Science.gov

Sample records for advancing making progress

  1. Let s make progress together!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriana, Mazare; Liliana, Gheorghian

    2015-04-01

    Let's make progress together! The "Theodor Balan" Secondary School in the urban area of Suceava County in northeastern Romania is involved in several different projects. In order to extend previous successful projects with the students, parents, teachers, businesses and local government representatives in science symposiums for civic projects within the concept of sustainable development, the school is continuing to develop various successful programs. "The battle" continues both in nature and in the classrooms, in order to preserve the environment and to discover new resources. To raise awareness about the importance of existing resources even at the level of individuals there is a constant concern for keeping up to date on what already exists and is well known, but at the same time to remove "barriers" and discover new horizons and resources. Scientific activities held in our school are an effective way to educate students and the community to which they belong. In our community, we discovered sources of drinking water polluted by nitrites from fertilizers used in agriculture. In order to inform and educate people in the area, our teachers have organized several educational activities. Its purpose was: -Knowledge of the importance of water for the environment and human health. -Reducing water pollution. Students have informed their families' about sustainable development acquired at school. In this way, the school manages to educate and change people's ideas. The ways and methods of adults' learning were practiced within a Grundtvig training course "It's never too late learning to learn" in February 2014, in Florence, Italy. The GIFT 2014 was a great occasion for the teachers and students, the county's educational department and the participants at the National Colloquia of Physics to discover new materials provided at the Conference and the latest news and topics in the world of science. The theme trips at the physics laboratories of "Alexandru Ioan Cuza

  2. Progress of NIL template making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusa, Satoshi; Hiraka, Takaaki; Kobiki, Ayumi; Sasaki, Shiho; Itoh, Kimio; Toyama, Nobuhito; Kurihara, Masaaki; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2007-05-01

    Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) has been counted as one of the lithography solutions for hp32nm node and beyond. Recently, the small line edge roughness (LER) as well as the potentially high resolution that will ensure no-OPC mask feature is attracting many researchers. The template making is one of the most critical issues for the realization of NIL. Especially when we think of a practical template fabrication process on a 65mm square format that is going to be the industry standard, the resolution of the template making process showed a limitation. We have achieved for the first time an hp22nm resolution on the 65nm template format. Both line and space patterns and hole patterns were well resolved. Regarding dot patterns, we still need improvement, but we have achieved resolution down to hp28nm. Although so far we cannot achieve these resolution limits of various pattern category at the same time on one substrate, an intermediate process condition showed sufficient uniformity both in lateral CD and in vertical depth. Global pattern image placement also showed sufficient numbers at this stage of lithography development. A 20nm feature (with a pitch of 80nm) showed sufficient imprint result.

  3. Decision making cognition in primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Torralva, Teresa; Roca, María; Szenkman, Daniela; Ibanez, Agustin; Richly, Pablo; Pose, Mariángeles; Manes, Facundo

    2012-01-01

    We sought to investigate the decision making profile of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) by assessing patients diagnosed with this disease (n = 10), patients diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 35), and matched controls (n = 14) using the Iowa Gambling Task, a widely used test that mimics real-life decision making. Participants were also evaluated with a complete neuropsychological battery. Patients with PPA were unable to adopt an advantageous strategy on the IGT, which resulted in a flat performance, different to that exhibited by both controls (who showed advantageous decision making) and bvFTD patients (who showed risk-appetitive behavior). The decision making profile of PPA patients was not associated with performance on language tasks and did not differ between sub-variants of the disease (namely, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia). Investigating decision making in PPA is crucial both from a theoretical perspective, as it can shed light about the way in which language interacts with other cognitive functions, as well as a clinical standpoint, as it could lead to a more objective detection of impairments of decision making deficits in this condition.

  4. Decision Making Cognition in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Torralva, Teresa; Roca, María; Szenkman, Daniela; Ibanez, Agustin; Richly, Pablo; Pose, Mariángeles; Manes, Facundo

    2012-01-01

    We sought to investigate the decision making profile of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) by assessing patients diagnosed with this disease (n = 10), patients diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 35), and matched controls (n = 14) using the Iowa Gambling Task, a widely used test that mimics real-life decision making. Participants were also evaluated with a complete neuropsychological battery. Patients with PPA were unable to adopt an advantageous strategy on the IGT, which resulted in a flat performance, different to that exhibited by both controls (who showed advantageous decision making) and bvFTD patients (who showed risk-appetitive behavior). The decision making profile of PPA patients was not associated with performance on language tasks and did not differ between sub-variants of the disease (namely, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia). Investigating decision making in PPA is crucial both from a theoretical perspective, as it can shed light about the way in which language interacts with other cognitive functions, as well as a clinical standpoint, as it could lead to a more objective detection of impairments of decision making deficits in this condition. PMID:22207422

  5. Locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: are we making progress?. Highlights from the "2011 ASCO Annual Meeting". Chicago, IL, USA; June 3-7, 2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Ng, John; Allendorf, John; Saif, Muhammad W

    2011-07-08

    Pancreatic cancer, as the 4th leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., remains a challenging disease for all oncologists. Less than 20% of all cases could be potentially cured by surgical resection, while the majority of cases are deemed either unresectable or metastatic upon diagnosis. In this year's American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, several studies were presented with novel approaches towards treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The LAP-07 study, a large phase III study with two separate randomizations, updated their accrual status, but with no interim data yet reported (Abstract #e14619). A single institutional review study reported its promising results on the incorporation of interferon to chemoradiation, but the toxicities could be concerning (Abstract #e14648). Abstract #e14607 demonstrated promising survival data from a tri-modality approach incorporating local and systemic chemotherapy concurrent with external beam radiation as well as radiofrequency ablation. The tolerability of sorafenib in locally advanced pancreatic cancer was shown in a small phase I study (Abstract #e14525). CyberKnife® stereotactic body radiation therapy was investigated as a modality for local palliation (Abstract #e14506). More effective therapeutic agents and approaches are still needed in this difficult disease. This highlight article will focus on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  6. Making advanced analytics work for you.

    PubMed

    Barton, Dominic; Court, David

    2012-10-01

    Senior leaders who write off the move toward big data as a lot of big talk are making, well, a big mistake. So argue McKinsey's Barton and Court, who worked with dozens of companies to figure out how to translate advanced analytics into nuts-and-bolts practices that affect daily operations on the front lines. The authors offer a useful guide for leaders and managers who want to take a deliberative approach to big data-but who also want to get started now. First, companies must identify the right data for their business, seek to acquire the information creatively from diverse sources, and secure the necessary IT support. Second, they need to build analytics models that are tightly focused on improving performance, making the models only as complex as business goals demand. Third, and most important, companies must transform their capabilities and culture so that the analytical results can be implemented from the C-suite to the front lines. That means developing simple tools that everyone in the organization can understand and teaching people why the data really matter. Embracing big data is as much about changing mind-sets as it is about crunching numbers. Executed with the right care and flexibility, this cultural shift could have payoffs that are, well, bigger than you expect.

  7. Making Progress as Leaders among University Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quah, Cheng Sim; Sim, Sandra Phek Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the overview of how individuals in their respective teams operated and contributed to their organization. This study also identified the salient characteristics of how the respondents made progress as leaders in their respective faculties or departments towards identifying directions for innovative future practice through…

  8. Advanced 80 We Stirling Convertor Development Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Carroll, Cliff; Penswick, L. B.

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents progress on the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) being developed by Sunpower and Boeing/Rocketdyne under NASA NRA funding. The ASC will use a high temperature heater head to allow for operation at 850 °C. The ASC is projected to have an efficiency approaching 40% (AC electrical out/ heat in) when operating at a temperature ratio of 3.0, and to have a convertor specific power of 90 We/kg (AC). An early developmental unit, the Frequency Test Bed (FTB) convertor, has already demonstrated 36% efficiency (based on AC electrical out) at this temperature ratio. The ASC is being developed for potential use in advanced radioisotope space power systems. The increased efficiency of this Stirling convertor compared to RTGs, would reduce the required amount of Plutonium fuel by a factor of approximately 5.

  9. Advanced method for making vitreous waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, J.M.; Harrison, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for making waste glass that circumvents the problems of dissolving nuclear waste in molten glass at high temperatures. Because the reactive mixing process is independent of the inherent viscosity of the melt, any glass composition can be prepared with equal facility. Separation of the mixing and melting operations permits novel glass fabrication methods to be employed.

  10. Halting progressive neurodegeneration in advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Susanne F.; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Duong, Jimmy K.; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wei-Pu; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary retinal degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), are characterized by the progressive loss of rod photoreceptors followed by loss of cones. While retinal gene therapy clinical trials demonstrated temporary improvement in visual function, this approach has yet to achieve sustained functional and anatomical rescue after disease onset in patients. The lack of sustained benefit could be due to insufficient transduction efficiency of viral vectors (“too little”) and/or because the disease is too advanced (“too late”) at the time therapy is initiated. Here, we tested the latter hypothesis and developed a mouse RP model that permits restoration of the mutant gene in all diseased photoreceptor cells, thereby ensuring sufficient transduction efficiency. We then treated mice at early, mid, or late disease stages. At all 3 time points, degeneration was halted and function was rescued for at least 1 year. Not only do our results demonstrate that gene therapy effectively preserves function after the onset of degeneration, our study also demonstrates that there is a broad therapeutic time window. Moreover, these results suggest that RP patients are treatable, despite most being diagnosed after substantial photoreceptor loss, and that gene therapy research must focus on improving transduction efficiency to maximize clinical impact. PMID:26301813

  11. Progress in advanced high temperature materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    Significant progress has recently been made in many high temperature material categories pertinent to such applications by the industrial community. These include metal matrix composites, superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, coatings, and ceramics. Each of these material categories is reviewed and the current state-of-the-art identified, including some assessment, when appropriate, of progress, problems, and future directions.

  12. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

  13. Advanced Ablative Insulators and Methods of Making Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced ablative (more specifically, charring) materials that provide temporary protection against high temperatures, and advanced methods of designing and manufacturing insulators based on these materials, are undergoing development. These materials and methods were conceived in an effort to replace the traditional thermal-protection systems (TPSs) of re-entry spacecraft with robust, lightweight, better-performing TPSs that can be designed and manufactured more rapidly and at lower cost. These materials and methods could also be used to make improved TPSs for general aerospace, military, and industrial applications.

  14. Progress in Advanced Spray Combustion Code Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1993-01-01

    A multiyear project to assemble a robust, muitiphase spray combustion code is now underway and gradually building up to full speed. The overall effort involves several university and government research teams as well as Rocketdyne. The first part of this paper will give an overview of the respective roles of the different participants involved, the master strategy, the evolutionary milestones, and an assessment of the state-of-the-art of various key components. The second half of this paper will highlight the progress made to date in extending the baseline Navier-Stokes solver to handle multiphase, multispecies, chemically reactive sub- to supersonic flows. The major hurdles to overcome in order to achieve significant speed ups are delineated and the approaches to overcoming them will be discussed.

  15. Advanced Communications Architecture Demonstration Made Significant Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carek, David Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Simulation for a ground station located at 44.5 deg latitude. The Advanced Communications Architecture Demonstration (ACAD) is a concept architecture to provide high-rate Ka-band (27-GHz) direct-to-ground delivery of payload data from the International Space Station. This new concept in delivering data from the space station targets scientific experiments that buffer data onboard. The concept design provides a method to augment the current downlink capability through the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Ku-band (15-GHz) communications system. The ACAD concept pushes the limits of technology in high-rate data communications for space-qualified systems. Research activities are ongoing in examining the various aspects of high-rate communications systems including: (1) link budget parametric analyses, (2) antenna configuration trade studies, (3) orbital simulations (see the preceding figure), (4) optimization of ground station contact time (see the following graph), (5) processor and storage architecture definition, and (6) protocol evaluations and dependencies.

  16. AGU governance's decision-making process advances strategic plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-10-01

    A lot has happened in a little more than 2 years, and we want give AGU members an update on how things are working under AGU's strategic plan and governance model. AGU is an organization committed to its strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml), and if you have not read the plan lately, we encourage you to do so. AGU's vision is to be an organization that "galvanizes a community of Earth and space scientists that collaboratively advances and communicates science and its power to ensure a sustainable future." We are excited about the progress we have made under this plan and the future course we have set for the Union. Everything the Board of Directors, Council, and committees put on their agendas is intended to advance AGU's strategic goals and objectives. Together with headquarters staff, these bodies are working in an integrated, effective manner to carry out this plan. The best way to demonstrate the progress made and each group's role is to walk through a recent example: the creation of a new Union-level award (see Figure 1).

  17. Animal research ethics in Africa: is Tanzania making progress?

    PubMed

    Seth, Misago; Saguti, Fredy

    2013-12-01

    The significance of animals in research cannot be over-emphasized. The use of animals for research and training in research centres, hospitals and schools is progressively increasing. Advances in biotechnology to improve animal productivity require animal research. Drugs being developed and new interventions or therapies being invented for cure and palliation of all sorts of animal diseases and conditions need to be tested in animals for their safety and efficacy at some stages of their development. Drugs and interventions for human use pass through a similar development process and must be tested pre-clinically in laboratory animals before clinical trials in humans can be conducted. Therefore, animals are important players in research processes which directly and indirectly benefit animals and humans. However, questions remain as to whether these uses of animals consider the best interests of animals themselves. Various research and training institutions in Tanzania have established some guidelines on animal use, including establishing animal ethics committees. However, most institutions have not established oversight committees. In institutions where there may be guidelines and policies, there are no responsible committees or units to directly oversee if and how these guidelines and policies are enforced; thus, implementation becomes difficult or impossible. This paper endeavours to raise some issues associated with the responsible use of animals in research and training in Tanzania and highlights suggestions for improvement of deficiencies that exist in order to bridge the gap between what ought to be practised and what is practised.

  18. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technology is assessed in terms of improved aircraft turbine engine performance. High cycle operating temperatures, lighter structural components, and adequate resistance to the various environmental factors associated with aircraft gas turbine engines are among the factors considered. Emphasis is placed on progress in development of high temperature materials for coating protection against oxidation, hot corrosion and erosion, and in turbine cooling technology. Specific topics discussed include metal matrix composites, superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, and ceramics.

  19. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  20. Impact of Disease Progression Date Determination on Progression-free Survival Estimates in Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yingwei; Ziegler, Allen; Katie, L.; Hillman, Shauna L.; Redman, Mary W.; Schild, Steven E.; Gandara, David R.; Adjei, Alex A.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Progression-free survival (PFS) based endpoints are controversial; however in advanced lung cancer, overall survival is largely influenced by the progression status. We thus evaluated the impact of progression date (PD) determination approach on PFS estimates. METHODS Individual patient data from 21 trials (14 NCCTG; 7 SWOG) were used. Reported progression date (RPD) was defined as either the scan date or the clinical deterioration date. PD was determined using 4 methods (M): RPD (M1), one day after last progression-free scan (M2), midpoint between last progression-free scan and RPD (M3), and using an interval censoring approach (M4). PFS was estimated using Kaplan-Meier (M1, M2, M3), and maximum likelihood (M4). Simulation studies were performed to understand the impact of the length of time elapsed between the last progression-free scan and the PD on time to progression (TTP) estimates. RESULTS PFS estimates using RPD were the highest, with M2 being the most conservative. M3 and M4 were similar due to majority of progressions occurring during treatment (i.e., frequent disease assessments). M3 was less influenced by the length of the assessment schedules (%difference from true TTP <1.5%) compared to M1 (11% to 30%) and M2 (-8% to -29%). The overall study conclusion was unaffected by the method used for randomized trials. CONCLUSION The magnitude of difference in the PFS estimates is large enough to alter trial conclusions in advanced lung cancer. Standards for PD determination, use of sensitivity analyses, and randomized trials are critical when designing trials and reporting efficacy using PFS based endpoints. PMID:22434489

  1. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1996-04-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components:(1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub- micrometer and micrometer sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct liquefaction of coal. Progress reports for these tasks are presented.

  2. Advanced GLS map-making for the Herschel's photometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzo, Lorenzo; Raguso, Maria C.; Mastrogiuseppe, Marco; Calzoletti, Luca; Altieri, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    We discuss Generalised Least Squares (GLS) map-making for the data of the Herschel satellite's photometers, which is a difficult task, due to the many disturbances affecting the data, and requires appropriate pre- and post-processing. Taking an existing map-maker as a reference, we propose several advanced techniques, which can improve both the quality of the estimate and the efficiency of the software. As a main contribution we discuss two disturbances, which have not been studied yet and may be detrimental to the image quality. The first is a data shift, due to delays in the timing system or in the processing chain. The second is a random noise, termed pixel noise, due to the jitter and the approximation of the pointing information. For both these disturbances, we develop a mathematical model and propose a compensation method. As an additional contribution, we note that the performance can be improved by properly adapting the algorithm parameters to the data being processed and discuss an automatic setting method. We also provide a rich set of examples and experiments, illustrating the impact of the proposed techniques on the image quality and the execution speed.

  3. Beyond the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator: are we making progress?

    PubMed

    Weiss, James N

    2008-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation occurs when a dynamic interaction between triggers and substrate leads to the development of reentry, initiation of ventricular tachycardia, and its degeneration to fibrillation. To move beyond the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as the only effective therapy for aborting sudden cardiac death, an improved understanding of trigger-substrate interaction is essential. This brief review summarizes some of the recent progress in this direction.

  4. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  5. Smokefree Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean: Making Progress

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto M.; Schoj, Verónica; Travers, Mark J.; McGaw, Barbara; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the adoption and implementation of smokefree policies in all Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC) countries. Significant progress has been achieved among LAC countries since the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) was adopted in 2005. Both national and sub-national legislation have provided effective mechanisms to increase the fraction of the population protected from secondhand tobacco smoke. Civil society has actively promoted these policies and played a main role in enacting them and monitoring their enforcement. The tobacco industry, while continuing to oppose the approval and regulation of the laws at legislative and executive levels, has gone a step further by litigating against them in the Courts. As in the US and elsewhere, this litigation has failed to stop the legislation. PMID:22754484

  6. Therapeutic advances in multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Poewe, Werner; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Krismer, Florian

    2015-09-15

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative diseases leading to severe disability and ultimately death within less than 10 y. Despite increasing efforts in basic and clinical research, effective therapies for these atypical parkinsonian disorders are lacking. Although earlier small clinical studies in MSA and PSP mainly focused on symptomatic treatment, advances in the understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these diseases and in the search for biomarkers have paved the way for the first large and well-designed clinical trials aiming at disease modification. Targets of intervention in these trials have included α-synuclein inclusion pathology in the case of MSA and tau-related mechanisms in PSP. Since 2013, four large randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind disease-modification trials have been completed and published, using rasagiline (MSA), rifampicin (MSA), tideglusib (PSP), or davunetide (PSP). All of these failed to demonstrate signal efficacy with regard to the primary outcome measures. In addition, two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials have studied the efficacy of droxidopa in the symptomatic treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, including patients with MSA, with positive results in one trial. This review summarizes the design and the outcomes of these and other smaller trials published since 2013 and attempts to highlight priority areas of future therapeutic research in MSA and PSP. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  7. Challenges and progress in making DNA-based AIS early ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of DNA barcoding to find additional species in hard-to-sample locations or hard-to-identify samples is well established. Nevertheless, adoption of DNA barcoding into regular monitoring programs has been slow, in part due to issues of standardization and interpretation that need resolving. In this presentation, we describe our progress towards incorporating DNA-based identification into broad-spectrum aquatic invasive species early-detection monitoring in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Our work uses community biodiversity information as the basis for evaluating survey performance for various taxonomic groups. Issues we are tackling in bringing DNA-based data to bear on AIS monitoring design include: 1) Standardizing methodology and work flow from field collection and sample handling through bioinformatics post-processing; 2) Determining detection sensitivity and accounting for inter-species differences in DNA amplification and primer affinity; 3) Differentiating sequencing and barcoding errors from legitimate new finds when range and natural history information is limited; and 4) Accounting for the different nature of morphology- vs. DNA-based biodiversity information in subsequent analysis (e.g., via species accumulation curves, multi-metric indices). not applicable

  8. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  9. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution provides a contemporary update on the status of geriatric education and explores how geriatric coverage is valued, how geriatric competence is defined, and how students are evaluated for geriatric competencies. Design and Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with curriculum representatives from 7 health profession disciplines in a case study of one academic medical center. Findings: Geriatric training varies across health professions’ disciplines. Although participants recognized the unique needs of older patients and valued geriatric coverage, they identified shortage of time in packed curricula, lack of geriatrics-trained educators, absence of financial incentive, and low student demand (resulting from limited exposure to older adults and gerontological stereotyping) as barriers to improving geriatric training. Implications: Progress in including geriatric training within curricula across the health professions continues to lag behind need as a result of the continuing presence of barriers identified several decades ago. There remains an urgent need for institutional commitment to enhance geriatric education as a component of health professions curricula. PMID:22394495

  10. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. Case report: A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV1-to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m3. In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Conclusions: Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option. PMID:27488043

  11. An Interdisciplinary Network Making Progress on Climate Change Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J. C.; Bales, S.; Fraser, J.; Yoder, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Public understanding of climate change continues to lag far behind the scientific consensus not merely because the public lacks information, but because there is in fact too much complex and contradictory information available. Fortunately, we can now (1) build on careful empirical cognitive and social science research to understand what people already value, believe, and understand; and then (2) design and test strategies for translating complex science so that people can examine evidence, make well-informed inferences, and embrace science-based solutions. Informal science education institutions can help bridge the gap between climate scientists and the public. In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks, etc.) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Extensive research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change and trust these institutions as reliable sources. Ultimately, we need to take a strategic approach to the way climate change is communicated. An interdisciplinary approach is needed to bring together three key areas of expertise (as recommended by Pidgeon and Fischhoff, 2011): 1. Climate and decision science experts - who can summarize and explain what is known, characterize risks, and describe appropriate mitigation and adaptation strategies; 2. Social scientists - who can bring to bear research, theory, and best practices from cognitive, communication, knowledge acquisition, and social learning theory; and 3. Informal educators and program designers - who bring a practitioner perspective and can exponentially facilitate a learning process for additional interpreters. With support from an NSF CCEP Phase I grant, we have tested this approach, bringing together Interdisciplinary teams of colleagues for a five month "study circles" to develop skills to communicate climate change based on research in the social and cognitive sciences. In 2011

  12. Progress in the Advanced Synthetic-Diamond Drill Bit Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, D.A.; Dennis, T.; Le, Phi; Cohen, J.; Chow, J.

    1995-11-01

    Cooperative research is currently underway among five drill bit companies and Sandia National Laboratories to improve synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock applications. This work, sponsored by the US Department of Energy and individual bit companies, is aimed at improving performance and bit life in harder rock than has previously been possible to drill effectively with synthetic-diamond drill bits. The goal is to extend to harder rocks the economic advantages seen in using synthetic-diamond drill bits in soft and medium rock formations. Four projects are being conducted under this research program. Each project is investigating a different area of synthetic diamond bit technology that builds on the current technology base and market interests of the individual companies involved. These projects include: optimization of the PDC claw cutter; optimization of the Track-Set PDC bit; advanced TSP bit development; and optimization of impregnated-diamond drill bits. This paper describes the progress made in each of these projects to date.

  13. Making Progress: The Use of Multiple Progress Reports to Enhance Advertising Students' Media Plan Term Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritz, Gary H.; Lozada, Hector R.; Long, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the AACSB mandates that students demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills, it is imperative that business professors do what is necessary to improve such skills. The authors investigate whether the use of using multiple progress reports in an Advertising class project improves the final product. The data results show that…

  14. FY2013 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-12-01

    Annual progress report on the work of the the Advanced Combustion Engine Program. The Advanced Combustion Engine Program supports the Vehicle Technologies Office mission by addressing critical technical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions, advanced combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  15. Graphene nanoribbons as an advanced precursor for making carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Behabtu, Natnael; Liu, Yaodong; Chae, Han Gi; Young, Colin C; Genorio, Bostjan; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E; Zhang, Chenguang; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Lomeda, Jay R; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Kumar, Satish; Pasquali, Matteo; Tour, James M

    2013-02-26

    Graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) and chemically reduced graphene nanoribbons (crGNRs) were dispersed at high concentrations in chlorosulfonic acid to form anisotropic liquid crystal phases. The liquid crystal solutions were spun directly into hundreds of meters of continuous macroscopic fibers. The relationship of fiber morphology to coagulation bath conditions was studied. The effects of colloid concentration, annealing temperature, spinning air gap, and pretension during annealing on the fibers' performance were also investigated. Heat treatment of the as-spun GONR fibers at 1500 °C produced thermally reduced graphene nanoribbon (trGNR) fibers with a tensile strength of 378 MPa, Young's modulus of 36.2 GPa, and electrical conductivity of 285 S/cm, which is considerably higher than that in other reported graphene-derived fibers. This better trGNR fiber performance was due to the air gap spinning and annealing with pretension that produced higher molecular alignment within the fibers, as determined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The specific modulus of trGNR fibers is higher than that of the commercial general purpose carbon fibers and commonly used metals such as Al, Cu, and steel. The properties of trGNR fibers can be further improved by optimizing the spinning conditions with higher draw ratio, annealing conditions with higher pretensions, and using longer flake GONRs. This technique is a new high-carbon-yield approach to make the next generation carbon fibers based on solution-based liquid crystal phase spinning.

  16. Making the Case for Leadership: Profiles of Chief Advancement Officers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Smith, Zachary A.

    2011-01-01

    The advancement industry has experienced tremendous growth in breadth and depth over the last few decades. Driving this growth is the chief advancement officer; however, as a relatively new position on most college and university campuses, little is formally known about the role and the people who fill it. In "Making the Case for Leadership", Jon…

  17. The role of advance euthanasia directives as an aid to communication and shared decision-making in dementia.

    PubMed

    Hertogh, C M P M

    2009-02-01

    Recent evaluation of the practice of euthanasia and related medical decisions at the end of life in the Netherlands has shown a slight decrease in the frequency of physician-assisted death since the enactment of the Euthanasia Law in 2002. This paper focuses on the absence of euthanasia cases concerning patients with dementia and a written advance euthanasia directive, despite the fact that the only real innovation of the Euthanasia Law consisted precisely in allowing physicians to act upon such directives. The author discusses two principal reasons for this absence. One relates to the uncertainty about whether patients with advanced dementia truly experience the suffering they formerly feared. There is reason to assume that they don't, as a consequence of psychological adaptation and progressive unawareness (anosognosia). The second, more fundamental reason touches upon the ethical relevance of shared understanding and reciprocity. The author argues that, next to autonomy and mercifulness, "reciprocity" is a condition sine qua non for euthanasia. The absence thereof in advanced dementia renders euthanasia morally inconceivable, even if there are signs of suffering and notwithstanding the presence of an advance euthanasia directive. This does not mean, however, that advance euthanasia directives of patients with dementia are worthless. They might very well have a role in the earlier stages of certain subtypes of the disease. To illustrate this point the author presents a case in which the advance directive helped to create a window of opportunity for reciprocity and shared decision-making.

  18. Technical Advancement and Human Progress and The Problems of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixby, Louis W.

    1980-01-01

    Projects and discusses possible future developments resulting from electrochemical technological advancements. Educational implications are explored, and examples of integrated learning in diverse interest areas are given. (CS)

  19. FY2015 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Gurpreet; Gravel, Roland M.; Howden, Kenneth C.; Breton, Leo

    2016-03-25

    The Advanced Combustion Engine research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  20. FY2014 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Combustion Engine research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  1. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    Material categories as well as coatings and recent turbine cooling developments are reviewed. Current state of the art is identified, and as assessment, when appropriate, of progress, problems, and future directions is provided.

  2. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites - PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites - MMC's and IMC's), and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites - CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed in-house by Lewis researchers and on grants and contracts.

  3. FY 2007 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    Advanced combustion engines have great potential for achieving dramatic energy efficiency improvements in light-duty vehicle applications, where it is suited to both conventional and hybrid- electric powertrain configurations. Light-duty vehicles with advanced combustion engines can compete directly with gasoline engine hybrid vehicles in terms of fuel economy and consumer-friendly driving characteristics; also, they are projected to have energy efficiencies that are competitive with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles when used in hybrid applications.Advanced engine technologies being researched and developed by the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program will also allow the use of hydrogen as a fuel in ICEs and will provide an energy-efficient interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology during the transition to hydrogen/fuelcell-powered transportation vehicles.

  4. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  5. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  6. Reversible and Noisy Progression towards a Commitment Point Enables Adaptable and Reliable Cellular Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Süel, Gürol M.

    2011-01-01

    Cells must make reliable decisions under fluctuating extracellular conditions, but also be flexible enough to adapt to such changes. How cells reconcile these seemingly contradictory requirements through the dynamics of cellular decision-making is poorly understood. To study this issue we quantitatively measured gene expression and protein localization in single cells of the model organism Bacillus subtilis during the progression to spore formation. We found that sporulation proceeded through noisy and reversible steps towards an irreversible, all-or-none commitment point. Specifically, we observed cell-autonomous and spontaneous bursts of gene expression and transient protein localization events during sporulation. Based on these measurements we developed mathematical population models to investigate how the degree of reversibility affects cellular decision-making. In particular, we evaluated the effect of reversibility on the 1) reliability in the progression to sporulation, and 2) adaptability under changing extracellular stress conditions. Results show that reversible progression allows cells to remain responsive to long-term environmental fluctuations. In contrast, the irreversible commitment point supports reliable execution of cell fate choice that is robust against short-term reductions in stress. This combination of opposite dynamic behaviors (reversible and irreversible) thus maximizes both adaptable and reliable decision-making over a broad range of changes in environmental conditions. These results suggest that decision-making systems might employ a general hybrid strategy to cope with unpredictably fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:22102806

  7. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  8. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  9. Making Progress in Mental Health Policy in Conservative Times: One Step at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Howard H.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in mental health services has been made incrementally in a sequence of policy steps. In recent years, in spite of political conservatism, progressive changes have advanced new principles of service delivery. Reports from the surgeon general and the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health advanced these principles, including recovery and evidence-based practices. Both of these high-level reports were influenced by the findings of the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT). The Schizophrenia PORT established the effectiveness of mental health treatments and supports, which provided a scientific foundation for the optimistic focus on recovery and its expectation of improved outcomes for individuals with severe mental disorders. The PORT study also established the gap between treatment recommendations and actual services. Concern about this gap has motivated efforts to transform services by implementing evidence-based practices. Advances in broad mental health and social policy, coupled with continued advances in science, have the potential to improve the care of individuals who experience severe mental disorders, such as schizophrenia. PMID:16436626

  10. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  11. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  12. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-07

    Objectives are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability, for the Advanced Turbine Systems program (gas turbine). The base program consists of three phases: Phase I, program planning (complete); Phase II, development; and Phase III (selected specimen-bench test). Work is currently being performed in Phase II.

  13. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  14. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  15. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. ); Thompson, P.B. . Engineering Division)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  16. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I & C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  17. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites--PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites--MMC's and IMC's) and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites--CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed by in-house researchers and on grants and contracts. NASA considers this program to be a focused materials and structures research effort that builds on our base research programs and supports component-development projects. HITEMP is coordinated with the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program and the Department of Defense/NASA Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program. Advanced materials and structures technologies from HITEMP may be used in these future applications. Recent technical accomplishments have not only improved the state-of-the-art but have wideranging applications to industry. A high-temperature thin-film strain gage was developed to measure both dynamic and static strain up to 1100 C (2000 F). The gage's unique feature is that it is minimally intrusive. This technology, which received a 1995 R&D 100 Award, has been transferred to AlliedSignal Engines, General Electric Company, and Ford Motor Company. Analytical models developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center were used to study Textron Specialty Materials' manufacturing process for titanium-matrix composite rings. Implementation of our recommendations on tooling and processing conditions resulted in the production of defect free rings. In the Lincoln Composites/AlliedSignal/Lewis cooperative program, a composite compressor case is being manufactured with a Lewis

  18. Clinical Cancer Advances 2017: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Harold J; Krilov, Lada; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Baxter, Nancy N; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Chow, Warren Allen; De Groot, John Frederick; Devine, Steven Michael; DuBois, Steven G; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Epstein, Andrew S; Heymach, John; Jones, Joshua Adam; Mayer, Deborah K; Miksad, Rebecca A; Pennell, Nathan A; Sabel, Michael S; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn Mara; Tung, Nadine; Winkfield, Karen Marie; Wirth, Lori J; Dizon, Don S

    2017-02-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I am pleased to present Clinical Cancer Advances 2017, which highlights the most promising advances in patient-oriented cancer research over the past year. The report gives us an opportunity to reflect on what an exciting time it is for cancer research and how swiftly our understanding of cancer has improved. One year ago, the White House announced the national Cancer Moonshot program to accelerate progress against cancer. This shared vision of progress has reinvigorated the research community, identified new areas of scientific collaboration, and raised our ambitions regarding what may be possible beyond the progress we have already made. When I entered the field 35 years ago, I could not have imagined where we would be today. We can now detect cancer earlier, target treatments more effectively, and manage adverse effects more effectively to enable patients to live better, more fulfilling lives. Today, two of three people with cancer live at least 5 years after diagnosis, up from roughly one of two in the 1970s. This progress has resulted from decades of incremental advances that have collectively expanded our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of cancer. There is no better current example of this than ASCO's 2017 Advance of the Year: Immunotherapy 2.0. Over the last year, there has been a wave of new successes with immunotherapy. Research has proven this approach can be effective against a wide range of hard-to-treat advanced cancers previously considered intractable. Researchers are now working to identify biologic markers that can help increase the effectiveness of treatment and determine who is most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This knowledge will enable oncologists to make evidence-based decisions so as many patients as possible might benefit from this new type of treatment. Each successive advance builds on the previous hard work of generations of basic, translational, and clinical cancer researchers

  19. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p < .05 level in the ability of the participants to organize and interpret information between the advanced glass cockpit instrumentation and the traditional cockpit instrumentation. It is recommended that the industry explore technological solutions toward creating cockpit instrumentation that could match the type of information display to the type of decision making scenario in order to aid pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation

  20. The Power of the President: Recommendations to Advance Progressive Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartell, Sarah Rosen, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrating on executive powers presents a real opportunity for the Obama administration to turn its focus away from a divided Congress and the unappetizing process of making legislative sausage. Instead, the administration can focus on the president's ability to deliver results for the American people on the things that matter most to them. The…

  1. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

  3. 7 CFR 1484.57 - Will FAS make advance payments to a Cooperator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Will FAS make advance payments to a Cooperator? 1484.57 Section 1484.57 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...

  4. 7 CFR 1486.406 - Will CCC make advance payments to Recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Will CCC make advance payments to Recipients? 1486.406 Section 1486.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS EMERGING...

  5. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    Several NASA-sponsored benefit-cost studies have shown that very substantial benefits can be obtained by increasing material capability for aircraft gas turbines. Prealloyed powder processing holds promise for providing superalloys with increased strength for turbine disk applications. The developement of advanced powder metallurgy disk alloys must be based on a design of optimum processing and heat treating procedures. Materials considered for high temperature application include oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, directionally solidified superalloys, ceramics, directionally solidified eutectics, materials combining the high strength of a gamma prime strengthened alloy with the elevated temperature strength of an ODS, and composites. Attention is also given to the use of high pressure turbine seals, approaches for promoting environmental protection, and turbine cooling technology.

  6. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-10

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase 1: Program Planning--Complete; Phase 2: Development; Phase 3: Selected Specimen--Bench Test. Work is currently being performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, process improvements will be married with new bond coat and ceramic materials systems to provide improvements over currently available TBC systems. Coating reliability will be further improved with the development of an improved lifing model and NDE techniques. This will be accomplished by conducting the following program tasks: II.1 Process Modeling; II.2 Bond Coat Development; II.3 Analytical Lifing Model; II.4 Process Development; II.5 NDE, Maintenance and Repair; II.6 New TBC Concepts. A brief summary is given of progress made in each of these 6 areas.

  7. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  8. Fan Atomized Burner design advances & commercial development progress

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, B.; Butcher, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    As a part of the Oil Heat Research and Development program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has an on-going interest in advanced combustion technologies. This interest is aimed at: improving the initial efficiency of heating equipment, reducing long term fouling and efficiency degradation, reducing air pollutant emissions, and providing practical low-firing rate technologies which may lead to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The Fan-Atomized Burner (FAB) technology is being developed at BNL as part of this general goal. The Fan-Atomized Burner uses a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle in place of the high pressure nozzle used in conventional burners. Because it is air-atomized the burner can operate at low firing rates without the small passages and reliability concerns of low input pressure nozzles. Because it uses a low pressure nozzle the burner can use a fan in place of the small compressor used in other air-atomized burner designs. High initial efficiency of heating equipment is achieved because the burner can operate at very low excess air levels. These low excess air levels also reduce the formation of sulfuric acid in flames. Sulfuric acid is responsible for scaling and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces.

  9. Progress in LHCD: a tool for advanced regimes on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, A. A.; Barbato, E.; Bae, Y. S.; Becoulet, A.; Bernabei, S.; Bibet, P.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Cho, M. H.; Cirant, S.; Crisanti, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Farina, D.; Giruzzi, G.; Goniche, M.; Granucci, G.; Ide, S.; Imbeaux, F.; Karttunen, S.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Mazon, D.; Mirizzi, F.; Moreau, D.; Nowak, S.; Namkung, W.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Peysson, Y.; Petrzilka, V.; Podda, S.; Rantamaki, K.; Santini, F.; Saveliev, A.; Schneider, M.; Sozzi, C.; Suzuki, T.

    2005-12-01

    The recent success in coupling lower hybrid (LH) waves in high performance plasmas at JET together with the first demonstration on FTU of the coupling capability of the new passive active multijunction launcher removed major concerns on the possibility of using LH on ITER. LH exhibits the highest experimental current drive (CD) efficiency at low plasma temperature thus making it the natural candidate for off-axis CD on ITER where current profile control will help in maintaining burning performance on a long-time scale. We review recent LH results: long internal transport barrier obtained in JET with current profile sustained and controlled by LH acting under real time feedback together with first LH control of flat q-profile in a hybrid regime with Te ~ Ti. Minutes long fully non-inductive LH driven discharges on Tore Supra (TS). High CD efficiency with electron cyclotron in synergy with LH obtained in FTU and TS opening the possibility of interesting scenarii on ITER for MHD stabilization. Preliminary results of LH modelling for ITER are also reported. A brief overview of ITER LH system is reported together with some indication of new coming LH experiments, in particular KSTAR where CW klystrons at the foreseen ITER frequency of 5 GHz are being developed.

  10. Clinical Advances in Fibrosis Progression of Chronic Hepatitis B and C

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ye-Jiao; Xu, Ming-Yi; Lu, Lun-Gen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC), are characterized by the presence of liver fibrosis, which may ultimately lead to cirrhosis. The progression of fibrosis is associated with various factors. Here, we review recent advances in the study of factors related to the progression rate of CHB- and CHC-induced fibrosis. Identification of these factors and establishment of a scoring system for cirrhosis risk are particularly important for predicting cirrhosis development, planning individualized treatment, and preventing fibrosis progression. PMID:26357628

  11. [Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research]. Technical Quarterly Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    Major Accomplishments by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during this reporting period are highlighted below and amplified in later sections of this report: AGTSR distributed 50 proposals from the 98RFP to the IRB for review, evaluation and rank-ordering during the summer; AGTSR conducted a detailed program review at DOE-FETC on July 24; AGTSR organized the 1998 IRB proposal review meeting at SCIES on September 15-16; AGTSR consolidated all the IRB proposal scores and rank-orderings to facilitate the 98RFP proposal deliberations; AGTSR submitted meeting minutes and proposal short-list recommendation to the IRB and DOE for the 98RFP solicitation; AGTSR reviewed two gas turbine related proposals as part of the CU RFP State Project for renovating the central energy facility; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from the University of Pittsburgh, Wisconsin, and Minnesota; AGTSR assisted GTA in obtaining university stakeholder support of the ATS program from California, Pennsylvania, and Colorado; AGTSR assisted GTA in distributing alert notices on potential ATS budget cuts to over 150 AGTSR performing university members; AGTSR submitted proceedings booklet and organizational information pertaining to the OAI hybrid gas turbine workshop to DOE-FETC; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR updated the university consortium poster to include new members and research highlights; For DOE-FETC, the general AGTSR Fact Sheet was updated to include new awards, workshops, educational activity and select accomplishments from the research projects; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR prepared three fact sheets highlighting university research supported in combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted pictures on materials research for inclusion in the ATS technology brochure; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted a post-2000 roadmap showing potential technology paths AGTSR could pursue in the next decade; AGTSR distributed the ninth newsletter UPDATE to DOE, the

  12. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  14. DOE/JPL advanced thermionic technology program. Progress report No. 42

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following tasks: (I) surface and plasma investigations, (II) low-temperature converter development, (III) enhanced mode converter experiments, (IV) component hardware development, (V) thermionic power module system studies, (VI) thermionic array module development, (VII) high-temperature converter evaluation, (VIII) advanced converter studies, (IX) postoperational diagnostics, (X) cylindrical converter component development, and (XI) correlation of design interfaces. (WHK)

  15. New Rule Use Drives the Relation between Working Memory Capacity and Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Jennifer; Jarosz, Andrew F.; Cushen, Patrick J.; Colflesh, Gregory J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between individual differences in working memory capacity and performance on the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) is well documented yet poorly understood. The present work proposes a new explanation: that the need to use a new combination of rules on RAPM problems drives the relation between performance and working…

  16. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D; Matsushima, Glenn K; Tabas, Ira

    2016-12-13

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl(-/-) or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis.

  17. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl−/− or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr−/− mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr−/− mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27958361

  18. Rethinking autonomy: decision making between patient and surgeon in advanced illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced illness such as advanced stage cancer presenting with the need for possible surgical intervention can be some of the most challenging cases for a surgeon. Often there are multiple factors influencing the decisions made. For patients they are facing not just the effects of the disease on their body, but the stark realization that the disease will also limit their life. Not only are these factors a consideration when patients are making decisions, but also the desire to make the decision that is best for themselves, the autonomous decision. Also included in this process for the patient facing the possible need for an intervention is the surgeon. While patient autonomy remains one of the main principles within medicine, guiding treatment decisions, there is also the surgeon’s autonomy to be considered. Surgeons determine if there is even a possible intervention to be offered to patients, a decision making process that respects surgeons’ autonomous choices and includes elements of paternalism as surgeons utilize their expertise to make decisions. Included in the treatment decisions that are made and the care of the patient is the impact patients’ outcomes have on the surgeon, the inherent drive to be the best for the patient and desire for good outcomes for the patient. While both the patient’s and surgeon’s autonomy are a dynamic interface influencing decision making, the main goal for the patient facing a palliative procedure is that of making treatment decisions based on the concept of shared decision making, always giving primary consideration to the patient’s goals and values. Lastly, regardless of the decision made, it is the responsibility of surgeons to their patients to be a source of support through this challenging time. PMID:27004224

  19. 25 CFR 166.416 - May a permittee make a grazing rental payment in advance of the due date?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a permittee make a grazing rental payment in advance... LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental Payments § 166.416 May a permittee make a grazing rental payment in advance of the due date? Rent may...

  20. 25 CFR 166.416 - May a permittee make a grazing rental payment in advance of the due date?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a permittee make a grazing rental payment in advance... LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental Payments § 166.416 May a permittee make a grazing rental payment in advance of the due date? Rent may...

  1. 48 CFR 970.5232-1 - Reduction or suspension of advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. 970.5232-1 Section... upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. As prescribed in 970.3200-1-1, insert the following... Contractor's request for advance, partial, or progress payment is based on fraud. (b) The Contractor shall...

  2. 48 CFR 970.5232-1 - Reduction or suspension of advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. 970.5232-1 Section... upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. As prescribed in 970.3200-1-1, insert the following... Contractor's request for advance, partial, or progress payment is based on fraud. (b) The Contractor shall...

  3. 48 CFR 970.5232-1 - Reduction or suspension of advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. 970.5232-1 Section... upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. As prescribed in 970.3200-1-1, insert the following... Contractor's request for advance, partial, or progress payment is based on fraud. (b) The Contractor shall...

  4. 48 CFR 970.5232-1 - Reduction or suspension of advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... advance, partial, or progress payments upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. 970.5232-1 Section... upon finding of substantial evidence of fraud. As prescribed in 970.3200-1-1, insert the following... Contractor's request for advance, partial, or progress payment is based on fraud. (b) The Contractor shall...

  5. Toward improved durability in advanced combustors and turbines: Progress in the prediction of thermomechanical loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Ensign, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    NASA is sponsoring the Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project to address the need for improved durability in advanced combustors and turbines. Analytical and experimental activities aimed at more accurate prediction of the aerothermal environment, the thermomechanical loads, the material behavior and structural responses to such loading, and life predictions for high temperature cyclic operation have been underway for several years and are showing promising results. Progress is reported in the development of advanced instrumentation and in the improvement of combustor aerothermal and turbine heat transfer models that will lead to more accurate prediction of thermomechanical loads.

  6. Age-related characteristics of risky decision-making and progressive expectation formation.

    PubMed

    Kardos, Zsófia; Kóbor, Andrea; Takács, Ádám; Tóth, Brigitta; Boha, Roland; File, Bálint; Molnár, Márk

    2016-10-01

    During daily encounters, it is inevitable that people take risks. Investigating the sequential processing of risk hazards involve expectation formation about outcome contingencies. The present study aimed to explore risk behavior and its neural correlates in sequences of decision making, particularly in old age, which represents a critical period regarding risk-taking propensity. The Balloon Analogue Risk Task was used in an electrophysiological setting with young and elderly age groups. During the task each additional pump on a virtual balloon increased the likelihood of a balloon burst but also increased the chance to collect more reward. Event-related potentials associated with rewarding feedback were analyzed based on the forthcoming decisions (whether to continue or to stop) in order to differentiate between states of expectation towards gain or loss. In the young, the reward positivity ERP component increased as a function of reward contingencies with the largest amplitude for rewarding feedback followed by the decision to stop. In the elderly, however, reward positivity did not reflect the effect of reward structure. Behavioral indices of risk-taking propensity suggest that the performance of the young and the elderly were dissociable only with respect to response times: The elderly was characterized by hesitation and more deliberative decision making throughout the experiment. These findings signify that sequential tracking of outcome contingencies has a key role in cost-efficient action planning and progressive expectation formation.

  7. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This detailed report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project demonstrates an advanced thermal coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to high-quality, low-sulfur fuel. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the project was to expand market awareness and acceptability for the products and the technology. The use of covered hopper cars has been successful and marketing efforts have focused on this technique. Operational improvements are currently aimed at developing fines marketing systems, increasing throughput capacity, decreasing operation costs, and developing standardized continuous operator training. Testburns at industrial user sites were also conducted. A detailed process description; technical progress report including facility operations/plant production, facility testing, product testing, and testburn product; and process stability report are included. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. The neural processes underlying perceptual decision making in humans: recent progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Simon P; O'Connell, Redmond G

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, animal neurophysiology research has made great strides towards explaining how the brain can enable adaptive action in the face of noisy sensory information. In particular, this work has identified neural signals that perform the role of a 'decision variable' which integrates sensory information in favor of a particular outcome up to an action-triggering threshold, consistent with long-standing predictions from mathematical psychology. This has provoked an intensive search for similar neural processes at work in the human brain. In this paper we review the progress that has been made in tracing the dynamics of perceptual decision formation in humans using functional imaging and electrophysiology. We highlight some of the limitations that non-invasive recording techniques place on our ability to make definitive judgments regarding the role that specific signals play in decision making. Finally, we provide an overview of our own work in this area which has focussed on two perceptual tasks - intensity change detection and motion discrimination - performed under continuous-monitoring conditions, and highlight the insights gained thus far. We show that through simple paradigm design features such as avoiding sudden intensity transients at evidence onset, a neural instantiation of the theoretical decision variable can be directly traced in the form of a centro-parietal positivity (CPP) in the standard event-related potential (ERP). We recapitulate evidence for the domain-general nature of the CPP process, being divorced from the sensory and motor requirements of the task, and re-plot data of both tasks highlighting this aspect as well as its relationship to decision outcome and reaction time. We discuss the implications of these findings for mechanistically principled research on normal and abnormal decision making in humans.

  9. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1995-10-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet engine fuels has five components: development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer-sized and micrometer particles suspended in fuels during thermal stresses; characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct coal liquefaction. Progress is described.

  10. Make the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice: Using Behavioral Economics to Advance a Culture of Health.

    PubMed

    Volpp, Kevin G; Asch, David A

    2016-11-01

    Despite great advances in the science and technology of health care, a large gap separates theoretically achievable advances in health from what individuals and populations actually achieve. Human behavior sits on the final common pathway to so many of our health and health care goals, including the prevention and management of illness and the fostering of wellness. Behavioral economics is a relatively new field offering approaches to supplement many of the conventional approaches to improving health behaviors that rely on education or standard economic theory. While those conventional approaches presume that an educated public will naturally make decisions that optimize personal welfare, approaches derived from behavioral economics harness existing and predictable patterns of behavior that often lead people to make choices against their best interests. By keeping these predictable patterns of behavior in mind when designing health insurance, health care programs, or the health-related aspects of everyday life, behavioral economists aim to meet people half-way: no longer asking them to reshape their behavior to something more health promoting, but helping the behavioral patterns they already follow lead them to better health.

  11. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The aims of this research program are to advance to bench-scale testing, concepts that have the potential for making net reductions in direct coal liquefaction process costs. The research involves a teaming arrangement between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and LDP Associates. Progress reports are presented for: Task 2.1.1 development of a catalyst screening test (UK/CAER); Task 2.1.2 activation of impregnated catalysts (UK/CAER); Task 2.2 laboratory support (CONSOL); Task 3 continuous operations/parametric studies (Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.) and; Task 4.4 conceptual design, preliminary technical assessment (LDP Associates).

  12. Can fisheries management make substantial progress towards further reductions in sport fish PCB concentrations?

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    Great Lakes managers continue to be concerned by PCB concentrations in Great Lakes sport fish. A reduction in sport fish consumption advisory levels would heighten public concern and increase pressure on managers to reduce contaminant levels in sport fish. PCB concentrations in Great Lakes sediments remain high and exchange with the water column is significant. Atmospheric inputs help maintain PCB availability in the Great Lakes. However, it is not technically feasible to control sediment and atmospheric inputs. Here the author uses a detailed age-structured simulation model of chinook salmon, alewife and rainbow smelt to examine the potential for fish management actions to make progress towards reducing PCB concentrations of sport fish consumed by humans. Chinook salmon PCB concentrations were found to be more affected by prey PCB concentrations than chinook salmon growth rates. Salmonid predators selectively attack the largest prey, but these prey are likely the oldest and most contaminated. The interaction between size selective predation by chinook salmon and their growth rates suggests that there is an ideal stocking level of sport fish that should keep the average prey fish small, and therefore have relatively low PCE concentrations, but not reduce the age structure of the alewife population to include few reproductive individuals. These results are applicable to other stocked salmonids too, (e.g., lake trout, brown trout, coho salmon, steelhead) because they also exhibit size selective predation and their recruitment is primarily by stocking.

  13. EPA Report Shows Progress on E-Recycling and Identifies Opportunity to Advance G7s Recognition of Circular Economy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released the Advancing Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Facts and Figures report showing progress in consumer electronics recycling in the United States. Consumer electronics re

  14. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Advanced MHD Algorithm for Solar and Space Science: lst Year Semi Annual Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    We report progress for the development of MH4D for the first and second quarters of FY2004, December 29, 2002 - June 6, 2003. The present version of MH4D can now solve the full viscous and resistive MHD equations using either an explicit or a semi-implicit time advancement algorithm. In this report we describe progress in the following areas. During the two last quarters we have presented poster at the EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly in Nice, France, April 6-11, 2003, and a poster at the 2003 International Sherwood Theory Conference in Corpus Christi, Texas, April 28-30 2003. In the area of code development, we have implemented the MHD equations and the semi-implicit algorithm. The new features have been tested.

  16. Progress on advanced dc and ac induction drives for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of complete electric vehicle propulsion systems, and the results of tests on the Road Load Simulator of two such systems representative of advanced dc and ac drive technology are presented. One is the system used in the DOE's ETV-1 integrated test vehicle which consists of a shunt wound dc traction motor under microprocessor control using a transistorized controller. The motor drives the vehicle through a fixed ratio transmission. The second system uses an ac induction motor controlled by transistorized pulse width modulated inverter which drives through a two speed automatically shifted transmission. The inverter and transmission both operate under the control of a microprocessor. The characteristics of these systems are also compared with the propulsion system technology available in vehicles being manufactured at the inception of the DOE program and with an advanced, highly integrated propulsion system upon which technology development was recently initiated.

  17. Convergence of advances in genomics, team science, and repositories as drivers of progress in psychiatric genomics.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Thomas; Senthil, Geetha; Addington, Anjené M

    2015-01-01

    After many years of unfilled promise, psychiatric genetics has seen an unprecedented number of successes in recent years. We hypothesize that the field has reached an inflection point through a confluence of four key developments: advances in genomics; the orientation of the scientific community around large collaborative team science projects; the development of sample and data repositories; and a policy framework for sharing and accessing these resources. We discuss these domains and their effect on scientific progress and provide a perspective on why we think this is only the beginning of a new era in scientific discovery.

  18. Data-based Decision-making: Teachers' Comprehension of Curriculum-based Measurement Progress-monitoring Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bosch, Roxette M.; Espin, Christine A.; Chung, Siuman; Saab, Nadira

    2017-01-01

    Teachers have difficulty using data from Curriculum-based Measurement (CBM) progress graphs of students with learning difficulties for instructional decision-making. As a first step in unraveling those difficulties, we studied teachers' comprehension of CBM graphs. Using think-aloud methodology, we examined 23 teachers' ability to…

  19. Are Substance Use Prevention Programs More Effective in Schools Making Adequate Yearly Progress? A Study of Project ALERT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Ringwalt, Chris L.; Shamblen, Stephen R.; Hanley, Sean M.; Flewelling, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study sought to determine if a popular school-based drug prevention program might be effective in schools that are making adequate yearly progress (AYP). Thirty-four schools with grades 6 through 8 in 11 states were randomly assigned either to receive Project ALERT (n = 17) or to a control group (n = 17); of these, 10 intervention…

  20. Toward making progress feedback an effective common factor in couple therapy.

    PubMed

    Halford, W Kim; Hayes, Samira; Christensen, Andrew; Lambert, Michael; Baucom, Donald H; Atkins, David C

    2012-03-01

    Systematic monitoring of individual therapy progress, coupled with feedback to the therapist, reliably enhances therapy outcome by alerting therapists to individual clients who are off track to benefit by the end of therapy. The current paper reviews the possibility of using similar systematic monitoring and feedback of therapy progress as a means to enhance couple therapy outcome, including what measures of therapy progress are most likely to be useful, how to structure feedback to be most useful to therapists, and the likely mediators of the effects of therapy progress feedback. One implicit assumption of therapy progress feedback is that clients unlikely to benefit from therapy can be detected early enough in the course of therapy for corrective action to be taken. As a test of this assumption, midtherapy progress was examined as a predictor of final couple therapy outcome in a sample of 134 distressed couples. Either a brief 7- or 32-item assessment of couple therapy progress at midtherapy detected a substantial proportion (46%) of couples who failed to benefit by the end of therapy. Given that failure to benefit from couple therapy is somewhat predictable across the course of therapy, future research should test whether systematic monitoring and feedback of progress could enhance therapy outcome.

  1. DNA technological progress toward advanced diagnostic tools to support human hookworm control.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Cantacessi, C; Loukas, A

    2008-01-01

    Blood-feeding hookworms are parasitic nematodes of major human health importance. Currently, it is estimated that 740 million people are infected worldwide, and more than 80 million of them are severely affected clinically by hookworm disease. In spite of the health problems caused and the advances toward the development of vaccines against some hookworms, limited attention has been paid to the need for improved, practical methods of diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis and genetic characterization of hookworms is central to their effective control. While traditional diagnostic methods have considerable limitations, there has been some progress toward the development of molecular-diagnostic tools. The present article provides a brief background on hookworm disease of humans, reviews the main methods that have been used for diagnosis and describes progress in establishing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the specific diagnosis of hookworm infection and the genetic characterisation of the causative agents. This progress provides a foundation for the rapid development of practical, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic and analytical tools to be used in improved hookworm prevention and control programmes.

  2. Advanced converter technology. Technical progress report, May 23, 1979-May 22, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Banic, C. V.; Eckhouse, S. A.; Kornbrust, F. J.; Lipman, K.; Peterson, J. L.; Rosati, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to define an advanced converter system employing 1980's technology in all subsystem and component areas for use in electrochemical energy storage systems. Additional experimental effort will validate elements of the advanced commutation circuitry on a full-scale breadboard basis. Improved models of battery electrical characteristics are beng defined and experimental apparatus is being designed to measure these characteristics and to enable better definition of the battery-power conditioner interface. Improvement of energy-storage system performance through modification of battery converter characteristics will also be investigated. During this first year of the contract, a new more advanced concept for power conditioning based on a concept defined by United Technologies Corporation for fuel cell use was evaluated. This high switching frequency concept has the potential for significantly reducing the size and cost of battery plant power conditioners. As a result, the Department of Energy authorized redirection of the program to first evaluate this new concept and then to reorient the program to adopt this concept as the primary one. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  3. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Making sense of progressive non-fluent aphasia: an analysis of conversational speech

    PubMed Central

    Woollams, Anna M.; Hodges, John R.; Patterson, Karalyn

    2009-01-01

    The speech of patients with progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) has often been described clinically, but these descriptions lack support from quantitative data. The clinical classification of the progressive aphasic syndromes is also debated. This study selected 15 patients with progressive aphasia on broad criteria, excluding only those with clear semantic dementia. It aimed to provide a detailed quantitative description of their conversational speech, along with cognitive testing and visual rating of structural brain imaging, and to examine which, if any features were consistently present throughout the group; as well as looking for sub-syndromic associations between these features. A consistent increase in grammatical and speech sound errors and a simplification of spoken syntax relative to age-matched controls were observed, though telegraphic speech was rare; slow speech was common but not universal. Almost all patients showed impairments in picture naming, syntactic comprehension and executive function. The degree to which speech was affected was independent of the severity of the other cognitive deficits. A partial dissociation was also observed between slow speech with simplified grammar on the one hand, and grammatical and speech sound errors on the other. Overlap between these sets of impairments was however, the rule rather than the exception, producing continuous variation within a single consistent syndrome. The distribution of atrophy was remarkably variable, with frontal, temporal and medial temporal areas affected, either symmetrically or asymmetrically. The study suggests that PNFA is a coherent, well-defined syndrome and that varieties such as logopaenic progressive aphasia and progressive apraxia of speech may be seen as points in a space of continuous variation within progressive non-fluent aphasia. PMID:19696033

  5. Advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) progress with respect to remote operation and maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yoon, Ji Sup

    2007-07-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to reduce the volume of spent fuel, and the construction of the ACP facility (ACPF) for a demonstration of its technical feasibility has been completed. In 2006 two inactive demonstrations were performed with simulated fuels in the ACPF. Accompanied by process equipment performance tests, its remote operability and maintainability were also tested during that time. Procedures for remote operation tasks are well addressed in this study and evaluated thoroughly. Also, remote maintenance and repair tasks are addressed regarding some important modules with a high priority order. The above remote handling test's results provided a lot of information such as items to be revised to improve the efficiency of the remote handling tasks. This paper deals with the current status of ACP and the progress of remote handling of ACPF. (authors)

  6. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Contributes to the Progression of Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sambamurthy, Nisha; Leme, Adriana S.; Oury, Tim D.; Shapiro, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent clinical studies have implied a role for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its variants in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study we have defined a role for RAGE in the pathogenesis of emphysema in mice. RAGE deficient mice (RAGE-/-) exposed to chronic cigarette smoke were significantly protected from smoke induced emphysema as determined by airspace enlargement and had no significant reduction in lung tissue elastance when compared to their air exposed controls contrary to their wild type littermates. The progression of emphysema has been largely attributed to an increased inflammatory cell-mediated elastolysis. Acute cigarette smoke exposure in RAGE-/- mice revealed an impaired early recruitment of neutrophils, approximately a 6-fold decrease compared to wild type mice. Hence, impaired neutrophil recruitment with continued cigarette smoke exposure reduces elastolysis and consequent emphysema. PMID:25781626

  7. Advanced Separators for Lithium-Ion and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: A Review of Recent Progress.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yinyu; Li, Junsheng; Lei, Jiaheng; Liu, Dan; Xie, Zhizhong; Qu, Deyu; Li, Ke; Deng, Tengfei; Tang, Haolin

    2016-11-09

    Li-ion and Li-S batteries find enormous applications in different fields, such as electric vehicles and portable electronics. A separator is an indispensable part of the battery design, which functions as a physical barrier for the electrode as well as an electrolyte reservoir for ionic transport. The properties of the separators directly influence the performance of the batteries. Traditional polyolefin separators showed low thermal stability, poor wettability toward the electrolyte, and inadequate barrier properties to polysulfides. To improve the performance and durability of Li-ion and Li-S batteries, development of advanced separators is required. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the fabrication and application of novel separators, including the functionalized polyolefin separator, polymeric separator, and ceramic separator, for Li-ion and Li-S batteries. The characteristics, advantages, and limitations of these separators are discussed. A brief outlook for the future directions of the research in the separators is also provided.

  8. A novel method for analyzing sequential eye movements reveals strategic influence on Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Taylor R; Petrov, Alexander A; Sederberg, Per B

    2011-09-16

    Eye movements are an important data source in vision science. However, the vast majority of eye movement studies ignore sequential information in the data and utilize only first-order statistics. Here, we present a novel application of a temporal-difference learning algorithm to construct a scanpath successor representation (SR; P. Dayan, 1993) that captures statistical regularities in temporally extended eye movement sequences. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the scanpath SR on eye movement data from participants solving items from Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices Test. Analysis of the SRs revealed individual differences in scanning patterns captured by two principal components that predicted individual Raven scores much better than existing methods. These scanpath SR components were highly interpretable and provided new insight into the role of strategic processing on the Raven test. The success of the scanpath SR in terms of prediction and interpretability suggests that this method could prove useful in a much broader context.

  9. Making Sense of Nonsense Word Fluency: Determining Adequate Progress in Early First-Grade Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Roland H., III; Baker, Scott K.; Peyton, Julia A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine the contribution of initial skill and slope of progress on alphabetic principle to end of first-grade reading outcomes. Initial skill and slope were measured using DIBELS Nonsense Word Fluency. Reading outcomes were measured at the end of first grade with DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency. Students in Oregon Reading First…

  10. Perceptions of Teachers in Their First Year of School Restructuring: Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The 2007-2008 school year marked the first year Florida's Title I schools that did not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for five consecutive years entered into restructuring as mandated by the "No Child Left Behind Act" of 2001. My study examines the perceptions of teacher entering into their first year of school restructuring due to…

  11. A Combined Method for Segmentation and Registration for an Advanced and Progressive Evaluation of Thermal Images

    PubMed Central

    Barcelos, Emilio Z.; Caminhas, Walmir M.; Ribeiro, Eraldo; Pimenta, Eduardo M.; Palhares, Reinaldo M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method that combines image analysis techniques, such as segmentation and registration, is proposed for an advanced and progressive evaluation of thermograms. The method is applied for the prevention of muscle injury in high-performance athletes, in collaboration with a Brazilian professional soccer club. The goal is to produce information on spatio-temporal variations of thermograms favoring the investigation of the athletes' conditions along the competition. The proposed method improves on current practice by providing a means for automatically detecting adaptive body-shaped regions of interest, instead of the manual selection of simple shapes. Specifically, our approach combines the optimization features in Otsu's method with a correction factor and post-processing techniques, enhancing thermal-image segmentation when compared to other methods. Additional contributions resulting from the combination of the segmentation and registration steps of our approach are the progressive analyses of thermograms in a unique spatial coordinate system and the accurate extraction of measurements and isotherms. PMID:25414972

  12. 20 CFR 411.205 - What if I disagree with the PM's decision about whether I am making timely progress toward self...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... What if I disagree with the PM's decision about whether I am making timely progress toward self... decision to you. We will consider you to be making timely progress toward self-supporting employment until... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What if I disagree with the PM's...

  13. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1993. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low- rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  14. Progress in Materials and Component Development for Advanced Lithium-ion Cells for NASA's Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha, M.; Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Vehicles and stand-alone power systems that enable the next generation of human missions to the Moon will require energy storage systems that are safer, lighter, and more compact than current state-of-the- art (SOA) aerospace quality lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. NASA is developing advanced Li-ion cells to enable or enhance the power systems for the Altair Lunar Lander, Extravehicular Activities spacesuit, and rovers and portable utility pallets for Lunar Surface Systems. Advanced, high-performing materials are required to provide component-level performance that can offer the required gains at the integrated cell level. Although there is still a significant amount of work yet to be done, the present state of development activities has resulted in the synthesis of promising materials that approach the ultimate performance goals. This report on interim progress of the development efforts will elaborate on the challenges of the development activities, proposed strategies to overcome technical issues, and present performance of materials and cell components.

  15. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1994, through March 31, 1994. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  16. Advanced Applications of CBM in Reading (K-6): Instructional Decision-Making Strategies Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecker, Pamela M.; Lembke, Erica S.

    2011-01-01

    Progress monitoring refers to a system of ongoing data collection on academic skills of interest. Short samples of student performance are collected on a regular basis, and the scores from these short samples of performance are graphed to create a picture of student progress. Teachers can use the graphed student performance as they make…

  17. Making human junk: child labor as a health issue in the Progressive Era.

    PubMed Central

    Derickson, A

    1992-01-01

    The adverse health effects of work on approximately 2 million employed children troubled many in the United States during the early 20th century. Advocates of reform initially built a rationale for protective legislation primarily from informal, lay observations of the broad developmental outcomes of premature employment. In this endeavor, they projected a dismal scenario of impending national deterioration. This argument received strong criticism for the inadequacy of its corroborating evidence. In response, Progressive reformers emphasized the specific, measurable consequences of particular occupations. Increasingly, liberal advocates of the exclusion of boys and girls from the work force drew upon statistical compilations of occupational injuries and illnesses diagnosed by physicians. Despite their turn toward scientism, Progressives remained somewhat ambivalent about the sufficiency of quantitative data alone to achieve their aims. Images p1282-a p1285-a PMID:1503173

  18. 7 CFR 1484.57 - Will FAS make advance payments to a Cooperator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... an advance, FAS may require the participant to submit security in a form and amount acceptable to FAS... where a special advance is outstanding from a prior marketing plan year. Cooperators shall deposit and... reimbursement claim. All checks shall be mailed to the Director, Marketing Operations Staff, FAS, USDA....

  19. 7 CFR 1484.57 - Will FAS make advance payments to a Cooperator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... an advance, FAS may require the participant to submit security in a form and amount acceptable to FAS... where a special advance is outstanding from a prior marketing plan year. Cooperators shall deposit and... reimbursement claim. All checks shall be mailed to the Director, Marketing Operations Staff, FAS, USDA....

  20. 7 CFR 1484.57 - Will FAS make advance payments to a Cooperator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... advance, FAS may require the participant to submit security in a form and amount acceptable to FAS to... special advance is outstanding from a prior marketing plan year. Cooperators shall deposit and maintain... reimbursement claim. All checks shall be mailed to the Director, Marketing Operations Staff, FAS, USDA....

  1. Caring for older cancer patients: practical decision-making guidelines with a focus on advance directives.

    PubMed

    Sachs, G A

    1992-02-01

    There are no simple solutions to difficult ethical problems. Advance directives, however, offer a way to help prevent ethical dilemmas from occurring in the care of older cancer patients. Studies show that there is overwhelming support from both older patients and physicians for advance treatment planning through the use of living wills, durable powers of attorney for health care, and less formal means. Despite this support, few physicians and patients discuss advance directives. This paper discusses potential barriers to this dialogue and suggests specific ways to incorporate advance directive into routine cancer care of older patients. The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990 represents additional pressure from society on the medical profession to carry out advance directive discussions.

  2. The Need for Accurate Risk Prediction Models for Road Mapping, Shared Decision Making and Care Planning for the Elderly with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Stryckers, Marijke; Nagler, Evi V; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-11-01

    As people age, chronic kidney disease becomes more common, but it rarely leads to end-stage kidney disease. When it does, the choice between dialysis and conservative care can be daunting, as much depends on life expectancy and personal expectations of medical care. Shared decision making implies adequately informing patients about their options, and facilitating deliberation of the available information, such that decisions are tailored to the individual's values and preferences. Accurate estimations of one's risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease and death with or without dialysis are essential for shared decision making to be effective. Formal risk prediction models can help, provided they are externally validated, well-calibrated and discriminative; include unambiguous and measureable variables; and come with readily applicable equations or scores. Reliable, externally validated risk prediction models for progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage kidney disease or mortality in frail elderly with or without chronic kidney disease are scant. Within this paper, we discuss a number of promising models, highlighting both the strengths and limitations physicians should understand for using them judiciously, and emphasize the need for external validation over new development for further advancing the field.

  3. Use of Different Information Sources for Decision Making by Traditional Farmers in a Progressive Knowledge System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Abraham

    1989-01-01

    A study determined the use of different information sources for decision making used by traditional Arab farmers in Israel. A questionnaire was used to interview 48 farmers from 4 villages in the Nazareth region and 56 farmers from 5 villages in the Gaza strip in their homes. Farmers were asked to name major innovations they had adopted during the…

  4. Can focusing on UPDRS Part II make assessments of Parkinson disease progression more efficient?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Cristina

    2009-03-01

    Harrison et al. have attempted to validate Part II of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS II) as a medication-independent measure of disease progression. The authors collected cross-sectional data from a cohort of 888 patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease, and they found a robust association between UPDRS II scores and disease duration. Other variables considered were the patients' levodopa status, age at disease onset, and scores on UPDRS I, II and III. The results suggest that a single UPDRS II measurement might be a good indicator of progression at a given time point, irrespective of the current disease-related circumstances. This concept is attractive in its simplicity and patient-centeredness. However, this evidence came from a single-center, retrospective study, the statistical model was constructed using a nonvalidated surrogate as an independent variable, and no external replication was conducted. Until further confirmation, therefore, Harrison et al.'s proposal can only be considered to be a working hypothesis.

  5. Advanced systemic mastocytosis: the impact of KIT mutations in diagnosis, treatment, and progression

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan

    2013-01-01

    Apart from indolent systemic mastocytosis (SM), which is associated with a favorable prognosis, other subtypes of SM (SM with associated clonal hematologic non–mast cell lineage disease, aggressive SM, and mast cell leukemia – collectively referred to in this review as advanced SM) can be debilitating. The complexity of SM makes both the diagnosis and design of response criteria challenging for clinical studies. The tyrosine kinase KIT has been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of SM and has been a focal point in the development of targeted therapy. Mutations within various domains of the KIT receptor that lead to constitutive activation have been identified in patients, and those involving the activation loop of the KIT receptor are the mutations most frequently detected in patients with mastocytosis. Aberrant activation of the KIT receptor results in increased production of mast cells in extracutaneous organs that may lead to organ failure or early death. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of patients with advanced SM, including the relevance of KIT in this disease, potential therapies targeting this kinase, and criteria for measuring responses to these therapies. PMID:23181448

  6. Advanced systemic mastocytosis: the impact of KIT mutations in diagnosis, treatment, and progression.

    PubMed

    Verstovsek, Srdan

    2013-02-01

    Apart from indolent systemic mastocytosis (SM), which is associated with a favorable prognosis, other subtypes of SM (SM with associated clonal hematologic non-mast cell lineage disease, aggressive SM, and mast cell leukemia - collectively referred to in this review as advanced SM) can be debilitating. The complexity of SM makes both the diagnosis and design of response criteria challenging for clinical studies. The tyrosine kinase KIT has been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of SM and has been a focal point in the development of targeted therapy. Mutations within various domains of the KIT receptor that lead to constitutive activation have been identified in patients, and those involving the activation loop of the KIT receptor are the mutations most frequently detected in patients with mastocytosis. Aberrant activation of the KIT receptor results in increased production of mast cells in extracutaneous organs that may lead to organ failure or early death. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of patients with advanced SM, including the relevance of KIT in this disease, potential therapies targeting this kinase, and criteria for measuring responses to these therapies.

  7. Advance Notice of Proposed Rule Making for Minor Source Permitting in Indian Country - Oil and Gas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to solicit broad feedback on the most effective and efficient means of implementing the EPA's Indian Country Minor New Source Review program for sources in the oil and natural gas production segment.

  8. [Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project]. Technical progress report: April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from April 1, 1992, through June 30, 1992. This project demonstrates an advanced thermal coal drying process coupled with physical cleaning techniques designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals into a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After drying, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal{reg_sign} process enhances low-rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,500 to 9,000 British thermal units per pound (Btu/Ib), by producing a stable, upgraded coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. The 45-ton-per-hour unit is located adjacent to a unit train loadout facility at Western Energy Company`s Rosebud coal mine near Colstrip, Montana. The demonstration plant is sized at about one-tenth the projected throughput of a multiple processing train commercial facility. The demonstration drying and cooling equipment is currently near commercial size.

  9. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal Process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal Process enhances low-rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,5000 to 9,000 British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb), by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the ACCP Demonstration Project team was to expand SynCoal market awareness and acceptability for both the products and the technology. The ACCP Project team continued to focus on improving the operation, developing commercial markets, and improving the SynCoal products as well as the product`s acceptance.

  10. Making sense of autism: Progressive engagement with science among parents of young, recently diagnosed autistic children.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Noah Weeth

    2014-07-01

    This exploratory study examines the significance of science to parents whose children were recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. It asks: (I) In what manner did science emerge in parents' concerns and resources as they attempted to understand and advocate for their children? (2) Did some parents engage with science in a qualitatively deeper or more intense manner? Using longitudinal data from interviews and a novel data collection strategy called engagement mapping, it shows that parents asked questions and used resources that were strongly associated with science, but these were vastly outnumbered by "near-science" concerns and resources that mingled meanings from science and daily life. Several parents in the study wove together concerns and resources in an iterative pattern referred to here as progressive engagement with science.

  11. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    PubMed

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process.

  12. Recent Progress in Self‐Supported Metal Oxide Nanoarray Electrodes for Advanced Lithium‐Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The rational design and fabrication of electrode materials with desirable architectures and optimized properties has been demonstrated to be an effective approach towards high‐performance lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs). Although nanostructured metal oxide electrodes with high specific capacity have been regarded as the most promising alternatives for replacing commercial electrodes in LIBs, their further developments are still faced with several challenges such as poor cycling stability and unsatisfying rate performance. As a new class of binder‐free electrodes for LIBs, self‐supported metal oxide nanoarray electrodes have many advantageous features in terms of high specific surface area, fast electron transport, improved charge transfer efficiency, and free space for alleviating volume expansion and preventing severe aggregation, holding great potential to solve the mentioned problems. This review highlights the recent progress in the utilization of self‐supported metal oxide nanoarrays grown on 2D planar and 3D porous substrates, such as 1D and 2D nanostructure arrays, hierarchical nanostructure arrays, and heterostructured nanoarrays, as anodes and cathodes for advanced LIBs. Furthermore, the potential applications of these binder‐free nanoarray electrodes for practical LIBs in full‐cell configuration are outlined. Finally, the future prospects of these self‐supported nanoarray electrodes are discussed. PMID:27711259

  13. Recent Progress in Self-Supported Metal Oxide Nanoarray Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Qi, Limin

    2016-09-01

    The rational design and fabrication of electrode materials with desirable architectures and optimized properties has been demonstrated to be an effective approach towards high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Although nanostructured metal oxide electrodes with high specific capacity have been regarded as the most promising alternatives for replacing commercial electrodes in LIBs, their further developments are still faced with several challenges such as poor cycling stability and unsatisfying rate performance. As a new class of binder-free electrodes for LIBs, self-supported metal oxide nanoarray electrodes have many advantageous features in terms of high specific surface area, fast electron transport, improved charge transfer efficiency, and free space for alleviating volume expansion and preventing severe aggregation, holding great potential to solve the mentioned problems. This review highlights the recent progress in the utilization of self-supported metal oxide nanoarrays grown on 2D planar and 3D porous substrates, such as 1D and 2D nanostructure arrays, hierarchical nanostructure arrays, and heterostructured nanoarrays, as anodes and cathodes for advanced LIBs. Furthermore, the potential applications of these binder-free nanoarray electrodes for practical LIBs in full-cell configuration are outlined. Finally, the future prospects of these self-supported nanoarray electrodes are discussed.

  14. The Impact of Macrophage Insulin Resistance on Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression

    PubMed Central

    Tabas, Ira; Tall, Alan; Accili, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is the major cause of death and disability in obese and diabetic subjects with insulin resistance. Although increased systemic risk factors in the setting of insulin resistance contribute to this problem, it is likely exacerbated by direct effects of insulin resistance on the arterial wall cells that participate in atherosclerosis. A critical process in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions to those that cause clinical disease is necrotic breakdown of plaques. Plaque necrosis, which is particularly prominent in the lesions of diabetics, is caused by the combination of macrophage apoptosis and defective clearance, or efferocytosis, of the apoptotic macrophages. One cause of macrophage apoptosis in advanced plaques is activation of a pro-apoptotic branch of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway known as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Macrophages have a functional insulin receptor signal transduction pathway, and down regulation of this pathway in the setting insulin resistance enhances UPR-induced apoptosis. Moreover, other aspects of the obesity/insulin-resistance syndrome may adversely affect efferocytosis. These processes may therefore provide an important mechanistic link among insulin resistance, plaque necrosis, and atherothrombotic vascular disease and suggest novel therapeutic approaches to this expanding health problem. PMID:20056946

  15. Therapeutic Rationales, Progresses, Failures, and Future Directions for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) have several therapeutic options with good prognosis. However, survival of patients with high-risk, advanced PCa is significantly less than patients with early-stage, organ-confined disease. Testosterone and other androgens have been directly linked to PCa progression since 1941. In this review, we chronicle the discoveries that led to modern therapeutic strategies for PCa. Specifically highlighted is the biology of androgen receptor (AR), the nuclear receptor transcription factor largely responsible for androgen-stimulated and castrate-recurrent (CR) PCa. Current PCa treatment paradigms can be classified into three distinct but interrelated categories: targeting AR at pre-receptor, receptor, or post-receptor signaling. The continuing challenge of disease relapse as CR and/or metastatic tumors, destined to occur within three years of the initial treatment, is also discussed. We conclude that the success of PCa therapies in the future depends on targeting molecular mechanisms underlying tumor recurrence that still may affect AR at pre-receptor, receptor, and post-receptor levels. PMID:27019626

  16. Space Launch System Spacecraft and Payload Elements: Making Progress Toward First Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Andrew A.; Creech, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Significant and substantial progress continues to be accomplished in the design, development, and testing of the Space Launch System (SLS), the most powerful human-rated launch vehicle the United States has ever undertaken. Designed to support human missions into deep space, SLS is one of three programs being managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Exploration Systems Development directorate. The Orion spacecraft program is developing a new crew vehicle that will support human missions beyond low Earth orbit, and the Ground Systems Development and Operations program is transforming Kennedy Space Center into next-generation spaceport capable of supporting not only SLS but also multiple commercial users. Together, these systems will support human exploration missions into the proving ground of cislunar space and ultimately to Mars. SLS will deliver a near-term heavy-lift capability for the nation with its 70 metric ton (t) Block 1 configuration, and will then evolve to an ultimate capability of 130 t. The SLS program marked a major milestone with the successful completion of the Critical Design Review in which detailed designs were reviewed and subsequently approved for proceeding with full-scale production. This marks the first time an exploration class vehicle has passed that major milestone since the Saturn V vehicle launched astronauts in the 1960s during the Apollo program. Each element of the vehicle now has flight hardware in production in support of the initial flight of the SLS -- Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), an un-crewed mission to orbit the moon and return. Encompassing hardware qualification, structural testing to validate hardware compliance and analytical modeling, progress in on track to meet the initial targeted launch date in 2018. In Utah and Mississippi, booster and engine testing are verifying upgrades made to proven shuttle hardware. At Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana, the world's largest spacecraft welding

  17. Nitrate in the Mississippi River and Its Tributaries, 1980 to 2008: Are We Making Progress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Changes in nitrate concentration and flux between 1980 and 2008 at eight sites in the Mississippi River basin were determined using a new statistical method that accommodates evolving nitrate behavior over time and produces flow-normalized estimates of nitrate concentration and flux that are independent of random variations in streamflow. The results show that little consistent progress has been made in reducing riverine nitrate since 1980, and that flow-normalized concentration and flux are increasing in some areas. Flow-normalized nitrate concentration and flux increased between 9 and 76% at four sites on the Mississippi River and a tributary site on the Missouri River, but changed very little at tributary sites on the Ohio, Iowa, and Illinois Rivers. Increases in flow-normalized concentration and flux at the Mississippi River at Clinton and Missouri River at Hermann were more than three times larger than at any other site. The increases at these two sites contributed much of the 9% increase in flow-normalized nitrate flux leaving the Mississippi River basin. At most sites, concentrations increased more at low and moderate streamflows than at high streamflows, suggesting that increasing groundwater concentrations are having an effect on river concentrations. PMID:21823673

  18. Nitrate in the Mississippi River and its tributaries, 1980 to 2008: Are we making progress?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, Lori A.; Hirsch, Robert M.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in nitrate concentration and flux between 1980 and 2008 at eight sites in the Mississippi River basin were determined using a new statistical method that accommodates evolving nitrate behavior over time and produces flow-normalized estimates of nitrate concentration and flux that are independent of random variations in streamflow. The results show that little consistent progress has been made in reducing riverine nitrate since 1980, and that flow-normalized concentration and flux are increasing in some areas. Flow-normalized nitrate concentration and flux increased between 9 and 76% at four sites on the Mississippi River and a tributary site on the Missouri River, but changed very little at tributary sites on the Ohio, Iowa, and Illinois Rivers. Increases in flow-normalized concentration and flux at the Mississippi River at Clinton and Missouri River at Hermann were more than three times larger than at any other site. The increases at these two sites contributed much of the 9% increase in flow-normalized nitrate flux leaving the Mississippi River basin. At most sites, concentrations increased more at low and moderate streamflows than at high streamflows, suggesting that increasing groundwater concentrations are having an effect on river concentrations.

  19. Nitrate in the Mississippi River and its tributaries, 1980 to 2008: are we making progress?

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lori A; Hirsch, Robert M; Aulenbach, Brent T

    2011-09-01

    Changes in nitrate concentration and flux between 1980 and 2008 at eight sites in the Mississippi River basin were determined using a new statistical method that accommodates evolving nitrate behavior over time and produces flow-normalized estimates of nitrate concentration and flux that are independent of random variations in streamflow. The results show that little consistent progress has been made in reducing riverine nitrate since 1980, and that flow-normalized concentration and flux are increasing in some areas. Flow-normalized nitrate concentration and flux increased between 9 and 76% at four sites on the Mississippi River and a tributary site on the Missouri River, but changed very little at tributary sites on the Ohio, Iowa, and Illinois Rivers. Increases in flow-normalized concentration and flux at the Mississippi River at Clinton and Missouri River at Hermann were more than three times larger than at any other site. The increases at these two sites contributed much of the 9% increase in flow-normalized nitrate flux leaving the Mississippi River basin. At most sites, concentrations increased more at low and moderate streamflows than at high streamflows, suggesting that increasing groundwater concentrations are having an effect on river concentrations.

  20. What is this Substance? What Makes it Different? Mapping Progression in Students' Assumptions about Chemical Identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, Courtney; Sevian, Hannah; Talanquer, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    Given the diversity of materials in our surroundings, one should expect scientifically literate citizens to have a basic understanding of the core ideas and practices used to analyze chemical substances. In this article, we use the term 'chemical identity' to encapsulate the assumptions, knowledge, and practices upon which chemical analysis relies. We conceive chemical identity as a core crosscutting disciplinary concept which can bring coherence and relevance to chemistry curricula at all educational levels, primary through tertiary. Although chemical identity is not a concept explicitly addressed by traditional chemistry curricula, its understanding can be expected to evolve as students are asked to recognize different types of substances and explore their properties. The goal of this contribution is to characterize students' assumptions about factors that determine chemical identity and to map how core assumptions change with training in the discipline. Our work is based on the review and critical analysis of existing research findings on students' alternative conceptions in chemistry education, and historical and philosophical analyses of chemistry. From this perspective, our analysis contributes to the growing body of research in the area of learning progressions. In particular, it reveals areas in which our understanding of students' ideas about chemical identity is quite robust, but also highlights the existence of major knowledge gaps that should be filled in to better foster student understanding. We provide suggestions in this area and discuss implications for the teaching of chemistry.

  1. Item Response Theory Analysis and Differential Item Functioning across Age, Gender and Country of a Short Form of the Advanced Progressive Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiesi, Francesca; Ciancaleoni, Matteo; Galli, Silvia; Morsanyi, Kinga; Primi, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    Item Response Theory (IRT) models were applied to investigate the psychometric properties of the Arthur and Day's Advanced Progressive Matrices-Short Form (APM-SF; 1994) [Arthur and Day (1994). "Development of a short form for the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices test." "Educational and Psychological Measurement, 54," 395-403] in order to test…

  2. Completion of Advance Directives: Do Social Work Preadmission Interviews Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Yvonne M.; Stadel, Vivian L.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: This study tests the efficacy of a preadmission, educational interview on advance directives, in this case, health care proxies (HCPs) offered to elective, orthopedic patients. Method: Using a quasi-experimental design, participants (n = 54) are assigned to either treatment group (who received the educational interview, conducted by a…

  3. Advancing Your Career: Getting and Making the Most of Your Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Michael; Brubaker, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Entering a doctoral program can be an important first step in advancing your career. You will create a network of support that will include professors, intern advisors, and others who will have a vested interest in your success. From this support group will emerge one or more mentors who will guide you to successful completion of your program and…

  4. Advancing data assimilation in operational hydrologic forecasting: progresses, challenges, and emerging opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Weerts, A. H.; Clark, M.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Kumar, S.; Moradkhani, H.; Seo, D.-J.; Schwanenberg, D.; Smith, P.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; van Velzen, N.; He, M.; Lee, H.; Noh, S. J.; Rakovec, O.; Restrepo, P.

    2012-03-01

    Data assimilation (DA) holds considerable potential for improving hydrologic predictions as demonstrated in numerous research studies. However, advances in hydrologic DA research have not been adequately or timely implemented into operational forecast systems to improve the skill of forecasts to better inform real-world decision making. This is due in part to a lack of mechanisms to properly quantify the uncertainty in observations and forecast models in real-time forecasting situations and to conduct the merging of data and models in a way that is adequately efficient and transparent to operational forecasters. The need for effective DA of useful hydrologic data into the forecast process has become increasingly recognized in recent years. This motivated a hydrologic DA workshop in Delft, The Netherlands in November 2010, which focused on advancing DA in operational hydrologic forecasting and water resources management. As an outcome of the workshop, this paper reviews, in relevant detail, the current status of DA applications in both hydrologic research and operational practices, and discusses the existing or potential hurdles and challenges in transitioning hydrologic DA research into cost-effective operational forecasting tools, as well as the potential pathways and newly emerging opportunities for overcoming these challenges. Several related aspects are discussed, including (1) theoretical or mathematical considerations in DA algorithms, (2) the estimation of different types of uncertainty, (3) new observations and their objective use in hydrologic DA, (4) the use of DA for real-time control of water resources systems, and (5) the development of community-based, generic DA tools for hydrologic applications. It is recommended that cost-effective transition of hydrologic DA from research to operations should be helped by developing community-based, generic modelling and DA tools or frameworks, and through fostering collaborative efforts among hydrologic modellers

  5. Advancing data assimilation in operational hydrologic forecasting: progresses, challenges, and emerging opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Weerts, A. H.; Clark, M.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Kumar, S.; Moradkhani, H.; Seo, D.-J.; Schwanenberg, D.; Smith, P.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; van Velzen, N.; He, M.; Lee, H.; Noh, S. J.; Rakovec, O.; Restrepo, P.

    2012-10-01

    Data assimilation (DA) holds considerable potential for improving hydrologic predictions as demonstrated in numerous research studies. However, advances in hydrologic DA research have not been adequately or timely implemented in operational forecast systems to improve the skill of forecasts for better informed real-world decision making. This is due in part to a lack of mechanisms to properly quantify the uncertainty in observations and forecast models in real-time forecasting situations and to conduct the merging of data and models in a way that is adequately efficient and transparent to operational forecasters. The need for effective DA of useful hydrologic data into the forecast process has become increasingly recognized in recent years. This motivated a hydrologic DA workshop in Delft, the Netherlands in November 2010, which focused on advancing DA in operational hydrologic forecasting and water resources management. As an outcome of the workshop, this paper reviews, in relevant detail, the current status of DA applications in both hydrologic research and operational practices, and discusses the existing or potential hurdles and challenges in transitioning hydrologic DA research into cost-effective operational forecasting tools, as well as the potential pathways and newly emerging opportunities for overcoming these challenges. Several related aspects are discussed, including (1) theoretical or mathematical aspects in DA algorithms, (2) the estimation of different types of uncertainty, (3) new observations and their objective use in hydrologic DA, (4) the use of DA for real-time control of water resources systems, and (5) the development of community-based, generic DA tools for hydrologic applications. It is recommended that cost-effective transition of hydrologic DA from research to operations should be helped by developing community-based, generic modeling and DA tools or frameworks, and through fostering collaborative efforts among hydrologic modellers, DA

  6. Advancing Data Assimilation in Operational Hydrologic Forecasting: Progresses, Challenges, and Emerging Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuqiong; Weerts, A.; Clark, M.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J; Kumar, S.; Moradkhani, H.; Seo, D.-J.; Schwanenberg, D.; Smith, P.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; van Velzen, N.; He, M.; Lee, H.; Noh, S. J.; Rakovec, O.; Restrepo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Data assimilation (DA) holds considerable potential for improving hydrologic predictions as demonstrated in numerous research studies. However, advances in hydrologic DA research have not been adequately or timely implemented in operational forecast systems to improve the skill of forecasts for better informed real-world decision making. This is due in part to a lack of mechanisms to properly quantify the uncertainty in observations and forecast models in real-time forecasting situations and to conduct the merging of data and models in a way that is adequately efficient and transparent to operational forecasters. The need for effective DA of useful hydrologic data into the forecast process has become increasingly recognized in recent years. This motivated a hydrologic DA workshop in Delft, the Netherlands in November 2010, which focused on advancing DA in operational hydrologic forecasting and water resources management. As an outcome of the workshop, this paper reviews, in relevant detail, the current status of DA applications in both hydrologic research and operational practices, and discusses the existing or potential hurdles and challenges in transitioning hydrologic DA research into cost-effective operational forecasting tools, as well as the potential pathways and newly emerging opportunities for overcoming these challenges. Several related aspects are discussed, including (1) theoretical or mathematical aspects in DA algorithms, (2) the estimation of different types of uncertainty, (3) new observations and their objective use in hydrologic DA, (4) the use of DA for real-time control of water resources systems, and (5) the development of community-based, generic DA tools for hydrologic applications. It is recommended that cost-effective transition of hydrologic DA from research to operations should be helped by developing community-based, generic modeling and DA tools or frameworks, and through fostering collaborative efforts among hydrologic modellers, DA

  7. The Trail Making Test in Prodromal Huntington Disease: Contributions of Disease Progression to Test Performance

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Justin J.F.; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Smith, Megan M.; Mills, James; Moser, David J.; Rowe, Kelly C.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Duff, Kevin; Stout, Julie C.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Carlozzi, Noelle; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the Trail Making Test (TMT) in a sample of 767 participants with prodromal Huntington disease (prodromal HD) and 217 healthy comparisons to determine the contributions of motor, psychiatric, and cognitive changes to TMT scores. Eight traditional and derived TMT scores were also evaluated for their ability to differentiate prodromal participants closer to estimated age of diagnosis from those farther away and prodromal individuals from healthy comparisons. Results indicate that motor signs only mildly affected part A, and psychiatric symptoms did not affect either part. Tests of perceptual processing, visual scanning, and attention were primarily associated with part A, and executive functioning (response inhibition, set-shifting), processing speed, and working memory were associated with part B. Additionally, TMT scores differentiated between healthy comparisons and prodromal HD individuals as far as 9–15 years before estimated diagnosis. In participants manifesting prodromal motor signs and psychiatric symptoms, the TMT primarily measures cognition and is able to discriminate between groups based on health status and estimated time to diagnosis. PMID:21302170

  8. Selecting Gravitational Wave Candidates for Electromagnetic Follow-up: Advanced LIGO/Virgo's Decision Making Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min-A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most violent events in the universe are bright in both their gravitational wave (GW) emission and electromagnetic (EM). This means that prospects for multi-messenger astronomy increase as more and more detectors join the search for gravitational waves. Here I present the protocol created by members of Advanced LIGO/Virgo's EM Follow-up Program which ultimately results in alerting its astronomy partners or not. I discuss the series of checks and questions performed by humans (follow-up advocates and control room personnel) and automated online software (Approval Processor). This talk will follow the fate of the gravitational wave candidate event after it first enters Advanced LIGO/Virgo's online candidate event database. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant PHY-1404121.

  9. The desire to die: making treatment decisions for suicidal patients who have an advance directive.

    PubMed

    Salter, Erica K

    2014-01-01

    This article enumerates and critically examines the potential grounds on which we might treat the case of a patient with an advance directive who attempted suicide, differently from one whose injuries were the result of an accident. Grounds for differentiation are distilled into two potential justifications. The first addresses the concern that withholding or withdrawing care from a patient with self-inflicted injuries would be aiding and abetting suicide.The second examines concerns about the patient's decisionmaking capacity. Ultimately, it is argued that while there might be legitimate reasons to hold the advance directive of a suicidal patient to a different standard of scrutiny, the fact that the patient's medical state was self-inflicted should not, in and of itself, necessarily invalidate the guidance of the directive. Finally, four practical recommendations are offered for negotiating similar cases.

  10. A Revolution in the Making: Advances in Materials That May Transform Future Exploration Infrastructures and Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Dicus, Dennis L.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Strategic Plan identifies the long-term goal to provide safe and affordable space access, orbital transfer, and interplanetary transportation capabilities to enable research, human exploration, and the commercial development of space; and to conduct human and robotic missions to planets and other bodies in our solar system. Numerous scientific and engineering breakthroughs will be required to develop the technology necessary to achieve this goal. Critical technologies include advanced vehicle primary and secondary structure, radiation protection, propulsion and power systems, fuel storage, electronics and devices, sensors and science instruments, and medical diagnostics and treatment. Advanced materials with revolutionary new capabilities are an essential element of each of these technologies. This paper discusses those materials best suited for aerospace vehicle structure and highlights the enormous potential of one revolutionary new material, carbon nanotubes.

  11. RISA progress in the development of drought indicators to support decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.; Simpson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Communities around the country are increasingly recognizing the need to plan for water shortages and long-term drought. To build preparedness and help communities manage risk, researchers funded by NOAA's National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Coping with Drought initiative through the Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program are working to better understand these impacts across the country and work with communities and resource managers to develop adaptation strategies that meet their needs. The Coping with Drought initiative supports research involving the use of climate predictions and forecast information in decision-making across a range of sectors including agriculture, natural and water resources management, and public health. As a component of this initiative, the RISA program supported research and engagement to develop indicators of drought designed to be of most use to managers and planners grappling with severe and in some cases ongoing drought in their regions. Indicators are being developed for coastal ecosystems in the Carolinas, water management in California, and native communities in Arizona. For instance, the California Nevada Applications Program (CNAP) RISA developed a percentile-based indicator system for analyzing historic droughts and characterizing the ongoing California drought. And in the Southwest, the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) RISA has been working with the Hopi community on drought monitoring and planning to develop the first-ever Hopi Quarterly Drought Status Report which integrates scientific and local knowledge about drought. This presentation will discuss RISA's role in developing drought indicators based on engagement with decision makers and how this work fits into the larger role that RISAs are playing in the development of the NIDIS Regional Drought Early Warning Systems across the U.S.

  12. Recent progress towards an advanced spherical torus operating point in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Gates, D. A.; Kaye, S. M.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Canik, J. M.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaita, R.; Kolemen, E.; Kugel, H.; Le Blanc, B. P.; Mastrovito, D.; Mueller, D.; Yuh, H.

    2011-07-01

    Progress in the development of integrated advanced ST plasma scenarios in NSTX (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557) is reported. Recent high-performance plasmas in NSTX following lithium coating of the plasma facing surfaces have achieved higher elongation and lower internal inductance than previously. Analysis of the thermal confinement in these lithiumized discharges shows a stronger plasma current and weaker toroidal field dependence than in previous ST confinement scaling studies; the ITER-98(y, 2) scaling expression describes these scenarios reasonably well. Analysis during periods free of MHD activity has shown that the reconstructed current profile can be understood as the sum of pressure driven, inductive and neutral beam driven currents, without requiring any anomalous fast-ion transport. Non-inductive fractions of 65-70%, and βP > 2, have been achieved at lower plasma current. Some of these low-inductance discharges have a significantly reduced no-wall βN limit, and often have βN at or near the with-wall limit. Coupled m/n = 1/1 + 2/1 kink/tearing modes can limit the sustained β values when rapidly growing ideal modes are avoided. A βN controller has been commissioned and utilized in sustaining high-performance plasmas. 'Snowflake' divertors compatible with high-performance plasmas have been developed. Scenarios with significantly larger aspect ratios have also been developed, in support of next-step ST devices. Overall, these NSTX plasmas have many characteristics required for next-step ST devices.

  13. Recent progress toward an advanced spherical torus operating point in NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    S. P. Gerhardt; Gates, D. A.; Kaye, S.; ...

    2011-05-13

    Progress in the development of integrated advanced ST plasma scenarios in NSTX (Ono et al., 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557) is reported. Recent high-performance plasmas in NSTX following lithium coating of the plasma facing surfaces have achieved higher elongation and lower internal inductance than previously. Analysis of the thermal confinement in these lithiumized discharges shows a stronger plasma current and weaker toroidal field dependence than in previous ST confinement scaling studies; the ITER-98(y, 2) scaling expression describes these scenarios reasonably well. Analysis during periods free of MHD activity has shown that the reconstructed current profile can be understood as themore » sum of pressure driven, inductive and neutral beam driven currents, without requiring any anomalous fast-ion transport. Non-inductive fractions of 65–70%, and βP > 2, have been achieved at lower plasma current. Some of these low-inductance discharges have a significantly reduced no-wall βN limit, and often have βN at or near the with-wall limit. Coupled m/n = 1/1 + 2/1 kink/tearing modes can limit the sustained β values when rapidly growing ideal modes are avoided. A βN controller has been commissioned and utilized in sustaining high-performance plasmas. 'Snowflake' divertors compatible with high-performance plasmas have been developed. Scenarios with significantly larger aspect ratios have also been developed, in support of next-step ST devices. Furthermore, these NSTX plasmas have many characteristics required for next-step ST devices.« less

  14. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, March 1 - September 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-12-31

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utili- zation of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NNM methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 29}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  15. Advancing the Culture of Teaching on Campus: How a Teaching Center Can Make a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Constance, Ed.; Kaplan, Matthew, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Written by the director and staff of the first, and one of the largest, teaching centers in American higher education--the University of Michigan's Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT)--this book offers a unique perspective on the strategies for making a teaching center integral to an institution's educational mission. It presents a…

  16. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Annual report on the work of the the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the Vehicle Technologies Office mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  17. Advance Directive in End of Life Decision-Making among the Yoruba of South-Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Jegede, Ayodele Samuel; Adegoke, Olufunke Olufunsho

    2017-01-01

    End-of-life decision making is value-laden within the context of culture and bioethics. Also, ethics committee role is difficult to understand on this, thus need for ethnomethodological perspective in an expanding bioethical age. Anthropological approach was utilized to document Yoruba definition and perspective of death, cultural beliefs about end-of-life decision making, factors influencing it and ethics committee role. Interviews were conducted among selected Yoruba resident in Akinyele LGA, Oyo State, Nigeria. Content analytical approach was used for data analysis. Yoruba culture, death is socially constructed having spiritual, physical and social significance. Relationship between the dying and significant others influences decision making. Hierarchy of authority informs implementing traditional advance directive. Socialization, gender, patriarchy, religious belief and tradition are major considerations in end-of-life decision making. Awareness, resource allocation and advocacy are important ethics committees’ roles. Further research into cultural diversity of end-of-life decision making will strengthen ethical practice in health care delivery. PMID:28344984

  18. A Prospective Study of the Rate of Progression in Compensated, Histologically Advanced Chronic Hepatitis C (HEP-10-2210)

    PubMed Central

    Dienstag, Jules L.; Ghany, Marc G.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Kim, Hae-Young; Seeff, Leonard B.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Sterling, Richard K.; Everson, Gregory T.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Lok, Anna S.; Morishima, Chihiro; Stoddard, Anne M.; Everhart, James E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The incidence of liver disease progression among subjects with histologically advanced but compensated, chronic hepatitis C is incomplete. METHODS The Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis Trial was a randomized study of 3.5 years of maintenance peginterferon treatment on liver disease progression among patients who had not cleared virus on peginterferon and ribavirin therapy. Patients were followed subsequently off therapy. Because maintenance peginterferon treatment did not alter liver disease progression, we analyzed treated and control patients together. Among 1,050 subjects (60% advanced fibrosis, 40% cirrhosis), we determined the rate of progression to cirrhosis over 4 years and of clinical outcomes over 8 years. RESULTS Among patients with fibrosis, the incidence of cirrhosis was 9.9% per year. 679 clinical outcomes occurred among 329 subjects. Initial clinical outcomes occurred more frequently among subjects with cirrhosis (7.5%/year) than with fibrosis (3.3%/year) (P <0.0001). Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) ≥7 was the most common first outcome, followed by hepatocellular carcinoma. Following occurrence of a score CTP ≥7, the rate of subsequent events increased to 12.9%/year, including a death rate of 10%/year. Age and sex did not influence outcome rates. Baseline platelet count was a strong predictor of all clinical outcomes. During the 8 years of follow-up, death or liver transplantation occurred among 12.2% of patients with advanced fibrosis and 31.5% of those with cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with advanced hepatitis C who failed peginterferon and ribavirin, the rate of liver-related outcomes, including death and liver transplantation, is high, especially once CTP reaches at least 7. PMID:21520194

  19. Using the Malcolm Baldrige "are we making progress" survey for organizational self-assessment and performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Shields, Judith A; Jennings, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    A national healthcare company applied the Malcolm Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence and its "Are We Making Progress?" survey as an annual organizational self-assessment to identify areas for improvement. For 6 years, Liberty Healthcare Corporation reviewed the survey results on an annual basis to analyze positive and negative trends, monitor company progress toward targeted goals and develop new initiatives to address emerging areas for improvement. As such, the survey provided a simple and inexpensive methodology to gain useful information from employees at all levels and from multiple service sites and business sectors. In particular, it provided a valuable framework for assessing and improving the employees' commitment to the company's mission and values, high standards and ethics, quality of work, and customer satisfaction. The methodology also helped the company to incorporate the philosophy and principles of continuous quality improvement in a unified fashion. Corporate and local leadership used the same measure to evaluate the performance of individual programs relative to each other, to the company as a whole, and to the "best practices" standard of highly successful companies that received the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award.

  20. A new era of improving progression-free survival with dual blockade in postmenopausal HR(+), HER2(-) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jerusalem, Guy; Bachelot, Thomas; Barrios, Carlos; Neven, Patrick; Di Leo, Angelo; Janni, Wolfgang; de Boer, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Disease progression despite existing endocrine therapies remains a major challenge to the effective management of hormone-receptor-positive (HR(+)), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative (HER2(-)), advanced breast cancer. Recent advances in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of disease progression have identified the existence of adaptive "cross-talk" between the estrogen receptor (ER) and various growth factor receptor and intracellular signaling pathways, allowing breast cancer cells to escape the inhibitory effects of endocrine therapy. These findings provide the clinical rationale for enhancing or extending endocrine sensitivity by combining endocrine therapy with a targeted agent against a compensatory pathway. In BOLERO-2, adding the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to endocrine therapy significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with HR(+) advanced breast cancer previously treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy. Notably, PFS benefits were comparable in subgroup analyses of first- and later-line settings. These results contrast with those of the large first-line HORIZON study, wherein adding the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus to endocrine therapy did not improve PFS. Therefore, it is unclear whether a targeted agent should only be combined with endocrine therapy to restore endocrine sensitivity or whether it may also prevent or delay resistance in hormone-sensitive advanced breast cancer. Numerous additional targeted agents are currently being evaluated in combination with endocrine therapies, including PI3K, cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6, SRC, and histone deacetylase inhibitors. Appropriate patient selection based on prior treatment history will become increasingly important in maximizing the incremental benefit derived from these new agents combined with existing endocrine therapies in HR(+) advanced breast cancer.

  1. Award-Winning CARES/Life Ceramics Durability Evaluation Software Is Making Advanced Technology Accessible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Products made from advanced ceramics show great promise for revolutionizing aerospace and terrestrial propulsion and power generation. However, ceramic components are difficult to design because brittle materials in general have widely varying strength values. The CARES/Life software developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center eases this by providing a tool that uses probabilistic reliability analysis techniques to optimize the design and manufacture of brittle material components. CARES/Life is an integrated package that predicts the probability of a monolithic ceramic component's failure as a function of its time in service. It couples commercial finite element programs--which resolve a component's temperature and stress distribution - with reliability evaluation and fracture mechanics routines for modeling strength - limiting defects. These routines are based on calculations of the probabilistic nature of the brittle material's strength.

  2. Update of progress for Phase II of B&W`s advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Madden, D.A.; Rodgers, L.W.

    1995-11-01

    Over the past five years, advances in emission control techniques at reduced costs and auxiliary power requirements coupled with significant improvements in steam turbine and cycle design have significantly altered the governing criteria by which advanced technologies have been compared. With these advances, it is clear that pulverized coal technology will continue to be competitive in both cost and performance with other advanced technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) or first generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) technologies for at least the next decade. In the early 1990`s it appeared that if IGCC and PFBC could achieve costs comparable to conventional pulverized coal plants, their significantly reduced NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions would make them more attractive. A comparison of current emission control capabilities shows that all three technologies can already achieve similarly low emissions levels.

  3. Advanced Technology Lunar Telescopes I. Overview and Progress Report On Ultra-Lightweight Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Stolarik, J. D.; Segal, K.; Wilson, T. L.; Lin, E. I.; Hull, J. R.; Romeo, R.; Hojaji, H.; Ma, K. B.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.; Chu, C. W.

    1993-12-01

    The materials and technology already exist to build fully functional steerable telescopes for use on the moon, telescopes that are cost effective, that can be deployed using existing launchers, and that can function for extended periods without human maintenance. We describe our concept of advanced technology telescopes (ATT) which combines the elements of i) ultra-lightweight precision optics and structures, ii) non-contact, electronically controlled superconductor bearings and drive mechanisms, and iii) high dynamic range radiation resistant sensors. Unlike previous transit telescope designs, the ATTs can point and track objects anywhere in the sky over the entire lunar night (or day), can be deployed in multiple unit arrays, and can be equipped with standard astronomical instruments including spectrographs, imagers, or even interferometers. We first describe the optics. Lightweight optics are crucial because they minimize the mass of the telescope assembly and its support structure and ultimately the entire payload. By using materials and fabrication technology similar to that already refined by ESA and proven for space applications, we show that it is possible to produce precision optical elements of very low areal density (< 2 kg per sq. m). The process also has much lower per unit cost compared to traditional mirror fabrication techniques. By supporting the optical elements with a class of very lightweight but stiff material already developed by NASA, a telescope assembly can be made that has essentially the minimum possible mass. Such ultra-lightweight construction makes possible astronomical payloads that can be sent to the moon using existing small and medium size rockets. The very low per unit cost permits the production and deployment of multiple units, thereby increasing the versatility and productivity of a lunar observatory while providing good redundancy. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept optical telescope assembly that has a 31 cm diameter primary

  4. Resource-saving technologies of making advanced cast and deformable superalloys with allowance for processing all types of wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, E. N.; Sidorov, V. V.; Kablov, D. E.; Min, P. G.; Rigin, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    The results of thermodynamic analysis of the vacuum-melt-ceramic system and experimental investigations of using up to 100% wastes during vacuum-induction melting are presented. An important role of rare-earth and alkaline-earth metals and heat treatment is shown for effective refining of a melt from impurities and gases. As a result, a resource-saving technology of making advanced cast and deformable nickel superalloys is developed with allowance for processing all types of wastes, including off-grade wastes. The developed technology of refining wastes under vacuum makes it possible to manufacture the alloys that fully meet the requirements of alloy specifications from 100% wastes. This technology is now used for the mass production of nickel superalloys in a research complex at FGUP VIAM.

  5. The Experience of Older People in the Shared Decision-Making Process in Advanced Kidney Care

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Karen; McManus, Breeda; Gracey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This qualitative descriptive study was designed to understand the experiences of older people (>70 years) when making a decision about renal replacement therapy. This was a coproduced study, whereby patients and carers were involved in all aspects of the research process. Methods. A Patient and Carer Group undertook volunteer and research training. The group developed the interview questions and interviewed 29 people who had commenced dialysis or made a decision not to have dialysis. Interview data were transcribed and analysed, and common themes were identified. Results. 22 men and 7 women (mean age 77.4 yrs) from two hospitals were interviewed. 18 had chosen haemodialysis, 6 peritoneal dialysis, and 5 supportive care. The majority of patients were involved in the dialysis decision. Most were satisfied with the amount of information that they received, although some identified that the quality of the information could be improved, especially how daily living can be affected by dialysis. Conclusion. Our findings show that overall older patients were involved in the dialysis decision along with their families. Our approach is innovative because it is the first time that patients and carers have been involved in a coproduced study about shared decision-making. PMID:27990438

  6. Intricate decision making: ambivalences and barriers when fulfilling an advance directive

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Lars; Hommel, Gerhard; Sahm, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a recent statutory ruling stating the binding nature of advance directives (ADs), only a minority of the population has signed one. Yet, a majority deem it of utmost importance to ensure their wishes are followed through in case they are no longer able to decide. The reasons for this discrepancy have not yet been investigated sufficiently. Patients and methods This article is based on a survey of patients using a well-established structured questionnaire. First, patients were asked about their attitudes with respect to six therapeutic options at the end of life: intravenous fluids, artificial feeding, antibiotics, analgesia, chemotherapy/dialysis, and artificial ventilation; and second, they were asked about the negative effects related to the idea of ADs surveying their apprehensions: coercion to fulfill an AD, dictatorial reading of what had been laid down, and abuse of ADs. Results A total of 1,260 interviewees completed the questionnaires. A significant percentage of interviewees were indecisive with respect to therapeutic options, ranging from 25% (analgesia) to 45% (artificial feeding). There was no connection to health status. Apprehensions about unwanted effects of ADs were widespread, at 51%, 35%, and 43% for coercion, dictatorial reading, and abuse, respectively. Conclusion A significant percentage of interviewees were unable to anticipate decisions about treatment options at the end of life. Apprehensions about negative adverse effects of ADs are widespread. PMID:27574407

  7. U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Pharmacists: Making a Difference in Advancing the Nation’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Louis; Wick, Jeannette; Figg, William Douglas; McClelland, Robert H.; Shiber, Michael; Britton, James E.; Ngo, Diem-Kieu H.; Borders-Hemphill, Vicky; Mead, Christina; Zee, Jerry; Huntzinger, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe how pharmacy officers in the Commissioned Corps are making a difference in protecting, promoting, and advancing health and safety of the Nation. Summary Pharmacists who serve in the Commissioned Corps of the United States Public Health Service fill roles that are considerably different than their counterparts in the private sector. Their work takes them out from behind the counter and into the world. Pharmacy officers advance the health and safety of the Nation by their involvement in the delivery of direct patient care to medically underserved people, national security, drug vigilance, research and policy-making endeavors. PHS pharmacists fill essential public health leadership and service roles throughout the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and certain non-HHS federal agencies and programs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, Health Resources and Services Administration, Food and Drug Administration, United States Coast Guard, Indian Health Service, and National Institutes of Health are among the many federal agencies where pharmacy officers are assigned. Conclusion In each setting, pharmacists find traditional roles augmented with assignments and challenges that broaden the scope of their practice. PMID:19443327

  8. Alternative treatments in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients with progressive disease after sorafenib treatment: a prospective multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masahito; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kuromatsu, Ryoko; Nagamatsu, Hiroaki; Satani, Manabu; Niizeki, Takashi; Okamura, Shusuke; Iwamoto, Hideki; Shimose, Shigeo; Shirono, Tomotake; Noda, Yu; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has been approved to treat advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), though it is unclear how much benefit advanced HCC patients with progressive disease (PD) derive from sorafenib treatment. This study aimed to assess survival risk factors and evaluate therapeutic strategies for advanced HCC patients with PD after sorafenib treatment. We analyzed the clinical data and treatment outcomes for 315 consecutive advanced HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Univariate analyses of overall survival identified therapeutic effect as an independent risk factor in all patients. Among all patients, 141 developed PD. Of those, 58 (41%) were treated with sorafenib monotherapy, 70 (50%) with agents other than sorafenib, and 13 (9%) were not treated at all. The median survival time was 6.1 months for PD patients with sorafenib monotherapy and 12.2 months for those administered alternative treatments (p < 0.0001). Our results indicated that sorafenib treatment may have negative long-term therapeutic effects in advanced HCC patients with PD, and that alternative treatments should be considered for these patients after sorafenib administration. PMID:27462865

  9. Advancing an Ethic of Embodied Relational Sexuality to Guide Decision-Making in Dementia Care.

    PubMed

    Grigorovich, Alisa; Kontos, Pia

    2016-12-07

    Sexuality and intimacy are universal needs that transcend age, cognitive decline, and disability; sexuality is a fundamental aspect of the human experience. However, supporting sexuality in long-term residential care presents ethical challenges as this setting is both a home environment for residents and a workplace for health practitioners. This is particularly complex in the case of residents with dementia given the need to balance protection from harm and freedom of self-determination. Despite such complexity, this challenge has received limited critical theoretical attention. The dominant approach advocated to guide ethical reasoning is the bioethical four principles approach. However, the application of this approach in the context of dementia and long-term care may set the bar for practitioners' interference excessively high, restricting assentual (i.e., voluntary) sexual expression. Furthermore, it privileges cognitive and impartial decision-making, while disregarding performative, embodied, and relational aspects of ethical reasoning. With an interest in addressing these limitations, we explicate an alternative ethic of embodied relational sexuality that is grounded in a model of citizenship that recognizes relationality and the agential status of embodied self-expression. This alternative ethic broadens ethical reasoning from the exclusive duty to protect individuals from harm associated with sexual expression, to the duty to also uphold and support their rights to experience the benefits of sexual expression (e.g., pleasure, intimacy). As such it has the potential to inform the development of policies, organizational guidelines, and professional curricula to support the sexuality of persons with dementia, and thereby ensure more humane practices in long-term residential care settings.

  10. Surgical advances in bone and soft tissue sarcoma: 50 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Henshaw, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    As the American Society of Clinical Oncology celebrates its 50th anniversary, physicians can appreciate the significant advances made in the treatment of patients with sarcoma. Historically, these rare tumors have garnered great interest in the medical profession, due to their ability to reach extraordinary size, resulting in substantial deformities and disabilities. Fortunately, advances in surgical management, which have occurred concurrently with advances in imaging, diagnostic techniques, and both local and systemic adjuvant treatments, offer patients diagnosed with sarcoma significant hope for successful treatment and the expectation of a meaningful quality of life.

  11. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-12-01

    The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  12. Reduced expression of AMPK-β1 during tumor progression enhances the oncogenic capacity of advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy sensor that is involved in regulating cell metabolism. Our previous study revealed that the subunits of the heterotimeric AMPK enzyme are diversely expressed during ovarian cancer progression. However, the impact of the variable expression of these AMPK subunits in ovarian cancer oncogenesis remains obscure. Here, we provide evidence to show that reduced expression of the AMPK-β1 subunit during tumor progression is associated with the increased oncogenic capacity of advanced ovarian cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that AMPK-β1 levels were reduced in advanced-stage (P = 0.008), high-grade (P = 0.013) and metastatic ovarian cancers (P = 0.008). Intriguingly, down-regulation of AMPK-β1 was progressively reduced from tumor stages 1 to 3 of ovarian cancer. Functionally, enforced expression of AMPK-β1 inhibited ovarian-cancer-cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, cell migration and invasion. Conversely, depletion of AMPK-β1 by siRNA enhanced the oncogenic capacities of ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that the loss of AMPK-β1 favors the aggressiveness of ovarian cancer. Mechanistically, enforced expression of AMPK-β1 increased AMPK activity, which, in turn, induced cell-cycle arrest via inhibition of AKT/ERK signaling activity as well as impaired cell migration/invasion through the suppression of JNK signaling in ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that the reduced expression of AMPK-β1 confers lower AMPK activity, which enhances the oncogenic capacity of advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:24602453

  13. Coordination of care for individuals with advanced progressive conditions: a multi-site ethnographic and serial interview study

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Bruce; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Nanton, Veronica; Donaldson, Anne; Shipman, Cathy; Daveson, Barbara A; Harding, Richard; Higginson, Irene; Munday, Dan; Barclay, Stephen; Boyd, Kirsty; Dale, Jeremy; Kendall, Marilyn; Worth, Allison; Murray, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Background Coordination of care for individuals with advanced progressive conditions is frequently poor. Aim To identify how care is coordinated in generalist settings for individuals with advanced progressive conditions in the last year of life. Design and setting A mixed methods study of three UK generalist clinical settings producing three parallel case studies: an acute admissions unit in a regional hospital, a large general practice, and a respiratory outpatient service. Method Ethnographic observations in each setting, followed by serial interviews of patients with advanced progressive conditions and their family carers in the community. A spectrum of clinicians and healthcare workers were also interviewed. Results Ethnographic observations were conducted for 22 weeks. A total of 56 patients, 25 family carers and 17 clinicians yielded 198 interviews. Very few participants had been identified for a palliative approach. Rapid throughput of hospital patients and time pressures in primary care hindered identification of palliative care needs. Lack of care coordination was evident during emergency admissions and discharges. Patient, families, and professionals identified multiple problems relating to lack of information, communication, and collaboration at care transitions. Family carers or specialist nurses, where present, usually acted as the main care coordinators. Conclusion Care is poorly coordinated in generalist settings for patients in the last year of life, although those with cancer have better coordinated care than other patients. A model to improve coordination of care for all individuals approaching the end of life must ensure that patients are identified in a timely way, so that they can be assessed and their care planned accordingly. PMID:23972199

  14. Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report for the period July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from July 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995. The ACCP Demonstration Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the cola is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal.

  15. Progress and recent advances in fabrication and utilization of hypoxanthine biosensors for meat and fish quality assessment: a review.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Abdulazeez T; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2012-10-15

    This review provides an update on the research conducted on the fabrication and utilization of hypoxanthine (Hx) biosensors published over the past four decades. In particular, the review focuses on progress made in the development and use of Hx biosensors for the assessment of fish and meat quality which has dominated research in this area. The various fish and meat freshness indexes that have been proposed over this period are highlighted. Furthermore, recent developments and future advances in the use of screen-printed electrodes and nanomaterials for achieving improved performances for the reliable determination of Hx in fish and meat are discussed.

  16. Maraviroc Failed to Control Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy-Associated IRIS in a Patient with Advanced HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Silva-Sánchez, Fernando Antonio; Luna-Rivero, César; Vega-Barrientos, Ricardo; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of therapeutic options for patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-associated IRIS), maraviroc has generated expectations among the medical community. However, we report a patient with advanced HIV infection, who developed PML-associated IRIS and had a fatal outcome despite the addition of maraviroc to suppressive ART. Future studies are required to define the therapeutic role of maraviroc in PML-associated IRIS and differentiate individuals who may benefit from maraviroc from those who may develop neurological deterioration. PMID:25587282

  17. Progress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists who were once protected by the hammer and sickle are now being bludgeoned with them, according to a report published in November by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Thousands of scientists, professors, and science teachers who had been affiliated with the communist regimes of Central and Eastern European nations are being purged from academic institutions under the premise of righting a perceived historical wrong.More than 3,000 scientists in Bulgaria, as well as 884 university professors and 10,000 teachers in the German state of Saxony, have lost their jobs in the past 5 years. Nearly 6% of all Czech faculty members also have been fired. The purges—which are more reminiscent of the communist past than of a democratic future—are the result of government-sanctioned programs to weed out public employees who may have received their positions due to their Communist affiliation.

  18. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Section 1 contains a report of the progress by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research on the following tasks: laboratory support (liquefaction in dewaxed and hydrotreated dewaxed solvent); CO pretreatment (effect of process variables on CO pretreatment, CO-pretreated product characterization, and liquefaction results); and iron based dispersed catalysts (production, characterization and testing of sulfated hematites and reaction model development). Section 2 contains a progress report by CONSOL, Inc. on the following tasks: laboratory support; pretreatment work on dewaxing; pretreatment work on agglomeration; and economic evaluation. Progress by Sandia National Laboratories is reported in Section 3 on the following: laboratory support (TGA methods) and solvent pretreatment (coker tar hydrogenation and coal liquefaction results). Section 4 gives a preliminary technical assessment by LDP Associates on the following: baseline economic assessment; assessment of improved coal conversion; and fluid coking.

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Video Decision Support Tool for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decision Making in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volandes, Angelo E.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Mitchell, Susan L.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Davis, Aretha Delight; Barry, Michael J.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Jackson, Vicki Ann; Gillick, Muriel R.; Walker-Corkery, Elizabeth S.; Chang, Yuchiao; López, Lenny; Kemeny, Margaret; Bulone, Linda; Mann, Eileen; Misra, Sumi; Peachey, Matt; Abbo, Elmer D.; Eichler, April F.; Epstein, Andrew S.; Noy, Ariela; Levin, Tomer T.; Temel, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Decision making regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging. This study examined the effect of a video decision support tool on CPR preferences among patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with advanced cancer from four oncology centers. Participants in the control arm (n = 80) listened to a verbal narrative describing CPR and the likelihood of successful resuscitation. Participants in the intervention arm (n = 70) listened to the identical narrative and viewed a 3-minute video depicting a patient on a ventilator and CPR being performed on a simulated patient. The primary outcome was participants' preference for or against CPR measured immediately after exposure to either modality. Secondary outcomes were participants' knowledge of CPR (score range of 0 to 4, with higher score indicating more knowledge) and comfort with video. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (standard deviation, 11 years); 49% were women, 44% were African American or Latino, and 47% had lung or colon cancer. After the verbal narrative, in the control arm, 38 participants (48%) wanted CPR, 41 (51%) wanted no CPR, and one (1%) was uncertain. In contrast, in the intervention arm, 14 participants (20%) wanted CPR, 55 (79%) wanted no CPR, and 1 (1%) was uncertain (unadjusted odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2; P < .001). Mean knowledge scores were higher in the intervention arm than in the control arm (3.3 ± 1.0 v 2.6 ± 1.3, respectively; P < .001), and 65 participants (93%) in the intervention arm were comfortable watching the video. Conclusion Participants with advanced cancer who viewed a video of CPR were less likely to opt for CPR than those who listened to a verbal narrative. PMID:23233708

  20. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder — Self-binding directives and self-determination

    PubMed Central

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S.

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being ‘protected’ through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician–patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research. PMID:25939286

  1. Progress toward an advanced condition monitoring system for reusable rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, J.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1987-01-01

    A new generation of advanced sensor technologies will allow the direct measurement of critical/degradable rocket engine components' health and the detection of degraded conditions before component deterioration affects engine performance, leading to substantial improvements in reusable engines' operation and maintenance. When combined with a computer-based engine condition-monitoring system, these sensors can furnish a continuously updated data base for the prediction of engine availability and advanced warning of emergent maintenance requirements. Attention is given to the case of a practical turbopump and combustion device diagnostic/prognostic health-monitoring system.

  2. Randomized Phase II Trial of Erlotinib Beyond Progression in Advanced Erlotinib-Responsive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Nathan A.; Fu, Pingfu; Saad, Shumaila; Gadgeel, Shirish; Otterson, Gregory A.; Mekhail, Tarek; Snell, Michael; Kuebler, J. Philip; Sharma, Neelesh

    2015-01-01

    Background. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is clearly beneficial in patients with advanced EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, acquired resistance develops uniformly and the benefit of continuation of EGFR TKI therapy beyond progression remains unclear. Materials and Methods. This was a randomized phase II study of chemotherapy (arm A: pemetrexed or docetaxel) versus chemotherapy plus erlotinib (ERL) (arm B) in patients with progressive NSCLC following clinical benefit from erlotinib. In arm B, chemotherapy was given with erlotinib at an oral daily dose of 150 mg on days 2–19 of each cycle to minimize negative pharmacodynamic interactions. The primary endpoint was that continuation of erlotinib in this patient population could extend progression-free survival (PFS) by 50%. Results. A total of 46 patients were randomized (arm A: 24; arm B: 22). Patient characteristics were well balanced except there were more female patients in arm A (p = .075). The median PFS of patients in arm A was 5.5 months and for those in arm B, 4.4 months (p = .699). The response rates were 13% and 16% in arms A and B, respectively (p = .79). EGFR status data were available for 39 of the 46 patients and no significant difference in PFS was seen for continuing ERL beyond progression in mutation-positive patients. Substantially more toxicity was seen in arm B than arm A. Conclusion. There was added toxicity but no benefit with the continuation of ERL beyond progression along with chemotherapy as compared with chemotherapy alone. Implications for Practice: The benefits of continuing erlotinib upon progression alongside conventional chemotherapy are unclear. This randomized phase II study, initiated prior to the establishment of routine epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing, addressed this clinically relevant issue through randomizing patients with prior clinical benefit from erlotinib (thereby enriching

  3. Therapeutic Advances and Future Prospects in Progressive Forms of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Afsaneh; Okuda, Darin T; Stüve, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Identifying effective therapies for the treatment of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) is a highly relevant priority and one of the greatest challenges for the global MS community. Better understanding of the mechanisms involved in progression of the disease, novel trial designs, drug repurposing strategies, and new models of collaboration may assist in identifying effective therapies. In this review, we discuss various therapies under study in phase II or III trials, including antioxidants (idebenone); tyrosine kinase inhibitors (masitinib); sphingosine receptor modulators (siponimod); monoclonal antibodies (anti-leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain containing neurite outgrowth inhibitor receptor-interacting protein-1, natalizumab, ocrelizumab, intrathecal rituximab); hematopoetic stem cell therapy; statins and other possible neuroprotective agents (amiloride, riluzole, fluoxetine, oxcarbazepine); lithium; phosphodiesterase inhibitors (ibudilast); hormone-based therapies (adrenocorticotrophic hormone and erythropoietin); T-cell receptor peptide vaccine (NeuroVax); autologous T-cell immunotherapy (Tcelna); MIS416 (a microparticulate immune response modifier); dopamine antagonists (domperidone); and nutritional supplements, including lipoic acid, biotin, and sunphenon epigallocatechin-3-gallate (green tea extract). Given ongoing and planned clinical trial initiatives, and the largest ever focus of the global research community on progressive MS, future prospects for developing targeted therapeutics aimed at reducing disability in progressive forms of MS appear promising.

  4. Monitoring Progress toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Following a 2011 report by the National Research Council (NRC) on successful K-12 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Congress asked the National Science Foundation to identify methods for tracking progress toward the report's recommendations. In response, the NRC convened the Committee on an Evaluation Framework…

  5. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Covaris E210: DNA shearer used to produce next-gen libraries v) Caliper Sciclone: liquid handling robotic station vi) Autoloader-2: robotic platform...the NGS capabilities funded through the NFGC/TATRC mechanism have been published: 1. Hennon MW, Yendamuri S. Advances in lung cancer surgery . J

  6. Progress and challenges in advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adier, M.; Aguilar, F.; Akutsu, T.; Arain, M. A.; Ando, M.; Anghinolfi, L.; Antonini, P.; Aso, Y.; Barr, B. W.; Barsotti, L.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bellon, L.; Bertolini, A.; Blair, C.; Blom, M. R.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Brown, D.; Buchler, B. C.; Bulten, H. J.; Cagnoli, G.; Canepa, M.; Carbone, L.; Cesarini, E.; Champagnon, B.; Chen, D.; Chincarini, A.; Chtanov, A.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Ciani, G.; Coccia, E.; Conte, A.; Cortese, M.; Daloisio, M.; Damjanic, M.; Day, R. A.; De Ligny, D.; Degallaix, J.; Doets, M.; Dolique, V.; Dooley, K.; Dwyer, S.; Evans, M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Farinon, S.; Feldbaum, D.; Flaminio, R.; Forest, D.; Frajuca, C.; Frede, M.; Freise, A.; Fricke, T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Geitner, M.; Gemme, G.; Gleason, J.; Goßler, S.; Gordon, N.; Gräf, C.; Granata, M.; Gras, S.; Gross, M.; Grote, H.; Gustafson, R.; Hanke, M.; Heintze, M.; Hennes, E.; Hild, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Izumi, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kasprzack, M.; Khalaidovski, A.; Kimura, N.; Koike, S.; Kume, T.; Kumeta, A.; Kuroda, K.; Kwee, P.; Lagrange, B.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Leavey, S.; Leonardi, M.; Li, T.; Liu, Z.; Lorenzini, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lumaca, D.; Macarthur, J.; Magalhaes, N. S.; Majorana, E.; Malvezzi, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G.; Marque, J.; Martin, R.; Martynov, D.; Mavalvala, N.; McClelland, D. E.; Meadors, G. D.; Meier, T.; Mermet, A.; Michel, C.; Minenkov, Y.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mudadu, L.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mul, F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Neri, M.; Niwa, Y.; Ohashi, M.; Okada, K.; Oppermann, P.; Pinard, L.; Poeld, J.; Prato, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Puncken, O.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Reitze, D. H.; Risson, P.; Rocchi, A.; Saito, N.; Saito, Y.; Sakakibara, Y.; Sassolas, B.; Schimmel, A.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Sequino, V.; Serra, E.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shoda, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shibata, K.; Sigg, D.; Smith-Lefebvre, N.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stefszky, M. S.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Suzuki, T.; Takahashi, R.; Tanner, D. B.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Tokoku, C.; Tsubono, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Ueda, S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vorvick, C.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Wade, A.; Ward, R.; Wessels, P.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Yamamoto, K.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    The Amaldi 10 Parallel Session C3 on Advanced Gravitational Wave detectors gave an overview of the status and several specific challenges and solutions relevant to the instruments planned for a mid-decade start of observation. Invited overview talks for the Virgo, LIGO, and KAGRA instruments were complemented by more detailed discussions in presentations and posters of some instrument features and designs.

  7. Advancing Stage 2 Research on Measures for Monitoring Kindergarten Reading Progress.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Nathan H; Soohoo, Michelle M; Wiley, Colby P; Hsiao, Yu-Yu; Estrella, Ivonne; Allee-Smith, Paula J; Yoon, Myeongsun

    2017-01-01

    Although several measures exist for frequently monitoring early reading progress, little research has specifically investigated their technical properties when administered on a frequent basis with kindergarten students. In this study, kindergarten students ( N = 137) of whom the majority was receiving supplemental intervention for reading skills were monitored using Letter Sound Fluency, Phoneme Segmentation Fluency, Word Reading Fluency, Nonsense Word Fluency, Highly Decodable Passages, and Spelling on a biweekly basis between February and May. Acceptable reliability was observed for all measures. Analyses of slope validity using latent growth models, latent change score models, and slope differences according to level of year-end achievement indicated that the relation of slope to overall reading skills varied across the measures. A suggested approach to kindergarten students' reading progress is offered that includes Letter Sound Fluency and a measure of word-reading skills to provide a comprehensive picture of student growth toward important year-end reading outcomes.

  8. Progress in the Development of Direct Osmotic Concentration Wastewater Recovery Process for Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cath, Tzahi Y.; Adams, Dean V.; Childress, Amy; Gormly, Sherwin; Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Direct osmotic concentration (DOC) has been identified as a high potential technology for recycling of wastewater to drinking water in advanced life support (ALS) systems. As a result the DOC process has been selected for a NASA Rapid Technology Development Team (RTDT) effort. The existing prototype system has been developed to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3. The current project focuses on advancing the development of this technology from TRL 3 to TRL 6 (appropriate for human rated testing). A new prototype of a DOC system is been designed and fabricated that addresses the deficiencies encountered during the testing of the original system and allowing the new prototype to achieve TRL 6. Background information is provided about the technologies investigated and their capabilities, results from preliminary tests, and the milestones plan and activities for the RTDT program intended to develop a second generation prototype of the DOC system.

  9. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  10. Advanced particle filter. Technical progress report No. 19, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Tidd advanced particle filtration (APF) test runs 25 through 34 were completed during the first quarter of 1995. All Tidd testing was completed with the conclusion of APF test run 34 on 3/30/95. The Westinghouse activities supporting the APF operation during this quarter included processing of test data and participating in one APF borescope inspection. Data is included on the filter operation.

  11. [Research progress on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome with mandibular advancement device].

    PubMed

    Li, De-hong; Yang, Xiang-hong; Guo, Tian-wen

    2010-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterized by obstruction of upper airway and respiratory disturbance, excessive daytime sleepiness and tiredness.The possible causes are obesity, hypertension, and upper airway malformations,etc. The location and degree of upper airway structure narrowing in patients have been investigated in many ways, such as X-ray, multi-slices spiral computed tomography, etc. With multi-planar reconstruction technique,3-dimensional construction of upper airway can be established which shows the delicate changes of the upper airway structure. Mandibular advancement device is known as an effective treatment on mild and moderate OSAHS. By advancing the mandible forward, it can increase the space of upper airway, especially the oropharyngeal space. This paper reviewed the methods of investigating on OSAHS and the change of upper airway structure in OSAHS patients treated with mandibular advancement device. Supported by Combined Research Fund of Bureau of Health, Yunan Province and Kunming Medical College(Grant No.2009CD205).

  12. Progress in the treatment of locally advanced clinically resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-12-01

    There have been significant developments in the adjuvant treatment of locally advanced clinically resectable (T3 and/or N+) rectal cancer. Postoperative systemic chemotherapy plus concurrent pelvic irradiation (chemoradiation) significantly improves local control and survival compared with surgery alone. The German Rectal Cancer Trial confirmed that when chemoradiation is delivered preoperatively there is a significant decrease in acute and late toxicity and a corresponding increase in local control and sphincter preservation. Despite these advances, controversies remain. Among these controversies are the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery after chemoradiation can be modified based on tumor response. Are there more accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers to help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes with the goal of reducing the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve outcome and modify the need for pelvic irradiation? This review examines the advances in chemoradiation as well as addresses these and other opportunities for improvement.

  13. Progress toward a Semantic eScience Framework; building on advanced cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, D. L.; Fox, P. A.; West, P.; Rozell, E.; Zednik, S.; Chang, C.

    2010-12-01

    The configurable and extensible semantic eScience framework (SESF) has begun development and implementation of several semantic application components. Extensions and improvements to several ontologies have been made based on distinct interdisciplinary use cases ranging from solar physics, to biologicl and chemical oceanography. Importantly, these semantic representations mediate access to a diverse set of existing and emerging cyberinfrastructure. Among the advances are the population of triple stores with web accessible query services. A triple store is akin to a relational data store where the basic stored unit is a subject-predicate-object tuple. Access via a query is provided by the W3 Recommendation language specification SPARQL. Upon this middle tier of semantic cyberinfrastructure, we have developed several forms of semantic faceted search, including provenance-awareness. We report on the rapid advances in semantic technologies and tools and how we are sustaining the software path for the required technical advances as well as the ontology improvements and increased functionality of the semantic applications including how they are integrated into web-based portals (e.g. Drupal) and web services. Lastly, we indicate future work direction and opportunities for collaboration.

  14. Advances in Measurement for Universal Screening and Individual Progress Monitoring of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Carta, Judith J.; McConnell, Scott

    2011-01-01

    In the last two and half decades, much has been learned about conceptualizing and developing measures for use by practitioners designed to inform their intervention decision making, such as when a child would benefit from receiving additional instructional support (universal screening) and whether the child is responding positively to the…

  15. FY 2014 Annual Progress Report - Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  16. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  17. FY2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2012-01-31

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  18. FY2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  19. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q98.

  20. Rechargeable Zn-air batteries: Progress in electrolyte development and cell configuration advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Ivey, D. G.; Xie, Z.; Qu, W.

    2015-06-01

    Zn-air batteries, which are cost-effective and have high energy density, are promising energy storage devices for renewable energy and power sources for electric transportation. Nevertheless, limited charge and discharge cycles and low round-trip efficiency have long been barriers preventing the large-scale deployment of Zn-air batteries in the marketplace. Technology advancements for each battery component and the whole battery/cell assembly are being pursued, with some key milestones reached during the past 20 years. As an example, commercial Zn-air battery products with long lifetimes and high energy efficiencies are being considered for grid-scale energy storage and for automotive markets. In this review, we present our perspectives on improvements in Zn-air battery technology through the exploration and utilization of different electrolyte systems. Recent studies ranging from aqueous electrolytes to nonaqueous electrolytes, including solid polymer electrolytes and ionic liquids, as well as hybrid electrolyte systems adopted in Zn-air batteries have been evaluated. Understanding the benefits and drawbacks of each electrolyte, as well as the fundamental electrochemistry of Zn and air electrodes in different electrolytes, are the focus of this paper. Further consideration is given to detailed Zn-air battery configurations that have been studied and applied in commercial or nearing commercial products, with the purpose of exposing state-of-the-art technology innovations and providing insights into future advancements.

  1. Advanced biomass research program. Annual report for 1987. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    These results are from an interdisciplinary program researching plant growth and bioconversion processes for enhancing methane from biomass. Modern molecular and cellular biology approaches are being used to characterize the genes and to develop methods for accomplishing transformations to improve biomass quality by regulating plant chemicals. Quality is being emphasized since quantities of 25 Mg/ha can be sustained for five years and conditions for higher yields of some grasses were identified. Breeding has succeeded in the development of hexaploids that produce seeds, and vegetative propagation from tissue cultures for asexual species. Gel seeding of tissue culture derived plantlets inoculated with mycrohizal to improve survivability has shown promise. Biological methane potential assays have revealed the effects of harvesting frequency, storage and the proportion of plant parts on methane yields. Non-hydrolytical depolymerization of polypectate and hydrolytic degradation of cellulose occur more rapidly at near neutral pH's. A gene encoding for the xylan-degrading enzymes was isolated. These enzymes are repressed by glucose. Kinetic modeling of these reactions is progressing. Methods of describing the microbial community structure in digesters are being developed and used to monitor digester health and performance. Polyclonal antibodies for 9 methanogenic bacteria were developed, propionate and butyrate inhibited dissimilation of large organic polymers, the cellular location of key enzyme were revealed and cellulolytic bacteria were found to attack cells from inside the lumen. Controls of formate production and conversion to gas were identified and the genes for the hydrogenase enzymes in the conversions were cloned. System analysis allows the authors to assess the impact of research progress on cost factors. Sixty scientific papers reporting program results were published in 1987.

  2. Advancement of flash hydrogasification. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, A.Y.

    1984-06-25

    This first quarterly report documents technical progress during the period 31 December 1983 through 30 March 1984. The technical effort is 17 months in duration and is divided into two major technical tasks: Task VII, Hardware Fabrication and PDU Modifications, and Task VIII, Performance Testing. The design of test hardware and process development unit modifications had been previously completed as part of Task VI of the current contract. Task VII involves the fabrication of test hardware and modification of an existing 1-ton/h hydroliquefaction PDU at Rockwell's facilities for use as a hydrogasifier test facility. During this report period, fabrication of the test hardware and modifications to the PDU were initiated. Test hardware fabrication is now approximately 80% complete and should be completed by the end of May 1984. PDU modifications are progressing well and should be completed by the end of June 1984. The completed test hardware fabrication and PDU modifications will allow the conduct of short duration (1 to 2 h) hydrogasification tests along with preburner assembly performance evaluation tests in order to fulfill the test program objectives. Separate supplies of hydrogen, oxygen, methane, carbon monoxide, and water (for steam generation) are provided for this purpose. The modified facility is designed to accommodate both 10- and 20-ft-long hydrogasifier reactors so that residence times will be in the range of 2 to 6 s when coal is fed at a nominal 1/2 ton/h into reactors at 1000 psia pressure. Provisions are being made for real-time analysis of the product gases using an on-line gas chromatograph system. Test planning was the only Task VIII effort active during this report period. An initial (preliminary) test matrix has been defined. Preparation of a data analysis plan is underway, and data reduction programs are being programmed. 17 references, 25 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  4. Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

  5. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  6. FY2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2014-02-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) technology area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs.

  7. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    In the Advance Coal Liquefaction Concept Proposal (ACLCP) carbon monoxide (CO) and water have been proposed as the primary reagents in the pretreatment process. The main objective of this project is to develop a methodology for pretreating coal under mild conditions based on a combination of existing processes which have shown great promise in liquefaction, extraction and pyrolysis studies. The aim of this pretreatment process is to partially depolymerise the coal, eliminate oxygen and diminish the propensity for retograde reactions during subsequent liquefaction. The desirable outcome of the CO pretreatment step should be: (1) enhanced liquefaction activity and/or selectivity toward products of higher quality due to chemical modification of the coal structure; (2) cleaner downstream products; (3) overall improvement in operability and process economics.

  8. NASA's First Year Progress with Fuel Cell Advanced Development in Support of the Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, Mark

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), in collaboration with Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and industry partners, is leading a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) advanced development effort to support the vision for Exploration. This effort encompasses the fuel cell portion of the Energy Storage Project under the Exploration Technology Development Program, and is directed at multiple power levels for both primary and regenerative fuel cell systems. The major emphasis is the replacement of active mechanical ancillary components with passive components in order to reduce mass and parasitic power requirements, and to improve system reliability. A dual approach directed at both flow-through and non flow-through PEMFC system technologies is underway. A brief overview of the overall PEMFC project and its constituent tasks will be presented, along with in-depth technical accomplishments for the past year. Future potential technology development paths will also be discussed.

  9. Advanced sensing and control techniques to facilitate semi-autonomous decommissioning. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schalkoff, R.J.; Geist, R.M.; Dawson, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    'This research is intended to advance the technology of semi-autonomous teleoperated robotics as applied to Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) tasks. Specifically, research leading to a prototype dual-manipulator mobile work cell is underway. This cell is supported and enhanced by computer vision, virtual reality and advanced robotics technology. This report summarizes work after approximately 1.5 years of a 3-year project. The autonomous, non-contact creation of a virtual environment from an existing, real environment (virtualization) is an integral part of the workcell functionality. This requires that the virtual world be geometrically correct. To this end, the authors have encountered severe sensitivity in quadric estimation. As a result, alternative procedures for geometric rendering, iterative correction approaches, new calibration methods and associated hardware, and calibration quality examination software have been developed. Following geometric rendering, the authors have focused on improving the color and texture recognition components of the system. In particular, the authors have moved beyond first-order illumination modeling to include higher order diffuse effects. This allows us to combine the surface geometric information, obtained from the laser projection and surface recognition components of the system, with a stereo camera image. Low-level controllers for Puma 560 robotic arms were designed and implemented using QNX. The resulting QNX/PC based low-level robot control system is called QRobot. A high-level trajectory generator and application programming interface (API) as well as a new, flexible robot control API was required. Force/torque sensors and interface hardware have been identified and ordered. A simple 3-D OpenGL-based graphical Puma 560 robot simulator was developed and interfaced with ARCL and RCCL to assist in the development of robot motion programs.'

  10. Mono-2-ethyhexyl phthalate advancing the progression of prostate cancer through activating the hedgehog pathway in LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wang; Jiao, Chen; Jianhui, Wu; Yan, Zhao; Qi, Pan; Xiu, Wang; Zuyue, Sun; Yunhui, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays a critical role in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in male adults. Studies showed that di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) could interference with the Hh pathway. Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), the congener of DBP, is the major plasticizer used in plastic materials that are inevitably exposed by patients with PCa. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate whether mono-2-ethyhexyl phthalate (MEHP, the active metabolite of DEHP) could activate the Hh pathway of LNCaP cells. Results showed that the expression of the critical gene of Hh pathway PTCH and androgen-regulated gene KLK3 was significantly decreased on 3, 6 and 9 days with Hh pathway inhibitor cyclopamine's treatment. MEHP notably up-regulated the expression of PTCH with a dose-response relationship in the presence of cyclopamine, which indicate that MEHP might target on the downstream components of Hh pathway and advance the progression of PCa through activating the Hh pathway.

  11. Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

  12. Iron Levels in Hepatocytes and Portal Tract Cells Predict Progression and Outcome of Patients with Advanced Chronic Hepatitis C1

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, Richard W.; Sterling, Richard K.; Naishadham, Deepa; Stoddard, Anne M.; Rogers, Thomas; Morishima, Chihiro; Morgan, Timothy R.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Iron might influence severity and progression of non-hemochromatotic liver diseases. We assessed the relationships between iron, variants in HFE, and progression and outcomes using data from the HALT-C Trial. We determined whether therapy with pegylated interferon (PegIFN) affects iron variables. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to groups given long-term therapy with PegIFN (n=400) or no therapy (n=413) for 3.5 y and followed for up to 8.7 y (median 6.0 y). Associations between patient characteristics and iron variables, at baseline and over time, were made using Kaplan-Meier analyses, Cox regression models, and repeated measures analysis of covariance. Iron was detected by Prussian blue staining. Results Patients with poor outcomes (increase in Child-Turcotte-Pugh score to ≥ 7, development of ascites, encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, death) had significantly higher baseline scores for stainable iron in hepatocytes and cells in portal tracts than those without outcomes. Staining for iron in portal triads correlated with lobular and total Ishak inflammatory and fibrosis scores (P<0.0001). High baseline levels of iron in triads increased the risk for poor outcome (hazard ratio=1.35, P=0.02). Iron staining decreased in hepatocytes but increased in portal stromal cells over time (P<0.0001). Serum levels of iron and total iron binding capacity decreased significantly over time (P <0.0001), as did serum ferritin (P=0.0003). Long-term therapy with PegIFN did not affect levels of iron staining. Common variants in HFE did not correlate with outcomes, including development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusions Degree of stainable iron in hepatocytes and portal tract cells predicts progression and clinical and histological outcomes of patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C. Long-term therapy with low-dose PegIFN did not improve outcomes or iron variables. PMID:21335007

  13. A Summary on Progress in Materials Development for Advanced Lithium-ion Cells for NASA's Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Vehicles and stand-alone power systems that enable the next generation of human missions to the moon will require energy storage systems that are safer, lighter, and more compact than current state-of-the-art (SOA) aerospace quality lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. NASA is developing advanced Li-ion cells to enable or enhance future human missions to Near Earth Objects, such as asteroids, planets, moons, libration points, and orbiting structures. Advanced, high-performing materials are required to provide component-level performance that can offer the required gains at the integrated cell level. Although there is still a significant amount of work yet to be done, the present state of development activities has resulted in the synthesis of promising materials that approach the ultimate performance goals. This paper on interim progress of the development efforts will present performance of materials and cell components and will elaborate on the challenges of the development activities and proposed strategies to overcome technical issues.

  14. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1994-07-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 3 subtasks which are described: Pyrolysis of n-alkylbenzenes; Thermal decomposition of n-tetradecane in near-critical region; and Re-examining the effects of reactant and inert gas pressure on tetradecane pyrolysis--Effect of cold volume in batch reactor. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, is subtask, Effects of high surface area activated carbon and decalin on thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Screening potential jet fuel stabilizers using the model compound dodecane; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, is subtask, Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels. 25 refs., 64 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. MGMT expression levels predict disease stabilisation, progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanomas treated with DTIC.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Geisler, Jürgen; Lillehaug, Johan R; Lønning, Per Eystein

    2010-07-01

    Metastatic melanoma responds poorly to systemic treatment. We report the results of a prospective single institution study evaluating O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status as a potential predictive and/or prognostic marker among patients treated with dacarbazine (DTIC) 800-1000 mg/m(2) monotherapy administered as a 3-weekly schedule for advanced malignant melanomas. The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Committee. Surgical biopsies from metastatic or loco-regional deposits obtained prior to DTIC treatment were snap-frozen immediately upon removal and stored in liquid nitrogen up to processing. Median time from enrolment to end of follow-up was 67 months. MGMT expression levels evaluated by qRT-PCR correlated significantly to DTIC benefit (CR/PR/SD; p=0.005), time to progression (TTP) (p=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (p=0.003). MGMT expression also correlated to Breslow thickness in the primary tumour (p=0.014). While MGMT promoter hypermethylation correlated to MGMT expression, MGMT promoter hypermethylation did not correlate to treatment benefit, TTP or OS, suggesting that other factors may be critical in determining MGMT expression levels in melanomas. In a Cox proportional regression analysis, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, p<0.001), MGMT expression (p=0.022) and p16(INK4a) expression (p=0.037) independently predicted OS, while TTP correlated to DTIC benefit after 6 weeks only (p=0.001). Our data reveal MGMT expression levels to be associated with disease stabilisation and prognosis in patients receiving DTIC monotherapy for advanced melanoma. The role of MGMT expression as a predictor to DTIC sensitivity versus a general prognostic factor in advanced melanomas warrants further evaluation.

  16. Advanced fuel cell development. Progress Report, April-June 1980. [LiAlO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.D.; Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.; Fraioli, A.V.; Kucera, G.H.; Poeppel, R.B.; Sim, J.W.; Smith, J.L.

    1980-11-01

    Advanced fuel cell research and development activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the period April-June 1980 are described. These efforts have been directed toward understanding and improving components of molten carbonate fuel cells and have included operation of a 10-cm square cell. Studies have continued on the development of electrolyte structures (LiAlO/sub 2/ and Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). This effort is being concentrated on the preparation of sintered LiAl0/sub 2/ as electrolyte support. Tape casting is presently under investigation as a method for producing green bodies to be sintered; this technique may be an improvement over cold pressing, which was used in the past to produce green bodies. The transition temperature for the ..beta..- to ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/ allotropic transformation is being determined using differential thermal analysis. Work is continuing on the development of preoxidized, prelithiated NiO cathodes. Two techniques, one of which is simpler than the other, have been developed to fabricate plates of Li/sub 0/ /sub 05/Ni/sub 0/ /sub 95/O. In addition, electroless nickel plating is being investigated as a means of providing corrosion protection to structural hardware. To improve its cell testing capability, ANL has constructed a device for improved resistance measurements by the current-interruption technique.

  17. A progress report on DOE`s advanced hydropower turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M.J.; Cada, G.F.; Rinehart, B.E.

    1997-06-01

    Recent hydropower research within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has focused on the development of new turbine designs that can produce hydroelectricity without such adverse environmental affects as fish entrainment/impingement or degradation of water quality. In partnership with the hydropower industry, DOE`s advanced turbine program issued a Request for Proposals for conceptual designs in October 1994. Two contracts were awarded for this initial program phase, work on which will be complete this year. A technical advisory committee with representatives from industry, regulatory agencies, and natural resource agencies was also formed to guide the DOE turbine research. The lack of quantitative biological performance criteria was identified by the committee as a critical knowledge gap. To fill this need, a new literature review was completed on the mechanisms of fish mortality during turbine passage (e.g., scrape/strike, shear, press change, etc.), ways that fish behavior affects their location and orientation in turbines, and how these turbine passage stresses can be measured. Thus year, new Laboratory tests will be conducted on fish response to shear, the least-well understood mechanism of stress. Additional testing of conceptual turbine designs depends on the level of federal funding for this program.

  18. Progress in workforce development since 2000: advanced training opportunities in public and community psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Wesley; Pollack, David; Everett, Anita; Thompson, Kenneth S; Ranz, Jules; Primm, Annelle

    2011-07-01

    A crisis in the behavioral health care workforce has drawn considerable attention from consumers, families, advocates, clinical professionals, and system administrators at local, state, and federal levels in the past decade. Its effects have been felt in the recruitment, retention, and performance of psychiatrists in the public sector, where a focus on biological aspects of illness and efforts to cut costs have made it difficult for public psychiatrists to engage meaningfully in leadership, consultation, prevention, and psychosocial interventions. An array of training opportunities has recently been created to meet the needs of community psychiatrists at various stages of their careers, from psychiatrists just beginning their careers to those who have been working as medical directors for several years. This article describes the development of these initiatives and their impact on public psychiatry in four key areas--training of experienced psychiatrists, ensuring retention of psychiatrists in community programs, providing fellowship training, and creating professional identity and pride. Although these programs constitute only initial steps, opportunities for psychiatrists to obtain advanced training in community psychiatry are much greater now than they were ten years ago. These initiatives will enhance the professional identity of community psychiatrists and provide a solid foundation for future development of public service psychiatry in the behavioral health workforce.

  19. DOE/NE robotics for advanced reactors. Bimonthly progress report, October--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document details activities during this reporting period. The Michigan group has developed, built, and tested a general purpose interface circuit for DC motors and encoders. This interface is based on an advanced microchip, the HCTL 1100 manufactured by Hewlett Packard. The HCTL 1100 can be programmed by a host computer in real-time, allowing sophisticated motion control for DC motors. At the University of Florida, work on modeling the details of the seismic isolators and the jack mechanism has been completed. A separate 3D solid view of the seismic isolator floor, with the full set of isolators shown in detail, has been constructed within IGRIP. ORNL led the robotics team at the ALMR review meeting. Discussions were held with General Electric (GE) engineers and contractors on the robotic needs for the ALMR program. The Tennessee group has completed geometric modeling of the Andros Mark VI mobile platform with two fixed tracks and for articulated tracks, the give degree-of-freedom manipulator and its end-effector, and two cameras. A graphical control of panel was developed which allow the user to operate the simulated robot. The University of Texas team visited ORNL to complete the implementation of computed-torque controller on the CESARm manipulator. This controller was previously developed and computer simulations were carried out specifically for the CESARm robot.

  20. Progress towards top-up mode operations at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, L.; Borland, M.

    1999-10-26

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV, third-generation synchrotron radiation source. To provide a more stable beam for users, in September 1998 the authors began commissioning a new operating mode called top-up. In this mode, the beam current does not decay but is maintained at a high level using frequent injection, while photon shutters are open and photon beams are delivered to users. The exhaustive analysis for top-up safety will be reviewed as well as the hardware and software required for top-up operation. Operational experience so far includes testing aspects of top-up injection, delivering beam to X-ray users for a few hours with fractional current stability of 0.001, and routinely providing beam to users by refilling the ring to 100 mA every 12 hours with shutters open. Top-up performance issues encountered are short-lived orbit and emittance transients during the injection event, which appear in user experiments as X-ray beam brightness dips. Planned system modifications to reduce these beam transients are described. The main operational issue left for continuous top-up injection will then be sharing the injector system with other operations.

  1. Second generation advanced reburning for high efficiency NO(x) control. Progress report, 1196

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, V.M.; Maly, P.M.

    1996-10-01

    This project is designed to develop a family of novel NO{sub x} control technologies, called Second Generation Advanced Reburning (SGAR), which has the potential to achieve 90+% NO{sub x} control in coal fired boilers at a significantly lower cost than Selective Catalytic Reduction. Phase I consists of six tasks: Task 1.1 Project Coordination and Reporting/Deliverables; Task 1.2 Kinetics of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} Reactions with Flue Gas Components; Task 1.3 O.l x lO{sup 6}Btu/hr Optimization Studies; Task 1.4 1.0 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr Process Development Tests; Task 1.5 Mechanism Development and Modeling; and Task 1. 6 Design Methodology and Application. The fourth reporting period (July 1 - September 30, 1996) included both experimental and modeling activities. The bench scale CTT experiments (Task 1.3) were completed. The 1 MMBtu/hr Boiler Simulator Facility (BSF) was prepared for the test program and experiments were conducted using natural gas (NG) as main and reburing fuels (Task 1.4). A few preliminary tests were also performed with coal firing. The results have been reduced and are reported. Initial experimental data were obtained on reactions of sodium promoters (Task 1.2) at the University of Texas in Austin (UT). The kinetic model was extended to include reactions of sulfur and sodium (Task 1.5).

  2. Quantitative evaluation of haze formation of koji and progression of internal haze by drying of koji during koji making.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazunari; Gomi, Katsuya; Kariyama, Masahiro; Miyake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-31

    The construction of an experimental system that can mimic koji making in the manufacturing setting of a sake brewery is initially required for the quantitative evaluation of mycelia grown on/in koji pellets (haze formation). Koji making with rice was investigated with a solid-state fermentation (SSF) system using a non-airflow box (NAB), which produced uniform conditions in the culture substrate with high reproducibility and allowed for the control of favorable conditions in the substrate during culture. The SSF system using NAB accurately reproduced koji making in a manufacturing setting. To evaluate haze formation during koji making, surfaces and cross sections of koji pellets obtained from koji making tests were observed using a digital microscope. Image analysis was used to distinguish between haze and non-haze sections of koji pellets, enabling the evaluation of haze formation in a batch by measuring the haze rate of a specific number of koji pellets. This method allowed us to obtain continuous and quantitative data on the time course of haze formation. Moreover, drying koji during the late stage of koji making was revealed to cause further penetration of mycelia into koji pellets (internal haze). The koji making test with the SSF system using NAB and quantitative evaluation of haze formation in a batch by image analysis is a useful method for understanding the relations between haze formation and koji making conditions.

  3. Remote Sensing of Aerosols from Satellites: Why Has It Been Do Difficult to Quantify Aerosol-Cloud Interactions for Climate Assessment, and How Can We Make Progress?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    The organizers of the National Academy of Sciences Arthur M. Sackler Colloquia Series on Improving Our Fundamental Understanding of the Role of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the Climate System would like to post Ralph Kahn's presentation entitled Remote Sensing of Aerosols from Satellites: Why has it been so difficult to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions for climate assessment, and how can we make progress? to their public website.

  4. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1994-07-01

    Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

  5. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Assessing Competing Demands and Charting a Course: A Phenomenological Study of Advanced Placement U.S. History Teachers' Decision Making and Course Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Kerry D.

    2014-01-01

    Florida has experienced some of the greatest growth of Advanced Placement (AP) programs in recent years and student scores on the AP exams have evolved into a highly significant metric in evaluating student proficiency and teacher and school effectiveness. Despite this growth, it is not well known how AP teachers make decisions about the content…

  7. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, August 1992--October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Bortiatynski, J.; Burgess, C.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Lai, W.C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Parfitt, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Yoon, E.

    1993-02-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five borad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and miocrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Pyrolysis of four isomers of butylbenzene was investigated in static microautoclave reactors at 450{degrees}C under 0.69 MPa of UHP N{sub 2}. Thee rates of disappearance of substrates were found to depend upon the bonding energy of C{alpha}-C{beta} bond in the side chain in the initial period of pyrolysis reactions. Possible catalytic effects of metal surfaces on thermal degradation and deposit formation at temperatures >400{degrees}C have been studied. Carbon deposition depends on the composition of the metal surfaces, and also depends on the chemical compositions of the reactants. Thermal stressing of JP-8 was conducted in the presence of alumina, carbonaceous deposits recovered from earlier stressing experiments, activated carbon, carbon black, and graphite. The addition of different solid carbons during thermal stressing leads to different reaction mechanisms. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, along with {sup 13}C-labeling techniques, have been used to examine the thermal stability of a jet fuel sample mixed with 5% benzyl alcohol. Several heterometallic complexes consisting of two transition metals and sulfur in a single molecule were synthesized and tested as precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous and Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coals.

  8. Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high moisture, low rank coals to a high quality, low sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal process enhances low rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,500 to 9,000 Btu/lb, by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. The 45 ton per hour unit is located adjacent to a unit train load out facility at Western Energy Company`s Rosebud coal mine near Colstrip, Montana. The demonstration plant is sized at about one-tenth the projected throughput of a multiple processing train commercial facility. During this report period the primary focus has been to continue the operation of the demonstration facility. Production has been going to area power plants. Modifications and maintenance work was also performed this quarter.

  9. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1993-10-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Some of our accomplishments and findings are: The product distribution and reaction mechanisms for pyrolysis of alkylcyclohexanes at 450{degree}C have been investigated in detail. In this report we present results of pyrolysis of cyclohexane and a variety of alkylcyclohexanes in nitrogen atmospheres, along with pseudo-first order rate constants, and possible reaction mechanisms for the origin of major pyrolysis products are presented. Addition of PX-21 activated carbon effectively stops the formation of carbonaceous solids on reactor walls during thermal stressing of JPTS. A review of physical and chemical interactions in supercritical fluids has been completed. Work has begun on thermal stability studies of a second generation of fuel additives, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-l-naphthol, 9,10-phenanthrenediol, phthalan, and 1,2-benzenedimethanol, and with careful selection of the feedstock, it is possible to achieve 85--95% conversion of coal to liquids, with 40--50% of the dichloromethane-soluble products being naphthalenes. (Further hydrogenation of the naphthalenes should produce the desired highly stable decalins.)

  10. The Use of Individual Growth and Developmental Indicators for Progress Monitoring and Intervention Decision Making in Early Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Dale; Carta, Judith J.; Greenwood, Charles R.; Buzhardt, Joseph F.

    2008-01-01

    Progress monitoring tools have been shown to be essential elements in current approaches to intervention problem-solving models. Such tools have been valuable not only in marking individual children's level of performance relative to peers but also in measuring change in skill level in a way that can be attributed to intervention and development.…

  11. Cell therapy companies make strong progress from October 2012 to March 2013 amid mixed stock market sentiment.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chris; Mason, Julian; Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Bonfiglio, Gregory A; Reeve, Brock C

    2013-06-06

    During Q4 2012 and Q1 2013, the cell therapy industry made strong progress in translation and commercialization. Continued development of the companies included in a dedicated stock market index suggests emergence of this industry as a distinct healthcare sector.

  12. REDUCTION IN HEPATIC INFLAMMATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH LESS FIBROSIS PROGRESSION AND FEWER CLINICAL OUTCOMES IN ADVANCED HEPATITIS C

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Chihiro; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Lindsay, Karen L; Szabo, Gyongyi; Everson, Gregory T.; Lok, Anna S.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Ghany, Marc G.; Naishadham, Deepa; Morgan, Timothy R.; Wright, Elizabeth C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective During the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis Trial, 3.5 years of maintenance peginterferon-alfa-2a therapy did not affect liver fibrosis progression or clinical outcomes among 1,050 prior interferon nonresponders with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. We investigated whether reduced hepatic inflammation was associated with clinical benefit in 834 patients with a baseline and follow-up biopsy 1.5 years after randomization to peginterferon or observation. Methods Relationships between change in hepatic inflammation (Ishak HAI) and serum ALT, fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes after randomization, and HCV RNA decline before and after randomization were evaluated. Histologic change was defined as a ≥2-point difference in HAI or Ishak fibrosis score between biopsies. Results Among 657 patients who received full-dose peginterferon/ribavirin “lead-in” therapy before randomization, year-1.5 HAI improvement was associated with lead-in HCV RNA suppression in both randomized treated (P <0.0001) and control (P = 0.0001) groups, even in the presence of recurrent viremia. This relationship persisted at year 3.5 in both treated (P = 0.001) and control (P = 0.01) groups. Among 834 patients followed for a median of 6 years, fewer clinical outcomes occurred in patients with improved HAI at year 1.5 compared to those without such improvement in both treated (P = 0.03) and control (P = 0.05) groups. Among patients with Ishak 3–4 fibrosis at baseline, those with improved HAI at year 1.5 had less fibrosis progression at year 1.5 in both treated (P = 0.0003) and control (P = 0.02) groups. Conclusion Reduced hepatic inflammation (measured 1.5 and 3.5 years after randomization) was associated with profound virological suppression during lead-in treatment with full-dose peginterferon/ribavirin and with decreased fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes, independent of randomized treatment. PMID:22688849

  13. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and pattern

  14. Laser treatment of drusen to prevent progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Virgili, Gianni; Michelessi, Manuele; Parodi, Maurizio B; Bacherini, Daniela; Evans, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Background Drusen are amorphous yellowish deposits beneath the sensory retina. People with drusen, particularly large drusen, are at higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most common complication in AMD is choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), the growth of new blood vessels in the centre of the macula. The risk of CNV is higher among people who are already affected by CNV in one eye. It has been observed clinically that laser photocoagulation of drusen leads to their disappearance and may prevent the occurrence of advanced disease (CNV or geographic atrophy) associated with visual loss. Objectives To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of laser photocoagulation of drusen in AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 August 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment of drusen in AMD in which laser treatment had been compared with no intervention or sham treatment. Two types of trials were included. Some trials studied one eye of each participant (unilateral studies); other studies recruited participants with bilateral drusen and randomised one eye to photocoagulation or control and the fellow eye to the other group. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently

  15. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Several promising leads that have developed during the course of this program are being evaluated in this phase of the study. These have been selected from those that can be economically evaluated within the time constraints of the program schedule. A detailed plan for evaluating these approaches was formulated. The individual steps that will be evaluated are: (1) Dewaxing of the distillate recycle solvent stream treating either 25% or 100% of the stream. (2) Hydrotreating the dewaxed distillate streams in a downflow fixed bed reactor. (3) Agglomerating the coal using both the 25% and 100% dewaxed-hydrotreated distillate streams. (4) Liquefying the as-received coal and the agglomerated coals using two different Mo-promoted hematite particulate catalysts. (5) Liquefying two different Mo-Fe impregnated coals. (6) Liquefying the two off-agglomerated, Mo-Fe impregnated coals. The effect of the presence of molybdenum in the 1050{degrees}F{sup +} will be determined by making comparisons in both Mo-containing and Mo-free full range V-131B process solvent. The solvents that will be used in this study are the full-range reconstituted Mo-containing V-131B from Run 262E and a Mo-free V-131B made up of 1050{degrees}F{sup +} bottoms from Run 258K V-131B and V-1074 distillate from Run 262E. The series of experiments are described and a chart has been prepared summarizing this series of runs. The plan requires significant exchange of samples between the different participants in the program with the schedule timed for providing the data for economic evaluation within the next quarterly reporting period.

  16. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  17. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability and Systems Engineering Capability Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikins, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps. Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  18. Using the Advanced Progressive Matrices (Set I) to Assess Fluid Ability in a Short Time Frame: An Item Response Theory-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiesi, Francesca; Ciancaleoni, Matteo; Galli, Silvia; Primi, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    This article is aimed at evaluating the possibility that Set I of the Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM-Set I) can be employed to assess fluid ability in a short time frame. The APM-Set I was administered to a sample of 1,389 primary and secondary school students. Confirmatory factor analysis attested to the unidimensionality of the scale. Item…

  19. Assessing Progress toward Accreditation Related Objectives: Evidence regarding the Use of Self-Efficacy as an Outcome in the Advanced Concentration Research Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Rosenberg, Gary; Onghena, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Assessing the achievement of social work educational outcomes is a requirement of the Council on Social Work Education's Educational Policy and Standards (EPAS). The Evaluation Self-Efficacy Scale (ESE) was created to assess student progress in advanced concentration courses focused on evaluation and thereby provide data regarding…

  20. The Quest for Item Types Based on Information Processing: An Analysis of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, with a Consideration of Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigneau, Francois; Bors, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Various taxonomies of Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) items have been proposed in the literature to account for performance on the test. In the present article, three such taxonomies based on information processing, namely Carpenter, Just and Shell's [Carpenter, P.A., Just, M.A., & Shell, P., (1990). What one intelligence test…

  1. Lenvatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of radioiodine refractory, advanced, and progressive thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Loredana; Pieruzzi, Letizia; Biagini, Agnese; Sabini, Elena; Valerio, Laura; Giani, Carlotta; Passannanti, Paolo; Pontillo-Contillo, Benedetta; Battaglia, Valentina; Mazzeo, Salvatore; Molinaro, Eleonora; Elisei, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Lenvatinib is a small oral molecule able to inhibit three of the extracellular and intracellular molecules involved in the modulation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1–3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1–4, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Since it is also able to inhibit the REarranged during Transfection oncogene and the protooncogene c-KIT, this drug can also be used to control tumor cell proliferation. The maximum tolerated dose, as demonstrated in Phase I studies, is 25 mg daily. The drug is rapidly absorbed with maximum concentrations achieved within 3 and 5 hours after administration in fasting and nonfasting treated patients, respectively. The most common adverse events, reported in Phase I study and confirmed in the subsequent Phase II and III studies, are hypertension, proteinuria, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, and stomatitis. In Phase I studies, efficacy of lenvatinib in solid tumors was demonstrated, and these encouraging results have led to the development of a Phase II study using lenvatinib in advance radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCs) patients. Since an overall response rate of 50% was reported, this study also confirmed the efficacy of lenvatinib in DTCs patients with an acceptable toxicity profile. Recently, a Phase III study in patients with DTCs (SELECT study) demonstrated the lenvatinib efficacy in prolonging progression-free survival with respect to the placebo (18.3 vs 3.6 months; P<0.001). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the overall survival of the entire group, this result was observed when the analysis was restricted to both the follicular histotype and the group of senior patients (>65 years). The study confirmed that the most common side effects of this drug are hypertension, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, nausea, and proteinuria. In this review, we report the results of

  2. Long-term outcome of enzyme-replacement therapy in advanced Fabry disease: evidence for disease progression towards serious complications

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, F; Niemann, M; Störk, S; Breunig, F; Beer, M; Sommer, C; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Wanner, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective The long-term effects of enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) in Fabry disease are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ERT in patients with advanced Fabry disease affects progression towards ‘hard’ clinical end-points in comparison with the natural course of the disease. Methods A total of 40 patients with genetically proven Fabry disease (mean age 40 ± 9 years; n = 9 women) were treated prospectively with ERT for 6 years. In addition, 40 subjects from the Fabry Registry, matched for age, sex, chronic kidney disease stage and previous transient ischaemic attack (TIA), served as a comparison group. The main outcome was a composite of stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Secondary outcomes included changes in myocardial left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and replacement fibrosis, change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), new TIA and change in neuropathic pain. Results During a median follow-up of 6.0 years (bottom and top quartiles: 5.1, 7.2), 15 events occurred in 13 patients (n = 7 deaths, n = 4 cases of ESRD and n = 4 strokes). Sudden death occurred (n = 6) only in patients with documented ventricular tachycardia and myocardial replacement fibrosis. The annual progression of myocardial LV fibrosis in the entire cohort was 0.6 ± 0.7%. As a result, posterior end-diastolic wall thinning was observed (baseline, 13.2 ± 2.0 mm; follow-up, 11.4 ± 2.1 mm; P < 0.01). GFR decreased by 2.3 ± 4.6 mL min−1 per year. Three patients experienced a TIA. The major clinical symptom was neuropathic pain (n = 37), and this symptom improved in 25 patients. The event rate was not different between the ERT group and the untreated (natural history) group of the Fabry Registry. Conclusion Despite ERT, clinically meaningful events including sudden cardiac death continue to develop in patients with advanced Fabry disease. PMID:23586858

  3. Lenvatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of radioiodine refractory, advanced, and progressive thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Loredana; Pieruzzi, Letizia; Biagini, Agnese; Sabini, Elena; Valerio, Laura; Giani, Carlotta; Passannanti, Paolo; Pontillo-Contillo, Benedetta; Battaglia, Valentina; Mazzeo, Salvatore; Molinaro, Eleonora; Elisei, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Lenvatinib is a small oral molecule able to inhibit three of the extracellular and intracellular molecules involved in the modulation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-4, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Since it is also able to inhibit the REarranged during Transfection oncogene and the protooncogene c-KIT, this drug can also be used to control tumor cell proliferation. The maximum tolerated dose, as demonstrated in Phase I studies, is 25 mg daily. The drug is rapidly absorbed with maximum concentrations achieved within 3 and 5 hours after administration in fasting and nonfasting treated patients, respectively. The most common adverse events, reported in Phase I study and confirmed in the subsequent Phase II and III studies, are hypertension, proteinuria, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, and stomatitis. In Phase I studies, efficacy of lenvatinib in solid tumors was demonstrated, and these encouraging results have led to the development of a Phase II study using lenvatinib in advance radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCs) patients. Since an overall response rate of 50% was reported, this study also confirmed the efficacy of lenvatinib in DTCs patients with an acceptable toxicity profile. Recently, a Phase III study in patients with DTCs (SELECT study) demonstrated the lenvatinib efficacy in prolonging progression-free survival with respect to the placebo (18.3 vs 3.6 months; P<0.001). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the overall survival of the entire group, this result was observed when the analysis was restricted to both the follicular histotype and the group of senior patients (>65 years). The study confirmed that the most common side effects of this drug are hypertension, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, nausea, and proteinuria. In this review, we report the results of the

  4. Incremental Innovation and Progress in Advanced Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: Current Status and Future Impact of Treatment.

    PubMed

    Langer, Corey J; Obasaju, Coleman; Bunn, Paul; Bonomi, Philip; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R; Kim, Edward S; Natale, Ronald B; Novello, Silvia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pérol, Maurice; Reck, Martin; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Reynolds, Craig H; Socinski, Mark A; Spigel, David R; Wakelee, Heather; Mayo, Carlos; Thatcher, Nick

    2016-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (sqCLC) is an aggressive form of cancer that poses many therapeutic challenges. Patients tend to be older, present at a later stage, and have a high incidence of comorbidities, which can compromise treatment delivery and exacerbate toxicity. In addition, certain agents routinely available for nonsquamous cell histologic subtypes, such as bevacizumab and pemetrexed, are contraindicated or lack efficacy in sqCLC. Therapeutic progress has been much slower for advanced sqCLC, with median survival times of approximately 9 to 11 months in most studies. Herein, we discuss the current therapeutic landscape for patients with sqCLC versus with nonsquamous NSCLC. Current evidence indicates that new targeted treatments, notably monoclonal antibodies such as ramucirumab and necitumumab, and immunotherapies such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab can provide survival prolongation, although the benefits are still relatively modest. These incremental improvements, all realized since 2012, in aggregate, will very likely have a clinically meaningful impact for patients with sqCLC. We also discuss recent genomic studies of sqCLC that have identified potentially actionable molecular targets, as well as the relevant targeted agents in clinical development. Finally, we discuss the magnitude of survival benefit and the risk-to-benefit ratio that would prove clinically meaningful in this underserved patient population with unmet needs.

  5. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1996 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

  6. Progression Rate From Intermediate to Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration Is Correlated With the Number of Risk Alleles at the CFH Locus

    PubMed Central

    Sardell, Rebecca J.; Persad, Patrice J.; Pan, Samuel S.; Whitehead, Patrice; Adams, Larry D.; Laux, Reneé A.; Fortun, Jorge A.; Brantley, Milam A.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Agarwal, Anita; Haines, Jonathan L.; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Progression rate of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) varies substantially, yet its association with genetic variation has not been widely examined. Methods We tested whether progression rate from intermediate AMD to geographic atrophy (GA) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was correlated with genotype at seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the four genes most strongly associated with risk of advanced AMD. Cox proportional hazards survival models examined the association between progression time and SNP genotype while adjusting for age and sex and accounting for variable follow-up time, right censored data, and repeated measures (left and right eyes). Results Progression rate varied with the number of risk alleles at the CFH:rs10737680 but not the CFH:rs1061170 (Y402H) SNP; individuals with two risk alleles progressed faster than those with one allele (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08–2.40, P < 0.02, n = 547 eyes), although this was not significant after Bonferroni correction. This signal was likely driven by an association at the correlated protective variant, CFH:rs6677604, which tags the CFHR1-3 deletion; individuals with at least one protective allele progressed more slowly. Considering GA and CNV separately showed that the effect of CFH:rs10737680 was stronger for progression to CNV. Conclusions Results support previous findings that AMD progression rate is influenced by CFH, and suggest that variants within CFH may have different effects on risk versus progression. However, since CFH:rs10737680 was not significant after Bonferroni correction and explained only a relatively small portion of variation in progression rate beyond that explained by age, we suggest that additional factors contribute to progression. PMID:27832277

  7. Multi-criteria decision making in flood risk management: research progress and the challenge of handling uncertainty and stakeholder participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga de Brito, Mariana; Evers, Mariele

    2016-04-01

    Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods have received much attention from researchers and practitioners for solving flood risk management problems in the last decades due to its capacity to deal with multiple criteria, conflicting objectives as well as the knowledge arising from the participation of several actors. In order to consolidate recent research conducted in this area, this study presents a state-of-the-art literature review of MCDM applications to flood risk management, seeking to provide a better understanding of the current status of how participatory MCDM is being conducted and the way uncertainties are included in the decision-making process. Totally, 128 peer-reviewed papers published from 1995 to June 2015 in 72 different journals were systematically analyzed. Results indicated that the number of flood MCDM publications has exponentially grown during this period, with over 82% of all papers published since 2009. A wide range of application areas was identified, with most papers focusing on ranking alternatives for flood mitigation (22.78% of the total) followed by risk (21.11%) and vulnerability assessment (15%). The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was the most popular MCDM method (42.72%) followed by Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) (13.33%) and Weighted Sum Method (WSM) (12.73%). Although significant improvements have been made over the last decades, shortcomings remain in handling the uncertainty. Only eight papers (6.25%) have conducted uncertainty analysis, suggesting that a general procedure for performing it in MCDM does not yet exist. Researchers have applied the Monte Carlo simulation, Taylor's series error propagation method or assessed the uncertainty in qualitative ways, by describing its main sources or analyzing the stakeholders' degree of confidence. In addition, 35 articles (27.34%) have performed a sensitivity analysis of the criteria weights. Three distinct approaches were

  8. Advanced Placement versus Dual Enrollment: Making the Best Choice for College Selection, Persistence, Early Success, and Time to Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruman, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial amount of research examines the benefits of high school college-credit attainment programs against non-participation. The growth in popularity of these programs, particularly Advanced Placement (AP) and dual enrollment (DE), has them competing against one another for student attention. However, students, schools, and policymakers do…

  9. Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

  10. [ADVANCE: America`s economic Development Venture for Area Neighborhoods, Communities, and Enterprises]. Quarterly progress report -- Year two

    SciTech Connect

    McDavid, R.A.

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable, to be a responsible steward of the Nation`s nuclear weapons, to clean up decommissioned facilities, and to support continued US leadership in science and technology. To effectively utilize and integrate its mission, DOE has created the Regional Environmental Technology and Business Development Office (RETBDO) serving as a Community Reuse Organization, a stakeholder organization, which represents interests and economic concerns of communities surrounding DOE sites that are being closed or reconfigured. RETBDO is a branch office of ADVANCE, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization established in 1994. The mission of RETBDO is to diversify the economy by creating an environment conductive to improve the representation of minorities and small businesses in the region and to assure fair business participation in major environmental decision-making, technology based start-ups, expansion management, and the attractive of new ventures to the Southwest region, including, bu not limited to, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. This report describes the RETBDO program and its implementation.

  11. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 6, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-05-03

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1- March 31, 1996.

  12. Advanced human carotid plaque progression correlates positively with flow shear stress using follow-up scan data: an in vivo MRI multi-patient 3D FSI study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Canton, Gador; Yuan, Chun; Ferguson, Marina; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Tang, Dalin

    2010-09-17

    Although it has been well-accepted that atherosclerosis initiation and early progression correlate negatively with flow wall shear stresses (FSS), increasing evidence suggests mechanisms governing advanced plaque progression are not well understood. Fourteen patients were scanned 2-4 times at 18 month intervals using a histologically validated multi-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol to acquire carotid plaque progression data. Thirty-two scan pairs (baseline and follow-up scans) were formed with slices matched for model construction and analysis. 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models were constructed and plaque wall stress (PWS) and flow shear stress (FSS) were obtained from all matching lumen data points (400-1000 per plaque; 100 points per matched slice) to quantify correlations with plaque progression measured by vessel wall thickness increase (WTI). Using FSS and PWS data from follow-up scan, 21 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant positive correlation between WTI and FSS (positive/negative/no significance ratio=21/8/3), and 26 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant negative correlation between WTI and PWS (positive/negative/no significance ratio=2/26/4). The mean FSS value of lipid core nodes (n=5294) from all 47 plaque models was 63.5dyn/cm(2), which was 45% higher than that from all normal vessel nodes (n=27553, p<0.00001). The results from this intensive FSI study indicate that flow shear stress from follow-up scan correlates positively with advanced plaque progression which is different from what has been observed in plaque initiation and early-stage progression. It should be noted that the correlation results do not automatically lead to any causality conclusions.

  13. Visual/verbal-analytic reasoning bias as a function of self-reported autistic-like traits: a study of typically developing individuals solving Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices.

    PubMed

    Fugard, Andrew J B; Stewart, Mary E; Stenning, Keith

    2011-05-01

    People with autism spectrum condition (ASC) perform well on Raven's matrices, a test which loads highly on the general factor in intelligence. However, the mechanisms supporting enhanced performance on the test are poorly understood. Evidence is accumulating that milder variants of the ASC phenotype are present in typically developing individuals, and that those who are further along the autistic-like trait spectrum show similar patterns of abilities and impairments as people with clinically diagnosed ASC. We investigated whether self-reported autistic-like traits in a university student sample, assessed using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Skinner, et al., 2001), predict performance on Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices. We found that reporting poorer social skills but better attention switching predicted a higher Advanced matrices score overall. DeShon, Chan, and Weissbein (1995) classified Advanced matrices items as requiring a visuospatial, or a verbal-analytic strategy. We hypothesised that higher AQ scores would predict better performance on visuospatial items than on verbal-analytic items. This prediction was confirmed. These results are consistent with the continuum view and can be explained by the enhanced perceptual functioning theory of performance peaks in ASC. The results also confirm a new prediction about Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices performance in people with ASC.

  14. Prognostic factors for disease progression in advanced Hodgkin's disease: an analysis of patients aged under 60 years showing no progression in the first 6 months after starting primary chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. M.; Radford, J. A.; Ryder, W. D.; Collins, C. D.; Deakin, D. P.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a very high-risk group based on presenting characteristics could be identified in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease who may benefit from high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT). Between 1975 and 1992, 453 previously untreated patients aged under 60 years who did not progress in the first 6 months after the start of standard chemotherapy had their hospital notes reviewed. The outcomes analysed were early disease progression (in the 6- to 18-month window following the start of chemotherapy) and disease progression in the whole of the follow-up period. A Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the combined effects of a number of presenting characteristics on these outcomes. Despite the presence of factors with significant effects on the relative rate of progression, the absolute effects in a group identified as having the poorest prognosis were not especially poor. No group could be defined with a freedom from progression rate of less than 70% over 6-18 months, and the worst prognostic group, which included only 53 patients, had an overall freedom from progression rate of 57% at 5 years. Four other reported prognostic indices were evaluated using our data set, but none of the indices was more successful in identifying a very high-risk group. It has not been possible to define a sufficiently high-risk group of patients with Hodgkin's disease based on presenting characteristics for whom HDCT could be advised as part of primary treatment. The search for more discriminating prognostic factors identifying vulnerable patients with a high risk of relapse must continue before a role can be found for HDCT following conventional chemotherapy in patients without disease progression. PMID:9000607

  15. Responsiveness of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire to Progression to Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Vision Loss, and Lens Opacity

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the ability of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ) to detect meaningful change over time (responsiveness) to the primary Age-Related Eye Disease Study outcomes. Methods The 25-item NEI-VFQ plus appendix was administered at 2 visits at 1- to 4-year intervals to 4119 participants in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. Events evaluated were progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), visual acuity (VA) loss of at least 15 letters, and lens opacity progression. Responsiveness was measured by the t statistic, effect size (ES), responsiveness statistic, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Variance components were used to estimate the contributions of events to variability of the NEI-VFQ score. Results Overall NEI-VFQ score was responsive to AMD progression (t = 14.0; P<.001; ES=0.81) and VA (t = 16.2; P<.001; ES=0.74). Mean changes ranged from 11 to 25 points for the subscales of general vision, near and distance activities, social functioning, mental health, role difficulties, dependency, and driving. The NEI-VFQ was unresponsive to lens opacity progression, although when the event occurred in the eye with the best vision at the first administration, the lens opacity ES was moderate for the color vision (ES = 0.62) and driving subscales (ES=0.66). Progression to advanced AMD and VA loss contributed significantly to the variation in the mean difference in overall VFQ score. Conclusions Changes in the NEI-VFQ overall and subscale scores of 10 points or more are associated with clinically significant changes in vision and AMD. This finding may assist the design of interventional studies of AMD and VA loss that include the NEI-VFQ as an outcome measure. PMID:16157800

  16. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gallier, P.W.

    1992-10-20

    The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies- advanced cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept. The commercially available ASPEN PLUS process simulation package will be extended to handle coal cleaning applications. Algorithms for predicting the process performance, equipment size, and flowsheet economics of commercial coal cleaning devices and related ancillary equipment will be incorporated into the coal cleaning simulator. This report is submitted to document the progress of Aspen Technology Inc. (AspenTech), its contractor, ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., (ICF KE) and CQ Inc., for the period of July through September 1992. ICF KE is providing coal preparation consulting and processing engineering services in this work and they are responsible for recommending the design of models to represent conventional coal cleaning equipment and costing of these models. CQ Inc. is a subcontractor to ICF KE on Tasks I - 5 and is a contractor to AspenTech on Task 6.

  17. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Quarterly technical progress report No. 13, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gallier, P.W.

    1993-01-20

    This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the ``Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies: The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cycloning, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level. The commercially available ASPEN PLUS process simulation package will be extended to handle coal cleaning applications. Algorithms for predicting the process performance, equipment size, and flowsheet economics of commercial coal cleaning devices and related ancillary equipment will be incorporated into the coal cleaning simulator. This report is submitted to document the progress of Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech), its contractor, ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc.,(ICF KE) and CQ Inc., a subcontractor to ICF KE, for the period of October through December 1992. ICF KE is providing coal preparation consulting and processing engineering services in this work and they are responsible for recommending the design of models to represent conventional coal cleaning equipment and costing of these models. CQ Inc. is a subcontractor to ICF KE on Tasks 1-5.

  18. Advanced Genetic Testing Comes to the Pain Clinic to Make a Diagnosis of Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ashley; Guthrie, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the use of an advanced genetic testing technique, whole exome sequencing, to diagnose a patient and their family with a SCN9A channelopathy. Setting. Academic tertiary care center. Design. Case report. Case Report. A 61-year-old female with a history of acute facial pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, and constipation was found to have a gain of function SCN9A mutation by whole exome sequencing. This mutation resulted in an SCN9A channelopathy that is most consistent with a diagnosis of paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. In addition to the patient being diagnosed, four siblings have a clinical diagnosis of SCN9A channelopathy as they have consistent symptoms and a sister with a known mutation. For treatment, gabapentin was ineffective and carbamazepine was not tolerated. Nontraditional therapies improved symptoms and constipation resolved with pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback. Conclusion. Patients with a personal and family history of chronic pain may benefit from a referral to Medical Genetics. Pelvic floor retraining with biofeedback should be considered for patients with a SCN9A channelopathy and constipation. PMID:27525141

  19. The VMAT-2 Inhibitor Tetrabenazine Affects Effort-Related Decision Making in a Progressive Ratio/Chow Feeding Choice Task: Reversal with Antidepressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Patrick A.; Lee, Christie A.; Nunes, Eric J.; Yohn, Samantha E.; Nowak, Victoria; Khan, Bilal; Shah, Priya; Pandit, Saagar; Vemuri, V. Kiran; Makriyannis, Alex; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral activation is a fundamental feature of motivation, and organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon evaluations of reinforcement value and response costs. Furthermore, people with major depression and other disorders often show anergia, psychomotor retardation, fatigue, and alterations in effort-related decision making. Tasks measuring effort-based decision making can be used as animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2) inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine induces depressive symptoms in humans, and also preferentially depletes dopamine (DA). Rats were assessed using a concurrent progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding task, in which they can either lever press on a PROG schedule for preferred high-carbohydrate food, or approach and consume a less-preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. Previous work has shown that the DA antagonist haloperidol reduced PROG work output on this task, but did not reduce chow intake, effects that differed substantially from those of reinforcer devaluation or appetite suppressant drugs. The present work demonstrated that tetrabenazine produced an effort-related shift in responding on the PROG/chow procedure, reducing lever presses, highest ratio achieved and time spent responding, but not reducing chow intake. Similar effects were produced by administration of the subtype selective DA antagonists ecopipam (D1) and eticlopride (D2), but not by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor neutral antagonist and putative appetite suppressant AM 4413, which suppressed both lever pressing and chow intake. The adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3, the antidepressant and catecholamine uptake inhibitor bupropion, and the MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl, all reversed the impairments induced by tetrabenazine. This work demonstrates the potential utility of the PROG/chow procedure as a rodent model of

  20. The VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine affects effort-related decision making in a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice task: reversal with antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Randall, Patrick A; Lee, Christie A; Nunes, Eric J; Yohn, Samantha E; Nowak, Victoria; Khan, Bilal; Shah, Priya; Pandit, Saagar; Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, Alex; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral activation is a fundamental feature of motivation, and organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon evaluations of reinforcement value and response costs. Furthermore, people with major depression and other disorders often show anergia, psychomotor retardation, fatigue, and alterations in effort-related decision making. Tasks measuring effort-based decision making can be used as animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2) inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine induces depressive symptoms in humans, and also preferentially depletes dopamine (DA). Rats were assessed using a concurrent progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding task, in which they can either lever press on a PROG schedule for preferred high-carbohydrate food, or approach and consume a less-preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. Previous work has shown that the DA antagonist haloperidol reduced PROG work output on this task, but did not reduce chow intake, effects that differed substantially from those of reinforcer devaluation or appetite suppressant drugs. The present work demonstrated that tetrabenazine produced an effort-related shift in responding on the PROG/chow procedure, reducing lever presses, highest ratio achieved and time spent responding, but not reducing chow intake. Similar effects were produced by administration of the subtype selective DA antagonists ecopipam (D1) and eticlopride (D2), but not by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor neutral antagonist and putative appetite suppressant AM 4413, which suppressed both lever pressing and chow intake. The adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3, the antidepressant and catecholamine uptake inhibitor bupropion, and the MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl, all reversed the impairments induced by tetrabenazine. This work demonstrates the potential utility of the PROG/chow procedure as a rodent model of

  1. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  2. Executive Center Makes Rapid Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumarsq, Carolyn C.; Scott, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    In a pilot test, superintendents participated in self-assessment activities in the American Association of School Administrator's Executive Development Center program. Activity stages centered on professional attitudes and skills, personal health, and fitness. Data provided a profile for professional development. Participants felt activities were…

  3. Advancing precollege science and mathematics education in San Diego County. Progress report, March 1, 1995--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schissel, D.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report discusses advancing precollege science and mathematics education in San Diego Count. Described in this report are: curriculum and teacher development; pre-tour material; facility tour; student workbook; evaluation and assessment; and internet access.

  4. Advanced Technology Section semiannual progress report, April 1-September 30, 1977. Volume 1. Biotechnology and environmental programs. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1980-06-01

    Research efforts in six areas are reported. They include: centrifugal analyzer development; advanced analytical systems; environmental research; bioengineering research;bioprocess development and demonstration; and, environmental control technology. Individual abstracts were prepared for each section for ERA/EDB. (JCB)

  5. Advancing the Use of Evidence-Based Decision-Making in Local Health Departments With Systems Science Methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Kong, Nan; Lawley, Mark; Weiss, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed how systems science methodologies might be used to bridge resource gaps at local health departments (LHDs) so that they might better implement evidence-based decision-making (EBDM) to address population health challenges. Methods. We used the New York Academy of Medicine Cardiovascular Health Simulation Model to evaluate the results of a hypothetical program that would reduce the proportion of people smoking, eating fewer than 5 fruits and vegetables per day, being physically active less than 150 minutes per week, and who had a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/m2 or greater. We used survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to evaluate health outcomes and validate simulation results. Results. Smoking rates and the proportion of the population with a BMI of 25 kg/m2 or greater would have decreased significantly with implementation of the hypothetical program (P < .001). Two areas would have experienced a statistically significant reduction in the local population with diabetes between 2007 and 2027 (P < .05). Conclusions. The use of systems science methodologies might be a novel and efficient way to systematically address a number of EBDM adoption barriers at LHDs. PMID:25689181

  6. Identifying patients with advanced chronic conditions for a progressive palliative care approach: a cross-sectional study of prognostic indicators related to end-of-life trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Amblàs-Novellas, J; Murray, S A; Espaulella, J; Martinez-Muñoz, M; Blay, C; Gómez-Batiste, X

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 2 innovative concepts have lately been developed to radically improve the care of patients with advanced chronic conditions (PACC): early identification of palliative care (PC) needs and the 3 end-of-life trajectories in chronic illnesses (acute, intermittent and gradual dwindling). It is not clear (1) what indicators work best for this early identification and (2) if specific clinical indicators exist for each of these trajectories. The objectives of this study are to explore these 2 issues. Setting 3 primary care services, an acute care hospital, an intermediate care centre and 4 nursing homes in a mixed urban–rural district in Barcelona, Spain. Participants 782 patients (61.5% women) with a positive NECPAL CCOMS-ICO test, indicating they might benefit from a PC approach. Outcome measures The characteristics and distribution of the indicators of the NECPAL CCOMS-ICO tool are analysed with respect to the 3 trajectories and have been arranged by domain (functional, nutritional and cognitive status, emotional problems, geriatric syndromes, social vulnerability and others) and according to their static (severity) and dynamic (progression) properties. Results The common indicators associated with early end-of-life identification are functional (44.3%) and nutritional (30.7%) progression, emotional distress (21.9%) and geriatric syndromes (15.7% delirium, 11.2% falls). The rest of the indicators showed differences in the associations per illness trajectories (p<0.05). 48.2% of the total cohort was identified as advanced frailty patients with no advanced disease criteria. Conclusions Dynamic indicators are present in the 3 trajectories and are especially useful to identify PACC for a progressive PC approach purpose. Most of the other indicators are typically associated with a specific trajectory. These findings can help clinicians improve the identification of patients for a palliative approach. PMID:27645556

  7. Recent Research and Progress in Food, Feed and Nutrition with Advanced Synchrotron-based SR-IMS and DRIFT Molecular Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraspatially resolved synchrotron radiation based infrared microspectroscopy is able to detect the structure features of a food or feed tissue at cellular and molecular levels. However, to date, this advanced synchrotron-based technique is almost unknown to food and feed scientists. The objective of this article was to introduce this novel analytical technology, ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron radiation based infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) to food, feed, conventional nutrition, and molecular nutrition scientists. The emphasis of this review focused on the following areas: (1) Principles of molecular spectroscopy for food and feed structure research, such as protein molecular structure, carbohydrate conformation, heating induced protein structure changes, and effect of gene-transformation on food and feed structure; (2) Molecular spectral analysis methodology; (3) Biological applications of synchrotron SR-IMS and DRIFT spectroscopy; and (4) Recent progress in food, feed and nutrition research program. The information described in this article gives better insight in food structure research progress and update.

  8. Current concepts on burn wound conversion-A review of recent advances in understanding the secondary progressions of burns.

    PubMed

    Salibian, Ara A; Rosario, Angelica Tan Del; Severo, Lucio De Almeida Moura; Nguyen, Long; Banyard, Derek A; Toranto, Jason D; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-08-01

    Burn wound conversion describes the process by which superficial partial thickness burns convert into deeper burns necessitating surgical intervention. Fully understanding and thus controlling this phenomenon continues to defy burn surgeons. However, potentially guiding burn wound progression so as to obviate the need for surgery while still bringing about healing with limited scarring is the major unmet challenge. Comprehending the pathophysiologic background contributing to deeper progression of these burns is an essential prerequisite to planning any intervention. In this study, a review of articles examining burn wound progression over the last five years was conducted to analyze trends in recent burn progression research, determine changes in understanding of the pathogenesis of burn conversion, and subsequently examine the direction for future research in developing therapies. The majority of recent research focuses on applying therapies from other disease processes to common underlying pathogenic mechanisms in burn conversion. While ischemia, inflammation, and free oxygen radicals continue to demonstrate a critical role in secondary necrosis, novel mechanisms such as autophagy have also been shown to contribute affect significantly burn progression significantly. Further research will have to determine whether multiple mechanisms should be targeted when developing clinical therapies.

  9. To Know or Not to Know? Theta and Delta Reflect Complementary Information about an Advanced Cue before Feedback in Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhaofeng; Peng, Xiaozhe; Yang, Tiantian; Li, Peng; Cong, Fengyu; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate brain activity during the reinforcement learning process in social contexts is a topic of increasing research interest. Previous studies have mainly focused on using electroencephalograms (EEGs) for feedback evaluation in reinforcement learning tasks by measuring event-related potentials. Few studies have investigated the time–frequency (TF) profiles of a cue that manifested whether a following feedback is available or not after decision-making. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the TF profiles of the cue interact with different agents to whom the feedback related. In this study we used the TF approach to test EEG oscillations of the cue stimuli in three agents (‘Self’, ‘Other’, and ‘Computer’) conditions separately. The results showed that the increased central-posterior delta power was elicited by the feedback unavailable cues more so than with the feedback available cue within 200–350 ms after the onset of the cue, but only in the self-condition. Moreover, a frontal-central theta oscillation had enhanced power when following the feedback unavailable cue as opposed to the feedback available cue across three agencies. These findings demonstrated that the cue for knowing an outcome produced reward prediction error-like signals, which were mirrored by the delta and theta oscillations during decision-making. More importantly, the present study demonstrated that the theta and delta oscillations reflected separable components of the advanced cue processing before the feedback in decision-making. PMID:27766090

  10. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-07-31

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from April 1 - June 30, 1996.

  11. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, No. 4, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-11-06

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from July 1 - September 29, 1995.

  12. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 2, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-05-05

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 to March 31, 1995.

  13. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Gallier, P.W.

    1991-10-20

    The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies- heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of- concept (POC) level. The commercially available ASPEN PLUS process simulation package will be extended to handle coal applications. Algorithms for predicting the process performance, equipment size, and flowsheet economics of commercial coal cleaning devices and related ancillary equipment will be incorporated into the coal cleaning simulator. This report is submitted to document the progress of Aspen Technology, Inc. (ApsenTech), its contractor, ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., (ICF KE) and CQ Inc., a subcontractor to ICF KE, for the seventh quarterly reporting period, April through June 1991. ICF KE is providing coal preparation consulting and processing engineering services in this work and they are responsible for recommending the design of models to represent conventional coal cleaning equipment and costing of these models.

  14. Organising health research systems as a key to improving health: the World Health Report 2013 and how to make further progress.

    PubMed

    Hanney, Stephen R; González-Block, Miguel A

    2013-12-17

    The World Health Report 2013 provides a major boost to the health research community and, in particular, to those who believe that health research will make its greatest impact on improving health when it is organised through a systems approach. The World Health Report 2013, Research for Universal Health Coverage, starts with three key messages. Firstly, that universal health coverage, with full access to high-quality services, needs research evidence if it is to be achieved; second, all nations should conduct and use research; and finally, the report states that systems are needed to develop national research agendas, to raise funds, to strengthen research capacity, and to make effective use of research findings. Each of these themes is elaborated in the report and supported by extensive references.In this editorial, we first outline the key messages from the World Health Report 2013 and highlight the contributions made by papers from our journal, Health Research Policy and Systems. In addition, we discuss very recent papers that advance some issues even further. In particular, we consider new evidence both on how to achieve financial protection for those who use health services, and on whether healthcare professionals and organisations who engage in research provide an improved healthcare performance. Finally, we propose additional perspectives that add to the impressive body of evidence and analyses presented in the report. Specifically, we suggest that considering the needs of various stakeholders, as attempted in the UK, in parallel with analysing how to fulfil essential functions, should boost the prospects of successfully building and strengthening health research systems. This is important because research is vital for achieving universal health coverage, and consequently for improving the health of millions of people.

  15. Presence of novel compound BCR-ABL mutations in late chronic and advanced phase imatinib sensitive CML patients indicates their possible role in CML progression.

    PubMed

    Akram, Afia Muhammad; Iqbal, Zafar; Akhtar, Tanveer; Khalid, Ahmed Mukhtar; Sabar, Muhammad Farooq; Qazi, Mahmood Hussain; Aziz, Zeba; Sajid, Nadia; Aleem, Aamer; Rasool, Mahmood; Asif, Muhammad; Aloraibi, Saleh; Aljamaan, Khaled; Iqbal, Mudassar

    2017-02-21

    BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations are well known for causing resistance against tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and disease progression in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In recent years, compound BCR-ABL mutations have emerged as a new threat to CML patients by causing higher degrees of resistance involving multiple TKIs, including ponatinib. However, there are limited reports about association of compound BCR-ABL mutations with disease progression in imatinib (IM) sensitive CML patients. Therefore, we investigated presence of ABL-KD mutations in chronic phase (n = 41), late chronic phase (n = 33) and accelerated phase (n = 16) imatinib responders. Direct sequencing analysis was employed for this purpose. Eleven patients (12.22%) in late-CP CML were detected having total 24 types of point mutations, out of which eight (72.72%) harbored compound mutated sites. SH2 contact site mutations were dominant in our study cohort, with E355G (3.33%) being the most prevalent. Five patients (45%) all having compound mutated sites, progressed to advanced phases of disease during follow up studies. Two novel silent mutations G208G and E292E/E were detected in combination with other mutants, indicating limited tolerance for BCR-ABL1 kinase domain for missense mutations. However, no patient in early CP of disease manifested mutated ABL-KD. Occurrence of mutations was found associated with elevated platelet count (p = 0.037) and patients of male sex (p = 0.049). The median overall survival and event free survival of CML patients (n = 90) was 6.98 and 5.8 years respectively. The compound missense mutations in BCR-ABL kinase domain responsible to elicit disease progression, drug resistance or disease relapse in CML, can be present in yet Imatinib sensitive patients. Disease progression observed here, emphasizes the need of ABL-KD mutation screening in late chronic phase CML patients for improved clinical management of disease.

  16. Serum Vitamin D Levels Are Not Predictive of the Progression of Chronic Liver Disease in Hepatitis C Patients with Advanced Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Kathleen E.; Zheng, Hui; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Delgado-Borrego, Aymin; Dienstag, Jules L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    In animal models and human cross-sectional studies, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with liver disease progression. Vitamin D supplementation has been suggested as a treatment to prevent disease progression. We sought to evaluate the role of vitamin D levels in predicting chronic liver disease development. We conducted a nested case-control study of vitamin D levels in subjects with (cases) and without (controls) liver histologic progression or clinical decompensation over the course of the HALT-C Trial. Vitamin D levels were measured at 4 points over 45 months. 129 cases and 129 aged-matched controls were included. No difference in baseline vitamin D levels were found between cases and controls. (44.8 ng/mL vs. 44.0 ng/mL, P = 0.74). Vitamin D levels declined in cases and controls over time (P = 0.0005), however, there was no difference in the level of decline (P = 0.37). Among study subjects with diabetes mellitius, baseline vitamin D levels were higher in cases, 49.9 ng/mL, than controls, 36.3 ng/mL. (P = 0.03) In addition, baseline vitamin D levels were higher in black case subjects, 32.7 ng/mL, than in black control subjects, 25.2 ng/mL (P = 0.08) No difference in vitamin D levels was found between patients with and without progression of hepatitis C-associated liver disease over 4 years. Our data do not suggest any role for vitamin D supplementation in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C and raise the possibility that higher vitamin D levels may be associated with disease progression. PMID:22359532

  17. Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal process. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1986--July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Mining and Minerals Resources Research Institute (MMRRI) to monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with select advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period to collect data on the field disposal behavior of these wastes. There has been considerable research on the characteristics and laboratory leaching behavior of coal wastes -- a lesser amount on wastes from advanced coal processes. However, very little information exists on the field disposal behavior of these wastes. Information on field disposal behavior is needed (1) as input to predictive models being developed, (2) as input to the development of rule of thumb design guidelines for the disposal of these wastes, and (3) as evidence of the behavior of these wastes in the natural environment.

  18. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Rowe, R.M.; Anast, K.R.; Jha, M.C.

    1994-05-06

    This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effectve replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States as well as for advanced combustars currently under development. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals fbr clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 51-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress, made during the 6th quarter of the project from January 1 to March 31, 1994. The project has three major objectives: (1) The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. (2) A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. (3) A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

  19. Recombinant erythropoietin for the anaemia of patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST) receiving imatinib: an active agent only in non progressive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant erythropoietin for the anaemia of patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST) receiving imatinib : an active agent only in non progressive patients. Background Imatinib is a standard treatment for advanced/metastatic GIST and in adjuvant setting. Anaemia is frequently observed in patients with advanced GIST, and is one of the most frequent side effects of imatinib with grade 3–4 anaemia in 10% of patients. Whether EPO treatment is useful in the management of GIST patients receiving imatinib treatment is unknown. Methods A retrospective study of EPO treatment in GIST patients receiving imatinib was undertaken in 4 centres. Thirty four patients received EPO treatment among the 319 GIST patients treated with imatinib in clinical trials or with compassionate use between 2001 and 2003. The efficacy of EPO on the anaemia of patients with GIST treated with imatinib was analyzed. Results There were 18 males and 16 females with a median age of 59 years. Median WHO-PS was 1. Primary tumour sites were mainly gastric (32%) and small bowel (29%). Sites of metastases were mainly liver (82%) and peritoneum (79%). The median delay between the initiation of imatinib treatment and EPO was 58 days (range 0–553). Median haemoglobin (Hb) level prior to EPO was 9 g/dL (range 6,9-11,8) and 11,7 g/dL (range 6,8-14,4) after 2 months. An increase of more than 2 g/dL was observed in 18 (53%) of patients. None of the 7 patients who progressed (PD) under imatinib treatment (400 mg/day) experienced HB response, as compared to 66% (18/27) of the remaining patients (PR + SD) (p = 0,002). Primary tumour site, liver metastases, peritoneal metastases, age, gender did not correlate with HB response to EPO. Response to EPO was observed in 2/11 patients receiving high-dose imatinib (800 mg/day) vs 16/23 of others. Using logistic regression, only PD before EPO treatment was retained as a predictive factor for EPO response. Conclusion EPO enables to

  20. Progress Toward Quality Assurance Standards for Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuels Based on Thermal Performance Testing and Chemometric Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 13 Nov 2015 – 15 Dec 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Progress Toward Quality Assurance Standards For...UNIT NUMBER Q0A4 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research...MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQR 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT 5 Pollux Drive NUMBER(S) Edwards AFB, CA

  1. High temperature materials technology research for advanced thermionic systems. Quarterly progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zee, R.H.; Rose, M.F.

    1993-12-31

    Objective was to understand the strengthening mechanisms in advanced refractory alloys for high-temperature thermionic applications. During the first 6 months, the role of substitutional solutes in refractory alloy single crystals was identified and modeled using a simple size misfit factor as the governing parameter. During the past period, effort was concentrated on the strengthening effects in various refractory structures and the growth of refractory alloy single crystals. 11 figs, 4 tabs.

  2. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  3. Dysfunctions of decision-making and cognitive control as transdiagnostic mechanisms of mental disorders: advances, gaps, and needs in current research.

    PubMed

    Goschke, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Disadvantageous decision-making and impaired volitional control over actions, thoughts, and emotions are characteristics of a wide range of mental disorders such as addiction, eating disorders, depression, and anxiety disorders and may reflect transdiagnostic core mechanisms and possibly vulnerability factors. Elucidating the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms is a precondition for moving from symptom-based to mechanism-based disorder classifications and ultimately mechanism-targeted interventions. However, despite substantial advances in basic research on decision-making and cognitive control, there are still profound gaps in our current understanding of dysfunctions of these processes in mental disorders. Central unresolved questions are: (i) to which degree such dysfunctions reflect transdiagnostic mechanisms or disorder-specific patterns of impairment; (ii) how phenotypical features of mental disorders relate to dysfunctional control parameter settings and aberrant interactions between large-scale brain systems involved in habit and reward-based learning, performance monitoring, emotion regulation, and cognitive control; (iii) whether cognitive control impairments are consequences or antecedent vulnerability factors of mental disorders; (iv) whether they reflect generalized competence impairments or context-specific performance failures; (v) whether not only impaired but also chronic over-control contributes to mental disorders. In the light of these gaps, needs for future research are: (i) an increased focus on basic cognitive-affective mechanisms underlying decision and control dysfunctions across disorders; (ii) longitudinal-prospective studies systematically incorporating theory-driven behavioural tasks and neuroimaging protocols to assess decision-making and control dysfunctions and aberrant interactions between underlying large-scale brain systems; (iii) use of latent-variable models of cognitive control rather than single tasks; (iv) increased focus on

  4. Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, May--July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Mineral Research Center (EMRC) to design, construct and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. The specific objectives for the reporting period were as follows: review fourth site candidates; obtain site access for the Freeman United site; select an ash supplier for the Illinois site and initiate subcontracts for on-site work; commence construction of the Freeman United test cell; and obtain waste for the Colorado Ute test site. Accomplishments under each task are discussed.

  5. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  6. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Progress made in five areas of research is described briefly. The subtask in oil shale research is on oil shale process studies. For tar sand the subtask reported is on process development. Coal research includes the following subtasks: Coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes the following: Advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sup 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residua; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process;NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of Mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 26, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery. The overall project scope of the engineering development project is to conceptually develop a commercial flowsheet to maximize pyritic sulfur reduction at practical energy recovery values. This is being accomplished by utilizing the basic research data on the surface properties of coal, mineral matter and pyrite obtained from the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Fine Coal Flotation Project, to develop this conceptual flowsheet. This progress report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  8. Advanced Development of the rF1V and rBV A/B Vaccines: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Mary Kate; Saviolakis, George A.; Welkos, Susan L.; House, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of vaccines for microorganisms and bacterial toxins with the potential to be used as biowarfare and bioterrorism agents is an important component of the US biodefense program. DVC is developing two vaccines, one against inhalational exposure to botulinum neurotoxins A1 and B1 and a second for Yersinia pestis, with the ultimate goal of licensure by the FDA under the Animal Rule. Progress has been made in all technical areas, including manufacturing, nonclinical, and clinical development and testing of the vaccines, and in assay development. The current status of development of these vaccines, and remaining challenges are described in this chapter. PMID:22028978

  9. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-18

    This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described. This includes: screening creep results, weight gain and post-exposure mechanical properties for materials thermally exposed at 750/sup 0/ and 850/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/ and 1562/sup 0/F). In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  10. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    ``Evaluation, Engineering and Development of Advanced Cyclone Processes`` is a research and development project for the reduction of pyritic sulfur in coal. Project goals are to remove 80 to 90% of the ash and pyritic sulfur while retaining 80 to 90% of the parent coal`s heating value. A number of media and media separator options are to be evaluated and tested, culminating with the implementation of the preferred combination in a 1,000 lb/hr bench-scale process optimization circuit.

  11. Advanced fuel gas desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project. Technical progress report No. 19, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The {open_quotes}Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project{close_quotes} is a $150.5 million cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy and Pure Air, a general partnership of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. The AFGD process is one of several alternatives to conventional flue gas desulfurization (FGD) being demonstrated under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The AFGD demonstration project is located at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station, about 12 miles northeast of Gary, Indiana.

  12. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

    1993-07-28

    This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 48-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress made during the quarter from April 1 to June 30, 1993. The project has three major objectives: (1) the primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. (2) a secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics; and (3) a third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

  13. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.

  14. Advanced Researech and Technology Development fossil energy materials program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the ARandTD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure in which projects are organized according to materials research thrust areas. These areas are (1) Structural Ceramics, (2) Alloy Development and Mechanical Properties, (3) Corrosion and Erosion of Alloys, and (4) Assessments and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. Quantifying disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Turner, Martin R; Vucic, Steve; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shefner, Jeremy; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2014-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibits characteristic variability of onset and rate of disease progression, with inherent clinical heterogeneity making disease quantitation difficult. Recent advances in understanding pathogenic mechanisms linked to the development of ALS impose an increasing need to develop strategies to predict and more objectively measure disease progression. This review explores phenotypic and genetic determinants of disease progression in ALS, and examines established and evolving biomarkers that may contribute to robust measurement in longitudinal clinical studies. With targeted neuroprotective strategies on the horizon, developing efficiencies in clinical trial design may facilitate timely entry of novel treatments into the clinic.

  16. Modelling and assessment of advanced processes for integrated environmental control of coal-fired power plants. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, J.G.; Bloyd, C.N.; McMichael, F.C.; Rubin, E.S.

    1984-07-01

    The key objective of this research is the development of a computer based model for the assessment of integrated environmental control (IEC) systems for conventional and advanced coal fired power plant designs. Efforts during the period April 1-June 30, 1984 focused on, (1) testing of a preliminary integrated model linking pre-combustion and post-combustion control options for conventional plants; (2) documentation of the analytical models of existing control technology options; (3) development and preliminary testing of a second model design for the propagation and analysis of uncertainty; and (4) development of new analytical models needed for IEC assessments. Activities and accomplishments in each of these areas are described. 4 references, 13 figures, 4 tables.

  17. [Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems]. Technical progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wesnor, J.D.; Bakke, E.; Bender, D.J.; Kaminski, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emisssion boiler systems. The primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions, lb/million Btu; SO{sub 2} emissions, lb/million Btu; particulate emissions, lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency, not less than 42%. The secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability; reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. Accomplishments to date are summarized for the following tasks: task 1, project planning and management; task 7, component development and optimization; task 8, preliminary POC test facility design; task 9, subsystem test design and plan; task 10, subsystem test unit construction; and task 11, subsystem test operation and evaluation.

  18. Recent progress in advanced optical materials based on gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Guang; Sakka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    This review article summarizes the recent achievements in stabilization of the metastable lattice of gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12, GAG) and the related developments of advanced optical materials, including down-conversion phosphors, up-conversion phosphors, transparent ceramics, and single crystals. Whenever possible, the materials are compared with their better known YAG and LuAG counterparts to demonstrate the merits of the GAG host. It is shown that novel emission features and significantly improved luminescence can be attained for a number of phosphor systems with the more covalent GAG lattice and the efficient energy transfer from Gd3+ to the activator. Ce3+ doped GAG-based single crystals and transparent ceramics are also shown to simultaneously possess the advantages of high theoretical density, fast scintillation decay, and high light yields, and hold great potential as scintillators for a wide range of applications. The unresolved issues are also pointed out. PMID:27877750

  19. Recent progress in advanced optical materials based on gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12).

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Guang; Sakka, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    This review article summarizes the recent achievements in stabilization of the metastable lattice of gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12, GAG) and the related developments of advanced optical materials, including down-conversion phosphors, up-conversion phosphors, transparent ceramics, and single crystals. Whenever possible, the materials are compared with their better known YAG and LuAG counterparts to demonstrate the merits of the GAG host. It is shown that novel emission features and significantly improved luminescence can be attained for a number of phosphor systems with the more covalent GAG lattice and the efficient energy transfer from Gd(3+) to the activator. Ce(3+) doped GAG-based single crystals and transparent ceramics are also shown to simultaneously possess the advantages of high theoretical density, fast scintillation decay, and high light yields, and hold great potential as scintillators for a wide range of applications. The unresolved issues are also pointed out.

  20. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

  1. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The project goal is to develop an advanced coal beneficiation technology that can achieve high recovery of the parent coal`s calorific value, while maximizing pyritic sulfur removal. Coal cleaning is to be accomplished by physical means incorporating an advanced form of cycloning or gravimetric process. Evaluation of different media types and their attendant systems for recovery, concentration, and regeneration is to be completed. Phase I, media evaluation, now completed involved a paper study and a number of laboratory tests to eliminate all but the best media options. Phase II, media testing, involved detailed testing of the more promising media and separators in a closed-loop pilot facility circuit. In the final phase, Phase III, it is proposed to test individual components of the process using the optimum medium, separator, and medium recovery systems(s) selected in prior phases. Some of the highlights for this reporting period are: (1) Outomec conducted a second set of hot water wash experiments. These hot water experiments, using prefiltered medium, yielded a significant improvement in calcium nitrate recovery, and showed a consistent decrease in residuum calcium nitrate with increasing wash rate. (2) Several alternatives were investigated for potential reduction in thermal regeneration process costs. Culligan, Spin Tek, and Rochem, manufacturers of reverse osmosis or ultra filtration systems were contacted. Rochem ultimately performed laboratory experiments. Starting with a dilute medium density of 1.07, the Rochem laboratory system achieved a density of 1.11. A density of 1.22 sg would be commercially attainable. This is less than the target medium density of 1.35, meaning that if their system were utilized, some thermal means would still be required to regenerate medium to operating density. (3) Management and Technical Systems initiated work on a preliminary economic study and will submit a report during the next quarterly reporting period.

  2. The Real-World Problem of Care Coordination: A Longitudinal Qualitative Study with Patients Living with Advanced Progressive Illness and Their Unpaid Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Daveson, Barbara A.; Harding, Richard; Shipman, Cathy; Mason, Bruce L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Higginson, Irene J.; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Henson, Lesley; Munday, Dan; Nanton, Veronica; Dale, Jeremy R.; Boyd, Kirsty; Worth, Allison; Barclay, Stephen; Donaldson, Anne; Murray, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a model of care coordination for patients living with advanced progressive illness and their unpaid caregivers, and to understand their perspective regarding care coordination. Design A prospective longitudinal, multi-perspective qualitative study involving a case-study approach. Methods Serial in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and then analyzed through open and axial coding in order to construct categories for three cases (sites). This was followed by continued thematic analysis to identify underlying conceptual coherence across all cases in order to produce one coherent care coordination model. Participants Fifty-six purposively sampled patients and 27 case-linked unpaid caregivers. Settings Three cases from contrasting primary, secondary and tertiary settings within Britain. Results Coordination is a deliberate cross-cutting action that involves high-quality, caring and well-informed staff, patients and unpaid caregivers who must work in partnership together across health and social care settings. For coordination to occur, it must be adequately resourced with efficient systems and services that communicate. Patients and unpaid caregivers contribute substantially to the coordination of their care, which is sometimes volunteered at a personal cost to them. Coordination is facilitated through flexible and patient-centered care, characterized by accurate and timely information communicated in a way that considers patients’ and caregivers’ needs, preferences, circumstances and abilities. Conclusions Within the midst of advanced progressive illness, coordination is a shared and complex intervention involving relational, structural and information components. Our study is one of the first to extensively examine patients’ and caregivers’ views about coordination, thus aiding conceptual fidelity. These findings can be used to help avoid oversimplifying a real-world problem, such as care coordination. Avoiding

  3. Implementing Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century (TT21C): Making safety decisions using toxicity pathways, and progress in a prototype risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin; Clewell, Rebecca; Davies, Michael; Dent, Matthew; Edwards, Sue; Fowler, Paul; Malcomber, Sophie; Nicol, Beate; Scott, Andrew; Scott, Sharon; Sun, Bin; Westmoreland, Carl; White, Andrew; Zhang, Qiang; Carmichael, Paul L

    2015-06-05

    Risk assessment methodologies in toxicology have remained largely unchanged for decades. The default approach uses high dose animal studies, together with human exposure estimates, and conservative assessment (uncertainty) factors or linear extrapolations to determine whether a specific chemical exposure is 'safe' or 'unsafe'. Although some incremental changes have appeared over the years, results from all new approaches are still judged against this process of extrapolating high-dose effects in animals to low-dose exposures in humans. The US National Research Council blueprint for change, entitled Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and Strategy called for a transformation of toxicity testing from a system based on high-dose studies in laboratory animals to one founded primarily on in vitro methods that evaluate changes in normal cellular signalling pathways using human-relevant cells or tissues. More recently, this concept of pathways-based approaches to risk assessment has been expanded by the description of 'Adverse Outcome Pathways' (AOPs). The question, however, has been how to translate this AOP/TT21C vision into the practical tools that will be useful to those expected to make safety decisions. We have sought to provide a practical example of how the TT21C vision can be implemented to facilitate a safety assessment for a commercial chemical without the use of animal testing. To this end, the key elements of the TT21C vision have been broken down to a set of actions that can be brought together to achieve such a safety assessment. Such components of a pathways-based risk assessment have been widely discussed, however to-date, no worked examples of the entire risk assessment process exist. In order to begin to test the process, we have taken the approach of examining a prototype toxicity pathway (DNA damage responses mediated by the p53 network) and constructing a strategy for the development of a pathway based risk assessment for a specific

  4. An Exploratory Analysis for the Selection and Implementation of Advanced Manufacturing Technology by Fuzzy Multi-criteria Decision Making Methods: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Surajit; Sarkar, Bijan

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMTs) offer opportunities for the manufacturing organizations to excel their competitiveness and in turn their effectiveness in manufacturing. Proper selection and evaluation of AMTs is the most significant task in today's modern world. But this involves a lot of uncertainty and vagueness as it requires many conflicting criteria to deal with. So the task of selection and evaluation of AMTs becomes very tedious for the evaluators as they are not able to provide crisp data for the criteria. Different Fuzzy Multi-criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods help greatly in dealing with this problem. This paper focuses on the application of two very much potential Fuzzy MCDM methods namely COPRAS-G, EVAMIX and a comparative study between them on some rarely mentioned criteria. Each of the two methods is very powerful evaluation tool and has beauty in its own. Although, performance wise these two methods are almost at same level, but, the approach of each one of them are quite unique. This uniqueness is revealed by introducing a numerical example of selection of AMT.

  5. Skin advanced glycation end products glucosepane and methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone are independently associated with long-term microvascular complication progression of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Genuth, Saul; Sun, Wanjie; Cleary, Patricia; Gao, Xiaoyu; Sell, David R; Lachin, John; Monnier, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Six skin collagen advanced glycation end products (AGEs) originally measured near to the time of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) closeout in 1993 may contribute to the "metabolic memory" phenomenon reported in the follow-up Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. We have now investigated whether the addition of four originally unavailable AGEs (i.e., glucosepane [GSPNE], hydroimidazolones of methylglyoxal [MG-H1] and glyoxal, and carboxyethyl-lysine) improves associations with incident retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy events during 13-17 years after DCCT. The complete 10-AGE panel is associated with three-step Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale worsening of retinopathy (P ≤ 0.002), independent of either mean DCCT or EDIC study A1C level. GSPNE and fructose-lysine (furosine [FUR]) correlate with retinopathy progression, independently of A1C level. The complete panel also correlates with microalbuminuria (P = 0.008) and FUR with nephropathy independently of A1C level (P ≤ 0.02). Neuropathy correlates with the complete panel despite adjustment for A1C level (P ≤ 0.005). MG-H1 and FUR are dominant, independent of A1C level (P < 0.0001), whereas A1C loses significance after adjustment for the AGEs. Overall, the added set of four AGEs enhances the association of the original panel with progression risk of retinopathy and neuropathy (P < 0.04) but not nephropathy, while GSPNE and MG-H1 emerge as the principal new risk factors. Skin AGEs are robust long-term markers of microvascular disease progression, emphasizing the importance of early and sustained implementation of intensive therapy.

  6. Xanthohumol impairs human prostate cancer cell growth and invasion and diminishes the incidence and progression of advanced tumors in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Venè, Roberta; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Astigiano, Simonetta; Tosetti, Francesca; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2012-12-06

    Despite recent advances in understanding the biological basis of prostate cancer, management of the disease, especially in the phase resistant to androgen ablation, remains a significant challenge. The long latency and high incidence of prostate carcinogenesis provides the opportunity to intervene with chemoprevention to prevent or eradicate prostate malignancies. In this study, we have used human hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC3, as an in vitro model to assess the efficacy of xanthohumol (XN) against cell growth, motility and invasion. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer cells with low micromolar doses of XN inhibits proliferation and modulates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT phosphorylation leading to reduced cell migration and invasion. Oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was associated with these effects. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) transgenic mice were used as an in vivo model of prostate adenocarcinoma. Oral gavage of XN, three times per week, beginning at 4 wks of age, induced a decrease in the average weight of the urogenital (UG) tract, delayed advanced tumor progression and inhibited the growth of poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma. The ability of XN to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo suggests that XN may be a novel agent for the management of prostate cancer.

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 25, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery. This progress report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  8. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1980-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-12

    Objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, 950 and 1050/sup 0/C. Initiation of controlled purity helium creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. In addition, the results of 1000-hour exposures at 750 and 850/sup 0/C on several experimental alloys are discussed.

  9. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report for period October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Progress reports are presented for: Task 1 management plan; Task 2.1 laboratory support (University of Kentucky/Center for Applied Energy Research); Task 3 continuous operations/parametric studies (Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.); Task 4.1 process modeling; and Task 4.4 preliminary technical assessment (LDP Associates). Some of the high points for this period are: the activity of the base catalyst prepared by pressure filtration of the Wilsonville Run 262E V-1082 ashy resid was determined and compared with the conversion of coal in the absence of any added catalyst; this material was found to contain 740 mg Mo/kg; in the catalyst screening test, the pressure filtered solids that had been added to the reaction mixture to a level equivalent to the solids contained in Wilsonville Run 263J gave coal conversion of 98.2% with a resid conversion of 24%; and the effect of presulfiding conditions on activating a Mo-impregnated coal with different H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures at different temperatures and reaction times was investigated.

  10. Concomitant consumption of marijuana, alcohol and tobacco in oral squamous cell carcinoma development and progression: recent advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Caio Fabio Baeta; de Angelis, Bruno Brandão; Prudente, Henrique Maciel; de Souza, Bernardo Vieira Goulart; Cardoso, Sérgio Vitorino; de Azambuja Ribeiro, Rosy Iara Maciel

    2012-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) corresponds to 95% of all malignant tumours of the mouth. The association between alcohol and tobacco is the major risk factor for this disease, increasing the chances for the development of OSCC by 35-fold. The plant, Cannabis sativa is smoked as cigarettes or blunts and is commonly used in association with tobacco and alcohol. Any type of smoking habit exposes individuals to a wide range of carcinogens or pro-carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as some ethanol derived substances such as acetaldehyde (AA), and all are genotoxic in the same way. In addition, ethanol acts in the oral mucosa as a solvent and therefore increases the cellular membrane permeability to carcinogens. Carcinogens found in tobacco are also concentrated in marijuana, but the latter also contains high levels of cannabinoids, bioactive compounds responsible for several effects such as euphoria and analgesia. However, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), the major psychotropic cannabinoid found in plants, causes a reduction of cellular metabolism and induction of apoptosis, both of which are anti-neoplastic properties. Apart from limited epidemiologic and experimental data, the effects of concomitant chronic exposure to marijuana (or Δ(9)-THC), tobacco and alcohol in OSCC development and progression is poorly known. This paper reviews the most recent findings on the effects of marijuana over cellular proliferation, as well as in the risk for OSCC, with emphasis on its interaction with tobacco and ethanol consumption.

  11. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  12. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-14

    Objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described; this includes: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850 and 950/sup 0/C. The initiation of air creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  13. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-2/beta3 Integrin Expression Profile: Signature of Local Progression After Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Massabeau, Carole; Rouquette, Isabelle; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Mazieres, Julien; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Armand, Jean-Pierre; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Favre, Gilles; Toulas, Christine; Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: No biologic signature of chemoradiotherapy sensitivity has been reported for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have previously demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and alphavbeta3 integrin pathways control tumor radioresistance. We investigated whether the expression of the proteins involved in these pathways might be associated with the response to treatment and, therefore, the clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: FGF-2, beta3 integrin, angiopoietin-2, and syndecan-1 expression was studied using immunohistochemistry performed on biopsies obtained, before any treatment, from 65 patients exclusively treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced NSCLC. The response to treatment was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria using computed tomography at least 6 weeks after the end of the chemoradiotherapy. Local progression-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and disease-free survival were studied using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: Among this NSCLC biopsy population, 43.7% overexpressed beta3 integrin (beta3{sup +}), 43% FGF-2 (FGF-2{sup +}), 41.5% syndecan-1, and 59.4% angiopoietin-2. Our results showed a strong association between FGF-2 and beta3 integrin expression (p = .001). The adjusted hazard ratio of local recurrence for FGF-2{sup +}/beta3{sup +} tumors compared with FGF-2{sup -}/beta3{sup -} tumors was 6.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.6-14.6, p = .005). However, the risk of local recurrence was not increased when tumors overexpressed beta3 integrin or FGF-2 alone. Moreover, the co-expression of these two proteins was marginally associated with the response to chemoradiotherapy and metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: The results of this study have identified the combined profile FGF-2/beta3 integrin expression as a signature of local control in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced

  14. The future of inflammatory bowel disease management: combining progress in trial design with advances in targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Travis, Simon; Feagan, Brian G; Rutgeerts, Paul; van Deventer, Sander

    2012-02-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor antagonists have appreciably improved patient outcomes in Crohn's disease, shifting the goals of treatment from control of symptoms to clinical remission (Crohn's disease activity index <150) combined with mucosal healing - the new concept of 'deep remission'. Achieving deep remission brings clinically meaningful benefits, including reduced hospitalization and reduced need for surgery. Aspects such as the dose, timing and intensification of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy affect the likelihood of achieving deep remission, but definitive evidence on long-term benefits and the risk/benefit profile of treatment intensification is needed. A consequence of the success of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapies has been a change in the disease characteristics of the patient population entering clinical trials. Therefore, new clinical study paradigms, such as cluster randomization and therapeutic strategy trials, are needed. High placebo response rates and the ethics of testing emerging agents against placebo in an era of effective therapies are challenges to traditional randomized controlled trials. Overcoming these challenges will not only help to optimize anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy, but also advance development of emerging treatments for Crohn's disease.

  15. Tropical Moored Buoy Arrays To Advance Climate Science: A 30-Year Progress Report (Fridtjof Nansen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in the tropics lead to significant climate fluctuations such as El Niño and the Southern Oscillation in the Pacific, the Indian Ocean Dipole, and the Atlantic meridional gradient mode. These and other prominent climate phenomena originating in the tropics on seasonal to decadal time scales affect regional and global patterns of weather variability. Associated floods, droughts, heat waves and other extreme weather events have significant socio-economic consequences that affect millions of people worldwide. This presentation describes a coordinated multi-national effort to develop tropical moored buoy arrays in support of climate research and forecasting. Basin specific components include the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean/Triangle Trans-Ocean Buoy Network (TAO/TRITON) in the Pacific, the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA), and the Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA) in the Indian Ocean. These arrays, the origins of which date back to the early 1980s, complement other satellite and in situ elements of the Global Ocean Observing System by providing high temporal resolution time series of key environmental parameters in real time. This presentation will feature a discussion of historical perspectives, recent scientific advances, and future directions in the development of the arrays.

  16. The promoter polymorphisms of receptor for advanced glycation end products were associated with the susceptibility and progression of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Y; Shao, X; He, J; Cai, Y; Zhao, J; Chen, F; Tao, H; Yin, Z; Tan, X; He, Y; Lin, Y; Li, K; Cui, L

    2017-04-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is considered a major pattern recognition receptor, which plays an important role in the development of sepsis. Increasing evidence showed an association between RAGE polymorphisms and the susceptibility to several inflammatory-related diseases. However, little is known about the clinical relationship between RAGE polymorphisms and sepsis. In this study, we analyzed the association of sepsis with three functional RAGE gene polymorphisms (rs1800624, rs1800625 and rs2070600) in a Chinese Han population (372 sepsis cases and 400 healthy controls). Significant differences were observed in the rs1800624 and rs1800625 genotype/allele distributions between the sepsis and controls, but no significant difference was observed in the rs2070600 genotype/allele. Moreover, our results also revealed a significant difference in the genotype/allele frequencies of the rs1800624 and rs1800625 polymorphisms between the sepsis and severe sepsis subtypes, the rs1800624 TT or rs1800625 TT genotype carriers exhibited a significant increase in RAGE mRNA, sRAGE, TNF-α and IL-6 expression compared with the rs1800624 AT/AA or rs1800625 CT/CC carriers in sepsis patients. Overall, this study might provide valuable clinical evidence between the RAGE gene polymorphisms and the risk or the development of sepsis.

  17. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.; Sanderson, P.; Reising, D.V.

    1993-05-21

    With recent theoretical and empirical research in basic and applied psychology, human factors, and engineering, it is now sufficient to define an integrated approach to the deign of advanced displays for present and future nuclear power plants. Traditionally, the conventional displays have shown operators the individual variables on gauges, meters, strip charts, etc. This design approach requires the operators to mentally integrate the separately displayed variables and determine the implications for the plant state. This traditional approach has been known as the single-sensor-single-indicator display design and it places an intolerable amount of mental workload on operators during transients and abnormal conditions. This report discusses a new alternative approach which is the use of direct perception interfaces. Direct perception a interfaces display the underlying physical and system constraints of the situation in a directly perceptual way, such that the viewer need not reason about what is seen to identify system states, but can identify the state of the system perceptually. It is expected that displays which show the dynamics of fundamental physical laws should better support operator decisions and diagnoses of plant states. The purpose of this research project is to develop a suite of direct perception displays for PWR nuclear power plant operations.

  18. Progress on the Development of the Next Generation X-ray Beam Position Monitors at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Yang, B.X.; Decker, G.; Sereno, N.; Ramanathan, M.

    2016-07-27

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are ke y elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The next generat ion XBPMs for high heat load front ends (HHL FEs) have been designed to meet these requirements by utilizing Cu K-edge x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from a pair of copper absorbers and have been installed at the front ends (FEs) of the APS. Com missioning data showed a significant performance improvement over the existing photoemission-based XBPMs. While a similar design concept can be applied for the canted undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0-mrad, the lower beam power (< 10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scat tering from the diamond blades placed edge-on to the x- ray beam. A prototype of the Compton scattering XBPM system was i nstalled at 24-ID-A in May 2015. In this report, the design and test results for XRF-based XBPM and Compton scattering based XBPM are presented. Ongoing research related to the development of the next generation XBPMs on thermal contac t resistance of a joint between two solid bodies is also discussed

  19. Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The specific objectives for the reporting period of October, 1992 to December, 1992 were as follows: (1) Finish analyzing leachates from the third annual core samples from the Ohio site, collected in August 1992; (2) Collect and analyze the sixth quarterly water samples from the first Illinois test case in August, 1992. Make field measurements and collect data from the data logger; (3) Begin construction of the second Illinois test case; (4) Continue production of a video presentation on the project; (5) Load all remaining EERC data on the Colorado and Ohio sites into the project database; (6) Finalize plans with METC for continued monitoring at the Colorado and Ohio sites beyond the initial three year period, and (7) Submit and the Final Case Report on the Colorado site to the DOE and EPRI.

  20. Progression-Free Survival as a Surrogate for Overall Survival in Clinical Trials of Targeted Therapy in Advanced Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Stefan; Saad, Everardo D; Buyse, Marc

    2017-03-23

    Over the past 15 years, targeted therapy has revolutionized the systemic treatment of cancer. In parallel, there has been a growing debate on the choice of end points in clinical trials in oncology. This debate basically hinges on the choice between overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). PFS is advantageous because it is measured earlier than OS, requires a smaller sample size than OS to achieve the desired power, and is not influenced by cross-over. On the other hand, PFS is prone to measurement error and bias, and may not capture the entire treatment effect on the outcomes of most interest to patients with an incurable disease: a prolonged survival and improved quality of life. Therefore, how can we choose between two imperfect end points? The answer to this question would certainly be made easier if PFS could be demonstrated to be a valid surrogate for OS. The validation of a surrogate end point is best made using individual-patient data (IPD) from randomized trials, which allows for standardized assessments of the patient-level and the trial-level correlations between surrogate and final end points. Proper IPD meta-analytical evaluations for targeted agents have still been rare, and to our knowledge only three studies on this topic are currently available in the metastatic setting: one in breast cancer, one in colorectal cancer and one in lung cancer. Although these three studies suffer from limitations inherent to the availability of IPD and the design of the original clinical trials, they have not been able to validate PFS as surrogate for OS, because only modest correlations were found between these two end points, both at the patient and at the trial level. Even if properly conducted surrogate-endpoint evaluations have thus far been unsuccessful, these evaluations are a step in the right direction and can be expected to be applied on a much larger scale in the era of data sharing of clinical trials.

  1. Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}4, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Farthing, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B and W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  2. An Advanced Control System for Fine Coal Flotation. Sixth quarter, technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1997-10-27

    Over the past thirty years, process control has spread from the chemical industry into the fields of mineral and coal processing. Today, process control computers, combined with improved instrumentation, are capable of effective control in many modem flotation circuits. Unfortunately, the classical methods used in most control strategies have severe limitations when used in froth flotation. For example, the nonlinear nature of the flotation process can cause single-input, single-output lines to battle each other in attempts to achieve a given objective. Other problems experienced in classical control schemes include noisy signals from sensors and the inability to measure certain process variables. For example, factors related to ore type or water chemistry, such as liberation, froth stability, and floatability, cannot be measured by conventional means. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate an advanced control system for fine coal flotation. The demonstration is being carried out at an existing coal preparation plant by a team consisting of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI&SU) as the prime contractor and J.A. Herbst and Associates as a subcontractor. The objectives of this work are: (1) to identify through sampling, analysis, and simulation those variables which can be manipulated to maintain grades, recoveries, and throughput rates at levels set by management; (2) to develop and implement a model-based computer control strategy that continuously adjusts those variables to maximize revenue subject to various metallurgical, economic, and environmental constraints; and (3) to employ a video-based optical analyzer for on-line analysis of ash content in fine coal slurries.

  3. Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}8, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in Babcock and Wilcox`s state-of-the-art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; and establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  4. Dietary folate, B vitamins, genetic susceptibility and progression to advanced nonexudative age-related macular degeneration with geographic atrophy: a prospective cohort study12

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Rachel E; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of the importance of nutrition in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but few studies have explored associations with folate and B vitamins. No effective therapeutic strategy for geographic atrophy (GA) is available, and prevention could be of great value. Objective: We investigated associations between dietary folate, B vitamins, and progression to GA and whether these associations might be modified by genetic susceptibility. Design: Among 2525 subjects (4663 eyes) in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, 405 subjects (528 eyes) progressed to GA over 13 y. Folate and B vitamins were log transformed and calorie adjusted separately for men and women. Ten loci in 7 AMD genes [complement factor H, age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2/high-temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1, complement component 2, complement component 3, complement factor B, collagen type VIII α 1, and RAD51 paralog B] were examined. Survival analysis was used to assess associations between incident GA and dietary intake of folate and B vitamins. Interaction effects between these nutrients and genetic variation on AMD risk were also evaluated. Subjects with at least one eye free of advanced AMD at baseline were included in these analyses. Results: There was a reduced risk of progression to GA with increasing intake of thiamin, riboflavin, and folate after adjusting for age, sex, and total energy intake (P-trend = 0.01, 0.03, and 0.001, respectively). After adjustment for demographic, behavioral, ocular, and genetic covariates, trends remained statistically significant for folate (P-trend = 0.007) and were borderline for thiamin (P-trend = 0.05). Riboflavin did not retain statistical significance (P-trend = 0.20). Folate was significantly associated with lower risk of incident GA among subjects homozygous for the complement component 3 (C3) R102G rs2230199 nonrisk genotype (CC) (HR = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.70; P = 0.0005) but not subjects carrying

  5. New Mechanisms of Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Promoting Tumor Progression: Recent Research Advances and Potential Targets for Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Shulin; Hou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The majority of basic and clinical studies have shown a protumor function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which represent a large proportion of matrix cells. TAMs promote tumorigenesis, and their number is related to the malignancy degree and poor prognosis of many kinds of tumors. Macrophage plasticity makes it possible to change the tumor microenvironment and remodel antitumor immunity during cancer immunotherapy. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed the effects of TAMs on the tumor microenvironment, for example, via promotion of tumor growth and tumorigenesis and through an increase in the number of cancer stem cells or via facilitation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis. Investigators also proposed tumor-immunological treatments targeting TAMs by inhibiting TAM recruitment and differentiation, by regulating TAM polarization, and by blocking factors and pathways associated with the protumor function of TAMs. This comprehensive review presents recent research on TAMs in relation to prediction of poor outcomes, remodeling of the tumor immune microenvironment, and immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27975071

  6. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Roh, Young Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m2): no DKD (uACR <30 and eGFR ≥60), non-severe DKD (uACR ≥30 or eGFR <60), and severe DKD (uACR ≥30 and eGFR <60). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and HbA1c variability (standard deviation [SD] of serial HbA1c values or HbA1c-SD) were calculated for the preceding 2 years. Results The prevalence of no DKD, non-severe DKD, and severe DKD was 37.2% (n=118), 37.0% (n=117), and 25.8% (n=82), respectively. HbA1c-SD and the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. Conclusion The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients. PMID:27766790

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 11, April--June, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-07-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 tons of each of three project coals, by each process. During Quarter 11 (April--June, 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Preparation Plant with the installation and calibration of a refurbished 30-inch diameter column. The evaluation of toxic trace element data for column flotation samples continued, with preliminary analysis indicating that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements, and that significant reductions in the concentration of many elements were observed from raw coal, to flotation feed, to flotation product samples. Significant progress was made on Subtask 6.5 selective agglomeration bench-scale testing. Data from this work indicates that project ash specifications can be met for all coals evaluated, and that the bulk of the bridging liquid (heptane) can be removed from the product for recycle to the process. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module progressed this quarter with the completion of several revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Procurement of coal for PDU operation began with the purchase of 800 tons of Taggart coal. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU continued through this reporting quarter and is currently approximately 60% complete.

  8. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma with Doxorubicin in Patients Progressing after Paclitaxel/Carboplatin: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience from 1995-2009

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Hensley, Martee L.; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Aghajanian, Carol. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Long-term survival for patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma is poor, and limited options exist for the management of recurrent disease. Our goal was to investigate the activity of doxorubicin in the second-line setting in patients who progressed after paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant treatment. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma who were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-2009, and who received paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy followed by second-line doxorubicin therapy at time of recurrence. The median PFS and OS times following paclitaxel/carboplatin and following second-line doxorubicin therapy were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed by the treating physician at each visit and graded using version 4.0 of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient presentation, treatment, patterns of recurrence, and patient outcomes were summarized. Results Seventeen patients were included in study analyses. The median PFS from completion of paclitaxel/carboplatin was 8.0 months (95% CI: 4.5-13.6 months). At the time of recurrence, all 17 patients were treated with doxorubicin as second-line therapy. No patient achieved objective response of stable disease. The median PFS of this cohort following doxorubicin treatment was 2.1 months (95% CI: 0.95-2.7) months. Median OS was 5.8 months (95% CI: 1.0-15.0 months). There is only one patient still alive; her median follow-up time is 49.4 months. Predominant doxorubicin-related grade 2 toxicities included nausea/vomiting (18.8%), fatigue (18.8%), and neutropenia (12.5%). No grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred. Conclusions Among patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma who had received adjuvant paclitaxel/carboplatin, treatment with doxorubicin at time of disease recurrence failed to achieve any objective responses and was associated with a very short (2 months) time to

  9. 20 CFR 411.192 - What choices do I have if I am unable to make timely progress toward self-supporting employment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... timely progress toward self-supporting employment? 411.192 Section 411.192 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Suspension of Continuing Disability... disability reviews during those months. The months in which your ticket is in inactive status do not...

  10. An Evaluation of the Value of Choice-Making Opportunities in Single-Operant Arrangements: Simple Fixed- and Progressive-Ratio Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Toussaint, Karen A.; Roath, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The current study compared the effects of choice and no-choice reinforcement conditions on the task responding of 3 children with autism across 2 single-operant paradigm reinforcer assessments. The first assessment employed simple fixed-ratio (FR) schedules; the second used progressive-ratio (PR) schedules. The latter assessment identified the…

  11. {sup 18}Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Is Prognostic of Progression-Free and Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Quon, Andy; Minn, A. Yuriko; Graves, Edward E.; Kunz, Pamela; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) for locally advanced pancreas cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Patients and Methods: Fifty-five previously untreated, unresectable pancreas cancer patients received a single fraction of 25-Gy SBRT sequentially with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. On the preradiation PET-CT, the tumor was contoured and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and metabolic tumor burden (MTB) were calculated using an in-house software application. High-SUVmax and low-SUVmax subgroups were created by categorizing patients above or below the median SUVmax. The analysis was repeated to form high-MTB and low-MTB subgroups as well as clinically relevant subgroups with SUVmax values of <5, 5-10, or >10. Multivariate analysis analyzing SUVmax, MTB, age, chemotherapy cycles, and pretreatment carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 was performed. Results: For the entire population, median survival was 12.7 months. Median survival was 9.8 vs.15.3 months for the high- and low- SUVmax subgroups (p <0.01). Similarly, median survival was 10.1 vs. 18.0 months for the high MTB and low MTB subgroups (p <0.01). When clinical SUVmax cutoffs were used, median survival was 6.4 months in those with SUVmax >10, 9.5 months with SUVmax 5.0-10.0, and 17.7 months in those with SUVmax <5 (p <0.01). On multivariate analysis, clinical SUVmax was an independent predictor for overall survival (p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (p = 0.03). Conclusion: PET scan parameters can predict for length of survival in locally advanced pancreas cancer patients.

  12. Long Term Progression-Free Survival in a Patient with Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer under Low Dose Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy with Bicalutamide Only.

    PubMed

    Latz, Stefan; Fisang, Christian; Ebert, Wolfram; Orth, Stefan; Engehausen, Dirk G; Müller, Stefan C; Anding, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is a common treatment option in patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. No case of long term treatment with an intermittent approach with only low dose bicalutamide (50 mg daily) has been described yet. We report a 60-year-old patient, initially presenting with a PSA elevation of 19.2 ng/mL in 1996. After diagnosis of well to moderately differentiated prostate cancer by transrectal biopsy, the patient underwent an open radical prostatectomy. Final diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of the prostate, classified as pT3a, pR1, pV0, and pL1. Adjuvant intermittent androgen deprivation therapy with flutamide 250 mg was applied, which was changed to bicalutamide 50 mg once daily when it became available in 2001. Six on-phases were performed and PSA values never exceeded 20 ng/mL. The patient did not experience any serious side effects. To date, there are no clinical or radiological signs of progression. Current PSA value is 3.5 ng/mL.

  13. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1993-04-26

    The main purpose of this project is engineering development of advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies for cleaning coal. Development of these technologies is an important step in the Department of Energy program to show that ultra-clean fuel can be produced from selected United States coals and that this fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for a portion of the premium fuels (oil and natural gas) burned by electric utility and industrial boilers in this country. Capturing a relatively small fraction of the total utility and industrial oil-fired boiler fuel market would have a significant impact on domestic coal production and reduce national dependence on petroleum fuels. Significant potential export markets also exist in Europe and the Pacific Rim for cost-effective premium fuels prepared from ultra-clean coal. The replacement of premium fossil fuels with coal can only be realized if retrofit costs, and boiler derating are kept to a minimum. Also, retrofit boiler emissions must be compatible with national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for the ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of ultra-clean coal discussed below. The cost-shared contract effort is for 48 months beginning September 30, 1992, and ending September 30, 1996. This report discusses the technical progress made during the second 3 months of the project, January 1 to March 31, 1993.

  14. Exploring uncertainty in advance care planning in African Americans: does low health literacy influence decision making preference at end of life.

    PubMed

    Melhado, Lolita; Bushy, Angeline

    2011-11-01

    African Americans over 65 represent 3.5 of the 35.6 million Americans. Morbidity and mortality rates are highest among this group; associated with lack of resources and awareness of health problems. But health needs are the same at end of life, yet care is less than optimal. African Americans are less likely to have advance directives nonetheless desire communication, information, respect, and a trusting doctor-patient relationship. Low health literacy may contribute to this disparity. This scholarly review examines the health literacy in advance care planning and refines concepts of uncertainty in illness theory deriving a model for advance care planning in African Americans.

  15. The Brain Trust: Advancement Services Helps Institutions Use Data Strategically to Meet Fundraising Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medlock, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    It was not all that many years ago that advancement services was thought of as the "back office"--a term that still makes veterans in the field cringe. Historically, the role of advancement services was keeping donor and alumni records up-to-date, processing gifts, sending receipts, and generating fundraising progress reports. However,…

  16. Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-22

    Objective is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery and to transfer this technology to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced technologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elswhere in the US oil and gas industry. This is the first quarterly progress report on the project; results to date are summarized.

  17. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  18. The Monsoon-90 / SALSA / EOS / SUDMED / SAHRA / HELP / USPP Experience: A Progression of Interdisciplinary Integration of Science and Decision Making over 20 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehbouni, G.; Goodrich, D.; Kustas, B.; Sorooshian, S.; Shuttleworth, J.; Richter, H.

    2008-12-01

    The Monsoon'90 Experiment conducted at the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southeast Arizona was the start of a long arc of subsequent experiments and research that were larger, longer-term, more international, more interdisciplinary, and led to more direct integration of science for decision making and watershed management. In this era, much of our research and science must be more directly relevant to decision-makers and natural resource managers as they increasingly require sophisticated levels of expert findings and scientific results (e.g. interdisciplinary) to make informed decisions. Significant effort beyond focused, single disciplinary research is required conduct interdisciplinary science typical in large scale field experiments. Even greater effort is required to effectively integrate our research across the physical and ecological sciences for direct use by policy and decision makers. This presentation will provide an overview of the evolution of this arc of experiments and long-term projects into a mature integrated science and decision making program. It will discuss the transition in project focus from science and research for understanding; through science for addressing a need; to integrated science and policy development. At each stage the research conducted became more interdisciplinary, first across abiotic disciplines (hydrology, remote sensing, atmospheric science), then by merging abiotic and biotic disciplines (adding ecology and plant physiology), and finally a further integration of economic and social sciences with and policy and decision making for resource management. Lessons learned from this experience will be reviewed with the intent providing guidance to ensure that the resulting research is socially and scientifically relevant and will not only result in cutting edge science but will also directly address the needs of policy makers and resource managers.

  19. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Ninth quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1992-- December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, C.L.

    1992-12-31

    This is the 9th quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled ``Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies``, DE-FG22-90PC90295. The work presented in this report was performed from September 1, 1992 to November 31, 1992. The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface chemistry of pyrite oxidation and flotation and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the surface oxidation of pyrite in various electrolytes was investigated. It has been demonstrated, for the first time, that borate, a pH buffer and electrolyte used by many previous investigators in studying sulfide mineral oxidation, actively participates in the surface oxidation of pyrite. In borate solutions, the surface oxidation of pyrite is tronly enhanced. The anodic oxidation potential of pyrite is lowered by more than 0.4 volts. The initial reaction of the borate enhanced pyrite oxidation can be described by:FeS{sub 2} + B(OH){sub 4}{sup =} ------> [S{sub 2}Fe-B(OH){sub 4}]{sub surf} + e. This reaction is irreversible and is controlled by the mass-transfer of borate species from the solution to the surface. It has been shown that the above reaction inhibits the adsorption of xanthate on pyrite. Comparative studies have been made with other sulfide minerals. The solution chemistry of the iron-borate systems have been studied to understand the electrochemical results.

  20. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-01-25

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

  1. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-02-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  2. Using SAR and GPS for Hazard Management and Response: Progress and Examples from the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. E.; Simons, M.; Hua, H.; Yun, S. H.; Agram, P. S.; Milillo, P.; Sacco, G. F.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Lundgren, P.; Milillo, G.; Manipon, G. J. M.; Moore, A. W.; Liu, Z.; Polet, J.; Cruz, J.

    2014-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech project to automate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and GPS imaging capabilities for scientific understanding, hazard response, and societal benefit. We have built a prototype SAR and GPS data system that forms the foundation for hazard monitoring and response capability, as well as providing imaging capabilities important for science studies. Together, InSAR and GPS have the ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution. For earthquakes, this deformation provides information that is complementary to seismic data on location, geometry and magnitude of earthquakes. Accurate location information is critical for understanding the regions affected by damaging shaking. Regular surface deformation measurements from SAR and GPS are useful for monitoring changes related to many processes that are important for hazard and resource management such as volcanic deformation, groundwater withdrawal, and landsliding. Observations of SAR coherence change have a demonstrated use for damage assessment for hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and volcanic eruptions. These damage assessment maps can be made from imagery taken day or night and are not affected by clouds, making them valuable complements to optical imagery. The coherence change caused by the damage from hazards (building collapse, flooding, ash fall) is also detectable with intelligent algorithms, allowing for rapid generation of damage assessment maps over large areas at fine resolution, down to the spatial scale of single family homes. We will present the progress and results we have made on automating the analysis of SAR data for hazard monitoring and response using data from the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) COSMO-SkyMed constellation of X-band SAR satellites. Since the beginning of our project with ASI, our team has imaged deformation and coherence change caused by many natural hazard events around the world. We will present progress on our

  3. Research Advances. Image Pinpoints All 5 Million Atoms in Viral Coat; Bilirubin, "Animals-Only" Pigment, Found in Plants; New Evidence Shows Humans Make Salicylic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Angela G.

    2009-08-01

    Recent "firsts" in chemical research: image of a viral capsid pinpointing 5 million atoms; isolation and identification of an "animal" pigment, bilirubin, from a plant source; evidence that humans make salicylic acid.

  4. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the ``Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

  5. Where People Live and Die Makes a Difference: Individual and Geographic Disparities in Well-Being Progression at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Gerstorf, Denis; Ram, Nilam; Goebel, Jan; Schupp, Jürgen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Wagner, Gert G.

    2010-01-01

    Lifespan psychological research has long been interested in the contextual embeddedness of individual development. To examine if and how regional factors relate to between-person disparities in the progression of late-life well-being, we applied three-level growth curve models to 24-year longitudinal data from deceased participants of the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (N = 3,427; age at death: 18 to 101 years). Results indicate steep declines in well-being with impending death, with some 8% of the between-person differences in both level and decline of well-being reflecting between-county differences. Exploratory analyses revealed that individuals living and dying in less affluent counties reported lower late-life well-being, controlling for key individual predictors including age at death, gender, education, and household income. The regional factors examined did not directly relate to well-being change, but were found to moderate (e.g., amplify) the disparities in change attributed to individual factors. Our results suggest that resource-poor counties provide relatively less fertile grounds for successful aging until the end of life and may serve to exacerbate disparities. We conclude that examinations of how individual and residential characteristics interact can further our understanding of individual psychological outcomes and suggest routes for future inquiry. PMID:20677887

  6. Older patient considering treatment for advanced renal disease: protocol for a scoping review of the information available for shared decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Mai; Jose, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Older adults constitute the largest group of patients on dialysis in most parts of the world. Management of advanced renal disease in the older adult is complex; treatment outcomes and prognosis can be markedly different from younger patients. Clinical teams caring for such patients are often called on to provide information regarding prognosis and outcomes with treatment—particularly, the comparison between having dialysis treatment versus not having dialysis. These discussions can be difficult for clinicians because they have to contend with incomplete or nascent data regarding prognosis and outcomes in this age group. We aim to summarise the currently available information regarding the prognosis and outcomes of advanced renal disease in the older adult by means of a scoping review of the literature. This article discusses our protocol. Methods This scoping review will be undertaken in accordance with the Joanna Briggs Institute's methodology for scoping reviews. A directed search will look for relevant articles in English (within electronic databases and the grey literature), written between 2000 and 2016, which have studied older patients with advanced renal disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2). After screening by two independent reviewers, selected articles will be analysed using a data charting tool. Reporting will include descriptions, analysis of themes using qualitative software and display of information using charts. Ethics and dissemination This scoping review will analyse previously collected data, and so does not require ethical approval. Results will be disseminated through academic journals, conferences and seminars. We anticipate that our summary of the currently available knowledge regarding the older adult with advanced renal disease will be a repository of information for clinicians in the field. We expect to identify areas of study that are suited to systematic reviews. Our findings can also be

  7. Making of epistemologically sophisticated physics teachers: A cross-sequential study of epistemological progression from preservice to in-service teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lin; Zhang, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Previous literature on learners' epistemological beliefs about physics has almost exclusively focused on analysis of university classroom instruction and its effects on students' views. However, little is known about other populations or factors other than classroom instruction on learners' epistemologies. In this study, we used a cross-sequential method, combining both longitudinal and cross-sectional designs, to investigate an epistemological progression trend from preservice to in-service teachers. Six cohorts of participants were studied, who either were then attending or had completed an undergraduate teacher preparation program in physics at a major Chinese university. These cohorts were incoming freshmen, end-of-year freshmen, end-of-year sophomores, end-of-year juniors, end-of-year seniors, and 1st-year high school physics teachers who were about to enter the 2nd year of teaching. We used the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) as both a pretest and a post-test to gauge the changes in the participants' epistemological views over an entire academic year. Follow-up interviews were also conducted to explore factors responsible for such changes. Results showed that the epistemological trend as measured by CLASS did not increase monotonically. Instead, there was a decrease in the epistemological trend among the incoming freshmen in their first year undergraduate studies, followed by a long stasis until the end of the senior year. Then, there was a rebound for the end-of-year seniors in their 1st year of teaching, followed by another plateau. Interviews revealed that the competitive learning environment, increased content difficulty, and unfamiliar pedagogies in college were major factors that negatively influenced incoming freshmen's views about physics. Conversely, a role change from student to teacher and relatively easy content in high school positively impacted end-of-year seniors' views about physics and learning.

  8. Next-Gen Gene Synthesis Enables Large-Scale Engineering in Biological Systems: Recent advances in synthetic biology are making this field more promising than ever.

    PubMed

    Leake, Devin

    2015-01-01

    As scientists make strides toward the goal of developing a form of biological engineering that's as predictive and reliable as chemical engineering is for chemistry, one technology component has become absolutely critical: gene synthesis. Gene synthesis is the process of building stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to order--some stretches based on DNA that exists already in nature, some based on novel designs intended to accomplish new functions. This process is the foundation of synthetic biology, which is rapidly becoming the engineering counterpart to biology.

  9. IPY Progress and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D.

    2008-12-01

    We can summarize the IPY goals as: (a) make major advances in polar knowledge and understanding; (b) leave a legacy of new or enhanced observational systems, facilities and infrastructure; (c) excite a new generation of polar scientists and engineers, and (d) elicit exceptional interest and participation from polar residents, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide. This talk reports on the progress and prospects in each of those areas from an overall international view; separate talks will describe details of future researcher and the IPY outreach efforts. To achieve major advances in knowledge, IPY has entrained the intellectual resources of thousands of scientists, many more than expected, often from 'non- polar' nations, and representing an unprecedented breadth of scientific specialties; integration of those efforts across disciplines to achieve integrated system-level understanding remains a substantial challenge. Many national and international organizations prepare plans to sustain new and improved observational systems, but clear outcomes and the necessary resources remain elusive. International outreach networks gradually build breadth and strength, largely through IPY Polar Science Days and other internationally- coordinated IPY events. A new Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) devotes talent and energy to shaping the future of polar research. These activities and networks may, with time and with continued international coordination, achieve an exceptional level of interest and participation. In all areas, much work remains.

  10. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    SciTech Connect

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  11. 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1994, April 1994--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NOx burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters. Results are described.

  12. 1999 annual progress report -- Energy conservation team

    SciTech Connect

    Chalk, S.

    1999-10-19

    This report highlights progress achieved during FY 1999 under the Light-duty Fuels Utilization R and D Program. The program is comprised of two elements: the Advanced Petroleum-Based APB Fuels Program which focused on developing and testing advanced fuels for use with compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines and fuel cells and the Alternative Fuels Program which focused on Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels. The report contains 17 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects. Fuel efficient vehicles with very low emissions are essential to meet the challenges of climate change, energy security, and improved air quality. The authors anticipate cooperative efforts with the auto and energy industries to develop new and innovative technologies that will be used to make advanced transportation vehicles that are fuel efficient, clean, and safe.

  13. Do the changes in muscle mass, muscle direction, and rotations of the condyles that occur after sagittal split advancement osteotomies play a role in the aetiology of progressive condylar resorption?

    PubMed

    Dicker, G J; Castelijns, J A; Tuinzing, D B; Stoelinga, P J W

    2015-05-01

    Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA), volume (indicating muscle strength), and direction of the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles after surgical mandibular advancement were measured, along with the rotation of the condyles after bilateral sagittal split osteotomies (BSSOs) to advance the mandible. Measurements were done on magnetic resonance images obtained before and 2 years after surgery. CSA and volume were measured in five short-face and seven long-face patients (five males, seven females). Muscle direction was calculated in eight short-face and eight long-face patients (eight males, eight females). Short-face patients underwent BSSO only; long-face patients underwent combined BSSO and Le Fort I osteotomies. The CSA and volume decreased significantly (mean 18%) in all patients after surgery. The postoperative muscle direction was significantly more vertical (9°) in long-face patients. Rotations of the proximal segments (condyles) were minimal after 2 years. The results of this study showed that, after BSSO advancement surgery, changes in the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles are not likely to cause increased pressure on the condyles and nor are the minimal rotations of the condyles. It is concluded that neither increased muscle traction nor condylar rotations can be held responsible for progressive condylar resorption after advancement BSSO.

  14. Native Americans Make Progress Against Diabetes Complication

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney failure in all racial/ethnic groups. Mary Smith is Indian Health Service principal deputy director. She ... improvements in clinical care by the IHS." And, Smith added, "We believe these strategies can be effective ...

  15. Progress of UV-NIL template making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Nakanishi, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Shiho; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2009-04-01

    Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) has been counted as one of the lithography candidates for hp32nm node and beyond and has showed excellent resolution capability with remarkable low line edge roughness that is attracting many researchers in the industry who were searching for the finest patterning technology. Therefore, recently we have been focusing on the resolution improvement on the NIL templates with the 100keV acceleration voltage spot beam (SB) EB writer and the 50keV acceleration voltage variable shaped beam (VSB) EB writer. The 100keV SB writers have high resolution capability, but they show fatally low throughput if we need full chip writing. Usually templates for resolution pioneers needed just a small field (several hundred microns square or so), but recently requirements for full chip templates are increasing. For full chip writing, we have also started the resolution improvement with the 50keV VSB writers used in current 4X photomask manufacturing. The 50keV VSB writers could generate full chip pattern in a reasonable time though resolution limits are inferior to that with the 100keV SB writers. In this paper, we will show latest results with both the 100keV SB and the 50keV VSB EB writers. With the 100keV SB EB writer, we have achieved down to hp15nm resolution for line and space pattern, but found that to achieve further improvement, an innovation in pattern generation method or material would be inevitable. With the 50keV VSB EB writer, we have achieved down to hp22nm resolution for line and space pattern. Though NIL has excellent resolution capability, solutions for defect inspection and repair are not clearly shown yet. In this paper, we will show preliminary inspection results with an EB inspection tool. We tested an EB inspection tool by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI), which was originally developed for and are currently used as a wafer inspection tool, and now have been started to seek the application for mask use, using a programmed defect template.

  16. Indigenous child health: are we making progress?

    PubMed

    Brewster, David R; Morris, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    We identified 244 relevant articles pertinent to indigenous health (4% of the total) with a steady increase in number since 1995. Most Australian publications in the journal (with a small Indigenous population) have focussed on conditions such as malnutrition, diarrhoeal disease, iron deficiency, rheumatic fever, acute glomerulonephritis and respiratory and ear infections, and in settings where nearly all affected children are Indigenous. In contrast, New Zealand publications (with a large Maori and Pacific Islander population) have addressed important health issues affecting all children but emphasised the over-representation of Maori and Pacific Islanders. Publications in the journal are largely descriptive studies with relatively few systematic reviews and randomised trials. Our review attempts to cover the important Indigenous health issues in our region as represented by articles published in the Journal. The studies do document definite improvements in indigenous child health over the last 50 years.

  17. Comprehensive Trail Making Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT) is designed to be used in neuropsychological assessment for the purposes of detecting effects of brain defects and deficits and in tracking progress in rehabilitation. More specific purposes include the detection of frontal lobe deficits, problems with psychomotor speed, visual search and sequencing,…

  18. Advanced manual lensometry: a self-learning guide for evaluating multifocal and specialty lenses, progressive lenses, prisms, and rigid contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Garber, N

    2000-01-01

    Advanced manual lensometry techniques are required when automated lensometry may not be appropriate for reading special lenses or rigid contact lenses. These advanced techniques are challenging but provide accurate diagnostic and lens verification data. One should never assume that the glasses the patient is wearing match what the doctor prescribed. The prescription should be checked at least once, even when there are no patient complaints. If possible, learn and practice these special procedures under the supervision of an optician or ophthalmic clinical trainer. This will help to verify that you are performing these special techniques correctly.

  19. Living with Advanced MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... more progressive disease course. Taking these factors into account can help you and your family plan more effectively for the future. Identifying options The key message to anyone living with advanced MS is ...

  20. Progress report on understanding AFIS seed coat nep levels in pre-opened slivers on the Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS) is utilized in this segment of the research project to study how seed coat neps are measured. A patent search was conducted, and studied to assist with the understanding of the AFIS measurement of this impurity in raw cotton. The older AFIS 2 is primari...

  1. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are briefly described for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale and tar sand researches cover processing studies. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology covers: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

  2. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  3. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

  4. Engineereing development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1994-02-18

    This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. The project has three major objectives: The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

  5. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1993-01-18

    This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean fuel can be produced from selected coals and that the fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling boilers in this country. The replacement of premium fossil fuels with coal can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the ultra-clean coal. The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term commercial integration of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for economically and efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines. A third objective is to determine the distribution of toxic trace elements between clean coal and refuse when applying the advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies. The project team consists of Amax Research & Development Center (Amax R&D), Amax Coal industries, Bechtel Corporation, Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky, and Arcanum Corporation.

  6. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  7. You Make the Call.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Five situations are posed in which a college advancement administrator must make an ethical judgment. They involve renaming a building named after a graduate, use of personal versus institutional funds for a sensitive information search, use of unrestricted gifts, respecting donor intentions, and candor in information dissemination. Readers are…

  8. Continuing EGFR-TKI treatment in combination with super-selective arterial infusion chemotherapy beyond disease progression for patients with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Huiwei; Jiang, Sen; Yu, Dong; Ni, Huijuan; Hu, Qiong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Regional therapy has shown promising results in patients with an oligo-metastasis after the occurrence of resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of continuing EGFR-TKI therapy concurrently with arterial infusion chemotherapy in 6 patients (median age 55.9 years) with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had a locally progressive, centrally located lung lesion after EGFR-TKI therapy. The patients received a super-selective arterial infusion of docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)) every 28 days concurrently with EGFR-TKI therapy until further progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable adverse effects (AEs) occurred. Treatment outcomes were assessed via progression-free survival (PFS) times (PFS-1: time to PD after EGFR-TKI therapy; PFS-2: time to further PD after arterial infusion chemotherapy with EGFR-TKI therapy), the occurrence of treatment-related AEs, and patient responses to the QLQ-LC13 quality-of-life questionnaire. Three of the 6 patients achieved partial responses, and three had stable disease. The median PFS-1 was 10.42 months, and the median PFS-2 was 4.1 months (range, 2.1-5.7 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 28.6 months (range, 24.1-32.9 months). All AEs were either grade 1 or grade 2 in severity, and no unexpected AEs were observed. One patient died of lung cancer. The patients reported significant reductions from baseline in symptoms of cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and hemoptysis (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Thus, continuing EGFR-TKI therapy in combination with super-selective arterial infusion chemotherapy beyond PD for patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC is feasible, and this approach warrants further investigation.

  9. FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect

    2005-10-01

    In cooperation with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies, the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program is advancing the state of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in support of the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The initiative seeks to develop hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed to make it practical and cost-effective for Americans to choose to use fuel cell vehicles by 2020. Significant progress was made in fiscal year 2005 toward that goal.

  10. Positron emission tomography has a high negative predictive value for progression or early relapse for patients with residual disease after first-line chemotherapy in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, Carsten; Dietlein, Markus; Franklin, Jeremy; Markova, Jana; Lohri, Andreas; Amthauer, Holger; Klutmann, Susanne; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Bockisch, Andreas; Weckesser, Matthias; Lorenz, Reinhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bares, Roland; Eich, Hans T.; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Fuchs, Michael; Borchmann, Peter; Schicha, Harald; Diehl, Volker

    2008-01-01

    In the HD15 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group, the negative predictive value (NPV) of positron emission tomography (PET) using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) was evaluated. A total of 817 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive BEACOPP-based chemotherapy. After completion of chemotherapy, residual disease measuring more than or equal to 2.5 cm in diameter was assessed by PET in 311 patients. The NPV of PET was defined as the proportion of PET− patients without progression, relapse, or irradiation within 12 months after PET review panel. The progression-free survival was 96% for PET− patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 94%-99%) and 86% for PET+ patients (95% CI, 78%-95%, P = .011). The NPV for PET in this analysis was 94% (95% CI, 91%-97%). Thus, consolidation radiotherapy can be omitted in PET− patients with residual disease without increasing the risk for progression or early relapse compared with patients in complete remission. The impact of this finding on the overall survival at 5 years must be awaited. Until then, response adapted therapy guided by PET for HL patients seems to be a promising approach that should be further evaluated in clinical trials. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org study as #ISRCTN32443041. PMID:18757777

  11. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 23, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  12. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In order to develop additional confidence in the conceptual design of the advanced froth flotation circuit, a 2-3 TPH Proof-of-Concept (POC) facility was necessary. During operation of this facility, the ICF KE team will demonstrate the ability of the conceptual flowsheets to meet the program goals of maximum pyritic sulfur reduction coupled with maximum energy recovery on three DOE specified coals. The POC circuit was designed to be integrated into the Ohio Coal Development`s facility near Beverly, Ohio. OCDO`s facility will provide the precleaning unit operations and ICF KE will add the advanced froth flotation circuitry. The work in this task will include the POC conceptual design, flowsheet development, equipment list, fabrication and construction drawings, procurement specifications and bid packages and a facilities.

  13. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 16, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  14. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 24, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  15. Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration phase 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

  16. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system. Technical progress report No. 1, August--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-26

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems`` Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

  17. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 16, July--September, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, G.L.; Moro, N.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-10-30

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. 28 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 15, April 15 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-19

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering; Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quote} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis.

  19. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Morea, M.F.

    1998-04-23

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project focused on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field. Progress to date is described.

  20. Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1983-04-21

    The overall objective of the Westinghouse coal gasification program is to demonstrate the viability of the Westinghouse pressurized, fluidized bed, gasification system for the production of medium-Btu fuel gas for syngas, electrical power generation, chemical feedstocks, or industrial fuels and to obtain performance and scaleup data for the process and hardware. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) operation and maintenance of the process development unit (PDU); (2) process analysis; (3) cold flow scaleup facility; (4) process component engineering and design; and (5) laboratory support studies involving gas solids flow modeling and coal/ash behavior. 9 figures, 19 tables.

  1. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Advanced research and technology. Technical progress report, 1 January 1983-31 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1983-05-01

    The primary objective is to develop and/or improve methods for utilization of coal fly ash as a source of minerals. Processes are being studied for the recovery of aluminium, iron, and titanium from fly ash and for the utilization of residues. There are 4 tasks which include: development of the HiChlor process; improvement of the Lime-Soda Sinter Process; improvement of the Lime-Flyash Sinter Process; and the recovery and use of an iron-rich fly ash fraction. Progress accomplished during the quarter ending March 31, 1983, is reported. 6 references, 21 figures, 9 tables. (DMC)

  2. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    PubMed

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses.

  3. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 12, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-10-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by June, 1997. During Quarter 12 (July--September 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at Lady Dunn. Under Subtask 4.4, additional toxic trace element analysis of column flotation samples finalized the data set. Data analysis indicates that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements. The final Subtask 6.3 Selective Agglomeration Process Optimization topical report was issued this quarter. Preliminary Subtask 6.4 work investigating coal-water-fuel slurry formulation indicated that selective agglomeration products formulate slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Work continued on Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing. Results indicate that a 2 lb ash/MBtu product could be produced at a 100-mesh topsize with the Elkhorn No. 3 coal. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module neared completion this quarter with the completion of additional revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU and advanced flotation module was completed this quarter and startup and shakedown testing began.

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly progress report No. 10, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-04-27

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and benchscale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by June, 1997. During Quarter 10 (January--March, 1995), preliminary work continued for the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Preparation Plant. Towards this end, laboratory flotation testing and refurbishing of the column have been started. The final version of the Subtask 4.2 Advanced Flotation Process Optimization Research topical report was issued, as was a draft version of the Subtask 4.3 report discussing the formulation of coal-water slurry fuels (CWF) from advanced flotation products. A number of product samples from Subtask 4.4 testing were sent to both Combustion Engineering and Penn State for combustion testing. The evaluation of toxic trace element analyses of column flotation products also continued. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr PDU was essentially completed with the approval of various process flow, plant layout, electrical, and vendor equipment drawings. The final version of the Subtask 6.5 -- Selective Agglomeration Bench-Scale Design and Test Plan Report was issued during this reporting quarter. Design and construction of this 25 lb/hr selective agglomeration test unit was completed and preliminary testing started. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU began following the selection of TIC. The Industrial Company as the construction subcontractor.

  5. Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, S. , Casteel, J.

    1997-05-11

    The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and

  6. European Archaeomagnetism: Progress and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Hoye, G.

    2009-05-01

    Much progress has been made since the seminal work of Giuseppe Folgheraiter (1856-1913) in the late 19th century. So much so that recent advances now make it possible to draw up complete isogonic and isoclinic maps for Europe and adjacent areas spanning the last three millennia (Pavon-Carrasco et al., 2009). Results based on multiple independent studies, with high precision and good age control are crucial and should be recognized as "anchor points" (e.g. Pompeii). On the other hand, the nagging problem of outliers persists. Among the possible causes are magnetic refraction, physical distortion, and inadequate chronological control. Some examples, drawn from our own investigations over the last 30 years, will be discussed in detail. These include previously unpublished data from a detailed study (more than 100 samples) of a kiln in southern Italy, and an apparently good (but aberrant) archaeodirection from a kiln in southern Spain.

  7. Green Chemistry: Progress and Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Sarah A.

    2016-10-01

    Green chemistry can advance both the health of the environment and the primary objectives of the chemical enterprise: to understand the behavior of chemical substances and to use that knowledge to make useful substances. We expect chemical research and manufacturing to be done in a manner that preserves the health and safety of workers; green chemistry extends that expectation to encompass the health and safety of the planet. While green chemistry may currently be treated as an independent branch of research, it should, like safety, eventually become integral to all chemistry activities. While enormous progress has been made in shifting from "brown" to green chemistry, much more effort is needed to effect a sustainable economy. Implementation of new, greener paradigms in chemistry is slow because of lack of knowledge, ends-justify-the-means thinking, systems inertia, and lack of financial or policy incentives.

  8. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Cole, N.C.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)

  9. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR&TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Cole, N.C.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)

  10. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.; Ershaghi, I.; Davies, D.; Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J.

    1995-07-28

    This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

  11. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology provide considerable opportunity for application to future aircraft thermal protection system (TPS), providing materials with higher temperature capability, lower weight, and higher strength and stiffness than traditional materials. The Thermal Protection Material Branch at NASA Ames Research Center has been making significant progress in the development, characterization, and entry simulation (arc-jet) testing of new CMC's. This protection gives a general overview of the Ames Thermal Protection Materials Branch research activities, followed by more detailed descriptions of recent advances in very-high temperature Zr and Hf based ceramics, high temperature, high strength SiC matrix composites, and some activities in polymer precursors and ceramic coating processing. The presentation closes with a brief comparison of maximum heat flux capabilities of advanced TPS materials.

  12. Making Pickles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Sarah

    1977-01-01

    Making pickles developed from a laboratory lesson during a unit on solutions, suspensions, acids, and bases. The pickle lab has been used as a summation and application of these topics. Directions for setting up the lab experience and actually making the pickles are included. (MA)

  13. Cold plasma processing technology makes advances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma (AKA nonthermal plasma, cool plasma, gas plasma, etc.) is a rapidly maturing antimicrobial process being developed for applications in the food industry. A wide array of devices can be used to create cold plasma, but the defining characteristic is that they operate at or near room temper...

  14. Breakthrough: Using Microbes to Make Advanced Biofuels

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay

    2016-07-12

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab's Associate Director for Bioscience and the CEO of DOE's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), explains how special strains of microbes can convert the biomass of non-food crops and agricultural waste into fuels for cars, trucks and jet planes. Keasling's research team at JBEI has developed E.coli that can digest switchgrass and convert the plant sugars into gasoline, diesel or jet fuel, not unlike the process by which beer is brewed.

  15. Breakthrough: Using Microbes to Make Advanced Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab's Associate Director for Bioscience and the CEO of DOE's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), explains how special strains of microbes can convert the biomass of non-food crops and agricultural waste into fuels for cars, trucks and jet planes. Keasling's research team at JBEI has developed E.coli that can digest switchgrass and convert the plant sugars into gasoline, diesel or jet fuel, not unlike the process by which beer is brewed.

  16. Advancing the Profession through Journals. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on advancing the profession of human resource development (HRD). "The Role of the 'Human Resource Development Quarterly' in Shaping the HRD Profession: An Eight and One-Half Year Perspective" (Ronald L. Jacobs) discusses the progress of the quarterly and makes suggestions to authors to enhance…

  17. Second generation advanced reburning for high efficiency NO{sub x} control. Progress report No. 2, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, V.M.

    1996-04-25

    Existing NO{sub x} control technologies have limitations which may prevent them from successfully achieving commercial, cost effective application in the near future. This project develops a family of novel NO{sub x} control technologies, Second Generation Advanced Reburning (SGAR), which have a potential to achieve 90+% NO{sub x} control at a significantly lower cost than Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). Phase I consists of six tasks: Task 1.1, project coordination and reporting deliverables; Task 1.2, kinetics of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} reactions with flue gas components; Task 1.3, 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} Btu/hr optimization studies; Task 1.4, 1.0 {times} 10{sup 6} Btu/hr process development tests; Task 1.5, mechanism development and modeling; and Task 1.6, design methodology and application. This second reporting period included both modeling and experimental activities. Modeling was focused on evaluation of ammonia injection into the reburning zone and on the effect of various additives on promotion of the NO-NH{sub 3} interaction in the reburning zone. First bench scale Controlled Temperature Tower (CTT) experiments have been performed on different variants of the Advanced Returning technology. The tests are continued, and the results will be reduced and reported in the next quarter.

  18. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems: Technical progress report No. 16, July-September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Barcikowski, G.F.; Borio, R.W.; Bozzuto, C.R.; Burr, D.H.; Cellilli, L.; Fox, J.D.; Gibbons, T.B.; Hargrove, M.J.; Jukkola, G.D.; King, A.M.

    1996-11-27

    The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The Project is under budget and generally on schedule. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Status Report included as Appendix A. Under Task 7--Component development and optimization, the CeraMem filter testing was completed. Due to an unacceptably high flue gas draft loss, which will not be resolved in the POCTF timeframe, a decision was made to change the design of the flue gas cleaning system from Hot SNO{sub x}{sup {trademark}} to an advanced dry scrubber called New Integrated Desulfurization (NID). However, it is recognized that the CeraMem filter still has the potential to be viable in pulverized coal systems. In Task 8-- Preliminary POCTF design, integrating and optimizing the performance and design of the boiler, turbine/generator and heat exchangers of the Kalina cycle as well as the balance of plant design were completed. Licensing activities continued. A NID system was substituted for the SNO{sub x} Hot Process.

  19. Phlebotonic and compression stocking therapy in venous edema management: an overview of recent advances with a focus on Cyclo 3 Fort® and progressive compression stockings.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Patrick; Allaert, François-André; Chudek, Jerzy; Mosti, Giovanni

    2013-07-01

    Venous edema of the limb presents several challenges to clinicians, particularly with regard to its definition, pathophysiology and measurement, as well as those relating to its management. Compression therapy forms the cornerstone of standard care for thromboprophylaxis and management of lower limb venous and lymphatic disorders. Venoactive drugs, of plant or synthetic origin, have also been shown to be effective and safe in the management of venous edema and/or chronic venous disease-related symptoms. This article, based on a symposium held at the XXV World Congress of the International Union of Angiology on 2-5 July 2012 (Prague, Czech Republic), provides an overview of some of the recent developments in the use of phlebotonic and compression therapy in the management of patients with lower limb venous edema, with a focus on Cyclo 3 Fort(®) and progressive compression stockings.

  20. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  1. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Lara; Dirven, Linda; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Koekkoek, Johan A. F.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Pasman, H. Roeline W.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL) care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP). Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population. PMID:27834803

  2. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor Phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995 No. 16

    SciTech Connect

    Borio, R.W.

    1995-12-15

    The objective of this project is to retrofit a burner, capable of firing microfine coal, to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the sixteenth quarter (July `95 through September `95) of the program. The overall program has consisted of five major tasks: (1) A review of current state-of-the-art coal firing system components. (2) Design and experimental testing of a prototype HEACC (High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor) burner. (3) Installation and testing of a prototype HEACC system in a commercial retrofit application. (4) Economics evaluation of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications. (5) Long term demonstration under commercial user demand conditions.

  3. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 15, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-07-25

    Goal is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on 6 coals to optimize these processes, followed by design/construction/operation of a 2-t/hr PDU. During this quarter, parametric testing of the 30-in. Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn plant was completed and clean coal samples submitted for briquetting. A study of a novel hydrophobic dewatering process continued at Virginia Tech. Benefits of slurry PSD (particle size distribution) modification and pH adjustment were evaluated for the Taggart and Hiawatha coals; they were found to be small. Agglomeration bench-scale test results were positive, meeting product ash specifications. PDU Flotation Module operations continued; work was performed with Taggart coal to determine scaleup similitude between the 12-in. and 6-ft Microcel{trademark} columns. Construction of the PDU selective agglomeration module continued.

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a contract entitled ``Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technology - Froth Flotation``, to ICF Kaiser Engineers with the following team members, Ohio Coal Development Office, Babcock and Wilcox, Consolidation Coal Company, Eimco Process Equipment Company, Illinois State Geological Survey, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Process Technology, Inc. This document a quarterly report prepared in accordance with the project reporting requirements covering the period from July 1, 1992 to September 30, 1992. This report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

    1999-10-15

    This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

  6. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 13, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-01-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. During Quarter 13 (October--December 1995), testing of the GranuFlow dewatering process indicated a 3--4% reduction in cake moisture for screen-bowl and solid-bowl centrifuge products. The Orimulsion additions were also found to reduce the potential dustiness of the fine coal, as well as improve solids recovery in the screen-bowl centrifuge. Based on these results, Lady Dunn management now plans to use a screen bowl centrifuge to dewater their Microcel{trademark} column froth product. Subtask 3.3 testing, investigating a novel Hydrophobic Dewatering process (HD), continued this quarter. Continuing Subtask 6.4 work, investigating coal-water-slurry formulation, indicated that selective agglomeration products can be formulated into slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing results indicate that a very fine grind is required to meet the 2 lb ash/MBtu product specification for the Winifrede coal, while the Hiawatha coal requires a grind in the 100- to 150-mesh topsize range. Detailed design work remaining involves the preparation and issuing of the final task report. Utilizing this detailed design, a construction bid package was prepared and submitted to three Colorado based contractors for quotes as part of Task 9.

  7. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique: Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1997-01-21

    The advanced fine-coal cleaning techniques such as column flotation, recovers a low-ash ultra-fine size clean-coal product. However, economical dewatering of the clean coal product to less than 20 percent moisture using conventional technology is difficult. This research program objective is to evaluate a novel coal surface modification technique developed at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research in conjunction with conventional and advanced dewatering technique at a pilot scale at the Powell Mountain Coal Company`s Mayflower preparation plant located in St. Charles, VA. During this quarter in the laboratory dewatering studies were conducted using copper and aluminum ions showed that for the low sulfur clean coal slurry addition of 0.1 Kg/t of copper ions was effective in lowering the filter cake moisture from 29 percent to 26.3 percent. Addition of 0.3 Kg/t of aluminum ions provided filter cake with 28 percent moisture. For the high sulfur clean coal slurry 0.5 Kg/t of copper and 0.1 Kg/t of aluminum ions reduced cake moisture from 30.5 percent to 28 percent respectively. Combined addition of anionic (10 g/t) and cationic (10 g/t) flocculants was effective in providing a filter cake with 29.8 percent moisture. Addition of flocculants was not effective in centrifuge dewatering. In pilot scale screen bowl centrifuge dewatering studies it was found that the clean coal slurry feed rate of 30 gpm was optimum to the centrifuge, which provided 65 percent solids capture. Addition of anionic or cationic flocculants was not effective in lowering of filter cake moisture, which remained close to 30 percent for both clean coal slurries.

  8. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 11, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-30

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quotes} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: (1) NO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS. (2) SO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS. (3) Particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: (1) Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation. (2) Reduced air toxics emissions. (3) Increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a Commercial Generation Unit. The work in Phase I covered a 24-month period and included system analysis, RD&T Plan formulation, component definition, and preliminary Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) design. Phase II will cover a 15-month period and will include preliminary Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) design and subsystem testing. Phase III will cover a 9-month period and will produce a revised CGU design and a revised POCTF design, cost estimate and a test plan. Phase IV, the final Phase, will cover a 36-month period and will include POCTF detailed design, construction, testing, and evaluation.

  9. Making Movies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Zoe; Davies, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Children enjoy making movies but can it help them to understand science? In this article, the authors discuss how creating stop-frame animations of salt dissolving can deepen children's understanding of this process. (Contains 1 figure.)

  10. Mural Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Five articles describe techniques of mural making and mural projects which have been accomplished by elementary and secondary students, including a class of blind and partially sighted children. (SJL)

  11. Arsenic | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Home | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Radon | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Prevention | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Introduction | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  17. Diagnosis | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Sunburn | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Weight | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Mortality | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Survival | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Incidence | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Benzene | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Acknowledgements | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Nitrate | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Cadmium | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Vandetanib for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Katherine; Kim, Geoffrey; Maher, V Ellen; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Moon, Young Jin; Song, Pengfei; Marathe, Anshu; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Zhu, Hao; Garnett, Christine; Liu, Qi; Booth, Brian; Gehrke, Brenda; Dorsam, Robert; Verbois, Leigh; Ghosh, Debasis; Wilson, Wendy; Duan, John; Sarker, Haripada; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Skarupa, Lisa; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Murgo, Anthony; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-07-15

    On April 6, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved vandetanib (Caprelsa tablets; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP) for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic disease. Vandetanib is the first drug approved for this indication, and this article focuses on the basis of approval. Approval was based on the results of a double-blind trial conducted in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to vandetanib, 300 mg/d orally (n = 231), or to placebo (n = 100). The primary objective was demonstration of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with vandetanib compared with placebo. Other endpoints included evaluation of overall survival and objective response rate. The PFS analysis showed a marked improvement for patients randomized to vandetanib (hazard ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate for the vandetanib arm was 44% compared with 1% for the placebo arm. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities (>5%) were diarrhea and/or colitis, hypertension and hypertensive crisis, fatigue, hypocalcemia, rash, and corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation. This approval was based on a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS. Given the toxicity profile, which includes prolongation of the QT interval and sudden death, only prescribers and pharmacies certified through the vandetanib Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy Program are able to prescribe and dispense vandetanib. Treatment-related risks should be taken into account when considering the use of vandetanib in patients with indolent, asymptomatic, or slowly progressing disease.

  8. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-03

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) system followed by Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  9. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-24

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  10. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 5, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-06

    Work continued as planned and scheduled. Total expenditures are below budget. Task 2 is complete. Task 3 is complete except for R, D & T Plan -- Phase II. Task 4 is currently slightly behind schedule but is projected to finish on or ahead of schedule. Task 5 was started early. The following major deliverables were issued: (1) Technical Paper for `93 International Joint Power Generation Conference. (2) Technical Paper for IEA Second International Conference, and (3) Topical Report by EAR on Air Toxics. Subtask 4.1 -- Engineering Analysis in support of the CGU design is nearly complete and partial design specifications are being employed in Task 5. Subtask 4.2 -- Experimental Research efforts consisted of the first series of Drop Tube Furnace tests. Data is being analyzed. Subtask 4.3 -- Modeling work to data resulted in input files for Boiler Simulation Facility and flow pattern convergence was attained. Particle combustion is the next step. This work will be reported on at the next Quarterly Project Review meeting. Task 5 was started early to facilitate Task 6 schedule and quality. Integration of the SNO{sub x} Hot Scheme into the boiler and turbine/feedwater train was optimized and design work on the boiler and ``backend`` is underway. Cost estimating assumptions and methodology were discussed at length and finalized. The RAM analysis is nearly complete. BOP engineering is in progress. No changes to the Work Plan are anticipated for the next quarter.

  11. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development program. Progress report, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1981. [Alloy-MA-956; alloy-MA-754

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, O.F.

    1982-06-15

    Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply systems and testing equipment. The progress in the screening test program is descibed; this includes: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750/sup 0/, 850/sup 0/, 950/sup 0/ and 1050/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/, 1562/sup 0/, 1742/sup 0/, and 1922/sup 0/F) in controlled-purity helium. The status of creep-rupture in controlled-purity helium and air and fatigue testing in the controlled-purity helium in the intensive screening test program is discussed. The results of metallographic studies of screening alloys exposed in controlled-purity helium for 3000 hours at 750/sup 0/C and 5500 hours at 950/sup 0/C, 3000 hours at 1050/sup 0/C and 6000 hours at 1050/sup 0/C and for weldments exposed in controlled-purity helium for 6000 hours at 750/sup 0/C and 6000 hours at 1050/sup 0/C are presented and discussed.

  12. A community-based approach to non-communicable chronic disease management within a context of advancing universal health coverage in China: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Paralleled with the rapid socio-economic development and demographic transition, an epidemic of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) has emerged in China over the past three decades, resulting in increased disease and economic burdens. Over the past decade, with a political commitment of implementing universal health coverage, China has strengthened its primary healthcare system and increased investment in public health interventions. A community-based approach to address NCDs has been acknowledged and recognized as one of the most cost-effective solutions. Community-based strategies include: financial and health administrative support; social mobilization; community health education and promotion; and the use of community health centers in NCD detection, diagnosis, treatment, and patient management. Although China has made good progress in developing and implementing these strategies and policies for NCD prevention and control, many challenges remain. There are a lack of appropriately qualified health professionals at grass-roots health facilities; it is difficult to retain professionals at that level; there is insufficient public funding for NCD care and management; and NCD patients are economically burdened due to limited benefit packages covering NCD treatment offered by health insurance schemes. To tackle these challenges we propose developing appropriate human resource policies to attract greater numbers of qualified health professionals at the primary healthcare level; adjusting the service benefit packages to encourage the use of community-based health services; and increase government investment in public health interventions, as well as investing more on health insurance schemes. PMID:25082410

  13. A community-based approach to non-communicable chronic disease management within a context of advancing universal health coverage in China: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Nanzi; Long, Qian; Tang, Xiaojun; Tang, Shenglan

    2014-01-01

    Paralleled with the rapid socio-economic development and demographic transition, an epidemic of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) has emerged in China over the past three decades, resulting in increased disease and economic burdens. Over the past decade, with a political commitment of implementing universal health coverage, China has strengthened its primary healthcare system and increased investment in public health interventions. A community-based approach to address NCDs has been acknowledged and recognized as one of the most cost-effective solutions. Community-based strategies include: financial and health administrative support; social mobilization; community health education and promotion; and the use of community health centers in NCD detection, diagnosis, treatment, and patient management. Although China has made good progress in developing and implementing these strategies and policies for NCD prevention and control, many challenges remain. There are a lack of appropriately qualified health professionals at grass-roots health facilities; it is difficult to retain professionals at that level; there is insufficient public funding for NCD care and management; and NCD patients are economically burdened due to limited benefit packages covering NCD treatment offered by health insurance schemes. To tackle these challenges we propose developing appropriate human resource policies to attract greater numbers of qualified health professionals at the primary healthcare level; adjusting the service benefit packages to encourage the use of community-based health services; and increase government investment in public health interventions, as well as investing more on health insurance schemes.

  14. Second generation advanced reburning for high efficiency NO{sub x} control. Quaterly progress report No. 1, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, V.M.; Maly, P.M.

    1996-01-22

    Title 1 of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990 requires NO{sub x} controls in ozone non- attainment areas. The initial Title 1 regulations, implemented over the last few years, required Reasonably Available Control Technologies (RACT). In most areas, the NO{sub x} levels for RACT are based on Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB) and are in the range of 0.4 to 0.5 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. As a result, there has been little industry demand for higher efficiency and more expensive NO{sub x} controls such as reburning, Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). However, the current RACT requirements will not be the end of NO{sub x} regulations. Much more stringent NO{sub x} control will be required to bring many of the ozone non-attainment areas into compliance, particularly in the Northeast. This paper describes second generation advanced reburning for nitrogen oxides control.

  15. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 12, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-27

    The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The goals for emissions and plant efficiency are: NO{sub x} emissions not greater than 0.1 lb/million Btu; SO{sub x} emissions not greater than 0.1 lb/million Btu; particulate emissions not greater than 0.01 lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency (HHV basis) not less than 42%. Other goals include: improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives, and a preliminary design of a Commercial Generation Unit. The work in Phase I covered a 24- month period and included system analysis, RD&T Plan formulation, component definition, and preliminary Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) design. Phase II will cover a 15-month period and will include preliminary Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) design and subsystem testing. Phase III will cover a 9-month period and will produce a revised CGU design and a revised POCTF design, cost estimate and a test plan. Phase IV, the final Phase, will cover a 36- month period and will include POCTF detailed design, construction, testing, and evaluation.

  16. Second generation advanced reburning for high efficiency NO{sub x} control. Progress report No. 3, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, V.M.; Maly, P.M.

    1996-07-26

    This project develops a family of novel NO{sub x} control technologies, Second Generation Advanced Reburning (SGAR), which has the potential to achieve 90+% NO{sub x} control at a significantly lower cost than selective catalytic reduction. Phase I consists of six tasks: Task 1.1, project coordination and reporting deliverables; Task 1.2, kinetics of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} reactions with flue gas components; Task 1.3, 20 kW optimization studies; Task 1.4, 20 kW process development tests; Task 1.5, mechanism development and modeling; and Task 1.6, design methodology and application. This third reporting period included both experimental and modeling activities. Tests continued at the Controlled Temperature Tower (CTT), and the results have been reduced and are reported. A study on high- temperature reactions of sodium promoters (Task 1.2) is underway at the University of Texas in Austin (UT). A brief literature review on high-temperature sodium reactions is included in this report. A high- temperature flow system with GC analysis was prepared at the University of Texas at Austin for the experimental program. Modeling focused on description of NO-NH{sub 3} interaction in the burnout zone.

  17. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1994-10-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 8 (July - September, 1994), work on the formulation of coal water slurries from flotation concentrates was completed. Parametric and optimization tests were performed on the Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch MicrocelT{sup M} flotation column. Laboratory research on selective agglomeration was completed with limited testing of the Dietz coal and alternate agglomerants. Initial planning has started for the bench-scale agglomeration unit which will utilize heptane as the bridging liquid in a conventional two-stage system, and steam stripping for heptane recovery and recycle. A project review meeting was held at Bechtel to discuss the detailed design of the PDU, which is being designed to process Indiana VII, Sunnyside, and Taggart coals. Process flow, piping and instrument, and equipment layout diagrams are being revised to reflect the process improvements resulting from bench-scale testing. Material Requisition activity has commenced, and will continue next quarter along with the selection of a construction subcontractor.

  18. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-02-01

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

  19. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The design criteria for each unit operation have been developed based upon a number of variables. These variables, at this time, are based upon the best engineering design information available to industry. A number of assumptions utilized in the design criteria are uncertain. The uncertainties of inert atmospheres for grinding and flotation as well as pyrite depressants were answered by the Surface Control Project. It was determined that inerting was not required and no ``new`` reagents were presented that improved the flotation results. In addition, Tasks 5 and 6 results indicated the required reagent dosage for conventional flotation and advanced flotation. Task 5 results also indicated the need for a clean coal,thickener, the flocculent dosages for both the clean coal and refuse thickeners, and final dewatering requirements. The results from Tasks 5 and 6 and summarized in Task 7 indicate several uncertainties that require continuous long duration testing. The first is the possibility of producing a grab product for both the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals in conventional flotation. Second what does long-term recirculation of clarified water do to the product quality? The verification process and real data obtained from Tasks 5 and 6 greatly reduced the capital and operating costs for the process. This was anticipated and the test work indeed provided confirming data.

  20. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document a quarterly report prepared in accordance with the project reporting requirements covering the period from July 1, 1992 to September 30, 1992. This report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings. The overall project scope of the engineering development project is to conceptually develop a commercial flowsheet to maximize pyritic sulfur reduction at practical energy recovery values. This is being accomplished by utilizing the basic research data on the surface properties of coal, mineral matter and pyrite obtained from the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Fine Coal Flotation Project, to develop this conceptual flowsheet. The conceptual flowsheet must be examined to identify critical areas that need additional design data. This data will then be developed using batch and semi-continuous bench scale testing. In addition to actual bench scale testing, other unit operations from other industries processing fine material will be reviewed for potential application and incorporated into the design if appropriate. The conceptual flowsheet will be revised based on the results of the bench scale testing and areas will be identified that need further larger scale design data verification, to prove out the design.

  1. Development of advanced NO{sub x} control concepts for coal-fired utility boilers. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.; Pont, J.N.; England, G.; Seeker, W.R.

    1993-03-04

    The complete CombiNO{sub x}, process has now been demonstrated at a level that is believed to be representative of a full-scale boiler in terms of mixing capabilities. A summary of the results is displayed in Figure 5-1. While firing Illinois Coal on the Reburn Tower, Advanced Reburning was capable of reducing NO{sub x}, by 83 percent. The injection of methanol oxidized 50--58 percent of the existing NO to N0{sub 2}. Assuming that 85 percent of the newly formed N0{sub 2} can be scrubbed in a liquor modified wet-limestone scrubber, the CombiNO{sub x}, process has been shown capable of reducing NO{sub 2}, by 90--91 percent in a large pilot-scale coal-fired furnace. There is still uncertainty regarding the fate of the N0{sub 2} formed with methanol injection. Tests should be conducted to determine whether the reconversion is thermodynamic or catalytic, and what steps can be taken (such as quench rate) to prevent it from happening.

  2. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1996-04-30

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

  3. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically

  4. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium

  5. Decision making.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2011-01-01

    A decision is a commitment of resources under conditions of risk in expectation of the best future outcome. The smart decision is always the strategy with the best overall expected value-the best combination of facts and values. Some of the special circumstances involved in decision making are discussed, including decisions where there are multiple goals, those where more than one person is involved in making the decision, using trigger points, framing decisions correctly, commitments to lost causes, and expert decision makers. A complex example of deciding about removal of asymptomatic third molars, with and without an EBD search, is discussed.

  6. Intraoperative Monitoring: Recent Advances in Motor Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Koht, Antoun; Sloan, Tod B

    2016-09-01

    Advances in electrophysiological monitoring have improved the ability of surgeons to make decisions and minimize the risks of complications during surgery and interventional procedures when the central nervous system (CNS) is at risk. Individual techniques have become important for identifying or mapping the location and pathway of critical neural structures. These techniques are also used to monitor the progress of procedures to augment surgical and physiologic management so as to reduce the risk of CNS injury. Advances in motor evoked potentials have facilitated mapping and monitoring of the motor tracts in newer, more complex procedures.

  7. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}6 for the period: January 1 to March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Farthing, George A.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B{ampersand}W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self- consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  8. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}5 for the period October 1 to December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Farthing, George A.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five year project aimed at the development of practical, cost- effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  9. Final Progress Report: Collaborative Research: Decadal-to-Centennial Climate & Climate Change Studies with Enhanced Variable and Uniform Resolution GCMs Using Advanced Numerical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M; Cote, J

    2009-06-05

    The joint U.S-Canadian project has been devoted to: (a) decadal climate studies using developed state-of-the-art GCMs (General Circulation Models) with enhanced variable and uniform resolution; (b) development and implementation of advanced numerical techniques; (c) research in parallel computing and associated numerical methods; (d) atmospheric chemistry experiments related to climate issues; (e) validation of regional climate modeling strategies for nested- and stretched-grid models. The variable-resolution stretched-grid (SG) GCMs produce accurate and cost-efficient regional climate simulations with mesoscale resolution. The advantage of the stretched grid approach is that it allows us to preserve the high quality of both global and regional circulations while providing consistent interactions between global and regional scales and phenomena. The major accomplishment for the project has been the successful international SGMIP-1 and SGMIP-2 (Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project, phase-1 and phase-2) based on this research developments and activities. The SGMIP provides unique high-resolution regional and global multi-model ensembles beneficial for regional climate modeling and broader modeling community. The U.S SGMIP simulations have been produced using SciDAC ORNL supercomputers. Collaborations with other international participants M. Deque (Meteo-France) and J. McGregor (CSIRO, Australia) and their centers and groups have been beneficial for the strong joint effort, especially for the SGMIP activities. The WMO/WCRP/WGNE endorsed the SGMIP activities in 2004-2008. This project reflects a trend in the modeling and broader communities to move towards regional and sub-regional assessments and applications important for the U.S. and Canadian public, business and policy decision makers, as well as for international collaborations on regional, and especially climate related issues.

  10. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3, industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report number 12, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R.; McGowan, J.G.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. During this reporting period, data reduction/evaluation and interpretation from the long term four hundred hours Proof-of-Concept System Test under Task 3 were completed. Cumulatively, a total of approximately 563 hours of coal testing was performed with 160 hrs on 100% coal and over 400 hours with co-firing coal and gas. The primary objectives of this testing were to: (1) obtain steady state operation consistently on 100% coal; (2) increase carbon conversion efficiency from 95% to the project goal of 98%; and (3) maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lbs/MBtu. The following specific conclusions are based on results of coal-fired testing at Penn State and the initial economic evaluation of the HEACC system: a coal handling/preparation system can be designed to meet the technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal combustion to a gas/oil-designed boiler; the boiler thermal performance requirements were met; the NOx emission target of was met; combustion efficiencies of 95% could be met on a daily average basis, somewhat below the target of 98%; the economic playback is very sensitive to fuel differential cost, unit size, and annual operating hours; continuous long term demonstration is needed to quantify ash effects and how to best handle ashes. The following modifications are recommended prior to the 1,000 hour demonstration phase testing: (1) coal feeding improvements--improved raw coal/storage and transport, installation of gravimetric feeder, and redesign/installation of surge bin bottom; (2) burner modification--minor modification to the tip of the existing HEACC burner to prevent change of flame shapes for no apparent reason.

  11. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 14, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-04-30

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by June 1997. During Quarter 14 (January--March 1996), parametric testing of the 30-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Plant continued under Subtask 3.2. Subtask 3. 3 testing, investigating a novel Hydrophobic Dewatering process (HD), continued this quarter with parametric testing of the batch dewatering unit. Coal product moistures of 3 to 12 percent were achieved, with higher percent solids slurry feeds resulting in lower product moistures. For a given percent solids feed, the product moisture decreased with increasing butane to dry coal ratios. Stirring time, stirring rate, and settling time were all found to have little effect on the final moisture content. Continuing Subtask 6.4 work, investigating coal-water-fuel slurry formulation for coals cleaned by selective agglomeration, indicated that pH adjustment to 10 resulted in marginally better (lower viscosity) slurries for one of the two coals tested. Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing results indicate that the new Taggart coal requires a grind with a d{sub 80} of approximately 33 microns to achieve the 1 lb ash/MBtu product quality specification. Also under Subtask 6.5, reductions in the various trace element concentrations accomplished during selective agglomeration were determined. Work was essentially completed on the detailed design of the PDU selective agglomeration module under Task 7 with the issuing of a draft report.

  12. Recent advances in understanding and managing chordomas

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Carl; Aoun, Salah; Moreno, Jessica R.; Bagley, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors arising from embryonic remnants of the notochord. They are slow-growing, locally aggressive, and destructive and typically involve the axial skeleton. Genetic studies have identified several mutations implicated in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Treatment poses a challenge given their insidious progression, degree of local invasion at presentation, and high recurrence rate. They tend to respond poorly to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. This makes radical resection the mainstay of their treatment. Recent advances in targeted chemotherapy and focused particle beam radiation, however, have improved the management and prognosis of these tumors. PMID:28105324

  13. Progress in NASA Rotorcraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Johnson, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reviews recent progress made under NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) propulsion research activities. Advances in engines, drive systems and optimized propulsion systems are discussed. Progress in wide operability compressors, modeling of variable geometry turbine performance, foil gas bearings and multi-speed transmissions are presented.

  14. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to illustrate a process of making connections, not between mathematics and other activities, but within mathematics itself--between diverse parts of the subject. Novel connections are still possible in previously explored mathematics when the material happens to be unfamiliar, as may be the case for a learner at any career stage.…

  15. Making Lemonade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2009-01-01

    In the current economic climate, alumni associations are taking hard looks at their budgets and making cuts where necessary. However, the recession is an opportunity for alumni associations to create and build alumni loyalty through networking and career services--when they are needed most. Many alumni association budgets are set through the end…

  16. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  17. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  18. Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) Preoperative Score Versus Postoperative Score (CAPRA-S): ability to predict cancer progression and decision-making regarding adjuvant therapy after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Won Ik; Kang, Pil Moon; Kang, Dong Il; Yoon, Jang Ho; Kim, Wansuk; Chung, Jae Il

    2014-09-01

    The University of California, San Francisco, announced in 2011 Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Postsurgical (CAPRA-S) score which included pathologic data, but there were no results for comparing preoperative predictors with the CAPRA-S score. We evaluated the validation of the CAPRA-S score in our institution and compare the result with the preoperative progression predictor, CAPRA score. Data of 130 patients were reviewed who underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer from 2008 to 2013. Performance of CAPRA-S score in predicting progression free probabilities was assessed through Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression test. Additionally, prediction probability was compared with preoperative CAPRA score by logistic regression analysis. Comparing CAPRA score, the CAPRA-S score showed improved prediction ability for 5 yr progression free survival (concordance index 0.80, P = 0.04). After risk group stratification, 3 group model of CAPRA-S was superior than 3 group model of CAPRA for 3-yr progression free survival and 5-yr progression free survival (concordance index 0.74 vs. 0.70, 0.77 vs. 0.71, P < 0.001). Finally the CAPRA-S score was the more ideal predictor concerned with adjuvant therapy than the CAPRA score through decision curve analysis. The CPARA-S score is a useful predictor for disease progression after radical prostatectomy.

  19. Sustained uremic toxin control improves renal and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with advanced renal dysfunction: post-hoc analysis of the Kremezin Study against renal disease progression in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ran-hui; Kang, Shin Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Cha, Dae Ryong; Na, Ki Young; Kim, Sung Gyun; Yoon, Sun Ae; Kim, Sejoong; Han, Sang Youb; Park, Jung Hwan; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated the long-term effect of AST-120, which has been proposed as a therapeutic option against renal disease progression, in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We performed post-hoc analysis with a per-protocol group of the K-STAR study (Kremezin study against renal disease progression in Korea) that randomized participants into an AST-120 and a control arm. Patients in the AST-120 arm were given 6 g of AST-120 in three divided doses, and those in both arms received standard conventional treatment. Results The two arms did not differ significantly in the occurrence of composite primary outcomes (log-rank P = 0.41). For AST-120 patients with higher compliance, there were fewer composite primary outcomes: intermediate tertile hazard ratio (HR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.01, P = 0.05; highest tertile HR 0.436, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.76, P = 0.003. The estimated glomerular filtration rate level was more stable in the AST-120 arm, especially in diabetic patients. At one year, the AST-120-induced decrease in the serum indoxyl sulfate concentration inversely correlated with the occurrence of composite primary outcomes: second tertile HR 1.59, 95% CI 0.82 to 3.07, P = 0.17; third tertile HR 2.11, 95% CI 1.07 to 4.17, P = 0.031. Furthermore, AST-120 showed a protective effect against the major cardiovascular adverse events (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.99, P = 0.046). Conclusion Long-term use of AST-120 has potential for renal protection, especially in diabetic patients, as well as cardiovascular benefits. Reduction of the serum indoxyl sulfate level may be used to identify patients who would benefit from AST-120 administration. PMID:28392999

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB plus AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB long-term data collected show the full-load NO{sub x} emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu with fly ash LOI values of approximately 8 percent. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. For comparison, the long-term full-load, baseline NO{sub x} emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration indicate that at full-load, NO{sub x} emissions and fly ash LOI are near 0.40 lb/MBtu and 8 percent, respectively. However, it is believed that a substantial portion of the incremental change in NO{sub x} emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations is the result of additional burner tuning and other operational adjustments and is not the result of the AOFA system. During this quarter, LNB+AOFA testing was concluded. Testing performed during this quarter included long-term and verification testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration.

  1. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Fourth quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x } reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, and LNB without AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB tong-term data collected show the full load NO{sub x} emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. Flyash LOI values for the LNB configuration are approximately 8 percent at full load. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. Abbreviated diagnostic tests for the LNB+AOFA configuration indicate that at 500 MWe, NO{sub x} emissions are approximately 0.55 lb/MBtu with corresponding flyash LOI values of approximately 11 percent. For comparison, the long-term, full load, baseline NO{sub x} emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing of the LNB+AOFA configuration will be performed when the stack particulate emissions issue is resolved.

  2. NASA R and T aerospace plane vehicles: Progress and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in key technologies such as materials, structures, aerothermodynamics, hypersonic aerodynamics, and hypersonic airbreathing propulsion are reported. Advances were made in more generic, areas such as active controls, flight computer hardware and software, and interdisciplinary analytical design methodology. These technology advances coupled with the development of and experiences with the Space Shuttle make feasible aerospace plane-type vehicles that meet the more demanding requirements of various DOD missions and/or an all-weather Shuttle II with reduced launch costs. Technology needs and high payoff technologies, and the technology advancements in propulsion, control-configured-vehicles, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, aerothermal loads, and materials and structures were studied. The highest payoff technologies of materials and structures including thermal-structural analysis and high temperature test techniques are emphasized. The high priority technology of propulsion, and plans, of what remains to be done rather than firm program commitments, are briefly discussed.

  3. The Use of Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography to Monitor the Treatment Progress of Vismodegib and Imiquimod 5% Cream in a Transplant Patient with Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Orit; Schwartz, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressed transplant recipients have increased risk for the development of basal cell carcinoma skin cancers. While oral vismodegib therapy has been successful in treating locally advanced basal cell tumors, few studies document its use and efficacy in organ transplant patients. In this immunocompromised population, topical imiquimod 5% cream has been shown to be an effective and well-tolerated option for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinomas. To the authors’ knowledge, no data documents the use of optical coherence tomography, a noninvasive imaging technique, to monitor progress of such combined therapies on in vivo skin. The authors report the successful treatment of an extensive basal cell carcinoma on the nose of an immunosuppressed 54-year-old Caucasian man with a history of kidney and pancreas transplantations. By combining continuous noninvasive lesion monitoring with vismodegib 150mg/d therapy and adjuvant imiquimod 5% topical cream, the patient showed complete disease clearance on clinical, optical coherence tomography, and histological evaluation. This report supports the feasibility and efficacy of nonsurgical treatment of basal cell lesions in complicated transplant patients and the need for individualized treatment plans. A noninvasive follow-up tool, especially during nonsurgical therapy, is of critical value to ensure the best possible treatment outcome for the patient. PMID:27672417

  4. Fluor Hanford Project Focused Progress at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    HANSON, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    Fluor Hanford is making significant progress in accelerating cleanup at the Hanford site. This progress consistently aligns with a new strategic vision established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (RL).

  5. Making Aliens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, A.

    During the next few decades, the decisions we make will determine the future of our biosphere and our species. In this context, space exploration will literally answer a question that has preoccupied us ever since we became self-aware: What is going to happen to us? Reaching and inhabiting other planets is often considered an extension of human exploration and occupation of Earth but the analogy is useful only as a metaphor. Whatever the extremes of Earth, we can live almost everywhere on it because we started and evolved here. Given the vagaries of chance in every event of planetmaking, we will never find an Earth twin. To live under strange skies will require courage, ingenuity and stamina ­ but above all, it will require a hard look at our assumptions, including what it means to be human.

  6. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  7. Making strides

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.; Burr, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    Inge Fretheim, president of Amoco Power Resources Corp., was speaking to an audience of developers, finance executives and other power industry leader at the Fifth Annual Independent Energy Forum in New York City last October. {open_quotes}A deregulated framework should include market competition, not just private investment that the government defines,{close_quotes} he said. {open_quotes}Governments that only seek to increase the efficiency of power generation itself will not see the full benefits that the IPP industry can bring to the table.{close_quotes} The industry has made significant progress in many markets around the world in the past year, but a number of obstacles are still standing in developers` way. As Fretheim pointed out, in many cases project tender solicitations are too rigid to allow the competitive process to achieve its full potential. When companies are asked to bid on a pre-defined {open_quotes}box,{close_quotes} they are not able to bring their full palette of skills and resources to the canvas. Competitive bidding has during the past year become a favorite means of awarding project contracts in many countries around the world. This trend reflect the increasing state of competitiveness in the global power industry. New financing sources are emerging, but not enough to fill the gap. Numerous examples of the industry`s consolidation--including the Enron/Portland General merger. Southern Energy International`s purchase of Consolidated Electric Power Asia and Tractebel`s acquisition of CRSS Capital and several plants in the United States--point toward an industry of large, trans-border utility companies.

  8. [Progress in optical imaging].

    PubMed

    Bremer, C; Ntziachristos, V; Mahmood, U; Tung, C H; Weissleder, R

    2001-02-01

    Different optical imaging technologies have significantly progressed over the last years. Besides advances in imaging techniques and image reconstruction, new "smart" optical contrast agents have been developed which can be used to detect molecular targets (such as endogenous enzymes) in vivo. The combination of novel imaging technologies coupled with smart agents bears great diagnostic potential both clinically and experimentally. This overview outlines the basic principles of optical imaging and summarizes the current state of the art.

  9. Accelerating Progress Against Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Investment in cancer research is making a difference, but we still must overcome disparities in cancer incidence and mortality, and expand research to detect cancers earlier and develop more effective, less-toxic treatments. NCI supports research studies and programs across the country that are working to further advance cancer, research, and clinical care.

  10. Advanced progress concepts for direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Derbyshire, F.; Givens, E.

    1995-09-01

    Given the low cost of petroleum crude, direct coal liquefaction is still not an economically viable process. The DOE objectives are to further reduce the cost of coal liquefaction to a more competitive level. In this project the primary focus is on the use of low-rank coal feedstocks. A particular strength is the use of process-derived liquids rather than model compound solvents. The original concepts are illustrated in Figure 1, where they are shown on a schematic of the Wilsonville pilot plant operation. Wilsonville operating data have been used to define a base case scenario using run {number_sign}263J, and Wilsonville process materials have been used in experimental work. The CAER has investigated: low severity CO pretreatment of coal for oxygen rejection, increasing coal reactivity and mg inhibiting the propensity for regressive reactions; the application of more active. Low-cost Fe and Mo dispersed catalysts; and the possible use of fluid coking for solids rejection and to generate an overhead product for recycle. CONSOL has investigated: oil agglomeration for coal ash rejection, for the possible rejection of ash in the recycled resid, and for catalyst addition and recovery; and distillate dewaxing to remove naphthenes and paraffins, and to generate an improved quality feed for recycle distillate hydrogenation. At Sandia, research has been concerned with the production of active hydrogen donor distillate solvent fractions produced by the hydrogenation of dewaxed distillates and by fluid coking via low severity reaction with H{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2}O mixtures using hydrous metal oxide and other catalysts.

  11. Progressive Failure Analysis of Advanced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-25

    subroutine SUBROUTINE UVARM(UVAR,DIRECT,T,TIME,DTIME,CMNAME,ORNAME, 1 NUVARM,NOEL,NPT,LAYER,KSPT,KSTEP,KINC,NDI,NSHR,COORD, 2 JMAC ,JMATYP,MATLAYO,LACCFLA...CHARACTER dmkname*255, FNAMEX*80 DIMENSION UVAR(*),DIRECT(3,3),T(3,3),TIME(2) DIMENSION ARRAY(15),JARRAY(15), JMAC (*),JMATYP(*),COORD(*) C DIMENSION stress(6...CALL GETVRM(’S’,ARRAY,JARRAY,FLGRAY,JRCD, JMAC ,JMATYP,MATLAYO, 1 LACCFLA) C 48 if(klarc.eq.3) then ! LaRC03 failure criteria stress(1) = array(1

  12. Progress in Advanced Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Flory, Adam E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Suckow, Thomas J.

    2010-09-21

    Improvements to a Java based software package developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for display and analysis of radioxenon spectra acquired by the International Monitoring System (IMS) are described here. The current version of the Radioxenon JavaViewer implements the region of interest (ROI) method for analysis of beta-gamma coincidence data. Upgrades to the Radioxenon JavaViewer will include routines to analyze high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) data, Standard Spectrum Method to analyze beta-gamma coincidence data and calibration routines to characterize beta-gamma coincidence detectors. These upgrades are currently under development; the status and initial results will be presented. Implementation of these routines into the JavaViewer and subsequent release is planned for FY 2011-2012.

  13. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  14. The making of a muscle.

    PubMed

    Fiorotto, Marta

    2012-06-01

    The skeletal musculature is usually thought of as the primary organ of locomotion, and, like the tyres of a high-performance racing car, their composition, design, preparation and plasticity can make the difference between winner and 'wannabe'. The similarities do not end there, however. Their primary components (cells of the mesodermal layer in the embryo and latex from the rubber tree) begin their existence in locations that can be quite distant from their final point of use and in forms that bear no resemblance to the final product. Their differentiation from primary material to final product entails extensive processing, and the integration of other materials and structures are essential to ensure their function. A fundamental difference, however, is that, in the case of muscle, once the embryo is formed, the progression from relatively undifferentiated mesodermal cells to the final structures is on autopilot, provided there are no contextual aberrations either from genetic or environmental causes. Our current understanding of how muscles develop is a synthesis of observations made on a wide array of organisms, including nematode worms, fruitflies, fish, frogs, birds and various mammals, as well as from the in vitro study of cells isolated from these species. The study of myogenesis in mammals, although less amenable to experimental manipulation, has been facilitated by the recent advances in mouse genetic engineering which has enabled the function of individual genes and cell types to be investigated, as well as the lineage of cells to be traced back to their origin. In this rapid trek through the life of a muscle, how the production of a mature functional muscle from its early inception is orchestrated will be outlined in exceedingly broad strokes so as to convey the wide range of processes that must be engaged in order to generate a functional muscle. Hopefully, enough information will be provided to encourage those interested to explore further.

  15. Circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as predictive factor of progression-free survival in patients with advanced chordoma receiving sorafenib: an analysis from a phase II trial of the french sarcoma group (GSF/GETO)

    PubMed Central

    Lebellec, Loic; Bertucci, François; Tresch-Bruneel, Emmanuelle; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Toiron, Yves; Camoin, Luc; Mir, Olivier; Laurence, Valerie; Clisant, Stephanie; Decoupigny, Emilie; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Penel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced chordoma are often treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors without any predictive factor to guide decision. We report herein an ancillary analysis of the the Angionext phase II trial (NCT 00874874). Results From May 2011 to January 2014, 26 were sampled. The 9-month PFS rate was 72.9% (95%-CI: 45.9-87.9). During sorafenib treatment, a significant increase in PlGF (18.4 vs 43.8 pg/mL, p<0.001) was noted along with a non-significant increase in VEGF (0.7 vs 1.0 ng/mL, p=0.07). VEGF at D1 >1.04 ng/mL (HR=12.5, 95%-CI: 1.37-114, p=0.025) and VEGF at D7 >1.36 ng/mL (HR=10.7, 95%-CI: 1.16-98, p=0.037) were associated with shorter PFS. The 9-month PFS rate was 92.3% (95%-CI: 56.6-98.9) when VEGF at D1 was ≤1.04 ng/mL versus 23.3% (95%-CI: 1.0-63.2) when >1.04 ng/mL. Patients and Methods Chordoma patients were treated with sorafenib 800 mg/day for 9 months, unless earlier occurrence of progression or toxicities. Six biomarkers (sE-Selectin, VEGF, VEGF-C, placental growth factor (PlGF), Thrombospondin, Stem Cell Factor (SCF)) were measured at baseline (day 1: D1) and day 7 (D7). Conclusion High levels of VEGF was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27659533

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  17. Synthetic biology: advancing the design of diverse genetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Hsiang; Wei, Kathy Y.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    A main objective of synthetic biology is to make the process of designing genetically-encoded biological systems more systematic, predictable, robust, scalable, and efficient. The examples of genetic systems in the field vary widely in terms of operating hosts, compositional approaches, and network complexity, ranging from a simple genetic switch to search-and-destroy systems. While significant advances in synthesis capabilities support the potential for the implementation of pathway- and genome-scale programs, several design challenges currently restrict the scale of systems that can be reasonably designed and implemented. Synthetic biology offers much promise in developing systems to address challenges faced in manufacturing, the environment and sustainability, and health and medicine, but the realization of this potential is currently limited by the diversity of available parts and effective design frameworks. As researchers make progress in bridging this design gap, advances in the field hint at ever more diverse applications for biological systems. PMID:23413816

  18. Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from Slope Basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report (sixth quarter), January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-30

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  19. Making and Differentiating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    The rocky planets formed by progressive aggregation of dust to make planetesimals which joined to make large objects called planetary embryos that finally accumulated into planets, one of which we live on. This chaotic process is complicated further by chemical changes with distance from the Sun, including differences in oxidation conditions and water concentration. Once the inner planets began to form, metallic iron sank to form cores, reacting with the rocky portions in the process. David C. Rubie (University of Bayreuth, Germany) and colleagues in Germany, France, and the United States put all this planetary action into an impressively thorough computer model of planet formation and differentiation. They show that the observed compositions of the Earth can be matched by simulations that include the Grand Tack (Jupiter and Saturn migrate inwards towards the Sun and then back out), and chemical gradients in the Solar System, with more reducing conditions near the Sun, more oxidizing farther from the Sun, and oxidizing and hydrated conditions even farther from the Sun. The study identifies other important variables, such as the extent to which metallic iron chemically equilibrated with the silicate making up the Earth's mantle, the pressure at which it happened, and the likelihood that Earth accreted heterogeneously.

  20. Progress in the genetics of polygenic brain disorders: significant new challenges for neurobiology.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Steven A; Hyman, Steven E

    2013-10-30

    Advances in genome analysis, accompanied by the assembly of large patient cohorts, are making possible successful genetic analyses of polygenic brain disorders. If the resulting molecular clues, previously hidden in the genomes of affected individuals, are to yield useful information about pathogenesis and inform the discovery of new treatments, neurobiology will have to rise to many difficult challenges. Here we review the underlying logic of the genetic investigations, describe in more detail progress in schizophrenia and autism, and outline the challenges for neurobiology that lie ahead. We argue that technologies at the disposal of neuroscience are adequately advanced to begin to study the biology of common and devastating polygenic disorders.

  1. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  2. Slow Progress in Dune (Left Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The left front wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's front hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  3. Slow Progress in Dune (Left Rear Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The left rear wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's rear hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  4. Slow Progress in Dune (Right Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The right front wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's front hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  5. Slow Progress in Dune (Right Rear Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The right rear wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's rear hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The wheel is largely hidden by a cable bundle. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  6. Progress in the spectacle correction of presbyopia. Part 1: Design and development of progressive lenses.

    PubMed

    Meister, Darryl J; Fisher, Scott W

    2008-05-01

    Most of the commercial advances in the spectacle correction of presbyopia continue to occur in progressive lens design, which has been the focus of intense research and development over the past 60 years by major spectacle lens manufacturers. While progressive lens design and manufacturing techniques have advanced at a steady pace, recent progress in 'free-form' lens surfacing has opened up many exciting possibilities that will in all likelihood bring about a paradigm shift in the current model of progressive lens fabrication and distribution. The first installment of this two-part series will review the fundamental optical principles and early development work associated with progressive lenses.

  7. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z

  8. [OMICS AND BIG DATA, MAJOR ADVANCES TOWARDS PERSONALIZED MEDICINE OF THE FUTURE?].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest for personalized medicine evolves together with two major technological advances. First, the new-generation, rapid and less expensive, DNA sequencing method, combined with remarkable progresses in molecular biology leading to the post-genomic era (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics). Second, the refinement of computing tools (IT), which allows the immediate analysis of a huge amount of data (especially, those resulting from the omics approaches) and, thus, creates a new universe for medical research, that of analyzed by computerized modelling. This article for scientific communication and popularization briefly describes the main advances in these two fields of interest. These technological progresses are combined with those occurring in communication, which makes possible the development of artificial intelligence. These major advances will most probably represent the grounds of the future personalized medicine.

  9. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  10. FAmily CEntered (FACE) advance care planning: Study design and methods for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for patients with HIV/AIDS and their surrogate decision-makers.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Allison L; Wang, Jichuan; Scott, Rachel K; Briggs, Linda; Lyon, Maureen E

    2015-07-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has become a chronic illness, disease-specific advance care planning has not yet been evaluated for the palliative care needs of adults with HIV/AIDS. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized, two-arm controlled clinical trial aims to test the efficacy of FAmily CEntered advance care planning among adults living with AIDS and/or HIV with co-morbidities on congruence in treatment preferences, healthcare utilization, and quality of life. The FAmily CEntered intervention arm is two face-to-face sessions with a trained, certified facilitator: Session 1) Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Respecting Choices Interview; Session 2) Completion of advance directive. The Healthy Living Control arm is: Session 1) Developmental/Relationship History; Session 2) Nutrition. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-intervention. A total of 288 patient/surrogate dyads will be enrolled from five hospital-based, out-patient clinics in Washington, District of Columbia. Participants will be HIV positive and ≥ 21 years of age; surrogates will be ≥ 18 years of age. Exclusion criteria are homicidality, suicidality, psychosis, and impaired cognitive functioning. We hypothesize that this intervention will enhance patient-centered communication with a surrogate decision-maker about end of life treatment preferences over time, enhance patient quality of life and decrease health care utilization. We further hypothesize that this intervention will decrease health disparities for Blacks in completion of advance directives. If proposed aims are achieved, the benefits of palliative care, particularly increased treatment preferences about end-of-life care and enhanced quality of life, will be extended to people living with AIDS.

  11. Advanced techniques for the storage and use of very large, heterogeneous spatial databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peuquet, Donna J.

    1987-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of a prototype knowledge-based geographic information system. The overall purpose of this project is to investigate and demonstrate the use of advanced methods in order to greatly improve the capabilities of geographic information system technology in the handling of large, multi-source collections of spatial data in an efficient manner, and to make these collections of data more accessible and usable for the Earth scientist.

  12. 24 CFR 2002.15 - Advance payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advance payments. 2002.15 Section... THE PUBLIC § 2002.15 Advance payments. (a) HUD may not require a requester to make an advance payment... where the requester has a history of prompt payment of FOIA fees, or require an advance payment of...

  13. 24 CFR 2002.15 - Advance payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advance payments. 2002.15 Section... THE PUBLIC § 2002.15 Advance payments. (a) HUD may not require a requester to make an advance payment... where the requester has a history of prompt payment of FOIA fees, or require an advance payment of...

  14. Overview of research in progress at the Center of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    The Center of Excellence (COE) was created nine years ago to facilitate active collaboration between the scientists at Ames Research Center and the Stanford Psychology Department. Significant interchange of ideas and personnel continues between Stanford and participating groups at NASA-Ames; the COE serves its function well. This progress report is organized into sections divided by project. Each section contains a list of investigators, a background statement, progress report, and a proposal for work during the coming year. The projects are: Algorithms for development and calibration of visual systems, Visually optimized image compression, Evaluation of advanced piloting displays, Spectral representations of color, Perception of motion in man and machine, Automation and decision making, and Motion information used for navigation and control.

  15. Secondhand Smoke Exposure | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Life After Cancer | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  17. End of Life | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Early Detection | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Adult Tobacco Use | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Data Sources | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.