Science.gov

Sample records for advancing fundamental physics

  1. Fundamental Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  2. Fundamental Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-09

    This image depicts the formation of multiple whirlpools in a sodium gas cloud. Scientists who cooled the cloud and made it spin created the whirlpools in a Massachusetts Institute of Technology laboratory, as part of NASA-funded research. This process is similar to a phenomenon called starquakes that appear as glitches in the rotation of pulsars in space. MIT's Wolgang Ketterle and his colleagues, who conducted the research under a grant from the Biological and Physical Research Program through NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., cooled the sodium gas to less than one millionth of a degree above absolute zero (-273 Celsius or -460 Fahrenheit). At such extreme cold, the gas cloud converts to a peculiar form of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate, as predicted by Albert Einstein and Satyendra Bose of India in 1927. No physical container can hold such ultra-cold matter, so Ketterle's team used magnets to keep the cloud in place. They then used a laser beam to make the gas cloud spin, a process Ketterle compares to stroking a ping-pong ball with a feather until it starts spirning. The spinning sodium gas cloud, whose volume was one- millionth of a cubic centimeter, much smaller than a raindrop, developed a regular pattern of more than 100 whirlpools.

  3. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  4. Fundamentals of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-01-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  5. GRBs and Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Patrick; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense flashes at the cosmological distances, which are the most luminous explosions in the Universe. The high luminosities of GRBs make them detectable out to the edge of the visible universe. So, they are unique tools to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal evolution of the Universe. First, they can be used to constrain the history of cosmic acceleration and the evolution of dark energy in a redshift range hardly achievable by other cosmological probes. Second, long GRBs are believed to be formed by collapse of massive stars. So they can be used to derive the high-redshift star formation rate, which can not be probed by current observations. Moreover, the use of GRBs as cosmological tools could unveil the reionization history and metal evolution of the Universe, the intergalactic medium (IGM) properties and the nature of first stars in the early universe. But beyond that, the GRB high-energy photons can be applied to constrain Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) and to test Einstein's Equivalence Principle (EEP). In this paper, we review the progress on the GRB cosmology and fundamental physics probed by GRBs.

  6. Fundamentals of Physical Mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter provides an overview of physical mapping in plants and its use for map-based gene cloning. A brief overview of cytogenetics-based physical mapping strategies, and physical mapping approaches currently used and the lessons learnt from the success stories were furnished. The statisti...

  7. Information physics fundamentals of nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Makoto; Tate, Naoya; Aono, Masashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2013-05-01

    Nanophotonics has been extensively studied with the aim of unveiling and exploiting light-matter interactions that occur at a scale below the diffraction limit of light, and recent progress made in experimental technologies--both in nanomaterial fabrication and characterization--is driving further advancements in the field. From the viewpoint of information, on the other hand, novel architectures, design and analysis principles, and even novel computing paradigms should be considered so that we can fully benefit from the potential of nanophotonics. This paper examines the information physics aspects of nanophotonics. More specifically, we present some fundamental and emergent information properties that stem from optical excitation transfer mediated by optical near-field interactions and the hierarchical properties inherent in optical near-fields. We theoretically and experimentally investigate aspects such as unidirectional signal transfer, energy efficiency and networking effects, among others, and we present their basic theoretical formalisms and describe demonstrations of practical applications. A stochastic analysis of light-assisted material formation is also presented, where an information-based approach provides a deeper understanding of the phenomena involved, such as self-organization. Furthermore, the spatio-temporal dynamics of optical excitation transfer and its inherent stochastic attributes are utilized for solution searching, paving the way to a novel computing paradigm that exploits coherent and dissipative processes in nanophotonics.

  8. Status of Fundamental Physics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.

    2003-01-01

    Update of the Fundamental Physics Program. JEM/EF Slip. 2 years delay. Reduced budget. Community support and advocacy led by Professor Nick Bigelow. Reprogramming led by Fred O Callaghan/JPL team. LTMPF M1 mission (DYNAMX and SUMO). PARCS. Carrier re baselined on JEM/EF.

  9. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  10. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2009-10-01

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  11. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-02-18

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law.

  12. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-02-01

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law.

  13. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Adam S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-01-01

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  14. Astrophysical Probes of Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.

    I review the theoretical motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain a number of fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inacessible to experiment. As a case study I will focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements can be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with important advantages over the standard methods. Assuming that the current observational evidence for varying α. and μ is correct, a several-sigma detection of dynamical dark energy is feasible within a few years, using currently operational ground-based facilities. With forthcoming instruments like CODEX, a high-accuracy reconstruction of the equation of state may be possible all the way up to redshift z ˜ 4.

  15. Fundamental Physics and Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, T. W.

    2006-11-01

    "Very high precision physics has always appealed to me. The steady improvement in technologies that afford higher and higher precision has been a regular source of excitement and challenge during my career. In science, as in most things, whenever one looks at something more closely, new aspects almost always come into play …" With these word from the book "How the Laser happened", Charles H. Townes expresses a passion for precision that is now shared by many scientists. Masers and lasers have become indispensible tools for precision measurements. During the past few years, the advent of femtosecond laser frequency comb synthesizers has revolutionized the art of directly comparing optical and microwave frequencies. Inspired by the needs of precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom, such frequency combs are now enabling ultra-precise spectroscopy over wide spectral ranges. Recent laboratory experiments are already setting stringent limits for possible slow variations of fundamental constants. Laser frequency combs also provide the long missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks that may ultimately reach a precision of parts in 1018 and beyond. Such tools will open intriguing new opportunities for fundamental experiments including new tests of special and general relativity. In the future, frequency comb techniques may be extended into the extreme ultraviolet and soft xray regime, opening a vast new spectral territory to precision measurements. Frequency combs have also become a key tool for the emerging new field of attosecond science, since they can control the electric field of ultrashort laser pulses on an unprecedented time scale. The biggest surprise in these endeavours would be if we found no surprise.

  16. Levitated Optomechanics for Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Optomechanics with levitated nano- and microparticles is believed to form a platform for testing fundamental principles of quantum physics, as well as find applications in sensing. We will report on a new scheme to trap nanoparticles, which is based on a parabolic mirror with a numerical aperture of 1. Combined with achromatic focussing, the setup is a cheap and readily straightforward solution to trapping nanoparticles for further study. Here, we report on the latest progress made in experimentation with levitated nanoparticles; these include the trapping of 100 nm nanodiamonds (with NV-centres) down to 1 mbar as well as the trapping of 50 nm Silica spheres down to 10?4 mbar without any form of feedback cooling. We will also report on the progress to implement feedback stabilisation of the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle using digital electronics. Finally, we argue that such a stabilised particle trap can be the particle source for a nanoparticle matterwave interferometer. We will present our Talbot interferometer scheme, which holds promise to test the quantum superposition principle in the new mass range of 106 amu. EPSRC, John Templeton Foundation.

  17. Fundamental Physics within Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Angela Michelle

    In this work, both experimental and numerical methods are used to investigate several of the fundamental processes and assumptions commonly found in an earth-based radio-frequency (RF) complex plasma discharge. First the manner in which the dust particle charge varies with the particle's height above the powered electrode is investigated. Knowledge of the dust particle charge is required to understand nearly all complex plasma experiments since it affects the dust particle's levitation height and particle-particle interactions. A fluid model which includes effects due to ion flow and electron depletion (which are significant dust charging effects within the sheath where the particles levitate) is employed to determine the plasma parameters required to calculate the dust particle charge. Second, the levitation limits of the dust particles and the structure of the sheath are investigated. The CASPER GEC RF reference cell is used to perform two experiments: one to measure the dust levitation height as a function of applied RF voltage and one to determine the electric force profile. The fluid model is then used to interpret the experimental results. This study provides a better understanding of the sheath structure, particle behavior within the sheath, and provides a new, in situ experimental method for locating the approximate height of the sheath edge in any dusty plasma system. Finally, both molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and an experiment are employed to determine the physical processes that a complex plasma system goes through as it rapidly transitions from a liquid to solid state.

  18. Chronometric Geodesy and Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, P.; Puchades, N.; Lodewyck, J.

    2016-12-01

    Atomic clocks are today essential for several daily life applications, such as the building of the International Atomic Time (TAI) or Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). With the new generation of optical clocks, they reach such accuracy and stability that they are now considered in practical applications for the measurement of gravitational potential differences, thanks to the Einstein effect, or gravitational redshift. Several projects explored the possibilities of using clocks in geodesy or geophysical applications and research. This context offers a fantastic opportunity to use atomic clocks to test fundamental physics. In this talk I will present two such studies for testing the gravitational redshift and Lorentz invariance.The first project is the "Galileo gravitational Redshift test with Eccentric sATellites" (GREAT), funded by the European Space Agency (ESA). Here we use the on-board atomic clocks of the Galileo satellites 5 and 6 to look for violations of general relativity theory. These two satellites were launched on August, 30th 2014 and, because of a technical problem, the launcher brought them on an elliptic orbit. An elliptic orbit induces a periodic modulation of the gravitational redshift while the good stability of recent GNSS clocks allows to test this periodic modulation to a very good level of accuracy. The Galileo 5 and 6 satellites, with their large eccentricity and on-board H-maser clocks, are hence perfect candidates to perform this test.In the second study we propose a test of special relativity theory using a network of distant optical lattice clocks located in France, Germany and Great-Britain. By exploiting the difference between the velocities of each clock in the inertial geocentric frame, due to their different positions on the surface of the Earth, we can test the time dilation effect. The connection between these clocks, achieved with phase-compensated optical fibers, allows for an unprecedented level of statistical

  19. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  20. Fundamentals of Physics, Problem Supplement No. 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2000-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  1. Fundamentals of Physics, Student's Solutions Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2000-07-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  2. Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. This book offers a unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications.

  3. High precision modeling for fundamental physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rievers, Benny; Nesemann, Leo; Costea, Adrian; Andres, Michael; Stephan, Ernst P.; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    With growing experimental accuracies and high precision requirements for fundamental physics space missions the needs for accurate numerical modeling techniques are increasing. Motivated by the challenge of length stability in cavities and optical resonators we propose the develop-ment of a high precision modeling tool for the simulation of thermomechanical effects up to a numerical precision of 10-20 . Exemplary calculations for simplified test cases demonstrate the general feasibility of high precision calculations and point out the high complexity of the task. A tool for high precision analysis of complex geometries will have to use new data types, advanced FE solver routines and implement new methods for the evaluation of numerical precision.

  4. Fundamentals of Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2016-05-01

    Part I. Basic Concepts: Electrons and Phonons: 1. Concept of a solid: qualitative introduction and overview; 2. Electrons in crystals; 3. Electronic energy bands; 4. Lattice vibrations and phonons; Part II. Electron Intercations, Dynamics and Responses: 5. Electron dynamics in crystals; 6. Many-electron interactions: the interacting electron gas and beyond; 7. Density functional theory; 8. The dielectric function for solids; Part III. Optical and Transport Phenomena: 9. Electronic transitions and optical properties of solids; 10. Electron-phonon interactions; 11. Dynamics of crystal electrons in a magnetic field; 12. Fundamentals of transport phenomena in solids; Part IV. Superconductivity, Magnetism, and Lower Dimensional Systems: 13. Using many-body techniques; 14. Superconductivity; 15. Magnetism; 16. Reduced-dimensional systems and nanostructures; Index.

  5. Physical fundamentals of remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanda, E.

    The physical principles describing the propagation of EM waves in the atmosphere and their interactions with matter are discussed as they apply to remote sensing, in an introductory text intended for graduate science students, environmental-science researchers, and remote-sensing practitioners. The emphasis is on basic effects rather than an specific remote-sensing techniques or observational results. Chapters are devoted to basic relations, the spectral lines of atmospheric gases, the spectral properties of condensed matter, and radiative transfer.

  6. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Facilities at NIST.

    PubMed

    Nico, J S; Arif, M; Dewey, M S; Gentile, T R; Gilliam, D M; Huffman, P R; Jacobson, D L; Thompson, A K

    2005-01-01

    The program in fundamental neutron physics at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) began nearly two decades ago. The Neutron Interactions and Dosimetry Group currently maintains four neutron beam lines dedicated to studies of fundamental neutron interactions. The neutrons are provided by the NIST Center for Neutron Research, a national user facility for studies that include condensed matter physics, materials science, nuclear chemistry, and biological science. The beam lines for fundamental physics experiments include a high-intensity polychromatic beam, a 0.496 nm monochromatic beam, a 0.89 nm monochromatic beam, and a neutron interferometer and optics facility. This paper discusses some of the parameters of the beam lines along with brief presentations of some of the experiments performed at the facilities.

  7. Dark Energy: A Crisis for Fundamental Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Stubbs, Christopher [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    2016-07-12

    Astrophysical observations provide robust evidence that our current picture of fundamental physics is incomplete. The discovery in 1998 that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating (apparently due to gravitational repulsion between regions of empty space!) presents us with a profound challenge, at the interface between gravity and quantum mechanics. This "Dark Energy" problem is arguably the most pressing open question in modern fundamental physics. The first talk will describe why the Dark Energy problem constitutes a crisis, with wide-reaching ramifications. One consequence is that we should probe our understanding of gravity at all accessible scales, and the second talk will present experiments and observations that are exploring this issue.

  8. Fundamental Physics for Probing and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Wade

    2006-12-01

    This book addresses the question 'What is physics for?' Physics has provided many answers for mankind by extending his ability to see. Modern technology has enabled the power of physics to see into objects to be used in archaeology, medicine including therapy, geophysics, forensics and other spheres important to the good of society. The book looks at the fundamental physics of the various methods and how they are used by technology. These methods are magnetic resonance, ionising radiation and sound. By taking a broad view over the whole field it encourages comparisons, but also addresses questions of risk and benefit to society from a fundamental viewpoint. This textbook has developed from a course given to third year students at Oxford and is written so that it can be used coherently as a basis for shortened courses by omitting a number of chapters.

  9. Fundamentals of Physics, Extended 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition and the Extended Version, 7th Edition offer a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, helping readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving, in a breezy, easy-to-understand style. A unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications. * Numerous improvements in the text, based on feedback from the many users of the sixth edition (both instructors and students) * Several thousand end-of-chapter problems have been rewritten to streamline both the presentations and answers * 'Chapter Puzzlers' open each chapter with an intriguing application or question that is explained or answered in the chapter * Problem-solving tactics are provided to help beginning Physics students solve problems and avoid common error * The first section in every chapter introduces the subject of the chapter by asking and answering, "What is Physics?" as the question pertains to the chapter * Numerous supplements available to aid teachers and students The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory.

  10. Photoacoustic tomography: fundamentals, advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    Optical microscopy has been contributing to the development of life science for more than three centuries. However, due to strong optical scattering in tissue, its in vivo imaging ability has been restricted to studies at superficial depths. Advances in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) now allow multiscale imaging at depths from sub-millimeter to several centimeters, with spatial resolutions from sub-micrometer to sub-millimeter. Because of this high scalability and its unique optical absorption contrast, PAT is capable of performing anatomical, functional, molecular and fluid-dynamic imaging at various system levels, and is playing an increasingly important role in fundamental biological research and clinical practice. This Review discusses recent technical progress in PAT and presents corresponding applications. It ends with a discussion of several prospects and their technical challenges. PMID:22025335

  11. Fundamental physics at the threshold of discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Natalia

    This thesis is divided into two parts: one driven by theory, the other by experiment. The first two chapters consider two model-building challenges: the little hierarchy of supersymmetry and the slowness of confinement in Randall-Sundrum models. In the third chapter, we turn to the question of determining the nature of fundamental physics at the TeV scale from LHC data. Crucial to this venture is a characterization for models of new physics. We present On-Shell Effective Theories (OSETs), a characterization of hadron collider data in terms of masses, production cross sections, and decay modes of new particles. We argue that such a description can likely be obtained from ≲ 1 year of LHC data, and in many scenarios is an essential intermediate step in describing fundamental physics at the TeV scale.

  12. Baryogenesis and its implications to fundamental physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, M.

    2008-08-08

    In this talk I shall explain some basic concepts of baryogenesis and leptogenesis theory, and a new idea of experimental method of verification of fundamental ingredients of leptogenesis theory; the Majorana nature and the absolute magnitude of neutrino masses. Both of these are important to the quest of physics beyond the standard theory, and have far reaching implications irrespective of any particular medel of leptogenesis. If this new method works ideally, there is even a further possibility of detecting relic neutrinos.

  13. Fundamental Characterization Studies of Advanced Photocatalytic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phivilay, Somphonh Peter

    Solar powered photocatalytic water splitting has been proposed as a method for the production of sustainable, non-carbon hydrogen fuel. Although much technological progress has been achieved in recent years in the discovery of advanced photocatalytic materials, the progress in the fundamental scientific understanding of such novel, complex mixed oxide and oxynitride photocatalysts has significantly lagged. One of the major reasons for this slow scientific progress is the limited number of reported surface characterization studies of the complex bulk mixed oxide and oxynitride photocatalyst systems. Although photocatalytic splitting of water by bulk mixed oxide and oxynitride materials involves both bulk (generation of excited electrons and holes) and surface phenomena (reaction of H2O with excited electrons and holes at the surface), the photocatalysis community has almost completely ignored the surface characteristics of such complex bulk photocatalysts and correlates the photocatalytic properties with bulk properties. Some of the most promising photocatalyst systems (NaTaO3, GaN, (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) and TaON) were investigated to establish fundamental bulk/surface structure photoactivity relationships. The bulk molecular and electronic structures of the photocatalysts were determined with Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) and transient PL spectroscopy were provided insight into how recombination of photogenerated electrons is related to the photocatalysis activity. The chemical states and atomic compositions of the surface region of the photocatalysts were determined with high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (˜1-3 nm) and high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (˜0.3 nm). The new insights obtained from surface characterization clarified the role of La and Ni promoters species for the NaTaO3 photocatalyst system. The La2O3 additive was found to be a structural promoter that stabilizes small NaTaO3 nanoparticles (NPs

  14. Fundamental constraints on two-time physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piceno, E.; Rosado, A.; Sadurní, E.

    2016-10-01

    We show that generalizations of classical and quantum dynamics with two times lead to a fundamentally constrained evolution. At the level of classical physics, Newton's second law is extended and exactly integrated in a (1 + 2) -dimensional space, leading to effective single-time evolution for any initial condition. The cases 2 + 2 and 3 + 2 are also analyzed. In the domain of quantum mechanics, we follow strictly the hypothesis of probability conservation by extending the Heisenberg picture to unitary evolution with two times. As a result, the observability of two temporal axes is constrained by a generalized uncertainty relation involving level spacings, total duration of the effect and Planck's constant.

  15. PREFACE: Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Volkmar; Kramer, Bernhard

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 70th PTB Seminar which, the second on the subject "Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology", was held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig from October 21 to 22, 1985. About 100 participants from the universities and various research institutes of the Federal Republic of Germany participated in the meeting. Besides a number of review lectures on various broader subjects there was a poster session which contained a variety of topical contributed papers ranging from the theory of the quantum Hall effect to reports on the status of the metrological experiments at the PTB. In addition, the participants were also offered the possibility to visit the PTB laboratories during the course of the seminar. During the preparation of the meeting we noticed that even most of the general subjects which were going to be discussed in the lectures are of great importance in connection with metrological experiments and should be made accessible to the scientific community. This eventually resulted in the idea of the publication of the papers in a regular journal. We are grateful to the editor of Metrologia for providing this opportunity. We have included quite a number of papers from basic physical research. For example, certain aspects of high-energy physics and quantum optics, as well as the many-faceted role of Sommerfeld's fine-structure constant, are covered. We think that questions such as "What are the intrinsic fundamental parameters of nature?" or "What are we doing when we perform an experiment?" can shed new light on the art of metrology, and do, potentially, lead to new ideas. This appears to be especially necessary when we notice the increasing importance of the role of the fundamental constants and macroscopic quantum effects for the definition and the realization of the physical units. In some cases we have reached a point where the limitations of our knowledge of a fundamental constant and

  16. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehney, A. F.; Inokuti, M.

    1983-12-01

    Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. These areas of study were chosen in view of our goals; that is to say, they were chosen so that the eventual outcome of the work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support the research. First, cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules were determined theoretically and experimently, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules were studied because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry.

  17. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-01

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  18. Top Ten Problems in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    In 1900 the world-renowned mathematician David Hilbert presented twenty-three problems at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris. These problems have inspired mathematicians throughout the last century. As a piece of millennial madness, all participants of the Strings 2000 Conference were invited to help formulate the ten most important unsolved problems in fundamental physics. Each participant was allowed to submit one candidate problem for consideration. To qualify, the problem must not only have been important but also well-defined and stated in a clear way. The best ten problems were selected at the end of the conference by a selection panel consisting of David Gross, Edward Witten and myself.

  19. Top Ten Problems in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    2001-04-01

    In 1900 the world-renowned mathematician David Hilbert presented twenty-three problems at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris. These problems have inspired mathematicians throughout the last century. As a piece of millennial madness, all participants of the Strings 2000 Conference were invited to help formulate the ten most important unsolved problems in fundamental physics. Each participant was allowed to submit one candidate problem for consideration. To qualify, the problem must not only have been important but also well-defined and stated in a clear way. The best ten problems were selected at the end of the conference by a selection panel consisting of David Gross, Edward Witten and myself.

  20. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  1. Nuclear and fundamental physics instrumentation for the ANS project

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.J.; Raman, S.; Arterburn, J.; McManamy, T.; Peretz, F.J.; Faust, H.; Piotrowski, A.E.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes work carried out during the period 1991-1995 in connection with the refinement of the concepts and detailed designs for nuclear and fundamental physics research instrumentation at the proposed Advanced Neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Initially, emphasis was placed on refining the existing System Design Document (SDD-43) to detail more accurately the needs and interfaces of the instruments that are identified in the document. The conceptual designs of these instruments were also refined to reflect current thinking in the field of nuclear and fundamental physics. In particular, the on-line isotope separator (ISOL) facility design was reconsidered in the light of the development of interest in radioactive ion beams within the nuclear physics community. The second stage of this work was to define those instrument parameters that would interface directly with the reactor systems so that these parameters could be considered for the ISOL facility and particularly for its associated ion source. Since two of these options involved ion sources internal to the long slant beam tube, these were studied in detail. In addition, preliminary work was done to identify the needs for the target holder and changing facility to be located in the tangential through-tube. Because many of the planned nuclear and fundamental physics instruments have similar needs in terms of detection apparatus, some progress was also made in defining the parameters for these detectors. 21 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Astronomers Gain Clues About Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-12-01

    An international team of astronomers has looked at something very big -- a distant galaxy -- to study the behavior of things very small -- atoms and molecules -- to gain vital clues about the fundamental nature of our entire Universe. The team used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to test whether the laws of nature have changed over vast spans of cosmic time. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) "The fundamental constants of physics are expected to remain fixed across space and time; that's why they're called constants! Now, however, new theoretical models for the basic structure of matter indicate that they may change. We're testing these predictions." said Nissim Kanekar, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), in Socorro, New Mexico. So far, the scientists' measurements show no change in the constants. "We've put the most stringent limits yet on some changes in these constants, but that's not the end of the story," said Christopher Carilli, another NRAO astronomer. "This is the exciting frontier where astronomy meets particle physics," Carilli explained. The research can help answer fundamental questions about whether the basic components of matter are tiny particles or tiny vibrating strings, how many dimensions the Universe has, and the nature of "dark energy." The astronomers were looking for changes in two quantities: the ratio of the masses of the electron and the proton, and a number physicists call the fine structure constant, a combination of the electron charge, the speed of light and the Planck constant. These values, considered fundamental physical constants, once were "taken as time independent, with values given once and forever" said German particle physicist Christof Wetterich. However, Wetterich explained, "the viewpoint of modern particle theory has changed in recent years," with ideas such as

  3. Chiroptical signatures of life and fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Macdermott, Alexandra J

    2012-09-01

    This paper aims to inspire experimentalists to carry out proposed new chiroptical experiments springing from the theoretical study of the role of parity violation in the origin of biomolecular homochirality and to provide a brief update on the current status of calculations of the electroweak parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers. If the PVED did select life's handedness, we would expect to find life on other planets consistently using the same hand as terrestrial biochemistry. Much more importantly, even finding the "wrong" hand (rather than a racemic mixture) on another planet could be the homochiral signature of life, and we discuss our proposal for chiroptical detection of life on extra-solar planets. The PVED may also have an exciting future as a "molecular footprint" of fundamental physics: comparison of calculated PVEDs with measured values could one day allow chemists to do "table-top particle physics" more cheaply with improved chiroptical techniques instead of ever larger particle accelerators. We discuss our proposed chiroptical method to measure the PVED by using molecular beams. To our knowledge, optical rotation has not yet been measured in molecular beams, but the rewards of doing so include a host of other "first ever" results in addition to measurement of the PVED.

  4. Fundamental Neutron Physics: Theory and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Vladimir

    2016-10-31

    The goal of the proposal was to study the possibility of searching for manifestations of new physics beyond the Standard model in fundamental neutron physics experiments. This involves detailed theoretical analyses of parity and time reversal invariance violating processes in neutron induced reactions, properties of neutron β-decay, and the precise description of properties of neutron interactions with nuclei. To describe neutron-nuclear interactions, we use both the effective field theory approach and the theory of nuclear reaction with phenomenological nucleon potentials for the systematic description of parity and time reversal violating effects in the consistent way. A major emphasis of our research during the funding period has been the study of parity violation (PV) and time reversal invariance violation (TRIV) in few-body systems. We studied PV effects in non-elastic processes in three nucleon system using both ”DDH-like” and effective field theory (EFT) approaches. The wave functions were obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space for a number of realistic strong potentials. The observed model dependence for the DDH approach indicates intrinsic difficulty in the description of nuclear PV effects and it could be the reason for the observed discrepancies in the nuclear PV data analysis. It shows that the DDH approach could be a reasonable approach for analysis of PV effects only if exactly the same strong and weak potentials are used in calculating all PV observables in all nuclei. However, the existing calculations of nuclear PV effects were performed using different potentials; therefore, strictly speaking, one cannot compare the existing results of these calculations among themselves.

  5. An integration of integrated information theory with fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Adam B.

    2014-01-01

    To truly eliminate Cartesian ghosts from the science of consciousness, we must describe consciousness as an aspect of the physical. Integrated Information Theory states that consciousness arises from intrinsic information generated by dynamical systems; however existing formulations of this theory are not applicable to standard models of fundamental physical entities. Modern physics has shown that fields are fundamental entities, and in particular that the electromagnetic field is fundamental. Here I hypothesize that consciousness arises from information intrinsic to fundamental fields. This hypothesis unites fundamental physics with what we know empirically about the neuroscience underlying consciousness, and it bypasses the need to consider quantum effects. PMID:24550877

  6. An integration of integrated information theory with fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Adam B

    2014-01-01

    To truly eliminate Cartesian ghosts from the science of consciousness, we must describe consciousness as an aspect of the physical. Integrated Information Theory states that consciousness arises from intrinsic information generated by dynamical systems; however existing formulations of this theory are not applicable to standard models of fundamental physical entities. Modern physics has shown that fields are fundamental entities, and in particular that the electromagnetic field is fundamental. Here I hypothesize that consciousness arises from information intrinsic to fundamental fields. This hypothesis unites fundamental physics with what we know empirically about the neuroscience underlying consciousness, and it bypasses the need to consider quantum effects.

  7. Fundamental physics of vacuum electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shigehiko

    2006-01-01

    The history of electron emission is reviewed from a standpoint of the work function that determines the electron emission capability and of applications in the fields of scientific instruments and displays. For years, in thermionic emission, a great deal of effort has been devoted to the search for low work function materials with high melting temperature, while reduction of the local change in time of the work function rather than the work function itself has been the main issue of field emission investigations. High brightness and long life are the central targets of emission material investigations for scientific instrument applications, while high current density and low power consumption are the guiding principles for display applications. In most of the present day industries, thermionic emission materials are exclusively used in such fields requiring high current and high reliability as cathode ray tubes, transmission and receiving tubes, x-ray sources and various electron beam machines. Field electron emission sources, however, since applied to high resolution electron microscopes in the 1970s have recently become dominant in research and development in the fields of scientific instruments as well as in the fields of various electron tubes and beam machines. The main issue in this report is to analyse the work function on the atomic scale and thereby to understand the fundamental physics behind the work function, the change in time of the local work function leading to field emission current fluctuation and the relationship between microscopic (on atomic scale) and macroscopic work functions. Our attempt is presented here, where the work function on the atomic scale is measured by utilizing a scanning tunnelling microscopy technique, and it is made clear how far the local work function extends its influence over neighbouring sites. As a result, a simple relationship is established between microscopic and macroscopic work functions.

  8. [The Study of Advanced Fundamental Parameter Method in EDXRFA].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Zhang, Qing-xian; Ge, Liang-quan; Gu, Yi; Zeng, Guo-qiang; Luo, Yao-yao; Chen, Shuang; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2015-07-01

    The X-ray Fluorescence Analysis(XRFA) is an important and efficient method on the element anylsis and is used in geology, industry and environment protection. But XRFA has a backdraw that the determination limit and accuracy are effected by the matrix of the sample. Now the fundamental parameter is usually used to calculate the content of elements in XRFA, and it is an efficient method if the matrix and net area of characteristic X-ray peak are obtained. But this is invalide in in-stu XRFA. Also the method of net area and the "black material" of sample are the key point of the fundamental parameter method when the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Analysis(EDXRFA) method is used in the low content sample. In this paper a advanced fundamental parameter method is discussed. The advanced fundamental parameter method includes the spectra analysis and the fundamental parameter method, which inserts the overlapping peaks separation method into the iteration process of the fundamental parameter method. The advanced method can resolve the net area and the quantitative analysis. The advanced method is used to analyse the standard sample. Compare to the content obtained from the coefficient method, the precision of Cu, Ni and Zn is better than coeffieciency method. The result shows that the advanced method could improve the precision of the EDXRFA, so the advanced method is better than the coefficient method.

  9. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William B.; Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 g/m3, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 mm in 3 min. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic performance of a compressor component

  10. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan; Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William

    2011-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice-crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 grams per cubic meter, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 millimeters in 3 minutes. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic

  11. PREFACE: Fundamental Neutron Physics: Introduction and Overview Fundamental Neutron Physics: Introduction and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2009-10-01

    In the 77 years since its discovery by Chadwick in 1932, the neutron has come to play an increasingly important role in contemporary physics. As the next to lightest baryon, it is, of course, one of the two primary components of the atomic nucleus and studies of isotopes (nuclei with varying numbers of neutrons but the same proton number) and of the neutron drip line are one of the important focuses of the recently approved radioactive beam machine to be built at Michigan State University. Precise knowledge of its ~900 second lifetime is crucial to determination of the time at which nucleosynthesis occurs in the early universe. Because it is electrically neutral, the neutron can penetrate the atomic cloud and neutron scattering has become a powerful tool in the study of the structure of materials in condensed matter and biophysics. These are all important issues, but will not be addressed in the articles presented below. Rather, in the set of manuscripts published herein, we show various ways in which the neutron has come to probe fundamental questions in physics. We present six such articles: Because of its simple structure, neutron beta decay has served as a laboratory for the study of possible symmetry violations, including search for possible Script T-violation via measurement of the D coefficient, search for second class currents and/or possible CVC violation via examination of recoil terms, search for right-handed currents via examination of correlations, search for S, T couplings via measurement of the b parameter, etc. The study of neutron decay is reviewed in the article by Jeff Nico. The use of the neutron as a probe of possible Script T-violation via the existence of a non-zero electric dipole moment is discussed in the article by Steve Lamoreaux. The neutron is a prime player in the experimental study of hadronic parity violation, via experiments involving radiative capture and spin rotation, as examined in the article by Barry Holstein. Because of its

  12. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  13. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  14. Fundamental Thermal Fluid Physics of High Temperature Flows in Advanced Reactor Systems - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program Interoffice Work Order (IWO) MSF99-0254 Final Report for Period 1 August 1999 to 31 December 2002

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Condie, K.G.; Foust, T.D.; McCreery, G.E.; Pink, R.J.; Stacey, D.E.; Shenoy, A.; Baccaglini, G.; Pletcher, R.H.; Wallace, J.M.; Vukoslavcevic, P.; Jackson, J.D.; Kunugi, T.; Satake, S.-i.

    2002-12-31

    The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of advanced reactors for higher efficiency and enhanced safety and for deployable reactors for electrical power generation, process heat utilization and hydrogen generation. While key applications would be advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGCRs) using the closed Brayton cycle (CBC) for higher efficiency (such as the proposed Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) of General Atomics [Neylan and Simon, 1996]), results of the proposed research should also be valuable in reactor systems with supercritical flow or superheated vapors, e.g., steam. Higher efficiency leads to lower cost/kwh and reduces life-cycle impacts of radioactive waste (by reducing waters/kwh). The outcome will also be useful for some space power and propulsion concepts and for some fusion reactor concepts as side benefits, but they are not the thrusts of the investigation. The objective of the project is to provide fundamental thermal fluid physics knowledge and measurements necessary for the development of the improved methods for the applications.

  15. Advanced Fencing; Physical Education: 5551.54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Marjorie

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 8-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Strategy, tactics, principles, and fundamentals of advanced fencing skills. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The contents are divided into seven areas, which are Course Guidelines, Course Description and Broad Goal, Course of Study Behavioral Objectives, Course Content, Learning Activities and…

  16. Noise in state of the art clocks and their impact for fundamental physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a review of the use of advanced atomic clocks in testing the fundamental physical laws will be presented. Noise sources of clocks will be discussed, together with an outline their characterization based on current models. The paper will conclude with a discussion of recent attempts to reduce the fundamental, as well as technical noise in atomic clocks.

  17. Noise in state of the art clocks and their impact for fundamental physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a review of the use of advanced atomic clocks in testing the fundamental physical laws will be presented. Noise sources of clocks will be discussed, together with an outline their characterization based on current models. The paper will conclude with a discussion of recent attempts to reduce the fundamental, as well as technical noise in atomic clocks.

  18. Fundamental physics possibilities at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkby, Esben; N-Nbar Collaboration; Soldner, Torsten; ANNI Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The construction of the European Spallation Source ESS is ongoing in Lund, Sweden. This new high power spallation source with its long-pulse structure opens up new possibilities for fundamental physics experiments. This paper focusses on two proposals for fundamental physics at the ESS: The ANNI instrument and the neutron-anti-neutron oscillation experiment.

  19. Fundamentals of Physics, Instructor Lab Manual with CD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-09-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  20. Fundamentals of Physics, Probeware Lab Manual/Student Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-09-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  1. Fundamental Physics Program and the NASA Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    The accomplishments of Physics, the increasing power of its instruments, and its expanding reach into other sciences have generated an unprecedented set of scientific opportunities. The committee has identified six such Grand Challenges listed below in no particular order: Developing quantum technologies. Creating new materials. Understanding complex systems. Unifying the forces of Nature. Exploring the universe Applying Physics to Biology.

  2. Physical Activity Fundamental to Preventing Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Regular physical activity, fitness, and exercise are critically important for all people's health and wellbeing. It can reduce morbidity and mortality from many chronic diseases. Despite its well-known benefits, most U.S. adults, and many children, are not active enough to achieve these health benefits. Physical inactivity and related health…

  3. Improving Advanced High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spital, Robin David

    2003-04-01

    A National Research Council study committee recently commissioned a "Physics Panel" to evaluate and make recommendations for improving advanced physics education in American high schools [1]. The Physics Panel recommends the creation of a nationally standardized Newtonian Mechanics Unit that would form the foundation of all advanced physics programs. In a one-year program, the Panel recommends that advanced physics students study at most one other major area of physics, so that sufficient time is available to develop the deep conceptual understanding that is the primary goal of advanced study. The Panel emphasizes that final assessments must be improved to focus on depth of understanding, rather than technical problem-solving skill. The Physics Panel strongly endorses the inclusion of meaningful real-world experiences in advanced physics programs, but believes that traditional "cook-book" laboratory exercises are not worth the enormous amount of time and effort spent on them. The Physics Panel believes that the talent and preparation of teachers are the most important ingredients in effective physics instruction; it therefore calls for a concerted effort by all parts of the physics community to remedy the desperate shortage of highly qualified teachers. [1] Jerry P. Gollub and Robin Spital, "Advanced Physics in the High Schools", Physics Today, May 2002.

  4. The Fundamental Physical Limits of Computation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Charles H.; Landauer, Rolf

    1985-01-01

    Examines what constraints govern the physical process of computation, considering such areas as whether a minimum amount of energy is required per logic step. Indicates that although there seems to be no minimum, answers to other questions are unresolved. Examples used include DNA/RNA, a Brownian clockwork turning machine, and others. (JN)

  5. The Fundamental Physical Limits of Computation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Charles H.; Landauer, Rolf

    1985-01-01

    Examines what constraints govern the physical process of computation, considering such areas as whether a minimum amount of energy is required per logic step. Indicates that although there seems to be no minimum, answers to other questions are unresolved. Examples used include DNA/RNA, a Brownian clockwork turning machine, and others. (JN)

  6. Fundamentals of ultrasound physics and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranat, Boris Abramovich; Dubrovin, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Khavskii, Nikolai Nikolaevich; Eskin, Georgii Iosifovich

    The scientific principles of the ultrasonic processing of materials and the use of ultrasonic technology in various fields are presented in a systematic manner. The discussion covers the physics of ultrasound propagation, ultrasound sources, the use of ultrasonic treatment in ore concentration, the principles of the ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals, ultrasonic dispersion and hydroabrasive treatment, and the use of ultrasound in the production of high-purity metals and semiconductors.

  7. Cosmic Acceleration, Dark Energy, and Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Huterer, Dragan

    2007-11-01

    A web of interlocking observations has established that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up and not slowing, revealing the presence of some form of repulsive gravity. Within the context of general relativity the cause of cosmic acceleration is a highly elastic ( p˜-ρ), very smooth form of energy called “dark energy” accounting for about 75% of the Universe. The “simplest” explanation for dark energy is the zero-point energy density associated with the quantum vacuum; however, all estimates for its value are many orders-of-magnitude too large. Other ideas for dark energy include a very light scalar field or a tangled network of topological defects. An alternate explanation invokes gravitational physics beyond general relativity. Observations and experiments underway and more precise cosmological measurements and laboratory experiments planned for the next decade will test whether or not dark energy is the quantum energy of the vacuum or something more exotic, and whether or not general relativity can self consistently explain cosmic acceleration. Dark energy is the most conspicuous example of physics beyond the standard model and perhaps the most profound mystery in all of science.

  8. Space-Based Research in Fundamental Physics and Quantum Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Israelsson, Ulf E.; Shao, Michael; Yu, Nan; Kusenko, Alexander; Wright, Edward L.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Kasevich, Mark; Lipa, John A.; Mester, John C.; Reasenberg, Robert D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ashby, Neil; Gould, Harvey; Paik, Ho Jung

    Space offers unique experimental conditions and a wide range of opportunities to explore the foundations of modern physics with an accuracy far beyond that of ground-based experiments. Space-based experiments today can uniquely address important questions related to the fundamental laws of Nature. In particular, high-accuracy physics experiments in space can test relativistic gravity and probe the physics beyond the Standard Model; they can perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for investigations in precision cosmology and astroparticle physics. In addition, atomic physics has recently shown substantial progress in the development of optical clocks and atom interferometers. If placed in space, these instruments could turn into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current status of space-based research in fundamental physics, its discovery potential, and its importance for modern science. We offer a set of recommendations to be considered by the upcoming National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics. In our opinion, the Decadal Survey should include space-based research in fundamental physics as one of its focus areas. We recommend establishing an Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee's interagency "Fundamental Physics Task Force" to assess the status of both ground- and space-based efforts in the field, to identify the most important objectives, and to suggest the best ways to organize the work of several federal agencies involved. We also recommend establishing a new NASA-led interagency program in fundamental physics that will consolidate new technologies, prepare key instruments for future space missions, and build a strong scientific and engineering community. Our goal is to expand NASA's science objectives in space by including "laboratory research in fundamental physics" as an element in the agency's ongoing space research efforts.

  9. Accreting Millisecond Pulsars and Fundamental Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2005-01-01

    X-ray emission from the surfaces of rapidly rotating neutron stars encodes information about their global properties as well as physical conditions locally. Detailed modelling of, for example, the energy dependent pulse profiles observed from accreting millisecond pulsars and thermonuclear burst oscillations can be used to derive constraints on the masses and radii of neutron stars. These measurements provide direct information on the properties of the dense matter equation of state of the supranuclear density matter in their interiors. Study of absorption lines created in the surface layers can also provide measurements of masses and radii, and may be able to probe aspects of relativistic gravity, such as frame dragging. I will discuss the results of recent efforts to carry out such measurements and their implications for the properties of dense matter.

  10. [Physical fundamentals of pressure measurement (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krösl, P

    1978-08-01

    The important role of pressure-measurement for many diagnostic, surgical, critical care and biomedical research problems should not be underestimated. For high accurancy the good knowledge of the underlying physical and mathematical principles seems to be necessary. On the other hand many users need some quick and easy methods for units of pressure measurements testing and calibration of their pressure-measurements system. In this survey a small introduction to the units is followed by basic considerations about fluid-mechanics. Fourier-analysis and theory of transmission. (The influence of terms like "natural frequency", "damping" and "phase lag" are shown). After the description of the commonly used pressure-transducers some hints are given to check the systems even in small laboratories.

  11. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierk, I.; Israelsson, U.; Lee, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics research program, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum fluid based sensor and modeling technology.

  12. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  13. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierk, I.; Israelsson, U.; Lee, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics research program, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum fluid based sensor and modeling technology.

  14. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  15. Role of Fundamental Physics in Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava

    2004-01-01

    This talk will discuss the critical role that fundamental physics research plays for the human space exploration. In particular, the currently available technologies can already provide significant radiation reduction, minimize bone loss, increase crew productivity and, thus, uniquely contribute to overall mission success. I will discuss how fundamental physics research and emerging technologies may not only further reduce the risks of space travel, but also increase the crew mobility, enhance safety and increase the value of space exploration in the near future.

  16. Role of Fundamental Physics in Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava

    2004-01-01

    This talk will discuss the critical role that fundamental physics research plays for the human space exploration. In particular, the currently available technologies can already provide significant radiation reduction, minimize bone loss, increase crew productivity and, thus, uniquely contribute to overall mission success. I will discuss how fundamental physics research and emerging technologies may not only further reduce the risks of space travel, but also increase the crew mobility, enhance safety and increase the value of space exploration in the near future.

  17. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  18. Fundamentals of Physics, Extended, Chapters 1 - 45 , Enhanced Problems Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-04-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory. This book offers a unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications.

  19. Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barry N.; Cohen, E. Richard

    1990-01-01

    We summarize the principal advances made in the fundamental physical constants field since the completion of the 1986 CODATA least-squares adjustment of the constants and discuss their implications for both the 1986 set of recommended values and the next least-squares adjustment. In general, the new results lead to values of the constants with uncertainties 5 to 7 times smaller than the uncertainties assigned the 1986 values. However, the changes in the values themselves are less than twice the 1986 assigned one-standard-deviation uncertainties and thus are not highly significant. Although much new data has become available since 1986, three new results dominate the analysis: a value of the Planck constant obtained from a realization of the watt; a value of the fine-structure constant obtained from the magnetic moment anomaly of the electron; and a value of the molar gas constant obtained from the speed of sound in argon. Because of their dominant role in determining the values and uncertainties of many of the constants, it is highly desirable that additional results of comparable uncertainty that corroborate these three data items be obtained before the next adjustment is carried out. Until then, the 1986 CODATA set of recommended values will remain the set of choice. PMID:28179787

  20. Advances in Medical Physics: 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Advances in Medical Physics: 2010., Wolbarst Anthony B., Karellas Andrew, Krupinski Elizabeth A., Hendee William R., Medical Physics Publishing, Madison, WI, 2010, 368 pp (hardcover). Price: $140.00. ISBN: 978-1-93052-450-7. © 2011 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Geoffrey; Cianciolo, Vince; Koehler, Paul; Allen, Richard; Snow, William Michael; Huffman, Paul; Gould, Chris; Bowman, David; Cooper, Martin; Doyle, John

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an anticipated start-up in early 2006, will provide the most intense pulsed beams of cold neutrons in the world. At a projected power of 1.4 MW, the time averaged fluxes and fluences of the SNS will approach those of high flux reactors. One of the flight paths on the cold, coupled moderator will be devoted to fundamental neutron physics. The fundamental neutron physics beamline is anticipated to include two beam-lines; a broad band cold beam, and a monochromatic beam of 0.89 nm neutrons for ultracold neutron (UCN) experiments. The fundamental neutron physics beamline will be operated as a user facility with experiment selection based on a peer reviewed proposal process. An initial program of five experiments in neutron decay, hadronic weak interaction and time reversal symmetry violation have been proposed. PMID:27308112

  2. Fundamental physics in space in ESA and COSPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southwood, D. J.; Reinhard, R.

    2003-10-01

    In recent years, fundamental physics has emerged as a new discipline in European space science. This Symposium marks the topic's entry into the COSPAR programme. There has been a small but important community active in the USA for many years. In Europe, the topic's history goes back to the very origins of cooperative space science. After a decade of activity in the 1970s and a period of hibernation in the 1980s the topic has now re-emerged, triggered by the activities in the USA. Exciting projects are now being studied by ESA, such as testing the Equivalence Principle with unprecedented precision and the search for gravitational waves. In space, experiments in fundamental physics can often be carried out with much higher precision than on the ground because of the quieter gravitational background and the absence of the 1-g gravity. Some detections, e.g. gravitational waves at low frequencies, can only be made in space. Scientific objectives of fundamental physics missions are distinctly different ( questioning the laws of Nature) from the objectives of astronomy and Solar System missions (taking the laws of Nature for granted and applying them). There is clearly now an active community of fundamental physicists in Europe in need of space flight opportunities, as there has been one in the USA for quite a while, and this is now being recognised by COSPAR. Consequently, on 21 July 1996, the COSPAR Council decided to set up a Scientific Commission for Fundamental Physics in Space (SC-H).

  3. Fundamental physics with cosmic high-energy gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.

  4. Fundamentals of Physics, Student Study Guide, Extended 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-06-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition and the Extended Version, 7th Edition offer a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, helping readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving, in a breezy, easy-to-understand style. A unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications. * Numerous improvements in the text, based on feedback from the many users of the sixth edition (both instructors and students) * Several thousand end-of-chapter problems have been rewritten to streamline both the presentations and answers * 'Chapter Puzzlers' open each chapter with an intriguing application or question that is explained or answered in the chapter * Problem-solving tactics are provided to help beginning Physics students solve problems and avoid common error * The first section in every chapter introduces the subject of the chapter by asking and answering, "What is Physics?" as the question pertains to the chapter * Numerous supplements available to aid teachers and students The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory.

  5. On the fundamental role of dynamics in quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Holger F.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum theory expresses the observable relations between physical properties in terms of probabilities that depend on the specific context described by the "state" of a system. However, the laws of physics that emerge at the macroscopic level are fully deterministic. Here, it is shown that the relation between quantum statistics and deterministic dynamics can be explained in terms of ergodic averages over complex valued probabilities, where the fundamental causality of motion is expressed by an action that appears as the phase of the complex probability multiplied with the fundamental constant ħ. Importantly, classical physics emerges as an approximation of this more fundamental theory of motion, indicating that the assumption of a classical reality described by differential geometry is merely an artefact of an extrapolation from the observation of macroscopic dynamics to a fictitious level of precision that does not exist within our actual experience of the world around us. It is therefore possible to completely replace the classical concepts of trajectories with the more fundamental concept of action phase probabilities as a universally valid description of the deterministic causality of motion that is observed in the physical world.

  6. Preface: Advances in solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2015-12-01

    The idea for this special issue of Advances in Space Research (ASR) was formulated during the 14th European Solar Physics Meeting (ESPM-14) that took place in Dublin, Ireland in September 2014. Since ASR does not publish conference proceedings, it was decided to extend a general call to the international solar-physics community for manuscripts pertinent to the following thematic areas: New and upcoming heliospheric observational and data assimilation facilities.

  7. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  8. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  9. TEACHING PHYSICS: Connecting with Advancing Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. M.

    2000-05-01

    A case is made for the Institute of Physics to provide services to back up physics courses in the first foundation year in British universities. There are several reasons why it is timely to consider such action. Firstly there are several physics departments in the country which are scarcely large enough to maintain a full four-year honours course while at the same time winning a lucrative research reputation. Secondly, if Advancing Physics, the new A-level initiative sponsored by the Institute of Physics, is successful, there will be a flood of new recruits into the subject, just at a time when the number of places available in universities is static or, more likely, falling. Thirdly, the new students will expect very high standards of presentation, for both practical and theoretical work: standards which, given the resources available to existing departments, will be very hard to provide under the present circumstances. It is proposed that the Standing Committee of Physics Professors should examine whether and in what ways the provision of IOP services to universities might be made. The SCPP is an appropriate body to manage such a resource.

  10. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  11. Fundamentals of Physics, 6th Edition Enhanced Problems Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-04-01

    No other text on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics. This text continues to outperform the competition year after year, and the new edition will be no exception. Intended for Calculus-based Physics courses, the 6th edition of this extraordinary text is a major redesign of the best-selling 5th edition, which still maintains many of the elements that led to its enormous success. Jearl Walker adds his unique style to this edition with the addition of new problems designed to capture, and keep, students' attention. Nearly all changes are based on suggestions from instructors and students using the 5th edition, from reviewer comments, and from research done on the process of learning. The primary goal of this text is to provide students with a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and to help them apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. The principal goal of Halliday-Resnick-Walker is to provide instructors with a tool by which they can teach students how to effectively read scientific material and successfully reason through scientific questions. To sharpen this tool, the Enhanced Problems Version of the sixth edition of Fundamentals of Physics contains over 1000 new, high-quality problems that require thought and reasoning rather than simplistic plugging of data into formulas.

  12. Recent advances of flow cytometry in fundamental and applied microbiology.

    PubMed

    Fouchet, P; Jayat, C; Héchard, Y; Ratinaud, M H; Frelat, G

    1993-01-01

    This review focuses on the recent applications of flow cytometry (FCM) in microbiological research (1987-mid 1992). It tries to give a scope of the important breakthroughs which occurred in this field during this period. The technical difficulties of microorganism analysis by flow cytometry is briefly appraised. The significance and the limits of the different microbial cell parameters attainable by flow analyses are systematically evaluated: light scatter for cell size and structure, fluorescence measurements for quantification of cellular components, microbial antigen detection and cell physiological activity estimation. Emphasis is given on the new technological advances which appeared in the last two years. The second part of the review is devoted to the analysis of the usefulness of flow cytometric approach in the different fields of microbiology: fundamental studies in microbial physiology, differentiation, microbial ecology and aquatic sciences, medical microbiology, parasitology, microbial pharmacology and biotechnology.

  13. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 5 (Chapters 38-44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    Chapter 38. Photons and Matter Waves. Chapter 39. More About Matter Waves. Chapter 40. All About Atoms. Chapter 41. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Chapter 42. Nuclear Physics. Chapter 43. Energy from the Nucleus. Chapter 44. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendix A: The International System of Units (SI). Appendix B: Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. Appendix C: Some Astronomical Data. Appendix D: Conversion Factors. Appendix E: Mathematical Formulas. Appendix F: Properties of the Elements. Appendix G: Periodic Tables of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions, Exercises, and Problems. Index.

  14. The determination of best values of the fundamental physical constants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barry N

    2005-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how a self-consistent set of 'best values' of the fundamental physical constants for use worldwide by all of science and technology is obtained from all of the relevant data available at a given point in time. The basis of the discussion is the 2002 Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) least-squares adjustment of the values of the constants, the most recent such study available, which was carried out under the auspices of the CODATA Task group on fundamental constants. A detailed description of the 2002 CODATA adjustment, which took into account all relevant data available by 31 December 2002, plus selected data that became available by Fall of 2003, may be found in the January 2005 issue of the Reviews of Modern Physics. Although the latter publication includes the full set of CODATA recommended values of the fundamental constants resulting from the 2002 adjustment, the set is also available electronically at http://physics.nist.gov/constants.

  15. NASA/JPL Plans for Fundamental Physics Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaelsson, Ulf E.; Lee, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, about 100 researchers met twice to develop plans for the future in this research area. The results of these meetings have been collected in a package titled "A Roadmap for Fundamental Physics in Space". A summary of the Roadmap will be presented along with an overview of the current program. Research is being performed in Low Temperature and Condensed Matter Physics, Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics, and Gravitational and Relativistic Physics. There are currently over 50 investigators in the program of which 8 are being evaluated as potential flight experiments. The number of investigators is expected to grow further during the next selection cycle, planned to start toward the end of this year. In the near future, our investigators will be able to take advantage of long duration experimentation in Space using a suite of different carriers under development.

  16. NASA/JPL Plans for Fundamental Physics Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaelsson, Ulf E.; Lee, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, about 100 researchers met twice to develop plans for the future in this research area. The results of these meetings have been collected in a package titled "A Roadmap for Fundamental Physics in Space". A summary of the Roadmap will be presented along with an overview of the current program. Research is being performed in Low Temperature and Condensed Matter Physics, Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics, and Gravitational and Relativistic Physics. There are currently over 50 investigators in the program of which 8 are being evaluated as potential flight experiments. The number of investigators is expected to grow further during the next selection cycle, planned to start toward the end of this year. In the near future, our investigators will be able to take advantage of long duration experimentation in Space using a suite of different carriers under development.

  17. Recent advances in medical physics.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A; Quick, Harald H

    2011-03-01

    Some of the major interests in medical physics over the last few years have concerned the technical advances in Computed Tomography and high field Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This review discusses the introduction of Dual Source CT and explains how it can not only offer faster data acquisition but also operate with lower radiation doses. This provides enormous benefits for all patients, but for cardiac and pediatric examinations in particular. The advances in MRI at 7 T esla are also impressive, with better signal to noise; cardiac and musculoskeletal applications are discussed; technical improvements are work-in-progress for other applications.

  18. Fundamental Physics from Observations of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, M. B.; Barstow, M. A.; Reindl, N.; Barrow, J. D.; Webb, J. K.; Hu, J.; Preval, S. P.; Holberg, J. B.; Nave, G.; Tchang-Brillet, L.; Ayres, T. R.

    2017-03-01

    Variation in fundamental constants provide an important test of theories of grand unification. Potentially, white dwarf spectra allow us to directly observe variation in fundamental constants at locations of high gravitational potential. We study hot, metal polluted white dwarf stars, combining far-UV spectroscopic observations, atomic physics, atmospheric modelling and fundamental physics, in the search for variation in the fine structure constant. This registers as small but measurable shifts in the observed wavelengths of highly ionized Fe and Ni lines when compared to laboratory wavelengths. Measurements of these shifts were performed by Berengut et al (2013) using high-resolution STIS spectra of G191-B2B, demonstrating the validity of the method. We have extended this work by; (a) using new (high precision) laboratory wavelengths, (b) refining the analysis methodology (incorporating robust techniques from previous studies towards quasars), and (c) enlarging the sample of white dwarf spectra. A successful detection would be the first direct measurement of a gravitational field effect on a bare constant of nature. We describe our approach and present preliminary results.

  19. The Planck Mission: Recent Results, Cosmological and Fundamental Physics Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Burigana, Carlo; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    We provide a description of the latest status and performance of the Planck satellite, focusing on the final predicted sensitivity of Planck. The optimization of the observational strategy for the additional surveys following the nominal 15 months of integration (about two surveys) originally allocated and the limitation represented by astrophysical foreground emissions are presented. An outline of early and intermediate astrophysical results from the Planck Collaboration is provided. A concise view of some fundamental cosmological results that will be achieved by exploiting Planck's full set of temperature and polarization data are presented. Finally, the perspectives opened by Planck in answering some key questions in fundamental physics, with particular attention to parity symmetry analyses, are described.

  20. The Multiverse--Emerging New View in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe has led to the dramatic new view that our universe may be one of the many universes in which low energy physical laws take different forms: the multiverse. I explain why/how this view is supported both observationally and theoretically, especially by string theory and eternal inflation. I then describe impacts this new view has on future observations and our fundamental understanding of spacetime and gravity. The topics discussed include an emerging new picture of general relativistic spacetime, especially the crucial role quantum mechanics plays at the largest distance scales, and possible signals of the multiverse in future cosmological observations.

  1. The Relation between Fundamental Constants and Particle Physics Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2017-01-01

    The observed constraints on the variability of the proton to electron mass ratio $\\mu$ and the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ are used to establish constraints on the variability of the Quantum Chromodynamic Scale and a combination of the Higgs Vacuum Expectation Value and the Yukawa couplings. Further model dependent assumptions provide constraints on the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa couplings separately. A primary conclusion is that limits on the variability of dimensionless fundamental constants such as $\\mu$ and $\\alpha$ provide important constraints on the parameter space of new physics and cosmologies.

  2. Advanced Computation in Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2001-10-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. This talk will review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically-confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop MPP's to produce 3-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for tens of thousands time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to stimulate improved cross-cutting collaborations with other fields and also to help attract

  3. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  4. BlackHoleCam: Fundamental physics of the galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddi, C.; Falcke, H.; Kramer, M.; Rezzolla, L.; Brinkerink, C.; Bronzwaer, T.; Davelaar, J. R. J.; Deane, R.; de Laurentis, M.; Desvignes, G.; Eatough, R. P.; Eisenhauer, F.; Fraga-Encinas, R.; Fromm, C. M.; Gillessen, S.; Grenzebach, A.; Issaoun, S.; Janßen, M.; Konoplya, R.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Laing, R.; Liu, K.; Lu, R.-S.; Mizuno, Y.; Moscibrodzka, M.; Müller, C.; Olivares, H.; Pfuhl, O.; Porth, O.; Roelofs, F.; Ros, E.; Schuster, K.; Tilanus, R.; Torne, P.; van Bemmel, I.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Wex, N.; Younsi, Z.; Zhidenko, A.

    fundamental BH parameters (mass, spin, and quadrupole moment) with sufficiently high precision to provide fundamental tests of GR (e.g. testing the no-hair theorem) and probe the spacetime around a BH in any metric theory of gravity. Here, we review our current knowledge of the physical properties of Sgr A* as well as the current status of such experimental efforts towards imaging the event horizon, measuring stellar orbits, and timing pulsars around Sgr A*. We conclude that the Galactic center provides a unique fundamental-physics laboratory for experimental tests of BH accretion and theories of gravity in their most extreme limits.

  5. Probes of Fundamental Physics using X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    The advent of X-ray polarimetry as an astronomical discipline is on the near horizon. Prospects of Explorer class missions currently under study in the NASA SMEX program, the Xipe mission under ESA study in Europe, and beyond to initiatives under development in Asia, indicate that the worldwide high energy astrophysics community view this as a high priority. The focal goal of X-ray polarization measurements is often to discern the geometry of a source, for example an accreting black hole, pulsing neutron star or a relativistic jet; these are addressed in other talks in this HEAD special session. In this talk, I discuss a parallel agenda, to employ X-ray polarimetry to glean insights into fundamental physics that is presently difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Much of this is centered around neutron stars, and I willaddress theoretically-expected signatures of vacuum birefringence and photon splitting, predictions of QED theory in the strong magnetic fields possessed by pulsars and magnetars. Of particular note is that time-dependent polarimetry coupled with spectroscopy can help disentangle purely geometrical effects and fundamental physics ones. A brief discussion of possible tests of Lorentz invariance violation, expected in some theories of quantum gravity, will also be presented. Instrument requirements to realize such science goals will also be briefly covered.

  6. Physical properties of organic and biomaterials: Fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Eden

    Silk materials are natural protein-based materials with an exceptional toughness. In addition to their toughness, silk materials also possess complex physical properties and functions resulting from a particular set of amino-acid arrangement that produces structures with crystalline beta-sheets connected by amorphous chains. Extensive studies have been performed to study their structure-function relationship leading to recent advancements in bio-integrated devices. Applications to fields other than textiles and biomedicine, however, have been scarce. In this dissertation, an investigation of the electronic properties, functionalization, and role of silk materials (spider silk and Bombyx mori cocoon silk) in the field of organic materials research is presented. The investigation is conducted from an experimental physics point of view where correlations with charge transport mechanisms in disordered, semiconducting, and insulating materials are made when appropriate. First, I present the electronic properties of spider silk fibers under ambient, humidified, iodized, polar solvent exposure, and pyrolized conditions. The conductivity is exponentially dependent on relative humidity changes and the solvent polarity. Iodine doping increases the conductivity only slightly but has pronounced effects on the pyrolization process, increasing the yield and flexibility of the pyrolized silk fibers. The iodized samples were further studied using magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealing non-homogenous iodine doping and I2 induced hydrogenation that are responsible for the minimal conductivity improvement and the pyrolization effects, respectively. Next, I present the investigation of silk fiber functionalization with gold and its role in electrical measurements. The gold functionalized silk fiber (Au-SS) is metallic down to cryogenic temperatures, has a certain amount of flexibility, and possesses

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    Professor Kenro Miyamoto, already well known for his textbook Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1976; revised edition 1989), has now published a new book entitled Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Iwanami Book Service Center, Tokyo, 1997). To a large extent, the new book is a somewhat shortened and well reorganized version of its predecessor. The style, concise and matter of fact, clearly shows the origin of the text in lectures given by the author to graduate students. As announced by the title, the book is divided into two parts: the first part (about 250 pages) is a general introduction to the physics of plasmas, while the second, somewhat shorter, part (about 150 pages), is devoted to a description of the most important experimental approaches to achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion. Even in the first part, moreover, the choice of subjects is consistently oriented towards the needs of fusion research. Thus, the introduction to the behaviour of charged particles (particle motion, collisions, etc.) and to the collective description of plasmas is quite short, although the reader will get a flavour of all the most important topics and will find a number of examples chosen for their relevance to fusion applications (only the presentation of the Vlasov equation, in the second section of Chapter 4, might be criticized as so concise as to be almost misleading, since the difference between microscopic and macroscopic fields is not even mentioned). Considerably more space is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of equilibrium and stability. This part includes the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for circular tokamaks, a brief discussion of Pfirsch-Schlüter, neoclassical and anomalous diffusion, and two relatively long chapters on the most important ideal and resistive MHD instabilities of toroidal plasmas; drift and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are also briefly presented. The

  8. ASP2012: Fundamental Physics and Accelerator Sciences in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darve, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Much remains to be done to improve education and scientific research in Africa. Supported by the international scientific community, our initiative has been to contribute to fostering science in sub-Saharan Africa by establishing a biennial school on fundamental subatomic physics and its applications. The school is based on a close interplay between theoretical, experimental, and applied physics. The lectures are addressed to students or young researchers with at least a background of 4 years of university formation. The aim of the school is to develop capacity, interpret, and capitalize on the results of current and future physics experiments with particle accelerators; thereby spreading education for innovation in related applications and technologies, such as medicine and information science. Following the worldwide success of the first school edition, which gathered 65 students for 3-week in Stellenbosch (South Africa) in August 2010, the second edition will be hosted in Ghana from July 15 to August 4, 2012. The school is a non-profit organization, which provides partial or full financial support to 50 of the selected students, with priority to Sub-Saharan African students.

  9. The physical salience of non-fundamental local beables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egg, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    I defend the idea that objects and events in three-dimensional space (so-called local beables) are part of the derivative ontology of quantum mechanics, rather than its fundamental ontology. The main objection to this idea stems from the question of how it can endow local beables with physical salience, as opposed to mere mathematical definability. I show that the responses to this objection in the previous literature are insufficient, and I provide the necessary arguments to render them successful. This includes demonstrating the legitimacy of dynamical considerations in the derivation of local beables and responding to the threat stemming from the availability of different sets of local beables in the context of the GRW theory.

  10. Summary remarks: Fundamental physics with the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Bruce

    2006-12-01

    This article is less a summary of the meeting, vibrant as it was, than a reflection on the present state of CMB studies. We are at an interesting juncture: in the week before the Irvine meeting, the rich results of the WMAP 3-year study were released, and the next goals in CMB studies have been examined in some detail by a recent multi-agency Task Force. I will look at the value of theory and phenomenology to the field, and the increasing importance of CMB studies to fundamental physics. Then I'll move to challenges facing us over the next decade or so. These include coping with foreground emission, polarized and unpolarized, and readjusting the sociology of our field as experiments grow more complex and costly.

  11. ESO Future Facilities to Probe Fundamental Physical Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Paolo; Liske, Jochen

    Following HARPS, two ESO projects are aimed at the ambitious goal of trying to reach the highest possible precision in measuring the radial velocity of astronomical sources. ESPRESSO spectrograph, located at the incoherent combined 4VLT focus, but able to work either with one or all VLT units, and CODEX for E-ELT will mark ESO roadmap towards the cm s - 1level of precision and possibly to an unlimited temporal baseline. By providing photon noise limited measures their promise is to improve the present limits in the variability of fundamental physical constants by one and two orders of magnitude, respectively, thus allowing for instance to verify the claim discussed at this conference by John Webb of a possible spatial dipole in the variation of the fine structure constant.

  12. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xingshu; Sun, Yubo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Bermel, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

  13. Review of fundamental physics results with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes are powerful tools for the exploration of the Physics frontiers, addressing topics such as the nature of dark matter and its distribution in the Universe, or the search for quantum gravitational effects in photon propagation. Since the beginning of operations in 2004, MAGIC has studied these questions thanks to hundreds of hours of observations of different targets, and has produced several high-impact results. Those include, significantly, the most constraining limits to the WIMP annihilation cross-section for particle masses above few hundred GeV, from observations of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies. More recently, we have completed a combined analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations of dSphs, obtaining limits for dark matter particle masses between 10 GeV and 100 TeV - the widest mass range ever explored by a single gamma-ray analysis - and improving the previously published Fermi-LAT and MAGIC results by up to a factor of two at certain masses. In this talk, I present an overview of the status and results of MAGIC Fundamental Physics projects, including our latest results concerning searches for Lorentz Invariance violation (LIV), and dark matter searches. I will propose the use of the framework developed for the MAGIC/Fermi-LAT joint analysis for the combination of results from the current generation of gamma-ray and neutrino detectors.

  14. H line; a beam line for fundamental physics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Naritoshi; Toyoda, Akihisa; Aoki, Masaharu; Shimomura, Koichiro; Mibe, Tsutomu; Nakatsugawa, Yohei; Otani, Masashi; Saito, Naohito; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-01

    The muon facility, J-PARC (Muon Science Establishment; MUSE), has been operating since the first beam in 2008. Starting with a 200 kW proton beam, a beam intensity of 3 × 106 muons/s was reached in 2009 which was the most intense pulsed muon beam in the world. From the 2 cm thick graphite target, four secondary muon beam lines are designed to be extracted. Three beam lines currently exist, the first being operational and the other two undergoing commissioning. The fourth and the last beam line, the H line, is planned to be constructed. This new beam line is designed to have a large acceptance, provides the ability to tune the momentum, and use a kicker magnet and/or a Wien filter. The H line is designed to provide an intense beam of 108 surface muons/s for fundamental physics studies to observe new physics beyond the standard model. Such studies require high statistics and they need to occupy the experimental areas for a relatively long period.

  15. Understanding Femtosecond-Pulse Laser Damage through Fundamental Physics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A., III

    It did not take long after the invention of the laser for the field of laser damage to appear. For several decades researchers have been studying how lasers damage materials, both for the basic scientific understanding of highly nonequilibrium processes as well as for industrial applications. Femtosecond pulse lasers create little collateral damage and a readily reproducible damage pattern. They are easily tailored to desired specifications and are particularly powerful and versatile tools, contributing even more industrial interest in the field. As with most long-standing fields of research, many theoretical tools have been developed to model the laser damage process, covering a wide range of complexities and regimes of applicability. However, most of the modeling methods developed are either too limited in spatial extent to model the full morphology of the damage crater, or incorporate only a small subset of the important physics and require numerous fitting parameters and assumptions in order to match values interpolated from experimental data. Demonstrated in this work is the first simulation method capable of fundamentally modeling the full laser damage process, from the laser interaction all the way through to the resolidification of the target, on a large enough scale that can capture the full morphology of the laser damage crater so as to be compared directly to experimental measurements instead of extrapolated values, and all without any fitting parameters. The design, implementation, and testing of this simulation technique, based on a modified version of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, is presented. For a 60 fs, 1 mum wavelength laser pulse with fluences of 0.5 J/cm 2, 1.0 J/cm2, and 2.0 J/cm2 the resulting laser damage craters in copper are shown and, using the same technique applied to experimental crater morphologies, a laser damage fluence threshold is calculated of 0.15 J/cm2, consistent with current experiments performed under conditions similar

  16. Inerton fields: very new ideas on fundamental physics

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr

    2010-12-22

    Modern theories of everything, or theories of the grand unification of all physical interactions, try to describe the whole world starting from the first principles of quantum theory. However, the first principles operate with undetermined notions, such as the wave {psi}-function, particle, lepton and quark, de Broglie and Compton wavelengths, mass, electric charge, spin, electromagnetic field, photon, gravitation, physical vacuum, space, etc. From a logical point of view this means that such modern approach to the theory of everything is condemned to failure... Thus, what should we suggest to improve the situation? It seems quite reasonable to develop initially a theory of something, which will be able to clarify the major fundamental notions (listed above) that physics operates with every day. What would be a starting point in such approach? Of course a theory of space as such, because particles and all physical fields emerge just from space. After that, when a particle and fields (and hence the fields' carriers) are well defined and introduced in the well defined physical space, different kinds of interactions can be proposed and investigated. Moreover, we must also allow for a possible interaction of a created particle with the space that generated the appearance of the particle. The mathematical studies of Michel Bounias and the author have shown what the real physical space is, how the space is constituted, how it is arranged and what its elements are. Having constructed the real physical space we can then derive whatever we wish, in particular, such basic notions as mass, particle and charge. How are mechanics of such objects (a massive particle, a charged massive particle) organised? The appropriate theory of motion has been called a sub microscopic mechanics of particles, which is developed in the real physical space, not an abstract phase space, as conventional quantum mechanics does. A series of questions arise: can these two mechanics (submicroscopic

  17. The Physics of Ultrabroadband Frequency Comb Generation and Optimized Combs for Measurements in Fundamental Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-02

    understand this physically , it is instructive to compare the coherence time of the seed with the pump pulse duration. For an ASE seed with bandwidthΔλ, we...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0016 The physics of ultrabroadband frequency comb generation and optimized combs for measurements in fundamental physics John...DD-MM-YYYY)   02-07-2016 2. REPORT TYPE  Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To)  01 Feb 2013 to 31 Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The physics of

  18. Physics of Compact Advanced Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Zarnstorff; L.A. Berry; A. Brooks; E. Fredrickson; G.-Y. Fu; S. Hirshman; S. Hudson; L.-P. Ku; E. Lazarus; D. Mikkelsen; D. Monticello; G.H. Neilson; N. Pomphrey; A. Reiman; D. Spong; D. Strickler; A. Boozer; W.A. Cooper; R. Goldston; R. Hatcher; M. Isaev; C. Kessel; J. Lewandowski; J. Lyon; P. Merkel; H. Mynick; B.E. Nelson; C. Nuehrenberg; M. Redi; W. Reiersen; P. Rutherford; R. Sanchez; J. Schmidt; R.B. White

    2001-08-14

    Compact optimized stellarators offer novel solutions for confining high-beta plasmas and developing magnetic confinement fusion. The 3-D plasma shape can be designed to enhance the MHD stability without feedback or nearby conducting structures and provide drift-orbit confinement similar to tokamaks. These configurations offer the possibility of combining the steady-state low-recirculating power, external control, and disruption resilience of previous stellarators with the low-aspect ratio, high beta-limit, and good confinement of advanced tokamaks. Quasi-axisymmetric equilibria have been developed for the proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) with average aspect ratio 4-4.4 and average elongation of approximately 1.8. Even with bootstrap-current consistent profiles, they are passively stable to the ballooning, kink, vertical, Mercier, and neoclassical-tearing modes for beta > 4%, without the need for external feedback or conducting walls. The bootstrap current generates only 1/4 of the magnetic rotational transform at beta = 4% (the rest is from the coils), thus the equilibrium is much less nonlinear and is more controllable than similar advanced tokamaks. The enhanced stability is a result of ''reversed'' global shear, the spatial distribution of local shear, and the large fraction of externally generated transform. Transport simulations show adequate fast-ion confinement and thermal neoclassical transport similar to equivalent tokamaks. Modular coils have been designed which reproduce the physics properties, provide good flux surfaces, and allow flexible variation of the plasma shape to control the predicted MHD stability and transport properties.

  19. 21 cm radiation: A new probe of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-11-01

    New low frequency radio telescopes currently being built open up the possibility of observing the 21 cm radiation from redshifts 200 > z > 30, also known as the dark ages, see Furlanetto, Oh, & Briggs(2006) for a review. At these high redshifts, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is absorbed by neutral hydrogen at its 21 cm hyperfine transition. This redshifted 21 cm signal thus carries information about the state of the early Universe and can be used to test fundamental physics. The 21 cm radiation probes a volume of the early Universe on kpc scales in contrast with CMB which probes a surface (of some finite thickness) on Mpc scales. Thus there is many orders of more information available, in principle, from the 21 cm observations of dark ages. We have studied the constraints these observations can put on the variation of fundamental constants (Khatri & Wandelt(2007)). Since the 21 cm signal depends on atomic physics it is very sensitive to the variations in the fine structure constant and can place constraints comparable to or better than the other astrophysical experiments (Δα/α= < 10-5) as shown in Figure 1. Making such observations will require radio telescopes of collecting area 10 - 106 km2 compared to ~ 1 km2 of current telescopes, for example LOFAR. We should also expect similar sensitivity to the electron to proton mass ratio. One of the challenges in observing this 21 cm cosmological signal is the presence of the synchrotron foregrounds which is many orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal but the two can be separated because of their different statistical nature (Zaldarriaga, Furlanetto, & Hernquist(2004)). Terrestrial EM interference from radio/TV etc. and Earth's ionosphere poses problems for telescopes on ground which may be solved by going to the Moon and there are proposals for doing so, one of which is the Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI). In conclusion 21 cm cosmology promises a large wealth of data and provides

  20. Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with the Euclid Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Luca; Appleby, Stephen; Bacon, David; Baker, Tessa; Baldi, Marco; Bartolo, Nicola; Blanchard, Alain; Bonvin, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Branchini, Enzo; Burrage, Clare; Camera, Stefano; Carbone, Carmelita; Casarini, Luciano; Cropper, Mark; de Rham, Claudia; Di Porto, Cinzia; Ealet, Anne; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Finelli, Fabio; García-Bellido, Juan; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Guzzo, Luigi; Heavens, Alan; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Hollenstein, Lukas; Holmes, Rory; Horst, Ole; Jahnke, Knud; Kitching, Thomas D.; Koivisto, Tomi; Kunz, Martin; La Vacca, Giuseppe; March, Marisa; Majerotto, Elisabetta; Markovic, Katarina; Marsh, David; Marulli, Federico; Massey, Richard; Mellier, Yannick; Mota, David F.; Nunes, Nelson J.; Percival, Will; Pettorino, Valeria; Porciani, Cristiano; Quercellini, Claudia; Read, Justin; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Sapone, Domenico; Scaramella, Roberto; Skordis, Constantinos; Simpson, Fergus; Taylor, Andy; Thomas, Shaun; Trotta, Roberto; Verde, Licia; Vernizzi, Filippo; Vollmer, Adrian; Wang, Yun; Weller, Jochen; Zlosnik, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Euclid is a European Space Agency medium-class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and red-shifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid’s Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.

  1. Wireless avionics for space applications of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linna; Zeng, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental physics (FP) research in space relies on a strong support of spacecraft. New types of spacecraft including reusable launch vehicles, reentry space vehicles, long-term on-orbit spacecraft or other new type of spacecraft will pave the way for FP missions. In order to test FP theories in space, flight conditions have to be controlled to a very high precision, data collection and handling abilities have to be improved, real-time and reliable communications in critical environments are needed. These challenge the existing avionics of spacecraft. Avionics consists of guidance, navigation & control, TT&C, the vehicle management, etc. Wireless avionics is one of the enabling technologies to address the challenges. Reasons are expatiated of why it is of great advantage. This paper analyses the demands for wireless avionics by reviewing the FP missions and on-board wireless systems worldwide. Main types of wireless communication are presented. Preliminary system structure of wireless avionics are given. The characteristics of wireless network protocols and wireless sensors are introduced. Key technologies and design considerations for wireless avionics in space applications are discussed.

  2. A Postulation of a Concept in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-10-01

    I am postulating that all fermions have a quantum mouth (Planck size) that radiates a flux density of gravitons as a function of the mass of the particle. Nucleons are not hard balls like light bulbs radiating photons challenging Newtonian concepts of centers and surfaces. The hardball analogy is implicit in coupling constants that compare strong force relative to gravity. The radiating mouth is not localized at the center like a hypothetical point size filament of a light bulb with a hard surface. A point invokes mass of zero volume. It is too precise, inconsistent and illogical. Nothing can be localized with more accuracy that Planck length. Substituting the hard glass bulb surface with flexible plastic surface would clearly make the interacting mouths of particles approach each other as close as possible, but no less than the quantum limit of Planck length. Therefore, surface distance in Newtonian gravity would be a close approximation at particle scale and fits Feynman's road map [1]. My postulation reflected by Fig. 2 of gr-qc/0507130 explains observations of increasing values of coupling constants resulting from decreasing values of Planck length (See physics/0210040 v1). Since Planck length is the fundamental unit of length of nature, its variation can impact our observation of the universe and the evolutionary process.

  3. Parachute systems technology: Fundamentals, concepts, and applications: Advanced parachute design

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.; Johnson, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in high-performance parachute systems and the technologies needed to design them are presented in this paper. New parachute design and performance prediction codes are being developed to assist the designer in meeting parachute system performance requirements after a minimum number of flight tests. The status of advanced design codes under development at Sandia National Laboratories is summarized. An integral part of parachute performance prediction is the rational use of existing test data. The development of a data base for parachute design has been initiated to illustrate the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. Examples of advancements in parachute materials are presented, and recent problems with Mil-Spec broadgoods are reviewed. Finally, recent parachute systems tested at Sandia are summarized to illustrate new uses of old parachutes, new parachute configurations, and underwater recovery of payloads.

  4. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 4 (Chapters 34-38)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-04-01

    of Time. 37-6 The Relativity of Length. 37-7 The Lorentz Transformation. 37-8 Some Consequences of the Lorentz Equations. 37-9 The Relativity of Velocities. 37-10 Doppler Effect for Light. 37-11 A New Look at Momentum. 37-12 A New Look at Energy. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Appendices. A The International System of Units (SI). B Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. C Some Astronomical Data. D Conversion Factors. E Mathematical Formulas. F Properties of the Elements. G Periodic Table of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  5. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    . 10-8 Torque. 10-9 Newton's Second Law for Rotation. 10-10 Work and Rotational Kinetic Energy. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 11.Rolling, Torque, and Angular Momentum. When a jet-powered car became supersonic in setting the land-speed record, what was the danger to the wheels? 11-1 What Is Physics? 11-2 Rolling as Translation and Rotation Combined. 11-3 The Kinetic Energy of Rolling. 11-4 The Forces of Rolling. 11-5 The Yo-Yo. 11-6 Torque Revisited. 11-7 Angular Momentum. 11-8 Newton's Second Law in Angular Form. 11-9 The Angular Momentum of a System of Particles. 11-10 The Angular Momentum of a Rigid Body Rotating About a Fixed Axis. 11-11 Conservation of Angular Momentum. 11-12 Precession of a Gyroscope. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Appendix A: The International System of Units (SI). Appendix B: Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. Appendix C: Some Astronomical Data. Appendix D: Conversion Factors. Appendix E: Mathematical Formulas. Appendix F: Properties of the Elements. Appendix G: Periodic Table of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  6. Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion Physics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; March, Paul; Williams, Nehemiah; ONeill, William

    2011-01-01

    NASA/JSC is implementing an advanced propulsion physics laboratory, informally known as "Eagleworks", to pursue propulsion technologies necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system over the next 50 years, and enabling interstellar spaceflight by the end of the century. This work directly supports the "Breakthrough Propulsion" objectives detailed in the NASA OCT TA02 In-space Propulsion Roadmap, and aligns with the #10 Top Technical Challenge identified in the report. Since the work being pursued by this laboratory is applied scientific research in the areas of the quantum vacuum, gravitation, nature of space-time, and other fundamental physical phenomenon, high fidelity testing facilities are needed. The lab will first implement a low-thrust torsion pendulum (<1 uN), and commission the facility with an existing Quantum Vacuum Plasma Thruster. To date, the QVPT line of research has produced data suggesting very high specific impulse coupled with high specific force. If the physics and engineering models can be explored and understood in the lab to allow scaling to power levels pertinent for human spaceflight, 400kW SEP human missions to Mars may become a possibility, and at power levels of 2MW, 1-year transit to Neptune may also be possible. Additionally, the lab is implementing a warp field interferometer that will be able to measure spacetime disturbances down to 150nm. Recent work published by White [1] [2] [3] suggests that it may be possible to engineer spacetime creating conditions similar to what drives the expansion of the cosmos. Although the expected magnitude of the effect would be tiny, it may be a "Chicago pile" moment for this area of physics.

  7. Development of Junior High School Students' Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity in a Naturalistic Physical Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaja, Sami Pekka; Jaakkola, Timo Tapio; Liukkonen, Jarmo Olavi; Digelidis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is evidence showing that fundamental movement skills and physical activity are related with each other. The ability to perform a variety of fundamental movement skills increases the likelihood of children participating in different physical activities throughout their lives. However, no fundamental movement skill interventions…

  8. Development of Junior High School Students' Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity in a Naturalistic Physical Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaja, Sami Pekka; Jaakkola, Timo Tapio; Liukkonen, Jarmo Olavi; Digelidis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is evidence showing that fundamental movement skills and physical activity are related with each other. The ability to perform a variety of fundamental movement skills increases the likelihood of children participating in different physical activities throughout their lives. However, no fundamental movement skill interventions…

  9. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 2 (Chapters 12-20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Engines. 20-8 A Statistical View of Entropy. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Appendices. A The International System of Units (SI). B Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. C Some Astronomical Data. D Conversion Factors. E Mathematical Formulas. F Properties of the Elements. G Periodic Table of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  10. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    steam inside a railroad tank car cause the car to be crushed? 19-1 What Is Physics? 19-2 Avogadro's Number. 19-3 Ideal Gases. 19-4 Pressure, Temperature, and RMS Speed. 19-5 Translational Kinetic Energy. 19-6 Mean Free Path. 19-7 The Distribution of Molecular Speeds. 19-8 The Molar Speci.c Heats of an Ideal Gas. 19-9 Degrees of Freedom and Molar Speci.c Heats. 19-10 A Hint of Quantum Theory. 19-11 The Adiabatic Expansion of an Ideal Gas. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 20. Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Why is the popping of popcorn irreversible? 20-1 What Is Physics? 20-2 Irreversible Processes and Entropy. 20-3 Change in Entropy. 20-4 The Second Law of Thermodynamics. 20-5 Entropy in the Real World: Engines. 20-6 Entropy in the Real World: Refrigerators. 20-7 The Ef.ciencies of Real Engines. 20-8 A Statistical View of Entropy. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Appendices. A The International System of Units (SI). B Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. C Some Astronomical Data. D Conversion Factors. E Mathematical Formulas. F Properties of the Elements. G Periodic Table of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  11. Astrometric Gravitation Probe: a space mission concept for fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Fienga, Agnes; Gai, Mario; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Riva, Alberto; Busonero, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    Modern technological developments have pushed the accuracy of astrometric measurements in the visible band down to the micro-arcsec level. This allows to test theories of gravity in the weak field limit to unprecedented level, with possible consequences spanning from the validity of fundamental physics principles, to tests of theories describing cosmological and galactic dynamics without resorting to Dark Matter and Dark Energy.This is the main goal of Astrometric Gravitation Probe (AGP) mission, which will be achieved by highly accurate astrometric determination of light deflection (as a modern rendition of the Dyson, Eddington, and Robertson eclipse experiment of 1919), aberration, and of the orbits of selected Solar System objects, with specific reference to the excess shift of the pericentre effect.The AGP concept was recently proposed for the recent call for ESA M4 missions as a collaboration among several scientists coming from many different European and US institutions. Its payload is based on a 1.15 m diameter telescope fed through a coronagraphic system by four fields, two set in symmetric positions around the Sun, and two in the opposite direction, all imaged on a CCD detector. Large parts of the instrument are common mode to all fields. The baseline operation mode is the scan of the ±1.13 deg Ecliptic strip, repeated for a minimum of 3 years and up to an optimal duration of 5 years. Operations and calibrations are simultaneous, defined in order to ensure common mode instrumental effects, identified and removed in data reduction. The astrometric and coronagraphic technologies build on the heritage of Gaia and Solar Orbiter.We review the mission concept and its science case, and discuss how this measurement concepts can be scaled to different mission implementations.

  12. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 3 (Chapters 22-33)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-03-01

    magnetic .eld used in an MRI scan cause a patient to be burned? 30-1 What Is Physics? 30-2 Two Experiments. 30-3 Faraday's Law of Induction. 30-4 Lenz's Law. 30-5 Induction and Energy Transfers. 30-6 Induced Electric Fields. 30-7 Inductors and Inductance. 30-8 Self-Induction. 30-9 RL Circuits. 30-10 Energy Stored in a Magnetic Field. 30-11 Energy Density of a Magnetic Field. 30-12 Mutual Induction. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 31. Electromagnetic Oscillations and Alternating Current. How did a solar eruption knock out the power-grid system of Quebec? 31-1 What Is Physics? 31-2 LC Oscillations, Qualitatively. 31-3 The Electrical-Mechanical Analogy. 31-4 LC Oscillations, Quantitatively. 31-5 Damped Oscillations in an RLC Circuit. 31-6 Alternating Current. 31-7 Forced Oscillations. 31-8 Three Simple Circuits. 31-9 The Series RLC Circuit. 31-10 Power in Alternating-Current Circuits. 31-11 Transformers. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 32. Maxwell's Equations; Magnetism of Matter. How can a mural painting record the direction of Earth's magnetic field? 32-1 What Is Physics? 32-2 Gauss' Law for Magnetic Fields. 32-3 Induced Magnetic Fields. 32-4 Displacement Current. 32-5 Maxwell's Equations. 32-6 Magnets. 32-7 Magnetism and Electrons. 32-8 Magnetic Materials. 32-9 Diamagnetism. 32-10 Paramagnetism. 32-11 Ferromagnetism. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Appendices. A. The International System of Units (SI). B. Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. C. Some Astronomical Data. D. Conversion Factors. E. Mathematical Formulas. F. Properties of the Elements. G. Periodic Table of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  13. Physics and Advanced Technologies 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R

    2002-05-09

    include: (1) Leadership of the Laboratory's Physical Data Research Program that provides fundamental physics information for the Stockpile Stewardship Program. (2) Development of the handheld Microbead Immunoassay Dipstick System that will allow relatively untrained first-responders to run sophisticated onsite diagnostics for pathogens, including those associated with biowarfare agents, by using a simple, one-step measurement. (3) Major advances in target design for inertial fusion energy research using both laser and ion-beam drivers. (4) Development of the Advanced Technology Kill Vehicle concept for use as a high-performance interceptor in a broad range of missile defense programs. Over the course of the past decade, the Laboratory has seen its major program evolve from weapons research, development, and testing, to Stockpile Stewardship. Today, the country's national security priorities are changing rapidly: nuclear security is becoming a broader set of missions, and the Laboratory is being asked to contribute to a range of new mission areas from countering bioterrorism to ensuring information security. As we embark on the twenty-first century, the new PAT Directorate is poised to help lead the Laboratory's response to the country's changing national security needs.

  14. Advanced materials for magnetic cooling: Fundamentals and practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balli, M.; Jandl, S.; Fournier, P.; Kedous-Lebouc, A.

    2017-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the research activities on magnetocalorics have been exponentially increased, leading to the discovery of a wide category of materials including intermetallics and oxides. Even though the reported materials were found to show excellent magnetocaloric properties on a laboratory scale, only a restricted family among them could be upscaled toward industrial levels and implemented as refrigerants in magnetic cooling devices. On the other hand, in the most of the reported reviews, the magnetocaloric materials are usually discussed in terms of their adiabatic temperature and entropy changes (ΔTad and ΔS), which is not enough to get more insight about their large scale applicability. In this review, not only the fundamental properties of the recently reported magnetocaloric materials but also their thermodynamic performance in functional devices are discussed. The reviewed families particularly include Gd1-xRx alloys, LaFe13-xSix, MnFeP1-xAsx, and R1-xAxMnO3 (R = lanthanide and A = divalent alkaline earth)-based compounds. Other relevant practical aspects such as mechanical stability, synthesis, and corrosion issues are discussed. In addition, the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters that play a crucial role in the control of magnetic and magnetocaloric properties are regarded. In order to reproduce the needed magnetocaloric parameters, some practical models are proposed. Finally, the concepts of the rotating magnetocaloric effect and multilayered magnetocalorics are introduced.

  15. Fundamental Advances in Inverse Mechanics Towards Self-Aware and Intrinsically Adaptable Structural Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-30

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0007 FUNDAMENTAL ADVANCES IN INVERSE MECHANICS TOWARDS SELF-AWARE JOHN BRIGHAM UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Final Report 12/04/2014...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fundamental Advances in Inverse Mechanics Towards Self-Aware and Intrinsically Adaptable Structural Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...methods for solving inverse problems related to smart morphable structures that can evaluate their current environment and then adapt accordingly to

  16. Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz Vacuum Electronic Radiation Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-10

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0359 Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz John Booske UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM...12-2014 Final Technical Performance Report October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2014 Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and...based upon the perovskite structure that have potential to provide superior high power microwave (vacuum electronic) device cathodes (thermionic or

  17. Use of international space station for fundamental physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U.; Lee, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's research plans aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are discussed. Experiments in low temperature physics and atomic physics are planned to commence in late 2005. Experiments in gravitational physics are planned to begin in 2007. A low temperature microgravity physics facility is under development for the low temperature and gravitation experiments.

  18. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  19. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  20. Fundamental studies of structure borne noise for advanced turboprop applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.; Koval, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission of sound generated by wing-mounted, advanced turboprop engines into the cabin interior via structural paths is considered. The structural model employed is a beam representation of the wing box carried into the fuselage via a representative frame type of carry through structure. The structure for the cabin cavity is a stiffened shell of rectangular or cylindrical geometry. The structure is modelled using a finite element formulation and the acoustic cavity is modelled using an analytical representation appropriate for the geometry. The structural and acoustic models are coupled by the use of hard wall cavity modes for the interior and vacuum structural modes for the shell. The coupling is accomplished using a combination of analytical and finite element models. The advantage is the substantial reduction in dimensionality achieved by modelling the interior analytically. The mathematical model for the interior noise problem is demonstrated with a simple plate/cavity system which has all of the features of the fuselage interior noise problem.

  1. Handbook explaining the fundamentals of nuclear and atomic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanlen, D. F.; Morse, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    Indoctrination document presents nuclear, reactor, and atomic physics in an easy, straightforward manner. The entire subject of nuclear physics including atomic structure ionization, isotopes, radioactivity, and reactor dynamics is discussed.

  2. Recent advances in track physics

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V. . Dept. of Physics); Starace, A.F. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains the texts of the 17 invited papers presented at the Track Physics Conference held on the campus of the University of Nebraska, in Lincoln, during 18--20 October 1988. The conference brought together researchers from throughout the world who specialize in the study of the structure of particle tracks and its influence upon atomic physics, particle detection, radiation chemistry and radiobiology. Each paper is indexed separately on the energy data base.

  3. Advancements in Solar Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino; Antonelli, Vito

    2013-03-01

    We review the results of solar neutrino physics, with particular attention to the data obtained and the analyses performed in the last decades, which were determinant to solve the solar neutrino problem (SNP), proving that neutrinos are massive and oscillating particles and contributing to refine the solar models. We also discuss the perspectives of the presently running experiments in this sector and of the ones planned for the near future and the impact they can have on elementary particle physics and astrophysics.

  4. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  5. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  6. Physics in advanced GNVQ Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, D.

    1995-07-01

    GNVQ Science is a vocational qualification for students in England, with a demand equivalent to traditional GCE A-levels. This article looks at the approach adopted by GNVQ to physics, and discusses the way in which appropriate teaching resources have been developed by the Nuffield Science in Practice project.

  7. Fundamental movement skills and motivational factors influencing engagement in physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kalaja, Sami; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Watt, Anthony

    2010-08-01

    To assess whether subgroups based on children's fundamental movement skills, perceived competence, and self-determined motivation toward physical education vary with current self-reported physical activity, a sample of 316 Finnish Grade 7 students completed fundamental movement skills measures and self-report questionnaires assessing perceived competence, self-determined motivation toward physical education, and current physical activity. Cluster analysis indicated a three-cluster structure: "Low motivation/low skills profile," "High skills/low motivation profile," and "High skills/high motivation profile." Analysis of variance indicated that students in the third cluster engaged in significantly more physical activity than students of clusters one and two. These results provide support for previous claims regarding the importance of the relationship of fundamental movement skills with continuing engagement in physical activity. High fundamental movement skills, however, may represent only one element in maintaining adolescents' engagement in physical activity.

  8. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  9. The Belle II experiment: fundamental physics at the flavor frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia de la Cruz, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    After the major success of B-factories to establish the CKM mechanism and its proven potential to search for new physics, the Belle II experiment will continue exploring the physics at the flavor frontier over the next years. Belle II will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor, Belle, and allow for various precision measurements and searches of rare decays and particles. This paper introduces the B-factory concept and the flavor frontier approach to search for new physics. It then describes the SuperKEKB accelerator and the Belle II detector, as well as some of the physics that will be analyzed in Belle II, concluding with the experiment status and schedule.

  10. CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants: 2014*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Newell, David B.; Taylor, Barry N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper gives the 2014 self-consistent set of values of the constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA). These values are based on a least-squares adjustment that takes into account all data available up to 31 December 2014. Details of the data selection and methodology of the adjustment are described. The recommended values may also be found at physics.nist.gov/constants.

  11. CODATA Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants: 2014*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Newell, David B.; Taylor, Barry N.

    2016-12-01

    This paper gives the 2014 self-consistent set of values of the constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA). These values are based on a least-squares adjustment that takes into account all data available up to 31 December 2014. Details of the data selection and methodology of the adjustment are described. The recommended values may also be found at http://physics.nist.gov/constants.

  12. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  13. Redefinition of SI Units Based on Fundamental Physical Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenichi

    The definitions of some units of the International System are likely to be revised as early as 2011 by basing them on fixed values of fundamental constants of nature, provided experimental realizations are demonstrated with sufficiently small uncertainties. As regards the kilogram, experiments aiming at linking it to the Avogadro constant and the Planck constant are under way in several laboratories. Details are given on the experimental techniques developed to achieve the target. The other units likely to be redefined are the ampere, the kelvin and the mole. Advantages and disadvantages of different alternatives for revised definitions are discussed.

  14. The physical fundamental plane of black hole activity: revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Han, Zhenhua; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the jet power and accretion disk luminosity is investigated for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) from the literature. The power-law correlation index is steep (μ˜1.0 -1.4) for radio loud quasars and the `outliers' of BHXBs, and it is flatter (μ˜ 0.3 -0.6) for radio loud galaxies and the standard BHXBs. The steep-index groups are mostly at higher accretion rates (peaked at Eddington ratio > 0.01) and the flatter-index groups are at relatively low accretion rates (peaked at Eddington ratio < 0.01), implying that the former groups could be dominated by the inner disk accretion of black hole, while the jet in latter groups would be a hybrid production of the accretion and black hole spin. We could still have a fundamental plane of black hole activity for the BHXBs and AGNs with diverse (maybe two kinds of) correlation indices. It is noted that the fundamental plane of black hole activity should be referred to the correlation between the jet power and disk luminosity or equivalently to the correlation between jet power, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, rather than the jet power, disk luminosity and black hole mass.

  15. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  16. Fundamental Physics Changes in Response to Evolving NASA Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    Change continues in the NASA environment. The need for access to space for physicists is growing if we are to fruitfully address today s challenging questions. A new Roadmap is required to demonstrate the importance of our program to stakeholders. Our investigators must continue to advocate the benefits of our program: a) To NASA and Congress; b) To the scientific community; c) To students; d) To the general public. Our investigators must seek ways to use their advanced technology to support a human presence in space and to develop improved Earth applications.

  17. Fundamental Physics Changes in Response to Evolving NASA Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    To continue growing as a discipline, we need to establish a new vision of where we are going that is consistent with today s physics, NASA s strategic plan, and the new OBPR direction. 1998 Roadmap focused exclusively on Physics, and did not worry about boundaries between OBPR and OSS. Updated Roadmap: Must incorporate some strategic research activities to be fully responsive to the current OBPR direction. Must capture the imagination of OBPR leadership, OMB, and Congress. Must delineate OBPR from the "beyond Einstein" program in OSS. Must address relevancy to Society explicitly. Status of the Roadmap development will be discussed after lunch today. Seeking community inputs and endorsement. Draft update targeted for June, final in August.

  18. Fundamental movement skills and physical fitness as predictors of physical activity: A 6-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, T; Yli-Piipari, S; Huotari, P; Watt, A; Liukkonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which fundamental movement skills and physical fitness scores assessed in early adolescence predict self-reported physical activity assessed 6 years later. The sample comprised 333 (200 girls, 133 boys; M age = 12.41) students. The effects of previous physical activity, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were controlled in the main analyses. Adolescents' fundamental movement skills, physical fitness, self-report physical activity, and BMI were collected at baseline, and their self-report energy expenditure (metabolic equivalents: METs) and intensity of physical activity were collected using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire 6 years later. Results showed that fundamental movement skills predicted METs, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity physical activity levels, whereas fitness predicted METs, moderate, and vigorous physical activity levels. Hierarchical regression analyses also showed that after controlling for previous levels of physical activity, sex, and BMI, the size of the effect of fundamental movement skills and physical fitness on energy expenditure and physical activity intensity was moderate (R(2) change between 0.06 and 0.15), with the effect being stronger for high intensity physical activity.

  19. Measurements of Fundamental Fluid Physics of SNF Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Condie, Keith Glenn; Mc Creery, Glenn Ernest; McEligot, Donald Marinus

    2001-09-01

    With the University of Idaho, Ohio State University and Clarksean Associates, this research program has the long-term goal to develop reliable predictive techniques for the energy, mass and momentum transfer plus chemical reactions in drying / passivation (surface oxidation) operations in the transfer and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from wet to dry storage. Such techniques are needed to assist in design of future transfer and storage systems, prediction of the performance of existing and proposed systems and safety (re)evaluation of systems as necessary at later dates. Many fuel element geometries and configurations are accommodated in the storage of spent nuclear fuel. Consequently, there is no one generic fuel element / assembly, storage basket or canister and, therefore, no single generic fuel storage configuration. One can, however, identify generic flow phenomena or processes which may be present during drying or passivation in SNF canisters. The objective of the INEEL tasks was to obtain fundamental measurements of these flow processes in appropriate parameter ranges.

  20. Advanced Propulsion Physics Lab: Eagleworks Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scogin, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Eagleworks Laboratory is an advanced propulsions physics laboratory with two primary investigations currently underway. The first is a Quantum Vacuum Plasma Thruster (QVPT or Q-thrusters), an advanced electric propulsion technology in the development and demonstration phase. The second investigation is in Warp Field Interferometry (WFI). This is an investigation of Dr. Harold "Sonny" White's theoretical physics models for warp field equations using optical experiments in the Electro Optical laboratory (EOL) at Johnson Space Center. These investigations are pursuing technology necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system and beyond.

  1. Extensions of Fundamental Flow Physics to Practical MAV Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    Model of Vortex Physics 1-7 1.4.1 Non- Circulatory and Circulatory Force Contributions 1-7 1.4.2 Analytical Derivations for the Surging Plate 1-11...LEV) and Trailing Edge Vortex 1-10 (TEV) with Respect to the Plate, with Coordinate System with Origin at the Plate’s Leading Edge Figure 1-8...translation. Pitching causes a large force transient, both in rotation and translation, relative to surging. Non- circulatory or apparent-mass effects were

  2. X-ray Polarimetry. A tool for Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    X-ray Polarimetry is a window about to be disclosed in Astrophysics. From an extended literature, we expect a significant step forward in the understanding of astrophysical systems emitting X-rays. This includes the study of physics in extreme conditions and, in particular, of General Relativity and Quantum Electrodynamics in extreme conditions. An even more ambitious target could be the search for effects of propagation on long distances as predicted from some theories of New Physics. An example is the rotation of the polarization angle proportional to the distance and to the square of Energy predicted by some specifications of Loop Quantum Gravity. Another example is the change of the polarization status of the flux of far-away sources by the photon-Axion Like Particle conversion in domain-like intergalactic magnetic fields. In absence of a solid picture of the status of polarization of X-ray sources in their reference frame the viability of such measurements is only matter of conjectures. But we can already select a set of presumably polarized sources (within the AGN zoo) or of totally unpolarized sources (such as clusters) and evaluate the sensitivity to such measurements with a sensitive mission of polarimetry like XIPE under study by ESA.

  3. Superstrings:. why Einstein would Love Spaghetti in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James

    2001-09-01

    There are some questions in physics that until recently could not be answered due to the lack of a complete theory of gravitation. Some of these were, "How does the force of gravity work on objects a billion billions times smaller than the hydrogen atom?" or "What was the universe like, the very instant after the BIG BANG?" or "What is the complete physics of Black Holes?" In these arenas, the effects of gravity and all the other forces must be very different from those seen in everyday experience. Einstein suspected this and it led him to the belief that there must exist a "unified field theory" to describe our world at the tiniest scales. He spent the last forty years of his life unsuccessfully searching for this construction. More recently there appeared new mathematical models called "superstring theory" that have apparently succeeded in reaching his goal. This talk is an introduction to the idea of superstrings and heterotic strings as well as a progress report on the newest frontiers of this subject, "M-theory."

  4. Towards understanding fine-tuning in fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Grant Edward

    The standard models of particle physics and cosmology are enjoying wild success, but are beset by surprising features. Chief among these are the mysterious smallness of general relativity's cosmological constant (known as the cosmological constant "problem"), and the mysteriously tremendous strength of all other forces relative to gravity (known as the hierarchy "problem"). Both are instances of a physically relevant quantity that (due to quantum effects) is a sum of many (unknown) quantities; in both cases, these summands seem to cancel out to remarkable precision to give a much smaller sum, a phenomenon called fine-tuning. The size of the cosmological constant has proved robust against explanation on the grounds of physical principles like symmetry. Such explanations of the electroweak/gravity hierarchy abound, but recent experimental efforts have ruled many of them out, or forced them to introduce new fine-tuning. In both cases, arguments about selection effects and priors have emerged. Here, a dialectic approach is taken to understanding this apparent fine-tuning in nature: First, symmetry is employed. Supersymmetry famously resolves the hierarchy problem, but is under siege by increasing experimental constraints ruling out much of its natural parameter space. A class of supersymmetry models with supersymmetry broken at a low scale is proposed which evade experimental constraints without needing fine-tuning. The key ingredient is some anti-correlation between supersymmetry-breaking effects and electroweak-breaking effects on a field, e.g. if the symmetry-breaking fields are localized at different points along an extra dimension. Then, a careful argument employing selection effects and Bayesian reasoning is undertaken to show that the size of the cosmological constant is not surprising. Previous such arguments have suggested many different probability measures on the space of different possibilities, but a careful review of quantum mechanics shows a unique

  5. Fundamental Physics and Promising Applications of Superionic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Hiroo; Ishigame, Mareo

    1993-02-01

    Recently, superionic conductors (SIC’s) have been considered to be a key material for several application fields as well as energy engineering and ceramic technology. We review the recent stage of the basic models and concepts for the physical understanding of high-speed ionic transport in solids. In the latter part of this paper, we briefly review the applications of SIC’s to solid-state fuel cells and sensors. As a new application of SIC’s, we introduce a technique developed on a complex system consisting of an oxygen ionic conductor and high-Tc oxide super-conductors. Finally, we introduce the possibility of the application of SIC’s to optical devices.

  6. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 2 (Chapters 21- 44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    Part 3. Chapter 21. Electric Charge. Chapter 22. Electric Fields. Chapter 23. Gauss' Law. Chapter 24. Electric Potential. Chapter 25. Capacitance. Chapter 26. Current and Resistance. Chapter 27. Circuits. Chapter 28. Magnetic Fields. Chapter 29. Magnetic Fields Due to Currents. Chapter 30. Induction and Inductance. Chapter 31. Electromagnetic Oscillations and Alternating Current. Chapter 32. Maxwell's Equations; Magnetism of Matter. Part 4. Chapter 33. Electromagnetic Waves. Chapter 34. Images. Chapter 35. Interference. Chapter 36. Diffraction. Chapter 37. Relativity. Part 5. Chapter 38. Photons and Matter Waves. Chapter 39. More About Matter Waves. Chapter 40. All About Atoms. Chapter 41. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Chapter 42. Nuclear Physics. Chapter 43. Energy from the Nucleus. Chapter 44. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendices. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  7. Cold antihydrogen: a new frontier in fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Niels

    2010-08-13

    The year 2002 heralded a breakthrough in antimatter research when the first low energy antihydrogen atoms were produced. Antimatter has inspired both science and fiction writers for many years, but detailed studies have until now eluded science. Antimatter is notoriously difficult to study as it does not readily occur in nature, even though our current understanding of the laws of physics have us expecting that it should make up half of the universe. The pursuit of cold antihydrogen is driven by a desire to solve this profound mystery. This paper will motivate the current effort to make cold antihydrogen, explain how antihydrogen is currently made, and how and why we are attempting to trap it. It will also discuss what kind of measurements are planned to gain new insights into the unexplained asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the universe.

  8. Facilities for Fundamental Neutron Physics Research at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility

    PubMed Central

    Arif, M.; Dewey, M. S.; Greene, G. L.; Snow, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    The features of two fundamental neutron physics research stations at the NIST cold neutron research facility are described in some detail. A list of proposed initial experimental programs for these two stations is also given. PMID:28053463

  9. Teacher's Handbook for Advanced Physical Science 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Everett

    This handbook is an adjunct to the "Laboratory Manual for Advanced Physical Science 2," and is intended to assist teachers in organizing laboratory experiences. Information for each experiment includes (1) Introduction, (2) Scheduling, (3) Time required, (4) Materials needed , (5) Precautions, (6) Laboratory hints, (7) Sample data, and…

  10. Physics challenges for advanced fuel cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores; Gerardo Aliberti

    2014-06-01

    Advanced fuel cycles and associated optimized reactor designs will require substantial improvements in key research area to meet new and more challenging requirements. The present paper reviews challenges and issues in the field of reactor and fuel cycle physics. Typical examples are discussed with, in some cases, original results.

  11. Fundamental Physical Basis for Maxwell-Heaviside Gravitomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambuya, Golden Gadzirayi

    2015-08-01

    Gravitomagnetism is universally and formally recognised in contemporary physics as being the linear first-order approximation of Einstein's field equations emerging from the General Theory of Relativity (GTR). Herein, we argue that, as has been done by others in the past, gravitomagnetism can be viewed as a fully-fledged independent theory of gravitomagnetism that can be divorced from Professor Einstein's GTR. The gravitomagnetic theory whose exposition we give herein is exactly envisioned by Professor Maxwell and Dr. Heaviside. The once speculative Maxwell-Heaviside Gravitomagnetic theory now finds full justification as a fully fledged theory from Professor José Hera's Existence Theorem which states that all that is needed for there to exist the four Max-well-type field equations is that a mass-current conservation law be obeyed. Our contribution in the present work, if any, is that we demonstrate conclusively that like electromagnetism, the gravitomagnetic phenomenon leads to the prediction of gravitomagnetic waves that travel at the speed of light. Further, we argue that for the gravitational phenomenon, apart from the Newtonian gravitational potential, there are four more potentials and these operate concurrently with the Newtonian potential. At the end of it, it is seen that the present work sets the stage for a very interesting investigation of several gravitational anomalies such as the ponderous Pioneer Anomaly, the vexing Flyby Anomalies, the mysterious Anomalous Rotation Curves of Spiral Galaxies and as well, the possibility of the generation of stellar magnetic fields by rotating gravitational masses.

  12. Electrode Biasing on TEXTOR: A Tool for Fundamental Physics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Weynants, R.R.; Jachmich, S.; Schoor, M. van

    2005-02-15

    The application in TEXTOR of an externally controlled radial electric field E{sub r}, imposed by means of an electrode, has allowed to ascertain many aspects of the physics of the creation of E{sub r} and of its effect on radial transport. Radial conductivity was shown to depend on parallel viscosity with the latter's nonlinear response to E{sub r} providing the basic ingredient for E{sub r} bifurcation, typical for L- to H-mode transitions. Simultaneous time and space resolved measurements of E{sub r} and of the plasma flows in the edge by means of a newly developed inclined Mach probe have allowed to further substantiate the role of parallel viscosity and of neutral collisions in the damping of rotation. The causal role of grad E{sub r} in bringing about the transport changes has been proven by showing that the field shear is spatially correlated with and temporally leads the density gradient, as well as by comparison with theoretical modeling.

  13. Solar Sail Propulsion: An Enabling Technology for Fundamental Physics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachwald, Bernd; Seboldt, Wolfgang; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    Solar sails enable a wide range of high-energy missions, many of which are difficult or even impossible to accomplish with any other type of conventional propulsion system. They are also an enabling propulsion technology for two types of deep-space missions that are very favorable for testing current gravitational theories and the large-scale gravitational field of the solar system: the first type comprises missions that go very close to the Sun (<8 solar radii) and the second one comprises missions that go fast very far away from the Sun ( 200AU). Being propelled solely by the freely available solar radiation pressure, solar sails do not consume any propellant. Therefore, their capability to gain (or reduce) orbital energy is theoretically unlimited and practically only limited by their lifetime in the space environment and their distance from the Sun (because the solar radiation pressure decreases with the square of solar distance). Nevertheless, solar sails make also missions that go far away from the Sun feasible because they can gain a large amount of orbital energy by first making one or more close solar approaches that turn the trajectory hyperbolic. For both mission types, the temperature limit of the sail film is a critical issue. In this chapter, we briefly review the physics and the current technological status of solar sails, and then present mission outlines and trade-offs for both mission types. Thereby, we will show that even near- or medium-term solar sails with a relatively moderate performance enable these kinds of missions.

  14. Fundamental Distinctions in Physics underlying Nonsteady Forcings of Wind Turbine Power vs. Drivetrain by Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James; Lavely, Adam; Nandi, Tarak

    2016-11-01

    Whereas the primary function of a wind turbine (WT) is the generation of electricity, wind farm profitability is decreased both by integrated losses in power and increases in premature failures of drivetrain components resulting from energetic nonsteady aerodynamic forcings of WT rotors by atmospheric and wake turbulence. Here we contrast the physics underlying dominant nonsteady atmospheric turbulence forcings of the bending moments in the WT rotor plane (torque/power) vs. the out-of-plane bending moments (OPBM) that underlie premature drivetrain component failure. Using an advanced actuator line model of the 5 MW NREL and the 1.5 MW GE wind turbine rotors embedded within a high-fidelity spectral LES of a typical daytime convective atmospheric boundary layer, we show that (1) the physics underlying large torque vs. OBPM fluctuations are associated with fundamentally different turbulence eddy characteristics and (2) nonsteady response centers on 4 characteristic time scales associated advection of eddies and load response of blades cutting through internal turbulence eddy structure. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by NSF/XSEDE.

  15. Advanced Physical Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Pandey, Gaind P.

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of exciting research and applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) stimulated by deeper understanding of their fundamental properties and increasing production capability. The intrinsic properties of various CNTs were found to strongly depend on their internal microstructures. This review summarizes the fundamental structure-property relations of seamless tube-like single- and multiwalled CNTs and conically stacked carbon nanofibers, as well as the organized architectures of these CNTs (including randomly stacked thin films, parallel aligned thin films, and vertically aligned arrays). It highlights the recent development of CNTs as key components in selected applications, including nanoelectronics, filtration membranes, transparent conductive electrodes, fuel cells, electrical energy storage devices, and solar cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the link between the basic physical chemical properties of CNTs and the organized CNT architectures with their functions and performance in each application.

  16. Advanced physical chemistry of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Pandey, Gaind P

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of exciting research and applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) stimulated by deeper understanding of their fundamental properties and increasing production capability. The intrinsic properties of various CNTs were found to strongly depend on their internal microstructures. This review summarizes the fundamental structure-property relations of seamless tube-like single- and multiwalled CNTs and conically stacked carbon nanofibers, as well as the organized architectures of these CNTs (including randomly stacked thin films, parallel aligned thin films, and vertically aligned arrays). It highlights the recent development of CNTs as key components in selected applications, including nanoelectronics, filtration membranes, transparent conductive electrodes, fuel cells, electrical energy storage devices, and solar cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the link between the basic physical chemical properties of CNTs and the organized CNT architectures with their functions and performance in each application.

  17. Chain inflation and the imprint of fundamental physics in the CMBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chialva, Diego; Danielsson, Ulf H. E-mail: ulf.danielsson@fysast.uu.se

    2009-03-15

    In this work we investigate characteristic modifications of the spectrum of cosmological perturbations and the spectral index due to chain inflation. We find two types of effects. First, modifications of the spectral index depending on interactions between radiation and the vacuum, and on features of the effective vacuum potential of the underlying fundamental theory. Second, a modulation of the spectrum signaling new physics due to bubble nucleation. This effect is similar to those of transplanckian physics. Measurements of such signatures could provide a wealth of information on the fundamental physics at the basis of inflation.

  18. Fundamental Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Clues to the formation of planets and planetary rings -- like Saturn's dazzling ring system -- may be found by studying how dust grains interact as they collide at low speeds. To study the question of low-speed dust collisions, NASA sponsored the COLLisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) at the University of Colorado. It was designed to spring-launch marble-size projectiles into trays of powder similar to space or lunar dust. COLLIDE-1 (1998) discovered that collisions below a certain energy threshold eject no material. COLLIDE-2 was designed to identify where the threshold is. In COLLIDE-2, scientists nudged small projectiles into dust beds and recorded how the dust splashed outward (video frame at top; artist's rendering at bottom). The slowest impactor ejected no material and stuck in the target. The faster impactors produced ejecta; some rebounded while others stuck in the target.

  19. On foundational thinking in fundamental physics, from Riemann to Einstein to Heisenberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2012-03-01

    This paper considers the nature of foundational thinking in fundamental physics, most especially in quantum mechanics. By "fundamental physics" I mean those areas of experimental and theoretical physics that deal with the ultimate constitution of nature, for example, as defined by the so-called elementary particles in the case of quantum physics. By "foundational thinking" I mean thinking that concerns fundamental physics itself. First, I argue, following Riemann, that our foundational thinking is based on hypotheses that we form and test. Second, I argue that foundational thinking in physics is defined by concepts, and that in modern physics foundational concepts always contains physical, mathematical, and philosophical components. Third, finally, I argue that the relationships between these components and, hence, our foundational thinking, are different in quantum mechanics than they are in classical physics and relativity. In these theories mathematics describes, by way of idealized models, physical reality, and predictions made by them are derived from these descriptions. By contrast, in quantum mechanics, mathematics only serves to predict the outcome of quantum experiments in the absence of any description, however idealized, of quantum objects and their behavior. At least such is the case in certain interpretations of quantum mechanics, which follow and develop Heisenberg's approach in his paper introducing quantum mechanics, as does, for example, Bohr's interpretation, known as complementarity.

  20. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGES

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; ...

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  1. Fundamental physics at the intensity frontier. Report of the workshop held December 2011 in Rockville, MD.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; Weerts, H.; Brock, R.; Butler, J.N.; Casey, B.C.K.; Lu, Z.T.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Dietrich, M.R.; Djurcic, Z.; Goodman, M.; Green, J.P.; Holt, R.J.; Mueller, P.; Paley, J.; Reimer, P.; Singh, J.; Upadhye, A.

    2012-06-05

    new sources of CP violation? Is there CP violation in the leptonic sector? Are neutrinos their own antiparticles? Do the forces unify? Is there a weakly coupled hidden sector that is related to dark matter? Do new symmetries exist at very high energy scales? To identify the most compelling science opportunities in this area, the workshop Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier was held in December 2011, sponsored by the Office of High Energy Physics in the US Department of Energy Office of Science. Participants investigated the most promising experiments to exploit these opportunities and described the knowledge that can be gained from such a program. The workshop generated much interest in the community, as witnessed by the large and energetic participation by a broad spectrum of scientists. This document chronicles the activities of the workshop, with contributions by more than 450 authors. The workshop organized the intensity frontier science program along six topics that formed the basis for working groups: experiments that probe (i) heavy quarks, (ii) charged leptons, (iii) neutrinos, (iv) proton decay, (v) light, weakly interacting particles, and (vi) nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. The conveners for each working group included an experimenter and a theorist working in the field and an observer from the community at large. The working groups began their efforts well in advance of the workshop, holding regular meetings and soliciting written contributions. Specific avenues of exploration were identified by each working group. Experiments that study rare strange, charm, and bottom meson decays provide a broad program of measurements that are sensitive to new interactions. Charged leptons, particularly muons and taus, provide a precise probe for new physics because the Standard Model predictions for their properties are very accurate. Research at the intensity frontier can reveal CP violation in the lepton sector, and elucidate whether neutrinos are their own

  2. Resource Letter ANP-1: Advances in Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Maury C.

    2016-12-01

    Three of the twelve fundamental fermions in particle physics are neutrinos. It was long thought that neutrinos might be massless, but we now know through the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations that neutrinos have mass. This resource letter will cover the history of the growth in our knowledge about neutrinos since they were first proposed in the 1930s, and also covers some up the upcoming experiments which will further our understanding of neutrino properties. Results from experiments are described that use various sources of neutrinos including nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, accelerators, and supernovae. In this resource letter, the resources that can be used to trace the past, present, and anticipated future advances in neutrino physics are reviewed.

  3. Student Solutions Manual to accompany Fundamentals of Physics,7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl; Christman, J. Richard

    2004-06-01

    Work more effectively and check solutions as you go along with the text! This Student Solutions Manual that accompanies Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition, provides readers with complete, worked-out solutions to 30% of the end-of-chapter problems. These problems are indicated in the text by an ssm icon. No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style this Seventh Edition offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. This book offers a unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications.

  4. Advanced Electron Microscopy in Materials Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Jarausch, K.

    2009-06-01

    Aberration correction has opened a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes and extending information limits. The imaging and analytical performance of these corrector-equipped microscopes affords an unprecedented opportunity to study structure-property relationships of matter at the atomic scale. This new generation of microscopes is able to retrieve high-quality structural information comparable to neutron and synchrotron x-ray experiments, but with local atomic resolution. These advances in instrumentation are accelerating the research and development of various functional materials ranging from those for energy generation, conversion, transportation and storage to those for catalysis and nano-device applications. The dramatic improvements in electron-beam illumination and detection also present a host of new challenges for the interpretation and optimization of experiments. During 7-9 November 2007, a workshop, entitled 'Aberration Corrected Electron Microscopy in Material Physics', was convened at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratories (BNL) to address these opportunities and challenges. The workshop was co-sponsored by Hitachi High Technologies, a leader in electron microscopy instrumentation, and BNL's Institute of Advanced Electron Microscopy, a leader in materials physics research using electron microscopy. The workshop featured presentations by internationally prominent scientists working at the frontiers of electron microscopy, both on developing instrumentation and applying it in materials physics. The meeting, structured to stimulate scientific exchanges and explore new capabilities, brought together {approx}100 people from over 10 countries. This special issue complies many of the advances in instrument performance and materials physics reported by the invited speakers and attendees at the workshop.

  5. Her Physics, His Physics: Gender Issues in Israeli Advanced Placement Physics Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohar, Anat; Sela, David

    2003-01-01

    Investigates gender issues in Israeli advanced placement physics classes. Analyzes matriculation exam scores from approximately 400 high schools over 12 years. Conducts semi-constructed interviews with 50 advanced placement physics students (25 girls and 25 boys). Discusses changes in the ratio of girls, performance, and factors that are…

  6. Her Physics, His Physics: Gender Issues in Israeli Advanced Placement Physics Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohar, Anat; Sela, David

    2003-01-01

    Investigates gender issues in Israeli advanced placement physics classes. Analyzes matriculation exam scores from approximately 400 high schools over 12 years. Conducts semi-constructed interviews with 50 advanced placement physics students (25 girls and 25 boys). Discusses changes in the ratio of girls, performance, and factors that are…

  7. Select Advances in Computational Accelerator Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, John R.; Abell, Dan T.; Bell, George I.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; King, Jacob R.; Meiser, Dominic; Pogorelov, Ilya V.; Werner, Gregory R.

    2016-04-01

    Computational accelerator physics has changed and broadened over the last decade or so. Part of the change is due to the advent of multiple ways of parallel computing. Another part comes from algorithmic developments. The multiple ways of parallel computing include distributed memory parallelism and on-chip parallelism, with the latter coming from architectures (CPU and GPU) having multiple processing elements (cores or streaming multiprocessors) and wide vector (SIMD) instruction units. The basics of these new architectures and their application to computational accelerator physics are briefly reviewed. Algorithmic advances in the select areas of spin tracking, cavity calculations, plasma acceleration, and electron cooling are also reviewed. In some cases the algorithms provide increased fidelity improving the overall accuracy, while in other cases, such as controlled dispersion, the algorithms provide increased fidelity by better modeling the essential physical interaction. Finally, the use of computational frameworks, which provide the basic computational infrastructure, while allowing the capability developer to concentrate on the math and physics, is reviewed in the context of the Vorpal application, which has found use across accelerator physics and many other fields.

  8. The relationship between adolescents' physical activity, fundamental movement skills and weight status.

    PubMed

    O' Brien, Wesley; Belton, Sarahjane; Issartel, Johann

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a potential relationship among physical activity (PA), fundamental movement skills and weight status exists amongst early adolescent youth. Participants were a sample of 85 students; 54 boys (mean age = 12.94 ± 0.33 years) and 31 girls (mean age = 12.75 ± 0.43 years). Data gathered during physical education class included PA (accelerometry), fundamental movement skills and anthropometric measurements. Standard multiple regression revealed that PA and total fundamental movement skill proficiency scores explained 16.5% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the prediction of body mass index. Chi-square tests for independence further indicated that compared with overweight or obese adolescents, a significantly higher proportion of adolescents classified as normal weight achieved mastery/near-mastery in fundamental movement skills. Results from the current investigation indicate that weight status is an important correlate of fundamental movement skill proficiency during adolescence. Aligned with most recent research, school- and community-based programmes that include developmentally structured learning experiences delivered by specialists can significantly improve fundamental movement skill proficiency in youth.

  9. Subtask 2.13 - Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector-Fundamental Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley Miller

    2007-07-01

    Under the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a full-scale Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter was installed at the Big Stone Plant, with start-up in October 2002. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter was retrofitted into Fields 2-4 of the old Big Stone electrostatic precipitator (ESP). While many aspects of the operation were satisfactory, pressure drop was higher than expected. To achieve acceptable pressure drop and successfully demonstrate the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter technology, the first fields of the ESP were also converted into an Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter in 2005. However, since start-up in June 2005, the first fields have been inoperable for multiple reasons. The fundamental cause of the dysfunctional performance of the first fields was attributed to spacing and alignment problems, which led to excessive sparking and shutdown of the high-voltage power. In spite of attempts to correct the problems, satisfactory performance of the first fields was never achieved. Because of the uncertainties of how to achieve acceptable performance with a new technology, the Big Stone Plant made the decision to convert the entire Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter housing into a pulse-jet fabric filter.

  10. Fundamentals and advances in the development of remote welding fabrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapakis, J. E.; Masubuchi, K.; Von Alt, C.

    1986-01-01

    Operational and man-machine issues for welding underwater, in outer space, and at other remote sites are investigated, and recent process developments are described. Probable remote welding missions are classified, and the essential characteristics of fundamental remote welding tasks are analyzed. Various possible operational modes for remote welding fabrication are identified, and appropriate roles for humans and machines are suggested. Human operator performance in remote welding fabrication tasks is discussed, and recent advances in the development of remote welding systems are described, including packaged welding systems, stud welding systems, remotely operated welding systems, and vision-aided remote robotic welding and autonomous welding systems.

  11. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  12. Does Weight Status Influence Associations between Children's Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Clare; Okely, Anthony; Bagley, Sarah; Telford, Amanda; Booth, Michael; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether weight status influences the association among children's fundamental movement skills (FMS) and physical activity (PA). Two hundred forty-eight children ages 9-12 years participated. Proficiency in three object-control skills and two locomotor skills was examined. Accelerometers objectively assessed physical…

  13. Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity among Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This…

  14. Physical Education Teacher Training in Fundamental Movement Skills Makes a Difference to Instruction and Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Natalie Jayne; Barnett, Lisa M.; Brown, Helen; Telford, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate instruction and assessment of fundamental movement skills (FMSs) by Physical Education (PE) teachers of Year 7 girls. Of 168 secondary school PE teachers, many had received little FMSs professional development, and although most assessed student FMSs proficiency, the quality of assessment was variable.…

  15. Physical Education Teacher Training in Fundamental Movement Skills Makes a Difference to Instruction and Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Natalie Jayne; Barnett, Lisa M.; Brown, Helen; Telford, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate instruction and assessment of fundamental movement skills (FMSs) by Physical Education (PE) teachers of Year 7 girls. Of 168 secondary school PE teachers, many had received little FMSs professional development, and although most assessed student FMSs proficiency, the quality of assessment was variable.…

  16. Does Weight Status Influence Associations between Children's Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Clare; Okely, Anthony; Bagley, Sarah; Telford, Amanda; Booth, Michael; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether weight status influences the association among children's fundamental movement skills (FMS) and physical activity (PA). Two hundred forty-eight children ages 9-12 years participated. Proficiency in three object-control skills and two locomotor skills was examined. Accelerometers objectively assessed physical…

  17. Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity among Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This…

  18. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  19. FOREWORD: International Scientific Seminars on "Fundamental and Applied Problems of Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav; Ryzhii, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    International Scientific Seminars ''Fundamental and Applied Problems of Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics'' were held in Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) in May - June 2014. The idea of the Seminars was to organize a series of meetings between young scientists and discuss actual problems and the latest results in Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics. There were eight Sessions: Modern Problems of Condensed Matter Physics; Laser Physics; Spectroscopy of Condensed Matter; Terahertz Optical Technology; Optical Signals Processing; Physics of Optical Strong Correlated Systems; Complex Dusty Plasma Physics; Biomediacal Applications of Photonics. Seminars were organized by the young group of scientists and students from Research and Educational Center ''Photonics and Infrared Technology'' at BMSTU. It brought a significant contribution to the development of youth science in the field of Physics and Photonics in Russia. More than 100 young scientists and students participated in the Seminars in spring - summer 2014. The International Scientific Seminars were supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant # 14-08-06030-g). This volume contains proceedings of the International Scientific Seminars ''Fundamental and Applied Problems of Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics''. Stanislav Yurchenko and Viktor Ryzhii Bauman Moscow State Technical University

  20. Foundations of Physical Theory, I: Force and Energy. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Nolan E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is one of two units on the foundations of physical theory and the…

  1. Crossdisciplinary fundamental research--the seed for scientific advance and technological innovation.

    PubMed

    Kroto, Harold

    2011-12-28

    As it was earlier in the 1980's, so it is now, fundamental science research is under threat as decisions are made on science funding by people who do not do fundamental research, seem congenitally incapable of understanding what it is and furthermore in the face of countless examples seem blind to how important it has been to the technologies that govern our modern life and will be to the future technologies that we desperately need to develop to survive. In this article some general observations are made on how the fascination for what happens in space and stars was the key trigger that gave birth to Science itself and a particular case is outlined which indicates that this same fascination is still the catalyst of some fundamental breakthroughs today. This article also outlines an archetypal example of the way major breakthroughs are often made by the synergy that comes from cross-disciplinary research in a way which is totally surprising. In this case it started from a curiosity about the quantum mechanical description of molecular dynamics and involved pioneering advances in synthetic organic chemistry which led to the suprising discovery that some exotic carbon molecules were abundant in space and stars. These results initiated an experiment using a new technology that represented a major breakthrough in cluster science. The upshot was totally unpredictable, the birth of a whole new field of Chemistry as well as a paradigm shift in major areas of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

  2. Experimental Investigation and Fundamental Understanding of a Slowed UH-60A Rotor at High Advance Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Norman, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes the measurements from a full-scale, slowed RPM, UH-60A rotor tested at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80- ft wind tunnel up to an advance ratio of 1.0. A comprehensive set of measurements, that includes performance, blade loads, hub loads and pressures/airloads makes this data set unique. The measurements reveal new and rich aeromechanical phenomena that are special to this exotic regime. These include reverse chord dynamic stall, retreating side impulse in pitch-link load, large inboard-outboard elastic twist differential, supersonic flow at low subsonic advancing tip Mach numbers, diminishing rotor forces yet dramatic build up of blade loads, and dramatic blade loads yet benign levels of vibratory hub loads. The objective of this research is the fundamental understanding of these unique aeromechanical phenomena. The intent is to provide useful knowledge for the design of high speed, high efficiency, slowed RPM rotors of the future and a challenging database for advanced analyses validation.

  3. Fundamental movement skills proficiency in children with developmental coordination disorder: does physical self-concept matter?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Sit, Cindy H P; Capio, Catherine M; Burnett, Angus; Ha, Amy S C; Huang, Wendy Y J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) examine differences in fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency, physical self-concept, and physical activity in children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and (2) determine the association of FMS proficiency with physical self-concept while considering key confounding factors. Participants included 43 children with DCD and 87 age-matched typically developing (TD) children. FMS proficiency was assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development - second edition. Physical self-concept and physical activity were assessed using self-report questionnaires. A two-way (group by gender) ANCOVA was used to determine whether between-group differences existed in FMS proficiency, physical self-concept, and physical activity after controlling for age and BMI. Partial correlations and hierarchical multiple regression models were used to examine the relationship between FMS proficiency and physical self-concept. Compared with their TD peers, children with DCD displayed less proficiency in various components of FMS and viewed themselves as being less competent in physical coordination, sporting ability, and physical health. Physical coordination was a significant predictor of ability in object control skills. DCD status and gender were significant predictors of FMS proficiency. Future FMS interventions should target children with DCD and girls, and should emphasize improving object control skills proficiency and physical coordination. Children with DCD tend to have not only lower FMS proficiency than age-matched typically developing children but also lower physical self-concept. Self-perceptions of physical coordination by children with DCD are likely to be valuable contributors to development of object control skills. This may then help to develop their confidence in performing motor skills. Children with DCD need supportive programs that facilitate the development of object control skills. Efficacy of training

  4. Advanced instrumentation for Solar System gravitational physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, Roberto; Bellettini, G.; Berardi, S.; Boni, A.; Cantone, C.; Coradini, A.; Currie, D. G.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Fiorenza, E.; Garattini, M.; Iafolla, V.; Intaglietta, N.; Lefevre, C.; Lops, C.; March, R.; Martini, M.; Nozzoli, S.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.; Tauraso, R.; Vittori, R.

    2010-05-01

    The Solar System is a complex laboratory for testing gravitational physics. Indeed, its scale and hierarchical structure make possible a wide range of tests for gravitational theories, studying the motion of both natural and artificial objects. The usual methodology makes use of tracking information related to the bodies, fitted by a suitable dynamical model. Different equations of motion are provided by different theories, which can be therefore tested and compared. Future exploration scenarios show the possibility of placing deep-space probes near the Sun or in outer Solar System, thereby extending the available experimental data sets. In particular, the Earth-Moon is the most accurately known gravitational three-body laboratory, which is undergoing a new, strong wave of research and exploration (both robotic and manned). In addition, the benefits of a synergetic study of planetary science and gravitational physics are of the greatest importance (as shown by the success of the Apollo program), especially in the Earth-Moon, Mars-Phobos, Jovian and Saturnian sub-suystems. This scenarios open critical issues regarding the quality of the available dynamical models, i.e. their capability of fitting data without an excessive number of empirical hypotheses. A typical case is represented by the non-gravitational phenomena, which in general are difficult to model. More generally, gravitation tests with Lunar Laser Ranging, inner or outer Solar System probes and the appearance of the so-called 'anomalies'(like the one indicated by the Pioneers), whatever their real origin (either instrumental effects or due to new physics), show the necessity of a coordinated improvement of tracking and modelization techniques. A common research path will be discussed, employing the development and use of advanced instrumentation to cope with current limitations of Solar System gravitational tests. In particular, the use of high-sensitivity accelerometers, combined with microwave and laser

  5. Device physics vis-à-vis fundamental physics in Cold War America: the case of quantum optics.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Joan Lisa

    2006-06-01

    Historians have convincingly shown the close ties U.S. physicists had with the military during the Cold War and have raised the question of whether this alliance affected the content of physics. Some have asserted that it distorted physics, shifting attention from fundamental problems to devices. Yet the papers of physicists in quantum electronics and quantum optics, fields that have been exemplary for those who hold the distortion thesis, show that the same scientists who worked on military devices simultaneously pursued fundamental and foundational topics. This essay examines one such physicist, Marlan O. Scully, with attention to both his extensive foundational studies and the way in which his applied and basic researches played off each other.

  6. Climate Solutions based on advanced scientific discoveries of Allatra physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershigora, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change is one of the most important international problems of the 21st century. The overall rapid increase in the dynamics of cataclysms, which have been observed in recent decades, is particularly alarming. Howdo modern scientists predict the occurrence of certain events? In meteorology, unusually powerful cumulonimbus clouds are one of the main conditions for the emergence of a tornado. The former, in their turn, are formed during the invasion of cold air on the overheated land surface. The satellite captures the cloud front, and, based on these pictures, scientists make assumptions about the possibility of occurrence of the respective natural phenomena. In fact, mankind visually observes and draws conclusions about the consequences of the physical phenomena which have already taken place in the invisible world, so the conclusions of scientists are assumptions by their nature, rather than precise knowledge of the causes of theorigin of these phenomena in the physics of microcosm. The latest research in the field of the particle physics and neutrino astrophysics, which was conducted by a working team of scientists of ALLATRA International Public Movement (hereinafter ALLATRA SCIENCE group), offers increased opportunities for advanced fundamental and applied research in climatic engineering.

  7. The Shelter Island Conferences Revisited: "Fundamental" Physics in the Decade 1975-1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweber, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this broad historical overview of "the steady evolution of theoretical ideas" from Shelter Island I in 1947 to Shelter Island II in 1983 is some of the developments in "fundamental" physics after the establishment of the standard model, in particular, the adoption of the view that all present day field theories are "effective field theories" based on the gauge concept; taking seriously big bang cosmology, grand unified field theories (GUTs), and inflation; and the emergence of a new symbiosis of physics and mathematics.

  8. Proceedings of the 2003 NASA/JPL Workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Don (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Fundamental Physics workshop included presentations ranging from forces acting on RNA to properties of clouds of degenerate Fermi atoms, to techniques to probe for a added space-time dimensions, and to flight hardware for low temperature experiments, amongst others. Mark Lee from NASA Headquarters described the new strategic plan that NASA has developed under Administrator Sean O'Keefe's leadership. Mark explained that the Fundamental Physics community now needs to align its research program and the roadmap describing the long-term goals of the program with the NASA plan. Ulf Israelsson of JPL discussed how the rewrite of the roadmap will be implemented under the leadership of the Fundamental Physics Discipline Working Group (DWG). Nick Bigelow, chair of the DWG, outlined how investigators can contribute to the writing of the roadmap. Results of measurements on very cold clouds of Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance were described by three investigators. Also, new measurements relating to tests of Einstein equivalence were discussed. Investigators also described methods to test other aspects of Einstein's relativity theories.

  9. Proceedings of the 2003 NASA/JPL Workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Don (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Fundamental Physics workshop included presentations ranging from forces acting on RNA to properties of clouds of degenerate Fermi atoms, to techniques to probe for a added space-time dimensions, and to flight hardware for low temperature experiments, amongst others. Mark Lee from NASA Headquarters described the new strategic plan that NASA has developed under Administrator Sean O'Keefe's leadership. Mark explained that the Fundamental Physics community now needs to align its research program and the roadmap describing the long-term goals of the program with the NASA plan. Ulf Israelsson of JPL discussed how the rewrite of the roadmap will be implemented under the leadership of the Fundamental Physics Discipline Working Group (DWG). Nick Bigelow, chair of the DWG, outlined how investigators can contribute to the writing of the roadmap. Results of measurements on very cold clouds of Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance were described by three investigators. Also, new measurements relating to tests of Einstein equivalence were discussed. Investigators also described methods to test other aspects of Einstein's relativity theories.

  10. Advances in developing molecular-diagnostic tools for strongyloid nematodes of equids: fundamental and applied implications.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Chilton, Neil B; Beveridge, Ian

    2004-02-01

    Infections of equids with parasitic nematodes of the order Strongylida (subfamilies Strongylinae and Cyathostominae) are of major veterinary importance. In last decades, the widespread use of drugs against these parasites has led to problems of resistance within the Cyathostominae, and to an increase in their prevalence and intensity of infection. Novel control strategies, based on improved knowledge of parasite biology and epidemiology, have thus become important. However, there are substantial limitations in the understanding of fundamental biological and systematic aspects of these parasites, which have been due largely to limitations in their specific identification and diagnosis using traditional, morphological approaches. Recently, there has been progress in the development of DNA-based approaches for the specific identification of strongyloids of equids for systematic studies and disease diagnosis. The present article briefly reviews information on the classification, biology, pathogenesis, epidemiology of equine strongyloids and the diagnosis of infections, highlights knowledge gaps in these areas, describes recent advances in the use of molecular techniques for the genetic characterisation, specific identification and differentiation of strongyloids of equids as a basis for fundamental investigations of the systematics, population biology and ecology.

  11. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are

  12. The Physics of Ultrabroadband Frequency Comb Generation and Optimized Combs for Measurements in Fundamental Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-02

    Plenary Lecture at IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics , July 8-11, Besançon, France (2014) J. M. Dudley...3School of Mathematical Sciences , University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland *Corresponding author: john.dudley@univ‑fcomte.fr Received...time stretching as described above. From the measured time series, it is straightfor- ward to compute the coefficient of variation Cv, which is plotted

  13. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The contract objective was to demonstrate Advanced Energy Dynamics, Inc., (AED) Ultrafine Coal (UFC) electrostatic physical fine coal cleaning process as capable of: producing clean coal products of no greater than 2% ash; significantly reducing the pyritic sulfur content below that achievable with state-of-the-art coal cleaning; recovering over 80% of the available energy content in the run-of-mine coal; producing product and refuse with surface moisture below 30%. Originally the demonstration was to be of a Charger/Disc System at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Coal Quality Development Center (CQDC) at Homer City, Pennsylvania. As a result of the combination of Charger/Disc System scale-up problems and parallel development of an improved Vertical-Belt Separator, DOE issued a contract modification to perform additional laboratory testing and optimization of the UFC Vertical-Belt Separator System at AED. These comparative test results, safety analyses and an economic analysis are discussed in this report. 29 refs., 25 figs., 41 tabs.

  14. The relationship between fundamental movement skill proficiency and physical self-confidence among adolescents.

    PubMed

    McGrane, Bronagh; Belton, Sarahjane; Powell, Danielle; Issartel, Johann

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to assess fundamental movement skill (FMS) proficiency, physical self-confidence levels, and the relationship between these variables and gender differences among adolescents. Three hundred and ninety five adolescents aged 13.78 years (SD = ±1.2) from 20 schools were involved in this study. The Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd Edition (TGMD), TGMD-2 and Victorian Skills Manual were used to assess 15 FMS. Participants' physical self-confidence was also assessed using a valid skill-specific scale. A significant correlation was observed between FMS proficiency and physical self-confidence for females only (r = 0.305, P < 0.001). Males rated themselves as having significantly higher physical self-confidence levels than females (P = 0.001). Males scored significantly higher than females in FMS proficiency (P < 0.05), and the lowest physical self-confidence group were significantly less proficient at FMS than the medium (P < 0.001) and high physical self-confidence groups (P < 0.05). This information not only highlights those in need of assistance to develop their FMS but will also facilitate in the development of an intervention which aims to improve physical self-confidence and FMS proficiency.

  15. Interactive fundamental physics. [THE REAL STUFF: The New Expanded Media Physics Course for secondary school students

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton's first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered hypermedia'' structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have declined'' to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  16. Einstein Gravity Explorer-a medium-class fundamental physics mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, S.; Tino, G. M.; Gill, P.; Salomon, C.; Sterr, U.; Peik, E.; Nevsky, A.; Görlitz, A.; Svehla, D.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Lusanna, L.; Klein, H.; Margolis, H.; Lemonde, P.; Laurent, P.; Santarelli, G.; Clairon, A.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.; Müller, J.; Iorio, L.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Dittus, H.; Gill, E.; Rothacher, M.; Flechner, F.; Schreiber, U.; Flambaum, V.; Ni, Wei-Tou; Liu, Liang; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao; Gao, Kelin; Cacciapuoti, L.; Holzwarth, R.; Heß, M. P.; Schäfer, W.

    2009-03-01

    The Einstein Gravity Explorer mission (EGE) is devoted to a precise measurement of the properties of space-time using atomic clocks. It tests one of the most fundamental predictions of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, the gravitational redshift, and thereby searches for hints of quantum effects in gravity, exploring one of the most important and challenging frontiers in fundamental physics. The primary mission goal is the measurement of the gravitational redshift with an accuracy up to a factor 104 higher than the best current result. The mission is based on a satellite carrying cold atom-based clocks. The payload includes a cesium microwave clock (PHARAO), an optical clock, a femtosecond frequency comb, as well as precise microwave time transfer systems between space and ground. The tick rates of the clocks are continuously compared with each other, and nearly continuously with clocks on earth, during the course of the 3-year mission. The highly elliptic orbit of the satellite is optimized for the scientific goals, providing a large variation in the gravitational potential between perigee and apogee. Besides the fundamental physics results, as secondary goals EGE will establish a global reference frame for the Earth’s gravitational potential and will allow a new approach to mapping Earth’s gravity field with very high spatial resolution. The mission was proposed as a class-M mission to ESA’s Cosmic Vision Program 2015-2025.

  17. Lorenz, Gödel and Penrose: new perspectives on determinism and causality in fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, T. N.

    2014-07-01

    Despite being known for his pioneering work on chaotic unpredictability, the key discovery at the core of meteorologist Ed Lorenz's work is the link between space-time calculus and state-space fractal geometry. Indeed, properties of Lorenz's fractal invariant set relate space-time calculus to deep areas of mathematics such as Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem. Could such properties also provide new perspectives on deep unsolved issues in fundamental physics? Recent developments in cosmology motivate what is referred to as the 'cosmological invariant set postulate': that the universe ? can be considered a deterministic dynamical system evolving on a causal measure-zero fractal invariant set ? in its state space. Symbolic representations of ? are constructed explicitly based on permutation representations of quaternions. The resulting 'invariant set theory' provides some new perspectives on determinism and causality in fundamental physics. For example, while the cosmological invariant set appears to have a rich enough structure to allow a description of (quantum) probability, its measure-zero character ensures it is sparse enough to prevent invariant set theory being constrained by the Bell inequality (consistent with a partial violation of the so-called measurement independence postulate). The primacy of geometry as embodied in the proposed theory extends the principles underpinning general relativity. As a result, the physical basis for contemporary programmes which apply standard field quantisation to some putative gravitational lagrangian is questioned. Consistent with Penrose's suggestion of a deterministic but non-computable theory of fundamental physics, an alternative 'gravitational theory of the quantum' is proposed based on the geometry of ?, with new perspectives on the problem of black-hole information loss and potential observational consequences for the dark universe.

  18. TRIμP — trapped radioactive isotopes: μicrolaboratories for fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, K.; Berg, G. P.; Dendooven, P.; Dermois, O.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hoekstra, R.; Morgenstern, R.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Timmermans, R. G.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2003-04-01

    At the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) a new facility (TRIμP) is under development. It aims for producing a spectrum of radioactive isotopes in direct, inverse kiematics fusion and evaporation or fragmentation reactions with heavy ion beams from the superconducting cyclotron AGOR. The products will be slowed down and trapped for accurate measurements of fundamental symmetries and interactions in physics. The scientific focus of the local KVI research groups includes precision studies of nuclear β-decays through β-neutrino (recoil nucleus) momentum correlations in weak decays and searches for permanent electric dipole moments in heavy atomic systems. This research programme offers a large potential for discovering new physics or to limit parameters in models beyond standard theory significantly. The scientific approach chosen in TRIμP can be regarded as complementary to such high energy physics. The TRIμP facility in Groningen will be open for users worldwide.

  19. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  20. Lessons from the GP-B Experience for Future Fundamental Physics Missions in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery

    2006-01-01

    Gravity Probe B launched in April 2004 and completed its science data collection in September 2005, with the objective of sub-milliarcsec measurement of two General Relativistic effects on the spin axis orientation of orbiting gyroscopes. Much of the technology required by GP-B has potential application in future missions intended to make precision measurements. The philosophical approach and experiment design principles developed for GP-B are equally adaptable to these mission concepts. This talk will discuss GP-B's experimental approach and the technological and philosophical lessons learned that apply to future experiments in fundamental physics. Measurement of fundamental constants to high precision, probes of short-range forces, searches for equivalence principle violations, and detection of gravitational waves are examples of concepts and missions that will benefit kern GP-B's experience.

  1. Lessons from the GP-B Experience for Future Fundamental Physics Missions in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery

    2006-01-01

    Gravity Probe B launched in April 2004 and completed its science data collection in September 2005, with the objective of sub-milliarcsec measurement of two General Relativistic effects on the spin axis orientation of orbiting gyroscopes. Much of the technology required by GP-B has potential application in future missions intended to make precision measurements. The philosophical approach and experiment design principles developed for GP-B are equally adaptable to these mission concepts. This talk will discuss GP-B's experimental approach and the technological and philosophical lessons learned that apply to future experiments in fundamental physics. Measurement of fundamental constants to high precision, probes of short-range forces, searches for equivalence principle violations, and detection of gravitational waves are examples of concepts and missions that will benefit kern GP-B's experience.

  2. Fundamental physics from the sky: Cosmic rays, gamma rays and the hunt for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profumo, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astro-particle data? Understanding how this is possible is key to unraveling one of the most pressing mysteries at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: the fundamental nature of dark matter. I will discuss some of the recent puzzling findings in cosmic-ray electron-positron data and in gamma-ray observations that might be related to dark matter. I will argue that recent cosmic-ray data, most notably from the Pamela and Fermi satellites, indicate that previously unaccounted-for powerful sources in the Galaxy inject high-energy electrons and positrons. Interestingly, this new source class might be related to new fundamental particle physics, and specifically to pair-annihilation or decay of galactic dark matter. This exciting scenario is directly constrained by Fermi gamma-ray observations, which also inform us on astrophysical source counterparts that could also be responsible for the high-energy electron-positron excess. Observations of gamma-ray emission from the central regions of the Galaxy as well as claims on a gamma-ray line at around 130 GeV also recently triggered a wide-spread interest: I will address the question of whether we are really observing signals from dark matter annihilation, how to test this hypothesis, and which astrophysical mechanisms constitute the relevant background.

  3. Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope (ADEPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles L. Bennett

    2009-03-26

    In 2006, we proposed to NASA a detailed concept study of ADEPT (the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope), a potential space mission to reliably measure the time-evolution of dark energy by conducting the largest effective volume survey of the universe ever done. A peer-review panel of scientific, management, and technical experts reported back the highest possible 'excellent' rating for ADEPT. We have since made substantial advances in the scientific and technical maturity of the mission design. With this Department of Energy (DOE) award we were granted supplemental funding to support specific extended research items that were not included in the NASA proposal, many of which were intended to broadly advance future dark energy research, as laid out by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF). The proposed work had three targets: (1) the adaptation of large-format infrared arrays to a 2 micron cut-off; (2) analytical research to improve the understanding of the dark energy figure-of- merit; and (3) extended studies of baryon acoustic oscillation systematic uncertainties. Since the actual award was only for {approx}10% of the proposed amount item (1) was dropped and item (2) work was severely restricted, consistent with the referee reviews of the proposal, although there was considerable contradictions between reviewer comments and several comments that displayed a lack of familiarity with the research. None the less, item (3) was the focus of the work. To characterize the nature of the dark energy, ADEPT is designed to observe baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in a large galaxy redshift survey and to obtain substantial numbers of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The 2003 Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) made a precise determination of the BAO 'standard ruler' scale, as it was imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at z {approx} 1090. The standard ruler was also imprinted on the pattern of galaxies, and was first detected in 2005 in Sloan

  4. Physics and Advanced Technologies 2003 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A; Sketchley, J

    2005-01-20

    The Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate overcame significant challenges in 2003 to deliver a wealth of scientific and programmatic milestones, and move toward closer alignment with programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We acted aggressively in enabling the PAT Directorate to contribute to future, growing Lawrence Livermore missions in homeland security and at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We made heavy investments to bring new capabilities to the Laboratory, to initiate collaborations with major Laboratory programs, and to align with future Laboratory directions. Consistent with our mission, we sought to ensure that Livermore programs have access to the best science and technology, today and tomorrow. For example, in a move aimed at revitalizing the Laboratory's expertise in nuclear and radiation detection, we brought the talented Measurement Sciences Group to Livermore from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, after its mission there had diminished. The transfer to our I Division entailed significant investment by PAT in equipment and infrastructure required by the group. In addition, the move occurred at a time when homeland security funding was expected, but not yet available. By the end of the year, though, the group was making crucial contributions to the radiation detection program at Livermore, and nearly every member was fully engaged in programmatic activities. Our V Division made a move of a different sort, relocating en masse from Building 121 to the NIF complex. This move was designed to enhance interaction and collaboration among high-energy-density experimental scientists at the Laboratory, a goal that is essential to the effective use of NIF in the future. Since then, V Division has become increasingly integrated with NIF activities. Division scientists are heavily involved in diagnostic development and fielding and are poised to perform equation-of-state and high-temperature hohlraum experiments in 2004 as

  5. Fundamental Understanding of Rotor Aeromechanics at High Advance Ratio Through Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Benjamin

    The purpose of this research is to further the understanding of rotor aeromechanics at advance ratios (mu) beyond the maximum of 0.5 (ratio of forward airspeed to rotor tip speed) for conventional helicopters. High advance ratio rotors have applications in high speed compound helicopters. In addition to one or more conventional main rotors, these aircraft employ either thrust compounding (propellers), lift compounding (fixed-wings), or both. An articulated 4-bladed model rotor was constructed, instrumented, and tested up to a maximum advance ratio of mu=1.6 in the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel at the University of Maryland. The data set includes steady and unsteady rotor hub forces and moments, blade structural loads, blade flapping angles, swashplate control angles, and unsteady blade pressures. A collective-thrust control reversal--where increasing collective pitch results in lower rotor thrust--was observed and is a unique phenomenon to the high advance ratio flight regime. The thrust reversal is explained in a physical manner as well as through an analytical formulation. The requirements for the occurrence of the thrust reversal are enumerated. The effects of rotor geometry design on the thrust reversal onset are explored through the formulation and compared to the measured data. Reverse-flow dynamic stall was observed to extend the the lifting capability of the edgewise rotor well beyond the expected static stall behavior of the airfoil sections. Through embedded unsteady blade surface pressure transducers, the normal force, pitching moment, and shed dynamic stall vortex time histories at a blade section in strong reverse flow were analyzed. Favorable comparisons with published 2-D pitching airfoil reverse flow dynamic stall data indicate that the 3-D stall environment can likely be predicted using models developed from such 2-D experiments. Vibratory hub loads were observed to increase with advance ratio. Maximum amplitude was observed near mu=1, with a

  6. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  7. Fundamental physical processes in coronae: Waves, turbulence, reconnection, and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2008-05-01

    Our understanding of fundamental processes in the solar corona has been greatly progressed based on the space observations of SMM, Yohkoh, Compton GRO, SOHO, TRACE, RHESSI, and STEREO. We observe now acoustic waves, MHD oscillations, turbulence-related line broadening, magnetic configurations related to reconnection processes, and radiation from high-energy particles on a routine basis. We review a number of key observations in EUV, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays that innovated our physical understanding of the solar corona, in terms of hydrodynamics, MHD, plasma heating, and particle acceleration processes.

  8. Your Higgs number—how fundamental physics is connected to technology and societal revolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland E.; Lidström, Suzy

    2015-02-01

    Fundamental physics, as exemplified by the recently discovered Higgs boson, often appears to be completely disconnected from practical applications and ordinary human life. But this is not really the case, because science, technology, and human affairs are profoundly integrated in ways that are not immediately obvious. We illustrate this by defining a ‘Higgs number’ through overlapping activities. Following three different paths, which end respectively in applications of the World Wide Web, digital photography, and all modern electronic devices, we find that most people have a Higgs number of no greater than 3.

  9. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: fundamental physics of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Pooley, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Learning the basic concepts required to understand magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a straightforward process. Although the individual concepts are simple, there are many concepts to learn and retain simultaneously; this situation may give the illusion that learning the physics of MR imaging is complicated. It is important for the radiologist who interprets MR images to understand the methods used to create the images because image contrast specifically depends on how the image data were acquired. Initial concepts include formation of magnetic fields from electric currents in loops of wire, the resonance phenomenon, the hydrogen proton and its frequency of precession, and absorption of radiofrequency energy. These concepts can then be applied to learn about T1 and T2 relaxation and contrast and how the acquisition parameters of echo time and repetition time can be used to achieve these image contrasts. Basic pulse sequences include the spin-echo, multiecho spin-echo, turbo spin-echo, inversion-recovery, and gradient-recalled-echo sequences.

  10. Pre-Big Bang, fundamental Physics and noncyclic cosmologies. Possible alternatives to standard concepts and laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.

    2014-04-01

    Detailed analyses of WMAP and Planck data can have significant implications for noncyclic pre-Big Bang approaches incorporating a new fundamental scale beyond the Planck scale and, potentially, new ultimate constituents of matter with unconventional basic properties as compared to standard particles. Cosmic-ray experiments at the highest energies can also yield relevant information. Hopefully, future studies will be able to deal with alternatives: i) to standard physics for the structure of the physical vacuum, the nature of space-time, the validity of quantum field theory and conventional symmetries, the interpretation of string-like theories...; ii) to standard cosmology concerning the origin and evolution of our Universe, unconventional solutions to the cosmological constant problem, the validity of inflationary scenarios, the need for dark matter and dark energy... Lorentz-like symmetries for the properties of matter can then be naturally stable space-time configurations resulting from more general primordial scenarios that incorporate physics beyond the Planck scale and describe the formation and evolution of the physical vacuum. A possible answer to the question of the origin of half-integer spins can be provided by a primordial spinorial space-time with two complex coordinates instead of the conventional four real ones, leading to a really new cosmology. We discuss basic questions and phenomenological topics concerning noncyclic pre-Big Bang cosmologies and potentially related physics.

  11. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  12. Enhancing the public impact of the Higgs discovery and other fundamental physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidstrom, Suzy; Read, Alex; Parke, Stephen; Allen, Roland; Goldfarb, Steven; Mehlhase, Sascha; Ekelof, Tord; Walker, Alan

    2014-03-01

    The recent experimental discovery of a Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC, together with the awarding of the 2013 Nobel Prize for its theoretical prediction, has presented an exceptional opportunity for public outreach regarding the goals and importance of fundamental research in physics. We discuss novel avenues for further extending this outreach in all areas. These range from tutorial papers addressing students and teachers to internet resources and presentations to unconventional, but captivating, educational materials such as musical videos and LEGO models. Interaction with active scientists can be particularly stimulating. We account how this was encouraged (by means such as badges inviting questions from the public) during Nobel week and afterwards. The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics explained Physica Scripta, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

  13. Her physics, his physics: gender issues in Israeli advanced placement physics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Anat

    2003-02-01

    Gender gaps in physics in favour of boys are more prominent in Israel than in other countries. The main research question is to find out what gender issues are at play in Israeli advanced placement physics classes. Matriculation exam scores from approximately 400 high schools were analysed across 12 years. In addition, semi-constructed interviews were conducted with 50 advanced placement physics students (25 girls and 25 boys). In terms of participation, it was found that the ratio of girls to boys has been unchanged from 1988 to 2000 and is roughly 1:3. In terms of performance, it was found that the final matriculation scores of boys and girls are similar. However, breaking up the final scores into its two components - teachers' given grades and matriculation test scores - showed that boy's test scores are usually higher than girls' test scores, while girls' teachers' given grades are usually higher than boys'. Results from semi-constructed interviews pointed to two factors that are especially unfavourable to many girls: excessive competitiveness and lack of teaching for understanding. Girls' yearning for deep understanding is seen as a form of questing for connected knowledge. It is suggested that instructional methods that foster students' understanding while decreasing competitiveness in physics classes might contribute to girls' participation and performance in advanced physics classes while also supporting the learning of many boys.

  14. Base units of the SI, fundamental constants and modern quantum physics.

    PubMed

    Bordé, Christian J

    2005-09-15

    Over the past 40 years, a number of discoveries in quantum physics have completely transformed our vision of fundamental metrology. This revolution starts with the frequency stabilization of lasers using saturation spectroscopy and the redefinition of the metre by fixing the velocity of light c. Today, the trend is to redefine all SI base units from fundamental constants and we discuss strategies to achieve this goal. We first consider a kinematical frame, in which fundamental constants with a dimension, such as the speed of light c, the Planck constant h, the Boltzmann constant k(B) or the electron mass m(e) can be used to connect and redefine base units. The various interaction forces of nature are then introduced in a dynamical frame, where they are completely characterized by dimensionless coupling constants such as the fine structure constant alpha or its gravitational analogue alpha(G). This point is discussed by rewriting the Maxwell and Dirac equations with new force fields and these coupling constants. We describe and stress the importance of various quantum effects leading to the advent of this new quantum metrology. In the second part of the paper, we present the status of the seven base units and the prospects of their possible redefinitions from fundamental constants in an experimental perspective. The two parts can be read independently and they point to these same conclusions concerning the redefinitions of base units. The concept of rest mass is directly related to the Compton frequency of a body, which is precisely what is measured by the watt balance. The conversion factor between mass and frequency is the Planck constant, which could therefore be fixed in a realistic and consistent new definition of the kilogram based on its Compton frequency. We discuss also how the Boltzmann constant could be better determined and fixed to replace the present definition of the kelvin.

  15. NEW APPROACHES: Reading in Advanced level physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Dorothy

    1997-11-01

    Teachers often report that their A-level pupils are unwilling to read physics-related material. What is it about physics texts that deters pupils from reading them? Are they just too difficult for 16 - 18 year olds, or is it that pupils lack specific reading skills? This article describes some of the results from my research into pupils' reading of physics-related texts and tries to clarify the situation.

  16. Use of the Berkeley Physics Laboratory to Teach an Advanced Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, James David

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a course, centered around 32 experiments taught for advanced students, designed to develop a laboratory strongly suggestive of contemporary research using relatively sophisticated apparatus. Its unique advantage lies in enriching advanced physics curriculum. (DF)

  17. Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Owen Dennis

    Photonic innovation is becoming ever more important in the modern world. Optical systems are dominating shorter and shorter communications distances, LED's are rapidly emerging for a variety of applications, and solar cells show potential to be a mainstream technology in the energy space. The need for novel, energy-efficient photonic and optoelectronic devices will only increase. This work unites fundamental physics and a novel computational inverse design approach towards such innovation. The first half of the dissertation is devoted to the physics of high-efficiency solar cells. As solar cells approach fundamental efficiency limits, their internal physics transforms. Photonic considerations, instead of electronic ones, are the key to reaching the highest voltages and efficiencies. Proper photon management led to Alta Device's recent dramatic increase of the solar cell efficiency record to 28.3%. Moreover, approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit for any solar cell technology will require light extraction to become a part of all future designs. The second half of the dissertation introduces inverse design as a new computational paradigm in photonics. An assortment of techniques (FDTD, FEM, etc.) have enabled quick and accurate simulation of the "forward problem" of finding fields for a given geometry. However, scientists and engineers are typically more interested in the inverse problem: for a desired functionality, what geometry is needed? Answering this question breaks from the emphasis on the forward problem and forges a new path in computational photonics. The framework of shape calculus enables one to quickly find superior, non-intuitive designs. Novel designs for optical cloaking and sub-wavelength solar cell applications are presented.

  18. Fundamental Physics of the Slow Solar Wind - What do we Know?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Abbo, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y. K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y. M.

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental physical properties of the slow solar wind (SSW), such as density, temperature, outflow speed, heavy ion abundances and charges states were obtained from in-situ measurements at 1AU in the past from WIND, ACE, and other spacecraft. Plasma and magnetic field measurement are available as close as 0.3 AU from Helios data, Spektr-R, and MESSENGER spacecraft. Remote sensing spectroscopic measurements are available in the corona and below from SOHO/UVCS, Hinode, and other missions. One of the major objectives of the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions is to study the sources of the SSW close to the Sun. The present state of understanding of the physics of the SSW is based on the combination of the existing observations, theoretical and numerical 3D MHD and multi-fluid models, that connect between the SSW sources in the corona and the heliosphere. Recently, hybrid models that combine fluid electrons and kinetic ions of the expanding solar wind were developed, and provide further insights of the local SSW plasma heating processes that related to turbulent magnetic fluctuations spectra and kinetic ion instabilities observed in the SSW plasma. These models produce the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the protons and heavier ions as well as the ion anisotropic temperatures. I will discuss the results of the above observations and models, and review the current status of our understanding of the fundamental physics of the SSW. I will review the open questions, and discuss how they could be addressed with near future observations and models.

  19. Advanced Level Physics Students' Conceptions of Quantum Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashhadi, Azam

    This study addresses questions about particle physics that focus on the nature of electrons. Speculations as to whether they are more like particles or waves or like neither illustrate the difficulties with which students are confronted when trying to incorporate the concepts of quantum physics into their overall conceptual framework. Such…

  20. Physical and Chemical Aspects of Pharmaceutical Solids: Fundamentals of Polymorphs, Hydrates and Solvates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutzel-Edens, Susan

    2007-03-01

    Crystal polymorphs are solid phases of a given compound resulting from the possibility of at least two different arrangements of the molecules of that compound in the solid state. Solvates form when the solvent is incorporated in the crystal structure of a compound; hydrates form when water is the solvent of crystallization. The potential effects of crystal polymorphism and hydration on the quality and performance of drug products is widely recognized by the pharmaceutical industry. Investigations of crystal polymorphism and hydration are usually conducted early in drug development to optimize the physical properties of a pharmaceutical solid. Although the thermodynamically most stable crystal form is generally selected for commercial development to mitigate the risk of undesired phase transformations, form selection oftentimes involves a compromise among different physical properties of various drug crystal forms. Controlling polymorph (or hydrate) appearance must be accomplished through careful evaluation of both thermodynamic (tendency toward the formation of more stable crystal forms) and kinetic parameters (which lead to the formation of metastable forms) in the crystallization process. In this presentation, fundamental aspects of polymorphs and solvates (hydrates) will be explored. Particular attention will be given to the structure and stability relationships between polymorphs and hydrates, kinetic vs. thermodynamic transitions, and the impact of polymorphism and hydration on the chemical and physical stability of an active pharmaceutical ingredient.

  1. Educating Scientifically: Advances in Physics Education Research

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Noah

    2007-05-16

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  2. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Noah

    2007-05-16

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  3. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    ScienceCinema

    Finkelstein, Noah [University of Colorado, Colorado, USA

    2016-07-12

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  4. Advancing Successful Physics Majors - The Physics First Year Seminar Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Jason; Petkie, Douglas

    In 2012, the Wright State University physics curriculum introduced a new year-long seminar course required for all new physics majors. The goal of this course is to improve student retention and success via building a community of physics majors and provide them with the skills, mindset, and advising necessary to successfully complete a degree and transition to the next part of their careers. This new course sequence assembles a new cohort of majors annually. To prepare each cohort, students engage in a variety of activities that span from student success skills to more specific physics content while building an entrepreneurial mindset. Students participate in activities including study skills, career night, course planning, campus services, and a department social function. More importantly, students gain exposure to programming, literature searches, data analysis, technical writing, elevator pitches, and experimental design via hands-on projects. This includes the students proposing, designing, and conducting their own experiments. Preliminary evidence indicates increased retention, student success, and an enhanced sense of community among physics undergraduate students, The overall number of majors and students eventually completing their physics degrees has nearly tripled. Associate Professor, Department of Physics.

  5. Relations between nonlinear Riccati equations and other equations in fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    2014-10-01

    Many phenomena in the observable macroscopic world obey nonlinear evolution equations while the microscopic world is governed by quantum mechanics, a fundamental theory that is supposedly linear. In order to combine these two worlds in a common formalism, at least one of them must sacrifice one of its dogmas. Linearizing nonlinear dynamics would destroy the fundamental property of this theory, however, it can be shown that quantum mechanics can be reformulated in terms of nonlinear Riccati equations. In a first step, it will be shown that the information about the dynamics of quantum systems with analytical solutions can not only be obtainable from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation but equally-well from a complex Riccati equation. Comparison with supersymmetric quantum mechanics shows that even additional information can be obtained from the nonlinear formulation. Furthermore, the time-independent Schrödinger equation can also be rewritten as a complex Riccati equation for any potential. Extension of the Riccati formulation to include irreversible dissipative effects is straightforward. Via (real and complex) Riccati equations, other fields of physics can also be treated within the same formalism, e.g., statistical thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamical systems like those obeying a logistic equation as well as wave equations in classical optics, Bose- Einstein condensates and cosmological models. Finally, the link to abstract "quantizations" such as the Pythagorean triples and Riccati equations connected with trigonometric and hyperbolic functions will be shown.

  6. MAJORANA: An Ultra-Low Background Enriched-Germanium Detector Array for Fundamental Physics Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Jason

    2009-10-01

    The Majorana collaboration aims to perform a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) by fielding arrays of HPGe detectors mounted in ultra-clean electroformed-copper cryostats located deep underground. Recent advances in HPGe detector technology, in particular P-type Point-Contact (PPC) detectors, show great promise for identifying and reducing backgrounds to the 0νββ signal, which should result in improved sensitivity over previous generation experiments. The ultra-low energy threshold possible in PPC detectors also enables a broader physics program including sensitive searches for dark matter and axions. The Majorana Demonstrator R&D program will field three ˜20 kg modules of PPC detectors at Sanford Underground Laboratory. Half of the detector mass will be enriched to 86% in ^76Ge. I will present the motivation, design, recent progress and current status of this R&D effort, and discuss its physics reach.

  7. Demonstration of fundamental statistics by studying timing of electronics signals in a physics-based laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Shaun E.; Semkow, Thomas M.; Remling, David J.; Bradt, Clayton J.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed accessible methods to demonstrate fundamental statistics in several phenomena, in the context of teaching electronic signal processing in a physics-based college-level curriculum. A relationship between the exponential time-interval distribution and Poisson counting distribution for a Markov process with constant rate is derived in a novel way and demonstrated using nuclear counting. Negative binomial statistics is demonstrated as a model for overdispersion and justified by the effect of electronic noise in nuclear counting. The statistics of digital packets on a computer network are shown to be compatible with the fractal-point stochastic process leading to a power-law as well as generalized inverse Gaussian density distributions of time intervals between packets.

  8. Development of multi-representation learning tools for the course of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, C.; Siswanto, J.; Kurniawan, A. F.; Nuroso, H.

    2016-08-01

    This research is aimed at designing a learning tool based on multi-representation that can improve problem solving skills. It used the research and development approach. It was applied for the course of Fundamental Physics at Universitas PGRI Semarang for the 2014/2015 academic year. Results show gain analysis value of 0.68, which means some medium improvements. The result of t-test is shows a calculated value of 27.35 and a table t of 2.020 for df = 25 and α = 0.05. Results of pre-tests and post-tests increase from 23.45 to 76.15. Application of multi-representation learning tools significantly improves students’ grades.

  9. Beamline Performance Simulations for the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, P. R.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Huerto, R. R.; Koehler, P.; Desai, D.; Mahurin, R.; Yue, A.; Palmquist, G. R.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are being performed to design and characterize the neutron optics components for the two fundamental neutron physics beamlines at the Spallation Neutron Source. Optimization of the cold beamline includes characterization of the guides and benders, the neutron transmission through the 0.89 nm monochromator, and the expected performance of the four time-of-flight choppers. The locations and opening angles of the choppers have been studied using a simple spreadsheet-based analysis that was developed for other SNS chopper instruments. The spreadsheet parameters are then optimized using Monte Carlo techniques to obtain the results presented in this paper. Optimization of the 0.89 nm beamline includes characterizing the double crystal monochromator and the downstream guides. The simulations continue to be refined as components are ordered and their exact size and performance specifications are determined. PMID:27308115

  10. Beamline Performance Simulations for the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Huffman, P R; Greene, G L; Allen, R R; Cianciolo, V; Huerto, R R; Koehler, P; Desai, D; Mahurin, R; Yue, A; Palmquist, G R; Snow, W M

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are being performed to design and characterize the neutron optics components for the two fundamental neutron physics beamlines at the Spallation Neutron Source. Optimization of the cold beamline includes characterization of the guides and benders, the neutron transmission through the 0.89 nm monochromator, and the expected performance of the four time-of-flight choppers. The locations and opening angles of the choppers have been studied using a simple spreadsheet-based analysis that was developed for other SNS chopper instruments. The spreadsheet parameters are then optimized using Monte Carlo techniques to obtain the results presented in this paper. Optimization of the 0.89 nm beamline includes characterizing the double crystal monochromator and the downstream guides. The simulations continue to be refined as components are ordered and their exact size and performance specifications are determined.

  11. Beyond Classical Information Theory: Advancing the Fundamentals for Improved Geophysical Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, R. A. P.; Pires, C. L.; Hall, J.; Bloeschl, G.

    2016-12-01

    Information Theory, in its original and quantum forms, has gradually made its way into various fields of science and engineering. From the very basic concepts of Information Entropy and Mutual Information to Transit Information, Interaction Information and respective partitioning into statistical synergy, redundancy and exclusivity, the overall theoretical foundations have matured as early as the mid XX century. In the Earth Sciences various interesting applications have been devised over the last few decades, such as the design of complex process networks of descriptive and/or inferential nature, wherein earth system processes are "nodes" and statistical relationships between them designed as information-theoretical "interactions". However, most applications still take the very early concepts along with their many caveats, especially in heavily non-Normal, non-linear and structurally changing scenarios. In order to overcome the traditional limitations of information theory and tackle elusive Earth System phenomena, we introduce a new suite of information dynamic methodologies towards a more physically consistent and information comprehensive framework. The methodological developments are then illustrated on a set of practical examples from geophysical fluid dynamics, where high-order nonlinear relationships elusive to the current non-linear information measures are aptly captured. In doing so, these advances increase the predictability of critical events such as the emergence of hyper-chaotic regimes in ocean-atmospheric dynamics and the occurrence of hydro-meteorological extremes.

  12. Fundamental ecology is fundamental.

    PubMed

    Courchamp, Franck; Dunne, Jennifer A; Le Maho, Yvon; May, Robert M; Thébaud, Christophe; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The primary reasons for conducting fundamental research are satisfying curiosity, acquiring knowledge, and achieving understanding. Here we develop why we believe it is essential to promote basic ecological research, despite increased impetus for ecologists to conduct and present their research in the light of potential applications. This includes the understanding of our environment, for intellectual, economical, social, and political reasons, and as a major source of innovation. We contend that we should focus less on short-term, objective-driven research and more on creativity and exploratory analyses, quantitatively estimate the benefits of fundamental research for society, and better explain the nature and importance of fundamental ecology to students, politicians, decision makers, and the general public. Our perspective and underlying arguments should also apply to evolutionary biology and to many of the other biological and physical sciences. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in electronics and electron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, P.W. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains information on electronics and electron physics. Topics covered include: Theory of the Gaseous Detector Device in the ESEM; Carrier Transport in Bulk Silicon and in Weak Silicon Inversion Layers; and Emission-Imaging Electron-Optical System Design.

  14. The Relationship between Fundamental Movement Skills and Self-Reported Physical Activity during Finnish Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaakkola, Timo; Washington, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that fundamental movement skills (FMS) and physical activity are related. Specifically, earlier studies have demonstrated that the ability to perform a variety of FMS increases the likelihood of children participating in a range of physical activities throughout their lives. To date, however, there have not…

  15. Fundamental Physics Activities in the Hme Directorate of the European Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Minster, Olivier

    The Human Spaceflight, Microgravity, and Exploration (HME) Directorate of the European Space Agency is strongly involved in fundamental physics research. One of the major activities in this field is represented by the ACES (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space) mission. ACES will demonstrate the high performances of a new generation of atomic clocks in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS). Following ACES, a vigorous research program has been recently approved to develop a second generation of atomic quantum sensors for space applications: atomic clocks in the optical domain, aiming at fractional frequency stability and accuracy in the low 10-18 regime; inertial sensors based on matter-wave interferometry for the detection of tiny accelerations and rotations; a facility to study degenerate Bose gases in space. Tests of quantum physics on large distance scales represent another important issue addressed in the HME program. A quantum communication optical terminal has been proposed to perform a test of Bell's inequalities on pairs of entangled photons emitted by a source located on the ISS and detected by two ground stations. In this paper, present activities and future plans will be described and discussed.

  16. Advances in Measurement Technology at NIST's Physical Measurement Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmer, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The NIST mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology. The Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) has responsibility for maintaining national standards for two dozen physical quantities needed for international trade; and, importantly, it carries out advanced research at the frontiers of measurement science to enable extending innovation into new realms and new markets. This talk will highlight advances being made across several sectors of technology; and it will describe how PML interacts with its many collaborators and clients in industry, government, and academe.

  17. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  18. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  19. Fundamental concepts and research priorities for advancing the science of urban stormwater hydrology and flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nytch, C. J.; Meléndez-Ackerman, E. J.; Vivoni, E. R.; Grove, J. M.; Ortiz, J.

    2016-12-01

    In cities, hydrologic processes are drastically altered by human interventions. Modification of land cover and the enhancement of hydraulic efficiency have been documented as root causes of augmented stormwater runoff in urban watersheds, contributing to higher magnitude discharge events that pose flood risks for human communities. Climate change is expected to accelerate the hydrologic cycle, leading to more extreme events and increased flood risk. We present a synthesis of the physical and conceptual components and processes that govern urban stormwater runoff, and highlight key areas for future research. There is limited understanding about the fine-scale spatio-temporal relationships between gray, green, brown, and blue land cover features, the underlying social-ecological mechanisms responsible for their distribution, and the resulting effects on runoff dynamics. Horizontal and vertical complexity of urban morphological features and connectivity with the network of stormwater management infrastructure leads to heterogeneous and non-linear runoff responses that confound efforts for accurately predicting flood hazards. Quantitative analysis is needed to understand how urban drainage network structure varies across stream orders, and illuminate the landscape-scale patterns that potentially serve as organizing principles for generating hydrologic processes across diverse socio-bio-climatic domains and scales. Field-based and modeling studies are also needed to quantify the individual hydrologic capacities of urban structural elements and their cumulative effects at the watershed scale, particularly in developing regions. Integrated, transdisciplinary, multi-scalar approaches to framing and investigating complex socio-eco-techno-hydrologic systems are essential for advancing the science of urban stormwater hydrology, and developing resilient, multifunctional management solutions appropriate to the challenges of urban flooding in the twenty-first century.

  20. Advanced Software Methods for Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lista, L.

    2006-01-01

    Unprecedented data analysis complexity is experienced in modern High Energy Physics experiments. The complexity arises from the growing size of recorded data samples, the large number of data analyses performed by different users in each single experiment, and the level of complexity of each single analysis. For this reason, the requirements on software for data analysis impose a very high level of reliability. We present two concrete examples: the former from BaBar experience with the migration to a new Analysis Model with the definition of a new model for the Event Data Store, the latter about a toolkit for multivariate statistical and parametric Monte Carlo analysis developed using generic programming.

  1. Project for the Institution of an Advanced Course in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    2006-06-01

    A project for an advanced course in physics at the master level, is presented in great detail. The goal of this project is to create a specific and rigorous training for those who want to carry out experimental and theoretical research on "anomalies" in physical science, especially from the point of view of atmospheric physics, plasma physics, photonic physics, biophysics, astronomy and astrophysics. A specific training in powering mental skills is planned as well. The planned teaching program is presented as a two-year course where the following subjects are intended to be taught: cognitive techniques (I and II), radiation physics (I and II), biophysics (I and II), bioastronomy (I and II), history of physics (I and II), didactics of physics, physics of atmospheric plasmas, physics of non-stationary photonic events, physics of non-linear processes, complements of quantum mechanics, quantum informatics, research methodology in physics and astronomy, computer science methods in physics and astronomy, optoelectronics, radioelectronics. Detailed teaching programs, didactics methods, and performance evaluation, are presented for each subject. The technical content of this project is preceded by an ample introduction that shows all the reasons of this kind of physics course, particularly aimed at innovation in physical science.

  2. Design and fundamental understanding of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) assisted grinding using advanced nanolubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Parash

    Abrasive grinding is widely used across manufacturing industry for finishing parts and components requiring smooth superficial textures and precise dimensional tolerances and accuracy. Unlike any other machining operations, the complex thermo-mechanical processes during grinding produce excessive friction-induced energy consumption, heat, and intense contact seizures. Lubrication and cooling from grinding fluids is crucial in minimizing the deleterious effects of friction and heat to maximize the output part quality and process efficiency. The conventional flood grinding approach of an uneconomical application of large quantities of chemically active fluids has been found ineffective to provide sufficient lubrication and produces waste streams and pollutants that are hazardous to human health and environment. Application of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) that cuts the volumetric fluid consumption by 3-4 orders of magnitude have been extensively researched in grinding as a high-productivity and environmentally-sustainable alternative to the conventional flood method. However, the lubrication performance and productivity of MQL technique with current fluids has been critically challenged by the extreme thermo-mechanical conditions of abrasive grinding. In this research, an MQL system based on advanced nanolubricants has been proposed to address the current thermo-mechanical challenges of MQL grinding and improve its productivity. The nanolubricants were composed of inorganic Molybdenum Disulphide nanoparticles (≈ 200 nm) intercalated with organic macromolecules of EP/AW property, dispersed in straight (base) oils---mineral-based paraffin and vegetable-based soybean oil. After feasibility investigations into the grindability of cast iron using MQL with nanolubricants, this research focused on the fundamental understanding of tribological behavior and lubricating mechanisms of nanolubricants as a method to improve the productivity of MQL-assisted surface grinding

  3. Design and validation of a cost-effective physical endoscopic simulator for fundamentals of endoscopic surgery training.

    PubMed

    King, Neil; Kunac, Anastasia; Johnsen, Erik; Gallina, Gregory; Merchant, Aziz M

    2016-11-01

    The American Board of Surgery will require graduating surgical residents to achieve proficiency in endoscopy. Surgical simulation can help residents to prepare for this proficiency test, accelerate skill acquisition, shorten the learning, and improve patient safety. Currently, endoscopic simulators are extremely cost-prohibitive. We therefore designed an inexpensive physical endoscopic simulator to (1) facilitate Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery skills training and (2) teach basic colonoscopy skills, for <$200.00. We constructed the Rutgers Open Source Colonoscopy Simulator (ROSCO) from easily acquired commercial materials. For construct validation, we compared novices to experts in a two-arm non-randomized study. Each participant performed the five tasks and a full cecal intubation on the simulator. Face and content validity surveys were taken by the experts, after the construct validity study to determine the simulator's ability to achieve the intended task with "realism." Data were collected on (1) cost and construction, (2) time to completion of individual tasks, (3) percentage of task completion, and (4) survey statistics. Our simulator requires no advanced expertise, costs $62.77 US, and weighs 8.5 pounds. The ROSCO simulator was clearly able to distinguish expert from novice. Expert task times for completing all five tasks, performing the loop reduction, and reaching the splenic and hepatic flexures on the simulator were significantly better than novice times (p < 0.05). All participants were able to complete all five tasks on the simulator 100 % of the time. Three out of five experts "Agreed" or "Strongly Agreed" with five out of the six statements regarding the simulator's teaching ability. Four out of five experts rated each of the five specific aspects of the simulator as "Realistic" or "Very Realistic." We have designed a low-cost colonoscopy simulator with easily available materials and which requires very little advanced construction expertise

  4. ALPhA: The Advanced Laboratory Physics Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Eric; McCann, Lowell; Reichert, Jonathan; Spalding, Gabe; Essick, John; van Baak, David; Wonnell, Steve

    2011-03-01

    The Advanced Laboratory Physics Association (ALPhA) is a group of people with a shared interest in teaching physics labs at the advanced undergraduate or graduate level. ALPhA works closely with the American Physical Society (APS), the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) to develop new methods for teaching modern experimental physics. In the summer of 2010 we initiated the ALPhA Immersion Program, a three-day short course where instructors visit a lab, do one or more of the local experiments (home-built or commercial) with the local instructor, and learn the experiments well enough to incorporate them into their own programs. These immersions were very well received, with attendees filling up all available slots. In this talk I will describe ALPhA and the Immersions Program and solicit input from the broader community.

  5. Astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics with compact binary coalescence and the Einstein Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeck, C.

    2014-03-01

    The second-generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction are expected to make their first detections within this decade. This will firmly establish gravitational wave physics as an empirical science, and will open up a new era in astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics. Already with the first detections, we will be able to, among other things, establish the nature of short-hard gamma ray bursts, definitively confirm the existence of black holes, measure the Hubble constant in a completely independent way, and for the first time gain access to the genuinely strong-field dynamics of gravity. Hence, it is time to consider the longer-term future of this new field. The Einstein Telescope (ET) is a concrete conceptual proposal for a third-generation gravitational wave observatory, which will be ~ 10 times more sensitive in strain than the second-generation detectors. This will give access to sources at cosmological distances, with a correspondingly higher detection rate. We have given an overview of the science case for ET, with a focus on what can be learned from signals emitted by coalescing compact binaries. Third-generation observatories will allow us to map the coalescence rate out to redshifts z ~ 3, determine the mass functions of neutron stars and black holes, and perform precision measurements of the neutron star equation of state. ET will enable us to study the large-scale structure and evolution of the Universe without recourse to a cosmic distance ladder. Finally, we have discussed how it will allow for high-precision measurements of strong-field, dynamical gravity.

  6. Time Domain Science and Fundamental Physics with the Next-generation Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demorest, Paul; Bower, Geoffrey C.; ngVLA Time Domain/Physics Science Working Group

    2017-01-01

    The Next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) is a design concept for a future large-area radio telescope under development by the NRAO and interested members of the scientific community. The approximate ngVLA specifications call for a frequency range of ~1--116 GHz, ten times the effective collecting area and moderately increased field of view versus the current VLA, and an array configuration consisting of a dense (~km-scale) array core with some baselines extending out to hundreds of km. This instrument will enable new discoveries in many diverse areas of research relevant to modern astronomy; our group has explored the impact the ngVLA will have in time domain astronomy and fundamental physics.Here we present several key science topics considered as part of this work. These include: Searching for and timing radio pulsars at the galactic center -- the frequency coverage and sensitivity of the ngVLA will allow detection of highly-scattered pulsars near Sgr A*. Monitoring these sources will permit unprecedented tests of general relativity. Detecting and characterizing explosive transient sources -- electromagnetic observations of gravitational-wave sources provide complementary information to the GW signals themselves. Observations across the wide frequency range spanned by the ngVLA are critical for energy calorimetry of these events. Finally, with sufficient long-baseline coverage, novel astrometric approaches to cosmology become possible, by watching the expansion of the universe in real time through correlated proper motions of many extragalactic radio sources.

  7. Your Higgs number - how fundamental physics is connected to technology and societal revolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzy; Allen, Roland E.

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental physics, as exemplified by the recently discovered Higgs boson, often appears to be completely disconnected from practical applications and ordinary human life. But this is not really the case, because science, technology, and human affairs are profoundly integrated in ways that are not immediately obvious. We illustrate this by defining a ``Higgs number'' through overlapping activities. Following three different paths, which end respectively in applications of the World Wide Web, digital photography, and modern electronic devices, we find that most people have a Higgs number of no greater than 3. Specific examples chosen for illustration, with their assigned Higgs numbers, are: LHC experimentalists employing the Worldwide Computing Grid (0) - Timothy Berners-Lee (1) - Marissa Mayer, of Google and Yahoo, and Sheryl Sandberg, of Facebook (2) - users of all web-based enterprises (3). CMS and ATLAS experimentalists (0) - particle detector developers (1) - inventors of CCDs and active-pixel sensors (2) - users of digital cameras and camcorders (3). Philip Anderson (0) - John Bardeen (1) - Jack Kilby (2) - users of personal computers, mobile phones, and all other modern electronic devices (3).

  8. The Implementation of a Super Mirror Polarizer at the SNS Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Balascuta, S.; Alarcon, R.; Baessler, S.; Greene, Geoffrey; Mietke, A; Crawford, C.; Milburn, R.; Penttila, Seppo; Prince, J.; Schädler, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new bender supermirror polarizer is used to polarize the cold neutron beam at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source. We present the design of a compensation magnet that was built around the polarizer to minimize the polarizer fringe fields that could compromise the magnetic field requirements of the NPDGamma experiment for the field uniformity in the spin rotator and the field direction in the liquid hydrogen target located downstream from the polarizer. The entire magnetic field environment of the experiment has been analyzed using a finite-element model. Measurements of the magnetic field gradients and field direction have been carried out and the results are less than the upper limits required in the experiment. According to the results the compensated fields meet the stringent magnetic field requirements of the experiment defined by the systematic errors that have to be well below the statistical uncertainty of 10 8 in our main observable, the gamma asymmetry in neutron capture on hydrogen. We describe the design of the magnetic field, the construction of the compensation magnet, and we compare results of the field measurements with the results from the model.

  9. Characterising molecules for fundamental physics: an accurate spectroscopic model of methyltrioxorhenium derived from new infrared and millimetre-wave measurements.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Pierre; Berger, Yann; Huet, Thérèse R; Margulès, Laurent; Motiyenko, Roman; Hendricks, Richard J; Tarbutt, Michael R; Tokunaga, Sean K; Darquié, Benoît

    2017-02-08

    Precise spectroscopic analysis of polyatomic molecules enables many striking advances in physical chemistry and fundamental physics. We use several new high-resolution spectroscopic devices to improve our understanding of the rotational and rovibrational structure of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO), the achiral parent of a family of large oxorhenium compounds that are ideal candidate species for a planned measurement of parity violation in chiral molecules. Using millimetre-wave and infrared spectroscopy in a pulsed supersonic jet, a cryogenic buffer gas cell, and room temperature absorption cells, we probe the ground state and the Re[double bond, length as m-dash]O antisymmetric and symmetric stretching excited states of both CH3(187)ReO3 and CH3(185)ReO3 isotopologues in the gas phase with unprecedented precision. By extending the rotational spectra to the 150-300 GHz range, we characterize the ground state rotational and hyperfine structure up to J = 43 and K = 41, resulting in refinements to the rotational, quartic and hyperfine parameters, and the determination of sextic parameters and a centrifugal distortion correction to the quadrupolar hyperfine constant. We obtain rovibrational data for temperatures between 6 and 300 K in the 970-1015 cm(-1) range, at resolutions down to 8 MHz and accuracies of 30 MHz. We use these data to determine more precise excited-state rotational, Coriolis and quartic parameters, as well as the ground-state centrifugal distortion parameter DK of the (187)Re isotopologue. We also account for hyperfine structure in the rovibrational transitions and hence determine the upper state rhenium atom quadrupole coupling constant eQq'.

  10. Chapter 1: Recent Advances in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2008-10-01

    For millennia, the Sun (and the universe) has been viewed in the visual light. As the bestower of light and life, the ancients made God out of the Sun. With the Babylonians, or with the multiple origins with the Chinese, Egyptians and Indians, quoting the Rig Veda:"All that exists was born from Sūrya, the God of gods.", we have come a long way to understanding the Sun. In the early seventeenth century, however, Galileo showed that the Sun was not an immaculate object. Thus began our scientific interests in our nearest stellar neighbour, the Sun (cf., Figure 1.1.), with its sunspots and the related solar activity. The observations of the Sun and their interpretations are of universal importance for at least two reasons: First, the Sun is the source of energy for the entire planetary system and all aspects of our life have direct impact on what happens on the Sun; and second, the Sun's proximity makes it unique among the billions of stars in the sky of which we can resolve its surface features and study physical processes at work...

  11. Atomic physics at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Cowan, P.L.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne`s 7-GeV synchrotron light source (APS) is expected to commence operations for research early in FY 1996. The Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Research Center (BESSRC) is likewise expected to start its research programs at that time. As members of the BESSRC CAT (Collaborative Access Team), we are preparing, together with atomic physicists from the University of Western Michigan, the University of Tennessee, and University of Notre Dame, to initiate a series of atomic physics experiments that exploit the unique capabilities of the APS, especially its high brilliance for photon energies extending from about 3 keV to more than 50 keV. Most of our early work will be conducted on an undulator beam line and we are thus concentrating on various aspects of that beam line and its associated experimental areas. Our group has undertaken responsibilities in such areas as hutch design, evaluation of undulator performance, user policy, interfacing and instrumentation, etc. Initial experiments will probably utilize existing apparatus. We are, however, planning to move rapidly to more sophisticated measurements involving, for example, ion-beam targets, simultaneous laser excitation, and the spectroscopy of emitted photons.

  12. OSS (Outer Solar System): a fundamental and planetary physics mission to Neptune, Triton and the Kuiper Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, B.; Spilker, L. J.; Anderson, J. D.; André, N.; Asmar, S. W.; Aurnou, J.; Banfield, D.; Barucci, A.; Bertolami, O.; Bingham, R.; Brown, P.; Cecconi, B.; Courty, J.-M.; Dittus, H.; Fletcher, L. N.; Foulon, B.; Francisco, F.; Gil, P. J. S.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Grundy, W.; Hansen, C.; Helbert, J.; Helled, R.; Hussmann, H.; Lamine, B.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Lamy, L.; Lehoucq, R.; Lenoir, B.; Levy, A.; Orton, G.; Páramos, J.; Poncy, J.; Postberg, F.; Progrebenko, S. V.; Reh, K. R.; Reynaud, S.; Robert, C.; Samain, E.; Saur, J.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Schmitz, N.; Selig, H.; Sohl, F.; Spilker, T. R.; Srama, R.; Stephan, K.; Touboul, P.; Wolf, P.

    2012-10-01

    The present OSS (Outer Solar System) mission continues a long and bright tradition by associating the communities of fundamental physics and planetary sciences in a single mission with ambitious goals in both domains. OSS is an M-class mission to explore the Neptune system almost half a century after the flyby of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. Several discoveries were made by Voyager 2, including the Great Dark Spot (which has now disappeared) and Triton's geysers. Voyager 2 revealed the dynamics of Neptune's atmosphere and found four rings and evidence of ring arcs above Neptune. Benefiting from a greatly improved instrumentation, a mission as OSS would result in a striking advance in the study of the farthest planet of the solar system. Furthermore, OSS would provide a unique opportunity to visit a selected Kuiper Belt object subsequent to the passage of the Neptunian system. OSS would help consolidate the hypothesis of the origin of Triton as a Kuiper Belt object captured by Neptune, and to improve our knowledge on the formation of the solar system. The OSS probe would carry instruments allowing precise tracking of the spacecraft during the cruise. It would facilitate the best possible tests of the laws of gravity in deep space. These objectives are important for fundamental physics, as they test General Relativity, our current theoretical description of gravitation, but also for cosmology, astrophysics and planetary science, as General Relativity is used as a tool in all these domains. In particular, the models of solar system formation uses General Relativity to describe the crucial role of gravity. OSS is proposed as an international cooperation between ESA and NASA, giving the capability for ESA to launch an M-class mission towards the farthest planet of the solar system, and to a Kuiper Belt object. The proposed mission profile would allow to deliver a 500 kg class spacecraft. The design of the probe is mainly constrained by the deep space gravity test in order

  13. Investigating fundamental physics and space environment with a dedicated Earth-orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, Roberto

    The near-Earth environment is a place of first choice for performing fundamental physics experiments, given its proximity to Earth and at the same time being relatively quiet dynamically for particular orbital arrangements. This environment also sees a rich phenomenology for what concerns gravitation. In fact, the general theory of relativity is an incredibly accurate description of gravitational phenomenology. However, its overall validity is being questioned by the theories that aim at reconciling it with the microscopic domain. Challenges come also from the ‘mysteries’ of Dark Matter and Dark Energy, though mainly at scales from the galactic up to the cosmological. It is therefore important to precisely test the consequences of the theory -- as well as those of competing ones -- at all the accessible scales. At the same time, the development of high-precision experimental space techniques, which are needed for tests in fundamental physics, opens the way to complementary applications. The growth of the (man-made) orbital debris population is creating problems to the future development of space. The year 2009 witnessed the first accidental collision between two satellites in orbit (Iridium and Cosmos) that led to the creation of more debris. International and national agencies are intervening by issuing and/or adopting guidelines to mitigate the growth of orbital debris. A central tenet of these guidelines requires a presence in space shorter than 25 years to satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO) after the conclusion of their operational lives. However, the determination of the natural lifetime of a satellite in LEO is very uncertain due to a large extent to the short-term and long-term variability of the atmospheric density in LEO and the comparatively low-accuracy of atmospheric density models. Many satellites orbiting in the 500-1200 km region with circular or elliptical orbits will be hard pressed to establish before flight whether or not they meet the 25

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Astrophysics (Advanced Physics Readers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Bob

    2000-07-01

    Here is a handy and attractive reader to support students on post-16 courses. It covers the astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology that are demanded at A-level and offers anyone interested in these fields an interesting and engaging reference book. The author and the production team deserve credit for producing such an attractive book. The content, in ten chapters, covers what one would expect at this level but it is how it is presented that struck me as the book's most powerful asset. Each chapter ends with a summary of key ideas. Line drawings are clear and convey enough information to make them more than illustrations - they are as valuable as the text in conveying information. Full colour is used throughout to enhance illustrations and tables and to lift key sections of the text. A number of colour photographs complement the material and serve to maintain interest and remind readers that astrophysics is about real observable phenomena. Included towards the end is a set of tables offering information on physical and astronomical data, mathematical techniques and constellation names and abbreviations. This last table puzzled me as to its value. There is a helpful bibliography which includes society contacts and a website related to the text. Perhaps my one regret is that there is no section where students are encouraged to actually do some real astronomy. Astrophysics is in danger of becoming an armchair and calculator interest. There are practical projects that students could undertake either for school assessment or for personal interest. Simple astrophotography to capture star trails, observe star colours and estimate apparent magnitudes is an example, as is a simple double-star search. There are dozens more. However, the author's style is friendly and collaborative. He befriends the reader as they journey together through the ideas. There are progress questions at the end of each chapter. Their style tends to be rather closed and they emphasize factual recall

  15. Fundamental properties of fracture and seismicity in a non extensive statistical physics framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos

    2010-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in many scientific disciplines concerns upscaling, that is, of determining the regularities and laws of evolution at some large scale, from those known at a lower scale. Earthquake physics is no exception, with the challenge of understanding the transition from the laboratory scale to the scale of fault networks and large earthquakes. In this context, statistical physics has a remarkably successful work record in addressing the upscaling problem in physics. It is natural then to consider that the physics of many earthquakes has to be studied with a different approach than the physics of one earthquake and in this sense we can consider the use of statistical physics not only appropriate but necessary to understand the collective properties of earthquakes [see Corral 2004, 2005a,b,c;]. A significant attempt is given in a series of works [Main 1996; Rundle et al., 1997; Main et al., 2000; Main and Al-Kindy, 2002; Rundle et al., 2003; Vallianatos and Triantis, 2008a] that uses classical statistical physics to describe seismicity. Then a natural question arises. What type of statistical physics is appropriate to commonly describe effects from fracture level to seismicity scale?? The application of non extensive statistical physics offers a consistent theoretical framework, based on a generalization of entropy, to analyze the behavior of natural systems with fractal or multi-fractal distribution of their elements. Such natural systems where long - range interactions or intermittency are important, lead to power law behavior. We note that this is consistent with a classical thermodynamic approach to natural systems that rapidly attain equilibrium, leading to exponential-law behavior. In the frame of non extensive statistical physics approach, the probability function p(X) is calculated using the maximum entropy formulation of Tsallis entropy which involves the introduction of at least two constraints (Tsallis et al., 1998). The first one is the

  16. The Role of Fisher Information Theory in the Development of Fundamental Laws in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The unifying principle that involves rendering the Fisher information measure an extremum is reviewed. It is shown that with this principle, in conjunction with appropriate constraints, a large number of fundamental laws can be derived from a common source in a unified manner. The resulting economy of thought pertaining to fundamental principles…

  17. The Role of Fisher Information Theory in the Development of Fundamental Laws in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The unifying principle that involves rendering the Fisher information measure an extremum is reviewed. It is shown that with this principle, in conjunction with appropriate constraints, a large number of fundamental laws can be derived from a common source in a unified manner. The resulting economy of thought pertaining to fundamental principles…

  18. Recent advances in indirect drive ICF target physics at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bernat, T P; Collins, G W; Haan, S; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Sutter, L J

    1998-01-13

    In preparation for ignition on the National Ignition Facility, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, working in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Commissariat a 1'Energie Atomique (CEA), and Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester, has performed a broad range of experiments on the Nova and Omega lasers to test the fundamentals of the NIF target designs. These studies have refined our understanding of the important target physics, and have led to many of the specifications for the NIF laser and the cryogenic ignition targets. Our recent work has been focused in the areas of hohlraum energetics, symmetry, shock physics, and target design optimization & fabrication.

  19. Recent Advances in Indirect Drive ICF Target Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, B; Lindl, J; Amendt, P A; Bernat, G W; Collins, G W; Glenzer, S H; Koch, S H; Haan, S; Landen, O L; Suter, L J

    2002-10-08

    In preparation for ignition on the National Ignition Facility, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, working in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Commissariat a lEnergie Atomique (CEA), and Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester, has performed a broad range of experiments on the Nova and Omega lasers to test the fundamentals of the NIF target designs. These studies have refined our understanding of the important target physics, and have led to many of the specifications for the NIF laser and the cryogenic ignition targets. Our recent work has been focused in the areas of hohlraum energetics, symmetry, shock physics, and target design optimization & fabrication.

  20. Progress in Tests of Fundamental Physics Using a Helium-3 and Xenon-129 Zeeman Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenday, Alexander Graham

    We report on improved operation and understanding of the 3He and 129Xe Zeeman maser and its use in testing new theories in fundamental physics. The 3He and 129Xe Zeeman maser can make differential measurements of magnetic field versus new spin dependent forces that couple to the neutron, as 3He and 129Xe have nuclear gyromagnetic ratios that differ by a factor of ˜2.75, but whose spin-1/2 nuclear moments are due almost entirely to unpaired neutrons. Specifically, we evaluate the performance of the 3He and 129Xe maser in terms of searches for Lorentz and CPT symmetry breaking background fields to the universe described by the Standard Model Extension of Kostelecky and coworkers [1] and for placing limits on anomalous spin-spin coupling between neutrons such as those due to spin dependent forces mediated by the proposed axion particle [2]. The 3He and 129Xe maser has previously been used to place a limit on the coupling of the neutron to Lorentz and CPT symmetry violating fields at the level of 10-31 GeV (50 nHz in the 3He Zeeman frequency). Improvements we have made to the maser system have increased our sensitivity by almost a factor of four and we believe reasonable future upgrades could lead to a further order of magnitude improvement. In this work we have also measured the nuclear Zeeman frequencies of a 3He and 129Xe maser while modulating the nuclear spin polarization of a nearby 3He ensemble in a separate glass cell. We place limits on the coupling strength of neutron spin-spin interactions mediated by light pseudoscalar particles like the axion ( gpgp/(4pihc)) at the 3 x 10-7 level for interaction ranges longer than about 40 cm.

  1. Testing fundamental physics with laser ranged satellites: perspectives and goals of the LARASE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Visco, Massimo

    Passive laser-ranged satellites, launched for geodynamics and geophysics purposes, not only have contributed to significant measurements in space geodesy that enabled, among several aspects, a deeper knowledge of the Earth's geopotential (both in its static and dynamic behavior), as well as of the geocenter motion and GM value up to the definition of the terrestrial reference frame, but they also provided an outstanding test bench to fundamental physics, as in the case of the first measurement of the Lense-Thirring precession on the combined nodes of the two LAGEOS satellites, or in the case of the total relativistic precession of the argument of pericenter of LAGEOS II. Indeed, the physical characteristics of such satellites -- such as their low area-to-mass ratio -- as well as those of their orbits, and the availability of high-quality tracking data provided by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), allow for precise tests of gravitational theories. The aim of LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) is to go a step further in the tests of the gravitational interaction in the field of Earth, i.e. in the weak-field and-slow motion limit of general relativity, by the joint analysis of the orbits of the two LAGEOS satellites and that of the most recent LARES satellite. One of the key ingredients to reach such a goal is to provide high-quality updated models for the perturbing non-gravitational forces acting on the surface of such satellites. A large amount of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II has been analyzed using a set of dedicated models for satellite dynamics, and the related post-fit residuals have been analyzed. A parallel work is on-going in the case of LARES that, due to its much lower altitude, is subject to larger gravitational and non-gravitational effects; the latter are mitigated in part by its much lower area-to-mass ratio. Recent work on the data analysis of the orbit of such satellites will be presented together

  2. Directly Observed Physical Activity and Fundamental Motor Skills in Four-Year-Old Children in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iivonen, S.; Sääkslahti, A. K.; Mehtälä, A.; Villberg, J. J.; Soini, A.; Poskiparta, M.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA), its location, social interactions and fundamental motor skills (FMS) were investigated in four-year-old Finnish children in day care. Six skills in the stability, locomotor and manipulative domains were assessed in 53 children (24 boys, 29 girls, normal anthropometry) with the APM-Inventory manual for assessing children's…

  3. Directly Observed Physical Activity and Fundamental Motor Skills in Four-Year-Old Children in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iivonen, S.; Sääkslahti, A. K.; Mehtälä, A.; Villberg, J. J.; Soini, A.; Poskiparta, M.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA), its location, social interactions and fundamental motor skills (FMS) were investigated in four-year-old Finnish children in day care. Six skills in the stability, locomotor and manipulative domains were assessed in 53 children (24 boys, 29 girls, normal anthropometry) with the APM-Inventory manual for assessing children's…

  4. Earthquake precursors in the ionosphere: electrical linkage provided by the fundamental physics of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, Miles

    2013-04-01

    For more than a decade, evidence has been mounting that major earthquakes may be preceded, days to weeks later, by the appearance of local changes in electron density-gradient in the Earth's ionosphere above that area. Such linkage, albeit co-seismic, has been observed even when the earthquake was deep below electrically conducting seawater [1]. This appears to rule out many of the kinds of linkage that have been proposed. My inquiry as to the nature of the physical mechanism by which gravitational force is developed has led me to the surprising finding that the Newtonian potential is inevitably always accompanied by a corresponding positive-body-repelling radial electric field. I have called this the Gravity-Electric (G-E) field and have adduced evidence for its action at many astronomical scales [2 -4]. After outlining the reasoning that has led me to this result I will refer to observations which suggest that the G-E field is indeed the precursor link that we seek. Time permitting, I will show briefly how the likelihood of an ionospheric precursor will, in this case, depend on the plate dynamical mechanism and nature of the pre-quake deformation. Historical background. Newton's work on gravitation astride the end of the 17th century concentrated on the behaviour of the force, not upon its origin.. But he already endorsed the idea of an ubiquitously intervening aether tp convey the force and, as Huygens had already reasoned, also to transmit light waves. Then, in the 1860s, people [5, 6] started to think of fundamental particles as being aether in a vortex-like motion which would, by mutual attraction, provide their mass property and gravitation. In such a set-up, particles and the aether around them would not be dynamically independent, so the Michelson-Morley experiment, 20 years later [7], could equally have been interpreted as supporting that situation, not as disproving the existence of the aether. But, in setting up Relativity (1905-1916), Einstein took the

  5. Studying human immunodeficiencies in humans: advances in fundamental concepts and therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Su, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Immunodeficiencies reveal the crucial role of the immune system in defending the body against microbial pathogens. Given advances in genomics and other technologies, this is currently best studied in humans who have inherited monogenic diseases. Such investigations have provided insights into how gene products normally function in the natural environment and have opened the door to new, exciting treatments for these diseases. PMID:28408979

  6. 2004 Physics and Advanced Technologies In the News

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-11-01

    Several outstanding research activities in the Physics and Advanced Technology Directorate in 2004 were featured in ''Science & Technology Review'', the monthly publication of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Reprints of those articles accompany this report. Here we summarize other science and technology highlights, as well as the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2004.

  7. 2005 Physics and Advanced Technologies in the News

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2006-12-19

    Several outstanding research activities in the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate in 2005 were featured in ''Science and Technology Review'', the monthly publication of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Reprints of those articles accompany this report. Here we summarize other science and technology highlights, as well as the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2005. As part of the World Year of Physics commemorating the 100th anniversary of Einstein's ''miraculous year'', we also highlight ongoing physics research that would not be possible without Einstein's pioneering accomplishments.

  8. Dosimetric validation of the Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation algorithm: fundamental characterization in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca

    2011-05-01

    This corrigendum intends to clarify some important points that were not clearly or properly addressed in the original paper, and for which the authors apologize. The original description of the first Acuros algorithm is from the developers, published in Physics in Medicine and Biology by Vassiliev et al (2010) in the paper entitled 'Validation of a new grid-based Boltzmann equation solver for dose calculation in radiotherapy with photon beams'. The main equations describing the algorithm reported in our paper, implemented as the 'Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation Algorithm' in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system, were originally described (for the original Acuros algorithm) in the above mentioned paper by Vassiliev et al. The intention of our description in our paper was to give readers an overview of the algorithm, not pretending to have authorship of the algorithm itself (used as implemented in the planning system). Unfortunately our paper was not clear, particularly in not allocating full credit to the work published by Vassiliev et al on the original Acuros algorithm. Moreover, it is important to clarify that we have not adapted any existing algorithm, but have used the Acuros XB implementation in the Eclipse planning system from Varian. In particular, the original text of our paper should have been as follows: On page 1880 the sentence 'A prototype LBTE solver, called Attila (Wareing et al 2001), was also applied to external photon beam dose calculations (Gifford et al 2006, Vassiliev et al 2008, 2010). Acuros XB builds upon many of the methods in Attila, but represents a ground-up rewrite of the solver where the methods were adapted especially for external photon beam dose calculations' should be corrected to 'A prototype LBTE solver, called Attila (Wareing et al 2001), was also applied to external photon beam dose calculations (Gifford et al 2006, Vassiliev et al 2008). A new algorithm called Acuros, developed by the Transpire Inc. group, was

  9. Addressing fundamental architectural challenges of an activity-based intelligence and advanced analytics (ABIAA) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, Kevin; Albert, Thomas; Brower, Bernard V.; Pellechia, Matthew F.

    2015-06-01

    The domain of Geospatial Intelligence Analysis is rapidly shifting toward a new paradigm of Activity Based Intelligence (ABI) and information-based Tipping and Cueing. General requirements for an advanced ABIAA system present significant challenges in architectural design, computing resources, data volumes, workflow efficiency, data mining and analysis algorithms, and database structures. These sophisticated ABI software systems must include advanced algorithms that automatically flag activities of interest in less time and within larger data volumes than can be processed by human analysts. In doing this, they must also maintain the geospatial accuracy necessary for cross-correlation of multi-intelligence data sources. Historically, serial architectural workflows have been employed in ABIAA system design for tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination. These simpler architectures may produce implementations that solve short term requirements; however, they have serious limitations that preclude them from being used effectively in an automated ABIAA system with multiple data sources. This paper discusses modern ABIAA architectural considerations providing an overview of an advanced ABIAA system and comparisons to legacy systems. It concludes with a recommended strategy and incremental approach to the research, development, and construction of a fully automated ABIAA system.

  10. Fundamental Studies of the Role of Grain Boundaries on Uniform Corrosion of Advanced Nuclear Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Mitra; Motta, Arthur; Marquis, Emmanuelle

    2016-05-20

    The main objective of this proposal is to develop fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in stable oxide growth. To understand the process of oxide layer destabilization, it is necessary to observe the early stages of corrosion. During conventional studies in which a sample is exposed and examined after removal from the autoclave, the destabilization process will normally have already taken place, and is only examined post facto. To capture the instants of oxide destabilization, it is necessary to observe it in situ; however, significant questions always arise as to the influence of the corrosion geometry and conditions on the corrosion process. Thus, a combination of post facto examinations and in situ studies is proposed, which also combines state-of-the-art characterization techniques to derive a complete understanding of the destabilization process and the role of grain boundaries.

  11. Testing gravity beyond the standard model: status of GAP, an electrostatic accelerometer for interplanetary fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Joel; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise

    Theories beyond the standard model aim to face several challenges: connect gravitation with the other three known forces, and shed light on dark matter and dark energy. Although General Relativity has been incredibly successful at passing laboratory / Solar System scales tests to date, it is a classical theory (hence, incompatible with quantum physics scales) and it fails at explaining large scale astrophysical observations such as galaxy rotation curves and the accelerated expansion of the Universe without introducing dark matter and dark energy. Thus, most theories beyond the standard model explore modifications to General Relativity. Those modifications, whether they consist in adding an extra scalar field or adding a scale-dependence to the gravitation laws, allow us to predict small deviations from General Relativity at laboratory / Solar System scales. For instance, such a deviation could have explained the Pioneer anomaly, where the Pioneer probes were measured to undergo an unexpected acceleration. Although this anomaly has recently been accounted for by an instrumental thermal radiation, precise measurements of the non-gravitational forces applied to the probes would have helped decide whether the observed behavior was due to gravitational or non-gravitational physics. As a result, several missions have been proposed to embark an accelerometer on-board an interplanetary probe. Indeed, an accelerometer will measure the non-gravitational accelerations applied to the probe, thereby separating the potentially measured departures from a pure geodetic trajectory into their gravitational and non-gravitational components, and allowing us to easily constrain General Relativity in deep space. The Gravity Advanced Package (GAP) is an instrument developed for this purpose. It is composed of a 3-axes electrostatic accelerometer called MicroSTAR and a rotating platform called Bias Rejection System. It aims to provide an unbiased measurement of a spacecraft's non

  12. Advances in graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysts for solar energy conversion: fundamentals and materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Kretschmer, Katja; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-08-28

    Graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysis has been regarded as a promising technology for solar energy storage and conversion. In this review, we summarized recent developments of graphene-based photocatalysts, including preparation of graphene-based photocatalysts, typical key advances in the understanding of graphene functions for photocatalytic activity enhancement and methodologies to regulate the electron transfer efficiency in graphene-based composite photocatalysts, by which we hope to offer enriched information to harvest the utmost fascinating properties of graphene as a platform to construct efficient graphene-based composite photocatalysts for solar-to-energy conversion.

  13. The use of advanced physical assessment skills by cardiac nurses.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Linda; Ward, Susan; Barnes, Rhian

    To establish what advanced physical assessment skills are being used by cardiac nurses after they undertook a clinical patient assessment module; and to explore the factors that influence their use of these skills. A longitudinal descriptive approach using convenience sampling was employed. Qualitative data was obtained from individual interviews, non-participant observation within the participants' clinical environment and self-reported activity logs. Five key themes emerged: use of advanced physical assessment skills varied; use and development of skills was linked to personal characteristics; use influenced by perceptions of role boundaries, permission and cooperation; use influenced by participants' perception of nursing and the development of their own nursing practice; and use influenced by the physical environment and the human support within it. Cardiac nurses selectively use physical assessment skills, predominately related to the cardiorespiratory systems. Organisational structure, professional relationships and the professionalism of the individual nurse appear to play a significant part in the use of physical assessment skills. Although the findings from this qualitative study cannot be generalized, they concur with findings from recent research into physical assessment skills used by a variety of UK nurses. The implications identified are: first, for those who provide the education, in terms of what should be taught and facilitated; and second, for organizations, in ensuring staff have assessment skills relevant to their role and that systems are in place to enable the development of a supportive and progressive culture that embraces modernization congruent with healthcare policy.

  14. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  15. Amphiphile nanoarchitectonics: from basic physical chemistry to advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Muruganathan; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Mori, Taizo; Ji, Qingmin; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-14

    Amphiphiles, either synthetic or natural, are structurally simple molecules with the unprecedented capacity to self-assemble into complex, hierarchical geometries in nanospace. Effective self-assembly processes of amphiphiles are often used to mimic biological systems, such as assembly of lipids and proteins, which has paved a way for bottom-up nanotechnology with bio-like advanced functions. Recent developments in nanostructure formation combine simple processes of assembly with the more advanced concept of nanoarchitectonics. In this perspective, we summarize research on self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules such as lipids, surfactants or block copolymers that are a focus of interest for many colloid, polymer, and materials scientists and which have become increasingly important in emerging nanotechnology and practical applications, latter of which are often accomplished by amphiphile-like polymers. Because the fundamental science of amphiphiles was initially developed for their solution assembly then transferred to assemblies on surfaces as a development of nanotechnological techniques, this perspective attempts to mirror this development by introducing solution systems and progressing to interfacial systems, which are roughly categorized as (i) basic properties of amphiphiles, (ii) self-assembly of amphiphiles in bulk phases, (iii) assembly on static surfaces, (iv) assembly at dynamic interfaces, and (v) advanced topics from simulation to application. This progression also represents the evolution of amphiphile science and technology from simple assemblies to advanced assemblies to nanoarchitectonics.

  16. Plans and Preliminary Results of Fundamental Studies of Ice Crystal Icing Physics in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Bartkus, Tadas

    2016-01-01

    This presentation accompanies the paper titled Plans and Preliminary Results of Fundamental Studies of Ice Crystal Icing Physics in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. NASA is evaluating whether PSL, in addition to full-engine and motor-driven-rig tests, can be used for more fundamental ice-accretion studies that simulate the different mixed-phase icing conditions along the core flow passage of a turbo-fan engine compressor. The data from such fundamental accretion tests will be used to help develop and validate models of the accretion process. This presentation (and accompanying paper) presents data from some preliminary testing performed in May 2015 which examined how a mixed-phase cloud could be generated at PSL using evaporative cooling in a warmer-than-freezing environment.

  17. Plans and Preliminary Results of Fundamental Studies of Ice Crystal Icing Physics in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Bartkus, Tadas

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes plans and preliminary results for using the NASA Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) to experimentally study the fundamental physics of ice-crystal ice accretion. NASA is evaluating whether this facility, in addition to full-engine and motor-driven-rig tests, can be used for more fundamental ice-accretion studies that simulate the different mixed-phase icing conditions along the core flow passage of a turbo-fan engine compressor. The data from such fundamental accretion tests will be used to help develop and validate models of the accretion process. This paper presents data from some preliminary testing performed in May 2015 which examined how a mixed-phase cloud could be generated at PSL using evaporative cooling in a warmer-than-freezing environment.

  18. A perfect time to harness advanced molecular technologies to explore the fundamental biology of Toxocara species.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B

    2013-04-15

    Toxocarosis is of major canine health and socioeconomic importance worldwide. Although many studies have given insights into toxocarosis, to date, there has been limited exploration of the molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, epidemiology and ecology of Toxocara species as well as parasite-host interactions using '-omic' technologies. The present article gives a background on Toxocara species and toxocarosis, describes molecular tools for specific identification and genetic analysis, and provides a prospective view of the benefits that advanced molecular technologies will have towards better understanding the parasites and disease. Tackling key biological questions employing a 'systems biology' approach should lead to new and improved strategies for the treatment, diagnosis and control of toxocarosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. System studies for quasi-steady-state advanced physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1983-11-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of veriation in physics parameters and technology limits on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, high beta, quasi-steady-state tokamak for the purpose of fusion engineering experimentation. The features and characteristics chosen from each study were embodied into a single Advanced Physics Tokamak design for which a self-consistent set of parameters was generated and a value of capital cost was estimated.

  20. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Peiris, Hiranya V. E-mail: s.feeney@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: a.jaffe@imperial.ac.uk

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)∼1.3×10{sup −4}, σ(n{sub t})∼0

  1. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)~1.3×10-4, σ(nt)~0.03, σ( ns )~1.8×10

  2. Advanced Swimming, Phase II--Advanced Swimmer; Physical Education: 5551.48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutting, Dick

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 7-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Advanced swimming. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The first two sections of the guides are devoted to course guidelines, description, and broad goal statement. The next two sections list behavioral and skill objectives and course content. The fifth section presents learning activities and…

  3. Optical Second Harmonic Generation in Plasmonic Nanostructures: From Fundamental Principles to Advanced Applications.

    PubMed

    Butet, Jérémy; Brevet, Pierre-François; Martin, Olivier J F

    2015-11-24

    Plasmonics has emerged as an important research field in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Recently, significant attention has been devoted to the observation and the understanding of nonlinear optical processes in plasmonic nanostructures, giving rise to the new research field called nonlinear plasmonics. This review provides a comprehensive insight into the physical mechanisms of one of these nonlinear optical processes, namely, second harmonic generation (SHG), with an emphasis on the main differences with the linear response of plasmonic nanostructures. The main applications, ranging from the nonlinear optical characterization of nanostructure shapes to the optimization of laser beams at the nanoscale, are summarized and discussed. Future directions and developments, made possible by the unique combination of SHG surface sensitivity and field enhancements associated with surface plasmon resonances, are also addressed.

  4. (Advanced accelerator physics featuring the problems of small rings)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1989-10-16

    The traveler attended the CERN Accelerator School and Uppsala University short course on Advanced Accelerator Physics held on the University campus, Uppsala, Sweden, from September 18-29, 1989. The course, attended by 81 people, was well conceived, well presented, and informative. The course was organized and specialized on the problems of small rings. The traveler also visited the CELSIUS ring facility of Uppsala University and the CRYRING ring facility of the Manne Siegbahn Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

  5. Nanotechnology in hyperthermia cancer therapy: From fundamental principles to advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Beik, Jaber; Abed, Ziaeddin; Ghoreishi, Fatemeh S; Hosseini-Nami, Samira; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Kamrava, S Kamran

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we present an in-depth review of recent breakthroughs in nanotechnology for hyperthermia cancer therapy. Conventional hyperthermia methods do not thermally discriminate between the target and the surrounding normal tissues, and this non-selective tissue heating can lead to serious side effects. Nanotechnology is expected to have great potential to revolutionize current hyperthermia methods. To find an appropriate place in cancer treatment, all nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods and their risks/benefits must be thoroughly understood. In this review paper, we extensively examine and compare four modern nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods. For each method, the possible physical mechanisms of heat generation and enhancement due to the presence of nanoparticles are explained, and recent in vitro and in vivo studies are reviewed and discussed. Nano-Photo-Thermal Therapy (NPTT) and Nano-Magnetic Hyperthermia (NMH) are reviewed as the two first exciting approaches for targeted hyperthermia. The third novel hyperthermia method, Nano-Radio-Frequency Ablation (NaRFA) is discussed together with the thermal effects of novel nanoparticles in the presence of radiofrequency waves. Finally, Nano-Ultrasound Hyperthermia (NUH) is described as the fourth modern method for cancer hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Emotions beyond the laboratory: theoretical fundaments, study design, and analytic strategies for advanced ambulatory assessment.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Frank H; Grossman, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Questionnaire and interview assessment can provide reliable data on attitudes and self-perceptions on emotion, and experimental laboratory assessment can examine functional relations between stimuli and reactions under controlled conditions. On the other hand, ambulatory assessment is less constrained and provides naturalistic data on emotion in daily life, with the potential to (1) assure external validity of laboratory findings, (2) provide normative data on prevalence, quality and intensity of real-life emotion and associated processes, (3) characterize previously unidentified emotional phenomena, and (4) model real-life stimuli for representative laboratory research design. Technological innovations now allow for detailed ambulatory study of emotion across domains of subjective experience, overt behavior and physiology. However, methodological challenges abound that may compromise attempts to characterize biobehavioral aspects of emotion in the real world. For example, emotional effects can be masked by social engagement, mental and physical workloads, as well as by food intake and circadian and quasi-random variation in metabolic activity. The complexity of data streams and multitude of factors that influence them require a high degree of context specification for meaningful data interpretation. We consider possible solutions to typical and often overlooked issues related to ambulatory emotion research, including aspects of study design decisions, recording devices and channels, electronic diary implementation, and data analysis.

  7. Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children living in low-income communities: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known regarding children’s fundamental movement skill competency and their physical activity during key time periods of the school day (i.e., lunchtime, recess and after-school). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between fundamental movement skill competency and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) throughout the school day among children attending primary schools in low-income communities. Methods Eight primary schools from low-income communities and 460 children (8.5 ± 0.6 years, 54% girls) were involved in the study. Children’s fundamental movement skill competency (TGMD-2; 6 locomotor and 6 object-control skills), objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X + accelerometers), height, weight and demographics were assessed. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to assess the cross-sectional associations between fundamental movement skills and MVPA. Results After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and socio-economic status, locomotor skill competency was positively associated with total (P = 0.002, r = 0.15) and after-school (P = 0.014, r = 0.13) MVPA. Object-control skill competency was positively associated with total (P < 0.001, r = 0.20), lunchtime (P = 0.03, r = 0.10), recess (P = 0.006, r = 0.11) and after-school (P = 0.022, r = 0.13) MVPA. Conclusions Object-control skill competency appears to be a better predictor of children’s MVPA during school-based physical activity opportunities than locomotor skill competency. Improving fundamental movement skill competency, particularly object-control skills, may contribute to increased levels of children’s MVPA throughout the day. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN

  8. Revisiting the fundamental physical chemistry in heterogeneous photocatalysis: its thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-02-07

    Although the history of photocatalysis research is not so long, many researchers have studied photocatalysis and a large number of papers on photocatalysis have been published. The objectives of this review paper are to revisit the fundamentals of photocatalysis, especially its thermodynamics and kinetics, which have not been reexamined in recent studies, to clarify the problems, if any, that prevent developments in the field of photocatalysis, and to present insights for future progress.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

    2006-09-01

    INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT

  10. The Fundamental Principles of the Universe and the Origin of Physical Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    In this essay the ontological structure of reality is explored. The question of reducibility of biology to physics is considered in the context of their ultimate principles. It is shown that biology is an ontologically autonomous science and is based on its own, independent ultimate principle that is independent from that of physics. In the next step it is shown that self-consciousness represents a separate realm with its own, ontologically autonomous, ultimate principle. Understanding that reality is based on ultimate principles, a new possibility arises to interpret the origin of physical laws.

  11. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1979-September 1980: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, Mitio; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Dehmer, J. L.; Stockbauer, Roger; Dill, Dan; Parr, A. C.; Jackson, K. H.; Zare, R. N.; Person, J. C.; Nicole, P. P.; Fowler, D. E.; Codling, K.; West, J. B.; Ederer, D. L.; Cole, B. E.; Loomba, D.; Wallace, Scott; Swanson, J. R.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Spence, David; Chupka, W. A.; Stevens, C. M.; Shyn, W. T.; Sharp, W. E.; Kim, Y. K.; Eggarter, E.; Baer, T.; Hanson, J. D.; Shimamura, Isao; Dillon, Michael A.

    1981-09-01

    Research is reported on the physics and chemistry of atoms, ions, and molecules, especially their interactions with external agents such as photons and electrons. Individual items from the report were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  12. Transitioning a Fundamental Research Program to Align with the NASA Exploration Initiative-Perspectives from Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2004-01-01

    A new Vision for Space Exploration was announced earlier this year by U.S. President George W. Bush. NASA has evaluated on-going programs for strategic alignment with this vision. The evaluation proceeded at a rapid pace and is resulting in changes to the scope and focus of experimental research that will be conducted in support of the new vision. The existing network of researchers in the physical sciences - a highly capable, independent, and loosely knitted community - typically have shared conclusions derived from their work within appropriate discipline-specific peer reviewed journals and publications. The initial result of introducing this Vision for Space Exploration has been to shift research focus from a broad coverage of numerous, widely varying topics into a research program focused on a nearly-singular set of supporting research objectives to enable advances in space exploration. Two of these traditional physical science research disciplines, Combustion Science and Fluid Physics, are implementing a course adjustment from a portfolio dominated by "Fundamental Science Research" to one focused nearly exclusively on supporting the Exploration Vision. Underlying scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure of the Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics disciplines do provide essential research capabilities to support the contemporary thrusts of human life support, radiation countermeasures, human health, low gravity research for propulsion and materials and, ultimately, research conducted on the Moon and Mars. A perspective on how these two research disciplines responded to the course change will be presented. The relevance to the new NASA direction is provided, while demonstrating through two examples how the prior investment in fundamental research is being brought to bear on solving the issues confronting the successful implementation of the exploration goals.

  13. Introduction: the fundamental constants of physics, precision measurements and the base units of the SI.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Terry; Burnett, Keith

    2005-09-15

    This is a short introductory note to the texts of lectures presented at a Royal Society Discussion meeting held on 14-15 February 2005 and now published in this issue of Philosophical Transactions A. It contains a brief resumé of the papers in the order they were presented at the meeting. This issue contains the texts of all of the presentations except those of Christophe Salomon, on cold atom clocks and tests of fundamental theory, and Francis Everitt, on Gravity Probe B, which were, unfortunately, not available.

  14. The CODEX-ESPRESSO experiment: Cosmic dynamics, fundamental physics, planets and much more...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.; Avila, G.; Bonifacio, P.; Bouchy, F.; Carswell, B.; D'Odorico, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Delabre, B.; Dekker, H.; Dessauges, M.; Dimarcantonio, P.; Garcia-Lopez, R.; Grazian, A.; Haehnelt, M.; Herreros, J. M.; Israelian, G.; Levshakov, S.; Liske, J.; Lovis, C.; Manescau, A.; Martin, E.; Mayor, M.; Megevand, D.; Molaro, P.; Murphy, M.; Pasquini, L.; Pepe, F.; Perez, J.; Queloz, D.; Rebolo, R.; Santin, P.; Shaver, P.; Spanò, P.; Udry, S.; Vanzella, E.; Viel, M.; Zapatero, M. R.; Zerbi, F.; Zucker, S.

    2007-09-01

    CODEX, a high resolution, super-stable spectrograph to be fed by the E-ELT, the most powerful telescope ever conceived, will for the first time provide the possibility of directly measuring the change of the expansion rate of the Universe with time and much more, from the variability of fundamental constants to the search for other earths. A study for the implementation at the VLT of a precursor of CODEX, dubbed ESPRESSO, is presently carried out by a collaboration including ESO, IAC, INAF, IoA Cambridge and Observatoire de Geneve. The present talk is focused on the cosmological aspects of the experiment.

  15. Fundamental neutron physics at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Modern neutron sources and modern neutron science share a common origin in mid twentieth century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for the study of condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and primarily justified) as tools for condensed matter research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities carried out at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for the continuation of this program of research.

  16. Astrophysical tests for radiative decay of neutrinos and fundamental physics implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Brown, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative lifetime tau for the decay of massious neutrinos was calculated using various physical models for neutrino decay. The results were then related to the astrophysical problem of the detectability of the decay photons from cosmic neutrinos. Conversely, the astrophysical data were used to place lower limits on tau. These limits are all well below predicted values. However, an observed feature at approximately 1700 A in the ultraviolet background radiation at high galactic latitudes may be from the decay of neutrinos with mass approximately 14 eV. This would require a decay rate much larger than the predictions of standard models but could be indicative of a decay rate possible in composite models or other new physics. Thus an important test for substructure in leptons and quarks or other physics beyond the standard electroweak model may have been found.

  17. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (3/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  18. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (1/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  19. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (3/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-08

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  20. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (2/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  1. Revealing Fundamental Physics from the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment Using Deep Neural Networks

    DOE PAGES

    Racah, Evan; Ko, Seyoon; Sadowski, Peter; ...

    2017-02-02

    Experiments in particle physics produce enormous quantities of data that must be analyzed and interpreted by teams of physicists. This analysis is often exploratory, where scientists are unable to enumerate the possible types of signal prior to performing the experiment. Thus, tools for summarizing, clustering, visualizing and classifying high-dimensional data are essential. Here in this work, we show that meaningful physical content can be revealed by transforming the raw data into a learned high-level representation using deep neural networks, with measurements taken at the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment as a case study. We further show how convolutional deep neural networksmore » can provide an effective classification filter with greater than 97% accuracy across different classes of physics events, significantly better than other machine learning approaches.« less

  2. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (1/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-08

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  3. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (2/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-07

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  4. Improving fundamental abilities of atomic force microscopy for investigating quantitative nanoscale physical properties of complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.

    Measurements of local material properties of complex biological systems (e.g. live cells and viruses) in their respective physiological conditions are extremely important in the fields of biophysics, nanotechnology, material science, and nanomedicine. Yet, little is known about the structure-function-property relationship of live cells and viruses. In the case of live cells, the measurements of progressive variations in viscoelastic properties in vitro can provide insight to the mechanistic processes underpinning morphogenesis, mechano-transduction, motility, metastasis, and many more fundamental cellular processes. In the case of living viruses, the relationship between capsid structural framework and the role of the DNA molecule interaction within viruses influencing their stiffness, damping and electrostatic properties can shed light in virological processes like protein subunits assembly/dissassembly, maturation, and infection. The study of mechanics of live cells and viruses has been limited in part due to the lack of technology capable of acquiring high-resolution (nanoscale, subcellular) images of its heterogeneous material properties which vary widely depending on origin and physical interaction. The capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for measuring forces and topography with sub-nm precision have greatly contributed to research related to biophysics and biomechanics during the past two decades. AFM based biomechanical studies have the unique advantage of resolving/mapping spatially the local material properties over living cells and viruses. However, conventional AFM techniques such as force-volume and quasi-static force-distance curves are too low resolution and low speed to resolve interesting biophysical processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics for cells or assembly/dissasembly of viruses. To overcome this bottleneck, a novel atomic force microscopy mode is developed, that leads to sub-10-nm resolution and sub-15-minutes mapping of local

  5. Standard cell pin access and physical design in advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Cline, Brian; Yeric, Greg; Pan, David Z.

    2016-03-01

    Standard cell pin access has become one of the most challenging issues for the back-end physical design in sub-14nm technology nodes due to increased pin density, limited number of routing tracks, and complex DFM rules/constraints from multiple patterning lithography. The standard cell I/O pin access problem is very difficult also because the access points of each pin are limited and they interfere with each other. There have been several studies across various standard cell and physical design stages, including standard cell pin access optimization, placement mitigation and routing planning, to achieve overall pin access optimization. In this paper, we will introduce a holistic approach across different design stages to deal with the pin access issue while accommodating the complex DFM constraints in advanced lithography.

  6. Standard-Model Tests with Superallowed {beta} Decay: Nuclear Data Applied to Fundamental Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.C.

    2005-05-24

    The study of superallowed nuclear {beta} decay currently provides the most precise and convincing confirmation of the conservation of the vector current (CVC) and is a key component of the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, a basic pillar of the Electroweak Standard Model. Experimentally, the Q-value, half-life, and branching ratio for superallowed transitions must be determined with a precision better than 0.1%. This demands metrological techniques be applied to short-lived ({approx}1 s) activities and that strict standards be employed in surveying the body of world data. The status of these fundamental studies is summarized and recent work described.

  7. Identifying and addressing specific student difficulties in advanced thermal physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Trevor I.

    As part of an ongoing multi-university research study on student understanding of concepts in thermal physics at the upper division, I identified several student difficulties with topics related to heat engines (especially the Carnot cycle), as well as difficulties related to the Boltzmann factor. In an effort to address these difficulties, I developed two guided-inquiry worksheet activities (a.k.a. tutorials) for use in advanced undergraduate thermal physics courses. Both tutorials seek to improve student understanding of the utility and physical background of a particular mathematical expression. One tutorial focuses on a derivation of Carnot's theorem regarding the limit on thermodynamic efficiency, starting from the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The other tutorial helps students gain an appreciation for the origin of the Boltzmann factor and when it is applicable; focusing on the physical justification of its mathematical derivation, with emphasis on the connections between probability, multiplicity, entropy, and energy. Student understanding of the use and physical implications of Carnot's theorem and the Boltzmann factor was assessed using written surveys both before and after tutorial instruction within the advanced thermal physics courses at the University of Maine and at other institutions. Classroom tutorial sessions at the University of Maine were videotaped to allow in-depth scrutiny of student successes and failures following tutorial prompts. I also interviewed students on various topics related to the Boltzmann factor to gain a more complete picture of their understanding and inform tutorial revisions. Results from several implementations of my tutorials at the University of Maine indicate that students did not have a robust understanding of these physical principles after lectures alone, and that they gain a better understanding of relevant topics after tutorial instruction; Fisher's exact tests yield statistically significant improvement at the

  8. Particle Size Measurements from the first Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics Test in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael C.; Bachalo, William; Kurek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This presentation shows particle measurements by the Artium Technologies, Inc. Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the first Fundamental Ice Crystal Icing Physics test conducted in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The work focuses on humidity sweeps at a larger and a smaller median volumetric diameter. The particle size distribution, number density, and water content measured by the Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the sweeps are presented and compared. The current capability for these two instruments to measure and discriminate ICI conditions is examined.

  9. Particle Size Measurements From the First Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics Test in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael C.; Bachalo, William; Kurek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents particle measurements by the Artium Technologies, Inc. Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the first Fundamental Ice Crystal Icing Physics test conducted in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The work focuses on humidity sweeps at a larger and a smaller median volumetric diameter. The particle size distribution, number density, and water content measured by the Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the sweeps are presented and compared. The current capability for these two instruments to measure and discriminate ICI conditions is examined.

  10. Pragmatic evaluation of the Go2Play Active Play intervention on physical activity and fundamental movement skills in children.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Avril; Hughes, Adrienne R; Janssen, Xanne; Reilly, John J

    2017-09-01

    Active play is a novel approach to addressing low physical activity levels and fundamental movement skills (FMS) in children. This study aimed to determine if a new school-based, 'Go2Play Active Play' intervention improved school day physical activity and FMS. This was a pragmatic evaluation conducted in Scotland during 2015-16. Participants (n = 172; mean age = 7 years) were recruited from seven primary schools taking part in the 5-month intervention, plus 24 participants not receiving the intervention were recruited to act as a comparison group.189 participants had physical activity measured using an Actigraph GT3X accelerometer at baseline and again at follow-up 5 months later. A sub-sample of participants from the intervention (n = 102) and comparison (n = 21) groups had their FMS assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2) at baseline and follow-up. Changes in school day physical activity and FMS variables were examined using repeated measures ANOVA. The main effect was 'group' on 'time' from baseline to follow-up. Results indicated there was a significant interaction for mean counts per minute and percent time in sedentary behavior, light intensity physical activity and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (all p < 0.01) for school day physical activity. There was a significant interaction for gross motor quotient (GMQ) score (p = 0.02) and percentile (p = 0.04), locomotor skills score and percentile (both p = 0.02), but no significant interaction for object control skills score (p = 0.1) and percentile (p = 0.3). The Go2Play Active Play intervention may be a promising way of improving physical activity and FMS but this needs to be confirmed in an RCT.

  11. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  12. Advanced physical assessment skills: implementation of a module.

    PubMed

    Aldridge-Bent, Sharon

    2011-02-01

    This article aims to explore and examine advanced physical assessment skills and the role of the district nurse. It will particularly highlight district nurses' perceptions of how they may implement skills learnt on a new module introduced into the Community Health Care Nursing degree at a university in London. Physical assessment skills have traditionally been viewed as part of a doctor's role; however, with the advancement of nursing roles, it is argued that it has become a key nursing skill. As Government policy continues to expect health professionals to keep patients in the community who have complex health and social care needs, the role of the district nurse presents as 'best placed' to take on this challenge (Department of Health (DH), 2005a; 2005b). Evaluation of the district nurses' perceptions of their practice is shared here, highlighting some of the challenges that they face. The article will address the complexity of developing a curriculum in response to the DH initiatives and the importance of listening to students on courses.

  13. Quantum corrections in modern gauge theories of fundamental interactions and the search for new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchini, R.

    1988-01-01

    We show that the analysis of the quantum effects in gauge theories yields several constraints which may be used to test their internal consistency and physical viability. We have studied, in particular, the Higgs sector of the minimal standard model and tested the universality of the weak interactions and the conserved-vector-current hypothesis. Finally, we have analyzed modular invariance in the closed bosonic string.

  14. Interactive fundamental physics. [Final report], April 15, 1992--November 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton`s first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered ``hypermedia`` structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have ``declined`` to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  15. Iron-oxide colloidal nanoclusters: from fundamental physical properties to diagnosis and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulou, Athanasia; Brintakis, Konstantinos; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Angelakeris, Mavroeidis; Vasilakaki, Marianna; Trohidou, Kalliopi; Douvalis, Alexios P.; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Ranella, Anthi; Manna, Liberato; Lappas, Alexandros

    2014-03-01

    Research on magnetic nanocrystals attracts wide-spread interest because of their challenging fundamental properties, but it is also driven by problems of practical importance to the society, ranging from electronics (e.g. magnetic recording) to biomedicine. In that respect, iron oxides are model functional materials as they adopt a variety of oxidation states and coordinations that facilitate their use. We show that a promising way to engineer further their technological potential in diagnosis and therapy is the assembly of primary nanocrystals into larger colloidal entities, possibly with increased structural complexity. In this context, elevated-temperature nanochemistry (c.f. based on a polyol approach) permitted us to develop size-tunable, low-cytotoxicity iron-oxide nanoclusters, entailing iso-oriented nanocrystals, with enhanced magnetization. Experimental (magnetometry, electron microscopy, Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopies) results supported by Monte Carlo simulations are reviewed to show that such assemblies of surface-functionalized iron oxide nanocrystals have a strong potential for innovation. The clusters' optimized magnetic anisotropy (including microscopic surface spin disorder) and weak ferrimagnetism at room temperature, while they do not undermine colloidal stability, endow them a profound advantage as efficient MRI contrast agents and hyperthermic mediators with important biomedical potential.

  16. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook.

  17. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 2/Extended, Chapters 22 - 45, Enhanced Problems Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert

    2002-04-01

    PART III. Electric Charge. Electric Fields. Gauss' Law. Electric Potential. Capacitance. Current and Resistance. Circuits. Magnetic Fields. Magnetic Fields Due to Currents. Induction and Inductance. Magnetism of Matter; Maxwell's Equation. Electromagnetic Oscillations and Alternating Current. PART IV. Electromagnetic Waves. Images. Interference. Diffraction. Relativity. PART V. Photons and Matter Waves. More About Matter Waves. All About Atoms. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Nuclear Physics. Energy from the Nucleus. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendices. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions, Exercises, and Problems. Index.

  18. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1981-December 1982. Pt. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This document is the twelfth Annual Report of our Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry Program. Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. We chose these areas of study in view of our matic goals; that is to say, we chose them so that the eventual outcome of our work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support our research. First, we endeavor to determine theoretically and experimentally cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, we study the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry.

  19. Novel Infrared Coherent Sources and Techniques for Spectroscopic Test of Fundamental Physics Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, P. Cancio; Galli, I.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.

    2013-06-01

    Recent achievements in high sensitivity and precision molecular spectroscopy in the mid-IR open new perspectives for experiments looking for possible violations of the basic postulates in quantum mechanics or quantum electro-dynamics in simple molecular systems. A new generation of hybrid infrared sources, including a direct link to optical frequency comb synthesizers (OFCSs) is under development. They provide metrological frequency precision and sensitivities that have achieved record levels of tens of parts-per-quadrillion when appropriate spectroscopic techniques are implemented. Such very recent developments will be reviewed. An example of possible application to the test of fundamental principles is attacking the symmetrization postulate (SP). Actually, the requirement of symmetry of the wave function under exchange of identical particles has a striking demonstration in the spectra of molecules including identical nuclei. The basic idea of the spectroscopic tests is to search with extremely high sensitivity for (weak) molecular lines involving the forbidden states. Since the early test of SP violation in bosonic particles, ^{12}C^{16}O_2 molecule has been considered a playground system. An upper limit of 10^{-11} to such violation was measured more than one decade ago by our group. The recent developed spectroscopic technique^{d,e} measured a minimum detected CO_2 gas pressures, in a 1-Hz bandwidth, of a few tens of femtobar, which could improve the previous test by more than two orders of magnitude. Progress in high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements in view of new violation tests will be reviewed, to investigate molecules with two and also three identical nuclei, like SO_3 and NH_3. I. Galli et al., Opt. Lett. 35, 3616 (2010). I. Ricciardi et al., Opt. Express 20, 9178 (2012). S. Borri, et al., Opt. Lett. 37, 1011 (2012). G. Giusfredi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 110801(2010). I. Galli et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 270802 (2011). D. Mazzotti et al

  20. Fundamental and functional aspects of mesoscopic architectures with examples in physics, cell biology, and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Ziya

    2011-08-01

    How small can a macroscopic object be made without losing its intended function? Obviously, the smallest possible size is determined by the size of an atom, but it is not so obvious how many atoms are required to assemble an object so small, and yet that performs the same function as its macroscopic counterpart. In this review, we are concerned with objects of intermediate nature, lying between the microscopic and the macroscopic world. In physics and chemistry literature, this regime in-between is often called mesoscopic, and is known to bear interesting and counterintuitive features. After a brief introduction to the concept of mesoscopic systems from the perspective of physics, we discuss the functional aspects of mesoscopic architectures in cell biology, and supramolecular chemistry through many examples from the literature. We argue that the biochemistry of the cell is largely regulated by mesoscopic functional architectures; however, the significance of mesoscopic phenomena seems to be quite underappreciated in biological sciences. With this motivation, one of our main purposes here is to emphasize the critical role that mesoscopic structures play in cell biology and biochemistry.

  1. Revealing Fundamental Physical Properties of AGN with NuSTAR, XMM and Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura; Fuerst, F.; Walton, D.; Madejski, G. M.; Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Risaliti, G.; Elvis, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Harrison, F.; Stern, D.; the NuSTAR Team

    2014-01-01

    In its first year of operation, the NuSTAR X-ray telescope has opened a new window onto the high-energy universe by providing the first focused images and high signal-to-noise (S/N) data in the 3-80 keV band. The broad energy range of NuSTAR has revolutionized our ability to probe the physics at work in the cores of active galactic nuclei (AGN) around supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Obtaining simultaneous observations with NuSTAR and lower-energy X-ray telescopes such as XMM-Newton or Suzaku provides the best S/N across the broadband X-ray spectrum ever achieved, enabling the continuum, absorption and reflection components of these AGN to be definitively deconvolved for the first time. Isolating these components allows their physical processes to be studied with greater precision and accuracy than has hitherto been possible. We present results from three simultaneous campaigns carried out by NuSTAR in conjunction with XMM or Suzaku: IC 4329A, MCG--6-30-15 and NGC 1365. In each case, NuSTAR's unique strengths have led to unprecedented insights into coronal properties, absorbing structures and/or black hole spin.

  2. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigana, Carlo; Battistelli, Elia Stefano; Benetti, Micol; Cabass, Giovanni; de Bernardis, Paolo; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; di Valentino, Eleonora; Gerbino, Martina; Giusarma, Elena; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Liguori, Michele; Masi, Silvia; Norgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Rosati, Piero; Salvati, Laura; Trombetti, Tiziana; Vielva, Patricio

    2016-04-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) data in temperature and polarization have reached high precision in estimating all the parameters that describe the current so-called standard cosmological model. Recent results about the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from CMB anisotropies, galaxy surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the CMB, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum (PPS) and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial perturbations in the early universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from cosmic polarization rotation (CPR) analyses aimed at testing the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) are presented. Finally, we discuss the perspectives of next radio facilities for the improvement of the analysis of future CMB spectral distortion experiments.

  3. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Physics Models For Diagnostics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The project will use high-fidelity physics models and simulations to simulate real-time operations of cryogenic and systems and calculate the status/health of the systems. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators. The capability will also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenic system operations. This project will develop and implement high-fidelity physics-based modeling techniques tosimulate the real-time operation of cryogenics and other fluids systems and, when compared to thereal-time operation of the actual systems, provide assessment of their state. Physics-modelcalculated measurements (called “pseudo-sensors”) will be compared to the system real-timedata. Comparison results will be utilized to provide systems operators with enhanced monitoring ofsystems' health and status, identify off-nominal trends and diagnose system/component failures.This capability can also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenics and other fluidsystems designs. This capability will be interfaced with the ground operations command andcontrol system as a part of the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance (AGSM) project to helpassure system availability and mission success. The initial capability will be developed for theLiquid Oxygen (LO2) ground loading systems.

  4. Comparison of fundamental physical properties of the model cells (protocells) and the living cells reveals the need in protophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed about potassium ponds being the cradles of life enriches the gamut of ideas about the possible conditions of pre-biological evolution on the primeval Earth, but does not bring us closer to solving the real problem of the origin of life. The gist of the matter lies in the mechanism of making a delimitation between two environments - the intracellular environment and the habitat of protocells. Since the sodium-potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase) was discovered, no molecular model has been proposed for a predecessor of the modern sodium pump. This has brought into life the idea of the potassium pond, wherein protocells would not need a sodium pump. However, current notions of the operation of living cells come into conflict with even physical laws when trying to use them to explain the origin and functioning of protocells. Thus, habitual explanations of the physical properties of living cells have become inapplicable to explain the corresponding properties of Sidney Fox's microspheres. Likewise, existing approaches to solving the problem of the origin of life do not see the need for the comparative study of living cells and cell models, assemblies of biological and artificial small molecules and macromolecules under physical conditions conducive to the origin of life. The time has come to conduct comprehensive research into the fundamental physical properties of protocells and create a new discipline - protocell physiology or protophysiology - which should bring us much closer to solving the problem of the origin of life.

  5. Fundamental Magnetofluid Physics Studies on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment: Reconnection and Sustainment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.

    2001-07-31

    The general goal of the Magnetofluids Laboratory at Swarthmore College is to understand how magnetofluid kinetic energy can be converted to magnetic energy as it is in the core of the earth and sun (the dynamo problem) and to understand how magnetic energy can be rapidly converted back to kinetic energy and heat as it is in solar flares (the magnetic reconnection problem). Magnetic reconnection has been studied using the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) which was designed and built under this Junior Faculty Grant. In SSX we generate and merge two rings of magnetized plasma called spheromaks and study their interaction. The spheromaks have many properties similar to solar flares so this work is directly relevant to basic solar physics. In addition, since the spheromak is a magnetic confinement fusion configuration, issues of formation and stability have direct impact on the fusion program.

  6. TRIμP-Trapped Radioactive Atoms-μicrolaboratories for Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, K.; Berg, G. P.; Dammalapati, U.; Dendooven, P.; Dermois, O.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hoekstra, R.; Morgenstern, R.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Timmermans, R.; Traykov, E.; Willmann, L.; Wilscut, H. W.

    At the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) in Groningen, NL, a new facility (TRIμP) is under development. Radioactive nuclei will be produced using heavy ion beams from the superconducting AGOR cyclotron. They are then slowed down and finally trapped in ion or atomic traps in order to perform precision experiments with them. The facility will be open for use by the worldwide community. The present local research programme includes precision studies of nuclear β-decays through β-neutrino (recoil nucleus) momentum correlations in weak decays as well as searches for permanent electric dipole moments in heavy atomic systems. Such experiments offer a large potential for discovering new physics or to put sensitive limits on parameters in models beyond standard theory.

  7. Probing the Fundamental Physics of the Solar Corona with Lunar Solar Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. Rifai; Morgan, H.; Druckmüller, M.; Ding, A.; Cooper, J. F.; Daw, A.; Sittler, E. C.

    2013-07-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy of the solar corona, coupled with polarimetry, are the only tools available at present to capture signatures of physical processes responsible for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration within the first few solar radii above the solar limb. With the recent advent of improved detector technology and image processing techniques, broad-band white light and narrow-band multi-wavelength observations of coronal forbidden lines, made during total solar eclipses, have started to yield new views about the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of coronal structures. This paper outlines these unique capabilities, which until present, have been feasible primarily with observations during natural total solar eclipses. This work also draws attention to the exciting possibility of greatly increasing the frequency and duration of solar eclipse observations with Moon orbiting observatories utilizing lunar limb occultation of the solar disk for coronal measurements.

  8. The Relationships among Fundamental Motor Skills, Health-Related Physical Fitness, and Body Fatness in South Korean Adolescents with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, John T.; Harvey, Stephen; Chun, Hae-Ja; Kim, So-Yeun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the following: (a) the relationships among the latent constructs of fundamental motor skills (FMS), health-related physical fitness (HRF), and observed body fatness in South Korean adolescents with mental retardation (MR); (b) the indirect effect of fundamental motor skills on body fatness when mediated by…

  9. The Relationships among Fundamental Motor Skills, Health-Related Physical Fitness, and Body Fatness in South Korean Adolescents with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, John T.; Harvey, Stephen; Chun, Hae-Ja; Kim, So-Yeun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the following: (a) the relationships among the latent constructs of fundamental motor skills (FMS), health-related physical fitness (HRF), and observed body fatness in South Korean adolescents with mental retardation (MR); (b) the indirect effect of fundamental motor skills on body fatness when mediated by…

  10. Reflection on problem solving in introductory and advanced physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Andrew J.

    Reflection is essential in order to learn from problem solving. This thesis explores issues related to how reflective students are and how we can improve their capacity for reflection on problem solving. We investigate how students naturally reflect in their physics courses about problem solving and evaluate strategies that may teach them reflection as an integral component of problem-solving. Problem categorization based upon similarity of solution is a strategy to help them reflect about the deep features of the problems related to the physics principles involved. We find that there is a large overlap between the introductory and graduate students in their ability to categorize. Moreover, introductory students in the calculus-based courses performed better categorization than those in the algebra-based courses even though the categorization task is conceptual. Other investigations involved exploring if reflection could be taught as a skill on individual and group levels. Explicit self-diagnosis in recitation investigated how effectively students could diagnose their own errors on difficult problems, how much scaffolding was necessary for this purpose, and how effective transfer was to other problems employing similar principles. Difficulty in applying physical principles and difference between the self-diagnosed and transfer problems affected performance. We concluded that a sustained intervention is required to learn effective problem-solving strategies. Another study involving reflection on problem solving with peers suggests that those who reflected with peers drew more diagrams and had a larger gain from the midterm to final exam. Another study in quantum mechanics involved giving common problems in midterm and final exams and suggested that advanced students do not automatically reflect on their mistakes. Interviews revealed that even advanced students often focus mostly on exams rather than learning and building a robust knowledge structure. A survey was

  11. Research opportunities in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, A. S.; Robinson, A. L.

    1989-09-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is being planned as a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent X-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 11 long straight sections and up to 48 bending-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams from less than 10 eV to more than 1 keV will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in atomic and molecular physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bending magnets will provide high-flux broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV.

  12. Fundamental Scalings of Zonal Flows in a Basic Plasma Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir; Wei, Xiao; Sen, Amiya K.

    2007-11-01

    A basic physics experimental study of zonal flows (ZF) associated with ITG (ion temperature gradient) drift modes has been performed in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) and ZF has been definitively identified [1]. However, in contrast to most tokamak experiments, the stabilizing effect of ZF shear to ITG appears to be small in CLM. We now report on the study of important scaling behavior of ZF. First and most importantly, we report on the collisional damping scaling of ZF, which is considered to be its saturation mechanism [2]. By varying the sum of ion-ion and ion-neutral collision frequency over nearly half an order of magnitude, we find no change in the amplitude of ZF. Secondly, we study the scaling of ZF amplitude with ITG amplitude via increasing ITG drive though ηi, as well as feedback (stabilizing / destabilizing). We have observed markedly different scaling near and far above marginal stability. [1] V. Sokolov, X. Wei, A.K. Sen and K. Avinash, Plasma Phys.Controlled Fusion 48, S111 (2006). [2] P.H. Diamond, S.-I. Itoh, K.Itoh and T.S. Hahm, Plasma Phys.Controlled Fusion 47, R35 (2005).

  13. Fundamentals of Structural Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, David D.; Fletcher, Raymond C.

    2005-09-01

    Fundamentals of Structural Geology provides a new framework for the investigation of geological structures by integrating field mapping and mechanical analysis. Assuming a basic knowledge of physical geology, introductory calculus and physics, it emphasizes the observational data, modern mapping technology, principles of continuum mechanics, and the mathematical and computational skills, necessary to quantitatively map, describe, model, and explain deformation in Earth's lithosphere. By starting from the fundamental conservation laws of mass and momentum, the constitutive laws of material behavior, and the kinematic relationships for strain and rate of deformation, the authors demonstrate the relevance of solid and fluid mechanics to structural geology. This book offers a modern quantitative approach to structural geology for advanced students and researchers in structural geology and tectonics. It is supported by a website hosting images from the book, additional colour images, student exercises and MATLAB scripts. Solutions to the exercises are available to instructors. The book integrates field mapping using modern technology with the analysis of structures based on a complete mechanics MATLAB is used to visualize physical fields and analytical results and MATLAB scripts can be downloaded from the website to recreate textbook graphics and enable students to explore their choice of parameters and boundary conditions The supplementary website hosts color images of outcrop photographs used in the text, supplementary color images, and images of textbook figures for classroom presentations The textbook website also includes student exercises designed to instill the fundamental relationships, and to encourage the visualization of the evolution of geological structures; solutions are available to instructors

  14. Science with the ASTRI mini-array for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: blazars and fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnoli, Giacomo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Andrea; Bigongiari, Ciro; Di Pierro, Federico; Stamerra, Antonio; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium

    2016-05-01

    ASTRI (“Astronomia a Specchi con Tecnologia Replicante Italiana”) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research (MIUR), devoted to the realization, operation and scientific validation of an end-to-end prototype for the Small Size Telescope (SST) envisaged to become part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype is characterized by a dual mirror, Schwarzschild-Couder optical design and a compact camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. It will be sensitive to multi-TeV very high energy (VHE) gamma rays up to 100 TeV, with a PSF ~ 6’ and a wide (9.6°) unaberrated optical field of view. Right after validation of the design in single-dish observations at the Serra La Nave site (Sicily, Italy) during 2015, the ASTRI collaboration will be able to start deployment, at the final CTA southern site, of the ASTRI mini-array, proposed to constitute the very first CTA precursor. Counting 9 ASTRI SST-2M telescopes, the ASTRI mini-array will overtake current IACT systems in differential sensitivity above 5 TeV, thus allowing unprecedented observations of known and predicted bright TeV emitters in this band, including some extragalactic sources such as extreme high-peaked BL Lacs with hard spectra. We exploited the ASTRI scientific simulator ASTRIsim in order to understand the feasibility of observations tackling blazar and cosmic ray physics, including discrimination of hadronic and leptonic scenarios for the VHE emission from BL Lac relativistic jets and indirect measurements of the intergalactic magnetic field and of the extragalactic background light. We selected favorable targets, outlining observation modes, exposure times, multi-wavelength coverage needed and the results expected. Moreover, the perspectives for observation of effects due to the existence of axion-like particles or to Lorentz invariance violations have been investigated.

  15. XII Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, Thomas; Carminati, Federico; Werlen, Monique

    November 2008 will be a few months after the official start of LHC when the highest quantum energy ever produced by mankind will be observed by the most complex piece of scientific equipment ever built. LHC will open a new era in physics research and push further the frontier of Knowledge This achievement has been made possible by new technological developments in many fields, but computing is certainly the technology that has made possible this whole enterprise. Accelerator and detector design, construction management, data acquisition, detectors monitoring, data analysis, event simulation and theoretical interpretation are all computing based HEP activities but also occurring many other research fields. Computing is everywhere and forms the common link between all involved scientists and engineers. The ACAT workshop series, created back in 1990 as AIHENP (Artificial Intelligence in High Energy and Nuclear Research) has been covering the tremendous evolution of computing in its most advanced topics, trying to setup bridges between computer science, experimental and theoretical physics. Conference web-site: http://acat2008.cern.ch/ Programme and presentations: http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=34666

  16. Value of fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery training in a fourth-year medical school advanced surgical skills elective.

    PubMed

    Edelman, David A; Mattos, Mark A; Bouwman, David L

    2012-10-01

    Few data are available describing the benefits of initiating fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) training during medical school. We hypothesized that an intense 1-month surgical skills elective that included FLS task training for fourth-year medical students (MS4s) would result in performance levels indistinguishable from graduating chief residents (PGY5) who had received clinical skill training and access to self-guided FLS curriculum. From July 2007 through June 2011, 114 MS4s participated in a 1-month advanced surgical skills elective. The curriculum for the elective included cadaver dissections, patient management presentations, and surgical skill training (open surgical skills and basic laparoscopic skills modules performed on FLS trainers and virtual reality laparoscopic simulators). From June 2009 through June 2011, 21 PGY5s graduated who had never received formalized FLS skills training. These residents were tested on FLS by a certified proctor and the results recorded. The performance outcome measure was task completion time. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare the performance measures for each group. All PGY5s achieved FLS certification on their first attempt and completed enough cases for graduation. The MS4 group showed significantly better performance than the PGY5 group in the peg transfer and circle cut (P < 0.05). No difference was seen in the knot tying tasks between the two groups (P > 0.05) Incorporating FLS training into a 1 month-long medical school surgery elective enabled MS4s to achieve FLS performance similar to, or better than, the performance achieved by PGY5 surgery residents. We support the integration of FLS skills task training as a standard part of the skills training curriculum for medical students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The associations among fundamental movement skills, self-reported physical activity and academic performance during junior high school in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Timo; Hillman, Charles; Kalaja, Sami; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the longitudinal associations between (1) fundamental movement skills (FMSs) and academic performance, and (2) self-reported physical activity and academic performance through junior high school in Finland. The participants of the study were 325 Finnish students (162 girls and 163 boys), who were 13 years old at the beginning of the study at Grade 7. Students performed three FMS tests and responded to a self-reported physical activity questionnaire at Grades 7 and 8. Marks in Finnish language, mathematics and history from Grades 7, 8 and 9 were collected. Structural equation modelling with multigroup method demonstrated that in the boys' group, a correlation (0.17) appeared between FMS and academic performance measured at Grade 7. The results also indicated that FMS collected at Grade 8 were significantly but weakly (path coefficient 0.14) associated with academic performance at Grade 9 for both gender groups. Finally, the results of this study demonstrated that self-reported physical activity was not significantly related to academic performance during junior high school. The findings of this study suggest that mastery of FMS may contribute to better student achievement during junior high school.

  18. Possible determination of the physical parameters of the first living cells based on the fundamental physical constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2016-12-01

    Here is developed the hypothesis that the cell parameters of unicellular organisms (Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes) are determined by the gravitational constant (G, N.m2 /kg2), Planck constant (h, J.s) and growth rate of cells. By scaling analyses it was shown that the growth rate vgr(m/s) of unicellular bacteria and protozoa is relatively constant parameter, ranging in a narrow window of 10-12 - 10-10 m/s, in comparison to the diapason of cell mass, ranging 10 orders of magnitudes from 10-17 kg in bacteria to 10-7 kg in amoebas. By dimensional analyses it was shown that the combination between the growth rate of cells, gravitational constant and Planck constant gives equations with dimension of mass M(vgr)=(h.vgr/G)½ in kg, length L(v gr)=(hṡG/vgr3)1/2 in meter, time T(vgr)=(hṡG/vgr5)1/2 in seconds, and density ρ ((vgr)=vgr.3.5/hG2 in kg/m3 . For growth rate vgr in diapason of 1×10-11 m/s - 1×10-9.5 m/s the calculated numerical values for mass (3×10-18 -1×10-16 kg), length (5×10-8 -1×10-5 m), time (1×102 -1×106 s) and density (1×10-1 - 1×104 kg/m3) overlaps with diapason of experimentally measured values for cell mass (3×10-18 -1×10-15 kg), volume to surface ratio (1×10-7 -1×10-4 m), doubling time (1×103 -1×107 s), and density (1050 - 1300 kg/m3) in bacteria and protozoa. These equations show that appearance of the first living cells could be mutually connected to the physical constants.

  19. An Initial Study of the Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Van Zante, Judith F.; King, Michael C.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Bartkus, Tadas P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from an initial study of the fundamental physics of ice-crystal ice accretion using the NASA Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL). Ice accretion due to the ingestion of ice-crystals is being attributed to numerous jet-engine power-loss events. The NASA PSL is an altitude jet-engine test facility which has recently added a capability to inject ice particles into the flow. NASA is evaluating whether this facility, in addition to full-engine and motor-driven-rig tests, can be used for more fundamental ice-accretion studies that simulate the different mixed-phase icing conditions along the core flow passage of a turbo-fan engine compressor. The data from such fundamental accretion tests will be used to help develop and validate models of the accretion process. The present study utilized a NACA0012 airfoil. The mixed-phase conditions were generated by partially freezing the liquid-water droplets ejected from the spray bars. This paper presents data regarding (1) the freeze out characteristics of the cloud, (2) changes in aerothermal conditions due to the presence of the cloud, and (3) the ice accretion characteristics observed on the airfoil model. The primary variable in this test was the PSL plenum humidity which was systematically varied for two duct-exit-plane velocities (85 and 135 ms) as well as two particle size clouds (15 and 50 m MVDi). The observed clouds ranged from fully glaciated to fully liquid, where the liquid clouds were at least partially supercooled. The air total temperature decreased at the test section when the cloud was activated due to evaporation. The ice accretions observed ranged from sharp arrow-like accretions, characteristic of ice-crystal erosion, to cases with double-horn shapes, characteristic of supercooled water accretions.

  20. An Initial Study of the Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter; Bartkus, Tadas; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Bencic, Timothy; King, Michael; Ratvasky, Thomas; Van Zante, Judith

    2017-01-01

    This presentation shows results from an initial study of the fundamental physics of ice-crystal ice accretion using the NASA Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL). Ice accretion due to the ingestion of ice-crystals is being attributed to numerous jet-engine power-loss events. The NASA PSL is an altitude jet-engine test facility which has recently added a capability to inject ice particles into the flow. NASA is evaluating whether this facility, in addition to full-engine and motor-driven-rig tests, can be used for more fundamental ice-accretion studies that simulate the different mixed-phase icing conditions along the core flow passage of a turbo-fan engine compressor. The data from such fundamental accretion tests will be used to help develop and validate models of the accretion process. The present study utilized a NACA0012 airfoil. The mixed-phase conditions were generated by partially freezing the liquid-water droplets ejected from the spray bars. This presentation shows data regarding (1) the freeze out characteristics of the cloud, (2) changes in aerothermal conditions due to the presence of the cloud, and (3) the ice accretion characteristics observed on the airfoil model. The primary variable in this test was the PSL plenum humidity which was systematically varied for two duct-exit-plane velocities (85 and 135 ms) as well as two particle size clouds (15 and 50 m MVDi). The observed clouds ranged from fully glaciated to fully liquid, where the liquid clouds were at least partially supercooled. The air total temperature decreased at the test section when the cloud was activated due to evaporation. The ice accretions observed ranged from sharp arrow-like accretions, characteristic of ice-crystal erosion, to cases with double-horn shapes, characteristic of supercooled water accretions.

  1. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  2. An interdisciplinary approach to certain fundamental issues in the fields of physics and biology: towards a unified theory.

    PubMed

    Thaheld, Fred H

    2005-04-01

    Recent experiments appear to have revealed the possibility of the existence of quantum entanglement between spatially separated human subjects. In addition, a similar condition might exist between basins containing human neurons adhering to printed circuit boards. In both instances, preliminary data indicates what appear to be non-local correlations between brain electrical activities in the case of the human subjects and also non-local correlations between neuronal basin electrical activities, implying entanglement at the macroscopic level. If the ongoing expanded research and the analysis of same continues to support this hypothesis, it may then make it possible to simultaneously address some of the fundamental problems facing us in both physics and biology through the adoption of an interdisciplinary empirical approach based on Bell's experimental philosophy, with the goal of unifying these two fields.

  3. From CODEX to ESPRESSO to HIRES@E-ELT: a view on cosmology and fundamental physics from the IGM perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.; Cupani, G.; D'Odorico, V.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Haehnelt, M.; Maiolino, R.; Marconi, A.; Martins, C.; Mégevand, D.; Molaro, P.; Murphy, M. T.; Origlia, L.; Pepe, F.

    The Italian community, thanks to the strong technological and scientific tradition in the field of high-resolution spectroscopy and the study of the Intergalactic Medium, has played a key role in the conception of a high-resolution spectrograph for the new generation of giant telescopes (initially focused on the COsmic Dynamics EXperiment at OWL). This expertise is being exploited in the construction of a precursor: the ESPRESSO instrument that will start operations at the ESO VLT in 2017 and will pave the way to the HIRES instrument at the E-ELT. Here we discuss the role that the (evolving) scientific themes of cosmology and fundamental physics - from the Intergalactic Medium perspective - have played and are playing to shape the E-ELT high resolution instrument.

  4. Advanced quantitative measurement methodology in physics education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    The ultimate goal of physics education research (PER) is to develop a theoretical framework to understand and improve the learning process. In this journey of discovery, assessment serves as our headlamp and alpenstock. It sometimes detects signals in student mental structures, and sometimes presents the difference between expert understanding and novice understanding. Quantitative assessment is an important area in PER. Developing research-based effective assessment instruments and making meaningful inferences based on these instruments have always been important goals of the PER community. Quantitative studies are often conducted to provide bases for test development and result interpretation. Statistics are frequently used in quantitative studies. The selection of statistical methods and interpretation of the results obtained by these methods shall be connected to the education background. In this connecting process, the issues of educational models are often raised. Many widely used statistical methods do not make assumptions on the mental structure of subjects, nor do they provide explanations tailored to the educational audience. There are also other methods that consider the mental structure and are tailored to provide strong connections between statistics and education. These methods often involve model assumption and parameter estimation, and are complicated mathematically. The dissertation provides a practical view of some advanced quantitative assessment methods. The common feature of these methods is that they all make educational/psychological model assumptions beyond the minimum mathematical model. The purpose of the study is to provide a comparison between these advanced methods and the pure mathematical methods. The comparison is based on the performance of the two types of methods under physics education settings. In particular, the comparison uses both physics content assessments and scientific ability assessments. The dissertation includes three

  5. PET/CT: underlying physics, instrumentation, and advances.

    PubMed

    Torres Espallardo, I

    2017-01-12

    Since it was first introduced, the main goal of PET/CT has been to provide both PET and CT images with high clinical quality and to present them to radiologists and specialists in nuclear medicine as a fused, perfectly aligned image. The use of fused PET and CT images quickly became routine in clinical practice, showing the great potential of these hybrid scanners. Thanks to this success, manufacturers have gone beyond considering CT as a mere attenuation corrector for PET, concentrating instead on design high performance PET and CT scanners with more interesting features. Since the first commercial PET/CT scanner became available in 2001, both the PET component and the CT component have improved immensely. In the case of PET, faster scintillation crystals with high stopping power such as LYSO crystals have enabled more sensitive devices to be built, making it possible to reduce the number of undesired coincidence events and to use time of flight (TOF) techniques. All these advances have improved lesion detection, especially in situations with very noisy backgrounds. Iterative reconstruction methods, together with the corrections carried out during the reconstruction and the use of the point-spread function, have improved image quality. In parallel, CT instrumentation has also improved significantly, and 64- and 128-row detectors have been incorporated into the most modern PET/CT scanners. This makes it possible to obtain high quality diagnostic anatomic images in a few seconds that both enable the correction of PET attenuation and provide information for diagnosis. Furthermore, nowadays nearly all PET/CT scanners have a system that modulates the dose of radiation that the patient is exposed to in the CT study in function of the region scanned. This article reviews the underlying physics of PET and CT imaging separately, describes the changes in the instrumentation and standard protocols in a combined PET/CT system, and finally points out the most important

  6. Final Report: DE- FC36-05GO15063, Fundamental Studies of Advanced High-Capacity, Reversible Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Craig; McGrady, Sean; Severa, Godwin; Eliseo, Jennifer; Chong, Marina

    2013-05-31

    The project was component of the US DOE, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The Sandia National Laboratory led center was established to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE/FreedomCAR 2010 and 2015 system targets for hydrogen storage materials. Our approach entailed a wide variety of activities ranging from synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of new candidate hydrogen storage materials; screening of catalysts for high capacity materials requiring kinetics enhancement; development of low temperature methods for nano-confinement of hydrides and determining its effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrides; and development of novel processes for the direct re-hydrogenation of materials. These efforts have resulted in several advancements the development of hydrogen storage materials. We have greatly extended the fundamental knowledge about the highly promising hydrogen storage carrier, alane (AlH3), by carrying out the first crystal structure determinations and the first determination of the heats of dehydrogenation of β–AlH3 and γ-AlD3. A low-temperature homogenous organometallic approach to incorporation of Al and Mg based hydrides into carbon aerogels has been developed that that allows high loadings without degradation of the nano-porous scaffold. Nano-confinement was found to significantly improve the dehydrogenation kinetics but not effect the enthalpy of dehydrogenation. We conceived, characterized, and synthesized a novel class of potential hydrogen storage materials, bimetallic borohydrides. These novel compounds were found to have many favorable properties including release of significant amounts of hydrogen at moderate temperatures (75-190 º C). However, in situ IR studies in tandem with thermal gravimetric analysis have shown that about 0.5 equivalents of diborane are released during the

  7. Advancing reservoir operation description in physically based hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Giudici, Federico; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Last decades have seen significant advances in our capacity of characterizing and reproducing hydrological processes within physically based models. Yet, when the human component is considered (e.g. reservoirs, water distribution systems), the associated decisions are generally modeled with very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the actual operators' behaviour on a daily or sub-daily basis. For example, reservoir operations are usually described by a target-level rule curve, which represents the level that the reservoir should track during normal operating conditions. The associated release decision is determined by the current state of the reservoir relative to the rule curve. This modeling approach can reasonably reproduce the seasonal water volume shift due to reservoir operation. Still, it cannot capture more complex decision making processes in response, e.g., to the fluctuations of energy prices and demands, the temporal unavailability of power plants or varying amount of snow accumulated in the basin. In this work, we link a physically explicit hydrological model with detailed hydropower behavioural models describing the decision making process by the dam operator. In particular, we consider two categories of behavioural models: explicit or rule-based behavioural models, where reservoir operating rules are empirically inferred from observational data, and implicit or optimization based behavioural models, where, following a normative economic approach, the decision maker is represented as a rational agent maximising a utility function. We compare these two alternate modelling approaches on the real-world water system of Lake Como catchment in the Italian Alps. The water system is characterized by the presence of 18 artificial hydropower reservoirs generating almost 13% of the Italian hydropower production. Results show to which extent the hydrological regime in the catchment is affected by different behavioural models and reservoir

  8. Testing the Standard Model and Fundamental Symmetries in Nuclear Physics with Lattice QCD and Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Walker-Loud, Andre

    2016-10-14

    The research supported by this grant is aimed at probing the limits of the Standard Model through precision low-energy nuclear physics. The work of the PI (AWL) and additional personnel is to provide theory input needed for a number of potentially high-impact experiments, notably, hadronic parity violation, Dark Matter direct detection and searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in nucleons and nuclei. In all these examples, a quantitative understanding of low-energy nuclear physics from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), is necessary to interpret the experimental results. The main theoretical tools used and developed in this work are the numerical solution to QCD known as lattice QCD (LQCD) and Effective Field Theory (EFT). This grant is supporting a new research program for the PI, and as such, needed to be developed from the ground up. Therefore, the first fiscal year of this grant, 08/01/2014-07/31/2015, has been spent predominantly establishing this new research effort. Very good progress has been made, although, at this time, there are not many publications to show for the effort. After one year, the PI accepted a job at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, so this final report covers just a single year of five years of the grant.

  9. Fundamentals of Radiation Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    decay • p+→ n + e+ + neutrino + KE followed by e+/e- annihilation β+, γ decay • p+→ n + e+ + neutrino + KE followed by γ release and e+/e...annihilation 7 More Nuclear Processes Electron capture • p+ + e-→ n + neutrino + KE then characteristic x-rays or Auger electrons Electron capture, γ • p+ + e...n + neutrino + KE followed by γ release then characteristic x-rays or Auger electrons α decay α decay, γ followed by γ release 8 Basic Mathematical

  10. Recent advances in Rydberg physics using alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this brief review, the opportunities that the alkaline-earth elements offer for studying new aspects of Rydberg physics are discussed. For example, the bosonic alkaline-earth isotopes have zero nuclear spin which eliminates many of the complexities present in alkali Rydberg atoms, permitting simpler and more direct comparison between theory and experiment. The presence of two valence electrons allows the production of singlet and triplet Rydberg states that can exhibit a variety of attractive or repulsive interactions. The availability of weak intercombination lines is advantageous for laser cooling and for applications such as Rydberg dressing. Excitation of one electron to a Rydberg state leaves behind an optically active core ion allowing, for high-L states, the optical imaging of Rydberg atoms and their (spatial) manipulation using light scattering. The second valence electron offers the possibility of engineering long-lived doubly excited states such as planetary atoms. Recent advances in both theory and experiment are highlighted together with a number of possible directions for the future.

  11. Physics basis for an advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant configuration: ARIES-ACT1

    DOE PAGES

    Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F. M.; Ghantous, K.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Here, the advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at an aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2, and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall-stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n = 3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and/or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reaches βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle magnetohydrodynamic stability shows that themore » alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling shows that 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while >95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring ~1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ion cyclotron radio frequency/fast wave and 40 MW of lower hybrid current drive. Electron cyclotron is most effective for safety factor control over ρ~0.2 to 0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~0.9×1020/m3, and the temperature is ~4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the ratio of net power to threshold power is 2.8 to 3.0 in the flattop.« less

  12. The Physics Basis For An Advanced Physics And Advanced Technology Tokamak Power Plant Configuration, ARIES-ACT1

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Kessel, et al

    2014-03-05

    The advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n=3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, and requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reached βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle MHD stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling show that about 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while over 95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring about ~ 1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ICRF/FW and 40 MW of LHCD. EC was examined and is most effective for safety factor control over ρ ~ 0.2-0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~ 0.9x1020 /m3 and the temperature is ~ 4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the net power to LH threshold power is 2.8- 3.0 in the flattop.

  13. Physics basis for an advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant configuration: ARIES-ACT1

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F. M.; Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Rensink, M. E.; Rognlien, T. D.; Snyder, P. B.; St. John, H.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Here, the advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at an aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2, and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall-stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n = 3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and/or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reaches βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle magnetohydrodynamic stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling shows that 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while >95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring ~1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ion cyclotron radio frequency/fast wave and 40 MW of lower hybrid current drive. Electron cyclotron is most effective for safety factor control over ρ~0.2 to 0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~0.9×1020/m3, and the temperature is ~4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the ratio of net power to threshold power is 2.8 to 3.0 in the flattop.

  14. TIMSS Advanced 2015 and Advanced Placement Calculus & Physics. A Framework Analysis. Research in Review 2016-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Christopher; Jones, Lee; Webb, David C.; Grover, Ryan; Di Giacomo, F. Tony; Marino, Katherine Adele

    2016-01-01

    This report will determine to what degree the AP Physics 1 and 2 and AP Calculus AB and BC frameworks are aligned with the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced Physics and Mathematics frameworks. This will enable an exploration of any differences in content coverage and levels of complexity, and will set the stage…

  15. Advanced tokamak physics experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.S.

    1998-12-01

    Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy confinement time ({tau}{sub E}) and the plasma pressure (or beta {beta}{sub T} = 2 {mu}{sub 0} < p > /B{sub T}{sup 2}) can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self driven bootstrap current fraction. In addition, effective power exhaust and impurity and particle control is required. Significant progress has been made in experimentally achieving regimes having the required performance in all of these aspects as well as in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. The authors have extended the duration of high performance ELMing H-mode plasmas with {beta}{sub N} H{sub iop} {approximately} 10 for 5 {tau}{sub E} ({approximately}1 s) and have demonstrated that core transport barriers can be sustained for the entire 5-s neutral beam duration in L-mode plasmas. Recent DIII-D work has advanced the understanding of improved confinement and internal transport barriers in terms of E x B shear stabilization of micro turbulence. With the aim of current profile control in discharges with negative central magnetic shear, they have demonstrated off-axis electron cyclotron current drive for the first time in a tokamak, finding an efficiency above theoretical expectations. MHD stability has been improved through shape optimization, wall stabilization, and modification of the pressure and current density profiles. Heat flux reduction and improved impurity and particle control have been realized through edge/divertor radiation and understanding and utilization of forced scrape off layer flow and divertor baffling.

  16. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  17. Majo-ra-na: An Ultra-Low Background Enriched-Germanium Detector Array for Fundamental Physics Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, Victor

    2010-02-01

    The Majo-ra-na collaboration will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) by fielding an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in ultra-clean electroformed-copper cryostats deep underground. Recent advances in HPGe detector technology, in particular P-type Point-Contact (PPC) detectors, present exciting new techniques for identifying and reducing backgrounds to the 0νββ signal. This should result in greatly improved sensitivity over previous generation experiments. The very low energy threshold attainable with PPC detectors also provides for a broader physics program including searches for dark matter and axions. The Majo-ra-na De-mon-strat-or is an R&D program that will field three ˜20 kg modules of PPC detectors at Sanford Underground Laboratory. Half of the detectors will be enriched to 86% in ^76Ge. Here, we will cover the motivation, design, recent progress and current status of this effort, with special attention to its physics reach. )

  18. Time of flight of ultra-relativistic particles in a realistic Universe: A viable tool for fundamental physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanizza, G.; Gasperini, M.; Marozzi, G.; Veneziano, G.

    2016-06-01

    Including the metric fluctuations of a realistic cosmological geometry we reconsider an earlier suggestion that measuring the relative time-of-flight of ultra-relativistic particles can provide interesting constraints on fundamental cosmological and/or particle parameters. Using convenient properties of the geodetic light-cone coordinates we first compute, to leading order in the Lorentz factor and for a generic (inhomogeneous, anisotropic) space-time, the relative arrival times of two ultra-relativistic particles as a function of their masses and energies as well as of the details of the large-scale geometry. Remarkably, the result can be written as an integral over the unperturbed line-of-sight of a simple function of the local, inhomogeneous redshift. We then evaluate the irreducible scatter of the expected data-points due to first-order metric perturbations, and discuss, for an ideal source of ultra-relativistic particles, the resulting attainable precision on the determination of different physical parameters.

  19. Fundamentally updating fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gail; Barton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Recent educational research indicates that the six competencies of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative are best introduced in early prelicensure clinical courses. Content specific to quality and safety has traditionally been covered in senior level courses. This article illustrates an effective approach to using quality and safety as an organizing framework for any prelicensure fundamentals of nursing course. Providing prelicensure students a strong foundation in quality and safety in an introductory clinical course facilitates early adoption of quality and safety competencies as core practice values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Randolph S.; Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

  1. Relations among Basic Psychological Needs, PE-Motivation and Fundamental Movement Skills in 9-12-Year-Old Boys and Girls in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Aart, I.; Hartman, E.; Elferink-Gemser, M.; Mombarg, R.; Visscher, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many children aged 9-12 appear to have low levels of fundamental movement skills (FMS). Physical education (PE) is important because PE-teachers can teach children a variety of FMS and can influence PE-motivation. However, declined levels of PE-motivation are reported in the final grades of elementary school. Therefore, more insight in…

  2. Relations among Basic Psychological Needs, PE-Motivation and Fundamental Movement Skills in 9-12-Year-Old Boys and Girls in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Aart, I.; Hartman, E.; Elferink-Gemser, M.; Mombarg, R.; Visscher, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many children aged 9-12 appear to have low levels of fundamental movement skills (FMS). Physical education (PE) is important because PE-teachers can teach children a variety of FMS and can influence PE-motivation. However, declined levels of PE-motivation are reported in the final grades of elementary school. Therefore, more insight in…

  3. The Development of Fundamental Motor Skills of Four- to Five-Year-Old Preschool Children and the Effects of a Preschool Physical Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iivonen, S.; Saakslahti, A.; Nissinen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Altogether 38 girls and 46 boys aged four to five years were studied to analyse the linear and non-linear development of fundamental motor skills. The children were grouped into one experimental and one control group to study the effects of an eight-month preschool physical education curriculum. In the course of one year, the balance skills of the…

  4. Does physical exercise improve quality of life of advanced cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Navigante, Alfredo; Morgado, Pablo Cresta

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the principal issues about physical activity in advanced cancer patients through the analyses of the last articles and our experience in this field. The efficacy of exercise training intervention could improve quality of life (QOL), fatigue and well being in advanced cancer patients. Several published studies have included, nevertheless, patients with early stage of disease and more recently, populations of patients with local advanced tumors of the breast, rectum and lung, who are undergoing neoadjuvant therapy. Despite the insufficient sample of patients in these studies, physical exercise is considered to improve both cardiopulmonary function and physical muscle fitness. Cancer-related fatigue is a devastating symptom in advanced cancer patients that implies loss of mobility and independence. Physical exercise could be a treatment to increase skeletal muscle endurance and improve well being. In palliative medicine, physical activity could be applied to medical assistance or to design prospective and controlled trials so as to evaluate possible usefulness.

  5. NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor for 3-D viscous code assessment and fundamental flow physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Wood, J. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A low speed centrifugal compressor facility recently built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this facility is to obtain detailed flow field measurements for computational fluid dynamic code assessment and flow physics modeling in support of Army and NASA efforts to advance small gas turbine engine technology. The facility is heavily instrumented with pressure and temperature probes, both in the stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and is rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage being tested is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance centrifugal compressor stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Preliminary experimental investigations of inlet and exit flow uniformly and measurement repeatability are presented. These results demonstrate the high quality of the data which may be expected from this facility. The significance of synergism between computational fluid dynamic analysis and experimentation throughout the development of the low speed centrifugal compressor facility is demonstrated.

  6. CURRICULUM GUIDES IN PHYSICS--GENERAL ADVANCED PLACEMENT, COLLEGE LEVEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESNER, GORDON E.

    THE GENERAL PHYSICS CURRICULUM IS PLANNED FOR THOSE WHOSE GENERAL ABILITY IS BETTER THAN AVERAGE AND IS OFFERED IN GRADES 11 OR 12. GENERAL OBJECTIVES ARE, TO DEVELOP CRITICAL THINKING THROUGH THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, TO UNDERSTAND BASIC PHYSICAL LAWS AND MAN'S PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE, AND TO DEVELOP A SCIENTIFIC ABILITY AND INTEREST. ELEVEN UNITS OF…

  7. CURRICULUM GUIDES IN PHYSICS--GENERAL ADVANCED PLACEMENT, COLLEGE LEVEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESNER, GORDON E.

    THE GENERAL PHYSICS CURRICULUM IS PLANNED FOR THOSE WHOSE GENERAL ABILITY IS BETTER THAN AVERAGE AND IS OFFERED IN GRADES 11 OR 12. GENERAL OBJECTIVES ARE, TO DEVELOP CRITICAL THINKING THROUGH THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, TO UNDERSTAND BASIC PHYSICAL LAWS AND MAN'S PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE, AND TO DEVELOP A SCIENTIFIC ABILITY AND INTEREST. ELEVEN UNITS OF…

  8. Characteristics of Teacher Training in School-Based Physical Education Interventions to Improve Fundamental Movement Skills and/or Physical Activity: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lander, Natalie; Eather, Narelle; Morgan, Philip J; Salmon, Jo; Barnett, Lisa M

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence is positively associated with physical activity (PA). However, levels of both FMS and PA are lower than expected. Current reviews of interventions to improve FMS and PA have shown that many school-based programs have achieved positive outcomes, yet the maintenance of these interventions is variable. Teachers play a central role in the success and longevity of school-based interventions. Despite the importance of teacher engagement, research into the nature and quality of teacher training in school-based PA and FMS interventions has received little attention. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the type and quantity of teacher training in school-based physical education PA and/or FMS interventions, and to identify what role teacher training had on the intervention outcome. A systematic search of eight electronic databases was conducted. Publication date restrictions were not implemented in any database, and the last search was performed on 1 March 2015. School physical education-based interventions facilitated by a school teacher, and that included a quantitative assessment of FMS competence and/or PA levels were included in the review. The search identified 39 articles. Eleven of the studies measured FMS, 25 studies measured PA and three measured both FMS and PA. Nine of the studies did not report on any aspect of the teacher training conducted. Of the 30 studies that reported on teacher training, 25 reported statistically significant intervention results for FMS and/or PA. It appears that teacher training programs: are ≥ 1 day; provide comprehensive subject and pedagogy content; are framed by a theory or model; provide follow-up or ongoing support; and measure teacher satisfaction of the training, are more effective at improving student outcomes in FMS and/or PA. However, the provision of information regarding the characteristics of the teacher training was largely inadequate. Therefore, it was

  9. Key Enabling Physical Layer Technologies for LTE-Advanced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meilong; Prasad, Narayan; Xin, Yan; Yue, Guosen; Khojastepour, Amir; Liu, Le; Inoue, Takamichi; Koyanagi, Kenji; Kakura, Yoshikazu

    The 3GPP Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-A) system, as compared to the LTE system, is anticipated to include several new features and enhancements, such as the usage of channel bandwidth beyond 20MHz (up 100MHz), higher order multiple input multiple output (MIMO) for both downlink and uplink transmissions, larger capacity especially for cell edge user equipment, and voice over IP (VoIP) users, and wider coverage and etc. This paper presents some key enabling technologies including flexible uplink access schemes, advanced uplink MIMO receiver designs, cell search, adaptive hybrid ARQ, and multi-resolution MIMO precoding, for the LTE-A system.

  10. Nuclei and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick

    2016-09-01

    Nuclei provide marvelous laboratories for testing fundamental interactions, often enhancing weak processes through accidental degeneracies among states, and providing selection rules that can be exploited to isolate selected interactions. I will give an overview of current work, including the use of parity violation to probe unknown aspects of the hadronic weak interaction; nuclear electric dipole moment searches that may shed light on new sources of CP violation; and tests of lepton number violation made possible by the fact that many nuclei can only decay by rare second-order weak interactions. I will point to opportunities in both theory and experiment to advance the field. Based upon work supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics and SciDAC under Awards DE-SC00046548 (Berkeley), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL), and KB0301052 (LBNL).

  11. Teachers' Views about the Nuffield Advanced Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebbutt, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey on teachers' views of the Nuffield A-level physics course (NAP) including, among others, course content, philosophy, examinations, organization, and individual units. Suggests that most teachers surveyed were satisfied with their NAP course. (SK)

  12. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

  13. Advances in the physics basis for the European DEMO design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Angioni, C.; Artaud, J.-F.; Bernert, M.; Fable, E.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Jenko, F.; Maget, P.; Mattei, M.; Maviglia, F.; Poli, E.; Ramogida, G.; Reux, C.; Schneider, M.; Sieglin, B.; Villone, F.; Wischmeier, M.; Zohm, H.

    2015-06-01

    In the European fusion roadmap, ITER is followed by a demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO), for which a conceptual design is under development. This paper reports the first results of a coherent effort to develop the relevant physics knowledge for that (DEMO Physics Basis), carried out by European experts. The program currently includes investigations in the areas of scenario modeling, transport, MHD, heating & current drive, fast particles, plasma wall interaction and disruptions.

  14. The Efficacy of Advance Organizers and Behavioral Objectives for Improving Achievement in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershman, Kenneth Eugene

    This research investigates the utility of advance organizers and behavioral objectives in a traditional introductory physics class at the college level. The advance organizer was designed to compare and contrast content to be learned with content previously studied or with assumed common knowledge. Behavioral objectives listed the expected…

  15. The Efficacy of Advance Organizers and Behavioral Objectives for Improving Achievement in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershman, Kenneth Eugene

    This research investigates the utility of advance organizers and behavioral objectives in a traditional introductory physics class at the college level. The advance organizer was designed to compare and contrast content to be learned with content previously studied or with assumed common knowledge. Behavioral objectives listed the expected…

  16. Working with Advanced Primary School Students in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ljiljana; Cucic, Dragoljub

    2010-01-01

    Working with students who have special needs is the type of work that requires special engagement and skills of those who perform it. Working with gifted children requires outstanding knowledge of a teacher and above all the teachers should be very well informed on the subject they teach, Physics in our case. This work also requires great pedagogical and psychological skills so that these talented students would be approached in a suitable way. In this paper we will present to you our methods of teaching Physics to these talented children (13 years old), in the Regional Center for Talents "Mihajlo Pupin" in Pancevo.

  17. Advanced Quantitative Measurement Methodology in Physics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of physics education research (PER) is to develop a theoretical framework to understand and improve the learning process. In this journey of discovery, assessment serves as our headlamp and alpenstock. It sometimes detects signals in student mental structures, and sometimes presents the difference between expert understanding and…

  18. Recent advances in understanding physical properties of metallurgical slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong Joon; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2017-01-01

    Present-day knowledge of the structure and physical properties of metallurgical slags is summarized to address structure-property and inter-property relationships. Physical properties of slags including viscosity, electrical conductivity, and surface tension is reviewed focusing on the effect of slag structure, which is comprehensively evaluated using FT-IT, Raman, and MAS-NMR spectroscopy. The effect of the slag composition on slag structure and property is reviewed in detail: Compositional effect encompasses traditional concepts of basicity, network-forming behaviors of anions, and secondary impact of network-modifying cations. Secondary objective of this review is elucidating the mutual relationship between physical properties of slags. For instance, the relationship between slag viscosity and electrical conductivity is suggested by Walden's rule and discussed based on the experimental results. Slag foaming index is also introduced as a comprehensive understanding method of physical properties of slags. The dimensional analysis was made to address the effect of viscosity, density, and surface tension on the foaming index of slags.

  19. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Physics Models for Diagnostics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janicce Leshay

    2014-01-01

    The project will use high-fidelity physics models and simulations to simulate real-time operations of cryogenic and systems and calculate the status/health of the systems. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators. The capability will also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenic system operations.

  20. Using Tiered Assignments to Engage Learners in Advanced Placement Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents lesson plans that incorporate tiered objectives and brainstorming techniques as means for differentiating instruction and ensuring that learners are challenged at levels commensurate with their abilities even though they are developing an understanding of the same physics concepts. A listing of materials and resources…

  1. Advanced Quantitative Measurement Methodology in Physics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of physics education research (PER) is to develop a theoretical framework to understand and improve the learning process. In this journey of discovery, assessment serves as our headlamp and alpenstock. It sometimes detects signals in student mental structures, and sometimes presents the difference between expert understanding and…

  2. Hybrid Physical Vapor Deposition Instrument for Advanced Functional Multilayers and Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-27

    Hybrid Physical Vapor Deposition Instrument for Advanced Functional Multilayers and Materials PI Maria received support to construct a physical...vapor deposition (PVD) system that combines electron beam (e- beam) evaporation, magnetron sputtering, pulsed laser ablation, and ion-assisted deposition ...The instrumentation enables clean, uniform, and rapid deposition of a wide variety of metallic, semiconducting, and ceramic thin films with

  3. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Industrial Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisenhunt, James E.

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 20-hour introduction to industrial physics that explains and demonstrates to industrial maintenance mechanics the direct relationship of physics to machinery. Project TEAM is intended to upgrade basic technical competencies of…

  4. Advances on modelling of ITER scenarios: physics and computational challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2011-12-01

    Methods and tools for design and modelling of tokamak operation scenarios are discussed with particular application to ITER advanced scenarios. Simulations of hybrid and steady-state scenarios performed with the integrated tokamak modelling suite of codes CRONOS are presented. The advantages of a possible steady-state scenario based on cyclic operations, alternating phases of positive and negative loop voltage, with no magnetic flux consumption on average, are discussed. For regimes in which current alignment is an issue, a general method for scenario design is presented, based on the characteristics of the poloidal current density profile.

  5. Advanced physical-chemical life support systems research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evanich, Peggy L.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed NASA space research and technology development program will provide adequate data for designing closed loop life support systems for long-duration manned space missions. This program, referred to as the Pathfinder Physical-Chemical Closed Loop Life Support Program, is to identify and develop critical chemical engineering technologies for the closure of air and water loops within the spacecraft, surface habitats or mobility devices. Computerized simulation can be used both as a research and management tool. Validated models will guide the selection of the best known applicable processes and in the development of new processes. For the integration of the habitat system, a biological subsystem would be introduced to provide food production and to enhance the physical-chemical life support functions on an ever-increasing basis.

  6. Physical Chemistry Research Toward Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Advancement.

    PubMed

    Swider-Lyons, Karen E; Campbell, Stephen A

    2013-02-07

    Hydrogen fuel cells, the most common type of which are proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), are on a rapid path to commercialization. We credit physical chemistry research in oxygen reduction electrocatalysis and theory with significant breakthroughs, enabling more cost-effective fuel cells. However, most of the physical chemistry has been restricted to studies of platinum and related alloys. More work is needed to better understand electrocatalysts generally in terms of properties and characterization. While the advent of such highly active catalysts will enable smaller, less expensive, and more powerful stacks, they will require better understanding and a complete restructuring of the diffusion media in PEMFCs to facilitate faster transport of the reactants (O2) and products (H2O). Even Ohmic losses between materials become more important at high power. Such lessons from PEMFC research are relevant to other electrochemical conversion systems, including Li-air batteries and flow batteries.

  7. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  8. Advanced physical models and monitoring methods for in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, K.; Chalmer, P.

    1996-05-30

    Numerous reports have indicated that contamination at DOE facilities is widespread and pervasive. Existing technology is often too costly or ineffective in remediating these contamination problems. An effective method to address one class of contamination, petroleum hydrocarbons, is in situ bioremediation. This project was designed to provide tools and approaches for increasing the reliability of in situ bioremediation. An example of the recognition within DOE for developing these tools is in the FY-1995 Technology Development Needs Summary of the Office of Technology Development of the US DOE. This document identifies specific needs addressed by this research. For example, Section 3.3 Need Statement IS-3 identifies the need for a {open_quotes}Rapid method to detect in situ biodegradation products.{close_quotes} Also, BW-I identifies the need to recognize boundaries between clean and contaminated materials and soils. Metabolic activity could identify these boundaries. Measuring rates of in situ microbial activity is critical to the fundamental understanding of subsurface microbiology and in selecting natural attenuation as a remediation option. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of subsurface environments, a significant cost incurred during bioremediation is the characterization of microbial activity, in part because so many intermediate end points (biomass, gene frequency, laboratory measurements of activity, etc.) must be used to infer in situ activity. A fast, accurate, real-time, and cost-effective method is needed to determine success of bioremediation at DOE sites.

  9. Advances in atomic physics: Four decades of contribution of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M

    2015-09-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s - when the author first engaged in research - an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  10. Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G.

    2012-07-01

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

  11. Recent advances in understanding physical health problems in personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Conkey, Lindsey C; Whalen, Diana J

    2017-09-12

    Personality disorders are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes, contributing to the high healthcare utilization seen in patients with these disorders. A growing literature supports a robust association of personality disorders and health problems. The primary aim of this article is to summarize the most recent research documenting the associations between personality disorders and health conditions. Extending past reviews, we discuss the association of personality disorders with chronic physical illnesses, sleep disturbances, pain conditions, and obesity. We provide recommendations for future research in this area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An overview of the fundamentals of the chemistry of silica with relevance to biosilicification and technological advances

    PubMed Central

    Belton, David J.; Deschaume, Olivier; Perry, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Biomineral formation is widespread in Nature and occurs in bacteria, single-celled protists, plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Minerals formed in the biological environment often show unusual physical properties (e.g., strength, degree of hydration) and often have structures that exhibit order on many length scales. Biosilica, found in single cell organisms through to higher plants and primitive animals (sponges) is formed from an environment that is undersaturated with respect to silicon and under conditions of around neutral pH and low temperature ca. 4–40 °C. Formation of the mineral may occur intra- or extra-cellularly and specific biochemical locations for mineral deposition that include lipids, proteins and carbohydrates are known. In most cases the formation of the mineral phase is linked to cellular processes, understanding of which could lead to the design of new materials for biomedical, optical and other applications. In this contribution we describe the aqueous chemistry of silica, from uncondensed monomer through to colloidal particles and three dimensional structures, relevant to the environment from which the biomineral forms. We then describe the chemistry of silica formation from alkoxides such as tetraethoxysilane as this and other silanes have been used to study the chemistry of silica formation using silicatein and such precursors are often used in the preparation of silicas for technological applications. The focus of this article is on the methods, experimental and computational by which the process of silica formation can be studied with emphasis on speciation. PMID:22333209

  13. Advances in astronomy (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 February 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-07-01

    A scientific session of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled "Advances in Astronomy" was held on 27 February 2013 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division: (1) Chernin A D (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow) "Dark energy in the local Universe: HST data, nonlinear theory, and computer simulations"; (2) Gnedin Yu N (Main (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory, RAS, St. Petersburg) "A new method of supermassive black hole studies based on polarimetric observations of active galactic nuclei"; (3) Efremov Yu N (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow) "Our Galaxy: grand design and moderately active nucleus"; (4) Gilfanov M R (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "X-ray binaries, star formation, and type-Ia supernova progenitors"; (5) Balega Yu Yu (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Nizhnii Arkhyz, Karachaevo-Cherkessia Republic) "The nearest 'star factory' in the Orion Nebula"; (6) Bisikalo D V (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "Atmospheres of giant exoplanets"; (7) Korablev O I (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Spectroscopy of the atmospheres of Venus and Mars: new methods and new results"; (8) Ipatov A V (Institute of Applied Astronomy, RAS, St. Petersburg) "A new-generation radio interferometer for fundamental and applied research". Summaries of the papers based on reports 1, 2, 4, 7, 8 are given below. • Dark energy in the nearby Universe: HST data, nonlinear theory, and computer simulations, A D Chernin Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 7, Pages 704-709 • Investigating supermassive black holes: a new method based on the polarimetric observations of active galactic nuclei, Yu N Gnedin Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 7, Pages 709-714 • X-ray binaries and star formation, M R

  14. Health physics aspects of advanced reactor licensing reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Hinson, C.S.

    1995-03-01

    The last Construction Permit to be issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a U.S. light water reactor (LWR) was granted in the late 1970s. In 1989 the NRC issued 10 CFR Part 52 which is intended to serve as a framework for the licensing of future reactor designs. The NRC is currently reviewing four different future on {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs. Two of these designs are classified as evolutionary designs (modified versions of current generation LWRs) and two are advanced designs (reactors incorporating simplified designs and passive means for accident mitigation). These {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs currently being reviewed by the NRC.

  15. SOFTWARE REVIEW: The Advanced Physics Virtual Laboratory Series: CD-ROM Thermodynamics and Molecular Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1998-09-01

    -study'. Equations are presented without too much explanation, and definitions of key symbols are occasionally lacking - or have appeared in a different simulation and are not repeated. Where proofs or developments of formulae are presented steps are often left out. This means that students will get quite frustrated unless they have had some prior instruction or have read a fuller treatment in a textbook. The spoken commentary is slightly different from the text and leaves out the equations (sensibly enough!). Poor proof reading has allowed `typos' to stay in some places (notably the question in the Gas Diffusion simulation). Indeed the questions are particularly poor. On the whole they require the students to make some kind of calculation - and getting the right answer to these may not demonstrate understanding of the basic physics. Students will even so be quite frustrated by questions that are not based on the formulae in the text, or data from the simulation, and sometimes require concepts (e.g. molar mass) not mentioned anywhere. In one case a simulation headed isovolumic has a question in which the rather terrifying term isochoric is used instead. The answers to questions are given, but are rather misleadingly called solutions - all we get is the numerical answer, with no kind of help in finding out what went wrong. Students may also be frustrated by not knowing - or even being able to guess - how to input an answer in the same format as in the solution. Equally annoying is that when you pull down the question the graphical attachments to the main picture remain on top in the window, and have to dragged out of the way if you want to read it. I think that the authors need to do some more work in tidying up these aspects of the product. However, I have a more fundamental objection to the text in the thermodynamic simulations. I think that the difficult aspects of thermodynamics definitions and nomenclature have been skated over a little too glibly, and in addition it all reads

  16. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  17. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Kengyelics, S M

    2007-12-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors.

  18. Cognitive Mapping of Advanced Level Physics Students' Conceptions of Quantum Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashhadi, Azam; Woolnough, Brian

    This paper presents findings from a study that investigated students' understanding of quantum phenomena and focused on how students incorporate the ideas of quantum physics into their overall cognitive framework. The heuristic metaphor of the map is used to construct graphic representations of students' understanding of quantum physics. The…

  19. Advanced Experiments in Nuclear Science, Volume I: Advanced Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Jerome L.; And Others

    The experiments in this manual represent state-of-the-art techniques which should be within the budgetary constraints of a college physics or chemistry department. There are fourteen experiments divided into five modules. The modules are on X-ray fluorescence, charged particle detection, neutron activation analysis, X-ray attenuation, and…

  20. BOOK REVIEW: New Understanding Physics for Advanced Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breithaupt, Jim

    2000-09-01

    Breithaupt's new book is big: at 727 pages, it will be a hefty addition to any student's bag. According to the preface, the book is designed to help students achieve the transition from GCSE to A-level and to succeed well at this level. It also aims to cover the requirements of the compulsory parts of all new syllabuses and to cover most of the optional material, too. The book is organized into seven themes along traditional lines: mechanics, materials, fields, waves, electricity, inside the atom, and physics in medicine. Each theme begins with a colourful title page that outlines what the theme is about, lists the applications that students will meet in their reading, identifies prior learning from GCSE and gives a checklist of what students should be able to do once they have finished their reading of the theme. This is all very useful. The text of the book is illustrated with many colourful photographs, pictures and cartoons, but despite this it looks very dense. There are a lot of words on every page in a small font that makes them seem very unfriendly, and although the book claims to be readable I rather doubt that the layout will encourage voluntary reading of the text. Each chapter ends with a useful summary and a selection of short questions that allow students to test their understanding. Each theme has a set of multiple choice and long questions. Some of the questions have an icon referring the student to the accompanying CD (more of this later). There is much up-to-date material in the book. For example, the section on cosmology gives a brief description of the inflationary scenario within the Big Bang model of the origin of the universe, although no mechanism for the inflation is given, which might prove unsatisfying to some students. I do have some reservations about the presentation of some topics within the book: the discussion of relativistic mass, for example, states that `Einstein showed that the mass ... is given by the formula ...' and quotes

  1. Recruitment, Advancement and Retention of Women in the Physical Sciences at U.C. Irvine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, E. R.; Smecker-Hane, T.; Kehoe, P.; Bryant, S. V.

    2004-12-01

    Strategies for the recruitment, retention and advancement of women in the physical sciences at U.C. Irvine are presented. The NSF-funded ADVANCE Program has implemented several new initiatives. Among these are new requirements for recruitment committees, participation by school equity advisors, personalized mentoring programs and establishment of senior chairs. Progress towards our goals are reviewed and evaluated. Issues such as dual career couples and the balance between family/personal time and work are also addressed.

  2. Where the girls aren't: High school girls and advanced placement physics enrollment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Susan O'brien

    During the high school years, when many students first have some choice in course selection, research indicates that girls choose to enroll in more math and science courses, take more advanced placement courses, and take more honors courses in English, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and foreign languages than ever before. Yet, not only are boys more likely to take all of the three core science courses (biology, chemistry, and physics), boys enroll in advanced placement physics approximately three times as often as do girls. This study examines the perceptions, attitudes, and aspirations of thirty high school girls enrolled in senior-level science electives in an attempt to understand their high school science course choices, and what factors were influencing them. This is a qualitative investigation employing constructivist grounded theory methods. There are two main contributions of this study. First, it presents a new conceptual and analytical framework to investigate the problem of why some high school girls do not enroll in physics coursework. This framework is grounded in the data and is comprised of three existing feminist perspectives along the liberal/radical continuum of feminist thought. Second, this study illuminates a complex set of reasons why participants avoided high school physics (particularly advanced placement physics) coursework. These reasons emerged as three broad categories related to: (a) a lack of connectedness with physics curriculum and instruction; (b) prior negative experiences with physics and math classroom climates; and (c) future academic goals and career aspirations. Taken together, the findings of this study indicate that the problem of high school girls and physics enrollment---particularly advanced placement physics enrollment---is a problem that cannot be evaluated or considered from one perspective.

  3. Tether fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects of tethers are presented and briefly discussed. The effects of gravity gradients, dumbbell libration in circular orbits, tether control strategies and impact hazards for tethers are among those fundamentals. Also considered are aerodynamic drag, constraints in momentum transfer applications and constraints with permanently deployed tethers. The theoretical feasibility of these concepts are reviewed.

  4. Probing the scale of new physics by Advanced LIGO/VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mazumdar, A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that if the new physics beyond the standard model is associated with a first-order phase transition around 107- 108 GeV , the energy density stored in the resulting stochastic gravitational waves and the corresponding peak frequency are within the projected final sensitivity of the advanced LIGO/VIRGO detectors. We discuss some possible new physics scenarios that could arise at such energies, and in particular, the consequences for Peccei-Quinn and supersymmetry breaking scales.

  5. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  6. Multi-physics nuclear reactor simulator for advanced nuclear engineering education

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, A.

    2012-07-01

    Multi-physics nuclear reactor simulator, which aims to utilize for advanced nuclear engineering education, is being introduced to Nagoya Univ.. The simulator consists of the 'macroscopic' physics simulator and the 'microscopic' physics simulator. The former performs real time simulation of a whole nuclear power plant. The latter is responsible to more detail numerical simulations based on the sophisticated and precise numerical models, while taking into account the plant conditions obtained in the macroscopic physics simulator. Steady-state and kinetics core analyses, fuel mechanical analysis, fluid dynamics analysis, and sub-channel analysis can be carried out in the microscopic physics simulator. Simulation calculations are carried out through dedicated graphical user interface and the simulation results, i.e., spatial and temporal behaviors of major plant parameters are graphically shown. The simulator will provide a bridge between the 'theories' studied with textbooks and the 'physical behaviors' of actual nuclear power plants. (authors)

  7. Fundamental advancements of the future.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winblade, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    General aviation encompasses all aviation except air carrier and military. This includes a broad spectrum of aircraft types ranging from amateur-built aircraft to jet transports, and includes missions such as transportation of people and freight, firefighting, power line patrol, agricultural, racing, and police patrol. The time span from discovery to broad utilization is such that for the next decade the majority of the innovations that will show up in the general aviation fleet will be derived from today's research efforts. A second area that has high potential is the modification of technology developments for military and transport aircraft to the needs of general aviation requirements of cost, complexity, and reliability.

  8. Fundamentals and Advances in Tonometry.

    PubMed

    Nuyen, Brenda; Mansouri, Kaweh

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Although intraocular pressure (IOP) is not considered any more to be a defining feature of the disease, its lowering remains the only treatment option for glaucoma. Therefore, accurate and precise measurement of IOP is the cornerstone of glaucoma. Intraocular pressure is a highly dynamic physiological parameter with individual circadian rhythms. The main limitation of current tonometry methods remains the static and mostly office-based nature of their measurements. This review provides a brief historical overview on tonometry and discusses current tonometry instruments. In recent years, approaches to 24-hour IOP monitoring have been introduced, and there is hope that they may become part of routine clinical management in the future.

  9. Recent advances in the link between physical activity, sedentary behavior, physical fitness, and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Namasivayam, Vikneswaran; Lim, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent studies have characterized physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, and cardiorespiratory fitness as distinct, interrelated constructs that influence the risk of CRC and related outcomes. PA levels required to confer protection against CRC may be higher than previously thought. Sedentary behavior, defined as time spent sitting, increases CRC risk independent of PA and may require novel interventions distinct from those targeting PA. Finally, cardiorespiratory fitness is inversely associated with CRC risk and mortality and may provide a potential tool for risk stratification and intervention. PMID:28344777

  10. Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

  11. Short Animation Movies as Advance Organizers in Physics Teaching: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koscianski, Andre; Ribeiro, Rafael Joao; da Silva, Sani Carvalho Rutz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Advance organizers are instructional materials that help students use previous knowledge to make links with new information. Short animation movies are a possible format and are well suited for physics, as they can portray dynamic phenomena and represent abstract concepts. Purpose: The study aimed to determine guidelines for the…

  12. Physical Features of Soil: Advanced Crop and Soil Science. A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    The course of study represents the second of six modules in advanced crop and soil science and introduces the agriculture student to the subject of physical features of the soil. Upon completing the two day lesson, the student will be able to determine the texture and structural types of soil, list the structural classes of the soil and where they…

  13. Advanced Swimming, Phase One--Swimmer; Physical Education: 5551.48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutting, Dick

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 7-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Advanced swimming. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The first five sections of the guide list course guidelines, course description, broad goal statement, behavioral objectives, course content, learning activities, and teaching procedures. The guide also contains evaluation forms and a five-item…

  14. Short Animation Movies as Advance Organizers in Physics Teaching: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koscianski, Andre; Ribeiro, Rafael Joao; da Silva, Sani Carvalho Rutz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Advance organizers are instructional materials that help students use previous knowledge to make links with new information. Short animation movies are a possible format and are well suited for physics, as they can portray dynamic phenomena and represent abstract concepts. Purpose: The study aimed to determine guidelines for the…

  15. Reactor physics methods for the preconceptual core design of the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Difilippo, F.C.; Primm, R.T. III

    1987-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been jointly working to develop and evaluate preconceptual reactor core configurations for the advanced neutron source. This paper reviews the reactor physics methods used to compute reactor parameters and demonstrates that the laboratories achieve good agreement on these parameters.

  16. Fundamental Studies of Adhesion of Dust to PV Module Surfaces: Chemical and Physical Relationships at the Microscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.; Diniz, Antonia Sonia A. C.; Maia, Cristiana Brasil; Viana, Marcelo Machado; Costa, Suellen C.; Brito, Pedro P.; Campos, Claudio Dias; Neto, Lauro V. Macheto; de Morais Hanriot, Sergio; de Oliveira Cruz, Leila R.

    2016-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module soiling is a growing area of concern for performance and reliability. This paper provides evaluations of the fundamental interactions of dust/soiling particles with several PV module surfaces. The purpose is to investigate the basic mechanisms involving the chemistry, morphology, and resulting particle adhesion to the first photon-incident surface. The evaluation and mapping of the chemistry and composition of single dust particles collected from operating PV module surfaces are presented. The first correlated direct measurements of the adhesive force of individual grains from field-operating collectors on identical PV module glass are reported, including correlations with specific compositions. Special microscale atomic force microscopy techniques are adapted to determine the force between the particle and the module glass surface. Results are presented for samples under dry and moisture-exposed conditions, confirming the effects of cementation for surfaces having soluble mineral and/or organic concentrations. Additionally, the effects of hydrocarbon fuels on the enhanced bonding of soiling particles to surfaces are determined for samples from urban and highly trafficked regions. Comparisons between glass and dust-mitigating superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic coatings are presented. Potential limitations of this proximal probe technique are discussed in terms of results and initial proof-of-concept experiments.

  17. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction−acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiuchi, M. Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V. Kondo, K.; and others

    2016-04-15

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction–acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  18. Learning Through Doing: Teaching Advanced Physics Concepts Through Freshmen Research Immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahila, Matthew; Piper, Louis; Amey, Jennifer; Jones, Wayne; Fegley, Megan; Stamp, Nancy

    Often undergraduates have difficulty grasping advanced concepts in physics due to the seemingly abstract and foreign nature of the time and length scales involved. The ``Smart Energy'' Freshmen Research Immersion (FRI) program at Binghamton University was created as a way to address this issue and, in turn, improve undergraduate performance and retention in physics and chemistry. Using real-world research problems as a wider context to frame their understanding, we have developed a course sequence providing a more intuitive and comprehensive understanding of core physics and chemistry concepts over the course of the program. Advanced condensed matter topics, such as optical band gaps, crystal and electronic structure, and electron/hole conduction are introduced to students through hands-on, authentic research activities incorporating materials for real-world device applications. I will discuss how employing p-n junctions as a model device can allow for a natural and intuitive progression from basic to advanced physics and chemistry concepts. This approach illustrates how shifting exotic concepts into a more relatable form through the use of analogy is important for fostering a more intuitive understanding of physical phenomena.

  19. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

  20. Run II physics at the Fermilab Tevatron and advanced analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpalatha C Bhat

    2003-06-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron has the unique opportunity to explore physics at the electroweak scale with the highest ever proton-antiproton collision energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV and unprecedented luminosity. About 20 times more data is expected to be collected during the first phase of the collider Run II which is in its second year of data-taking. The second phase of Run II, expected to begin in 2005, will increase the integrated luminosity to about 10-15 fb{sup -1}. Discovering a low mass Higgs boson and evidence for Supersymmetry or for other new physics beyond the Standard Model are the main physics goals for Run II. It is widely recognized that the use of advanced analysis methods will be crucial to achieve these goals. I discuss the current status of Run II at the Tevatron, prospects and foreseen applications of advanced analysis methods.

  1. How gender and reformed introductory physics impacts student success in advanced physics courses and continuation in the physics major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Idaykis; Potvin, Geoff; Kramer, Laird H.

    2016-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] Active-learning approaches to teaching introductory physics have been found to improve student learning and affective gains on short-term outcomes [S. Freeman et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 8410 (2014)]; however, whether or not the benefits of active learning impact women to the same degree as men has been a point of concern [A. Madsen, S. B. McKagan, and E. C. Sayre, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 9, 020121 (2013)]. Further, the long-term impacts of active-learning experiences are also understudied. At Florida International University, a Hispanic-majority institution, we have implemented Modeling Instruction (MI) and the Integrated Science Learning Environment (ISLE) in introductory physics classes for the past decade. In this empirical paper, we report on a longitudinal investigation of student performance and persistence in upper level physics courses after having previously experienced MI or ISLE in their introductory physics courses, and disaggregate students by gender. Using survival analysis methods, we find women who declare physics as a major are more likely than men to graduate with a physics degree. Women are also just as likely as men to pass through the upper division courses, with the highest failure risk for both men and women occurring in the first semester of upper-division course taking. These results reinforce the need to expand considerations of performance outcomes to be longitudinal to measure the effectiveness of the entire physics experience.

  2. Views of a devil`s advocate -- Fundamental challenges to effective field theory treatments of nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D.

    1998-04-01

    The physics goals of the effective field theory program for nuclear phenomena are outlined. It is pointed out that there are multiple schemes for implementing EFT and it is presently not clear if any of these schemes is viable. Most of the applications of effective field theory ideas have been on nucleon-nucleon scattering. It is argued that this is little more than curve fitting and that other quantities need to be calculated to test the ideas. It is shown that EFT methods work well for certain bound state properties of the deuteron electric form factor. However, it is also shown that this success depends sensitively on the fact that the majority of the probability of the deuteron`s wave function is beyond the range of the potential. This circumstance is special to the deuteron suggesting that it will be very difficult to achieve the same kinds of success for tightly bound nuclei.

  3. Strategies for Advancing Women in Physics and other Sciences in an Undergraduate Hispanic Institution (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Idalia

    2009-04-01

    For the past 15 years, University of Puerto Rico at Humacao (UPRH) has implemented various efforts to increase participation and promote advancement of women in physics and other sciences. The strategies used include mentoring, collaborating, forming women's organizations, and offering training workshops. The physics program at UPRH is the largest in Puerto Rico with approximately 95 undergraduates. Since 1995, female students in the program have increased from 17% to 32%. Efforts to integrate women in undergraduate research as early as possible in their studies show promising results, with the percentage of women in research increasing from 13% to 60% in the last 13 years. The Faculty in Training (FIT) program, begun in 2003, has supported talented women students interested in academic careers. The first FIT physics student will obtain her PhD in 2009. At the faculty level, UPRH received a first-round US National Science Foundation ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Award in 2001. The ADVANCE legacy at UPRH is evident at levels ranging from changes in individual behaviors to the adoption of institutional policies. A strong network of women in science and their supporters continues to advance this legacy.

  4. Who cares about physics today? A marketing strategy for the survival of fundamental science and the benefit of society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannella, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    It is often said that the major stumbling block for doing scientific outreach is money because of funding issues. Ignoring that the true issue is the lack of time and/or inclination on the part of practicing scientists, this statement is too generic to be quantitative or even complete: in fact, as for every project or investment, the discussion should be based on context and impact. Initiatives are at hand to do outreach that cost nothing more than the budget already in place for a University, its Departments and its scientific research groups: it is more a matter of capitalizing existing assets at a University in a concerted way and taking full advantage of these assets by means of synergetic collaborations. I will describe one such collaboration among the School of Dance and the Astronomy and Physics Departments at the University of Maryland: the dance performance ``Gravity,'' inspired by gravitational-wave astronomy. Similar types of partnerships represent new promising ways of doing science communications according to what can be rightly called a marketing strategy (http://arxiv.org.abs/1210.0082).

  5. Physical constraints, fundamental limits, and optimal locus of operating points for an inverted pendulum based actuated dynamic walker.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Lalit; Umanand, Loganathan

    2015-10-26

    The inverted pendulum is a popular model for describing bipedal dynamic walking. The operating point of the walker can be specified by the combination of initial mid-stance velocity (v0) and step angle (φm) chosen for a given walk. In this paper, using basic mechanics, a framework of physical constraints that limit the choice of operating points is proposed. The constraint lines thus obtained delimit the allowable region of operation of the walker in the v0-φm plane. A given average forward velocity vx,avg can be achieved by several combinations of v0 and φm. Only one of these combinations results in the minimum mechanical power consumption and can be considered the optimum operating point for the given vx,avg. This paper proposes a method for obtaining this optimal operating point based on tangency of the power and velocity contours. Putting together all such operating points for various vx,avg, a family of optimum operating points, called the optimal locus, is obtained. For the energy loss and internal energy models chosen, the optimal locus obtained has a largely constant step angle with increasing speed but tapers off at non-dimensional speeds close to unity.

  6. Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

    2008-09-11

    The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

  7. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  8. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, R.H.

    1997-04-25

    The goal of this project is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Its scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design and construction of a 2 t/h process development unit (PDU). Large lots of clean coal are to be produced in the PDU from three project coals. Investigation of the near-term applicability of the two advanced fine coal cleaning processes in an existing coal preparation plant is another goal of the project and is the subject of this report.

  9. How Gender and Reformed Introductory Physics Impacts Student Success in Advanced Physics Courses and Continuation in the Physics Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Idaykis; Potvin, Geoff; Kramer, Laird H.

    2016-01-01

    Active-learning approaches to teaching introductory physics have been found to improve student learning and affective gains on short-term outcomes [S. Freeman et al., "Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111," 8410 (2014)]; however, whether or not the benefits of active learning impact women to the same degree as men has been a point of…

  10. How Gender and Reformed Introductory Physics Impacts Student Success in Advanced Physics Courses and Continuation in the Physics Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Idaykis; Potvin, Geoff; Kramer, Laird H.

    2016-01-01

    Active-learning approaches to teaching introductory physics have been found to improve student learning and affective gains on short-term outcomes [S. Freeman et al., "Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111," 8410 (2014)]; however, whether or not the benefits of active learning impact women to the same degree as men has been a point of…

  11. From Proposal Writing to Data Collection to Presentation: Physical Oceanography Laboratory Class Students Explore the Fundamentals of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijsman, M. C.; Church, I.; Haydel, J.; Martin, K. M.; Shiller, A. M.; Wallace, D. J.; Blancher, J.; Foltz, A.; Griffis, A. M.; Kosciuch, T. J.; Kincketootle, A.; Pierce, E.; Young, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    To better prepare first-year Department of Marine Science MSc students of the University of Southern Mississippi for their science careers, we plan to execute a semester-long Physical Oceanography laboratory class that exposes the enrolled students to all aspects of interdisciplinary research: writing a proposal, planning a cruise, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting their results. Although some of these aspects may be taught in any such class, the incorporation of all these aspects makes this class unique.The fieldwork will be conducted by boat in the Rigolets in Louisiana, a 13-km long tidal strait up to 1 km wide connecting the Mississippi Sound with Lake Pontchartrain. The students have the opportunity to collect ADCP, CTD, multibeam sonar, sediment and water samples.A second novel characteristic of this class is that the instructor partnered with the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, a not for profit environmental advocacy group. The foundation will give an hour-long seminar on the natural history of the study area and its environmental problems. This information provides context for the students' research proposals and allows them to formulate research questions and hypotheses that connect their research objectives to societally relevant issues, such as coastal erosion, salt water intrusion, and water quality. The proposal writing and cruise planning is done in the first month of the 3.5-month long semester. In the second month two surveys are conducted. The remainder of the semester is spent on analysis and reporting. Whenever possible we teach Matlab for the students to use in their data analysis. In this presentation, we will report on the successes and difficulties associated with teaching such a multi-faceted class.

  12. Fundamental Physics with the Hubble Frontier Fields: Constraining Dark Matter Models with the Abundance of Extremely Faint and Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Merle, A.; Totzauer, M.; Schneider, A.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the measured abundance of ultra-faint lensed galaxies at z≈ 6 in the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) provides stringent constraints on the parameter space of (i) dark matter models based on keV sterile neutrinos; (ii) “fuzzy” wavelike dark matter models, based on Bose–Einstein condensates of ultra-light particles. For the case of sterile neutrinos, we consider two production mechanisms: resonant production through mixing with active neutrinos and the decay of scalar particles. For the former model, we derive constraints for the combination of sterile neutrino mass {m}ν and mixing parameter {\\sin }2(2θ ) which provide the tightest lower bounds on the mixing angle (and hence on the lepton asymmetry) derived so far by methods independent of baryonic physics. For the latter we compute the allowed combinations of the scalar mass, its coupling to the Higgs field, and the Yukawa coupling of scalar to sterile neutrinos. We compare our results to independent existing astrophysical bounds on sterile neutrinos in the same mass range. For the case of “fuzzy” dark matter, we show that the observed number density ≈ 1/{{Mpc}}3 of high-redshift galaxies in the HFF sets a lower limit {m}\\psi ≥slant 8\\cdot {10}-22 eV (at the 3-σ confidence level) on the particle mass, a result that strongly disfavors wavelike bosonic dark matter as a viable model for structure formation. We discuss the impact on our results of uncertainties due to systematics in the selection of highly magnified, faint galaxies at high redshift.

  13. A novel approach for determination of fundamental physical transport processes in natural channel design restoration sites with river steering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Endreny, T. A.; Becker, J. F.; Kroll, C.

    2012-12-01

    River restoration projects in the United States are frequently proposed and constructed with the intention of improving water quality, yet relatively little evidence exists regarding the success of these efforts. Many projects use an approach known as natural channel design (NCD), and include river steering structures. Prior assessment of water quality improvements within NCD sites has involved hydrologic retention modeling using a non-reactive tracer, with the goal of separately identifying hyporheic and surface transient storage (STS). A comparative approach involving NCD and non-NCD sites used by the authors yielded mixed results: although physically-based assessments of STS profiles in many NCD sites support larger STS zones than non-NCD sites, these differences are not apparent when examining common transient storage metrics. Inverse modeling within nine NCD sites reveals additional obstacles, including generation of spurious lateral inflow/outflow values, limited detection of hyporheic processes due to strong surface transient storage, shear and Taylor dispersion, and divergent temporal patterns of solute flux over channel cross sections bounding structures. To overcome the obstacles encountered with 1D inverse modeling, data is presented from a new approach used in NCD reaches. This approach involves deriving a mass flux signature via pairing velocity and channel geometry with multiple electrical conductivity (EC) loggers deployed laterally at control cross sections (CCS). These CCS bound sub-reach segments (15 total across four NCD reaches) that include river steering structures and intermediate geomorphic features. Velocity and geometry measurements yield discharge values surrounding each EC logger which are used to weight a composite mass flux breakthrough curve above, within, and below each segment. Composite mass flux signatures reflect exchange processes that are not fully integrated laterally immediately below structures, and can be analyzed via

  14. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  15. DAWN (Design Assistant Workstation) for advanced physical-chemical life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudokas, Mary R.; Cantwell, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Peter I.; Shenk, Timothy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (NASA-OAST) under the Advanced Life Support Development Program. It is an initial attempt to integrate artificial intelligence techniques (via expert systems) with conventional quantitative modeling tools for advanced physical-chemical life support systems. The addition of artificial intelligence techniques will assist the designer in the definition and simulation of loosely/well-defined life support processes/problems as well as assist in the capture of design knowledge, both quantitative and qualitative. Expert system and conventional modeling tools are integrated to provide a design workstation that assists the engineer/scientist in creating, evaluating, documenting and optimizing physical-chemical life support systems for short-term and extended duration missions.

  16. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  17. DAWN (Design Assistant Workstation) for advanced physical-chemical life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudokas, Mary R.; Cantwell, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Peter I.; Shenk, Timothy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (NASA-OAST) under the Advanced Life Support Development Program. It is an initial attempt to integrate artificial intelligence techniques (via expert systems) with conventional quantitative modeling tools for advanced physical-chemical life support systems. The addition of artificial intelligence techniques will assist the designer in the definition and simulation of loosely/well-defined life support processes/problems as well as assist in the capture of design knowledge, both quantitative and qualitative. Expert system and conventional modeling tools are integrated to provide a design workstation that assists the engineer/scientist in creating, evaluating, documenting and optimizing physical-chemical life support systems for short-term and extended duration missions.

  18. Advanced Technology and Breakthrough Physics for 2025 and 2050 Military Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, David; Czysz, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating the development of military aerospace planes that would embody advanced technology and break-through physics to revolutionize the capability of the US Air Force to respond in a timely manner to hostile threats facing the United States and its Allies. One plane concept embodied science and technology advances deemed developable by 2025. These advances included: MHD airbreathing propulsion, aneutronic fusion propulsion and light weight and high-strength airframe and propulsion materials-to accomplish Air Force aerospace missions from the ground up to geostationary orbit. The other plane embodied the further advancements in science and technology that were deemed possible by 2050. These advancements included: augmentation of MHD and fusion power with power from the zero-point energies of the quantum vacuum, and augmentation of vehicle jet propulsion with field propulsion to increase vehicle delta V by a factor of more than 2, thereby extending Air Force protective operations beyond earth orbit-into cislunar space. This paper has been approved for public release by the USAF.

  19. Technical Basis for Physical Fidelity of NRC Control Room Training Simulators for Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Minsk, Brian S.; Branch, Kristi M.; Bates, Edward K.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Gore, Bryan F.; Faris, Drury K.

    2009-10-09

    The objective of this study is to determine how simulator physical fidelity influences the effectiveness of training the regulatory personnel responsible for examination and oversight of operating personnel and inspection of technical systems at nuclear power reactors. It seeks to contribute to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) understanding of the physical fidelity requirements of training simulators. The goal of the study is to provide an analytic framework, data, and analyses that inform NRC decisions about the physical fidelity requirements of the simulators it will need to train its staff for assignment at advanced reactors. These staff are expected to come from increasingly diverse educational and experiential backgrounds.

  20. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  1. Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, Paul; Corson, Dale R.; Lorrain, Francois

    Based on the classic Electromagnetic Fields and Waves by the same authors, Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena capitalizes on the older text's traditional strengths--solid physics, inventive problems, and an experimental approach--while offering a briefer, more accessible introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetism.

  2. Impact of 5-h phase advance on sleep architecture and physical performance in athletes.

    PubMed

    Petit, Elisabeth; Mougin, Fabienne; Bourdin, Hubert; Tio, Grégory; Haffen, Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    Travel across time zones causes jet lag and is accompanied by deleterious effects on sleep and performance in athletes. These poor performances have been evaluated in field studies but not in laboratory conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in athletes, the impact of 5-h phase advance on the architecture of sleep and physical performances (Wingate test). In a sleep laboratory, 16 male athletes (age: 22.2 ± 1.7 years, height: 178.3 ± 5.6 cm, body mass: 73.6 ± 7.9 kg) spent 1 night in baseline condition and 2 nights, 1 week apart, in phase shift condition recorded by electroencephalography to calculate sleep architecture variables. For these last 2 nights, the clock was advanced by 5 h. Core body temperature rhythm was assessed continuously. The first night with phase advance decreased total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, stage 2 of nonrapid eye movement (N2), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with baseline condition, whereas the second night decreased N2 and increased slow-wave sleep and REM, thus improving the quality of sleep. After phase advance, mean power improved, which resulted in higher lactatemia. Acrophase and bathyphase of temperature occurred earlier and amplitude decreased in phase advance but the period was not modified. These results suggest that a simulated phase shift contributed to the changes in sleep architecture, but did not significantly impair physical performances in relation with early phase adjustment of temperature to the new local time.

  3. Fundamental Physics with Cold Positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, D. B.; Tom, H. W. K.; Mills, A. P. Jr.

    2008-08-08

    The use of positron plasmas to produce intense positron pulses has made it possible to create relatively large instantaneous positronium densities. This in turn provides an opportunity to perform improved precision spectroscopy measurements on positronium that will be limited by systematic rather than statistical effects which will improve present QED positronium tests by orders of magnitude. Further increases in the positronium density will lead to the production of a positronium Bose-Einstein condensate, further increasing the accuracy of such measurements and making it possible to study the phase diagram of a matter-antimatter condensate for the first time.

  4. Clinical reasoning and advanced practice privileges enable physical therapist point-of-care decisions in the military health care system: 3 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Rhon, Daniel I; Deyle, Gail D; Gill, Norman W

    2013-09-01

    Physical therapists frequently make important point-of-care decisions for musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. In the Military Health System (MHS), these decisions may occur while therapists are deployed in support of combat troops, as well as in a more traditional hospital setting. Proficiency with the musculoskeletal examination, including a fundamental understanding of the diagnostic role of musculoskeletal imaging, is an important competency for physical therapists. The purpose of this article is to present 3 cases managed by physical therapists in unique MHS settings, highlighting relevant challenges and clinical decision making. Three cases are presented involving conditions where the physical therapist was significantly involved in the diagnosis and clinical management plan. The physical therapist's clinical privileges, including the ability to order appropriate musculoskeletal imaging procedures, were helpful in making clinical decisions that facilitate timely management. The cases involve patients with an ankle sprain and Maisonneuve fracture, a radial head fracture, and a pelvic neoplasm referred through medical channels as knee pain. Clinical pathways from point of care are discussed, as well as the reasoning that led to decisions affecting definitive care for each of these patients. In each case, emergent treatment and important combat evacuation decisions were based on a combination of examination and management decisions. Physical therapists can provide important contributions to the primary management of patients with musculoskeletal conditions in a variety of settings within the MHS. In the cases described, advanced clinical privileges contributed to the success in this role.

  5. Marketing fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Redmond, W H

    2001-01-01

    This chapter outlines current marketing practice from a managerial perspective. The role of marketing within an organization is discussed in relation to efficiency and adaptation to changing environments. Fundamental terms and concepts are presented in an applied context. The implementation of marketing plans is organized around the four P's of marketing: product (or service), promotion (including advertising), place of delivery, and pricing. These are the tools with which marketers seek to better serve their clients and form the basis for competing with other organizations. Basic concepts of strategic relationship management are outlined. Lastly, alternate viewpoints on the role of advertising in healthcare markets are examined.

  6. Fundamental Movement Skills Development under the Influence of a Gymnastics Program and Everyday Physical Activity in Seven-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Culjak, Zoran; Miletic, Durdica; Kalinski, Suncica Delas; Kezic, Ana; Zuvela, Frane

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objectives of this study were: a) to examine the influence of an 18-week basic artistic gymnastics program on fundamental movement skills (FMS) development in seven-year-old children; b) to determine correlations between children’s daily activities and successful performance of FMS and basic artistic gymnastics skills. Methods Seventy five first grade primary school children took part in this study. A physical education teacher specialized in artistic gymnastics conducted a gymnastics program for 18 weeks, three times a week. The level of gymnastics skills and FMS were identified at the beginning and at the end of the program. The level of gymnastics skills was evaluated by performance of eight artistic gymnastics skills, while FMS were evaluated by the use of FMS-polygon. Physical activity and inactivity was evaluated by using a proxy-questionnaire “Netherlands Physical Activity Questionnaire˝ (NPAQ). Findings According to the dependent samples t test, significant differences were found in the FMS-polygon and all gymnastics skills before and after the 18-week gymnastics program. Increasing correlations were established over time between gymnastics skills and the FMS-polygon. Unorganized daily activity of children significantly correlated with their mastering of gymnastics skills and FMS. The presented findings confirm: (1) the thesis that basic artistic gymnastics skills and FMS could be developed simultaneously, (2) the theory of positive transfer of similar skills between FMS and artistic gymnastic skills. Conclusion Mastering basic artistic gymnastics skills will provoke improvement of FMS and finally become a prerequisite for successful introduction of learning more complex gymnastics skills. The obtained results imply that an increase of children’s unorganized daily activities can improve the mastering of basic gymnastics skills and simultaneously the development of FMS. PMID:25535529

  7. Fundamental Movement Skills Development under the Influence of a Gymnastics Program and Everyday Physical Activity in Seven-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Culjak, Zoran; Miletic, Durdica; Kalinski, Suncica Delas; Kezic, Ana; Zuvela, Frane

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this study were: a) to examine the influence of an 18-week basic artistic gymnastics program on fundamental movement skills (FMS) development in seven-year-old children; b) to determine correlations between children's daily activities and successful performance of FMS and basic artistic gymnastics skills. Seventy five first grade primary school children took part in this study. A physical education teacher specialized in artistic gymnastics conducted a gymnastics program for 18 weeks, three times a week. The level of gymnastics skills and FMS were identified at the beginning and at the end of the program. The level of gymnastics skills was evaluated by performance of eight artistic gymnastics skills, while FMS were evaluated by the use of FMS-polygon. Physical activity and inactivity was evaluated by using a proxy-questionnaire "Netherlands Physical Activity Questionnaire˝ (NPAQ). According to the dependent samples t test, significant differences were found in the FMS-polygon and all gymnastics skills before and after the 18-week gymnastics program. Increasing correlations were established over time between gymnastics skills and the FMS-polygon. Unorganized daily activity of children significantly correlated with their mastering of gymnastics skills and FMS. The presented findings confirm: (1) the thesis that basic artistic gymnastics skills and FMS could be developed simultaneously, (2) the theory of positive transfer of similar skills between FMS and artistic gymnastic skills. Mastering basic artistic gymnastics skills will provoke improvement of FMS and finally become a prerequisite for successful introduction of learning more complex gymnastics skills. The obtained results imply that an increase of children's unorganized daily activities can improve the mastering of basic gymnastics skills and simultaneously the development of FMS.

  8. Reducing anxiety and enhancing physical performance by using an advanced version of EMDR: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rathschlag, Marco; Memmert, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background The main aim of this pilot study was to investigate an advanced version of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for reducing anxiety. Methods Fifty participants were asked at two times of measurement (T1 and T2 with a rest of 4 weeks) to generate anxiety via the recall of autobiographical memories according to their anxiety. Furthermore, the participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group, and the experimental group received an intervention of 1–2 h with the advanced version of EMDR in order to their anxiety 2 weeks after T1. At T1 as well as T2, we measured the intensity of participants' anxiety with a Likert scale (LS) and collected participants' state (temporary) and trait (chronic) anxiety with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). In addition, we measured participants' physical performance in a test for the finger musculature under the induction of their anxiety. Results The results showed that participant's ratings of their perceived intensity of anxiety (measured by a 9-point LS) and the state and trait anxiety decreased significantly in the experimental group but not in the control group from T1 to T2. Moreover, the physical performance under the induction of participants' anxiety increased significantly in the experimental group from T1 to T2 and there were no significant changes in the control group. Conclusions The study could show that the advanced version of EMDR is an appropriate method to reduce anxiety. PMID:24944864

  9. Short animation movies as advance organizers in physics teaching: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscianski, André; João Ribeiro, Rafael; Carvalho Rutz da Silva, Sani

    2012-11-01

    Background : Advance organizers are instructional materials that help students use previous knowledge to make links with new information. Short animation movies are a possible format and are well suited for physics, as they can portray dynamic phenomena and represent abstract concepts. Purpose : The study aimed to determine guidelines for the construction of an instructional short animation movie, with the role of an advance organizer. A film was created in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach, making part of a physics lesson and concerning the subject 'moment of a force'. Sample : The study took place in a Brazilian school in the city of Arapoti, in the south region of the country. Thirty-eight students participated, having an average age of 16 and following the third year of high school. Design and methods : Criteria drawn from a literature review directed the construction of the movie and the lesson. Data were collected using pre- and post-tests; registers of oral comments were also done during the class. The post-test included open-ended questions, allowing students to write remarks concerning the lesson and the animation. Conclusions : The article describes steps and guidelines to orient the process of designing an animation movie with the role of advance organizer. Data indicated that the movie facilitated the construction of links between pre-existent knowledge and the new information presented in the lesson. The proposed methodology can be considered a valid framework to derive similar approaches.

  10. Neutrons and Fundamental Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Plaster, Bradley

    2016-01-11

    The research supported by this project addressed fundamental open physics questions via experiments with subatomic particles. In particular, neutrons constitute an especially ideal “laboratory” for fundamental physics tests, as their sensitivities to the four known forces of nature permit a broad range of tests of the so-called “Standard Model”, our current best physics model for the interactions of subatomic particles. Although the Standard Model has been a triumphant success for physics, it does not provide satisfactory answers to some of the most fundamental open questions in physics, such as: are there additional forces of nature beyond the gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces?, or why does our universe consist of more matter than anti-matter? This project also contributed significantly to the training of the next generation of scientists, of considerable value to the public. Young scientists, ranging from undergraduate students to graduate students to post-doctoral researchers, made significant contributions to the work carried out under this project.

  11. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F.; Poore III, Willis P.; Muhlheim, Michael David

    2014-07-30

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  12. A qualitative study of advanced nurse practitioners' use of physical assessment skills in the community: shifting skills across professional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Mary; Allan, Helen

    2017-07-01

    To explore multiple perspectives on the use of physical assessment skills by advanced nurse practitioners in the UK. Physical assessment skills practices are embedded in advanced nursing practice roles in the UK. There is little evidence on how these skills are used by advanced nurse practitioners in the community. Case study. A qualitative interpretative single-embedded case study of 22 participants from South of England. A framework method analysed interview data collected by the researcher between March-August 2013. Participants included nurses, doctors, nurse educators and managers. Physical assessment skills education at universities is part of a policy shift to develop a flexible workforce in the UK. Shared physical assessment practices are less to do with role substitution and more about preparing practitioners with skills that are fit for purpose. Competence, capability and performance with physical assessment skills are an expectation of advanced nursing practice. These skills are used successfully by community advanced nurse practitioners to deliver a wide range of services in response to changing patient need. The introduction of physical assessment skills education to undergraduate professional preparation would create a firm foundation to develop these skills in postgraduate education. Physical assessment education prepares nurses with the clinical competencies to carry out healthcare reforms in the UK. Shared sets of clinical assessment competencies between disciplines have better outcomes for patients. Levels of assessment competence can depend on the professional attributes of individual practitioners. Unsupportive learning cultures can hinder professional development of advanced nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Experiences and Perspectives on Advance Care Planning among Individuals Living with Serious Physical Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Suzanne E; Weigel, Gabriela M; Stewart, Sabrina K A; Mako, Morgan; Loughnane, John F

    2017-02-01

    Despite frequent encounters with the healthcare system and high risk for secondary conditions, it is unclear how frequently individuals living with serious physical disabilities document advance directives (AD) or engage in advance care planning (ACP). Their perspectives on these topics are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize the perspectives of individuals with serious physical disabilities receiving care from two different healthcare delivery settings on the value of AD and ACP. Key informant interviews were conducted, audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis and constant comparative analysis. Twenty-five adults with serious physical disabilities were interviewed. Five organizing themes emerged as follows: (A) AD is a right versus responsibility, (B) past medical experiences influence ACP engagement, (C) ACP requires relationship-centered decision support, (D) concerns for care after death, and (E) suggestions for improving ACP experiences. Participants wished to engage in a relationship-centered approach to ACP, yet voiced hesitation due to experiences of significant medical bias and mistreatment, typically surrounding judgments of their quality of life. Better health professional training in ACP and heightened awareness of the unique ACP considerations pertaining to people with disabilities are recommended.

  14. Recent Advances in Free-Living Physical Activity Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Andre, David; Wolf, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    It has become clear recently that the epidemic of type 2 diabetes sweeping the globe is associated with decreased levels of physical activity and an increase in obesity. Incorporating appropriate and sufficient physical activity into one's life is an essential component of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight and overall health, especially for those with type II diabetes mellitus. Regular physical activity can have a positive impact by lowering blood glucose, helping the body to be more efficient at using insulin. There are other substantial benefits for patients with diabetes, including prevention of cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. Several complications of utilizing a self-care treatment methodology involving exercise include (1) patients may not know how much activity that they engage in and (2) health-care providers do not have objective measurements of how much activity their patients perform. However, several technological advances have brought a variety of activity monitoring devices to the market that can address these concerns. Ranging from simple pedometers to multisensor devices, the different technologies offer varying levels of accuracy, comfort, and reliability. The key notion is that by providing feedback to the patient, motivation can be increased and targets can be set and aimed toward. Although these devices are not specific to the treatment of diabetes, the importance of physical activity in treating the disease makes an understanding of these devices important. This article reviews these physical activity monitors and describes the advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:19885145

  15. Advances of Yemeni women in physics: Climbing toward a better status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraddin, S.; Alsowidi, N. A.

    2013-03-01

    In the three years since the last IUPAP Women in Physics Conference in 2008, the overall status of women in physics in Yemen has improved. The enrollment of women in the Department of Physics at Sana'a University has increased at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. At the graduate level, female enrollment has been equal to (50%) or greater than (57%) male enrollment in recent years. In addition, four of the leading state universities already have female faculty members with a PhD in physics who hold the title of assistant professor or better. These women in academia have made remarkable progress by publishing their work in distinctive journals as well as by winning national and regional scientific awards. We can be rather satisfied with the overall advances of Yemeni women in physics, as well, at every step up the academic ladder, but we simultaneously acknowledge their significant underrepresentation in the highest scientific positions as well as in decision-making positions at the faculty or administrative level of universities.

  16. CUNY Doctoral Students Expand Access to Advanced Placement Physics in Urban High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Paula; Khalfan, Amish; Strozak, Victor

    2006-03-01

    The CUNY GK-12 Fellows Program addresses the need to increase the participation of low-income and underrepresented minority students in high-school-level Advanced Placement (AP) courses in mathematics and sciences, particularly in urban schools. The project provides a unique opportunity for doctoral science and math students to work with AP teachers and students in public high schools in the Bronx, NY. The project has demonstrated that doctoral science students can be a valuable resource to both teachers and students and that their presence in the classroom can greatly enhance instruction at this level. Participation in the program also enhances the fellows' communication and teaching skills and deepens their awareness of issues in urban science and math education. We present the results of our work in Advanced Placement Physics during the project's first three years.

  17. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO[sub 2] per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO[sub 2] emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  18. CMAS Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited via Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, B. J.; Wiesner, V. L.; Zhu, D.; Johnson, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Materials for advanced turbine engines are expected to have temperature capabilities in the range of 1370-1500C. At these temperatures the ingestion of sand and dust particulate can result in the formation of corrosive glass deposits referred to as CMAS. The presence of this glass can both thermomechanically and thermochemically significantly degrade protective coatings on metallic and ceramic components. Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) was used to deposit advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for investigation on their interaction with CMAS compositions. Coatings were exposed to CMAS and furnace tested in air from 1 to 50 hours at temperatures ranging from 1200-1500C. Coating composition and crystal structure were tracked with X-ray diffraction and microstructure with electron microscopy.

  19. PREFACE: 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiong

    2014-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2013) which took place on 16-21 May 2013 at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The workshop series brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 120 participants from all over the world. 18 invited speakers presented key topics on the universe in computer, Computing in Earth Sciences, multivariate data analysis, automated computation in Quantum Field Theory as well as computing and data analysis challenges in many fields. Over 70 other talks and posters presented state-of-the-art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. The round table discussions on open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration stimulate us to think over the issue in the respective areas. ACAT 2013 was generously sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NFSC), Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA (BNL), Peking University (PKU), Theoretical Physics Cernter for Science facilities of CAS (TPCSF-CAS) and Sugon. We would like to thank all the participants for their scientific contributions and for the en- thusiastic participation in all its activities of the workshop. Further information on ACAT 2013 can be found at http://acat2013.ihep.ac.cn. Professor Jianxiong Wang Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science Details of committees and sponsors are available in the PDF

  20. Advances in Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E.; Jaros, John A.; Ma, Hong

    2010-11-23

    We review recent advances in calorimetry for high-energy physics. We provide an overview of the fundamentals of calorimetry, then survey calorimeters used in recent experiments, which represent the current state of the art. We conclude with descriptions of several research and development efforts and discuss future directions of the field.

  1. Advanced graphical user interface for multi-physics simulations using AMST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Florian; Vogel, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Numerical modelling of particulate matter has gained much popularity in recent decades. Advanced Multi-physics Simulation Technology (AMST) is a state-of-the-art three dimensional numerical modelling technique combining the eX-tended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) [1]. One major limitation of this code is the lack of a graphical user interface (GUI) meaning that all pre-processing has to be made directly in a HDF5-file. This contribution presents the first graphical pre-processor developed for AMST.

  2. The Advanced Light Source: A new tool for research in atomic and molecular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1991-04-01

    The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the world's brightest synchrotron radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum when it begins operation in 1993. It will be available as a national user facility to researchers in a broad range of disciplines, including materials science, atomic and molecular physics, chemistry, biology, imaging, and technology. The high brightness of the ALS will be particularly well suited to high-resolution studies of tenuous targets, such as excited atoms, ions, and clusters.

  3. The case for advanced physics topics in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Rahul; Herford, Alan S

    2014-10-01

    Research in oral and maxillofacial surgery has focused mainly on principles founded in the biological and chemical sciences, which have provided excellent answers to many questions. However, recent technologic advances have begun to gain prominence in many of the medical sciences, providing clinicians with more effective tools for diagnosis and treatment. The era of modern physics has led to the development of diagnostic techniques that could provide information at a more basic level than many of the current biochemical methods used. The goal of this report is to introduce 2 of these methods and describe how they can be applied to oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  4. Underwater Acoustic Wireless Sensor Networks: Advances and Future Trends in Physical, MAC and Routing Layers

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Salvador; Sanchez, Antonio; Capella, Juan Vicente; Meratnia, Nirvana; Serrano, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    This survey aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the current research on underwater wireless sensor networks, focusing on the lower layers of the communication stack, and envisions future trends and challenges. It analyzes the current state-of-the-art on the physical, medium access control and routing layers. It summarizes their security threads and surveys the currently proposed studies. Current envisioned niches for further advances in underwater networks research range from efficient, low-power algorithms and modulations to intelligent, energy-aware routing and medium access control protocols. PMID:24399155

  5. Advanced Physics-Based Modeling of Discrete Clutter and Diffuse Reverberation in the Littoral Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    2 9 0 V I L L A G E P A R K D R V I E • L E B A N O N , O H • 4 5 0 3 6 - 7 8 8 5 P H O N E : ( 5 1 3 ) 2 2 8 - 0 0 7 3 December 8...DEC 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Physics- Based Modeling of Discrete Clutter and Diffuse...2400 and 3600 Hz using path a (see Figure 3) shown by the solid blue line, using path e shown by the solid red line and path d shown by the dashed

  6. Zeeman effect experiment with high-resolution spectroscopy for advanced physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew S.; Hyde, Alexander R.; Batishchev, Oleg V.

    2017-08-01

    An experiment studying the physics underlying the Zeeman effect and the Paschen-Back effect is developed for an advanced physics laboratory. We have improved upon the standard Zeeman effect experiment by eliminating the Fabry-Perot etalon, so that virtually any emission line in the visible spectrum can be analyzed. The magnetic field is provided by neodymium magnets. Light emitted in the ˜1 T field is analyzed by a Czerny-Turner spectrograph equipped with medium-dispersion grating and small-pixel imaging CCD. A spectral resolution under 1 pm/pixel is achieved. The splitting of argon and helium lines is measured as a function of field strength. The proportionality of the splitting magnitude to the B-field strength and to λ 2 is demonstrated. The Bohr magneton is calculated and compared to the theoretical value.

  7. Role of the astronaut in operating the Advanced Fluid Physics Module.

    PubMed

    Pletser, V

    1995-08-01

    The role of man in space is investigated in the operation of the Advanced Fluid Physics Module (AFPM), a scientific instrument dedicated to fluid physics research in a microgravity environment and flown on the Spacelab D2 mission. The astronaut involvement is addressed by applying the criteria of the THURIS study, conducted by NASA for the optimization of future manned space flights. Outcomes of the THURIS study are first summarized. The AFPM characteristics and interfaces are briefly presented. The five experiments performed on board Spacelab D2 are introduced and the involvement of the astronaut is described. Finally, THURIS criteria are applied to an AFPM experiment scenario. Results show that, of all the activities involved in the AFPM nominal operation, two thirds are related to hardware manipulation and to procedure following, while the last third uses the unique astronaut intellectual capabilities, making his presence in orbit mandatory for successful experiment completion.

  8. Opportunities for Regenerative Rehabilitation and Advanced Technologies in Physical Therapy: Perspective From Academia.

    PubMed

    Norland, Ryan; Muchnick, Matthew; Harmon, Zachary; Chin, Tiffany; Kakar, Rumit Singh

    2016-04-01

    As rehabilitation specialists, physical therapists must continue to stay current with advances in technologies to provide appropriate rehabilitation protocols, improve patient outcomes, and be the preferred clinician of choice. To accomplish this vision, the physical therapy profession must begin to develop a culture of lifelong learning at the early stages of education and clinical training in order to embrace cutting-edge advancements such as stem cell therapies, tissue engineering, and robotics, to name a few. The purposes of this article are: (1) to provide a current perspective on faculty and graduate student awareness of regenerative rehabilitation concepts and (2) to advocate for increased integration of these emerging technologies within the doctor of physical therapy (DPT) curriculum. An online survey was designed to gauge awareness of principles in regenerative rehabilitation and to determine whether the topic was included and assessed in doctoral curricula. The survey yielded 1,006 responses from 82 DPT programs nationwide and indicated a disconnect in familiarity with the term "regenerative rehabilitation" and awareness of the inclusion of this material in the curriculum. To resolve this disconnect, the framework of the curriculum can be used to integrate new material via guest lecturers, interdisciplinary partnerships, and research opportunities. Successfully mentoring a generation of clinicians and rehabilitation scientists who incorporate new medical knowledge and technology into their own clinical and research practice depends greatly on sharing the responsibility among graduate students, professors, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), and DPT programs. Creating an interdisciplinary culture and integrating regenerative medicine and rehabilitation concepts into the curriculum will cultivate individuals who will be advocates for interprofessional behaviors and will ensure that the profession meets the goals stated in APTA Vision 2020.

  9. PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

    2015-05-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

  10. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  11. X-ray comb generation from nuclear-resonance-stabilized x-ray free-electron laser oscillator for fundamental physics and precision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K.-J.

    2015-03-01

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as 57Fe as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as 181Ta or 45Sc.

  12. X-ray comb generation from nuclear-resonance-stabilized x-ray free-electron laser oscillator for fundamental physics and precision metrology

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, B.  W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as ⁵⁷Fe as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuationmore » of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as ¹⁸¹Ta or ⁴⁵Sc.« less

  13. Successful Aging: Advancing the Science of Physical Independence in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen D.; Woods, Adam J.; Ashizawa, Tetso; Barb, Diana; Buford, Thomas W.; Carter, Christy S.; Clark, David J.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Corbett, Duane B.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Dotson, Vonetta; Ebner, Natalie; Efron, Philip A.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Foster, Thomas C.; Gundermann, David M.; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Karabetian, Christy; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Manini, Todd M.; Marsiske, Michael; Mankowski, Robert T.; Mutchie, Heather L.; Perri, Michael G.; Ranka, Sanjay; Rashidi, Parisa; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Scarpace, Philip J.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Solberg, Laurence M.; Someya, Shinichi; Uphold, Connie; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie; Wu, Samuel Shangwu; Pahor, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The concept of ‘Successful Aging’ has long intrigued the scientific community. Despite this long-standing interest, a consensus definition has proven to be a difficult task, due to the inherent challenge involved in defining such a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon. The lack of a clear set of defining characteristics for the construct of successful aging has made comparison of findings across studies difficult and has limited advances in aging research. The domain in which consensus on markers of successful aging is furthest developed is the domain of physical functioning. For example, walking speed appears to be an excellent surrogate marker of overall health and predicts the maintenance of physical independence, a cornerstone of successful aging. The purpose of the present article is to provide an overview and discussion of specific health conditions, behavioral factors, and biological mechanisms that mark declining mobility and physical function and promising interventions to counter these effects. With life expectancy continuing to increase in the United States and developed countries throughout the world, there is an increasing public health focus on the maintenance of physical independence among all older adults. PMID:26462882

  14. Successful aging: Advancing the science of physical independence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Anton, Stephen D; Woods, Adam J; Ashizawa, Tetso; Barb, Diana; Buford, Thomas W; Carter, Christy S; Clark, David J; Cohen, Ronald A; Corbett, Duane B; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Dotson, Vonetta; Ebner, Natalie; Efron, Philip A; Fillingim, Roger B; Foster, Thomas C; Gundermann, David M; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Karabetian, Christy; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Manini, Todd M; Marsiske, Michael; Mankowski, Robert T; Mutchie, Heather L; Perri, Michael G; Ranka, Sanjay; Rashidi, Parisa; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Scarpace, Philip J; Sibille, Kimberly T; Solberg, Laurence M; Someya, Shinichi; Uphold, Connie; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie; Wu, Samuel Shangwu; Pahor, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The concept of 'successful aging' has long intrigued the scientific community. Despite this long-standing interest, a consensus definition has proven to be a difficult task, due to the inherent challenge involved in defining such a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon. The lack of a clear set of defining characteristics for the construct of successful aging has made comparison of findings across studies difficult and has limited advances in aging research. A consensus on markers of successful aging is furthest developed is the domain of physical functioning. For example, walking speed appears to be an excellent surrogate marker of overall health and predicts the maintenance of physical independence, a cornerstone of successful aging. The purpose of the present article is to provide an overview and discussion of specific health conditions, behavioral factors, and biological mechanisms that mark declining mobility and physical function and promising interventions to counter these effects. With life expectancy continuing to increase in the United States and developed countries throughout the world, there is an increasing public health focus on the maintenance of physical independence among all older adults.

  15. Arguing against fundamentality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Kerry

    This paper aims to open up discussion on the relationship between fundamentality and naturalism, and in particular on the question of whether fundamentality may be denied on naturalistic grounds. A historico-inductive argument for an anti-fundamentalist conclusion, prominent within the contemporary metaphysical literature, is examined; finding it wanting, an alternative 'internal' strategy is proposed. By means of an example from the history of modern physics - namely S-matrix theory - it is demonstrated that (1) this strategy can generate similar (though not identical) anti-fundamentalist conclusions on more defensible naturalistic grounds, and (2) that fundamentality questions can be empirical questions. Some implications and limitations of the proposed approach are discussed.

  16. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  17. Healthcare fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Kauk, Justin; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    In order for a trauma surgeon to have an intelligent discussion with hospital administrators, healthcare plans, policymakers, or any other physicians, a basic understanding of the fundamentals of healthcare is paramount. It is truly shocking how many surgeons are unable to describe the difference between Medicare and Medicaid or describe how hospitals and physicians get paid. These topics may seem burdensome but they are vital to all business decision making in the healthcare field. The following chapter provides further insight about what we call "the basics" of providing medical care today. Most of the topics presented can be applied to all specialties of medicine. It is broken down into 5 sections. The first section is a brief overview of government programs, their influence on care delivery and reimbursement, and past and future legislation. Section 2 focuses on the compliance, care provision, and privacy statutes that regulate physicians who care for Medicare/Medicaid patient populations. With a better understanding of these obligations, section 3 discusses avenues by which physicians can stay informed of current and pending health policy and provides ways that they can become involved in shaping future legislation. The fourth section changes gears slightly by explaining how the concepts of trade restraint, libel, antitrust legislation, and indemnity relate to physician practice. The fifth, and final, section ties all of components together by describing how physician-hospital alignment can be mutually beneficial in providing patient care under current healthcare policy legislation.

  18. A driver linac for the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory : physics design and beam dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) being developed at ANL consists of an 833 MV heavy-ion driver linac capable of producing uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. We have designed all accelerator components including a two charge state LEBT, an RFQ, a MEBT, a superconducting linac, a stripper station and chicane. We present the results of an optimized linac design and end-to-end simulations including machine errors and detailed beam loss analysis. The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) has been proposed at ANL as a reduced scale of the original Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project with about half the cost but the same beam power. AEBL will address 90% or more of RIA physics but with reduced multi-users capabilities. The focus of this paper is the physics design and beam dynamics simulations of the AEBL driver linac. The reported results are for a multiple charge state U{sup 238} beam.

  19. Recent Advances and Cross-Century Outlooks in Physics, Interplay between Theory and Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Interdisciplinary Topics * SUPERSYMMETRY * Supersymmetry, Noncommutative Geometry and Ultimate Unification * Supersymmetry and Beam Dynamics * Brane World * Dynamical Symmetries in High-Temperature Superconductivity * BEAM, PLASMA, GRAVITATION, AND ASTRONOMY * Toroidal Akfvén Eigenmode Experiments in TFTR * Empirical Tests of the Relativistic Gravity: The Past, the Present and the Future * Radio Astronomy in Taiwan: (Personal) Highlights * PARTICLE AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS * Is There only Top Quark? Review of Top Results * Some Topics on Double Heavy Mesons: Heavy Quarkonia and Bc Meson * Softly Broken CP Symmetry * A Pilot Experiment with Reactor Neutrinos in Taiwan * The Composition of the Proton Spin * Recent Results from Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility * SYNCHROTRON RADIATION AND ATOMIC PHYSICS * Synchrotron Radiation/Laser and Doubly-Excited Atoms * Multiply Excited States for Lithium * FRACTIONAL QUANTUM HALL EFFECT * An Introduction to Topological Orders and Edge Excitations in Quantum Hall States * Phases and Phase Transitions in the Quantum Hall Effect * Chiral Luttinger Liquids at the Fractional Quantum Hall Edge * HIGH-Tc SUPERCONDUCTOR PHYSICS * Two Energy Gaps in Cuprate Superconductors: Clues to the High-Tc Mechanism * Applications of High Temperature Superconductors * Magnetism and Superconductivity in Ru-Based Perovskites * Correlation between Crystal Symmetry, Weak Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in Distorted T'-phase Cuprates * CHAOS * An Overview of Chaos * Chaotic Dynamics: Introduction and Recent Developments * Chaos in Accelerators * HIGHLIGHTS OF PHYSICS ADVANCES IN TAIWAN * Solving the X-Ray Phase Problem for omolecular Crystals by Multi-Wave X-Ray Interference * BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATION * Bogoliubov Dispersion Relation and the Possibility of Superfluidity for Weakly-interacting Photons * Bose-Einstein Effects in High-Energy Physics * Physics without Borders

  20. Ethics fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2011-01-01

    Ethics is about studying the right and the good; morality is about acting as one should. Although there are differences among what is legal, charitable, professional, ethical, and moral, these desirable characteristics tend to cluster and are treasured in dentistry. The traditional approach to professionalism in dentistry is based on a theory of biomedical ethics advanced 30 years ago. Known as the principles approach, general ideals such as respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, and veracity, are offered as guides. Growth in professionalism consists in learning to interpret the application of these principles as one's peers do. Moral behavior is conceived as a continuous cycle of sensitivity to situations requiring moral response, moral reasoning, the moral courage to take action when necessary, and integration of habits of moral behavior into one's character. This essay is the first of two papers that provide the backbone for the IDEA Project of the College--an online, multiformat, interactive "textbook" of ethics for the profession.