarian cancers.

  10. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Litkouhi, Babak; Kwong, Joseph; Lo, Chun-Min; Smedley, James G; McClane, Bruce A; Aponte, Margarita; Gao, Zhijian; Sarno, Jennifer L; Hinners, Jennifer; Welch, William R; Berkowitz, Ross S; Mok, Samuel C; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2007-01-01

    Background Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ) protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4-expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. Methods Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular) resistance (Rb) in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. Results Claudin-4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. Conclusions C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies. PMID:17460774

  11. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Prospects in cancer immunotherapy: treating advanced stage disease or preventing tumor recurrence?

    PubMed

    Manjili, Masoud H; Payne, Kyle K

    2015-06-01

    Human vaccines against infectious agents are often effective in a prophylactic setting. However, they are usually not effective when used post-exposure. Rabies vaccine is one of the exceptions, which can be used post-exposure, but is effective only when used in combination with other treatments. Similar results have been obtained with cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. Cancer immunotherapies generally prolong patients' survival when they are used during advanced stage disease. The potential of immunotherapy to cure cancer could be revealed when it is applied in a prophylactic setting. This article provides a brief overview of cancer immunotherapeutics and suggests that immunotherapy can cure cancer if used at the right time against the right target; we suggest that targeting cancer during dormancy in order to prevent tumor recurrence as advanced stage disease is potentially curative.

  13. The experience of living with advanced-stage cancer: a thematic synthesis of the literature.

    PubMed

    García-Rueda, N; Carvajal Valcárcel, A; Saracíbar-Razquin, M; Arantzamendi Solabarrieta, M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to understand the experience of people living with advanced-stage cancer through literature. The search included The Cochrane Library, PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Cuiden. Thirteen studies were included. A qualitative meta-synthesis was conducted. One thread emerged from the thematic synthesis: the desire to live as normally as possible, despite being aware of the proximity of death. Three themes also emerged: "a process that is unique" with its four sub-themes; "support network" and "health context," each of them having two sub-themes. This study concludes that living with advanced-stage cancer is a unique and complex process which has both positive and negative aspects. The review provides a comprehensive view of the experience, which considers the importance of the support network and the health context in which the person lives. In this study, "normalcy" is the adjustment to the new reality and living as closely as possible to the way one lived before the disease, while developing a new relationship with being finite and death. A better understanding of the experience of living with advanced-stage cancer will help health professionals to identify the needs of the patients in order to plan individual, high-quality care. PMID:27297131

  14. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives. PMID:22641322

  15. WWOX CNV-67048 Functions as a Risk Factor for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Chinese Women by Negatively Interacting with Oral Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongxiu; Tan, Xiaochang; Ding, Yongli; Mai, Bi; Huang, Xiaowen; Hu, Guiying

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) have attracted increasing evidences to represent their roles as cancer susceptibility regulators. However, little is known about the role of CNV in epithelia ovarian cancer (EOC). Recently, the CNV-67048 of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) was reported to alter cancer risks. Considering that WWOX also plays a role in EOC, we hypothesized that the CNV-67048 was associated with EOC risk. In a case-control study of 549 EOC patients and 571 age (±5 years) matched cancer-free controls, we found that the low copy number of CNV-67048 (1-copy and 0-copy) conferred a significantly increased risk of EOC (OR = 1.346, 95% CI = 1.037–1.747) and it determined the risk by means of copy number-dependent dosage effect (P = 0.009). Data from TCGA also confirmed the abovementioned association as the frequency of low copies in EOC group was 3.68 times more than that in healthy group (P = 0.023). The CNV also negatively interacted with oral contraceptive use on EOC risk (P = 0.042). Functional analyses further showed a lower mRNA level of WWOX in tissues with the 0-copy or 1-copy than that in those with the 2-copy (P = 0.045). Our data suggested the CNV-67048 to be a risk factor of EOC in Chinese women. PMID:27190995

  16. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Ovarian Brenner Tumors and Associated Mucinous Epithelial Neoplasms: High Variant Concordance and Identification of Mutually Exclusive RAS Driver Mutations and MYC Amplification.

    PubMed

    Tafe, Laura J; Muller, Kristen E; Ananda, Guruprasad; Mitchell, Talia; Spotlow, Vanessa; Patterson, Sara E; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Mockus, Susan M

    2016-03-01

    Benign ovarian Brenner tumors often are associated with mucinous cystic neoplasms, which are hypothesized to share a histogenic origin and progression, however, supporting molecular characterization is limited. Our goal was to identify molecular mechanisms linking these tumors. DNA from six Brenner tumors with paired mucinous tumors, two Brenner tumors not associated with a mucinous neoplasm, and two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples and sequenced using a 358-gene next-generation sequencing assay. Variant calls were compared within tumor groups to assess somatic mutation profiles. There was high concordance of the variants between paired samples (40% to 75%; P < 0.0001). Four of the six tumor pairs showed KRAS hotspot driver mutations specifically in the mucinous tumor. In the two paired samples that lacked KRAS mutations, MYC amplification was detected in both of the mucinous and the Brenner components; MYC amplification also was detected in a third Brenner tumor. Five of the Brenner tumors had no reportable potential driver alterations. The two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors both had RAS mutations. The high degree of coordinate variants between paired Brenner and mucinous tumors supports a shared origin or progression. Differences observed in affected genes and pathways, particularly involving RAS and MYC, may point to molecular drivers of a divergent phenotype and progression of these tumors.

  17. Diagnostic and prognostic relevance of circulating exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiaodan; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Trillsch, Fabian; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by transporting their molecular cargo from cell to cell. We investigated whether serum levels of exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c and circulating exosomes have diagnostic and prognostic relevance in a cohort of 163 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients using TaqMan MicroRNA assays and ELISA. The serum concentrations of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.0001), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.028) were significantly higher in EOC patients than healthy women. The levels of miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.019) could distinguish between malignant and benign ovarian tumors. While the levels of miR-373 and miR-200a were increased in all FIGO/lymph node stages (p = 0.0001), the levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were higher in patients with FIGO stage III–IV (p = 0.0001, p = 0.008, respectively) including lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0001, p = 0.004, respectively) than FIGO stages I–II. The increased levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were also associated with CA125 values (p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, respectively) and a shorter overall survival (p = 0.007, p = 0.017, respectively). The levels of exosomes were excessively elevated in EOC patients (p = 0.0001). In all three cohorts, they were positively associated with the serum levels of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.004), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.008). In conclusion, the increased levels of exosomal miR-200b and miR-200c mainly observed in advanced EOC suggest that these microRNAs may be involved in tumor progression. The high concentrations of exosomes in EOC patients imply an excessive, active exosomal secretion in EOC. PMID:26943577

  18. Diagnostic and prognostic relevance of circulating exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaodan; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Trillsch, Fabian; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2016-03-29

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by transporting their molecular cargo from cell to cell. We investigated whether serum levels of exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c and circulating exosomes have diagnostic and prognostic relevance in a cohort of 163 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients using TaqMan MicroRNA assays and ELISA. The serum concentrations of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.0001), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.028) were significantly higher in EOC patients than healthy women. The levels of miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.019) could distinguish between malignant and benign ovarian tumors. While the levels of miR-373 and miR-200a were increased in all FIGO/lymph node stages (p = 0.0001), the levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were higher in patients with FIGO stage III-IV (p = 0.0001, p = 0.008, respectively) including lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0001, p = 0.004, respectively) than FIGO stages I-II. The increased levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were also associated with CA125 values (p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, respectively) and a shorter overall survival (p = 0.007, p = 0.017, respectively). The levels of exosomes were excessively elevated in EOC patients (p = 0.0001). In all three cohorts, they were positively associated with the serum levels of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.004), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.008). In conclusion, the increased levels of exosomal miR-200b and miR-200c mainly observed in advanced EOC suggest that these microRNAs may be involved in tumor progression. The high concentrations of exosomes in EOC patients imply an excessive, active exosomal secretion in EOC.

  19. Ovarian Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... or if the cyst does not go away. Birth control pills can help prevent new cysts. A health problem that may involve ovarian cysts is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS can have high levels of male hormones, irregular or no periods and small ovarian ...

  20. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  1. A distinct pre-existing inflammatory tumour microenvironment is associated with chemotherapy resistance in high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koti, M; Siu, A; Clément, I; Bidarimath, M; Turashvili, G; Edwards, A; Rahimi, K; Masson, A-M M; Squire, J A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy resistance is a major determinant of poor overall survival rates in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). We have previously shown that gene expression alterations affecting the NF-κB pathway characterise chemotherapy resistance in HGSC, suggesting that the regulation of an immune response may be associated with this phenotype. Methods: Given that intrinsic drug resistance pre-exists and is governed by both tumour and host factors, the current study was performed to examine the cross-talk between tumour inflammatory microenvironment and cancer cells, and their roles in mediating differential chemotherapy response in HGSC patients. Expression profiling of a panel of 184 inflammation-related genes was performed in 15 chemoresistant and 19 chemosensitive HGSC tumours using the NanoString nCounter platform. Results: A total of 11 significantly differentially expressed genes were found to distinguish the two groups. As STAT1 was the most significantly differentially expressed gene (P=0.003), we validated the expression of STAT1 protein by immunohistochemistry using an independent cohort of 183 (52 resistant and 131 sensitive) HGSC cases on a primary tumour tissue microarray. Relative expression levels were subjected to Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Conclusions: This study confirms that higher STAT1 expression is significantly associated with increased progression-free survival and that this protein together with other mediators of tumour–host microenvironment can be applied as a novel response predictive biomarker in HGSC. Furthermore, an overall underactive immune microenvironment suggests that the pre-existing state of the tumour immune microenvironment could determine response to chemotherapy in HGSC. PMID:25826225

  2. PAX2 Expression in Low Malignant Potential Ovarian Tumors and Low-Grade Ovarian Serous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Celestine S.; Mok, Samuel C.; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Zu, Zhifei; Song, Huijuan; Liu, Jinsong; Deavers, Michael; Malpica, Anais; Wolf, Judith K.; Lu, Karen H.; Gershenson, David M.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian tumors of low-malignant potential and low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas are thought to represent different stages on a tumorigenic continuum and to develop along pathways distinct from high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma. We performed gene expression profiling on 3 normal human ovarian surface epithelia samples, and 10 low-grade and 10 high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas. Analysis of gene expression profiles of these samples has identified 80 genes up-regulated and 232 genes down-regulated in low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas. PAX2 was found to be one of the most up-regulated genes in low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma. The up-regulation of PAX2 was validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated a statistically significant difference in PAX2 mRNA expression (expressed as fold change in comparison to normal human ovarian surface epithelia) among ovarian tumors of low-malignant potential (1837.38, N=8), low-grade (183.12, N=17), and high-grade (3.72, N=23) carcinoma samples (p=0.015). Western blot analysis revealed strong PAX2 expression in ovarian tumors of low-malignant potential (67%, N=3) and low-grade carcinoma samples (50%, N=10) but no PAX2 protein expression in high-grade carcinomas (0%, N=10). Using immunohistochemistry, tumors of low-malignant potential (59%, N=17) and low-grade carcinoma (63%, N=16) samples expressed significantly stronger nuclear staining than high-grade ovarian carcinoma samples (9.1%, N=263). Furthermore, consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings, PAX2 expression was found to be expressed in the epithelial cells of fallopian tubes but not in normal ovarian surface epithelial cells. Our findings further support the two-tiered hypothesis that tumors of low-malignant potential and low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma are on a continuum and are distinct from high-grade ovarian carcinomas. Additionally, the absence of PAX2 expression in normal

  3. HIPEC ROC I: a phase I study of cisplatin administered as hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemoperfusion followed by postoperative intravenous platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Oliver; Abramian, Alina; Kullmann, Maximilian; Fuhrmann, Christine; Coch, Christoph; Hoeller, Tobias; Ruehs, Hauke; Keyver-Paik, Mignon Denise; Rudlowski, Christian; Weber, Stefan; Kiefer, Nicholas; Poelcher, Martin L; Thiesler, Thore; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Mallmann, Michael; Schaefer, Nico; Permantier, Maryse; Latten, Sandra; Kalff, Joerg; Thomale, Juergen; Jaehde, Ulrich; Kuhn, Walther C

    2015-02-01

    This phase I study tested the safety, feasibility, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cisplatin administered as hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) undergoing secondary cytoreductive surgery followed by postoperative platinum-based intravenous chemotherapy. Twelve patients with operable, recurrent platinum-sensitive EOC (recurrence ≥6 months after first-line therapy) were included according to the classical 3+3 dose-escalation design at three dose levels-60, 80 and 100 mg/m(2). After surgical cytoreduction, a single dose of cisplatin was administered via HIPEC for 90 min at 41-43°C. Postoperatively, all patients were treated with standard intravenous platinum-based combination chemotherapy. One of six patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (grade 3 renal toxicity) at a dose of 100 mg/m(2). The remaining five patients treated with 100 mg/m(2) tolerated their treatment well. The recommended phase II dose was established at 100 mg/m(2). The mean peritoneal-to-plasma AUC ratio was 19·5 at the highest dose level. Cisplatin-induced DNA adducts were confirmed in tumor samples. Common postoperative grade 1-3 toxicities included fatigue, postoperative pain, nausea, and surgical site infection. The ability to administer standard intravenous platinum-based chemotherapy after HIPEC was uncompromised. Cisplatin administered as HIPEC at a dose of 100 mg/m(2) has an acceptable safety profile in selected patients undergoing secondary cytoreductive surgery for platinum-sensitive recurrent EOC. Favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of HIPEC with cisplatin were confirmed at all dose levels, especially at 100 mg/m(2). The results are encouraging to determine the efficacy of HIPEC as a complementary treatment in patients with EOC. PMID:24895230

  4. Impact of hospital type and treatment on long-term survival among patients with FIGO Stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer: follow-up through two recurrences and three treatment lines in search for predictors for survival.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, W; Vistad, I; Kaern, J; Nakling, J; Tropé, C; Paulsen, T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of hospital type determined at primary treatment and find possible predictors of survival in a cohort of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) who recurred twice and received three lines of treatment during eight-year follow-up. Using the Norwegian Cancer Registry, the authors identified 174 women with FIGO Stage IIIC EOC diagnosed in 2002. First-line treatment consisted of up-front debulking surgery and chemotherapy, received in either a teaching hospital (TH, n = 84) or a non-teaching hospital (NTH, n = 90). After recurrence all patients in Norway are equally consulted at TH. Survival determined for three time intervals (TI): TI-1, from end date of first-line treatment to first recurrence or death, TI-2, from beginning of second-line treatment until second recurrence or death, and TI-3, from beginning of third-line treatment to death or end of follow-up. Extensive surgery carried out in TH followed by at least six cycles of platinol-taxan chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in the TH group during TI-1. Altogether, the majority of those who receive treatment for recurrences were primary better debulked with following platinol-taxane chemotherapy. Survival in TI-2 was influenced by platinol-sensitivity. During TI-3 the majority (96%) had good performance status and their mean age at primary diagnosis at either hospital type was 57 years. Extensive primary surgery at TH, platinol sensitivity, age, and performance status were predictors of survival in this cohort. PMID:27352555

  5. Assessment of HER2 Status Using Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Techniques in Mucinous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Comprehensive Comparison between ToGA Biopsy Method and ToGA Surgical Specimen Method

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Wan-Ru; Lee, Ming-Yung; Ruan, Alexandra; Sheng, Huang Pin; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Han, Chih-Ping; Koo, Chiew-Loon

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare the assay performance characteristics of HER2 status in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) by ToGA (Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer) biopsy versus ToGA surgical specimen methods. Forty-nine tissue microarray (TMA) samples of mucinous EOC from Asian women were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests using ToGA trial HER2 scoring methods. The overall concordance between IHC and FISH by the ToGA surgical specimen method is 97.56% and by the ToGA biopsy specimen method is 97.14%. The agreements of HER2 IHC results under both biopsy and surgical specimen methods were nearly perfect (weighted kappa = 0.845). Additionally, the percentage of Her2 FISH amplification showed increasing trend with increasing HER2 IHC ordinals (negative, equivocal, positive) by both TOGA biopsy (P<0.001) and surgical specimen method (P<0.001). After excluding equivocal cases, the sensitivity (100%), PPV (88.89%) and NPV (100%) of HER2 IHC were unchanged under either surgical specimen method or biopsy method. However, the specificity (96.97%) and accuracy (97.56%) of HER2 IHC was slightly higher under the surgical specimen method than those (specificity 96.30%, accuracy 97.14%) under the biopsy method. Of the total 49 cases, the number (n = 14) of HER2 IHC equivocal results under the ToGA biopsy method was 1.75-fold higher than those (n = 8) under the ToGA surgical specimen method (28.57% vs. 16.32%). Therefore, compared to ToGA surgery specimen method, the ToGA biopsy method caused more equivocal IHC cases to be referred to FISH testing and did not increase the detection rates of Her2 FISH amplification. PMID:26566289

  6. Assessment of HER2 Status Using Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Techniques in Mucinous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Comprehensive Comparison between ToGA Biopsy Method and ToGA Surgical Specimen Method.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wan-Ru; Lee, Ming-Yung; Ruan, Alexandra; Sheng, Huang Pin; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Han, Chih-Ping; Koo, Chiew-Loon

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare the assay performance characteristics of HER2 status in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) by ToGA (Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer) biopsy versus ToGA surgical specimen methods. Forty-nine tissue microarray (TMA) samples of mucinous EOC from Asian women were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests using ToGA trial HER2 scoring methods. The overall concordance between IHC and FISH by the ToGA surgical specimen method is 97.56% and by the ToGA biopsy specimen method is 97.14%. The agreements of HER2 IHC results under both biopsy and surgical specimen methods were nearly perfect (weighted kappa = 0.845). Additionally, the percentage of Her2 FISH amplification showed increasing trend with increasing HER2 IHC ordinals (negative, equivocal, positive) by both TOGA biopsy (P<0.001) and surgical specimen method (P<0.001). After excluding equivocal cases, the sensitivity (100%), PPV (88.89%) and NPV (100%) of HER2 IHC were unchanged under either surgical specimen method or biopsy method. However, the specificity (96.97%) and accuracy (97.56%) of HER2 IHC was slightly higher under the surgical specimen method than those (specificity 96.30%, accuracy 97.14%) under the biopsy method. Of the total 49 cases, the number (n = 14) of HER2 IHC equivocal results under the ToGA biopsy method was 1.75-fold higher than those (n = 8) under the ToGA surgical s