Science.gov

Sample records for advancing organizational change

  1. Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Dudley B., Jr.; Love, Patrick; Komives, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Management of student affairs is a complex and unpredictable task that requires thoughtful planning and sensitivity. Managers who set priorities in a planned way, act strategically to implement plans, and make adjustments based on changing conditions can make a difference. Managers must work collaboratively to achieve mutual purposes through…

  2. Managing Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watwood, Britt; And Others

    Based on studies comparing leadership in two rural community colleges undergoing change and examining the management of change at Maryland's Allegany College, this paper presents a conceptual framework and model for managing organizational change. First, a framework for understanding the community college chair's role in organizational change is…

  3. Changing Organizational Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on changing organizational forms. "Goal Integration in a Multi-divisional Organization" (Richard J. Torraco, Mary Finnegan), reports on a study that examined how goals are integrated into organizational activities once they have been identified, proposes a model of goal integration, and develops…

  4. Local institutional development and organizational change for advancing sustainable urban water futures.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebekah R

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the local institutional and organizational development insights from a five-year ongoing interdisciplinary research project focused on advancing the implementation of sustainable urban water management. While it is broadly acknowledged that the inertia associated with administrative systems is possibly the most significant obstacle to advancing sustainable urban water management, contemporary research still largely prioritizes investigations at the technological level. This research is explicitly concerned with critically informing the design of methodologies for mobilizing and overcoming the administrative inertia of traditional urban water management practice. The results of fourteen in-depth case studies of local government organizations across Metropolitan Sydney primarily reveal that (i) the political institutionalization of environmental concern and (ii) the commitment to local leadership and organizational learning are key corporate attributes for enabling sustainable management. A typology of five organizational development phases has been proposed as both a heuristic and capacity benchmarking tool for urban water strategists, policy makers, and decision makers that are focused on improving the level of local implementation of sustainable urban water management activity. While this investigation has focused on local government, these findings do provide guideposts for assessing the development needs of future capacity building programs across a range of different institutional contexts. PMID:18027015

  5. Local Institutional Development and Organizational Change for Advancing Sustainable Urban Water Futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rebekah R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the local institutional and organizational development insights from a five-year ongoing interdisciplinary research project focused on advancing the implementation of sustainable urban water management. While it is broadly acknowledged that the inertia associated with administrative systems is possibly the most significant obstacle to advancing sustainable urban water management, contemporary research still largely prioritizes investigations at the technological level. This research is explicitly concerned with critically informing the design of methodologies for mobilizing and overcoming the administrative inertia of traditional urban water management practice. The results of fourteen in-depth case studies of local government organizations across Metropolitan Sydney primarily reveal that (i) the political institutionalization of environmental concern and (ii) the commitment to local leadership and organizational learning are key corporate attributes for enabling sustainable management. A typology of five organizational development phases has been proposed as both a heuristic and capacity benchmarking tool for urban water strategists, policy makers, and decision makers that are focused on improving the level of local implementation of sustainable urban water management activity. While this investigation has focused on local government, these findings do provide guideposts for assessing the development needs of future capacity building programs across a range of different institutional contexts.

  6. Organizational Climate Changes over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, John C.; Taylor, Thomas N.; Watkins, J. Foster

    1975-01-01

    As the basis for his doctoral dissertation, Taylor explored some of the conjectures advanced by Halpin and Croft relative to the possible directional changes in the organizational climate of schools over time. Taylor limited his study to elementary school based upon the question raised by Watkins in his dissertation relative to the validity of the…

  7. Organizational Change as Paradigm Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Hasan; Louis, Karen Seashore

    1994-01-01

    A model of organizational change is applied to long-term planning at the University of Minnesota. Results suggest that, although planning began in the 1970s, the 1980s saw a model change that increased centralization in strategic orientation and a reduction in size and programs. Implications for organizational research are examined. (Author/MSE)

  8. Organizational change: Incentives and resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Topics concerning Space Exploration Initiative technical interchange are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: models of change, elements of the current period, the signs of change, leaders' contribution, paradigms - our worldview, paradigm change, the effects of revealing paradigms, a checklist for change, and organizational control.

  9. Discontinuous Change: Leading Organizational Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, David A.; And Others

    This book provides insights into the dynamics of organizational transformation and presents a diagnostic framework for leading organizations through periods of radical change. Part 1 provides a framework for looking at the different types of change and the action strategies for dealing with them. Chapters include: (1) "Change Leadership: Core…

  10. Communicating Change in Organizational Chaos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Kay E.

    A study examined the reactions of organizational members to ownership change. Participant observation during a 2-week stay in each of two national corporations, American Broadcasting Company (ABC) and Union Underwear, provided data in the study. Results showed different reactions to change illustrated through corporate differences in structure,…

  11. Managing a successful organizational change.

    PubMed

    Conner, D R; Newman, J A

    1988-06-01

    To survive in today's competitive environment, hospitals must prepare themselves to effectively manage organizational changes such as downsizing or mergers. By analyzing the change process and understanding key roles, managers will be likely to ensure a smooth and successful transition. And a smooth and well-managed change will produce positive results by reducing the amount of time needed for the change to take affect, minimizing or avoiding productivity declines, keeping morale high, and encouraging confidence in hospital leadership. PMID:10287602

  12. Exploring Effective Communication for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Eric John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore experiences and perceptions of organizational leaders regarding organizational change communication to improve change results in an organizational setting. Building on a conceptual framework of organizational theory, 25 full-time online faculty at an institution of higher learning in the southwestern…

  13. Organizational change strategies within healthcare.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Claudia; Dastmalchian, Ali; Blyton, Paul; Hasselback, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study explores ways in which healthcare organizations can improve their organizational fitness for change using Beer and Nohria's framework of Theory E (concentrating on the economic value of change) and Theory O (concentrating on the organization's long-term capabilities for change). Data were collected from senior leaders/medical directors from health regions in Alberta. The results show that even though there is a tendency for reliance on Theory E change strategies, the respondents demonstrated other preferred approaches to change. PMID:24409580

  14. Organizational change through Lean Thinking.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Bruce-Barrett, Cindy

    2008-08-01

    In production and manufacturing plants, Lean Thinking has been used to improve processes by eliminating waste and thus enhancing efficiency. In health care, Lean Thinking has emerged as a comprehensive approach towards improving processes embedded in the diagnostic, treatment and care activities of health-care organizations with cost containment results. This paper provides a case study example where Lean Thinking is not only used to improve efficiency and cost containment, but also as an approach to effective organizational change. PMID:18647948

  15. Using Policy to Drive Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsby, Eunice Ellen

    2006-01-01

    This chapter addresses recent changes in public policy and organizational practices that affect LGBTQ individuals and the role that organizational policy can play in establishing and maintaining respectful and inclusive workplaces.

  16. A theory of organizational readiness for change

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Bryan J

    2009-01-01

    Background Change management experts have emphasized the importance of establishing organizational readiness for change and recommended various strategies for creating it. Although the advice seems reasonable, the scientific basis for it is limited. Unlike individual readiness for change, organizational readiness for change has not been subject to extensive theoretical development or empirical study. In this article, I conceptually define organizational readiness for change and develop a theory of its determinants and outcomes. I focus on the organizational level of analysis because many promising approaches to improving healthcare delivery entail collective behavior change in the form of systems redesign--that is, multiple, simultaneous changes in staffing, work flow, decision making, communication, and reward systems. Discussion Organizational readiness for change is a multi-level, multi-faceted construct. As an organization-level construct, readiness for change refers to organizational members' shared resolve to implement a change (change commitment) and shared belief in their collective capability to do so (change efficacy). Organizational readiness for change varies as a function of how much organizational members value the change and how favorably they appraise three key determinants of implementation capability: task demands, resource availability, and situational factors. When organizational readiness for change is high, organizational members are more likely to initiate change, exert greater effort, exhibit greater persistence, and display more cooperative behavior. The result is more effective implementation. Summary The theory described in this article treats organizational readiness as a shared psychological state in which organizational members feel committed to implementing an organizational change and confident in their collective abilities to do so. This way of thinking about organizational readiness is best suited for examining organizational

  17. Organizational Learning, Change and Socialization. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on organizational learning, change, and socialization. "A Study of the Organizational Learning Profile (OLP)" (Rae Dorai, Adela J. McMurray) reports findings that show the OLP (Pace et al. 1998) is a reliable instrument for measuring organizational learning and its content validity is high. "The Ability…

  18. Organizational Change. Symposium 19. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on organizational change consists of three presentations. "Institutionalizing Organizational Change Through Cascade Training: Implications for Human Resource Development (HRD) Research" (Ronald L. Jacobs, Darlene Russ-Eft, Suhail Zidan) proposes the institutionalization of change should be addressed as a major part of the change…

  19. Critical Review--Images of Change: The New Organizational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieves, Jim

    2000-01-01

    Includes "The Origins of Organizational Development"; "Restructuring Bureaucracy"; "The Emergence of Organizational Culture and Symbolic Intercourse"; "Organizational Development and the Art of Connoisseurship"; "Managing Change and Organizational Development"; "Skills, Values, or Impression Management?"; "Beyond Modernity"; and "If I Was…

  20. Organizational Learning and School Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silins, Halia Claudia; Mulford, William Richard; Zarins, Silja

    2002-01-01

    Examines nature of organizational learning and leadership practices and processes that foster organizational learning in Australian high schools. Uses a path model to test relationships between school-level factors and school outcome measures in terms of students' participation in and engagement with school. Discusses importance of…

  1. Implementation: The Glue of Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Roger M.; Lloyd, Clayton R.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of organizational change and performance improvement programs focuses on 10 guidelines for developing successful implementation plans. Highlights include defining a vision and mission; cultural considerations; forming a team; contingency plans; communication; employee education; monitoring mechanisms; and rewarding and recognizing…

  2. Expectation Effects in Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Albert S.

    1974-01-01

    The experiment reported here was conducted during a 12-month period at four plants owned by the same company. Managers were given artificial reports about previous findings obtained in implementing job enlargement and job rotation programs. Led to expect higher productivity as a result of these organizational innovations, the managers increased…

  3. National Call for Organizational Change from Sheltered to Integrated Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogan, Patricia; Rinne, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose in this article is to contend that organizational change from sheltered to integrated employment is not only possible but necessary, and a federal Employment First agenda must be advanced. Findings are reported from interviews with senior managers from 10 organizations that have shifted their service delivery to community employment,…

  4. Bibliography on Organizational Change in Schools, Selected, Annotated, and Indexed. Strategies of Organizational Change Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runkel, Philip J.; Burr, Ann

    The sources annotated in this bibliography contain ideas that the school administrator can use to enable organizational change to happen more surely, with less frustration. Most of the entries deal with processes or structures in schools or their environments. Many describe projects of organizational change. Some sources concerning other kinds of…

  5. The Goal Model and Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warriner, Charles K.

    This analysis is an attempt to specify the purposes and factors in organizational change and continuity. Denial of the purposeful premise makes possible an environmental perspective that views the characteristics of organizations as a function of their adaptation to their environment. This approach is based on the premises that (1) change in what…

  6. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking. PMID:19064453

  7. Organizational Change and the Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fojt, Martin, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Nineteen precis highlight concepts of managing change and people. Specific examples are provided from such companies as Texas Instruments, EMC, British Telecom, Cooper & Lybrands, MCB University Press, and the Royal Bank of Scotland. (SK)

  8. The Bikestuff Simulation: Experiencing the Challenge of Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollag, Keith; Parise, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a 2-hour experiential simulation that helps students understand (a) the challenge of even simple organizational changes, (b) the importance of communication between change agents and organizational members, and (c) the source of resistance to organizational change efforts. Teams of students compete to process the most…

  9. Understanding the Influence of Organizational Culture and Group Dynamics on Organizational Change and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Colleen; Kline, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was used to examine cultural and group level factors that potentially influence groups' learning in the context of…

  10. Consulting to Facilitate Planned Organizational Change in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zins, Joseph E.; Illback, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    We present an update of our 1984 chapter on organizational interventions in educational settings. Our view of the organizational change process is described, followed by a discussion of the gap between current theory and practice. We describe several examples of promising organizational change initiatives, followed by our observations of future…

  11. PRINCIPLES AND STRATEGIES OF DIRECTING ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE VIA LABORATORY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENNIS, WARREN G.

    THIS CHAPTER OF A LARGER WORK ON THE SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE SUGGESTS GUIDELINES FOR USING LABORATORY TRAINING WITHIN ORGANIZATIONAL SOCIAL SYSTEMS. THE ULTIMATE AIM OF SUCH TRAINING IS NOT ONLY TO IMPART HUMAN RELATIONS SKILLS TO THE PARTICIPANTS, BUT ALSO TO CHANGE ORGANIZATIONAL VALUES SO THAT HUMAN FEELINGS ARE REGARDED AS…

  12. 28 CFR 0.190 - Changes within organizational units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changes within organizational units. 0... JUSTICE Sections and Subunits § 0.190 Changes within organizational units. (a) The head of each Office... termination of major functions within his organizational unit as he may deem necessary or appropriate. In...

  13. 28 CFR 0.190 - Changes within organizational units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes within organizational units. 0... JUSTICE Sections and Subunits § 0.190 Changes within organizational units. (a) The head of each Office... termination of major functions within his organizational unit as he may deem necessary or appropriate. In...

  14. 28 CFR 0.190 - Changes within organizational units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes within organizational units. 0... JUSTICE Sections and Subunits § 0.190 Changes within organizational units. (a) The head of each Office... termination of major functions within his organizational unit as he may deem necessary or appropriate. In...

  15. Change Agent Research and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragab, A. Megid; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Change Agent Research (CAR) is a "people" change approach that contrasts what a group (or individual) thinks it is doing with the actual behavior that exists. The applicability of CAR methodology to organizations is discussed. (Author)

  16. Organizational Climate and Strategic Change in Higher Education: Organizational Insecurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, D. K.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the development of information strategies in 12 United Kingdom higher education institutions and highlighted the influence of different styles of management on organizational climate. Findings identify six issues that affect the climate of security or insecurity within different higher education institutions. (SLD)

  17. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Hammer, Leslie B; Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win-win for productivity and employees' well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today's U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  18. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  19. Sustaining organizational culture change in health systems.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron David; Saul, Jessie; Bevan, Helen; Scheirer, Mary Ann; Best, Allan; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Mannion, Russell; Cornelissen, Evelyn; Howland, David; Jenkins, Emily; Bitz, Jennifer

    2016-03-21

    Purpose - The questions addressed by this review are: first, what are the guiding principles underlying efforts to stimulate sustained cultural change; second, what are the mechanisms by which these principles operate; and, finally, what are the contextual factors that influence the likelihood of these principles being effective? The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach - The authors conducted a literature review informed by rapid realist review methodology that examined how interventions interact with contexts and mechanisms to influence the sustainability of cultural change. Reference and expert panelists assisted in refining the research questions, systematically searching published and grey literature, and helping to identify interactions between interventions, mechanisms and contexts. Findings - Six guiding principles were identified: align vision and action; make incremental changes within a comprehensive transformation strategy; foster distributed leadership; promote staff engagement; create collaborative relationships; and continuously assess and learn from change. These principles interact with contextual elements such as local power distributions, pre-existing values and beliefs and readiness to engage. Mechanisms influencing how these principles sustain cultural change include activation of a shared sense of urgency and fostering flexible levels of engagement. Practical implications - The principles identified in this review, along with the contexts and mechanisms that influence their effectiveness, are useful domains for policy and practice leaders to explore when grappling with cultural change. These principles are sufficiently broad to allow local flexibilities in adoption and application. Originality/value - This is the first study to adopt a realist approach for understanding how changes in organizational culture may be sustained. Through doing so, this review highlights the broad principles by which organizational action

  20. Organizational change tactics: the evidence base in the literature.

    PubMed

    Packard, Thomas; Shih, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Planned organizational change processes can be used to address the many challenges facing human service organizations (HSOs) and improve organizational outcomes. There is massive literature on organizational change, ranging from popular management books to academic research on specific aspects of change. Regarding HSOs, there is a growing literature, including increasing attention to implementation science and evidence-based practices. However, research which offers generalizable, evidence-based guidelines for implementing change is not common. The purpose of the authors was to assess the evidence base in this organizational change literature to lay the groundwork for more systematic knowledge development in this important field. PMID:25491004

  1. Organizational change theory: implications for health promotion practice.

    PubMed

    Batras, Dimitri; Duff, Cameron; Smith, Ben J

    2016-03-01

    Sophisticated understandings of organizational dynamics and processes of organizational change are crucial for the development and success of health promotion initiatives. Theory has a valuable contribution to make in understanding organizational change, for identifying influential factors that should be the focus of change efforts and for selecting the strategies that can be applied to promote change. This article reviews select organizational change models to identify the most pertinent insights for health promotion practitioners. Theoretically derived considerations for practitioners who seek to foster organizational change include the extent to which the initiative is modifiable to fit with the internal context; the amount of time that is allocated to truly institutionalize change; the ability of the agents of change to build short-term success deliberately into their implementation plan; whether or not the shared group experience of action for change is positive or negative and the degree to which agencies that are the intended recipients of change are resourced to focus on internal factors. In reviewing theories of organizational change, the article also addresses strategies for facilitating the adoption of key theoretical insights into the design and implementation of health promotion initiatives in diverse organizational settings. If nothing else, aligning health promotion with organizational change theory promises insights into what it is that health promoters do and the time that it can take to do it effectively. PMID:25398838

  2. Sport medicine and sport science practitioners' experiences of organizational change.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, C R D; Gilmore, S; Thelwell, R C

    2015-10-01

    Despite the emergence of and widespread uptake of a growing range of medical and scientific professions in elite sport, such environs present a volatile professional domain characterized by change and unprecedentedly high turnover of personnel. This study explored sport medicine and science practitioners' experiences of organizational change using a longitudinal design over a 2-year period. Specifically, data were collected in three temporally defined phases via 49 semi-structured interviews with 20 sport medics and scientists employed by three organizations competing in the top tiers of English football and cricket. The findings indicated that change occurred over four distinct stages; anticipation and uncertainty, upheaval and realization, integration and experimentation, normalization and learning. Moreover, these data highlight salient emotional, behavioral, and attitudinal experiences of medics and scientists, the existence of poor employment practices, and direct and indirect implications for on-field performance following organizational change. The findings are discussed in line with advances to extant change theory and applied implications for prospective sport medics and scientists, sport organizations, and professional bodies responsible for the training and development of neophyte practitioners. PMID:25487162

  3. Organizational Change Efforts: Methodologies for Assessing Organizational Effectiveness and Program Costs versus Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macy, Barry A.; Mirvis, Philip H.

    1982-01-01

    A standardized methodology for identifying, defining, and measuring work behavior and performance rather than production, and a methodology that estimates the costs and benefits of work innovation are presented for assessing organizational effectiveness and program costs versus benefits in organizational change programs. Factors in a cost-benefit…

  4. Delinquency Prevention: Selective Organizational Change in the School. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Judith Warren; Skarrow, Margaret

    Selective organizational change in the school presents one promising approach for delinquency prevention among young people. The organizational change approach assumes that: (1) delinquency will be reduced when young people are able to show their competence and worth; (2) young people learn socially legitimate behavior mainly in the school; and…

  5. From Here to There: Effectively Managing Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Casey J.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout organizational history it has been witnessed and written of time and again just how difficult initiating and leading change, as it relates to human behavior, can be. Initiating and implementing organizational change can be, and very often is, a journey characterized by periods of temporary progress followed by slow regression back to…

  6. 28 CFR 0.190 - Changes within organizational units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes within organizational units. 0.190 Section 0.190 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Sections and Subunits § 0.190 Changes within organizational units. (a) The head of each Office, Board, Division or Bureau may from time to...

  7. Change the System! School Psychologist as Organizational Consultant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Janis Clark; Bernstein, Rhoda

    Organizational development (OD) within school systems is productive work for the school psychologist. Basic to all OD is the principle of maximizing a system's resources. Following organizational change in the business world, schools can profit greatly from system changes which address today's "people problems." Outside consultants often provide…

  8. Coming Clean about Organizational Change: Leadership in the Real World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jerry

    This book examines change, leadership, and resilience, including levels of change, what constitutes effective leadership, and characteristics of organizational resilience. It describes ways to build organizational resilience and describes 12 harsh realities that people and organizations bring to reform, such as the reality that most people act…

  9. How Social Accounts and Participation during Change Affect Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Rune

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how the way change implemented effects organizational learning. More specifically, we study the relationships between the use of social accounts, participation and organizational learning in the context of strategic change. The use of social accounts and participation are often promoted during…

  10. Academic Restructuring: Organizational Change and Institutional Imperatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumport, Patricia J.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that there has been a macro-trend whereby the dominant concept of public higher education has changed from higher education as a social institution to higher education as an industry. Identifies three interrelated mechanisms advancing this process: academic management, academic consumerism, and academic stratification. Argues that wholesale…

  11. The impact of gendered organizational systems on women's career advancement.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Deborah A; Hopkins, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    In this Perspective article we propose that in order to pave the way for women's career advancement into the senior ranks of organizations, attention must be directed at the systemic norms and structures that drive the gendered nature of the workplace. A focus on individual level issues, i.e., women lacking confidence and women opting out, detracts from the work that must be done at the organizational level in order to dismantle the system of pervasive, structural disadvantage facing women seeking to advance to senior leadership positions. PMID:26175708

  12. Assessing Organizational Change in Multisector Community Health Alliances

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Hearld, Larry R; Shi, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article was to identify some common organizational features of multisector health care alliances (MHCAs) and the analytic challenges presented by those characteristics in assessing organizational change. Data Sources Two rounds of an Internet-based survey of participants in 14 MHCAs. Study Design We highlight three analytic challenges that can arise when quantitatively studying the organizational characteristics of MHCAs—assessing change in MHCA organization, assessment of construct reliability, and aggregation of individual responses to reflect organizational characteristics. We illustrate these issues using a leadership effectiveness scale (12 items) validated in previous research and data from 14 MHCAs participating in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) program. Findings High levels of instability and turnover in MHCA membership create challenges in using survey data to study changes in key organizational characteristics of MHCAs. We offer several recommendations to diagnose the source and extent of these problems. PMID:25102763

  13. Transforming Cultures of Care: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, Karyn; Cross, David; Jones, Daren; Buff, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a small organizational case study highlighting the dimensions of trauma-informed care, the processes of organizational change, and the growth of caregiver expertise. The article is framed by the notion of caregiving cultures, which refers to the beliefs, languages, and practices of caregivers and caregiving organizations.…

  14. Sustaining Motivation and Productivity during Significant Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellak, Mary T.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of organizational change and possible negative effects which can impact organizational performance focuses on ways a manager can identify problems with employee motivation and productivity and address them in a supportive manner. Topics include clear expectations, open communication, and recognizing employee efforts. (Author/LRW)

  15. The Informant Panel: A Retrospective Methodology for Guiding Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Craig C.; Glassman, Alan M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the origins and developmental requirements of the Informant Panel, an inexpensive, time-efficient, retrospective method for obtaining consequently meaningful information needed to guide organizational change projects. The panel combines features of the Nominal Group and Delphi Techniques. (WAS)

  16. Changing Persepectives from Individual to Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Most training and educational professionals have focused their efforts on inculcating learning within individuals rather than within organizations. This is understandable, writes Forman, because so much needs to be accomplished to improve the efficacy of schools and corporate training programs. The notion of organizational learning has been…

  17. Wisconsin Technical College Presidential Perspectives on Leading Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borowicz, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines leadership perceptions of attributes needed for effectively leading organizations within and through change. Current change forces substantiate the need for higher educational institutions to change in order to fulfill their missions. Creating a culture of organizational change presents a leadership challenge. The…

  18. Leading Organizational Change Is Like Climbing a Mountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Judith

    2004-01-01

    Leading organizational change is like climbing a mountain. Transformational leaders must prepare to lead change, understand the process and nature of change, and provide the essential gear so that those involved can be successful. The author draws on the literature and personal experiences as a hiker and change leader to provide a guide for…

  19. Mental health providers confronting organizational change: process, problems, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Gabel, S; Oster, G D

    1998-01-01

    Under the influence of managed care and diminished funding, the mental health field is undergoing a major transformation. Existing mental health programs, departments, and agencies are downsizing and restructuring to develop new types of service delivery systems. Organizations must change to survive; yet necessary and adaptive change may be resisted in numerous ways by providers whose reactions and behaviors may reduce the viability of their own programs and agencies. This paper explores various characteristics and reactions of mental health care professionals as they face great stress, professional devaluation, and necessary organizational change and restructuring. Adaptive and maladaptive patterns in response to potential organizational change are explored. The role of the leader in guiding and implementing programmatic changes and in dealing with denial and resistance is highlighted. Strategies to enhance the prospects for adaptive organizational change are offered. PMID:9919625

  20. Fostering Learning Opportunities through Employee Participation amid Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valleala, Ulla Maija; Herranen, Sanna; Collin, Kaija; Paloniemi, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are facing rapid changes, frequently involving modification of existing procedures. The case study reported here examined change processes and learning in a health care organization. The organizational change in question occurred in the emergency clinic of a Finnish central hospital where a new action model for…

  1. Predicting implementation from organizational readiness for change: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is widespread interest in measuring organizational readiness to implement evidence-based practices in clinical care. However, there are a number of challenges to validating organizational measures, including inferential bias arising from the halo effect and method bias - two threats to validity that, while well-documented by organizational scholars, are often ignored in health services research. We describe a protocol to comprehensively assess the psychometric properties of a previously developed survey, the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment. Objectives Our objective is to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the psychometric properties of the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment incorporating methods specifically to address threats from halo effect and method bias. Methods and Design We will conduct three sets of analyses using longitudinal, secondary data from four partner projects, each testing interventions to improve the implementation of an evidence-based clinical practice. Partner projects field the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment at baseline (n = 208 respondents; 53 facilities), and prospectively assesses the degree to which the evidence-based practice is implemented. We will conduct predictive and concurrent validities using hierarchical linear modeling and multivariate regression, respectively. For predictive validity, the outcome is the change from baseline to follow-up in the use of the evidence-based practice. We will use intra-class correlations derived from hierarchical linear models to assess inter-rater reliability. Two partner projects will also field measures of job satisfaction for convergent and discriminant validity analyses, and will field Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment measures at follow-up for concurrent validity (n = 158 respondents; 33 facilities). Convergent and discriminant validities will test associations between organizational readiness and different aspects of job

  2. Changing the Organizational Structure to Affect Perceived Bureaucracy, Organizational Processes, Loyalty, Job Satisfaction, and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David A.; Miskel, Cecil

    Schools are functioning in an era of rapid change and increasing mobility. In an effort to mobilize the organizational structure to meet the standards being dictated by society, the school district reorganized the administrative structure to emphasize decentralized decision-making for direct educational functions. The hypothesis was made that…

  3. A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.; Heerwagen, J.H.

    1995-02-01

    The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

  4. Leveraging organizational dynamics in buildings to change behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Elizabeth L.

    Buildings may be stationary, but they are not static; they are dynamic and active collectives of agents and actors, and play an important cultural and social role in shaping norms and influencing outcomes in the built environment. This research develops and applies a unique framework that conceptualizes the urban multifamily residential building as an organization, and seeks to use this lens to better understand the role of organizational characteristics in influencing energy efficiency in buildings. This work finds that an organizational analogy is a fruitful approach for understanding buildings, and that buildings in many ways can and do function successfully as organizations. In particular, eight organizational characteristics are explored here that extend well to buildings. These eight organizational characteristics are also explored more deeply to support an argument that some buildings have an organizational advantage that well positions them to undertake energy efficiency initiatives. One organizational characteristic -- the ownership type of the building -- is determined to be particularly important in driving energy outcomes in multifamily buildings in New York City. In particular, it was found that cooperative buildings in the New York City housing market consume less energy citywide than other types of multifamily properties, holding all else equal. Conversely, it was also found that rental buildings tend to consume more energy citywide. Subsequent qualitative case study work in a small Brooklyn cooperative building offers a deeper understanding of organizational decentralization and its role in driving decision-making and outcomes in the building. Additional comparative work in two rental properties -- one high-income and one low-income -- adds additional context and understanding to economic considerations such as the influence of income in overriding centralized efforts to operate the building efficiently. Ultimately, this research develops an analogy

  5. Changing Group and Organizational Cultures To Support Healthy Lifestyles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judd

    Group and organizational cultures play an important role in helping people to adopt healthier lifestyles. Culture can be assessed by looking at social expectations for behavior, called group norms. Cultural norms can be changed to support healthy lifestyles through a systematic and participatory process. Such a change effort would modify: (1)…

  6. Effects of Habitual Anger on Employees’ Behavior during Organizational Change

    PubMed Central

    Bönigk, Mareike; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees’ habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior—mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident’s negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. PMID:24287849

  7. Learning Is Change: Creating an Environment for Sustainable Organizational Change in Continuing and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Christie

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which learning itself is a form of organizational change and, as such, supports organizational readiness for change. The study considers a continuing education unit within a major Canadian university that managed to transform its decentralized and independent student records and administration system (student…

  8. Socialization Turning Points: An Examination of Change in Organizational Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Connie; Bach, Betsy Wackernagel

    To examine perspectives of change in individual-organizational socialization, a study used the retrospective interview technique (RIT) to reconstruct the history and process of individuals' socialization experiences over an 8-month period. Using the RIT, researchers asked subjects, 28 entering graduate students enrolled in three communication…

  9. The Impact of Presidential Cognition on Framing Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    Summarizes the theoretical foundations, data collection procedures, and findings from a study designed to examine the linkage between presidential cognition and the ultimate framing of organizational change on a community college campus. The data analyzed in this study was gathered at two community college sites intentionally selected based on the…

  10. Effective Organizational Structures and Processes: Addressing Issues of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes organizational structures and processes at the institutional and project levels for the development and support of distance learning initiatives. It addresses environmental and stakeholder issues and explores principles and strategies of effective leadership for change creation and management.

  11. Strategies for Organizational Change from Group Homes to Individualized Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to…

  12. OSUL2013: Fostering Organizational Change through a Grassroots Planning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides background on planning and organizational culture change in libraries and describes a grassroots planning process taking place at the Ohio State University Libraries. Now in its third phase, the process aims to create a long-term plan for the organization while fostering a more collaborative, innovative culture.

  13. The Sanctuary Model of Trauma-Informed Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Sandra L.; Sreedhar, Sarah Yanosy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Sanctuary Model[R], a trauma-informed method for creating or changing an organizational culture. Although the model is based on trauma theory, its tenets have application in working with children and adults across a wide diagnostic spectrum. Originally developed in a short-term, acute inpatient psychiatric setting for…

  14. Establishing the Unitary Classroom: Organizational Change and School Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Elizabeth M.; True, Joan H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational changes introduced in two elementary schools to create unitary (desegregated) classrooms. The different models adopted by the two schools--departmentalization and team teaching--are considered as expressions of their patterns of interaction, behavior, and values. (Part of a theme issue on educational…

  15. Organizational Change and the Development of Faculty Evaluation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orban, Deborah A.; Abedor, Allan J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes problems in faculty evaluation and performance appraisal and presents assumptions and features of newer alternative faculty evaluation systems. A strategy for developing systems which is based on organizational change theory is discussed. This system involves use of committees and structured phases for faculty input. (MBR)

  16. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  17. Revisiting Knowledge Sharing from the Organizational Change Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Eun-Jee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify how knowledge sharing literature has discussed task, structure, technology and people as elements of organizational change and to examine the interactions between the four elements of knowledge sharing. Design/methodology/approach: The research questions guiding the study are: How do organizational…

  18. Organizational Readiness for Change and Opinions toward Treatment Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Bret E.; Rieckmann, Traci; Nunes, Edward V.; Miller, Michael; Arfken, Cynthia; Edmundson, Eldon; McCarty, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Program administrators and staff in treatment programs participating in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) completed surveys to characterize participating programs and practitioners. A two-level random effects regression model assessed the influence of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) and organizational attributes on opinions toward the use of four evidence-based practices (manualized treatments, medication, integrated mental health services, and motivational incentives) and practices with less empirical support (confrontation and noncompliance discharge). The ORC Scales suggested greater support for evidence-based practices in programs where staff perceived more program need for improvement, better Internet access, higher levels of peer influence, more opportunities for professional growth, a stronger sense of organizational mission and more organizational stress. Support for confrontation and noncompliance discharge, in contrast, was strong when staff saw less opportunity for professional growth, weaker peer influence, less Internet access, and perceived less organizational stress. The analysis provides evidence of the ORC’s utility in assessing agency strengths and needs during the implementation of evidence-based practices. PMID:17434708

  19. Organizational Change: Motivation, Communication, and Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Ann; Gilley, Jerry W.; McMillan, Heather S.

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that numerous variables have an impact on a leader's effectiveness. This study explores the behaviors associated with leadership effectiveness in driving change. The findings confirm previous research that identifies change effectiveness skills, while isolating the specific leader behaviors deemed most valuable to implementing…

  20. Learning and Organizational Change in SPI Initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Marikka

    Explaining how organizations chance has been a central and enduring quest of management scholars and many other disciplines. In order to be successful change requires not only a new process or technology but also the engagement and participation of the people involved. In this vein the change process results in new behavior and is routinized in practical daily business life of the company. Change management provides a framework for managing the human side of these changes. In this article we present a literature review on the change management in the context of Software Process Improvement. The traditional view of learning, as a “lessons learned” or post-mortem reporting activity is often apparent in SPI literature. However, learning can also be viewed as a continuous change process where specific learning cycle starts with creative conflict and ends up in formal norms and systems. Since this perspective has almost no visibility in SPI literature of past it could show a new direction to the future development of change management in SPI.

  1. Organizational Adaptation: Managing in Complexly Changing Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zammuto, Raymond F.

    A model of strategic adaptation that focuses on how organizations adapt to both conditions of growth and decline is presented. The theoretical structure underlying the model is considered, with attention to organizations, niches, and environments, as well as environmental change and evolving niches. The model attempts to reconcile the perspectives…

  2. Turning Up the Staff for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jr., Richard V.

    1969-01-01

    With the tremendous growth of innovation in education in recent years, the need to "tune up the staff has appeared as an essential ingredient. The days of change through administrative directives have disappeared with the rise in teacher militancy and competency. (CK)

  3. Cynicism about organizational change: an attribution process perspective.

    PubMed

    Wanous, John P; Reichers, Arnon E; Austin, James T

    2004-06-01

    The underlying attribution process for cynicism about organizational change is examined with six samples from four different organizations. The samples include hourly (n=777) and salaried employees (n= 155) from a manufacturing plant, faculty (n=293) and staff (n=302) from a large university, managers from a utility company (n=97), and young managers (n=65) from various organizations who were attending an evening MBA program. This form of cynicism is defined as the combination of Pessimism (about future change efforts) and a Dispositional attribution (why past efforts to change failed). Three analyses support this definition. First, an exploratory factor analysis (from the largest sample) produced two factors, one composed of Pessimism and the Dispositional attribution items and the second of the Situational attribution items. Second, the average correlation (across several samples) between Pessimism and Dispositional attribution is much higher (.59) than the average correlation between Pessimism and Situational attribution (.17). Third, scores on two different trait-based measures of cynicism correlate highest with the Dispositional attribution component of cynicism. A practical implication is that organizational leaders may minimize cynicism by managing both employees' pessimism about organizational change and employees' attributions about it. Specific suggestions for how this might be done are offered. PMID:15362427

  4. Organizational readiness for implementing change: a psychometric assessment of a new measure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Organizational readiness for change in healthcare settings is an important factor in successful implementation of new policies, programs, and practices. However, research on the topic is hindered by the absence of a brief, reliable, and valid measure. Until such a measure is developed, we cannot advance scientific knowledge about readiness or provide evidence-based guidance to organizational leaders about how to increase readiness. This article presents results of a psychometric assessment of a new measure called Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change (ORIC), which we developed based on Weiner’s theory of organizational readiness for change. Methods We conducted four studies to assess the psychometric properties of ORIC. In study one, we assessed the content adequacy of the new measure using quantitative methods. In study two, we examined the measure’s factor structure and reliability in a laboratory simulation. In study three, we assessed the reliability and validity of an organization-level measure of readiness based on aggregated individual-level data from study two. In study four, we conducted a small field study utilizing the same analytic methods as in study three. Results Content adequacy assessment indicated that the items developed to measure change commitment and change efficacy reflected the theoretical content of these two facets of organizational readiness and distinguished the facets from hypothesized determinants of readiness. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis in the lab and field studies revealed two correlated factors, as expected, with good model fit and high item loadings. Reliability analysis in the lab and field studies showed high inter-item consistency for the resulting individual-level scales for change commitment and change efficacy. Inter-rater reliability and inter-rater agreement statistics supported the aggregation of individual level readiness perceptions to the organizational level of analysis

  5. Six Community College Presidents: Organizational Pressures, Change Processes and Approaches to Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malm, James R.

    2008-01-01

    A total of six Maryland community college presidents were guided through conversations to identify the organizational challenges and uncertainties that have forced organizational changes in their respective colleges. Another thrust of the research was to discover what organizational change processes these presidents have implemented to overcome…

  6. Politics of change: the discourses that inform organizational change and their capacity to silence.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kim

    2016-09-01

    Changes in healthcare organizations are inevitable and occurring at unprecedented rates. Such changes greatly impact nurses and their work, yet these experiences are rarely explored. Organizational change discourses remain grounded in perspectives that explore and explain systems, often not the people within them. Change processes in healthcare organizations informed by such organizational discourses validate only certain perspectives and forms of knowledge. This fosters exclusionary practices, limiting the capacity of certain individuals or groups of individuals to effectively contribute to change discourses and processes. The reliance on mainstream organizational discourses in healthcare organizations has left little room for the exploration of diverse perspectives on the subject of organizational change, particularly those of nurses. Michel Foucault's work challenges dominant discourse and suggest that strong reliance's on specific discourses effectively disqualify certain forms of knowledge. Foucault's writings on disqualified knowledge and parrhesia (truth telling and frank speech) facilitate the critical exploration of discourses that inform change in healthcare organizations and nurses capacities to contribute to organizational discourses. This paper explores the capacity of nurses to speak their truths within rapidly and continuously changing healthcare organizations when such changes are often driven by discourses not derived from nursing knowledge or experience. PMID:27152645

  7. Change In(ter)Ventions to Organizational Learning: Bravo to Leaders as Unifying Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Roland K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between change interventions and organizational learning. It seeks to identify the process through which team learning is developed, the factors that affect organizational learning and its influences on organizational effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach: Two groups of…

  8. Organizational Change. Symposium 11. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on organizational change. The first paper, "Kaizen Blitz: Rapid Learning to Facilitate Immediate Organizational Improvements" (Robert B. Gudgel, Fred C. Feitler), describes rapid and dramatic improvement in the organizational performance of a manufacturing firm after use of a series of kaizen…

  9. 7 CFR 3560.405 - Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... paragraph (b)(2) of this section. (c) Documentation of organizational structures and ownership interest... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Borrower organizational structure or ownership... Servicing § 3560.405 Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes. (a) General....

  10. 7 CFR 3560.405 - Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraph (b)(2) of this section. (c) Documentation of organizational structures and ownership interest... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Borrower organizational structure or ownership... Servicing § 3560.405 Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes. (a) General....

  11. 7 CFR 3560.405 - Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... paragraph (b)(2) of this section. (c) Documentation of organizational structures and ownership interest... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Borrower organizational structure or ownership... Servicing § 3560.405 Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes. (a) General....

  12. 7 CFR 3560.405 - Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... paragraph (b)(2) of this section. (c) Documentation of organizational structures and ownership interest... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Borrower organizational structure or ownership... Servicing § 3560.405 Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes. (a) General....

  13. New disability rights require organizational change and leadership.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Bopp, K D; Brown, G D

    1995-01-01

    On July 26, 1990, President George Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This legislation has been referred to as the "emancipation proclamation for the disabled" because of its great importance to persons with disabilities in our society. The ADA will not be implemented in a substantive way, however, without truly transformative leadership. Because of their traditional role in this area, health care professionals are in a unique position to provide that leadership and to help effect the necessary organizational changes. Passage of the ADA is only the beginning; the true test of its success will be in its implementation. PMID:10172512

  14. 7 CFR 3560.405 - Borrower organizational structure or ownership interest changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements of this section apply to changes in a borrower entity's organizational structure or to a change in... is transferred, within a 12-month period, the change will be considered a housing project transfer... organizational change. The request must document that the proposed changes will not adversely affect the...

  15. E-Tools of Change: An Analysis of a Corporate Intranet Promoting Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Through analysis of a qualitative case study, this paper argues that aspects of a hospital's environment affect the process of change promoted through the intranet. Specifically, the conditions of network readiness and continual change allowed the intranet to be accepted by organizational members and accomplished both surface change and deeper…

  16. The effects of governing board configuration on profound organizational change in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Ye, Yining; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Weiner, Bryan J

    2006-09-01

    This study extends the literature on governing boards and organizational change by examining how governing board configurations have influenced profound organizational change in U.S. hospitals, and the conditions under which such change occurs. Hospitals governed by boards that more closely resembled a corporate governance model were more likely to experience positive changes such as diversification and merger and less likely to undergo negative changes such as closure. Organizational performance influenced change, but largely independent of governance configurations. Only in the case of closure did we find that governance configuration operated jointly with organizational performance. PMID:17066778

  17. The Influence of Leadership Behavior and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Readiness for Change in a Higher Learning Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Norshidah

    2012-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the effectiveness in implementing organizational change. However, many change effort fail due to several factors such as lack of commitment, style of leadership, and emotional distress of the employees who have to implement the change. This study was intended to determine the influence of leadership behavior and…

  18. Exploring senior nurses' experiences of leading organizational change.

    PubMed

    Boyal, Amunpreet; Hewison, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to explore Senior nurses' experiences of leading organizational change. There is a substantial literature reporting middle-level nurse managers' experiences of change; however, there is less evidence concerning senior nurses' perspectives. In view of this, interview data collected from senior nurses, as part of a study of major organizational change, were analysed to redress this imbalance. Design/methodology/approach - In-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 14) were conducted with senior nurses (between 2009 and 2012). Findings - Senior nurses' activity centred on leadership and workforce issues, internal influences and external pressures. In periods of change, appropriate leadership was vital, and "weak" leaders were considered to have an adverse effect on teams. Concerns were expressed about financial strictures and their impact on patient care and service provision. The senior nurses were striving to provide the best quality of service delivery with the limited resources available. Concentration on operational matters was necessary to maintain stability in periods of change. However, this prevented senior nurses from influencing strategic decision-making in their organizations. Practical implications - If senior nurses are to realise their potential to operate at a strategic level, they need to be given time and support to lead, rather than just react to change. This research emphasises the importance of a "nursing voice" to inform board-level decisions and maintain a focus on patient care. Originality/value - This research sheds light on the work of a key group of staff in health-care organizations. Understanding senior nurses' experience of and contribution to change is a useful contribution to health services research. PMID:26764959

  19. Individual Readiness for Organizational Change and Its Implications for Human Resource and Organization Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Myungweon; Ruona, Wendy E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual readiness for organizational change reflects the concept of "unfreezing" proposed by Lewin (1947/1997b) and is critical to successful change implementation. Understanding the conditions conducive to individual readiness for organizational change, instead of the more traditional focus on resistance to change, can be useful for designing…

  20. The Zone of Inertia: Absorptive Capacity and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how interruptions in organizational learning effect institutional absorptive capacity and contribute to organizational inertia. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory model is presented as a heuristic to describe how interruptions in organizational learning affect absorptive capacity.…

  1. Correspondence of supervisor and subordinate perspectives during major organizational change.

    PubMed

    Leiter, M P; Harvie, P

    1997-10-01

    Staff members (N = 2,605) and supervisors (N = 55) of 39 administrative units in 2 healthcare organizations completed a survey measuring confidence in the organization, engagement with their work, and occupational hazards. A correlational analysis determined correspondence between the perspectives of supervisors with those of staff reporting to them as their facilities adjusted to major organizational changes. Supervisors' scores were significantly and positively correlated with the corresponding scores of staff members on cynicism, meaningfulness, acceptance of change, goals, hospital reputation, and health risks. Regression analysis found that relationships were relatively domain specific: Supervisor engagement with work was positively related to that of their staff members, and supervisors evaluations of the organization were positively related to those of their staff members. Supervisor assessment of occupational hazards was related to all 3 areas of staff perception. PMID:9552302

  2. The Effects of Governing Board Configuration on Profound Organizational Change in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Ye, Yining; Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2006-01-01

    This study extends the literature on governing boards and organizational change by examining how governing board configurations have influenced profound organizational change in U.S. hospitals, and the conditions under which such change occurs. Hospitals governed by boards that more closely resembled a corporate governance model were more likely…

  3. Institutionalization of Organizational Change: A Study of HRD Interventions in Singaporean, US, Japanese, and German Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman-Gani, AAhad M.; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    Institutionalizing organizational change has emerged as an issue among organization researchers and managers alike. Institutionalization of change is derived from change management theory in its emphasis on understanding the roots of organizational success and failure. The field of HRD appears particularly poised to help organizations…

  4. Measuring cynicism toward organizational change--one dimension or two?

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Wanous, Reichers, and Austin's (2000) measure of cynicism about organizational change (CAOC) was subjected to validation and cross-validation procedures using data collected from two Australian public sector organizations. More specifically analyses were conducted to determine whether CAOC is best understood as a single dimensional or a two dimensional construct. The results of confirmatory factor analysis suggest that neither a one dimensional nor a two dimensional measurement model provided a satisfactory fit to the data. However, removal of two of the original eight items resulted in a two dimensional model, with three items in each dimension, that provided a reasonable fit to the data. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:19092231

  5. From youth worker professional development to organizational change.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sheetal; Baumgardner, Briana; Germanic, Ofir; Graff, Randy; Korum, Kathy; Mueller, Megan; Randall, Steve; Simmons, Tim; Stokes, Gina; Xiong, Will; Peterson, Karen Kolb

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing, innovative youth worker professional development is described in this article. This initiative began as youth worker professional development and then transcended to personal and organizational development. It grew from a moral response of Saint Paul Parks and Recreation staff and two faculty members of Youth Studies, University of Minnesota to offer higher-quality services to youth for their healthy development. Its underlying philosophies and ethos included building and sustaining meaningful relationships, cocreating a space for learning and change, becoming a reflecting practitioner, and community organizing. This professional development responded to the participants' interests and needs or to local situations in that moment, that space, and the discussions, and took on different shapes at different times. There were many accomplishments of, challenges and barriers to, and lessons learned from this professional development. PMID:24136837

  6. Work-life initiatives and organizational change: Overcoming mixed messages to move from the margin to the mainstream.

    PubMed

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Lewis, Suzan; Hammer, Leslie B

    2010-01-01

    This article examines perspectives on employer work-life initiatives as potential organizational change phenomena. Work-life initiatives address two main organizational challenges: structural (flexible job design, human resource policies) and cultural (supportive supervisors, climate) factors. While work-life initiatives serve a purpose in highlighting the need for organizational adaptation to changing relationships between work, family, and personal life, we argue they usually are marginalized rather than mainstreamed into organizational systems. We note mixed consequences of work-life initiatives for individuals and organizations.While they may enable employees to manage work and caregiving, they can increase work intensification and perpetuate stereotypes of ideal workers. In order to advance the field, organizations and scholars need to frame both structural and cultural work-life changes as part of the core employment systems to enhance organizational effectiveness and not just as strategies to support disadvantaged, non-ideal workers. We conclude with an overview of the articles in this special issue. PMID:22021934

  7. Work–life initiatives and organizational change: Overcoming mixed messages to move from the margin to the mainstream

    PubMed Central

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Lewis, Suzan; Hammer, Leslie B

    2011-01-01

    This article examines perspectives on employer work–life initiatives as potential organizational change phenomena. Work–life initiatives address two main organizational challenges: structural (flexible job design, human resource policies) and cultural (supportive supervisors, climate) factors. While work–life initiatives serve a purpose in highlighting the need for organizational adaptation to changing relationships between work, family, and personal life, we argue they usually are marginalized rather than mainstreamed into organizational systems. We note mixed consequences of work–life initiatives for individuals and organizations.While they may enable employees to manage work and caregiving, they can increase work intensification and perpetuate stereotypes of ideal workers. In order to advance the field, organizations and scholars need to frame both structural and cultural work–life changes as part of the core employment systems to enhance organizational effectiveness and not just as strategies to support disadvantaged, non-ideal workers. We conclude with an overview of the articles in this special issue. PMID:22021934

  8. Organizational Change in the Community College: A Ripple or a Sea Change? New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 102.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John Stewart, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This journal focuses on organizational change within the community college and its reflection of social movement and institutional identity. The first article, "Organizational Change and the Community College," by John Stewart Levin, demonstrates how change determines the character of the institution. "In Search of Vision and Values: The Minnesota…

  9. Changing of the Guard: How Different School Leaders Change Organizational Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enomoto, Ernestine K.; Conley, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    While providing stability and uniformity, organizational routines can foster continuous change. Using Feldman's (2000) performative model of routinized action theory, coupled with leadership succession research, we examined how three successive administrations in a California high school revised a student attendance (tardy-monitoring) routine over…

  10. Trust, Isolation, and Presence: The Virtual Work Environment and Acceptance of Deep Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Laurence Michael

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of this research was to explore through the use of a grounded theory methodology if the human perceptions of trust, isolation, and presence affected the virtual workers ability to accept deep organizational change. The study found that the virtual workers in the sample defined their acceptance of deep organizational change by…

  11. Technological Capabilities and Human Constraints: Automation and Organizational Change in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Bryce

    Arguing that technological change often affects the organizational structure of library workplaces, this paper presents two alternative approaches to the implementation of change in organizational structures, provides several examples of each approach, and suggests related reading materials. It is noted that the configurational approach…

  12. Globalization and Organizational Change: Engineers' Experiences and Their Implications for Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucena, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    The demand for flexible engineers presents significant challenges to engineering education. Among these is the need for engineers to be prepared to understand and deal with organizational change. Yet engineering education and research on engineers have overlooked the impact of organizational change on engineering work. After outlining the impact…

  13. Monetary Incentives and Organizational Change in Mexican Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Carlos Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores and explains the organizational responses of Mexican public state universities to an ambitious incentive-based policy created by the federal government in 2001: "The Integral Program for Institutional Strengthening" ("PIFI"). Drawing upon literature on organizational-environmental relationships and on…

  14. Managing hospitals in turbulent times: do organizational changes improve hospital survival?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S Y; Alexander, J A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine (1) the degree to which organizational changes affected hospital survival; (2) whether core and peripheral organizational changes affected hospital survival differently; and (3) how simultaneous organizational changes affected hospital survival. DATA SOURCES: AHA Hospital Surveys, the Area Resource File, and the AHA Hospital Guides, Part B: Multihospital Systems. STUDY DESIGN: The study employed a longitudinal panel design. We followed changes in all community hospitals in the continental United States from 1981 through 1994. The dependent variable, hospital closure, was examined as a function of multiple changes in a hospital's core and peripheral structures as well as the hospital's organizational and environmental characteristics. Cox regression models were used to test the expectations that core changes increased closure risk while peripheral changes decreased such risk, and that simultaneous core and peripheral changes would lead to higher risk of closure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Results indicated more peripheral than core changes in community hospitals. Overall, findings contradicted our expectations. Change in specialty, a core change, was beneficial for hospitals, because it reduced closure risk. The two most frequent peripheral changes, downsizing and leadership change, were positively associated with closure. Simultaneous organizational changes displayed a similar pattern: multiple core changes reduced closure risk, while multiple peripheral changes increased the risk. These patterns held regardless of the level of uncertainty in hospital environments. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes are not all beneficial for hospitals, suggesting that hospital leaders should be both cautious and selective in their efforts to turn their hospitals around. PMID:10536977

  15. Organizational change, patient-focused care: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, J

    1995-08-01

    Hospitals throughout the world are attempting to improve organizational performance through a variety of means. The focus in this paper is on a leading teaching hospital in Australia for a review of current management strategy. In a time of shrinking resources, management adopted a multi-faceted change management program including restructuring the organization, becoming more patient-focused via a product-line management approach and emphasising efficiency and cost-reduction measures. The next stage in management thinking is to place greater emphasis on patient-focused care. It is concluded this has the propensity to yield substantial further benefits, including improved financial and quality of care outcomes, in the Australian as well as the British and wider Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) context. 'Professionally, we have committed ourselves to creating caring environments that promote healing. We cannot meet this goal until we make a commitment to be patient-focused and give up being nurse-focused or facility-focused' (Kerfort and LeClair, 1991). 'In a customer-driven [organization], the distribution of roles is different. The organization is decentralized, with responsibility delegated to those who until now have comprised the order-obeying bottom level of the pyramid. The traditional, hierarchical corporate structure, in other words, is beginning to give way to a flattened, more horizontal structure' (Carlzon, 1987). PMID:10151089

  16. Why Do Firms Train? Empirical Evidence on the Relationship between Training and Technological and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neirotti, Paolo; Paolucci, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We explore the relationship between training and innovation using key insights from the resource-based approach, organizational learning and labour studies. By using data from 304 large enterprises in Italy, the study highlights a twofold role of training in favouring technological and organizational changes. First, training plays a role in…

  17. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  18. An Investigation of Organizational Culture Changes and Effectiveness at Jefferson College: 1963-Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Dena M.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental factor in the internal dynamics of a college is its culture. Central to understanding organizational culture is to minimize the occurrence and consequences of cultural conflict and help foster the development of shared goals. Modifying organizational culture is important. Without culture change, there is little hope of enduring…

  19. A Co-Construction Perspective on Organizational Change and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehan, Hugh; Hubbard, Lea; Datnow, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    In their earlier work, the authors explained how the co-construction perspective has been heuristic in the study of organizational change and educational reform, often providing more nuanced analyses and findings than "technical-rational" models that dominated the field previously (Datnow, Hubbard, & Mehan, 2002). In framing organizational change…

  20. Managing Postsocialist Transitions: Politicized Sense Making as a Facilitator of Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana

    2011-01-01

    This study explores what organizational strategies are employed to initiate and facilitate organizational change in higher education institutions in the increasingly complex and competitive postsocialist environment of Bosnia-Herzegovina. By studying organizations trapped between their inert socialist-era legacies and desired organizational…

  1. (De)constructing Organizational Boundaries of University Administrations: Changing Profiles of Administrative Leadership at German Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blümel, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    By analysing institutional changes of administrative leadership at German universities, this paper studies the construction of organizational boundaries as an important aspect of organizational transformation of universities as complete organizations. Building on an analysis of the formal status of administrative leadership at universities derived…

  2. Taking Action toward Inclusion: Organizational Change and the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Museum Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined organizational change in science museums toward practices that are inclusive of people with disabilities. Guided by two overarching frameworks, organizational learning and the social model of disability, this study sought to answer the following: What are the contexts and processes that facilitate, sustain, or impede a science…

  3. The impact of gendered organizational systems on women’s career advancement

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Deborah A.; Hopkins, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    In this Perspective article we propose that in order to pave the way for women’s career advancement into the senior ranks of organizations, attention must be directed at the systemic norms and structures that drive the gendered nature of the workplace. A focus on individual level issues, i.e., women lacking confidence and women opting out, detracts from the work that must be done at the organizational level in order to dismantle the system of pervasive, structural disadvantage facing women seeking to advance to senior leadership positions. PMID:26175708

  4. PLANNED CHANGE AND ORGANIZATIONAL HEALTH--FIGURE AND GROUND. CHAPTER 2, CHANGE PROCESSES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILES, MATTHEW B.

    PLANNED CHANGE, CONDITIONED BY THE STATE OF THE SYSTEM IN WHICH IT OCCURS, MUST TAKE THE IMPROVEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL HEALTH AS A PRIMARY TARGET. THE HEALTHY SCHOOL SYSTEM IS ABLE TO FUNCTION EFFECTIVELY AND TO DEVELOP INTO A MORE FULLY FUNCTIONING SYSTEM. OF TEN ORGANIZATIONAL HEALTH DIMENSIONS APPLICABLE TO SCHOOLS, THREE ARE TASK CENTERED…

  5. Organizational Readiness for Change in Correctional and Community Substance Abuse Programs

    PubMed Central

    LEHMAN, WAYNE E. K.; GREENER, JACK M.; FLYNN, PATRICK M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant needs exist for increased and better substance abuse treatment services in our nation’s prisons. The TCU Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) survey has been widely used in community-based treatment programs and evidence is accumulating for relationships between readiness for change and implementation of new clinical practices. Results of organizational surveys of correctional counselors from 12 programs in two states are compared with samples of community-based counselors. Correctional counselors perceived strong needs for new evidence-based practices but, compared to community counselors, reported fewer resources and less favorable organizational climates. These results have important implications for successfully implementing new practices. PMID:22505796

  6. An Examination of Organizational Change through Nevada's Emerging Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research on how postsecondary institutions prepare to become HSIs. This chapter examines organizational change through a group of emerging HSIs and their governance, policy, and leadership.

  7. The Discipline of Rankings: Tight Coupling and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauder, Michael; Espeland, Wendy Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This article demonstrates the value of Foucault's conception of discipline for understanding organizational responses to rankings. Using a case study of law schools, we explain why rankings have permeated law schools so extensively and why these organizations have been unable to buffer these institutional pressures. Foucault's depiction of two…

  8. Contrasting Perspectives on Organizational Culture Change in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Michael; James, Chris; Beales, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The concept of organizational culture continues to be widely used for descriptive and explanatory purposes in academic, policy, and managerial debates in education and other contexts. The range of perspectives on its meaning, which are readily apparent in both educational and non-educational literature, is directly relevant to the analysis of…

  9. Leadership Development for Organizational Change in a "New" UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Sharon; Edwards, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a case study of an Organizational Development (OD) intervention within a new university in the UK. Previous research into the leadership of higher education has highlighted a number of apparently inevitable tensions. The findings of the case study uncovered a number of complex and interrelated tensions. The…

  10. From Youth Worker Professional Development to Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rana, Sheetal; Baumgardner, Briana; Germanic, Ofir; Graff, Randy; Korum, Kathy; Mueller, Megan; Randall, Steve; Simmons, Tim; Stokes, Gina; Xiong, Will; Peterson, Karen Kolb

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing, innovative youth worker professional development is described in this article. This initiative began as youth worker professional development and then transcended to personal and organizational development. It grew from a moral response of Saint Paul Parks and Recreation staff and two faculty members of Youth Studies, University of…

  11. Assessing Change: Can Organizational Learning "Work" for Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Manila S.; Harkins, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure the effectiveness and practical utility of an organizational learning intervention for an organization that was not progressive, was not specifically chartered as a learning organization, and was situated in an urban, culturally diverse, and under-privileged community. Design/methodology/approach:…

  12. Organizational Commitment in Times of Change: An Alternative Research Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkey, Linda Kathryn

    A study illustrated an interpretive approach to investigating personal commitment during radical organizational transition by examining how people talk metaphorically about commitment and identification as a process. A questionnaire was constructed to be used in phone interviews with six employee assistance program (EAP) counselors who contract…

  13. Change Orientations: The Effects of Organizational Climate on Principal, Teacher, and Community Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Page A.; Maika, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates the openness that teachers and principals have to change--specifically, the openness of the faculty to community pressure for change. Three dimensions of change are examined (teacher, principal, and community), as well as four aspects of organizational climate (institutional vulnerability, collegial leadership,…

  14. A Change Management, Systems Thinking, or Organizational Development Approach to the No Child Left Behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Dominique L.

    2007-01-01

    Problems with implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) can be assessed in light of change management theory. Viewing stakeholders collectively as a corporate entity supports employing change management strategies to make the NCLB work. Examining ways that organizational controls and change management can work together points to…

  15. Constancy and Change in Work Practice in Schools: The Role of Organizational Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Jennifer Zoltners; Spillane, James

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Though change is constant in organizations, determining how to successfully implement planned change has been a perennial challenge for both organizational scholars and practitioners. While the empirical knowledge base on planned change in schools and other organizations offers numerous insights, the inattention to activity, or…

  16. Readiness for Organizational Change: Do Organizational Commitment and Social Relationships in the Workplace Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Susan R.; Miller, Duane; John, Cameron R.

    2005-01-01

    Businesses are confronting continuous and unparalleled changes. For organizations to assist employees in being motivated and prepared for change, it is essential that managers, leaders, and organization development professionals understand factors that may influence individual change readiness. The purpose of the research study examined here was…

  17. Changing identity: predicting adjustment to organizational restructure as a function of subgroup and superordinate identification.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Jolanda; O'Brien, Anne; Trindall, Nicole

    2002-06-01

    We investigated a work-team restructure within an organization obtaining measures before and after the change occurred. Pre-restructure analyses revealed that, in addition to informational variables, subgroup identification (work-team) and superordinate identification (organization) were important predictors of negative feelings towards the restructure. The more that employees identified with the subgroup, the more negative feelings they reported about the upcoming change. In contrast, the higher the identification with the superordinate group, the less negative employees felt. Longitudinal analysis revealed that compared with the pre-restructure, post-restructure levels of work-team identification, organizational identification, job satisfaction and perceived work-team performance were significantly lower. Pre-restructure work-team identification was a stronger predictor of post-restructure job satisfaction than pre-restructure organizational identification. In addition, it was found that pre-restructure work-team identification and organizational identification had opposing effects on post-restructure organizational identification. There was some evidence that high initial organizational identification protected long-term organizational commitment. PMID:12133229

  18. Creating aging-enriched social work education:a process of curricular and organizational change.

    PubMed

    Hooyman, Nancy; St Peter, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The CSWE Geriatric Enrichment in Social Work Education Project, funded by the John A. Hartford foundation, aimed to change curricula and organizational structure in 67 GeroRich projects so that all students would graduate with foundation knowledge and skills to work effectively with older adults and their families. The emphasis was on change processes to infuse and sustain gerontological competencies and curricular resources in foundation courses. This article presents lessons learned and strategies for engaging faculty, practitioners and students in the curriculum and organizational change process. PMID:17200068

  19. Building skills in organizational and systems changes: a DNP-FNP clinical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Christine; Johnson, Gail

    2015-04-13

    DNP-prepared nurse practitioner leaders play a pivotal role in organizational change and quality improvement consistent with the IHI Triple Aim: improving quality of care, health of populations, and reducing cost. A DNP-FNP curriculum is described, designed to build students' leadership competencies for systems change in healthcare settings. PMID:25774811

  20. Distributed Leadership and Organizational Change: Implementation of a Teaching Performance Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Tine

    2013-01-01

    This article explores leadership practice and change as evidenced in multiple data sources gathered during a self-study implementation of a teaching performance assessment. It offers promising models of distributed leadership and organizational change that can inform future program implementers and the field in general. Our experiences suggest…

  1. A Case Study of Relationships between Organizational Culture and Curricular Change in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merton, Prudence; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; Clark, M. Carolyn; Richardson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    We examined two curricular change efforts at a small, midwestern engineering and science college in order to explore how organizational culture influences curricular change processes. We found that the failure of one effort (measured by inability to sustain the curriculum over time) and the success of the other (the curriculum continues to be…

  2. Changing Organizational Culture and Instructional Methods in Elementary Schools: Perceptions of Teachers and Professional Educational Consultants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachar, Hanna; Gavin, Suss; Shlomo, Sharan

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines teachers' perceptions of organizational changes in their elementary schools. These changes occurred following the implementation of a long-term comprehensive school improvement project (CSIP). One hundred and seventy one teachers who taught in six elementary schools located in two different school districts in Israel…

  3. Examining an Evolution: A Case Study of Organizational Change Accompanying the Community College Baccalaureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Lyle; Morris, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the nature and degree of organizational change that occurs when community colleges offer their own baccalaureate degree programs. Utilizing qualitative research methodology, we investigated how executive administrators at two Florida colleges managed this momentous change process and how this transformation has affected their…

  4. Changes in Extension Educators' Perceptions of Job Dimensions and Job Satisfaction Following Organizational Restructuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furgason, John W.

    A study explored whether changes in Nebraska Extension's organizational structure and programming approach, instituted in 1988, had altered 103 extension agents' perceptions of their jobs or job satisfaction. A literature review addressed both the primary variables, including specific aspects of job change, such as issues-based programming,…

  5. Organizational Routines in Flux: A Case Study of Change in Recording and Monitoring Student Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Sharon; Enomoto, Ernestine K.

    2009-01-01

    Using an organizational theory to study how people can actually change routines, this study examined alterations made to two aspects of a high school's attendance procedures over 5 years. The authors drew primarily from interviews and school documents to describe and analyze changes made by administrators, faculty, and staff. Organizing questions…

  6. Examining the Relationship between Learning Organization Characteristics and Change Adaptation, Innovation, and Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontoghiorghes, Constantine; Awbre, Susan M.; Feurig, Pamela L.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the relationship between certain learning organization characteristics and change adaptation, innovation, and bottom-line organizational performance. The following learning organization characteristics were found to be the strongest predictors of rapid change adaptation, quick product or…

  7. Academic Librarians' Perceptions of Teamwork and Organizational Structure in a Time of Rapid Technological Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strecker, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of academic librarians on two topics: the delivery of services to students and faculty in a time of rapid technological changes and an organizational structure appropriate for delivering services to students in a time of rapid technological changes. Several researchers agree that to…

  8. The Effect of Organizational Learning Patterns on Leading Strategic Change among Higher Education Institutions of Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olla, Woyita W.

    2013-01-01

    Innovations and reforms are crucial for both public and Christian higher education institutions in order to survive and thrive in an increasingly complex and turbulent today's environment. Although there is a plethora of literature on strategic change, the effect of organizational learning on leading strategic change has been barely investigated…

  9. Organizational Readiness for Change in Correctional and Community Substance Abuse Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Wayne E. K.; Greener, Jack M.; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant needs exist for increased and better substance abuse treatment services in our nation's prisons. The TCU Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) survey has been widely used in community-based treatment programs and evidence is accumulating for relationships between readiness for change and implementation of new clinical practices.…

  10. Psychic Energy and Organizational Change. Administrative and Policy Studies Series, Vol. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Orion, Jr.

    An effort is made at defining the lessons of the sixties as they relate to the understanding of processes of social and organizational change. This essay examines the theory of change that emerged in the sixties, describes how the current condition in the United States indicates the wrongness of this view, and suggests a reformulation based on a…

  11. Individual Response to Organizational Change: A Grounded Model. Training and Development Research Center Project Number Fifty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Barry-Craig Paul

    Twenty-nine members of a manufacturing organization were interviewed to learn how they identified, evaluated, and responded to what they perceived as significant changes in their organization. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the interview transcripts. A model of the process of organizational change was constructed from emergent…

  12. Organizational Transformation through Technological Change in Florida Community Colleges: Leaders' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Barbara J.

    2005-01-01

    My purpose was to understand the essence of a specific change effort that occurred in a select group of public community colleges in Florida. This phenomenological study was undertaken to discover how leaders from seven Florida Community Colleges perceived their experience of organizationally changing their institutions through a unique…

  13. Ensuring Access to Life-Long Learning: A Case Study of Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dance, Terry M.

    An analysis is provided of the relationship between organizational change and shifts in programming and curriculum at Georeg Brown College (GBC) in New Brunswick, Ontario. Sections I and II focus on trends affecting all Ontario colleges, including demographic changes in the student population; reduced government funding; the privatization of…

  14. Bibliography on Organizational Change in Schools: Selected, Annotated, and Indexed. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runkel, Philip J.; Harris, Pamela

    This annotated bibliography was compiled to help educators understand organizational change in schools. The purpose is to provide ideas that will help avoid wasted effort and reduce heartbreak in the application of change processes. This third edition omits at least one-third of the entries from the second edition. Items dropped are those…

  15. Adaptation to a Changing Environment by Modifications in Organizational Decision Unit Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Robert B.

    This paper presents a model of how organizations adapt to the uncertainty in their environment by making changes in the way they structure themselves for decisionmaking. The research reported here indicates that it is not just a single change in organizational structure, but rather a shifting between a more rigid and more flexible decision…

  16. Learning as Leadership: A Methodology for Organizational Change through Personal Mastery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuer, Lara H.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses personal mastery for organizational change based on experiences used by Learning as Leadership at Fairchild Semiconductor. Topics include individual change leading to more accountability in workplace performance improvement; examining the past to uncover behavioral and communication patterns; creating goals for the future; and taking…

  17. Sense-making in the Community College: The Meanings of Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John S.

    A study was undertaken to determine how individuals at community colleges made sense of organizational change, specifically with respect to the identification of external and internal forces of change. Interviews were conducted with over 200 administrators, board members, faculty, staff, and students at 6 community colleges in the United States…

  18. Change in Organizational Culture: The Use of Linguistic Methods in Corporate Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastien, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the links between social identity, language use, and retention in organizational mergers and acquisitions. Finds that (1) change in culture does not happen gradually across the whole organization, but either quickly or not at all; (2) change happens by subgroups; and (3) conflict in mergers and acquisitions was between individuals rather…

  19. Change Agent Research: Phase I-Organizational Audit and Communication Feedback Applied to Windsor Minor Lacrosse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Jones, Patti

    This study reports the results of a pilot Change Agent Research (CAR) project initiated in the summer of 1975 by the Sports Institute for Research (SIR) for the Windsor Minor Lacrosse Association. The purpose of the project was to audit the association to diagnose the nature of its organizational problems and assist in initiating change in order…

  20. Organizational structure, leadership and readiness for change and the implementation of organizational cultural competence in addiction health services.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Kim, Ahraemi

    2013-10-01

    Increasing representation of racial and ethnic minorities in the health care system and on-going concerns about existing health disparities have pressured addiction health services programs to enhance their cultural competence. This study examines the extent to which organizational factors, such as structure, leadership and readiness for change contribute to the implementation of community, policy and staffing domains representing organizational cultural competence. Analysis of a randomly selected sample of 122 organizations located in primarily Latino and African American communities showed that programs with public funding and Medicaid reimbursement were positively associated with implementing policies and procedures, while leadership was associated with staff having greater knowledge of minority communities and developing a diverse workforce. Moreover, program climate was positively associated with staff knowledge of communities and having supportive policies and procedures, while programs with graduate staff and parent organizations were negatively associated with knowledge of and involvement in these communities. By investing in funding, leadership skills and a strategic climate, addiction health services programs may develop greater understanding and responsiveness of the service needs of minority communities. Implications for future research and program planning in an era of health care reform in the United States are discussed. PMID:23816502

  1. Change Deafness and the Organizational Properties of Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Melissa K.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2008-01-01

    Change blindness, or the failure to detect (often large) changes to visual scenes, has been demonstrated in a variety of different situations. Failures to detect auditory changes are far less studied, and thus little is known about the nature of change deafness. Five experiments were conducted to explore the processes involved in change deafness…

  2. Organizational Decision-Making and the Change Agent: The Controlled Use of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark

    This document asks whether a stress situation created in an organization could be controlled and used to influence the decisionmaking process. The hypothesis tested was that stress induced intentionally by a change agent in a target agency, with consequent generation of strain between the actors of the organizational, would result in the…

  3. Organizational Change from Scientific Management to the Learning Organization--Implications for New Work Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusch, Gene E.

    Western enterprises confront an era of global competition in which industry leaders can no longer overlook negative effects originating from past Taylorist and autocratic organizational structures. Corporate leaders are exploring innovative methods to change their organizations from the Taylorist model to workplace environments that foster worker…

  4. Organizational Learning and Large-Scale Change: Adoption of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavis, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the United States and other countries, there is no organizational development model that addresses medical professionals' attitudes toward technology adoption in a learning organization. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a model would change those attitudes toward…

  5. Evolution of a Campus Sustainability Network: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurland, Nancy B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of a sustainability network at a large California public university, as an example of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines participant observation and case study techniques over a three-year period. From 2007 to 2010, the author helped found the…

  6. Coming in from the Margins: Faculty Development's Emerging Organizational Development Role in Institutional Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Connie

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing that a necessary and significant role change is underway in faculty development, this book calls for centers to merge their traditional responsibilities and services with a leadership role as organizational developers. Failing to define and outline the dimensions and expertise of this new role puts centers at risk of not only…

  7. Organizational Change and Conflict: A Case Study of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    1983-01-01

    Despite attempts by Congress during the 1970s to reform and reorganize the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), it has maintained substantive control over reservation institutions. A key to understanding BIA resistance to change appears to lie in organizational imperative of area directors to preserve and enhance their control over bureaucratic…

  8. Changes in Organizational Climate Associated with Development and Implementation of an Educational Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonney, Lewis A.

    The development and implementation of a humanistic educational management system in a large urban school district has been associated with demonstrable changes in organizational climate. The management system is humanistic in that teachers and principals select their educational priorities based on student needs and mutually agree with supervisors…

  9. Organizational Change at the Edge of Chaos: A Complexity Theory Perspective of Autopoietic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susini, Domenico, III.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study includes explorations of organizational change phenomena from the vantage point of complexity theory as experienced through the lived experiences of eight senior level managers and executives based in Northern N.J. who have experienced crisis situations in their organizations. Concepts from the natural…

  10. Explaining Employees' Evaluations of Organizational Change with the Job-Demands Resources Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Emmerik, I. J. Hetty; Bakker, Arnold B.; Euwema, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Departing from the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model, the paper examined the relationship between job demands and resources on the one hand, and employees' evaluations of organizational change on the other hand. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 818 faculty members within six faculties of a Dutch university. Data were…

  11. How Leaders Learn to Be Successful during Large-Scale Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Donna S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the strategies leaders used to learn new roles during large-scale organizational change and to understand what organizations can do to support the learning process. This was accomplished by exploring the experience of 15 school principals who learned to lead in the midst of two complex organizational…

  12. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  13. In the Same Boat? On Metaphor Variation as Mediating the Individual Voice in Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argaman, Einav

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the notion of metaphor variation, and argues that it may play a significant role as a linguistic tool for positioning the subjects in a given organizational change. More specifically, it is argued that metaphor variation enables the subject to corroborate the organization's centripetal forces on the one hand, and to express…

  14. Non-Traditional Education and Organizational Change: The Case of Athabasca University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrioux, Dominique; And Others

    Organizational change in the context of nontraditional education is discussed, with attention to Athabasca University (AU), which offers external degree programs in Canada. After considering the evolution of the role of academic faculty at AU, attention is directed to the role of research in the innovative, nontraditional university. Although AU's…

  15. Studying Changes in Organizational Design and Effectiveness: Retrospective Event Histories and Periodic Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, William H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes assumptions, rationale, and trade-offs involved in designing the research methodology used in a longitudinal study of organizational change. Data were obtained from over 100 organizations through 4 interviews spaced 6 months apart with top managers. (53 references) (MLF)

  16. Learning to See Differently: Viewing Technology Diffusion in Teacher Education through the Lens of Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Mei; Patterson, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    While the discussion on the topic of technology diffusion in teacher education primarily centers on course design, program development, and faculty technology training, this article explores technology diffusion from the perspective of organizational change. Technology diffusion in teacher education is a multi-faceted task and, therefore, requires…

  17. Organizational Learning, Change and Power: Toward a Practice-Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Randal

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to investigate the practices of the interim and current CEOs employed in managing a supportive environment conducive for learning as well as sustaining organizational change; and second, to describe the theory of practice guiding their efforts. Design/methodology/approach: An action science approach,…

  18. [Developing the hospital's mission to facilitate organizational change: limits and possibilities].

    PubMed

    de Oliviera Cecilio, L C

    2000-01-01

    The author begins by discussing the field of General Administration Theory vis-à-vis the defining role of "organizational goals" within an overall change process in organizations. While admitting the validity of some challenges raised by certain authors who deny the possibility of establishing a "single" direction for the organization by explicitly outlining its formal or official goals, the author presents and discusses his experience in defining the mission in the health sector as a way to implement organizational goals. This definition is meant as a strategy to improve communications among health team members and to a culture of responsibility when dealing with health service users. PMID:11175521

  19. Temporal Issues in Information and Communication Technology-Enabled Organizational Change: Evidence from an Enterprise Systems Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Steve; Southwick, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Examines how temporality influences the phenomena of organizational change associated with the implementation of enterprise-wide information systems. Presents an example of temporal issues and organizational change in a university setting and suggests how a temporal perspective provides insight into both the social and technical aspects of the…

  20. Improving hospital efficiency: a process model of organizational change commitments.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Amit; Huising, Ruthanne; Golden, Brian R

    2014-02-01

    Improving hospital efficiency is a critical goal for managers and policy makers. We draw on participant observation of the perioperative coaching program in seven Ontario hospitals to develop knowledge of the process by which the content of change initiatives to increase hospital efficiency is defined. The coaching program was a change initiative involving the use of external facilitators with the goal of increasing perioperative efficiency. Focusing on the role of subjective understandings in shaping initiatives to improve efficiency, we show that physicians, nurses, administrators, and external facilitators all have differing frames of the problems that limit efficiency, and propose different changes that could enhance efficiency. Dynamics of strategic and contested framing ultimately shaped hospital change commitments. We build on work identifying factors that enhance the success of change efforts to improve hospital efficiency, highlighting the importance of subjective understandings and the politics of meaning-making in defining what hospitals change. PMID:24132582

  1. Organizational Specialists in a School District: Four Years of Innovation. A Report of the Program on Strategies of Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runkel, Philip J.; And Others

    A case history of organizational development in the Kent, Washington, school district from August 1967 to April 1972 is presented in 14 chapters and numerous appendixes. The first section contains a summary, the theoretical scheme, and the principles used in building the cadre of organizational specialists. Chapters 5, 6, and 7, concern…

  2. 28 CFR 0.190 - Changes within organizational units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....190 Section 0.190 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF... instance, the head of the Office, Board, Division or Bureau shall submit the proposed change in writing to... shall evaluate the proposal and shall submit the proposed change, along with his recommendation, to...

  3. Creating the Infrastructure for Organizational Change with RAP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Julie; Milstein, Mindy; Robinson, Consuela

    2012-01-01

    In order to thrive, organizations must undergo significant change at various points in their development. Such is the case with Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) Emotional Disability Services in the beginning process of implementing Response Ability Pathways (RAP) with staff and students. The impetus for change originated from an…

  4. The Human Side of Change: Towards a Pragmatic, Evolutionary Conception of Cognition and Emotion in Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jason Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation synthesizes and analyzes an emblematic sample of three prevalent psychological approaches to organizational change and learning, giving particular attention to the conception of cognition and emotion. It also explores some of the philosophical and psychological assumptions undergirding these approaches. A web model depicting…

  5. The "Trouble Shooting" Checklist: A Manual to Aid Educational Change Agents in the Prediction of Organizational Change Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Brad A.

    The first section of this manual contains a selective review of organizational change literature which focuses on predictive institutional variables as they affect the adoption-diffusion process. The second section describes the development of the Trouble Shooting Checklist (TSC). The third section presents two Trouble Shooting Checklists (TSC-A…

  6. The Partnership between Project Management and Organizational Change: Integrating Change Management with Change Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith-Cooper, Barber; King, Karyl

    2007-01-01

    The nature of project management is change. Even though all knowledge areas in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) are rooted in controlling change, none of these areas specifically addresses the human elements of change. There is a significant distinction between directly controlling change relative to the nonhuman aspects of a…

  7. Evaluating organizational readiness for change: a preliminary mixed-model assessment of an interprofessional rehabilitation hospital.

    PubMed

    Devereaux, Moira W; Drynan, Allison K; Lowry, Sara; MacLennan, Daniel; Figdor, Matya; Fancott, Carol; Sinclair, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a Functional Organizational Readiness for Change Evaluation (FORCE) to assess the characteristics of readiness for change across two programs (N=216 employees) in an interprofessional rehabilitation hospital that was about to undergo strategic changes as part of a planned physical merger within the next two years. The study used a mixed-method approach: a quantitative survey, previously validated in a drug rehabilitation setting, followed by key informant interviews to further enlighten survey findings. Statistical analyses identified correlations between demographic variables (age, education and experience) and readiness for change, as well as the prevalence of specific organizational characteristics (motivation for change, access to resources, staff attributes, organizational climate, and exposure/ use of training opportunities) that facilitate or impede change. Findings were intended to better inform the tactics for successful implementation of upcoming initiatives. Much like assessing a patient prior to initiating a treatment, FORCE can serve as a management tool to direct the planning and implementation of changes intended to improve hospital performance. PMID:17076379

  8. Effects of organizational change on work-related empowerment, employee satisfaction, and motivation.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, Liisa; Suominen, Tarja; Härkönen, Eeva; Kukkurainen, Marja-Leena; Doran, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a longitudinal quantitative study on nurses' views on factors promoting and impeding empowerment and examines the relationship between work-related empowerment and background variables in one hospital. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed statistically. Nurses gave lowest assessments of promoting factors on the second measurement occasion, a time when the organization was going through major changes. Both job satisfaction and motivation showed a positive relationship with factors promoting empowerment. Organizational changes have a direct effect on the work environment in terms of empowerment and job satisfaction. To cope successfully with changes, special attention must be paid to personnel management. It seems that factors promoting and impeding empowerment can be used to measure effects of organizational changes as well. PMID:19305308

  9. The role of the organizational champion in achieving health system change.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Jane; Barlow, James

    2012-02-01

    In healthcare there is a long held wisdom that 'champions' are a key aspect of organizational change. Drawing on organizational management theory, we examine the role of champions in three health and social care organizations in England as they attempt to move services to a remote model of delivery, 'telecare'. The delivery of remote care is a significant policy in the U.K. and elsewhere, but its introduction has been challenging. Over three years ethnographic methods (observations, informed discussions and interviews) were used to analyze the role of organizational champions in implementing remote care. Cases were local authorities and associated primary care trusts. Participants were champions and organizational members involved in implementation. Our study shows that organizational champions are highly effective in the first phase of adoption, when change is contained within distinct sub-sets of practice. Moving beyond local contexts the effectiveness of the champions varied. Identification centered on the remote care work. This identification enabled the champions to motivate others and move beyond their normally prescribed roles, contributing to innovation ideas, processes and practices. When required to shift their work organization-wide, and share ideas outside their professional culture, some champions responded with resistance, resulting in a lack of innovation spread. These results caution against allowing change to become positioned within the remit of a few individuals. Whilst this strategy may be initially beneficial, the role of champion may be less useful, even detrimental to progress, in the later stages of implementation, particularly if identification with the new circumstances is not established. PMID:21444137

  10. Creating a Culture of Assessment: A Catalyst for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakos, Amos; Phipps, Shelley E.

    2004-01-01

    In the rapidly changing information environment, libraries have to demonstrate that their services have relevance, value, and impact for stakeholders and customers. To deliver effective and high quality services, libraries have to assess their performance from the customer point of view. Moving to an assessment framework will be more successful if…

  11. Organizational Feedback as a Factor of Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark

    This paper represents the findings of a field study designed to examine the management information system of an urban school district to determine the role it plays in (1) bringing about educational change in the classroom, and (2) drawing the district into a closer balance of systems bond with those organizations that receive and depend on the…

  12. Changing Organizational Culture to Achieve Excellence in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shera, Wes

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the research capacity building efforts of the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto over the past 12 years. It identifies the role of strategic planning, the process of change, and the key practices, in terms of personnel, resources, research center development, and strategic community…

  13. A Case Study in Organizational Change: Evaluation in Cooperative Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennekamp, Roger A.; Engle, Molly

    2008-01-01

    This chapter examines how factors both internal and external to Cooperative Extension have influenced its commitment and capability to assess the quality and impact of its programs. The authors begin by documenting how the nature of Extension programming has changed dramatically in response to societal needs over the course of the organization's…

  14. Breaking Free: A Prescription for Personal and Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noer, David M.

    Ways in which organizations can break free from counterproductive reactions are outlined. The text is divided into four parts and opens with a discussion on how to deal with a new reality. It details ways in which groups strive for cohesion, introducing a model that outlines the differences people have in their capacity for changing and their…

  15. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    PubMed

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10105044

  16. Using transformational change to improve organizational culture and climate in a school of nursing.

    PubMed

    Springer, Pamela J; Clark, Cynthia M; Strohfus, Pamela; Belcheir, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    A positive organizational culture and climate is closely associated with an affirming workplace and job satisfaction. Especially during a time of faculty shortages, academic leaders need to be cognizant of the culture and climate in schools of nursing. The culture of an organization affects employees, systems, and processes, and if the culture becomes problematic, transformational leadership is essential to create change. The purpose of this article is to describe an 8-year journey to change the culture and climate of a school of nursing from one of dissatisfaction and distrust to one of high employee satisfaction and trust. Kotter's model for transformational change was used to frame a longitudinal study using the Cultural and Climate Assessment Scale to transform the organizational culture and climate of a school of nursing. PMID:22201273

  17. Governing boards and profound organizational change in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fennell, M L; Alexander, J A

    1989-01-01

    of the maximally performing governing board, we should perhaps shift our focus back to a fuller understanding of board structure and function, and its influence on hospital change. The model developed here combines four essential, and very basic, questions: 1. What are the basic dimensions that underlie structural variation in different types of governing boards? 2. How do these board types influence structural change in hospitals? 3. How is the effect of board influence on change itself likely to change over time as a function of the hospital's general pattern of growth, decline, stability, or instability?(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:10303798

  18. Organizational culture in the changing workplace: an employee assistance program perspective.

    PubMed

    Churchill, J

    1999-03-01

    The rapid change experienced in the work world today results in an often dramatic change in the organizational culture. In the process of culture change, employees experience loss of identity and loss of meaning in their work. These losses will manifest themselves in the workplace in the form of withdrawal, isolation, the failure of teamwork, and a high conflict milieu. It is helpful to the effective navigation of the change process to facilitate the grieving of these losses. Only when these losses have been successfully mitigated will employees experience a resurgence of energy and commitment. PMID:10373979

  19. Aviation safety and maintenance under major organizational changes, investigating non-existing accidents.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Ivonne A; Nordskag, Arve O; Myhre, Grete; Halvorsen, Kåre

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the following questions: Do concurrent organizational changes have a direct impact on aviation maintenance and safety, if so, how can this be measured? These questions were part of the investigation carried out by the Accident Investigation Board, Norway (AIBN). The AIBN investigated whether Norwegian aviation safety had been affected due to major organizational changes between 2000 and 2004. The main concern was the reduction in safety margins and its consequences. This paper presents a summary of the techniques used and explains how they were applied in three airlines and by two offshore helicopter operators. The paper also discusses the development of safety related indicators in the aviation industry. In addition, there is a summary of the lessons learned and safety recommendations. The Norwegian Ministry of Transport has required all players in the aviation industry to follow up the findings and recommendations of the AIBN study. PMID:19819363

  20. Running as fast as they can: organizational changes in home health care.

    PubMed

    Estes, C L; Swan, J H; Bergthold, L A; Spohn, P H

    1992-01-01

    During the 1980s, as the health care industry experienced what observers have dubbed a revolution, the home health industry also experienced its own transformation. Utilizing three organizational theories (neoinstitutional, resource dependency and population ecology), the authors report on a study of a probability sample of 163 home health agencies (HHAs) that were interviewed in 1986 and again in 1987 on the effects of Medicare policy changes including prospective payment (DRGs). This study tests hypotheses concerning the influence of environmental factors (e.g., state policy and characteristics of the local market) and organizational characteristics of the HHA (e.g., tax status and Medicare reliance) in explaining the propensity of HHAs to be (or become) parts of chains and/or multi-facility systems; and to develop particular types of interorganizational relations. The paper discusses the results in the context of public policy changes and the implications for future research and practice. PMID:10126432

  1. Healthcare organizational change: implications for access to care and its measurement.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To summarize evidence from peer-reviewed literature on access to care for vulnerable HMO enrollee populations; to discuss the potential effect of recent HMO and physician organization changes on access to care and its measurement. STUDY DESIGN: Review and summary of peer-reviewed literature for two HMO populations: those with chronic conditions and diseases, and those subject to discrimination due to income, color, or ethnic background. I also reviewed and summarized literature on three major changes in capitated organizations (HMOs and capitated physician organizations) that could affect access to care for vulnerable populations, and summarized findings from healthcare manager interviews conducted for several recent research projects on health system change. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although mixed, there are enough negative results to raise some concerns about access to care for HMO enrollees with chronic conditions and diseases. Several emerging organizational changes have the potential to change access to care for the vulnerable HMO enrollees. The shift in cost-cutting from fragmented clinical management of specific services at a point in time toward more integrated clinical management of all services for specific types of patients across time may improve access to care, as may increased efforts to attract and retain HMO enrollees. The increased importance of capitated provider organizations within the health system may restrict access in some ways, and expand access in others. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes can affect both access to care and its measurement. More research is needed on the effects of these changes on access to care and quality of care. For researchers examining access to care for vulnerable HMO enrollee populations, these changes create challenges to determine the most appropriate measures of access to care, and the most appropriate organizations and organizational characteristics to measure. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

  2. Change in higher education: understanding and responding to individual and organizational resistance.

    PubMed

    Lane, India F

    2007-01-01

    In many fields, the ability of educators and practitioners to cope with rapid change is essential to sustained success. In veterinary medical education, as in other scientific disciplines, meaningful change is challenging to achieve and subject to resistance from many individual and organizational norms. Individual concerns often relate to fears of instability or uncertainty, loss of current status, or effects on individual time and workload. Sources of organizational resistance may include a conservative culture, fierce protection of current practices, and prevalence of disciplinary or territorial viewpoints. In academia, especially in scientific or medical fields, individuals appear to be strongly independent and conservative in nature, and generally skeptical of educational change. In this environment, a highly participatory process, with regular communication strategies and demonstrations or evidence that supports proposed changes, can be useful in facilitating change. An understanding of the nature of complex change, as well as of the reasons underlying resistance to change, and some methods to overcome these barriers are highly valuable tools for educational leaders. PMID:17446632

  3. Curriculum Change Through Organizational Change: A Human Relations Training Program in a School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimple, James; And Others

    This document contains three papers describing the South Brunswick Township (Kindall Park, N.J.) Public Schools inservice and preservice program based on a training design which includes group dynamics or human relations training combined with a summer laboratory school. The first paper "A Three-Year Organizational Development with a Total School…

  4. Taking aim at fall injury adverse events: best practices and organizational change.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patricia; Creager, Joann; Mooney, Sharon; Laizner, Andrea Maria; Ritchie, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    Fall injuries represent a huge healthcare, social and financial burden to the Canadian population. In 2004, the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) was awarded recognition as a National Spotlight Organization for Implementation of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario Best Practice Guidelines (BPGs). That same year, the author and co-leader of the Best Practice Guideline Program began the CHSRF Executive Training in Research Application (EXTRA) Program with the goal of reducing falls injuries, one of the most common adverse events in the MUHC and in acute care in Canada. This demonstration project used multiple strategies to strengthen a culture of safety and improve performance relating to adverse events, including: pilot testing several evidence-based falls prevention interventions (autumn 2005), training teams of champions to work across multiple sites, developing an infrastructure to support organizational change, modifying existing quality indicators to become benchmarkable, conducting a cost analysis of falls prevention, evaluating pre- and post-pilot surveys of organizational climate and obtaining initial baseline measures of the safety climate within the organization. Positive patient, practitioner and organizational outcomes suggest that falls safety prevention is feasible in large, complex healthcare organizations--and that safety is both a moral and a financial imperative. Next stages of the BPG program include full rollout, and measuring sustainability via a formal outcome evaluation study. PMID:17087167

  5. Optimization of technical and social systems: A goal of organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, M.J. Jr.; Farrar, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    What light does Behavioral Science and Organization Development shed on Total Quality Management (TQM) in Earth`s global environment? In 1968 Eric Trist, a well-known Social Psychologist, described TQM before it was an abbreviation. He concluded that (TQM) is ``{hor_ellipsis} a joint optimization of the technical and social systems as a goal of organizational change.`` The social and technical systems of Europe have been joined together in the European community 1992 (EC `92) coalition. As part of EC `92 the International organization of Standardization (ISO) has provided the technical standardization system for inter-country approval and use. Other non-European countries have joined the ISO movement including the United States of America. Change has been a result of this movement. Most of it has been on technical, quality, and management systems. The next century will require and reveal changes in behavioral thinking and organizational structure. TQM is at the frontier of this change. A case-study of change resulting from TQM in government is presented in this paper.

  6. Optimization of technical and social systems: A goal of organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, M.J. Jr. . Rocky Flats Plant); Farrar, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    What light does Behavioral Science and Organization Development shed on Total Quality Management (TQM) in Earth's global environment In 1968 Eric Trist, a well-known Social Psychologist, described TQM before it was an abbreviation. He concluded that (TQM) is [hor ellipsis] a joint optimization of the technical and social systems as a goal of organizational change.'' The social and technical systems of Europe have been joined together in the European community 1992 (EC '92) coalition. As part of EC '92 the International organization of Standardization (ISO) has provided the technical standardization system for inter-country approval and use. Other non-European countries have joined the ISO movement including the United States of America. Change has been a result of this movement. Most of it has been on technical, quality, and management systems. The next century will require and reveal changes in behavioral thinking and organizational structure. TQM is at the frontier of this change. A case-study of change resulting from TQM in government is presented in this paper.

  7. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    PubMed

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. PMID:23809640

  8. Organizational responses to a changing aid environment: the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ).

    PubMed

    Hill, Peter S

    2002-01-01

    As a major European donor, German government development assistance faces a series of challenges. Recent political changes have raised expectations for demonstrable health outcomes as a result of German development assistance; there has been a deepened commitment to collaboration with other bilateral and multilateral donors; and partner countries are increasingly open to new approaches to development. German development assistance also reflects a new ethos of partnership and the shift to programmatic and sector based development approaches. At the same time, its particular organizational structure and administrative framework highlight the extent of structural and systems reforms required of donors by changing development relationships, and the tensions created in responding to these. This paper examines organizational changes within the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische, Zusammenarbeit) (GTZ), aimed at increasing its Regional, Sectoral, Managerial and Process competence as they affect health and related sectors. These include the decentralization of GTZ, the trend to integration of projects, the increasing focus on policy and health systems reform, increased inter-sectoral collaboration, changes in recruitment and training, new perspectives in planning and evaluation and the introduction of a quality management programme. PMID:12298144

  9. Organizational change, restructuring and downsizing: The experience of employees in the electric utility industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korns, Michael T.

    This research examines the experience of employees working in the electric utility industry during a time when it was undergoing significant transformation. It was undertaken to examine this phenomenon in the context of how the history and nature of the industry's environment, and specifically regulatory effect of regulation, led to an organizational form characterized by stability, structure and inertial resistance to change. A case study approach was used to examine the effect of deregulation on an organization in the industry, and specifically how their actions impacted employees working there. A phenomenological approach was used to explore employee perceptions of the organizational culture and employment relationship there both prior to and after implementation of a reorganization and downsizing that resulted in the first significant employee layoffs in the history of the organization. Data gathering consisted of conducting semi-structured interviews with current and former employees of the company who experienced the phenomena. Analysis of the data show that employees in this organization perceived an unusually strong psychological contract for stable employment and the expectation that it would continue, despite the prevalence of corporate downsizing and restructuring at the time. This psychological contract and the importance of career employment was found to be particularly significant for women who were hired during a period of time when gender and pregnancy discrimination was prevalent. Findings demonstrate that, given the historical stability and strong inertial resistance in the organization, company leadership did not effectively communicate the need, or prepare employees sufficiently for the significance of the changes or the effect they had on the organization. Findings also revealed that employees perceived the methods used to select individuals for layoff and exit from the company violated principles of organizational justice for distributional

  10. A Multidimensional View of Resistance to Organizational Change: Exploring Cognitive, Emotional, and Intentional Responses to Planned Change across Perceived Change Leadership Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabla, David B.

    2007-01-01

    In this survey research study, the researcher employed a causal-comparative, or ex post facto, design to explore the relationship between how union employees of a U.S. county government perceived implementation of a new electronic performance appraisal process and how they responded to the planned organizational change along cognitive, emotional,…

  11. Enhancing the Informal Curriculum of a Medical School: A Case Study in Organizational Culture Change

    PubMed Central

    Suchman, Anthony L.; Litzelman, Debra K.; Frankel, Richard M.; Mossbarger, David L.; Williamson, Penelope R.; Baldwin, DeWitt C.; Inui, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Calls for organizational culture change are audible in many health care discourses today, including those focused on medical education, patient safety, service quality, and translational research. In spite of many efforts, traditional “top–down” approaches to changing culture and relational patterns in organizations often disappoint. Objective In an effort to better align our informal curriculum with our formal competency-based curriculum, Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) initiated a school-wide culture change project using an alternative, participatory approach that built on the interests, strengths, and values of IUSM individuals and microsystems. Approach Employing a strategy of “emergent design,” we began by gathering and presenting stories of IUSM’s culture at its best to foster mindfulness of positive relational patterns already present in the IUSM environment. We then tracked and supported new initiatives stimulated by dissemination of the stories. Results The vision of a new IUSM culture combined with the initial narrative intervention have prompted significant unanticipated shifts in ordinary activities and behavior, including a redesigned admissions process, new relational practices at faculty meetings, student-initiated publications, and modifications of major administrative projects such as department chair performance reviews and mission-based management. Students’ satisfaction with their educational experience rose sharply from historical patterns, and reflective narratives describe significant changes in the work and learning environment. Conclusions This case study of emergent change in a medical school’s informal curriculum illustrates the efficacy of novel approaches to organizational development. Large-scale change can be promoted with an emergent, non-prescriptive strategy, an appreciative perspective, and focused and sustained attention to everyday relational patterns. PMID:18389324

  12. CALM: Complex Adaptive System (CAS)-Based Decision Support for Enabling Organizational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Koehn, David J.

    Guiding organizations through transformational changes such as restructuring or adopting new technologies is a daunting task. Such changes generate workforce uncertainty, fear, and resistance, reducing morale, focus and performance. Conventional project management techniques fail to mitigate these disruptive effects, because social and individual changes are non-mechanistic, organic phenomena. CALM (for Change, Adaptation, Learning Model) is an innovative decision support system for enabling change based on CAS principles. CALM provides a low risk method for validating and refining change strategies that combines scenario planning techniques with "what-if" behavioral simulation. In essence, CALM "test drives" change strategies before rolling them out, allowing organizations to practice and learn from virtual rather than actual mistakes. This paper describes the CALM modeling methodology, including our metrics for measuring organizational readiness to respond to change and other major CALM scenario elements: prospective change strategies; alternate futures; and key situational dynamics. We then describe CALM's simulation engine for projecting scenario outcomes and its associated analytics. CALM's simulator unifies diverse behavioral simulation paradigms including: adaptive agents; system dynamics; Monte Carlo; event- and process-based techniques. CALM's embodiment of CAS dynamics helps organizations reduce risk and improve confidence and consistency in critical strategies for enabling transformations.

  13. Phenomenological Study: How Organizational Structures and Change Processes Influence Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charlotte Clay

    2013-01-01

    Educational institutions create organizational structures for younger students with limited work experience. New generations of adult students require different organizational structures to improve success. The current phenomenological qualitative study addressed the lack of consensus of what types of organizational structures in higher education…

  14. Exploring the Political Underbelly of Organizational Learning: Learning during Pay and Performance Management Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort to better understand the political dimensions of organizational learning, this paper aims to examine learning processes in an organizational context--namely renegotiation of pay and performance management arrangements--where the interests of organizational members are threatened. Design/methodology/approach: Data were derived…

  15. Mental Health System Transformation: Drivers for Change, Organizational Preparation, Engaging Partners and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Corring, Deborah J; Whittall, Sandy; MustinPowell, Jill; Jarmain, Sarah; Chapman, Patty; Sussman, Sam

    2016-01-01

    St. Joseph's Health Care London (hereafter referred to as St. Joseph's) is a publicly funded hospital that has led mental health (MH) service system transformation in south west Ontario following directives from the Health Services Restructuring Commission (HSRC) (Sinclair 2000). This paper documents how provincial policy; HSRC directives; use of change management activities; organizational planning; and partnerships with other hospitals, community agencies and LHINs drove, shaped and accomplished the transformational change. The transformation included divestment of beds and related ambulatory services to four other hospitals, closure of beds and employment services and the construction of two state-of-the-art facilities. This paper documents the tracking of system performance measures and the outcomes that resulted. PMID:26854541

  16. Understanding the Role of Culture and Communication in Implementing Planned Organizational Change: The Case of Compstat in Police Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuksel, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of planned change efforts, the failure rates of implementation are as high as 50 to 70 percent (Lewis & Seibold, 1998). While these efforts are affected by technical issues, the organizations' approach to change, structure, technological capabilities, and organizational culture and communication practices are…

  17. A Lesson of Lost Political Capital in Public Higher Education: Leadership Challenges in a Time of Needed Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Mark; Jacobson, Rod

    2012-01-01

    All higher education institutions are struggling with a rapidly changing market and financial landscape. Here is a management-centered analysis of what happened when a college president, recognizing the need to make a radical adaptation to those changes, tried moving a campus community to a new organizational model, without collegial consensus,…

  18. Timeless and Timely Advice: A Commentary on "Consultation to Facilitate Planned Organizational Change in Schools," an Article by Joseph E. Zins and Robert J. Illback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazel, Cynthia E.

    2007-01-01

    This commentary on Zins and Illback's (1995) article, Consultation to Facilitate Planned Organizational Change in Schools, argues that the authors provided a solid foundation for well-planned, proactive, sustainable, internally-driven systemic change in schools that has yet to be widely realized. Their school organizational change model and more…

  19. Utilizing Organizational Culture to Predict Responses to Planned Change in a Public School: A Test of the OC[superscript 3] Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Eric Christian

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to test the capability of the Organizational Change in Cultural Context (OC[superscript 3]) Model (Latta, 2009, 2011) to predict responses to change. According to Latta, predictions of resistance to or facilitation of change can be predicted by utilizing organizational culture and its alignment with the…

  20. Dispensing emotions: Norwegian community nurses' handling of diversity in a changing organizational context.

    PubMed

    Debesay, Jonas; Harsløf, Ivan; Rechel, Bernd; Vike, Halvard

    2014-10-01

    Since the mid-1990s, public sector health care services in Norway have been restructured, in line with New Public Management ideas. This restructuring has coincided with demographic changes that have led to a more culturally diverse patient population. Both developments have created new challenges for community nurses in managing their work. This qualitative study applies the concept of "emotional labor" to examine nurses' experiences in working with ethnic minority patients in the context of pressures arising from organizational reforms. The analysis sheds light on the nurses' attempts to comply with system-induced efficiency considerations, while catering to the special situation of patients with language barriers and unfamiliar cultural traditions. The article demonstrates how efficiency requirements and time constraints either aggravate the nurses' insecurity in dealing with minority patients or, in some cases, compel them to assume more work responsibilities so as to mitigate the effects of such constraints. PMID:25150653

  1. Organizational change and environmental impact assessment at the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand: 1972--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, A.; Ortolano, L.

    1997-09-01

    This study examines the influence of leadership, political entrepreneurship, and organizational change on the institutionalization of environmental impact assessment (EIA). The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) initiated EIA activities earlier and more comprehensively than most developing countries. How and why were EIA activities pursued? Part of the explanation for EGAT`s EIA activities involves external controls exerted by the World Bank, the Thai government, and concerned citizens. However, an explanation based on external factors alone overlooks the significant influence of internal forces and entrepreneurial activities within EGAT. Their analysis of EIA Adoption at EGAT reveals three factors that can contribute to the successful implementation of EIA: (1) mutually reinforcing support for EIA from both inside and outside a development agency, (2) political entrepreneurship by agency staff that are concerned about the environment and (3) the transformation of power relationships within the agency by environmental professionals.

  2. The self-reported well-being of employees facing organizational change: effects of an intervention.

    PubMed

    Iwi, D; Watson, J; Barber, P; Kimber, N; Sharman, G

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the self-reported well-being of employees facing organizational change, and the effect of an intervention. It was a controlled intervention study. Subjects were allocated to study and control groups, and brief individual counselling was offered to the subjects in the study groups. Questionnaire measures were administered before and after counselling (a 3-month interval), and non-counselled subjects also completed questionnaires at the same times. The setting was 15 estate offices in an urban local authority Housing Department. Subjects comprised the total workforce of the Housing Management division: 193 employees, male and female, aged 22-62 years, facing compulsory competitive tendering between 1994-97. Main outcome measures were baseline and comparative measures of psychological morbidity, including the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI). Questionnaire response rates were 72% and 47% on first and second occasions respectively. The uptake of counselling was 37%. In comparison with (1) the UK norms for the OSI and (2) the norms for a similar occupational group, this group of workers were under more work-related pressure and their self-reported health was markedly poorer. They were not however at a disadvantage in terms of coping strategies. Those accepting the offer of counselling were subject to greater levels of work stress, had poorer self-reported health and markedly lower levels of job satisfaction than those who did not. Questionnaire scores were not significantly different before and after counselling, giving no evidence of treatment effects on symptomatology. However, almost all subjects rated counselling as having been extremely helpful. This study suggests that adverse effects on staff facing organizational change may be ameliorated by improved management practice. PMID:10024731

  3. Factors underlying organizational change in local health care markets, 1982-1995.

    PubMed

    Begun, J W; Luke, R D

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the association between characteristics of local health care market areas in 1982 and the penetration of new organizational forms in those markets in 1995. The Northeast and South exhibit less organizational form development than the West. Local markets with higher population size and greater density of specialty physicians in 1982 are associated with greater proportions of the markets being covered by a wide variety of organizational forms in 1995. PMID:11293011

  4. Predicting employee intentions to support organizational change: an examination of identification processes during a re-brand.

    PubMed

    Jimmieson, Nerina L; White, Katherine M

    2011-06-01

    This study examined if organizational identification can account for the mechanisms by which two-change management practices (communication and participation) influence employees' intentions to support change. The context was a sample of 82 hotel employees in the early stages of a re-brand. Identification with the new hotel fully mediated the relationship between communication and adaptive and proactive intentions to support change, as well as between participation and proactive intentions. PMID:21361983

  5. A Case Study of Liberal Arts Colleges in the 21st Century: Understanding Organizational Change and Evolution in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki L.; Baldwin, Roger G.

    2015-01-01

    We draw upon the evolutionary model of change in order to examine the organizational transformation of three liberal arts colleges (Albion College, Allegheny College, Kenyon College). Relying on our prior research (Baker, Baldwin, & Makker, 2012), we seek to continue our exploration and understanding of the evolution occurring in the important…

  6. Using the Lessons of Organizational Change and Previous School Reforms To Predict Innovation Outcomes: Should We Expect more from TQM?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detert, James R.; Mauriel, John J.

    Can Total Quality Management (TQM) improve the performance of school systems in meaningful ways? This paper evaluates the soundness of TQM as an improvement program for education by comparing its philosophy and prescriptions with the mounting theoretical and empirical wisdom on introducing and sustaining large-scale organizational change and more…

  7. The Relationship of Receptivity to Change to Personal Characteristics and Organizational Perceptions of Teachers in Small Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wangen, Nancy Register; And Others

    The entire population of teachers (N=132) in 10 small schools (fewer than 350 students grades 7-12) and 17 other secondary teachers involved in innovative projects were surveyed by questionnaire to examine personal and organizational factors that might explain teachers' receptivity to change. Both groups responded to scales of receptivity to…

  8. Introducing New Technology into the Workplace: The Dynamics of Technological and Organizational Change. Background Paper No. 8a.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Patricia M.

    A human resource strategy to enable the effective integration of new technologies in the workplace must be comprehensive, flexible, and sensitive to the dynamics of technological and organizational change. However, information from macro-level studies provides little guidance for anticipating and planning for the adoption of new technologies,…

  9. National Results of the Organizational Change Survey: Cooperative Extension's Capacity To Support Programs for Children, Youth and Families at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Sherry C.; Marczak, Mary S.; Peterson, Donna J.; Sewell, Margaret; Lipinski, John

    As part of the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Evaluation Collaboration, responses from extension professionals in 42 states and territories to the 74-item Organizational Change Survey were analyzed. Overall trends in the discrepancy between the current and ideal status of extension as indicated by all state discrepancy scores in all…

  10. Organizational Adaptation to the Rapidly Changing External Environment: A Case Study of Strategic Marketing at Notre Dame College in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examined the role of strategic marketing in organizational adaptation to a rapidly changing and competitive external environment among institutions of higher education. Colleges and universities adapt to external pressures as open systems operating within a broader external environment (Bess & Dee, 2008; Keller, 1983). How does…

  11. The Luke Principle: Counting the Costs of Organizational Change for One-Stop Service Models in Student Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ousley, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    The Luke Principle states that the successful implementation of any organizational change requires a counting of the costs (Ousley, 2003). As developers do not construct a building, nor do governments go to war, without counting costs, administrators in higher education should not reorganize units or merge departments without counting costs. This…

  12. The Organizational History of the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union: SIR/CAR Model and Method for Analyzing Conflict and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick

    The Sports Institute for Research/Change Agent Research (SIR/CAR) model and method for research in organizational history are used to analyze the growth and development of the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union (CIAU) from its inception in 1906 through its breakup in 1955 and its reestablishment in 1961. Four stages of growth are identified:…

  13. Identifying the Organizational Changes Taking Place in Somali Community-Based Organization (CBO) in Response to New Patterns of Immigration: Implications for Adult Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Sirad Warfa

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on changes in the organizational development of community-based organizations (CBOs) within the context of new patterns of immigration, in the United States. Organizational development is considered within the context of dialects of growth, change and transformation of communities in transition. The primary goal of this…

  14. Making a Difference in Research and Practice: A Commentary on "Consulting to Facilitate Planned Organizational Change in Schools," an Article by Joseph E. Zins and Robert J. Illback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaspohler, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Zins and Illback observed in 1995 that planned organizational change processes were neglected in practice, training, and research. In the decade following publication of their article, implementation of processes and structures of planned organizational change increased dramatically. Schools and school districts continue to face increased…

  15. Italian survey of organizational functioning and readiness for change: a cross-cultural transfer of treatment assessment strategies.

    PubMed

    Rampazzo, Lorenzo; De Angeli, Monica; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Simpson, D Dwayne; Flynn, Patrick M

    2006-01-01

    To better understand why some drug abuse treatment programs are more effective than others, USA research about organizational functioning and its role in the provision of treatment services was extended through a study of a delivery system in another country. The Texas Christian University (TCU) organizational functioning and readiness for change instrument (ORC) was translated into Italian and administered to 405 treatment program directors and staff from both public and private sectors in the Veneto Region of Northern Italy. Results indicated that the psychometric properties of the ORC in the USA and Italy are consistent. Some general differences in staff attributes were found between USA and Italian programs, but organizational climates were remarkably similar. PMID:16968992

  16. Ecological Approaches to Organizational Consultation and Systems Change in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Adena B.; Meyers, Joel; Graybill, Emily C.; Proctor, Sherrie L.; Huddleston, Lillie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the conceptual foundations and specific features of an ecologically oriented model of school-based organizational consultation. We begin by providing an overview of ecological theory. This is followed by a brief description of a model of school-based organizational consultation with a special focus on the ecological elements…

  17. People and Teams Matter in Organizational Change: Professionals’ and Managers’ Experiences of Changing Governance and Incentives in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Helen T; Brearley, Sally; Byng, Richard; Christian, Sara; Clayton, Julie; Mackintosh, Maureen; Price, Linnie; Smith, Pam; Ross, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    ObjectivesTo explore the experiences of governance and incentives during organizational change for managers and clinical staff. Study SettingThree primary care settings in England in 2006–2008. Study DesignData collection involved three group interviews with 32 service users, individual interviews with 32 managers, and 56 frontline professionals in three sites. The Realistic Evaluation framework was used in analysis to examine the effects of new policies and their implementation. Principal FindingsIntegrating new interprofessional teams to work effectively is a slow process, especially if structures in place do not acknowledge the painful feelings involved in change and do not support staff during periods of uncertainty. ConclusionsEliciting multiple perspectives, often dependent on individual occupational positioning or place in new team configurations, illuminates the need to incorporate the emotional as well as technocratic and system factors when implementing change. Some suggestions are made for facilitating change in health care systems. These are discussed in the context of similar health care reform initiatives in the United States. PMID:23829292

  18. Assessing and changing organizational social contexts for effective mental health services.

    PubMed

    Glisson, Charles; Williams, Nathaniel J

    2015-03-18

    Culture and climate are critical dimensions of a mental health service organization's social context that affect the quality and outcomes of the services it provides and the implementation of innovations such as evidence-based treatments (EBTs). We describe a measure of culture and climate labeled Organizational Social Context (OSC), which has been associated with innovation, service quality, and outcomes in national samples and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of mental health and social service organizations. The article also describes an empirically supported organizational intervention model labeled Availability, Responsiveness, and Continuity (ARC), which has improved organizational social context, innovation, and effectiveness in five RCTs. Finally, the article outlines a research agenda for developing more efficient and scalable organizational strategies to improve mental health services by identifying the mechanisms that link organizational interventions and social context to individual-level service provider intentions and behaviors associated with innovation and effectiveness. PMID:25785894

  19. The impact of immersion training on complementing organizational goals and accelerating culture change - a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a national defense laboratory with a history of working in seclusion and secrecy, scientists and engineers have received an important new mission to partner with industry. The scientists and engineers need to expand their skill base beyond science and understand the business of innovation to be successful in this new environment. An administrative field experiment of conducting intensive, immersion training about the commercialization process was piloted at Los Alamos in September, 1992. This Field Research Project addresses the following research question: {open_quotes}Does {open_quotes}immersion{close_quotes} commercialization training complement organizational goals and does the method accelerate cultural change?{close_quotes} The field experiment first began as a pilot Commercialization Workshop conducted for twelve scientists in September, 1992. The objective was to create commercialization action plans for promising environmental technologies. The immersion method was compared to the indoctrination method of training also. The indoctrination training was a one-day lecture style session conducted for one hundred and fifty scientists in July, 1993. The impact of the training was measured by perceived attitude change and the amount of subsequent industrial partnerships that followed the training. The key management question addressed on the job was, {open_quotes}With a limited budget, how do we maximize the impact of training and achieve the best results?{close_quotes}

  20. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Willging, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress (“low” versus “high”) experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change. PMID:22229021

  1. Involvement and structure: A qualitative study of organizational change and sickness absence among women in the public sector in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Organizational changes in modern corporate life have become increasingly common and there are indications that they often fail to achieve their ends. An earlier study of 24,036 employees showed that those who had repeatedly been exposed to large increases in staffing during 1991-1996 had an excess risk of both long-term sickness absence and hospital admission during 1997-1999, while moderate expansion appeared to be protective. The former was most salient among female public sector employees. We used qualitative interviews to explore work environment factors underlying the impact of organizational changes (moderate and large expansions in staffing) on sickness absence from an employee perspective. Method We interviewed 21 strategically selected women from the earlier study using semi-structured telephone interviews focusing on working conditions during the organizational changes. We identified 22 themes which could explain the association between organizational changes and sickness absence. We then used Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) to reduce the number of themes and discover patterns of possible causation. Results The themes that most readily explained the outcomes were Well Planned Process of Change (a clear structure for involvement of the employees in the changes), Agent of Change (an active role in the implementation of the changes), Unregulated Work (a lack of clear limits and guidelines regarding work tasks from the management and among the employees), and Humiliating Position (feelings of low status or of not being wanted at the workplace), which had been salient throughout the analytic process, in combination with Multiple Contexts (working in several teams in parallel) and Already Ill (having already had a debilitating illness at the beginning of 1991), which may indicate degree of individual exposure and vulnerability. Well Planned Process of Change, Agent of Change and Multiple Contexts are themes that were associated with low

  2. Mentoring, Organizational Rank, and Women's Perceptions of Advancement Opportunities in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Christa Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived career barriers of women in entry-level and mid-level positions who were formally and informally mentored. Research studies have found that mentoring can yield positive outcomes; however, there is limited research on how mentoring style impacts career advancement. The primary research questions…

  3. Developing and Testing a Model to Predict Outcomes of Organizational Change

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, David H; Sainfort, François; Eichler, Mary; Adams, Laura; Bisognano, Maureen; Steudel, Harold

    2003-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of a Bayesian model employing subjective probability estimates for predicting success and failure of health care improvement projects. Data Sources Experts' subjective assessment data for model development and independent retrospective data on 221 healthcare improvement projects in the United States, Canada, and the Netherlands collected between 1996 and 2000 for validation. Methods A panel of theoretical and practical experts and literature in organizational change were used to identify factors predicting the outcome of improvement efforts. A Bayesian model was developed to estimate probability of successful change using subjective estimates of likelihood ratios and prior odds elicited from the panel of experts. A subsequent retrospective empirical analysis of change efforts in 198 health care organizations was performed to validate the model. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were used to evaluate the model's performance using three alternative definitions of success. Data Collection For the model development, experts' subjective assessments were elicited using an integrative group process. For the validation study, a staff person intimately involved in each improvement project responded to a written survey asking questions about model factors and project outcomes. Results Logistic regression chi-square statistics and areas under the ROC curve demonstrated a high level of model performance in predicting success. Chi-square statistics were significant at the 0.001 level and areas under the ROC curve were greater than 0.84. Conclusions A subjective Bayesian model was effective in predicting the outcome of actual improvement projects. Additional prospective evaluations as well as testing the impact of this model as an intervention are warranted. PMID:12785571

  4. Routinization of HIV Testing in an Inpatient Setting: A Systematic Process for Organizational Change.

    PubMed

    Mignano, Jamie L; Miner, Lucy; Cafeo, Christina; Spencer, Derek E; Gulati, Mangla; Brown, Travis; Borkoski, Ruth; Gibson-Magri, Kate; Canzoniero, Jenna; Gottlieb, Jonathan E; Rowen, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released revised recommendations for routinization of HIV testing in healthcare settings. Health professionals have been challenged to incorporate these guidelines. In March 2013, a routine HIV testing initiative was launched at a large urban academic medical center in a high prevalence region. The goal was to routinize HIV testing by achieving a 75% offer and 75% acceptance rate and promoting linkage to care in the inpatient setting. A systematic six-step organizational change process included stakeholder buy-in, identification of an interdisciplinary leadership team, infrastructure development, staff education, implementation, and continuous quality improvement. Success was measured by monitoring the percentage of offered and accepted HIV tests from March to December 2013. The targeted offer rate was exceeded consistently once nurses became part of the consent process (September 2013). Fifteen persons were newly diagnosed with HIV. Seventy-eight persons were identified as previously diagnosed with HIV, but not engaged in care. Through this process, patients who may have remained undiagnosed or out-of-care were identified and linked to care. The authors propose that this process can be replicated in other settings. Increasing identification and treatment will improve the individual patient's health and reduce community disease burden. PMID:26042762

  5. Institutionalizing evidence-based practice: an organizational case study using a model of strategic change

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a general expectation within healthcare that organizations should use evidence-based practice (EBP) as an approach to improving the quality of care. However, challenges exist regarding how to make EBP a reality, particularly at an organizational level and as a routine, sustained aspect of professional practice. Methods A mixed method explanatory case study was conducted to study context; i.e., in terms of the presence or absence of multiple, inter-related contextual elements and associated strategic approaches required for integrated, routine use of EBP ('institutionalization'). The Pettigrew et al. Content, Context, and Process model was used as the theoretical framework. Two sites in the US were purposively sampled to provide contrasting cases: i.e., a 'role model' site, widely recognized as demonstrating capacity to successfully implement and sustain EBP to a greater degree than others; and a 'beginner' site, self-perceived as early in the journey towards institutionalization. Results The two sites were clearly different in terms of their organizational context, level of EBP activity, and degree of institutionalization. For example, the role model site had a pervasive, integrated presence of EBP versus a sporadic, isolated presence in the beginner site. Within the inner context of the role model site, there was also a combination of the Pettigrew and colleagues' receptive elements that, together, appeared to enhance its ability to effectively implement EBP-related change at multiple levels. In contrast, the beginner site, which had been involved for a few years in EBP-related efforts, had primarily non-receptive conditions in several contextual elements and a fairly low overall level of EBP receptivity. The beginner site thus appeared, at the time of data collection, to lack an integrated context to either support or facilitate the institutionalization of EBP. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence of some of the key contextual elements

  6. Faculty Development for Institutional Change: Lessons from an Advance Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Sandra; Rocque, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The ADVANCE Institutional Transformation projects are remarkably diverse in their theories of action and choice of strategies. However, faculty development plays a role in many, and it was the central change strategy chosen by Leadership Education for Advancement and Promotion (LEAP), the 2002-2008 ADVANCE project at the University of Colorado at…

  7. Speech-language pathologists and the Common Core Standards initiative: an opportunity for leadership and organizational change.

    PubMed

    Dunkle, Jennifer; Flynn, Perry

    2012-05-01

    The Common Core State Standards initiative within public school education is designed to provide uniform guidelines for academic standards, including more explicit language targets. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are highly qualified language experts who may find new leadership roles within their clinical practice using the Common Core Standards. However, determining its usage by SLPs in clinical practice needs to be examined. This article seeks to discover the social context of organizations and organizational change in relation to clinical practice. Specifically, this article presents the diffusion of innovations theory to explain how initiatives move from ideas to institutionalization and the importance of social context in which these initiatives are introduced. Next, the values of both SLPs and organizations will be discussed. Finally, this article provides information on how to affect organizational change through the value of an affirmative, socially based theoretical perspective and methodology, appreciative inquiry. PMID:22538707

  8. An Incentive Pay Plan for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Impact On Provider and Organizational Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Bechtle, Mavis; McNett, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are integral to the provision of quality, cost-effective health care throughout the continuum of care. To promote job satisfaction and ultimately decrease turnover, an APRN incentive plan based on productivity and quality was formulated. Clinical productivity in the incentive plan was measured by national benchmarks for work relative value units for nonphysician providers. After the first year of implementation, APRNs were paid more for additional productivity and quality and the institution had an increase in patient visits and charges. The incentive plan is a win-win for hospitals that employ APRNs. PMID:26259336

  9. Transformational Leadership and Change: How Leaders Influence Their Followers' Motivation Through Organizational Justice.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Carl; Rinfret, Natalie; Lagacé, Marie Claude; Privé, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the reform of Québec's healthcare establishments has resulted in a reduction in the number of institutions through mergers and closures. In this report, we investigate the consequences of reform by looking at managers' motivations and related mitigating factors. We examine the influence that transformational leaders have on their employees' motivation through organizational justice. Using a survey of 253 healthcare managers, we describe how the positive impact of transformational leadership on motivation is fully mediated via different aspects of organizational justice. The results indicate that while transformational leaders influence each type of organizational justice, followers' motivation is affected primarily by procedural and interpersonal justice and little by distributive justice. PMID:27356446

  10. Looking from a CHAT-IT perspective to undergraduate Mexican physics: organizational trajectories or professors as agents of change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahveci, Ajda

    2010-09-01

    Recent elaborations on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) (Engeström et al., eds., Perspectives on activity theory. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999) and its relation to organizational theories have produced a theoretical amalgam of these earlier ideas, which allow for the exploration of learning in formal organizational contexts such as schools. In this paper I reflect on Candela's work situated in undergraduate Mexican physics by drawing attention to the CHAT-IT framework (Ogawa et al., Educational Researcher 37(2):83-95, 2008) as a viable lens. I suggest that it is important to understand the historical development of the Mexican university as an educational organization as well as the role of physics professors as agents of change whose practices contribute to not only breaking classroom walls but also to transforming the organization affecting future activity systems.

  11. Professional quality of life and organizational changes: a five-year observational study in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Fernandez, Jesus; Gomez-Gascon, Tomas; Beamud-Lagos, Milagros; Cortes-Rubio, Jose Alfonso; Alberquilla-Menendez-Asenjo, Angel

    2007-01-01

    maintained despite deep organizational changes at the macro-management level. Different professional groups experience different perceptions depending on how the changes impact their position in the organization. PMID:17610728

  12. Organizational Adaptation to Forces for Change in a Big City School System. A Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derr, C. Brooklyn

    This report on the relationship of a complex organization (such as a big-city school system) to its environment critiques the theory and method developed by Paul R. Lawrence and Jay W. Lorsch for analyzing this relationship. To test their approach to organizational analysis, the author conducted a research project in a large urban school system.…

  13. Institutions and Organizational Change: Reforming New York City's Public School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traver, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's education reform agenda, "Children first", in the light of organizational theory. I argue that this reform agenda reflects both coercive and mimetic isomorphism, as Bloomberg uses mayoral control to apply business concepts and practices to New York City's public school system. Through…

  14. Organizational Learning, Change Process, and Evolution of Management Systems: Empirical Evidence from the Basque Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aramburu, Nekane; Saenz, Josune; Rivera, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the organizational learning capacity of manufacturing companies in the Spanish Basque Region and their management systems. Design/methodology/approach: To this end, an ad hoc questionnaire was devised and addressed to the Chief Executive Officers of a representative…

  15. Building change: Effects of professional culture and organizational context on energy efficiency adoption in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Kathryn Bess

    1998-12-01

    Despite the apparent benefits of energy-efficient buildings, energy efficiency measures have not been widely adopted by the building industry. My dissertation addresses the question "If energy efficiency is such a good idea, why isn't there more of it?" by studying the two professional groups that have the most influence over building design: architects and engineers. My hypothesis is that the professional cultures and organizational contexts of building designers can and do influence the achievable potential for energy efficiency in buildings. "Professional culture" describes what architects and engineers are generally taught (both directly and indirectly) to want in a building. "Organizational context" refers to where and how an individual architect or engineer does his or her work. Two utility-funded demand-side management projects provide data for this effort. I use technologies, designers, and decisions from these projects to explore the effects of engineering-economic information, professional culture, and organizational context on energy efficiency adoption. My results show that even in situations where cost and information barriers are overcome, professional culture and organizational contexts affect energy efficiency adoption. My conclusions recommend treating energy efficiency in the built environment as a socio-technical problem, not an engineering-economic one. To improve energy efficiency adoption in the short term, efficiency advocates should focus on organizational context, matching efficient technologies with the firm types most likely to adopt them. To generate market transformation in the long term, efficiency advocates should focus on educating future generations of designers to include efficiency in their professional cultures.

  16. Organizational Paradigm Shifts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This collection of essays explores a new paradigm of higher education. The first essay, "Beyond Re-engineering: Changing the Organizational Paradigm" (L. Edwin Coate), suggests a model of quality process management and a structure for managing organizational change. "Thinking About Consortia" (Mary Jo Maydew) discusses cooperative effort and…

  17. The Development of a Questionnaire for an Organizational Development Program at Los Angeles Southwest College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Ollie B.; Andrews, James

    An Organizational Development (OD) questionnaire was designed at Los Angeles Southwest College to enhance planned change in that educational organization. The questionnaire measures attitudes in seven organizational development concept areas: (1) institutional climate indices--opportunity for advancement, general institutional conditions, concern…

  18. Stress changes ahead of an advancing tunnel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abel, J.F.; Lee, F.T.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumentation placed ahead of three model tunnels in the laboratory and ahead of a crosscut driven in a metamorphic rock mass detected stress changes several tunnel diameters ahead of the tunnel face. Stress changes were detected 4 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into nearly elastic acrylic, 2??50 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into concrete, and 2 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into Silver Plume Granite. Stress changes were detected 7??50 diameters ahead of a crosscut driven in jointed, closely foliated gneisses and gneissic granites in an experimental mine at Idaho Springs, Colorado. These results contrast markedly with a theoretical elastic estimate of the onset of detectable stress changes at 1 tunnel diameter ahead of the tunnel face. A small compressive stress concentration was detected 2 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in acrylic, 1.25 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in concrete, and 1 diameter ahead of the model tunnel in granite. A similar stress peak was detected about 6 diameters ahead of the crosscut. No such stress peak is predicted from elastic theory. The 3-dimensional in situ stress determined in the field demonstrate that geologic structure controls stress orientations in the metamorphic rock mass. Two of the computed principal stresses are parallel to the foliation and the other principal stress is normal to it. The principal stress orientations vary approximately as the foliation attitude varies. The average horizontal stress components and the average vertical stress component are three times and twice as large, respectively, as those predicted from the overburden load. An understanding of the measured stress field appears to require the application of either tectonic or residual stress components, or both. Laboratory studies indicate the presence of proportionately large residual stresses. Mining may have triggered the release of strain energy, which is controlled by geologic structure. ?? 1973.

  19. Competition and deregulation in the electric industry. A study of organizational change: The New York State Public Service Commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Deborah J. Cordaro

    2000-11-01

    Public organizations are formed in response to societal needs. They collect taxes, educate children, enforce laws and provide protection to the environment, the nation and consumers. One such organization is the New York State Public Service Commission. In 1907, legislation was passed to form the New York State Public Service Commission the first regulatory body of its kind in the United States. Its mission was to provide safe, reliable and reasonably priced electricity. Subsequently, this became the model that was implemented in every state in the nation. The past decade heralds an era of competition and a lessening of regulatory control. The telephone, natural gas and airline industries are in various stages of deregulation, and the electric industry is beginning down this path as well. In an environment such as this, are regulatory organizations necessary, and if they are, how can they organize to meet the new societal requirements? The case of the New York State Public Service Commission at this point in time offers a real time study of a regulatory body immersed in an environment that is calling for competition and an end to big government. Utilizing case studies of industries that have deregulated, or are in the process of deregulating, indicates a future societal need for regulations. This result does not lead to a conclusion that organizational change is unnecessary. This Dissertation will lay out the current organizational structure of the Public Service Commission, give an overview of the environmental signals, describe the mission/core values, and illustrate general political and employee factors that are indigenous to public service. Utilizing both classic and current organizational theory, an evaluation will be made of the Commission's need for change, their ability to change, and obstacles they may encounter.

  20. School promotion of healthful diet and exercise behavior: an integration of organizational change and social learning theory interventions.

    PubMed

    Parcel, G S; Simons-Morton, B G; O'Hara, N M; Baranowski, T; Kolbe, L J; Bee, D E

    1987-04-01

    In the Go For Health project, interventions based on organizational change and social learning theory facilitate changes in diet and exercise behavior by elementary school children. Baseline data documented the need for behavior change. Based on chemical analyses, average per meal amounts of total fat and sodium were higher than national recommendations: total fat was 29.3% higher than U.S. Dietary Goals; sodium was 107.4% greater than recommended levels. Observations of students in physical education class revealed children moved through space 50.1% of the time and moved continuously an average of 2.2 minutes per class period. These findings suggest the need for policy and practice changes in the school environment to enable children to engage in more healthful diet and exercise behavior. PMID:3646383

  1. Organizational Learning a Necessity for Sharing and Distributing Leadership To Bring about Real Change for Teachers and Students: One Principal's Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Peggy H.

    This portraiture study of Amherst Regional Middle School, Amherst, Massachusetts, examined a case of shared and distributed leadership. The organizational changes at Amherst have fostered collaboration, new patterns of behavior, and changed expectations of what rigorous academic curriculum, new patterns of behavior, and changed expectations of…

  2. The development of measures of organizational citizenship behaviour and changes in job behaviours related to quality management in health care.

    PubMed

    Irvine, D

    1995-08-01

    A study was conducted at two tertiary care hospitals in Canada for the purpose of developing instruments to measure organizational citizenship behaviours (OCB) and changes in job behaviours that occur as a result of participation on hospital quality improvement (CQI) teams. Semi structured interviews were conducted among 52 hospital employees in order to elicit critical incidents of OCB and changes in job behaviours related to CQI. The results of the staff interviews were used to develop a measure of OCB in the hospital setting, and a measure of changes in job behaviours related to CQI. 39 employees, who were drawn from the major departments within the two hospitals on the basis of their membership on CQI teams, participated in a test of the psychometric properties of the two research instruments. Exploratory factor analysis, employing an orthogonal rotation, yielded two factors that accounted for 30% of the variation among the OCB items. The Cronbach alpha for items loading highly on the first factor was .88. The factor was labelled 'OCB directed towards individuals within the organization'. This factor was dominated by items reflecting the kinds of extra-role job behaviours employees engage in to assist patients, family members, visitors, and other employees within the organization. The Cronbach alpha for items loading highly on the second factor was 0.71. The second factor was labelled 'organizationally directed OCB', and consisted of behaviours that reflected an impersonal form of OCB in the hospital setting. Factor analysis, employing an orthogonal rotation, yielded four factors that accounted for 48% of the variation among the items measuring changes in job behaviours related to CQI. The four factors were labelled 'problem-solving', Cronbach alpha 0.82; 'customer awareness', Cronbach alpha 0.79; 'use of CQI knowledge', Cronbach alpha 0.77; and 'organizational interests', Cronbach alpha 0.79. The two OCB factors were moderately correlated, there were no

  3. Simulation Gaming for Organizational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruohomaki, Virpi

    2003-01-01

    This article introduces development and design approaches to organizational change (DIL). Simulation games can be used for promoting organizational development. They offer an arena for organization members to analyze the present state of an organization and create new organizational solutions. The bridge between the present and future mode of…

  4. Organizational Learning and Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jia

    2007-01-01

    The impact of crises on organizations has been stronger than ever. This article explores the role of organizational learning in crisis management, an area that has received little attention from HRD community. Recognizing the dynamics and interconnectedness of crisis management, organizational learning, and organizational change, the article…

  5. Organizational Performance and Customer Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald; Herbst, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    While behavior systems analysts have recognized the importance of the consumer of organizational products (i.e., receiving system) in developing models of organizational change, few have offered a systematic assessment of the relationship between consumer and organizational practices. In this article we will discuss how a behavior systems approach…

  6. Towards a National Gang Strategy: A Meta-Policy Analysis of Leadership, Learning, and Organizational Change within the Law Enforcement Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Maurice V.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the process of change within law enforcement, focusing on the leadership, learning, and organizational change required to reduce crime, violence, and social disruption caused by criminal street gangs. The study tests the viability, results, and implications of a new policing model, the trans-jurisdictional task force, through…

  7. Organizational Epistemology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Krogh, George; Roos, Johan

    This book is intended to give readers an observational scheme for understanding the process of organizational knowledge development at the individual and social levels. Chapter 1 examines devising a concept of organizational knowledge. In chapter 2, the place of epistemology within philosophy is discussed along with organizational, cognitivist,…

  8. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Future of Nursing" explores how nurses' roles, responsibilities, and education should change significantly to meet the increased demand for care that will be created by health care reform and to advance improvements in America's increasingly complex health system. At more than 3 million in number, nurses make up the single…

  9. Varieties of Organizational Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Louis R.

    1969-01-01

    The viewpoints and findings of the seven empirical studies of organizational conflict contained in this issue are compared and contrasted. A distinction is made between conflict within a stable organization structure and conflict aimed at changing the organization structure. (Author)

  10. Strategic Institutional Change to Support Advancement of Women Scientists in the Academy: Lessons from a Study of ADVANCE-IT Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laursen, S. L.; Austin, A. E.; Soto, M.; Martinez, D.

    2011-12-01

    While women's representation among undergraduate and graduate degree-earners has grown steadily in most science fields, progress at the faculty level has been slow to realize, especially in upper academic ranks and in higher status institutions. This is only partly explained by the slow turnover of faculty positions. While some efforts to address this issue have aimed to support individual women and foster their career success, the National Science Foundation's ADVANCE program has taken a different approach, calling for institutions to take a systemic and organizational approach to enhance women's representation in the academy. Since 2001, some 50 institutions have received ADVANCE Institutional Transformation (IT) awards to develop such systemic approaches. Most ADVANCE-IT projects have attended to structures (e.g. committee and departmental leadership roles), processes (e.g. hiring), policy (e.g. family leave), attitudes and awareness (e.g. training for chairs), and workplace climate, as well as interventions that focus on faculty members as valuable human resources. Our research team is studying ADVANCE institutions' approaches to organizational change, by identifying and categorizing individual change interventions, examining how they combine to build an overall change portfolio, and considering how change interventions are selected or adapted to fit a specific institutional context. Because universities are complex organizations composed of multiple, loosely coupled, interconnected sub-systems, an overall change strategy cannot depend on a single type of intervention. Yet any particular intervention might be deployed on behalf of multiple goals and in a variety of forms that may depend on the context, or institutional system, in which it is introduced. We will discuss some common types of strategic intervention used in ADVANCE-IT projects, categorized by Bolman and Deal's (1991) four main perspectives or "lenses" for understanding organizational issues. The

  11. Organizational Behavior: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, H. Randolph, Jr.; Behling, Orlando C.

    1981-01-01

    Organizational behavior is defined and its micro and macro subdivisions described. Leavitt's model for organizational change (task, technology, structure, and people) is employed to extract meanings from the organizational behavior literature. A diagnostic approach is suggested for applying organizational behavior to the practice of higher…

  12. Qualitative Analysis of Organizational Change in One U.S. Dental School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Geralyn Dell

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is need for change in the way that dental schools in the United States educate their students to keep pace with the rapidly changing nature of the profession and to better address societal needs. Despite a well-documented change agenda put forth by individual authors and agencies both within and outside of dental education,…

  13. Organizational Models and Facilitators of Change: Providing a Framework for Student and Academic Affairs Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2001-01-01

    Reviews three prominent process change models--Kuh's seamless change, planned change, and restructuring--that have been advocated for creating a seamless learning environment. Also discusses whether results from an empirical research study support that these models aid in establishing collaboration. Offers a model for successfully creating…

  14. An Exploration of the Relationship between Readiness for Change and Organizational Trust in Turkish Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayim, Merve; Kondakci, Yasar

    2015-01-01

    Readiness for change is one of the constructs that fosters positive behaviours, attitudes and thinking towards new adjustments on the part of employees. As one of the internal context variables, trust acts as a catalyst for supportive behaviours in times of change and uncertainty by reducing change related resistance and stress. Based on this…

  15. Why Do People Reject New Technologies and Stymie Organizational Changes of Which They Are in Favor? Exploring Misalignments between Social Interactions and Materiality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonardi, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between users' interpretations of a new technology and failure of organizational change. I suggest that people form interpretations of a new technology not only based on their conversations with others, but also through their use of technology's material features directly. Through qualitative and quantitative…

  16. Organizational Uses of Health Information Exchange to Change Cost and Utilization Outcomes: A Typology from a Multi-Site Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Joshua R; Abramson, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) systems facilitate access to patient information for a variety of health care organizations, end users, and clinical and organizational goals. While a complex intervention, organizations’ usage of HIE is often conceptualized and measured narrowly. We sought to provide greater specificity to the concept of HIE as an intervention by formulating a typology of organizational HIE usage. We interviewed representatives of a regional health information organization and health care organizations actively using HIE information to change patient utilization and costs. The resultant typology includes three dimensions: user role, usage initiation, and patient set. This approach to categorizing how health care organizations are actually applying HIE information to clinical and business tasks provides greater clarity about HIE as an intervention and helps elucidate the conceptual linkage between HIE an organizational and patient outcomes. PMID:26958266

  17. Organizational change in the Medical Library Association: evolution of the continuing education program.

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, M K; Palmer, R A

    1987-01-01

    "Change" is a critical dimension of contemporary experience. Library associations are not exempt, and they change in ways similar to other organizations. According to some authorities, four phases typify the process: diagnosis, design, implementation, and incorporation. Focusing on changes in the Medical Library Association's longstanding program of continuing education, the authors utilize the "phase framework" to chart that association's movement from a management system depending primarily upon volunteers to one in which professional staff figure prominently. The historical review serves a heuristic purpose for individuals and institutions in identifying characteristic features of the change process. PMID:3329921

  18. Cultures of engagement: The organizational foundations of advancing health in immigrant and low-income communities of color.

    PubMed

    Bloemraad, Irene; Terriquez, Veronica

    2016-09-01

    A rich civic infrastructure of community-based organizations (CBOs) can help generate, diffuse and maintain a culture of engagement and health that benefits marginalized populations most at risk for illness, disability, and poor health. Attention to CBOs advances "meso-level" frameworks for understanding health cultures and outcomes by going beyond attention to social networks and social identities. We focus on three mechanisms: CBOs can (1) empower individuals by developing civic capacity and personal efficacy; (2) foster solidarity by building networks, social identities and a shared commitment to collective well-being; and (3) mobilize people to have a voice in health-related policies and programming, thereby affecting community well-being. We draw on theory and research in sociology, political science and psychology, and we illustrate the utility of a CBO approach by examining survey and semi-structured interview data from participants in youth civic groups in 13 low-income, predominantly immigrant communities in California. Interview data illustrate the ways in which CBOs enhance members' civic capacities, provide a sense of empowerment and efficacy to engage in healthy behaviors, develop solidarity among diverse participants, and elaborate networks among those committed to community well-being. We also discuss CBO-led campaigns in which youth mobilized for change in policies and practices of local institutions to illustrate possible community-wide health consequences of CBO engagement. CBOs can thus generate individual-level well-being effects, and reduce structural barriers to good health through changes in the broader environment. PMID:26898114

  19. America's Climate Choices: Advancing the Science of Climate Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, P. A.; Dietz, T.; Kraucunas, I.

    2010-12-01

    At the request of Congress, the National Academy of Sciences convened a series of coordinated activities to provide advice on actions and strategies the nation can take to respond to climate change. This suite of activities included a panel report on Advancing the Science of Climate Change. The report concludes that a strong, credible body of scientific evidence shows that climate change is occurring, is caused largely by human activities, and poses significant risks for a broad range of human and natural systems. As decision makers respond to these risks, the nation's scientific enterprise can contribute both by continuing to improve understanding of the causes and consequences of climate change, and by improving and expanding the options available to limit the magnitude of climate change and adapt to its impacts. To make this possible, the nation needs a comprehensive, integrated, and flexible climate change research enterprise that is closely linked with action-oriented programs at all levels. The report recommends that a single federal entity or program be given the authority and resources to coordinate a national research effort integrated across many disciplines and aimed at improving both understanding and responses to climate change. The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established in 1990, could fulfill this role, but it would need to address weaknesses in the current program and form partnerships with action-oriented programs at all levels. A comprehensive climate observing system, improved climate models and other analytical tools, investment in human capital, and better linkages between research and decision making are also essential for advancing the science of climate change.

  20. Lost in Translation? Emotional Intelligence, Affective Economies, Leadership and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Not until the late 1990s did the rational/emotional binary embedded in mainstream literature on educational leadership and management come under challenge. Now the emotional dimensions of organisational change and leadership are widely recognised in the leadership, organisational change and school improvement literature. However, the dissolution…

  1. Disseminating Information and Soliciting Input during Planned Organizational Change: Implementers' Targets, Sources, and Channels for Communicating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Laurie K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines implementers' use of channels to disseminate information to and solicit input from staff members during planned change. Assesses how communication was differently directed to paid and volunteer staff and the degree to which channel use is predictive of implementers' assessments of success of change efforts. Discusses potential…

  2. The Training Demand in Organizational Changes Processes in the Spanish Wine Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil, Alfonso J.; Garcia-Alcaraz, Jorge L.; Mataveli, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of training demand in the organisational changes. Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes the demand of training courses in the Rioja wine sector in Spain and its relation with the changes in the sector carried out in recent years. Through a questionnaire, wineries' managers asked…

  3. Achieving Performance Excellence in University Administration. A Team Approach to Organizational Change and Employee Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel

    This book uses the experiences of a large state research university over the past 5 years to illustrate principles to improve administrative efficiency and manage change. In 12 chapters the book examines, provides lists, and gives examples of plans and strategies for dealing with matters such as: (1) change strategies; (2) leadership roles,…

  4. An Organizational Case Study: The Impact of an Initiation, Implementation, and Institutionalization of a Curricular Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Successful change in schools is planned, expected and managed with the objective focused on benefiting the students, not just converting the staff. This investigation is a case study of a public school district that opted to implement curricular change following an examination of the district's performance toward adequate yearly progress.…

  5. The Development and Implementation of a Diversity Management Curriculum: Organizational Change through Exploration and Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danowitz, Mary Ann; Hanappi-Egger, Edeltraud; Hofmann, Roswitha

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide concepts and strategies to successfully introduce and implement curricular change; especially, related to incorporating diversity management into academic programs. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing documents and accounts from two agents involved in the change process and an outside observer,…

  6. Organizational Learning and Program Renewal in Teacher Education: A Sociocultural Theory of Learning, Innovation and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Charles A.; Gallucci, Chrysan; Sloan, Tine; Lippincott, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Pressures for change in the field of teacher education are escalating significantly as part of systemic education reform initiatives in a broad spectrum of economically developed and developing nations. Considering these pressures, it is surprising that relatively little theoretical or empirical analysis of learning and change processes within…

  7. Evolving to organizational learning.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, B L

    2000-02-01

    To transform in stride with the business changes, organizations need to think of development as "organizational learning" rather than "training." Companies need to manage learning as a strategic competitive advantage for current and future business rather than as a perk for individuals. To position themselves for success in a dynamic business environment, companies need to reframe their concept of learning and development to a mindset of organizational learning. PMID:11184906

  8. Citizen participation in neighborhood health centers for the poor: the politics of reform organizational change, 1965-77.

    PubMed

    Hessler, R M; Beavert, C S

    1982-01-01

    Through a longitudinal study of neighborhood health centers for the poor in the United States, this paper presents an analysis of the political economy of change within reform organizations. In the final accounting, we seek to explain the shift in the role of poor people participating in health care decision making from that of program developer and change agent to the role of program restrictor. We conceptualize the neighborhood health center (NHC) as a reform organization whose initial objective was to use health care as a tool for achieving political and economic development within low-income rural and urban communities. The analysis, based on a prospective study of NHCs between 1965 and 1977, using interviews with citizen board members, NHC project administrators, NHC physicians, HEW decision elites, and oral history interviews with former Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) administrators and directors, exemplifies the generic social organizational problem of how social, political, economic, and ideological forces shape the emergence and performance of a new reform organization. PMID:10260926

  9. Dryland ecohydrology and climate change: critical issues and technical advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; D'Odorico, P.; Evans, J. P.; Eldridge, D.; McCabe, M. F.; Caylor, K. K.; King, E. G.

    2012-04-01

    Drylands cover about 40% of the terrestrial land surface and account for approximately 40% of global net primary productivity. Water is fundamental to the biophysical processes that sustain ecosystem function and food production, particularly in drylands, where a tight coupling exists between water resource availability and ecosystem productivity, surface energy balance, and biogeochemical cycles. Currently, drylands support at least 2 billion people and comprise both natural and managed ecosystems. In this synthesis, we identify some current critical issues in the understanding of dryland systems and discuss how arid and semiarid environments are responding to the changes in climate and land use. Specifically, we focus on dryland agriculture and food security, dryland population growth, desertification, shrub encroachment and dryland development issues as factors of change requiring increased understanding and management. We also review recent technical advances in the quantitative assessment of human versus climate change related drivers of desertification, evapotranspiration partitioning using field deployable stable water isotope systems and the remote sensing of key ecohydrological processes. These technological advances provide new tools that assist in addressing major critical issues in dryland ecohydrology under climate change

  10. Major Changes in Systemic Therapy for Advanced Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John A

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 5 years, a host of new agents have radically changed the therapeutic landscape in advanced melanoma; gone are the days when the only active agents were interferon and dacarbazine. Nearly 25 years ago, few patients with stage IV melanoma reached 2-year survival; today, these survival curves have risen substantially. At the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, John A. Thompson, MD, discussed updates with longer duration of patient follow-up for immune checkpoint therapies. He also reviewed some of the newer approvals in advanced melanoma, including the combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab, high-dose ipilimumab, the oncolytic virus therapy talimogene laherparepvec, and the molecularly targeted combination of the BRAF and MEK inhibitors vemurafenib and cobimetinib. PMID:27226502

  11. Anatomy of an organizational change effort at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawker, James R.; Dali, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    By 1979, after a long decline following the end of the Apollo program, the Lewis Research Center found its very existence endangered because it was not doing the kind of research that could attract funding at the time. New management under Andrew J. Stofan applied a program of strategic planning, participative management, and consensus decision making. A corporate-cultural change was effected which enabled Lewis to commit itself to four fundable research and development projects. Morale-building and training programs which were essential to this change are described.

  12. Organizational Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Helping principals understand the importance of organizational justice is the first step in enhancing learning outcomes for all learners, regardless of their social class, race, abilities, sex, or gender. In schools, organizational justice may be defined as teachers' perceptions of fairness, respect, and equity that relate to their…

  13. Organizational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beriwal, Madhu; Clegg, Stewart; Collopy, Fred; McDaniel, Reuben, Jr.; Morgan, Gareth; Sutcliffe, Kathleen; Kaufman, Roger; Marker, Anthony; Selwyn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of organizational science, broadly defined as including many fields--organizational behavior and development, management, workplace performance, and so on--were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might…

  14. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today’s competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 ± 0.38) and dependable (4.29 ± 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 ± 0.70) and the affective (3.55 ± 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application

  15. Organizational Change Factors for Increasing Online Learning within a Southeastern State University System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, David Edwin

    2012-01-01

    This bounded case study describes the readiness of a Southeastern State University System to support the growth of online learning. Structured as a case study, the view provided of the Southeastern State University System in this moment in time provides a contextually rich view of the phenomenon of change within a university system. The study…

  16. Responding to Hostility: Evidence-Based Guidance for Communication during Planned Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kim Sydow; Carmichael, Pierson; Naidoo, Jefrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Hostile challenges to planned organization change are common and challenging to deal with effectively. Little research has explained successful responses to such stakeholder hostility. To address this gap, we use the concept of readiness to characterize the content of hostile challenges. We also use rhetorical strategies based on speech act theory…

  17. Knowledge Management as a Mechanism for Technological and Organizational Change Management in Israeli Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoham, Snunith; Perry, Milly

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, the higher education sector has experienced many pressures and changes (Hanna, "Educause Review, 38"(4), 25-34, 2003; Scott, "Educause Review, 38", 64-80, 2003; Waterhouse, "The power of e-learning: The essential guide for teaching in the digital age", 2005). Universities around the world are facing the need to adapt to a…

  18. Organizational Strategies for Promoting Instructional Change: Implementation Dynamics in Schools Working with Comprehensive School Reform Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Brian; Miller, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    This article develops a conceptual framework for studying how three comprehensive school reform (CSR) programs organized schools for instructional change and how the distinctive strategies they pursued affected implementation outcomes. The conceptual model views the Accelerated Schools Project as using a system of cultural control to produce…

  19. Designing Equity-Focused Action Research: Benefits and Challenges to Sustained Collaboration and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woerner, Christiane Rhys

    2013-01-01

    This study was a developmental evaluation that investigated whether practitioners' involved in an action research project experienced changes in their attitudes, assumptions, knowledge, behaviors, and beliefs by engaging in practitioner inquiry. The problem of the study revolved around the pressing issues of access, retention and degree completion…

  20. Downsizing, Competition, and Organizational Change in Government: Is Necessity the Mother of Invention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelman, Steven

    2006-01-01

    One answer to the question of why government organizations don't perform better - common in academic "public choice" literature but also in folk wisdom--is that resources come too easily, independent of performance. Some business management literature suggests that a crisis in resource flows can force successful change--"necessity is the mother of…

  1. An Exploration of Presidential Roles during Organizational Change in Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Niki J.

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities across the country are seeking ways to strategically position their campuses within the growingly competitive landscape of higher education. The presidents of these institutions are approaching these changes with a watchful eye on the fiscal, environmental, and human resources involved. The purpose of this study was to…

  2. Environment for Innovation: Exploring Associations with Individual Disposition toward Change, Organizational Conflict, Justice and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinert, Daniel James

    2013-01-01

    The environment in higher education and healthcare is rapidly changing. Adaptation through innovation is critical for organizations responsible for the education of healthcare providers. This study examined the climate for innovation at chiropractic colleges and health sciences universities offering a doctor of chiropractic program. The…

  3. Transforming University Practice through ICT--Integrated Perspectives on Organizational, Technological, and Pedagogical Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Lorentsen, Annette

    2003-01-01

    The article focuses on the use of information and communication technology (ICT) for strengthening and transforming university practice in line with the social and technological conditions of the new ideas for "interactive" universities. The purpose is to use ICT as a change-agent in order to establish new practices--new pedagogical methods, new…

  4. Socio-cultural implications of changing organizational technologies in the provision of care.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, David

    2002-02-01

    Technology refers to inputs (machines, bureaucratic procedures, management strategies) organized to achieve specified outcomes. Such inputs and how they are used arise from socio-cultural conditions and in turn influence social behavior and values. Advances in medical technology are due to the high value populations place on health, emerging developments in science (also a cultural product). and from the opportunities and incentives the society gives to varying stakeholders. In the United States for example, the development and uses of medical technology are shaped by faith in marketplace competition, technological progress, activism, choice and consumerism. This constellation of values has resulted in very rapid growth and dissemination of hardware and related procedures whose costs pose significant financial dilemmas. In response, a range of management technologies have been developed to restrain the excesses of intervention but, because they are counter to many prevailing values and interests, they have led to much tension and a social backlash. Resolving these rationing tensions--which are rarely acknowledged as such--is a major challenge in American medical care and in much of the world. In the context of American social values, once new preventive or treatment technologies are introduced, they take patients on treatment trajectories that are difficult to control and which result in many being labeled with diagnoses they do not have and receiving interventions they do not need. Major efforts are under way to increase the sophistication of consumers of health care in a manner consistent with evidence-based medicine but these face significant barriers. Underlying what at first appears as simply technical barriers are the particular social and cultural influences on how people acquire and use information, the sources they trust and distrust, and the types of information they find credible and relevant to their situations. In short, the competition between new

  5. Organizational cynicism: bases and consequences.

    PubMed

    Abraham, R

    2000-08-01

    Organizational cynicism is the belief that an organization lacks integrity, which, when coupled with a powerful negative emotional reaction, leads to disparaging and critical behavior. In this article, the author attempts to theoretically clarify the process by which five forms of cynicism develop in the workplace and to empirically relate them to affective outcomes. Societal, employee, and organizational change cynicisms may be attributed to psychological contract violations; work cynicism may be related to burnout; and person-role conflict and personality cynicism may be related to innate hostility. Empirically, personality cynicism emerged as the strongest predictor of organizational cynicism, adversely affecting all of the criteria. Other forms of cynicism had more selective effects. Organizational change cynicism induced job dissatisfaction and alienation, and employee cynicism affected organizational commitment. Societal cynicism actually increased both job satisfaction and commitment. Both personality and work cynicisms were related to organizational citizenship indirectly, through alienation. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:10950198

  6. Assimilation approach to measuring organizational change from pre- to post-intervention

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Scott C; Osatuke, Katerine; Howe, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To present a conceptual and measurement strategy that allows to objectively, sensitively evaluate intervention progress based on data of participants’ perceptions of presenting problems. METHODS: We used as an example an organization development intervention at a United States Veterans Affairs medical center. Within a year, the intervention addressed the hospital’s initially serious problems and multiple stakeholders (employees, management, union representatives) reported satisfaction with progress made. Traditional quantitative outcome measures, however, failed to capture the strong positive impact consistently reported by several types of stakeholders in qualitative interviews. To address the paradox, full interview data describing the medical center pre- and post- intervention were examined applying a validated theoretical framework from another discipline: Psychotherapy research. The Assimilation model is a clinical-developmental theory that describes empirically grounded change levels in problematic experiences, e.g., problems reported by participants. The model, measure Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Scale (APES), and rating procedure have been previously applied across various populations and problem types, mainly in clinical but also in non-clinical settings. We applied the APES to the transcribed qualitative data of intervention participants’ interviews, using the method closely replicating prior assimilation research (the process whereby trained clinicians familiar with the Assimilation model work with full, transcribed interview data to assign the APES ratings). The APES ratings summarized levels of progress which was defined as participants’ assimilation level of problematic experiences, and compared from pre- to post-intervention. RESULTS: The results were consistent with participants’ own reported perceptions of the intervention impact. Increase in APES levels from pre- to post-intervention suggested improvement, missed in the

  7. Organizational Changes to Thyroid Regulation in Alligator mississippiensis: Evidence for Predictive Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Boggs, Ashley S. P.; Lowers, Russell H.; Cloy-McCoy, Jessica A.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, organisms are sensitive to changes in thyroid hormone signaling which can reset the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. It has been hypothesized that this developmental programming is a ‘predictive adaptive response’, a physiological adjustment in accordance with the embryonic environment that will best aid an individual's survival in a similar postnatal environment. When the embryonic environment is a poor predictor of the external environment, the developmental changes are no longer adaptive and can result in disease states. We predicted that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and environmentally-based iodide imbalance could lead to developmental changes to the thyroid axis. To explore whether iodide or EDCs could alter developmental programming, we collected American alligator eggs from an estuarine environment with high iodide availability and elevated thyroid-specific EDCs, a freshwater environment contaminated with elevated agriculturally derived EDCs, and a reference freshwater environment. We then incubated them under identical conditions. We examined plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations, thyroid gland histology, plasma inorganic iodide, and somatic growth at one week (before external nutrition) and ten months after hatching (on identical diets). Neonates from the estuarine environment were thyrotoxic, expressing follicular cell hyperplasia (p = 0.01) and elevated plasma triiodothyronine concentrations (p = 0.0006) closely tied to plasma iodide concentrations (p = 0.003). Neonates from the freshwater contaminated site were hypothyroid, expressing thyroid follicular cell hyperplasia (p = 0.01) and depressed plasma thyroxine concentrations (p = 0.008). Following a ten month growth period under identical conditions, thyroid histology (hyperplasia p = 0.04; colloid depletion p = 0.01) and somatic growth (body mass p<0.0001; length p = 0.02) remained altered among the

  8. Hospital organizational change and financial status: costs and outcomes of care in Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Albert G; Goldfarb, Neil; May, Reuel; Moyer, Kerry; Jones, Jayne; Nash, David B

    2002-01-01

    Two recent changes in Philadelphia-area hospital organizations are consolidation into systems and acquisition of 2 medical school hospitals by a for-profit chain. This study explored whether such consolidation and conversion affected costs and outcomes of care. The analysis included 1,617,581 discharges from 49 acute-care hospitals from 1997 to 1999. Analyses within and between medical school hospitals examined trends in discharges, case mix, length of stay, and mortality. The study addressed 2 questions: whether, as hospitals consolidate into medical school hospital-based systems, volume, severity, length of stay, and mortality increase in those hospitals; and whether for-profit conversion redistributes complex, high-cost admissions to nonprofit hospitals. The 2 medical school hospitals that became for-profit experienced decreases in volume and resource intensity, coupled at one with an increase in severity. However, these patterns were produced more by the system's financial instability than by consolidation or conversion. PMID:12487339

  9. Psychophysiological correlates of organizational change and threat of unemployment among police inspectors.

    PubMed

    Grossi, G; Theorell, T; Jürisoo, M; Setterlind, S

    1999-01-01

    The study examined psychosocial work-conditions and physiological reactions among thirty-six police inspectors (median age 45 years, 81% males) who participated in a reorganization. At this time, subjects were threatened by unemployment and had to re-apply for their positions in a new police district. Data were collected during the reorganization and at three years follow-up, by means of questionnaires (Stress Profile) and blood samples. The blood samples were used to determine serum levels of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), glucose, lipids, prolactin, testosterone and cortisol. The results show a positive association between worry about employment and symptoms of burnout during the reorganization. Mean scores for the Stress Profile sub-scales worry about employment (p<.01) and work-load (p<.05) decreased between measurements, but an impairment in relationships with management was noticed (p<.05). No significant changes were observed in terms of self-rated health complaints. Significant decreases in total cholesterol (p<.0001), LDL-cholesterol (p<.0001), LDL/HDL-ratio (p<.01), prolactin (p<.0001), as well as increases in testosterone (p<.01) and cortisol (p<.001) were observed for the whole sample. Glucose decreased with marginal significance (<.07). Controlling for age and gender, multivariate regression analyses showed that subjects who reported deteriorations in satisfaction with work manifested the most modest decreases in prolactin (p<.05). Also, the decrease in glucose was larger for subjects who experienced impairments in satisfaction with work (p<.05), information (p<.05), task-oriented leadership, (p<.05), and respect and dignity (p<.05). Subjects who perceived deteriorations in the ethical and moral standards of the organization increased their cortisol level to a lower degree than their counterparts (p<.05). Favorable changes in employment status and psychosocial work environment seem to be related to improved physiological functioning. PMID:10381163

  10. Dryland ecohydrology and climate change: critical issues and technical advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; D'Odorico, P.; Evans, J. P.; Eldridge, D. J.; McCabe, M. F.; Caylor, K. K.; King, E. G.

    2012-08-01

    Drylands cover about 40% of the terrestrial land surface and account for approximately 40% of global net primary productivity. Water is fundamental to the biophysical processes that sustain ecosystem function and food production, particularly in drylands where a tight coupling exists between ecosystem productivity, surface energy balance, biogeochemical cycles, and water resource availability. Currently, drylands support at least 2 billion people and comprise both natural and managed ecosystems. In this synthesis, we identify some current critical issues in the understanding of dryland systems and discuss how arid and semiarid environments are responding to the changes in climate and land use. The issues range from societal aspects such as rapid population growth, the resulting food and water security, and development issues, to natural aspects such as ecohydrological consequences of bush encroachment and the causes of desertification. To improve current understanding and inform upon the needed research efforts to address these critical issues, we identify some recent technical advances in terms of monitoring dryland water dynamics, water budget and vegetation water use, with a focus on the use of stable isotopes and remote sensing. These technological advances provide new tools that assist in addressing critical issues in dryland ecohydrology under climate change.

  11. Advancing the long view of ecological change in tundra systems

    PubMed Central

    Post, Eric; Høye, Toke T.

    2013-01-01

    Despite uncertainties related to sustained funding, ideological rivalries and the turnover of research personnel, long-term studies and studies espousing a long-term perspective in ecology have a history of contributing landmark insights into fundamental topics, such as population- and community dynamics, species interactions and ecosystem function. They also have the potential to reveal surprises related to unforeseen events and non-stationary dynamics that unfold over the course of ongoing observation and experimentation. The unprecedented rate and magnitude of current and expected abiotic changes in tundra environments calls for a synthetic overview of the scope of ecological responses these changes have elicited. In this special issue, we present a series of contributions that advance the long view of ecological change in tundra systems, either through sustained long-term research, or through retrospective or prospective modelling. Beyond highlighting the value of long-term research in tundra systems, the insights derived herein should also find application to the study of ecological responses to environmental change in other biomes as well. PMID:23836784

  12. Changing first responder tactics through the use of advanced technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, William E.; Trotter, Stephen

    1998-12-01

    The authors will first analyze current tactics used by emergency personnel when responding to 'standard' emergencies involving transportation systems. Next, the vulnerabilities and the consequences of a terrorist attack on a transportation system. Next the vulnerabilities and the consequences of a terrorist attack on a transportation system in which weapons of mass destruction are employed will be explored. The unique problems associated with the site of an emergency where chemical, nuclear, or biological agents have been employed will be investigated. The use of available or next-ready technologies in the areas of detection devices, personal protective clothing, and decontamination equipment will be examined. Combining this information, we will seek to prove the hypothesis that without the use of new technologies a change in first responder tactics is impossible. However, with the use of advanced technologies we will illustrate how new tactics can produce safe, more effective emergency responses.

  13. Organizational Commitment as Symbolic Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkey, Linda; Morrill, Calvin

    1995-01-01

    Offers a processual (sic) approach suited to the complex nature of organizational commitment during times of radical change. Emphasizes commitment as communication processes that are integrally tied to the creation of organizational cultures, involve identification via symbolic processes, and encompass various degrees of linkages between…

  14. The Role of the Community College Chair in Organizational Change: Chaos, Leadership and the Challenge of Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellow, Gail O.

    The hierarchical organizational structures that exist at community colleges and other institutions of higher education reflect the Late Industrial Era; as organizations make the transition to the Early Information Era, however, these rigid structures can hinder institutions' efforts to effectively utilize information and respond to changing…

  15. Looking from a CHAT-IT Perspective to Undergraduate Mexican Physics: Organizational Trajectories or Professors as Agents of Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahveci, Ajda

    2010-01-01

    Recent elaborations on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) (Engestrom et al., eds., "Perspectives on activity theory." New York: Cambridge University Press, "1999") and its relation to organizational theories have produced a theoretical amalgam of these earlier ideas, which allow for the exploration of learning in formal organizational…

  16. Celebrating Change: Overcoming Resistance to Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golemo, Mary Beth

    1990-01-01

    College campus activities professionals implementing change need to simultaneously involve four elements in the organizational world: environment, people, structure, and purpose. Resistance to change can be countered by defusing resistance, developing a strategy, choosing leaders wisely, providing advance notice and information, and observing…

  17. Do associations between employee self-reported organizational assessments and attitudinal outcomes change over time? An analysis of four Veterans Health Administration surveys using structural equation modelling.

    PubMed

    Das, Sonali; Chen, Ming-Hui; Warren, Nicholas; Hodgson, Michael

    2011-12-01

    This paper evaluates relationships between healthcare employees' perceptions of three hospital organizational constructs (Leadership, Support and Resources), and their assessment of two employee-related outcomes (employee satisfaction and retention) and two patient-related outcomes (patient satisfaction and quality of care). Using four all-employee surveys conducted by the Veterans Health Administration in the United States between 1997 and 2006, we examine the strength of these relationships and their changes over time. Exposure and outcome measures are employee-assessed in all the surveys. Because it can accommodate both latent and measured variables into the model, Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) is used to capture and quantify the relationship structure. The aim of the project is to identify possible intervention foci. The analyses revealed that employee-related outcomes are improved by increases in Leadership and Support, and, not surprisingly, the outcome variable of employee satisfaction reduced turnover intention. The employee assessed patient-related outcomes of satisfaction and quality of care were most improved by increases in Resources. Results also indicate that the three organizational constructs and the web of associations characterized by SEM underwent changes over the study period, perhaps in relation to changes in VHA policy emphases, changes in survey wording and other possible unmeasured factors. PMID:22025392

  18. Organizational Culture and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  19. The relationship between baseline Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment subscale scores and implementation of hepatitis prevention services in substance use disorders treatment clinics: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment (ORCA) is a measure of organizational readiness for implementing practice change in healthcare settings that is organized based on the core elements and sub-elements of the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework. General support for the reliability and factor structure of the ORCA has been reported. However, no published study has examined the utility of the ORCA in a clinical setting. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between baseline ORCA scores and implementation of hepatitis prevention services in substance use disorders (SUD) clinics. Methods Nine clinic teams from Veterans Health Administration SUD clinics across the United States participated in a six-month training program to promote evidence-based practices for hepatitis prevention. A representative from each team completed the ORCA evidence and context subscales at baseline. Results Eight of nine clinics reported implementation of at least one new hepatitis prevention practice after completing the six-month training program. Clinic teams were categorized by level of implementation-high (n = 4) versus low (n = 5)-based on how many hepatitis prevention practices were integrated into their clinics after completing the training program. High implementation teams had significantly higher scores on the patient experience and leadership culture subscales of the ORCA compared to low implementation teams. While not reaching significance in this small sample, high implementation clinics also had higher scores on the research, clinical experience, staff culture, leadership behavior, and measurement subscales as compared to low implementation clinics. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the ORCA was able to measure differences in organizational factors at baseline between clinics that reported high and low implementation of practice recommendations at follow-up. This

  20. Organizational Learning Goes Virtual?: A Study of Employees' Learning Achievement in Stereoscopic 3D Virtual Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Kung Wong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to deepen understanding of the use of stereoscopic 3D technology (stereo3D) in facilitating organizational learning. The emergence of advanced virtual technologies, in particular to the stereo3D virtual reality, has fundamentally changed the ways in which organizations train their employees. However, in academic or…

  1. Typologizing Organizational Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Rozhan; Hashim, Noor Azuan

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes that a major problem limiting an organization's ability to develop organizational learning capacity is of organizational amnesia. To understand organizational amnesia, it is necessary to look at the various ways that organizational learning is defined. Organizational learning is not merely the process of acquiring knowledge.…

  2. Cognitive and organizational ergonomics in the transition of the new integrated center of control of an oil refinery: human reliability and administration of changes.

    PubMed

    Bau, Lucy M S; Puquirre, Magda S E S; Buso, Sandro A; Ogasawara, Érika L; Marcon Passero, Carolina R; Bianchi, Marcos C

    2012-01-01

    The conception of a product is closely tied to its adaptation level to the users. In this view, designers are increasingly oriented to survey the needs and features of the users. This paper aims at developing a diagnosis of employees working in high-complexity activities in a petrochemical company, in light of the physical and operating changes in the Integrated Center of Control; assessing the reception sensibility to changes; assessing the cognitive pattern of the group; and making suggestions that might eliminate or minimize the difficulties in the transition process of the change, in order to reduce the adaptation period. The field of study comprised 111 production, transfer and storage operators, forming 5 groups of desktop activities. The stages of the study followed the following flow: survey of the prescribed tasks and organizational structure; Concentrated Attention test; application of the Work and Disease Risks Inventory (ITRA, Portuguese acronym); and structured psychological interview. The ITRA results pointed to a serious cognitive cost (3.83) for all five groups, this being the largest intervention focus. The items: division of task contents (3.52), social professional relationships (2.93), quality of the physical environment (2.91), physical cost (3.24), emotional cost (2.71), freedom of expression (3.77), professional fulfillment (3.41); experience and suffering (2.75), lack of recognition (2.18) and physical injuries (2.07) were considered critical. Meanwhile, social damages (1.64) and psychological injuries (1.35) are bearable. As to the Concentrated Attention test, most workers registered average level. In the individual interviews, workers showed that larger involvement in the process of physical, organizational and operational change in the desktops and on field works was required, as well as the follow up of implementations, so as to reduce the adaptation process and prevent rework (furniture, equipment, noise, form of communication with the

  3. Early Childhood Community School Linkages: Advancing a Theory of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiser, Kristin E.; Rollins, S. Kwesi; Gerstein, Amy; Blank, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the Coalition for Community Schools at the Institute for Educational Leadership (CCS-IEL) embarked on an ambitious action research and development project, leveraging the community school system infrastructure present in three geographic regions (Tulsa, Oklahoma; Multnomah County, Oregon; Albuquerque, New Mexico) to advance research and…

  4. Cinematic Perspectives on Organizational Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Properly conceived and conducted, organizational mentoring can bestow benefits on the suppliant, the mentor and the firm. If prospective protégés assess the context of a mentoring relationship before they enter into one, they can enjoy a bonding experience that facilitates psychological satisfaction and furthers professional advancement. The movie…

  5. Organizational Theory Applied to School Reform: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Mike; Koch, Tom; Langmeyer, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Organizational change in education, as manifested by school reform, is indeed complex. In this article, we describe our experience with organizational change and analyse it using organizational change theories common in education. An evaluation of the reform initiative yielded unexpected problems related to sustainability. As a result, this…

  6. Lewin's Theory of Planned Change as a strategic resource.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2013-02-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author explores the use of the Lewin's Theory of Planned Change as a strategic resource to mobilize the people side of change. An overview of the theory is provided along with a discussion of its strengths, limitations, and targeted application. PMID:23343723

  7. Changes in the organizational structure of public health nurse service in the Republic of Croatia 1995 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Bendeković, Zvonimir; Simić, Dobrislav; Gladović, Ana; Kovačić, Luka

    2014-12-01

    Since 1996, after the privatization of primary health care, public health nurse (PHN) in Croatia remained employed within the health center, mainly responsible for the preventive care of the inhabitants from defined catchment's area. Before that time they were part of general practice teams. The main aim of the study was to investigate what are the trends in the organizational structure of PHN service in Croatia, from 1995-2012. The main source was the Croatian Health Service Yearbooks. The obtained results shows that they are college educated and mostly in full-time jobs. The important findings are the lack of nurses and theirs regional differences. In highly demanding societies, with growing numbers of elderly, mental, social and economic problems, it will be worthy to consider the lower standard then 5 100 inhabitants per one PHN. Also, it should be taken into account to invest into the lowering of regional disparities. PMID:25643533

  8. Organizational technologies for transforming care: measures and strategies for pursuit of IOM quality aims.

    PubMed

    Gamm, Larry; Kash, Bita; Bolin, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Progress on the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) 6 aims to bridge the "quality chasm" requires both measurement and the concerting of multiple organizational technologies. The basic thesis of this article is that rapid progress on the IOM's multiple aims calls for transformative change within and among healthcare organizations. The promise of a number of types of transformative approaches is closely linked to their ability to simultaneously build upon several organizational technologies: clinical, social, information, and administrative technologies. To encourage and advance such efforts, this article identifies illustrative measures of attainment of the IOM's 6 aims or targeted areas for improvement that reflect the contributions of the 4 organizational technologies. It discusses examples of relationships between the IOM aims and the organizational technologies considered. Finally, the article offers illustrations of the interplay of these organizational technologies and IOM aims-across an array of organizational innovations with transformative potential. Included among such innovations are information technology in the form of electronic medical records, computer-based physician order entry, and patient health records; organization-wide patient-centered cultural change such as Studer's Hardwiring Excellence; Six Sigma and Toyota Production Management/LEAN; major clinical technology change, for example, minimally invasive cardiac surgery and broader treatment innovations such as disease management. PMID:17873660

  9. Organizational Communication: ERIC Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boileau, Don M.

    1984-01-01

    Presents abstracts from "Resources in Education" on (1) teaching about women in organizational communication; (2) communication as part of job satisfaction; and (3) research in organizational communication. (PD)

  10. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  11. An advanced pitch change mechanism incorporating a hybrid traction drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, B. M.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Sargisson, D. F.; White, G.

    1984-01-01

    A design of a propeller pitch control mechanism is described that meets the demanding requirements of a high-power, advanced turboprop. In this application, blade twisting moment torque can be comparable to that of the main reduction gearbox output: precise pitch control, reliability and compactness are all at a premium. A key element in the design is a compact, high-ratio hybrid traction drive which offers low torque ripple and high torsional stiffness. The traction drive couples a high speed electric motor/alternator unit to a ball screw that actuates the blade control links. The technical merits of this arrangement and the performance characteristics of the traction drive are discussed.

  12. Energy Organizational Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Gina C. Paradis; James Yockey; Tracey LeBeau

    2009-04-17

    As the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) continues to refine and finalize its Strategic Energy Plan, it became necessary to insure that a sustainable organization structure was developed through which the energy program and its initiatives could be nurtured and managed. To that end, SNI undertook a study to thoroughly evaluate the existing organizational structures and assess the requisite changes and/or additions to that framework that would complement the mission of the Strategic Plan. The goal of this study was to analyze, work with staff and leadership and recommend the most effective plan for the development of an organizational framework within which the Seneca could more effectively exercise energy sovereignty – control and manage their natural resource assets – i.e. develop its own energy resources, meet the current and projected energy needs of their community, and “sit at the table” with other regional energy providers to deal with issues on a peer-to-peer basis.

  13. Organizational Commitment through Organizational Socialization Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filstad, Cathrine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate how organizational socialization tactics affect newcomers' organizational commitment and learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was conducted using a measurement tool based on Van Maanen and Schein's theory on organizational socialization tactics and Kuvaas' measurement tools of…

  14. The changing health care marketplace: current industry trends, new provider organizational structures, and effects on plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M

    1998-09-01

    Current market forces are driving the health care industry in new directions. The managed care industry is currently undergoing a market shakeout, as manifested by consolidation, increased competition, and lower profits. Medicare is fighting to remain solvent by lowering fees paid to providers, driving patients into managed care plans, and cracking down on billing irregularities. For providers, the combined effect of these trends is lower fees, increased risk-sharing, and increased overhead. Plastic surgeons face new demands in this environment. They must increase their efficiency and form new alliances with other providers. These alliances allow plastic surgeons to maintain a steady stream of patients, to manage risk, to negotiate more lucrative contracts with managed care organizations, and to increase efficiency. To achieve these alliances, plastic surgeons must alter the organizational structure of their practices. Several corporate practice models are becoming more prevalent; these include large group practices, physician practice management companies, and integrated delivery systems. Each structure has advantages for plastic surgeons, but each also requires plastic surgeons to trade varying degrees of financial and professional autonomy for market strength. PMID:9727464

  15. An advanced pitch change mechanism incorporating a hybrid traction drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, B. M.; Sargisson, D. F.; White, G.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A design of a propeller pitch control mechanism is described that meets the demanding requirements of a high-power, advanced turboprop. In this application, blade twisting moment torque can be comparable to that of the main reduction gearbox output: precise pitch control, reliability and compactness are all at a premium. A key element in the design is a compact, high-ratio hybrid traction drive which offers low torque ripple and high torsional stiffness. The traction drive couples a high speed electric motor/alternator unit to a ball screw that actuates the blade control links. The technical merits of this arrangement and the performance characteristics of the traction drive are discussed. Comparisons are made to the more conventional pitch control mechanisms.

  16. Advancing landscape change research through the incorporation of Inupiaq knowledge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisner, Wendy R.; Cuomo, Chris J.; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Brower, Ronald H., Sr.

    2009-01-01

    Indigenous knowledge is a valuable but under-used source of information relevant to landscape change research. We interviewed Iñupiat elders, hunters, and other knowledge-holders in the villages of Barrow and Atqasuk on the western Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska to gain further insight into the processes governing the ubiquitous lakes and the dynamics of landscape change in this region of continuous permafrost. The interviews provided a suite of information related to lakes and associated drained lake basins, as well as knowledge on landforms, environmental change, human events, and other phenomena. We were able to corroborate many observations independently and verify the timing of several large and significant lake drainage events using either aerial photography or remotely sensed time series. Data collected have been incorporated into a geodatabase to develop a multi-layer Geographic Information System that will be useful for local and scientific communities. This research demonstrates that indigenous knowledge can reveal a new understanding of landscape changes on the Arctic Coastal Plain in general and on lake processes in particular. We advocate ongoing, community-oriented research throughout the Arctic as a means of assessing and responding to the consequences of rapid environmental change.

  17. Advances in ocean modeling for climate change research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, William R.; Capotondi, Antonietta; Holland, Marika M.

    1995-07-01

    An adequate understanding of climate variability and the eventual prediction of climate change are among the most urgent and far-reaching efforts of the scientific community. The climate system is in an ever-changing state with vast impact on mankind in all his activities. Both short and long-term aspects of climate variability are of concern, and the unravelling of "natural" variability from "man-induced" climate change is required to prepare for and ameliorate, if possible, the potentially devastating aspects of such change. In terms of scientific effort, the climate community can be thought of as the union of the disciplinary sciences of meteorology, oceanography, sea ice and glaciology, and land surface processes. Since models are based upon mathematical and numerical constructs, mathematics and computer sciences are also directly involved. In addition, some of the problems of man-induced climate change (release of greenhouse gases, the ozone-hole problem, etc.) are basically chemical in nature, and the expertise of the atmospheric and oceanic chemist is also required. In addition, some part of the response to climate perturbations will arise in the biological world, due to upsetting the balance in the great food web that binds communities together on both the land and the sea. Thus, the problems to be solved are extraordinarily complex and require the efforts of many kinds of scientist.

  18. Advancing Science Literacy Through the Climate Change National Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen-Gammon, J. W.; Quirke, M.; Lefer, B. L.; Hester, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Change National Forum (http://climatechangenationalforum.org) was established almost a year ago to provide a publicly visible platform for discussion of scientific issues related to climate change and, at a later date, policy options motivated by climate change science. The site is also designed to promote public literacy in the culture and conduct of science by incorporating dozens of active scientists in a broad range of climate science and related fields and encouraging dialogue among those scientists. The forum provides a rare window into scientific debate, allowing non-scientists to see how scientists evaluate the work of others, construct meaning out of various bits of evidence, formulate ideas, challenge their colleagues, and (on occasion) develop a consensus. As such, the site is intended to have educational value well beyond its climate science focus.

  19. Regional Advanced Manufacturing Academy: An Agent of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmeling, Daniel M.; Rose, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Three Northeast Texas community colleges put aside service delivery areas and matters of "turf" to create Centers of Excellence that provided training throughout a nine county area. This consortium; along with 14 manufacturers, seven economic development corporations, and the regional workforce board, led the change in training a highly skilled…

  20. The Changing Nature of Performance: Implications for Staffing, Motivation, and Development. Frontiers of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgen, Daniel R., Ed.; Pulakos, Elaine D., Ed.

    This volume provides a discussion of the relationship between the changing nature of work and the understanding, measurement, and influence of human performance. Chapter 1, Employee Performance in Today's Organizations (Daniel R. Ilgen, Elaine D. Pulakos), introduces seven key changes in the nature of work--changes in technology, job design, type…

  1. Creating a winning organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robert James

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea of how to create a winning organizational culture. By definition, a winning organizational culture is one that is able to make current innovations stick, while continuously changing based on the demands of the marketplace. More importantly, the article explores the notion that a winning organizational culture can have a profound impact on the conscious of the workforce, helping each individual to become a better, more productive person, who provides important services and products to the community. To form a basis toward defining the structure of what a winning organization culture looks like, 4 experts were asked 12 questions related to the development of an organizational culture. Three of the experts have worked intimately within the health care industry, while a fourth has been charged with turning around an organization that has had a losing culture for 17 years. The article provides insight into the role that values, norms, goals, leadership style, familiarity, and hiring practices play in developing a winning organizational culture. The article also emphasizes the important role that leaders perform in developing an organizational culture. PMID:19910709

  2. Advancing Climate Change and Impacts Science Through Climate Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, W.; Pouchard, L. C.; King, A. W.; Branstetter, M. L.; Kao, S.; Wang, D.

    2010-12-01

    This poster will outline the work to date on developing a climate informatics capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The central proposition of this effort is that the application of informatics and information science to the domain of climate change science is an essential means to bridge the realm of high performance computing (HPC) and domain science. The goal is to facilitate knowledge capture and the creation of new scientific insights. For example, a climate informatics capability will help with the understanding and use of model results in domain sciences that were not originally in the scope. From there, HPC can also benefit from feedback as the new approaches may lead to better parameterization in the models. In this poster we will summarize the challenges associated with climate change science that can benefit from the systematic application of informatics and we will highlight our work to date in creating the climate informatics capability to address these types of challenges. We have identified three areas that are particularly challenging in the context of climate change science: 1) integrating model and observational data across different spatial and temporal scales, 2) model linkages, i.e. climate models linked to other models such as hydrologic models, and 3) model diagnostics. Each of these has a methodological component and an informatics component. Our project under way at ORNL seeks to develop new approaches and tools in the context of linking climate change and water issues. We are basing our work on the following four use cases: 1) Evaluation/test of CCSM4 biases in hydrology (precipitation, soil water, runoff, river discharge) over the Rio Grande Basin. User: climate modeler. 2) Investigation of projected changes in hydrology of Rio Grande Basin using the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity Macroscale) Hydrologic Model. User: watershed hydrologist/modeler. 3) Impact of climate change on agricultural productivity of the Rio Grande

  3. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system. PMID:27465446

  4. Missional Imaginations for Theological Education: Mixed Model, Exploratory, Action-Oriented Research Mapping the Theological Identity and Organizational Readiness for Change of Five Theological School Systems in the United States Originating after 1945

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Kyle J. A.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the formal theologies and organizational readiness for change with a view towards adopting missional prototypes for theological education across a school's (system's) tradition, curriculum, and structure. The research assessed five theological schools in the United States through an exploratory, action-oriented,…

  5. Triagency collaboration for the advancement of climate change education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Carolyn E.; Chambers, Lin H.; Schoedinger, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    Second Annual NASA, NOAA, and NSF Climate Change Education Principal Investigators Meeting; Fairfax, Virginia, 28 February to 2 March 2011; In 2009 the Obama administration identified climate change research and education as a presidential priority. Embracing the spirit of the America COMPETES Act, which encourages coordination of federal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education activities and programs, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have been working together to increase funding opportunities for projects focused on global climate literacy and education in formal and informal learning environments and have fostered collaborations among awardees that create a strong national network for effectively presenting climate science to diverse audiences.

  6. Advances in Soil Biology: What does this mean for assessing soil change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Helaina; Mele, Pauline

    2015-07-01

    Our interests in soil change are moving away from soil properties and increasingly towards changes in the processes and functioning of soils. Soil organisms are fundamental to dynamics and change in soils through their fundamental role in soil processes [1]. However it is only with recent technical and theoretical advances that we have started to establish quantitative relationships between soil biology and soil change (c.f. [2]). It is this predictive understanding that will enable us to fully integrate soil biology into the effective monitoring and sustainable management of soils. This paper outlines some of the recent advances in soil biology and discusses their relevance to monitoring and management.

  7. Methodological advances: using greenhouses to simulate climate change scenarios.

    PubMed

    Morales, F; Pascual, I; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Aguirreolea, J; Irigoyen, J J; Goicoechea, N; Antolín, M C; Oyarzun, M; Urdiain, A

    2014-09-01

    Human activities are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. Related to this global warming, periods of low water availability are also expected to increase. Thus, CO2 concentration, temperature and water availability are three of the main factors related to climate change that potentially may influence crops and ecosystems. In this report, we describe the use of growth chamber - greenhouses (GCG) and temperature gradient greenhouses (TGG) to simulate climate change scenarios and to investigate possible plant responses. In the GCG, CO2 concentration, temperature and water availability are set to act simultaneously, enabling comparison of a current situation with a future one. Other characteristics of the GCG are a relative large space of work, fine control of the relative humidity, plant fertirrigation and the possibility of light supplementation, within the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) region and/or with ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light. In the TGG, the three above-mentioned factors can act independently or in interaction, enabling more mechanistic studies aimed to elucidate the limiting factor(s) responsible for a given plant response. Examples of experiments, including some aimed to study photosynthetic acclimation, a phenomenon that leads to decreased photosynthetic capacity under long-term exposures to elevated CO2, using GCG and TGG are reported. PMID:25113448

  8. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  9. A Stakeholder View of Organizational Adaptation to Technological Change: The Case of U. S. State Universities, 2003-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed technological change in the core processes of teaching and learning in U. S. state universities in the decade from 2003-2012. Institutions of higher education in the U. S. have faced dramatically complex and rapidly changing operating environments. In response to these conditions, institutions of higher education have…

  10. Managing Organizational Commitment: Insights from Longitudinal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Paula C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes what is known about the "active" management of affective organizational commitment (AOC) through a review of 58 studies employing longitudinal research designs. The review yields six broad categories of antecedents that have empirically demonstrated effects on AOC: socialization practices, organizational changes, human…

  11. Inquiring into Organizational "Energy": A Consultancy Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosey, Paul; Llewellyn, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    An organizational consulting model that uses the ancient concept of chakras and energy flows was used to guide a collaborative inquiry into workers' experience of the organization. The model enabled participants to describe their organizational experience, construct a narrative about it, formulate intended changes. (Contains 32 references.)…

  12. Advancing Ecological Models to Compare Scale in Multi-Level Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, David James

    2016-01-01

    Education systems as units of analysis have been metaphorically likened to ecologies to model change. However, ecological models to date have been ineffective in modelling educational change that is multi-scale and occurs across multiple levels of an education system. Thus, this paper advances two innovative, ecological frameworks that improve on…

  13. An evaluation of a science professional development model: Examining participants' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Georgi Anne

    The problem of this study was to determine in what ways science professional development would support kindergarten through sixth grade teachers in their implementation of a revised curriculum. The problem centered on evaluating the relationship between professional development involvement and teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes. Using data derived from survey responses and other sources (e.g., test scores, financial records, etc.), this study examined use of a science course of study, use of activities/experiments from workshops, use and adequacy of materials adoptions, administrative support, and achievement scores. This research was completed using an Ex Post Facto research design. Using the General Linear Model and causal-comparative analyses, thus study significantly concluded that teachers with a higher level of involvement in science professional development were more likely to use the revised course of study for lesson planning and to perceive materials adoptions as being adequate, and that districts that had participated in science professional development to revise curriculum showed more gains in student learning outcomes. Data on teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills implied that districts needed to continue to design teacher leadership situations that implement long-term professional development, build capacity for shared decision making, create a supportive environment for leaders, and incorporate assessments. Teacher leaders needed to actively engage in action research as a professional development strategy to promote reflection on their teaching and student learning. Data on organizational support and change implied that without logistical and financial support for teaching and learning in terms of hands-on materials, teachers would be unable to support future curriculum improvement efforts. Building principals needed to play a more active role in

  14. Early changes in condylar position after mandibular advancement: a three-dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Manjón, I; Guijarro-Martínez, R; Valls-Ontañón, A; Hernández-Alfaro, F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a three-dimensional (3D) assessment of positional changes of the mandibular condyle after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). A prospective evaluation of 22 skeletal class II patients who underwent a BSSO for mandibular advancement was performed. Pre- and postoperative cone beam computed tomography scans were taken. Using the cranial base as a stable reference, the pre- and postoperative 3D skull models were superimposed virtually. Positional changes of the condyles were assessed with a 3D colour mapping system (SimPlant O&O). A Brunner-Langer statistical test was applied to test the null hypothesis that the condylar position remains stable after BSSO. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The mean mandibular advancement in the studied sample was 6.7±1.6mm. Overall, the condylar positional changes after BSSO for mandibular advancement were statistically significant (P<0.05). A positive correlation was found between the displacement of the left condyle and the amount of mandibular advancement (P<0.01). The results of this study suggest that statistically significant changes of condylar position occur after mandibular advancement. Long-term evaluation is needed to assess the capacity of the temporomandibular joint to adapt to these changes. PMID:26837717

  15. Library Evaluation and Organizational Learning: A Questionnaire Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kuan-Nien

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on organizational learning, particularly in the context of evaluation and organizational change. These concepts are discussed in terms of academic libraries. As part of this discussion, a model entitled Processes and Phases of Organizational Learning (PPOL) was developed which is a visual representation of the range of…

  16. A Propitious Moment in the Midst of Crisis: A Case Study of Organizational Change in an Academic Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Peter F.; Grigsby, R. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors analyze the change, growth, and healing process of the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, which came close to its demise when the department Chair and a senior faculty member were arrested and charged with criminal misconduct related to financial transactions in…

  17. Districts' Responses to Demographic Change: Making Sense of Race, Class, and Immigration in Political and Organizational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Erica O.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. public school systems now face three large demographic shifts: rising poverty, the growing number of students from immigrant families, and increasing populations of students of color. Yet, we know little about how district policymakers react to these important changes or indeed the factors that consistently shape their policymaking.…

  18. Media Selection during the Implementation of Planned Organizational Change: A Predictive Framework Based on Implementation Approach and Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, C. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Integrates literature that addresses implementation approaches and phases with media selection research to provide a descriptive framework for understanding and predicting media use during planned change implementation. Concludes by synthesizing the findings that emerge from the integration of these bodies of literature and describing implications…

  19. Organizational Repertoires and Institutional Change: Women's Groups and the Transformation of U.S. Politics, 1890-1920.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elisabeth S.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses social changes brought about in the United States as a result of the women's suffrage movement. Explains that groups marginalized by existing institutions must create alternative organizations if they are to be successful. Describes political innovations used by women's groups in the struggle for voting rights. (CFR)

  20. Restructuring Academic Libraries: Organizational Development in the Wake of Technological Change. ACRL Publications in Librarianship No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Charles A., Ed.

    This book is a collection of 19 essays and case studies about the challenges libraries face today. It assesses a broad range of opportunities and achievements, and emphasizes both theory and practice. The essays are divided into six sections: (1) Introduction--"Restructuring Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Technological Change" (Charles A.…

  1. The Organizational Meaning of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adria, Marco; Boechler, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Practitioners and theorists have given attention recently to the role and status of research activities in Canadian university continuing education units. For individuals in units that are increasing the proportion of their organizational activities devoted to research, there will be an ongoing process of cognitive change and development as a new…

  2. Ghosts: Gateway to Organizational Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Tim; Had, Gary

    2001-01-01

    "Ghosts" are elements that influence an organization's view of itself, its ways of working, and its culturally specific attitudes; they exert an indirect influence over everything that happens within an organization. Successful organizational change requires identifying and integrating these ghosts. (JOW)

  3. Environmental Decline and Organizational Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zammuto, Raymond F.; Cameron, Kim S.

    1985-01-01

    A management model uses a population perspective that examines types of change occurring in the environment of populations of organizations and results in four kinds of decline (erosion, contraction, dissolution, and collapse). It is used to explain several population-related organizational phenomena. (MSE)

  4. Organizational leadership: meeting the challenge.

    PubMed

    Hart, A L

    1994-06-01

    Leadership can be learned. Knowledge of leadership theories can serve as basis for developing skills and techniques. Style, trait, and transformational leadership can be applied in both health care institutions and professional associations. Organizational leadership is challenging, but those challenges can help individual nurses grow in the leadership skills that will continue to be demanded in the ever changing healthcare arena. PMID:8075165

  5. Approaches to Teaching Organizational Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses fundamental problems in selecting an approach to organizational communications; the purpose of an organizational communication course; the structure and content of organizational communication coursework; and teaching strategies used in the basic course in organizational communication. (RS)

  6. Some Aspects of the State-of-the-Arts in Biomedical Science Research: A Perspective for Organizational Change in African Academia.

    PubMed

    John, Theresa Adebola

    2014-01-01

    In the biomedical sciences, there is need to generate solutions for Africa's health and economic problems through the impact of university research. To guide organizational transformation, the author here presents some aspects of the state-of-the-arts of biomedical science research in advanced countries using a perspective derived from the FASEB journal publications. The author examines the thirty three peer reviewed scientific research articles in a centennial (April 2012) issue of the FASEB Journal [Volume 26(4)] using the following parameters: number of authors contributing to the paper; number of academic departments contributing to the paper; number of academic institutions contributing to the paper; funding of the research reported in the article. The articles were written by 7.97±0.61 authors from 3.46±0.3 departments of 2.79±0.29 institutions. The contributors were classified into four categories: basic sciences, clinical sciences, institutions and centers, and programs and labs. Amongst the publications, 21.2% were single disciplinary. Two tier collaboration amongst any two of the four categories were observed in 16/33 (48.5%) of the articles. Three tier and four tier collaborations were observed amongst 7/33 (21.2%) and 3/33 (9%) of the articles respectively. Therefore 26/33 (78.7%) of the articles were multidisciplinary. Collaborative efforts between basic science and clinical science departments were observed in 9/33 (27.3%) articles. Public funding through government agencies provided 85 out of a total of 143 (59.5%) grants. The collaborative and multidisciplinary nature and government support are characteristic of biomedical science in the US where research tends to result in solutions to problems and economic benefits. PMID:26196583

  7. Organizational Change, Leadership, and the Transformation of Continuing Professional Development: Lessons Learned From the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Beliveau, Mary Ellen; Warnes, Carole A; Harrington, Robert A; Nishimura, Rick A; O'Gara, Patrick T; Sibley, Janice B; Oetgen, William J

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for a transformational change in clinical education. In postgraduate medical education we have traditionally had a faculty-centric model. That is, faculty knew what needed to be taught and who were the best teachers to teach it. They built the agenda, and worked with staff to follow Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) accreditation criteria and manage logistics. Changes in the health care marketplace now demand a learner-centric model-one that embraces needs assessments, identification of practice gaps relative to competency, development of learning objectives, contemporary adult learning theory, novel delivery systems, and measurable outcomes. This article provides a case study of one medical specialty society's efforts to respond to this demand. PMID:26378426

  8. Patterns of Organizational Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Ronald G.

    1969-01-01

    Patterns of relationships were identified between indices of organizational conflict and several measures of each of five organizational variables. The measures were adapted from 1500 questionnaires and 600 interviews in 28 public high schools. (Author)

  9. Insecure Commitment and Resistance: An Examination of Change Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Trust on the Relationship between Job Insecurity, Employee Commitment, and Resistance to Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert Elijah

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the mediation role of self-efficacy and the moderating roles of change leadership strategy and trust on the change attitudes of job insecure employees. Using job insecurity theory (Greenhalgh, 1983), Chin & Benne's (1961) seminal classification of change leadership strategies and the tripartite model of…

  10. Dimensionality of Organizational Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Samuel H.; Wiswell, Albert K.

    2007-01-01

    Trust facilitates individual and organizational learning, and is often misunderstood by organizations although they must continuously learn in order to attain organizational goals and survive. Leaders of organizations often view trust defensively and their reactions may impede organizational learning This paper builds on prior research concerning…

  11. Emerging Organizational Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carchidi, Daniel M.; Peterson, Marvin W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of emerging higher educational organizational structures focuses on the increasing importance of distance education. Considers the emerging organizational landscape, three types of network organizations, six organization archetypes, organizational forms that support distance education, and implications for higher education planners. (DB)

  12. The Organizational Learning Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, R. Wayne

    2002-01-01

    Notes that organizational communication and organizational learning share a common focus on how message processing occurs in institutional settings and how they affect and are affected by people and relationships. Proposes that the assessment of organizational learning represents an assessment of a subset of communication processes in an…

  13. Cognitive and Affective Changes as Determinants for Taking Advanced Mathematics Courses in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth, this analysis tested whether changes during middle and high school in mathematics-related cognitive and affective factors influence participation in the most advanced mathematics course work, with control over confounding factors associated with student background. No significant…

  14. Organizational Transformation from the Inside Out: Reinventing the MIT Center for Organizational Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanon, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    The 2-year process by which the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Center for Organizational Learning transformed into the self-governed Society for Organizational Learning illustrates new ways of conceiving organizations, the capabilities required for change, and critical elements of the process: diverse representation, grounding in business…

  15. Teamwork in the Terminal Area: Organizational Issues and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, Bonny K.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic growth and technology advances in commercial aviation have turned the terminal area into a complex, multi-organization workplace which requires the smooth coordination of many operational teams. In addition to pilots, cabin crew, air traffic controllers, and dispatch (who nominally work together throughout a flight), surface operations additionally involve local, ground and ramp controllers, ramp agents, maintenance, dozens of service contractors, and any number of teams who are responsible for airport operations. Under abnormal or emergency conditions, even more teams become actively involved. In order to accommodate growth and to meet productivity and safety challenges, numerous changes are being made in surface operations. Unfortunately, it is often the case that changes in technologies, organizational roles, procedures, and training are developed and implemented in isolated and piecemeal fashion without regard to cross organizational impact. Thus, there is a need for evaluation methodologies which assure integrated system safety for all organizations. Such methodologies should aid the understanding of how organizations work together and how changes in one domain affects the next. In this study, we develop one approach toward addressing these organizational issues. Examples of surface operations in abnormal situations are examined in regard to their impact on personnel in the terminal area. Timelines are given for the responses to incidents, along with the necessary communication links, the specific roles that members of terminal teams have, and any overlapping responsibilities. Suggestions to improve cross-operational teamwork are given. Methods of graphic representation are explored, both in regards to human links and access to information. The outcome of such an approach should enhance the understanding which is critical for resolving organizational conflicts and maximizing system effectiveness.

  16. Influence of School Organizational Characteristics on the Outcomes of a School Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; Hebert, David; deMoor, Carl; Hearn, Marsha Davis; Resnicow, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Assessed the impact of school organizational characteristics on outcomes of a teacher health behavior change program. Organizational, dietary, and psychologic data from intervention and control schools indicated that teachers at intervention schools with high organizational climate, organizational health, and job satisfaction reported better…

  17. Leadership and organizational ethics: the three dimensional African perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the past, present and future aspects of African leadership and organizational ethics that have, are and will be key for any organization to sustain its systems and structures. Organizational ethics revolves around written and/or unwritten guidelines, ethical values, principles, rules and standards, that are drawn from the harmonious coexistence with the biosphere and it is how these elements are applied that dictates the style of leadership and the ethical thinking of the leaders. Africa has a wide range of complexities which are compounded by, inter alia, tribal divisiveness, selfish leadership, wealth inequality, and massive unemployment. Africans tend to draw their leadership and ethical practices and reflections from the events in the environment with which they have interacted for many years. However, in order to fully address and understand the African perspective in leadership and organizational ethics, a broad comprehension of the African diverse and complex landscape is needed through unravelling of the three dimensional existence of the people. African ethics, developed over time, unifies organizations and leadership since it is part of life and is practised, sub-consciously or unconsciously, by the people as they transform from one practice to the other, and during intergenerational transitions. Globalization, liberalization, technological changes and advancement, and market changes are rapidly transforming the environment in which organizations operate. In such a situation, an effective and true leader cannot be rigid but should be flexible, with the ability to use different leadership styles whenever the situation calls for it. Only those leaders with a three-dimensional perspective live inspiring lives, live with a cause and adopt organizational ethics and leadership styles that will stand the test of time. Despite Africa being the cradle of humankind, leadership and organizational ethics is still in its infancy and wanting, even

  18. Leadership and organizational ethics: the three dimensional African perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mathooko, Jude Mutuku

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the past, present and future aspects of African leadership and organizational ethics that have, are and will be key for any organization to sustain its systems and structures. Organizational ethics revolves around written and/or unwritten guidelines, ethical values, principles, rules and standards, that are drawn from the harmonious coexistence with the biosphere and it is how these elements are applied that dictates the style of leadership and the ethical thinking of the leaders. Africa has a wide range of complexities which are compounded by, inter alia, tribal divisiveness, selfish leadership, wealth inequality, and massive unemployment. Africans tend to draw their leadership and ethical practices and reflections from the events in the environment with which they have interacted for many years. However, in order to fully address and understand the African perspective in leadership and organizational ethics, a broad comprehension of the African diverse and complex landscape is needed through unravelling of the three dimensional existence of the people. African ethics, developed over time, unifies organizations and leadership since it is part of life and is practised, sub-consciously or unconsciously, by the people as they transform from one practice to the other, and during intergenerational transitions. Globalization, liberalization, technological changes and advancement, and market changes are rapidly transforming the environment in which organizations operate. In such a situation, an effective and true leader cannot be rigid but should be flexible, with the ability to use different leadership styles whenever the situation calls for it. Only those leaders with a three-dimensional perspective live inspiring lives, live with a cause and adopt organizational ethics and leadership styles that will stand the test of time. Despite Africa being the cradle of humankind, leadership and organizational ethics is still in its infancy and wanting, even

  19. 26 CFR 1.709-1T - Treatment of organizational expenses and syndication costs (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the partnership. A change in the characterization of an item as an organizational expense is a change... additional $10,000 of organizational expenses and must change its method under § 1.446-1(e) and the... using an impermissible method of accounting for the organizational expenses and must change its...

  20. Advanced technology needs for a global change science program: Perspective of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Swissler, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the NASA program in remote sensing is primarily the Earth system science and the monitoring of the Earth global changes. One of NASA's roles is the identification and development of advanced sensing techniques, operational spacecraft, and the many supporting technologies necessary to meet the stringent science requirements. Langley Research Center has identified the elements of its current and proposed advanced technology development program that are relevant to global change science according to three categories: sensors, spacecraft, and information system technologies. These technology proposals are presented as one-page synopses covering scope, objective, approach, readiness timeline, deliverables, and estimated funding. In addition, the global change science requirements and their measurement histories are briefly discussed.

  1. Competencies in Organizational E-Learning: Concepts and Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Competencies in Organizational E-Learning: Concepts and Tools" provides a comprehensive view of the way competencies can be used to drive organizational e-learning, including the main conceptual elements, competency gap analysis, advanced related computing topics, the application of semantic Web technologies, and the integration of competencies…

  2. Predicting Organizational Commitment from Organizational Culture in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipek, Cemalettin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe organizational culture and commitment and to predict organizational commitment from organizational culture in Turkish primary schools. Organizational Culture Scale (Ipek "1999") and Organizational Commitment Scale (Balay "2000") were used in the data gathering process. The data were collected from 415 primary teachers…

  3. Investigation of the Relationship between Organizational Trust and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastug, Gülsüm; Pala, Adem; Kumartasli, Mehmet; Günel, Ilker; Duyan, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Organizational trust and organizational commitment are considered as the most important entraining factors for organizational success. The most important factor in the formation of organizational commitment is trust that employees have in their organizations. In this study, the relationship between organizational trust and organizational…

  4. Development and Validation of a Questionnaire to Detect Behavior Change in Multiple Advance Care Planning Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L.; Stewart, Anita L.; Knight, Sara J.; McMahan, Ryan D.; Feuz, Mariko; Miao, Yinghui; Barnes, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advance directives have traditionally been considered the gold standard for advance care planning. However, recent evidence suggests that advance care planning involves a series of multiple discrete behaviors for which people are in varying stages of behavior change. The goal of our study was to develop and validate a survey to measure the full advance care planning process. Methods The Advance Care Planning Engagement Survey assesses “Process Measures” of factors known from Behavior Change Theory to affect behavior (knowledge, contemplation, self-efficacy, and readiness, using 5-point Likert scales) and “Action Measures” (yes/no) of multiple behaviors related to surrogate decision makers, values and quality of life, flexibility for surrogate decision making, and informed decision making. We administered surveys at baseline and 1 week later to 50 diverse, older adults from San Francisco hospitals. Internal consistency reliability of Process Measures was assessed using Cronbach's alpha (only continuous variables) and test-retest reliability of Process and Action Measures was examined using intraclass correlations. For discriminant validity, we compared Process and Action Measure scores between this cohort and 20 healthy college students (mean age 23.2 years, SD 2.7). Results Mean age was 69.3 (SD 10.5) and 42% were non-White. The survey took a mean of 21.4 minutes (±6.2) to administer. The survey had good internal consistency (Process Measures Cronbach's alpha, 0.94) and test-retest reliability (Process Measures intraclass correlation, 0.70; Action Measures, 0.87). Both Process and Action Measure scores were higher in the older than younger group, p<.001. Conclusion A new Advance Care Planning Engagement Survey that measures behavior change (knowledge, contemplation, self-efficacy, and readiness) and multiple advance care planning actions demonstrates good reliability and validity. Further research is needed to assess whether survey scores

  5. Interleukin-6 and leptin as markers of energy metabolic changes in advanced ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Daniela; Astara, Giorgio; Farci, Daniele; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    The progression of the neoplastic disease is characterized by specific alterations of energy metabolism and by symptoms like fatigue, anorexia, nausea, anaemia, immunodepression and poor performance status (PS). The main cause of these symptoms and metabolic abnormalities is the chronic action of proinflammatory cytokines released both by tumour and immune cells. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between markers of inflammation (C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, proinflammatory cytokines) and energy metabolic status (BMI, leptin, oxidative stress) according to clinical parameters in 104 ovarian cancer patients at different stage and, moreover, to evaluate prospectively the changes of these parameters in accordance to tumour response in a subgroup of 70 advanced stage ovarian cancer patients. Advanced stage and poor PS were associated to high-grade inflammation and impaired energy metabolism. Among inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6 had a central role as predictive factor of leptin, reactive oxygen species and glutathione peroxidase. In turn, leptin considered the key marker of the nutritional status and energy metabolism, was independently determined from stage and IL-6, not only from BMI. Moreover, the evaluation of the changes of these parameters during the course of the neoplastic disease in the subgroup of advanced ovarian cancer patients clearly unveils the central role of IL-6 and leptin as early markers of the metabolic alterations and symptoms associated to disease progression in advanced stage ovarian cancer. Their assessment should be included in monitoring disease outcome, especially when cancer is no longer curable and quality of life becomes the primary endpoint. PMID:18624749

  6. Using Corporate Tools for Organizational Development to Affect Cultural and Structural Change in the Academy: Gallup Impact Planning at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latta, Gail F.

    2006-01-01

    External pressures have transformed academic life, shattering the roles and relationships that created a sense of community. Increasingly the challenges of fostering an engaged workforce in these institutions mirror the corporate world. Leaders at UNL have adapted Gallup's organizational development strategy to improve faculty engagement and…

  7. Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing Work on Climate Change and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Gould, Solange; Rudolph, Linda

    2015-12-01

    Climate change poses a major threat to public health. Strategies that address climate change have considerable potential to benefit health and decrease health inequities, yet public health engagement at the intersection of public health, equity, and climate change has been limited. This research seeks to understand the barriers to and opportunities for advancing work at this nexus. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews (N = 113) with public health and climate change professionals and thematic analysis. Barriers to public health engagement in addressing climate change include individual perceptions that climate change is not urgent or solvable and insufficient understanding of climate change's health impacts and programmatic connections. Institutional barriers include a lack of public health capacity, authority, and leadership; a narrow framework for public health practice that limits work on the root causes of climate change and health; and compartmentalization within and across sectors. Opportunities include integrating climate change into current public health practice; providing inter-sectoral support for climate solutions with health co-benefits; and using a health frame to engage and mobilize communities. Efforts to increase public health sector engagement should focus on education and communications, building leadership and funding, and increasing work on the shared root causes of climate change and health inequities. PMID:26690194

  8. Organizational Theory, Organizational Communication, Organizational Knowledge, and Problematic Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhee, Robert D.; Zaug, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    Argues that three traditions of theory about organizational communication have special relevance to the ideas of problematic integration theory. Indicates the implications of theoretic currents and notes that the main implication is that problematic integration looks very different in the context of a complex communication system. (SG)

  9. Electronic Creativity Techniques for Organizational Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siau, Keng L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses using advanced electronic and communication technology to improve organizational innovation. Group creativity techniques, such as electronic brainstorming, PMI (a brainstorming approach involving plus, minus, and interesting points), synectics, and their verbal counterparts are compared. Electronic PMI and synectics are found to be…

  10. Applications of Advanced Technology for Monitoring Forest Carbon to Support Climate Change Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsey, R.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Hagen, S. C.; Vargas, R.; Nehrkorn, T.; Domke, G. M.; Houghton, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) is a broad concept guiding the application of monitoring technology to the needs of countries or entities for reporting and verifying reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or increases in greenhouse gas sinks. Credibility, cost-effectiveness, and compatibility are important features of global MRV efforts that can support implementation of climate change mitigation programs such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and Sustainable Forest Management (REDD+). Applications of MRV technology may be tailored to individual country circumstances following guidance provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; hence, there is no single approach that is uniquely viable but rather a range of ways to integrate new MRV methods. MRV technology is advancing rapidly with new remote sensing and advanced measurement of atmospheric CO2, and in situ terrestrial and ocean measurements, coupled with improvements in data analysis, modeling, and assessing uncertainty. Here we briefly summarize some of the most application-ready MRV technologies being developed under NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program, and illustrate how these technologies may be applied for monitoring forests using several case studies that span a range of scales, country circumstances, and stakeholder reporting requirements. We also include remarks about the potential role of advanced monitoring technology in the context of the global climate accord that is expected to result from the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which is expected to take place in December 2015, in Paris, France.

  11. Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing Work on Climate Change and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Solange; Rudolph, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Climate change poses a major threat to public health. Strategies that address climate change have considerable potential to benefit health and decrease health inequities, yet public health engagement at the intersection of public health, equity, and climate change has been limited. This research seeks to understand the barriers to and opportunities for advancing work at this nexus. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews (N = 113) with public health and climate change professionals and thematic analysis. Barriers to public health engagement in addressing climate change include individual perceptions that climate change is not urgent or solvable and insufficient understanding of climate change’s health impacts and programmatic connections. Institutional barriers include a lack of public health capacity, authority, and leadership; a narrow framework for public health practice that limits work on the root causes of climate change and health; and compartmentalization within and across sectors. Opportunities include integrating climate change into current public health practice; providing inter-sectoral support for climate solutions with health co-benefits; and using a health frame to engage and mobilize communities. Efforts to increase public health sector engagement should focus on education and communications, building leadership and funding, and increasing work on the shared root causes of climate change and health inequities. PMID:26690194

  12. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) pitch change actuator and control design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Carvalho, P.; Cutler, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the high inherent efficiency previously demonstrated by low speed turboprop propulsion systems may now be extended to today's higher speed aircraft if advanced high-speed propeller blades having thin airfoils and aerodynamic sweep are utilized. Hamilton Standard has designed a 9-foot diameter single-rotation Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) which will be tested on a static test stand, in a high speed wind tunnel and on a research aircraft. The major objective of this testing is to establish the structural integrity of large-scale Prop-Fans of advanced construction in addition to the evaluation of aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic design. This report describes the operation, design features and actual hardware of the (LAP) Prop-Fan pitch control system. The pitch control system which controls blade angle and propeller speed consists of two separate assemblies. The first is the control unit which provides the hydraulic supply, speed governing and feather function for the system. The second unit is the hydro-mechanical pitch change actuator which directly changes blade angle (pitch) as scheduled by the control.

  13. How institutional change and individual researchers helped advance clinical guidelines in American health care.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Amit

    2013-06-01

    Clinical guidelines are important tools for managing health care quality. Research on the origins of guidelines primarily focuses on the institutional causes of their emergence and growth. Individual medical researchers, however, have played important roles. This paper develops knowledge of the role of individual medical researchers in advancing guidelines, and of how researchers' efforts were enabled or constrained by broader institutional changes. Drawing on an analytical case study focused on the role of Kerr White, John Wennberg, and Robert Brook, it shows that guidelines were a product of the interplay between institutional change in the medical field and actions by individual researchers, acting as institutional entrepreneurs. Increased government involvement in the health care field triggered the involvement of a range of new actors in health care. These new organizations created a context that allowed individual researchers to advance guidelines by creating job opportunities, providing research funding, and creating opportunities for researchers to engage with the policy process. Individual researchers availed of this context to both advance their ideas, and to draw new actors into the field. PMID:23631774

  14. From Crisis to Success: Three Case Studies in Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitki, Yoram; Herstein, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radical changes and increasing competition in the global economy and markets lead enterprises to change their business policy and activities. This process demands the creation of effective organizational learning mechanisms. This paper seeks to illustrate how three service organizations designed and utilized organizational learning…

  15. Institutional transformation: An analysis of change initiatives at NSF ADVANCE institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Ellen W.

    The purpose of this study was to examine how institutional culture promoted or impeded the implementation of round one and two NSF ADVANCE initiatives designed to improve academic climates for women in science and engineering. This study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, 35 participants from 18 institutions were interviewed to answer three research questions. Participants identified a policy, process, or program designed to improve academic cultures for women in science and engineering fields. Participants also identified strategies that promoted the implementation of these efforts, and discussed factors that impeded these efforts. In phase two, site visits were conducted at two institutions to answer a fourth research question. How did institutional culture shape the design and implementation of faculty search processes? Policies, processes, and programs were implemented by participants at the institutional, departmental, and individual levels and included family friendly and dual career policies at the institutional level, improved departmental faculty search and climate improvement processes, and mentoring programs and training for department heads at the individual level. Communication and leadership strategies were key to the successful implementation of policies, processes, and programs designed to achieve institutional transformation. Communication strategies involved shaping change messages to reach varied audiences often with the argument that change efforts would improve the climate for everyone not just women faculty members. Administrative and faculty leaders from multiple levels proved important to change efforts. Institutional Transformation Institutional culture shaped initiatives to improve faculty search processes. Faculty leaders in both settings used data to persuade faculty members of the need for change. At one site, data that included national availability information was critical to advancing the change agenda. At the other site

  16. Organizational climate and culture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Benjamin; Ehrhart, Mark G; Macey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organizational culture is briefly defined as the basic assumptions about the world and the values that guide life in organizations. A brief history of climate research is presented, followed by the major accomplishments in research on the topic with regard to levels issues, the foci of climate research, and studies of climate strength. A brief overview of the more recent study of organizational culture is then introduced, followed by samples of important thinking and research on the roles of leadership and national culture in understanding organizational culture and performance and culture as a moderator variable in research in organizational behavior. The final section of the article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations. Throughout, recommendations are made for additional thinking and research. PMID:22856467

  17. Changing the academic culture: Valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Paul R.; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T.; Kaler, Eric W.; Marchase, Richard B.; Sands, Timothy D.; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-01-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  18. Changing the academic culture: valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T; Kaler, Eric W; Marchase, Richard B; Sands, Timothy D; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-05-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  19. The Experience of Leadership during Organizational Identity Transformation: A Phenomenological Study of Florida's State College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Tracy A.

    2010-01-01

    The study was a qualitative investigation into the sensemaking experience of leaders during transformative organizational identity change. How people arrive at meaning (sensemaking) and the implications of that meaning for organizational performance are essential to effective leadership during change. Organizational theory holds that…

  20. Guidance for Incorporating Organizational Factors Into Nuclear Power Plant Risk Assessments - Phase 1 Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    J. Julius; A. Mosleh; M. Golay; V. Guthrie; J. Wreathall; A. Spurgin; B. Hannaman; D. Ziebell

    2002-12-31

    EPRI sponsored this study in order to help determine the influence of organizational factors on plant safety, risk, and economics. PRA tools provide excellent models for answering the question, ''How does change in an organizational factor impact the risk value?''

  1. Appreciative Inquiry as an Organizational Development Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinetz, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Defines appreciative inquiry as a change model that uses traditional organizational development processes (team building, strategic planning, business process redesign, management audits) in a new way, both as a philosophy and as a process. Emphasizes collaboration, participation of all voices, and changing the organization rather than the people.…

  2. Employee response to major organizational redesign.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, G L; Fisher, M; Ross, B; Soja, M; Kidd, N

    2001-02-01

    A number of health care organizations are currently undergoing major organizational redesign. Despite these efforts, little is known about how these changes are affecting the employees participating in the redesign process. In response to this, a study was undertaken to determine the perceived impact of organizational redesign on nursing staff at 2 acute care hospitals that were undergoing major organizational change. Data were collected through semi-structured focus group interviews conducted on all 3 shifts (days, evenings, and nights). Findings suggest the early redesign period is highly turbulent and difficult for staff. Nurses expressed concern over changes in roles and responsibilities, disruption in work group relationships, loss of resource availability, reduction in quality of care, and alterations in physical and psychological state. PMID:11172226

  3. Building an ethical organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William A; Taylor, Emily; Walsh, Thom

    2014-01-01

    The success of a health care institution-as defined by delivering high-quality, high-value care, positive patient outcomes, and financial solvency-is inextricably tied to the culture within that organization. The ability to achieve and sustain alignment between its mission, values, and everyday practices defines a positive organizational culture. An institution that has a diminished organizational culture, reflected in the failure to consistently align management and clinical decisions and practices with its mission and values, will struggle. The presence of misalignment or of ethics gaps affects the quality of care being delivered, the morale of the staff, and the organization's image in the community. Transforming an organizational culture will provide a foundation for success and a framework for daily ethics-grounded operations in any organization. However, building an ethics-grounded organization is a challenging process requiring strong organization leadership and planning. Using a case study, the authors provide a multiyear, continuous step-by-step strategy consisting of identifying ethics culture gaps, establishing an ethics taskforce, clarifying and prioritizing the problems, developing strategy for change, implementing the strategy, and evaluating outcomes. This process will assist organizations in aligning its actions with its mission and values, to find success on all fronts. PMID:24776835

  4. Linking individual and organizational wellness.

    PubMed

    Canosa, J F; Lewandowski, L M

    1993-09-01

    In addition to intervening when workers have substance abuse or stress problems, many hospital employee assistance programs (EAPs) now include a wellness component that emphasizes prevention and organizational wholeness. The EAP at St. Joseph's Hospital & Medical Center, Paterson, NJ, has taken a number of steps to improve its responsiveness to employees' needs and promote constructive organizational changes. To meet increasing requests for mental health services, St. Joseph's EAP implemented a short-term (up to 12 sessions) counseling program that focuses on problem-solving techniques. The EAP has also used feedback from clients to address organizational issues. For example, a survey that revealed differences between managers' and employees' perceptions of managers' leadership skills has led St. Joseph's to consider development of further workshops to train managers on how to be more effective leaders. And in response to complaints from nurses about a lack of communication with physicians, St. Joseph's invested $8,000 to implement nursing support groups and seminars to enhance nurse-physician collaboration. Additional EAP activities include consulting services for other corporations and help for employees in overcoming financial barriers to access to healthcare and social services. As budgets tighten, effective marketing of EAPs will be essential to their continued growth. In particular, EAP administrators must learn how to document the strategic and financial benefits of their programs. PMID:10127981

  5. Confirmation of ETI: initial organizational response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.

    2003-08-01

    Perhaps the most crucial responses to the confirmation of extraterrestrial intelligence will come from organizations, rather than from individual people. Among the key organizations that will help shape humanity's response are political institutions such as the US Congress, administrative bodies such as the US Department of State, security agencies, the military, professional societies, and the media. Although popular culture and individual beliefs will affect organizational performance, organizational reactions will depend also on organizational cultures and traditions, administrative structures, communication patterns, decision-making processes, and the actions of other organizations. Prompt and effective responses may be blocked by sociopolitical constraints, jurisdictional disputes, cumbersome structures and procedures, stresses that frequently slow and distort information processing, and potentially counterproductive efforts to maintain positive organizational images. Efforts undertaken by governmental agencies will be hampered by public perceptions of low credibility. Foresight and advance preparation are among the steps that organizations may take to prepare for contact, but conservative values, skepticism towards SETI, and competing organizational priorities make serious preparation unlikely.

  6. Grassroots Organizational Battles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Michael

    1976-01-01

    The author presents these three ground rules for engaging in organizational conflict: (1) take the offensive; (2) take the cue for the second move from the opponent's defensive response; and (3) know when to execute a "strategic retreat." (HMV)

  7. The Impact of Training Interventions on Organizational Readiness to Support Innovations in Juvenile Justice Offices

    PubMed Central

    Taxman, Faye S.; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. METHODS A clinical trial was conducted examining the mpact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a one day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive three-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. RESULTS External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building

  8. The impact of training interventions on organizational readiness to support innovations in juvenile justice offices.

    PubMed

    Taxman, Faye S; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. A clinical trial was conducted examining the impact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a 1 day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive 3-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building approach did not perform any better

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  10. Progesterone-regulated changes in endometrial gene expression contribute to advanced conceptus development in cattle.

    PubMed

    Forde, N; Carter, F; Fair, T; Crowe, M A; Evans, A C O; Spencer, T E; Bazer, F W; McBride, R; Boland, M P; O'Gaora, P; Lonergan, P; Roche, J F

    2009-10-01

    The postovulatory rise in circulating progesterone (P4) concentrations is associated with increased pregnancy success in beef and dairy cattle. Our study objective was to determine how elevated P4 alters endometrial gene expression to advance conceptus development. Synchronized heifers were inseminated (Day 0) and randomly assigned to pregnant high P4 or to pregnant normal P4. All high P4 groups received a P4-release intravaginal device on Day 3 after insemination that increased P4 concentrations up to Day 7 (P < 0.05). Tissue was collected on Day 5, 7, 13, or 16 of pregnancy, and endometrial gene expression was analyzed using the bovine Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) microarrays. Microarray analyses demonstrated that the largest number of P4-regulated genes coincided with the day when the P4 profiles were different for the longest period. Genes with the largest fold change increase (such as DGAT2 and MSTN [also known as GDF8]) were associated with triglyceride synthesis and glucose transport, which can be utilized as an energy source for the developing embryo. Temporal changes occurred at different stages of early pregnancy, with the greatest difference occurring between well-separated stages of conceptus development. Validation of a number of genes by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that P4 supplementation advances endometrial gene expression by altering the time (FABP, DGAT2, and MSTN) or duration (CRYGS) of expression pattern for genes that contribute to the composition of histotroph. PMID:19553605

  11. Results of a Longitudinal Analysis of National Data to Examine Relationships Between Organizational and Market Characteristics and Changes in Antipsychotic Prescribing in US Nursing Homes From 1996 Through 2006

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Handler, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to examine the association between organizational characteristics, market characteristics, and changes in antipsychotic medication use in US nursing homes over time. Methods This was a longitudinal study comparing antipsychotic use in US nursing homes from 1996 through 2006 using Medicare and Medicaid data (the Online Survey Certification And Reporting system) and US Department of Health and Human Resources Health Resources and Services Administration data (the Area Resource File). The 3 outcomes of interest were increasing, decreasing, or stable use of antipsychotic medications. The primary independent variables were organizational characteristics (e.g., for-profit status, chain membership) and market characteristics (e.g., Medicaid reimbursement, levels of competition). Results Antipsychotic use increased from 16.4% in 1996 to 25.9% in 2006 (P < 0.05). A multinomial generalized estimating equations model, controlling for facility, staffing, and resident factors, suggested that increased antipsychotic use was associated with for-profit facilities (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.58; 95% CI, 1.51–1.65; P ≤ 0.001). Decreased antipsychotic use was associated with chain membership (AOR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.79–0.85; P ≤ 0.001), higher levels of competition (AOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.16–1.29; P ≤ 0.001), and a higher Medicaid reimbursement rate (AOR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85–0.92; P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion Antipsychotic use is increasing in nursing homes and is associated with certain organizational facility characteristics and market factors. Future interventions to reduce antipsychotic use in nursing homes will have to be targeted toward these factors. PMID:19616182

  12. Advances in desertification and climate change research: Are they accessible for application to enhance adaptive capacity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, M.; Dirkx, E.; Hager, C.; Klintenberg, P.; Roberts, C.; von Oertzen, D.

    2008-12-01

    Sustainable living in arid lands is the goal of many, including local residents, policy-makers and scientists. Research into desertification and climate change has the potential to significantly enhance livelihoods of resident people. It also has the potential to contribute to their capacity for risk reduction, improved natural resources management and adaptation to climatic and other changes in multi-stressor systems. This potential is not frequently realised. To effectively ensure that scientific insights and contemporary technologies are applied, active involvement of and feedback from those who apply and use the benefits offered by science and technology are required. Scientists and technologists have to address the diverse, mainly non-technical, aspects required to understand and cope with endemic climate variability, desertification and climate change. They need to appropriately tailor their approaches to disseminate results, and communicate their findings in a way that can be understood and readily implemented by policy-makers, politicians and communities. At the same time, they must learn from experiences gained through implementation by users at all levels. The challenges of making the necessary connections between the combinatory effects of desertification and climate change and their effective application are explored and tested. It was found that several key factors contribute to making the necessary connections to facilitate application on all levels of research advances. These include translation, information dissemination, communication, communication platforms, boundary organisations and leadership contributing to knowledge, motivation and capacity. The purpose of this paper is to assess research experiences from integrated land and water resource management, the application of renewable energy and energy efficiency, and local-level monitoring of natural resources and their application to the challenges of desertification and climate change. The

  13. 10 CFR 300.4 - Selecting organizational boundaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Selecting organizational boundaries. 300.4 Section 300.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL GUIDELINES § 300.4 Selecting organizational boundaries. (a) Each reporting entity must disclose in its...

  14. 10 CFR 300.4 - Selecting organizational boundaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Selecting organizational boundaries. 300.4 Section 300.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL GUIDELINES § 300.4 Selecting organizational boundaries. (a) Each reporting entity must disclose in its...

  15. 10 CFR 300.4 - Selecting organizational boundaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selecting organizational boundaries. 300.4 Section 300.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL GUIDELINES § 300.4 Selecting organizational boundaries. (a) Each reporting entity must disclose in its...

  16. 10 CFR 300.4 - Selecting organizational boundaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Selecting organizational boundaries. 300.4 Section 300.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL GUIDELINES § 300.4 Selecting organizational boundaries. (a) Each reporting entity must disclose in its...

  17. 10 CFR 300.4 - Selecting organizational boundaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Selecting organizational boundaries. 300.4 Section 300.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL GUIDELINES § 300.4 Selecting organizational boundaries. (a) Each reporting entity must disclose in its...

  18. Project Management Framework to Organizational Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotnour, Tim; Barton, Saul

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a project management framework and associated models for organizational transitions. The framework contains an integrated set of steps an organization can take to lead an organizational transition such as downsizing and change in mission or role. The framework is designed to help an organization do the right work the right way with the right people at the right time. The underlying rationale for the steps in the framework is based on a set of findings which include: defining a transition as containing both near-term and long-term actions, designing actions which respond to drivers and achieve desired results, aligning the organization with the external environment, and aligning the internal components of the organization. The framework was developed based on best practices found in the literature, lessons learned from heads of organizations who have completed large-scale organizational changes, and concerns from employees at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The framework is described using KSC.

  19. Upward appraisal as a means for improving supervisory performance and promoting process improvement, with long-term implications for organizational change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfeldt, Denise V.

    1994-01-01

    This study represents the implementation phase of an organizational development project which was initiated last year in the Management Support Division (MSD) at Langley Research Center to diagnose organizational functioning. As a result of MSD survey data from last year's effort, a Quality Action Team was created to address the responses compiled from the MSD Organizational Assessment Questionnaire and Follow-Up Questionnaire. The team was officially named the MSD Employee Relations Improvement Team (MERIT). MERIT's goal was to analyze major concerns generated by the questionnaires and to present feasible solutions to management which would improve supervisory performance, promote process improvement; and ultimately, lead to a better organization. The team met weekly and was very disciplined in following guidelines needed to ensure a fully functioning team. Several TQM tools were used during the team process, including brainstorming and the cause and effect diagram. One of the products produced by MERIT was a 'report card', more formally known as an upward appraisal system, to evaluate supervisory performance in the division office, its three branches, and in teams. Major areas of emphasis on the 47 item report card were those identified by employees through the previously administered questionnaires as needing to be improved; specifically, training, recognition, teamwork, supervision and leadership, and communication. MERIT created an enlarged and modified version of the report card which enabled scores for each individual supervisor to be recorded on a separate form, along with summary results and employee comments. Report card results have been compiled and fed back to the Division Chief and Assistant Division Chief. These individuals will in turn, feed the results back to the remaining supervisors and the team leaders. Although results differ among supervisors, some similarities exist. Communication generally appears to be adequate, which represents an

  20. Climate change-driven treeline advances in the Urals alter soil microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukic, Ika; Moiseev, Pavel; Hagedorn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Climatic warming may affect microbial communities and their functions either directly through increased temperatures or indirectly by changes in vegetation. Treelines are temperature-limited vegetation boundaries from tundra to forests. In unmanaged regions of the Ural mountains, there is evidence that the forest-tundra ecotone has shifted upward in response to climate warming during the 20th century. Little is known about the effects of the treeline advances on the microbial structure and function and hence they feedbacks on the belowground carbon and nitrogen cycling In our study, we aimed to estimate how ongoing upward shifts of the treeline ecotone might affect soil biodiversity and its function and hence soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Southern and Polar Ural mountains. Along altitudinal gradients reaching from the tundra to forests, we determined the soil microbial community composition (using Phospholipid Fatty Acids method) and quantified the activity of several extracellular enzymes involved in the C and nutrient cycling. In addition, we measured C pools in biomass and soils and quantified C and N mineralization. The results for the top soils, both in South Urals and in the Polar Ural, indicate a close link between climate change driven vegetation changes and soil microbial communities. The observed changes in microbial structure are induced through the resulting more favorable conditions than due to a shift in litter quality. The activities of chitinase were significantly higher under trees than under herbaceous plants, while activities of cellulase and protease declined with altitude from the tundra to the closed forest. In contrast to enzymatic activities, soil carbon stocks did not change significantly with altitude very likely as a result of a balancing out of increased C inputs from vegetation by an enhanced C output through mineralization with forest expansion. The accelerated organic matter turnover in the forest than in the tundra

  1. Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and ClimateChange Analyses of Extreme Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.

    2004-09-24

    During the period May 2003 to May 2004, there were two CEC/PIER funded primary research activities by the Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences Group/Earth Science Division at LBNL. These activities are the implementation and testing of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model (CLM) into MM5, and the analysis of extreme heat days under a new set of climate simulations. The new version of MM5,MM5-CLM, has been tested for a 90 day snowmelt period in the northwestern U.S. Results show that this new code upgrade, as compared to the MM5-NOAH, has improved snowmelt, temperature, and precipitation when compared to observations. These are due in part to a subgrid scheme,advanced snow processes, and advanced vegetation. The climate change analysis is the upper and lower IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios, representing fossil fuel intensive and energy conserving future emission scenarios, and medium and low sensitivity Global Climate Models. Results indicate that California cities will see increases in the number of heat wave and temperature threshold days from two to six times.These results may be viewed as potential outcomes based on today's decisions on emissions.

  2. Advanced Behavioral Analyses Show that the Presence of Food Causes Subtle Changes in C. elegans Movement

    PubMed Central

    Angstman, Nicholas B.; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    As a widely used and studied model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans worms offer the ability to investigate implications of behavioral change. Although, investigation of C. elegans behavioral traits has been shown, analysis is often narrowed down to measurements based off a single point, and thus cannot pick up on subtle behavioral and morphological changes. In the present study videos were captured of four different C. elegans strains grown in liquid cultures and transferred to NGM-agar plates with an E. coli lawn or with no lawn. Using an advanced software, WormLab, the full skeleton and outline of worms were tracked to determine whether the presence of food affects behavioral traits. In all seven investigated parameters, statistically significant differences were found in worm behavior between those moving on NGM-agar plates with an E. coli lawn and NGM-agar plates with no lawn. Furthermore, multiple test groups showed differences in interaction between variables as the parameters that significantly correlated statistically with speed of locomotion varied. In the present study, we demonstrate the validity of a model to analyze C. elegans behavior beyond simple speed of locomotion. The need to account for a nested design while performing statistical analyses in similar studies is also demonstrated. With extended analyses, C. elegans behavioral change can be investigated with greater sensitivity, which could have wide utility in fields such as, but not limited to, toxicology, drug discovery, and RNAi screening. PMID:27065825

  3. Stages of Change for the Component Behaviors of Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Terri R.; Redding, Colleen; Robbins, Mark; Paiva, Andrea; O’Leary, John R.; Iannone, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Objectives 1) To develop stages of change measures for advance care planning (ACP), conceptualized as a group of interrelated but separate behaviors. 2) To use these measures to characterize older persons’ engagement in and factors associated with readiness to participate in ACP. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Community. Participants Persons age ≥ 65 recruited from physician offices and a senior center. Measurements Stages of change for six ACP behaviors: completion of a living will and health care proxy, communication with loved ones regarding use of life-sustaining treatments and quantity versus quality of life (QOL), and communication with physicians about these same issues. Results Readiness to participate in ACP varied widely across behaviors. Whereas between approximately 50–60% of participants were in the action or maintenance stage for communicating with loved ones and completing a living will, 40% were in the precontemplation stage for communicating with loved ones about quantity versus QOL, and 70–75% were in the precontemplation stage for communicating with physicians. Participants were frequently in different stages for the different behaviors. Relatively few sociodemographic, health, or psychosocial factors were associated with stages of change for completing a living will, but a broader range of factors was associated with stages of change for communication with loved ones about quantity versus QOL. Conclusion Older persons show a range of readiness to engage in different aspects of ACP. Individualized assessment and interventions targeted to stage of behavior change for each component of ACP may be an effective strategy to increase participation in ACP. PMID:21143441

  4. Changes at work and employee reactions: organizational elements, job insecurity, and short-term stress as predictors for employee health and safety.

    PubMed

    Størseth, Fred

    2006-12-01

    The objective was to identify focus areas for possible reduction of job insecurity and its outcomes. A model was specified and tested as a prediction model for health and safety. First, a parsimonious model was specified. The model consisted of perceived job insecurity (as a stressor), organizational factors (information quality, leadership style, work task administration), and short-term stress reactions (job dissatisfaction, reduced work motivation). Second, the model was tested as a prediction model in three separate path analyses, in order to examine the model's contribution in explaining (1) physical health complaints, (2) mental health complaints, and (3) risk taking behavior. A quota sample of Norwegian employees (N= 1,002) was obtained by means of a self-completion questionnaire survey. The results of the structural equation modeling (path analyses) supported the hypothesized model. Mental health complaints and employee risk taking behavior were significantly predicted (not physical health complaints). PMID:17107503

  5. Research Models of the Future for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Gerald V.

    This paper presents three different aspects of research in industrial and organizational psychology. First, characteristics of major advances in science, and in the social and behavioral sciences are given, including: (1) team research is more common for major advances; and (2) young men under 35 are responsible for many major contributions.…

  6. Greens, suits, and bureaucrats: A sociological study of dynamic organizational relationships in energy efficient appliance policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwom-Evelich, Rachael Leah

    In this dissertation I develop an approach to understanding dynamic organizational relations and the processes of environmental degradation and reform. To do this, I draw on environmental and organizational sociology to inform an empirical study of interorganizational relationships in defining and promoting energy efficient appliances in the United States (US). The dissertation follows a three paper approach which involves (a) an overall introduction to the substantive issue of appliance energy efficiency in the US; (b) producing three separate and stand alone articles of publishable quality to be submitted to professional journals; and (c) an overall conclusion. The three articles are as follows: (1) a synthetic literature review identifying five lessons that organizational sociology and environmental sociology can learn from each other to advance our sociological understanding of organizations, energy issues, and climate change (2) a qualitative case study of the changing relationships between business, government and environmental and energy advocacy organizations around mandatory appliance efficiency standards supporting the development of a context-dependent theory of ecological modernization and treadmill of production theories in environmental sociology and (3) a network analysis of public government, business and energy efficiency advocate's interorganizational relationships and its influence on subsequent organizational behaviors in the appliance energy efficiency field. The second and third articles are based on extensive archival research on organizational negotiations of public record over defining energy efficient appliances in both regulatory and voluntary settings. Finally I will provide an overall conclusion that brings together the most significant findings of each individual article in anticipation of a synthetic approach to the study of organizations in environmental reform.

  7. Improving Organizational Productivity in NASA. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Recognizing that NASA has traditionally been in the forefront of technological change, the NASA Administrator challenged the Agency in 1982 to also become a leader in developing and applying advanced technology and management practices to increase productivity. One of the activities undertaken by the Agency to support this ambitious productivity goal was participation in a 2-year experimental action research project devoted to learning more about improving and assessing the performance of professional organizations. Participating with a dozen private sector organizations, NASA explored the usefulness of a productivity improvement process that addressed all aspects of organizational performance. This experience has given NASA valuable insight into the enhancement of professional productivity. More importantly, it has provided the Agency with a specific management approach that managers and supervisors can effectively use to emphasize and implement continuous improvement. This report documents the experiences of the five different NASA installations participating in the project, describes the improvement process that was applied and refined, and offers recommendations for expanded application of that process. Of particular interest is the conclusion that measuring white collar productivity may be possible, and at a minimum, the measurement process itself is beneficial to management. Volume I of the report provides a project overview, significant findings, and recommendations. Volume II presents individual case studies of the NASA pilot projects that were part of the action research effort.

  8. Organizational Considerations for Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRuntz, Bruce D.; Turner, Roger M.

    2003-01-01

    In the last several decades, the United States has experienced a decline in productivity, while the world has seen a maturation of the global marketplace. Nations have moved manufacturing strategy and process technology issues to the top of management priority lists. The issues surrounding manufacturing technologies and their implementations have…

  9. Attribution of maize yield increase in China to climate change and technological advancement between 1980 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Zhao, Junfang; Wu, Dingrong; Mu, Jia; Xu, Yanhong

    2014-12-01

    Crop yields are affected by climate change and technological advancement. Objectively and quantitatively evaluating the attribution of crop yield change to climate change and technological advancement will ensure sustainable development of agriculture under climate change. In this study, daily climate variables obtained from 553 meteorological stations in China for the period 1961-2010, detailed observations of maize from 653 agricultural meteorological stations for the period 1981-2010, and results using an Agro-Ecological Zones (AEZ) model, are used to explore the attribution of maize (Zea mays L.) yield change to climate change and technological advancement. In the AEZ model, the climatic potential productivity is examined through three step-by-step levels: photosynthetic potential productivity, photosynthetic thermal potential productivity, and climatic potential productivity. The relative impacts of different climate variables on climatic potential productivity of maize from 1961 to 2010 in China are then evaluated. Combined with the observations of maize, the contributions of climate change and technological advancement to maize yield from 1981 to 2010 in China are separated. The results show that, from 1961 to 2010, climate change had a significant adverse impact on the climatic potential productivity of maize in China. Decreased radiation and increased temperature were the main factors leading to the decrease of climatic potential productivity. However, changes in precipitation had only a small effect. The maize yields of the 14 main planting provinces in China increased obviously over the past 30 years, which was opposite to the decreasing trends of climatic potential productivity. This suggests that technological advancement has offset the negative effects of climate change on maize yield. Technological advancement contributed to maize yield increases by 99.6%-141.6%, while climate change contribution was from -41.4% to 0.4%. In particular, the actual

  10. Goal Translation: How To Create a Results-Focused Organizational Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourier, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    Presents a model for changing human and organizational behavior. Highlights include behavioral dynamics; expectations; alignment; organizational structure; organizational culture; individual skills and training; leadership; management systems; developing corporate-level goals; communicating goals to the organization; and developing employee goals.…

  11. Organizational Resilience and Culture a Model for Information Technology Service Management (ITSM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granito, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Organizational change and organizational culture have been studied and written about by many authors, most notably by Edgar Schein (1990, 1992), and are named as critical components of organizational maturity through such industry standards as The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), Control Objectives for Information and Related…

  12. Adaptability of Organizational Innovations as a Function of Eco-System Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurpius, DeWayne J.

    Research in organizational development and ecological psychology has demonstrated the importance of viewing organizations from a systems perspective. Organizational innovations are planned, designed, and implemented in increasingly complex and dynamic ecosystems. This paper presents a model of organizational change which was developed using a…

  13. Effects of Management Communication, Opportunity for Learning, and Work Schedule Flexibility on Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Butts, Marcus M.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; DeJoy, David M.; Wilson, Mark G.

    2006-01-01

    In the current career climate characterized by change and turbulence, employees may demonstrate limited organizational commitment to their employers. Rousseau (1998) suggests that two key ways to elicit loyalty from employees today are to reinforce perceptions of organizational membership and demonstrate organizational care and support for…

  14. Impact of Information Needs on Organizational Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, M. E.; Tulett, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the contingency approach to organizational design, information processing as a critical contingent of design, and use of organismic and mechanistic structures within an independent merchant bank. Proposes that a more appropriate model is needed which takes into account the changing nature of information processing and is flexible enough…

  15. Stress and Burnout: An Organizational Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Leslie H.; Clouse, R. Wilburn

    In the care, prevention, and treatment, of burnout, the reoccurring theme is "control and balance" between expectation and performance. Burnout is treatable and preventable, but changes and interventions must occur on all levels, (individual, organizational, and societal). Recent research, which has expanded the already complex definition of…

  16. Training and Restructuring in Organizational Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Studies indicate that employees experience increased equity, respect, and job satisfaction when able to assume more responsibility for work processes. The new work structures resulting from organizational change often necessitate new employee attitudes, knowledge, and skills as well as new management techniques. Integrated training programs are…

  17. Evolutionary Dynamics of Digitized Organizational Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the effects of increased digitization on the evolutionary dynamics of organizational routines. Do routines become more flexible, or more rigid, as the mix of digital technologies and human actors changes? What are the mechanisms that govern the evolution of routines? The dissertation theorizes about the effects of…

  18. Exploring Organizational Learning Mechanisms in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Chen; Feldman, Niv

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The notion of organizational learning (OL) has reached the forefront of both school change discourse and academic inquiry. However, this notion has not yet undergone deliberate thinking and research within the special education domain. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap in the literature by empirically investigating OL…

  19. Does Organizational Forgetting Matter? Organizational Survival for Life Coaching Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Erhan; Gormus, Alparslan Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this paper are to determine the role of organizational forgetting in different type of coaching companies and to determine organizational survival based on both knowledge structure of coaching companies and organizational forgetting with core features of organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Within the context of…

  20. Organizational Citizenship and Organizational Justice in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Kursad; Tasdan, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine primary school teachers' perceptions regarding organizational citizenship and organizational justice. The study also aims to determine whether such perceptions vary depending on the variables of gender, field of study and seniority, and whether organizational citizenship behaviors and…

  1. Organizational Justice As a Predictor of Organizational Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Çetin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, relation between teachers' perception for organizational justice and their organizational silence was examined. Sample of this study consists of 300 teachers who work at elementary schools in Siirt. Relational Scanning model was utilized in performance of this study. In this study, Organizational Justice Scale and…

  2. A methodology for evaluating the economic and organizational impact of information technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nirenberg, L.M. ); Colley, R.W. )

    1992-01-01

    Information management and communications technology, called information technology - IT in this paper, continues to revolutionize the way in which businesses operate. Information technology can increase both the congruity of the information for an activity and the velocity of the information, i.e., it can get the right information, to the right person in a timely manner for analysis, decision making and action. This paper reports that the transfer to an end user of an IT system by the developer/vendor, and the subsequent utilization by the end user is likely to cause substantial changes to the user's organization. As the interim report makes clear, these changes are not only hard to predict, but can cause organizational conflict. Further, as cited, IT systems tend to produce disappointing value to the firm because the investment process tends to ignore valuable intangible benefits. Thus, requirements are not specified in advance to achieve these intangibles. Consequently, much of the potential value of the information technology system is not realized. Accordingly, effective economic and organizational planning is required to gain the most value. This planning calls for new approaches to economic evaluation and management of organizational change.

  3. On-orbit absolute temperature calibration using multiple phase change materials: overview of recent technology advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Perepezko, John H.

    2010-11-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors onorbit, that uses the transient melt signatures from multiple phase change materials, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and is now undergoing technology advancement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). Refinements currently underway focus on ensuring that the melt materials in their sealed confinement housings perform as expected in the thermal and microgravity environment of a multi-year spaceflight mission. Thermal soak and cycling tests are underway to demonstrate that there is no dissolution from the housings into the melt materials that could alter melt temperature, and that there is no liquid metal embrittlement of the housings from the metal melt materials. In addition, NASA funding has been recently secured to conduct a demonstration of this scheme in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

  4. Changes in allelic imbalances in locally advanced breast cancers after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Varna, M; Soliman, H; Feugeas, J-P; Turpin, E; Chapelin, D; Legrès, L; Plassa, L-F; de Roquancourt, A; Espié, M; Misset, J-L; Janin, A; de Thé, H; Bertheau, P

    2007-01-01

    In advanced breast cancers, TP53 mutation is highly predictive of complete response to high-dose epirubicin/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy. In these tumours with an altered control of genomic stability, accumulation of chemotherapy-induced genetic alterations may contribute to cell death and account for complete response. To explore the effects of chemotherapy on stability of the tumour genome, allelic profiles were obtained from microdissected tumour samples before and after chemotherapy in 29 unresponsive breast cancers (9 with TP53 mutation). Ninety-four per cent allelic profiles remained unchanged after treatment. Interestingly, 11 profiles (6%) showed important changes after treatment; allelic imbalances significantly increased (four cases) or decreased (seven cases) after chemotherapy in three distinct experiments, two of which using laser microdissected tumour cells. These genetic changes were not linked to the TP53 status, but one tumour showed complete disappearance of TP53-mutated cells in the residual tumour after treatment. Altogether, these observations carry important implications for the clonal evolution of breast cancers treated with DNA-damaging agents, as they point both to the importance of tumour heterogeneity and chemotherapy-driven selection of subclones. PMID:17876337

  5. An advanced numerical model for phase change problems in complicated geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashan, Saud Abdel-Aziz

    1998-11-01

    An advanced fixed-grid enthalpy formulation based finite volume numerical method is developed to solve the phase change problems in complicated geometries. The numerical method is based on a general non-orthogonal grid structure and a colocated arrangement of variables. Second order discretizations and interpolations are used. The convergence rate is considerably accelerated by switching-off the velocity in the solidified region in an implicit way. This switching-off technique has a strong compatibility with SIMPLE-like methods. For all test cases conducted in this study, the rate of convergence using the new treatment exceeds that of the other enthalpy formulation-based methods and with less numerical stability constraints, when used in convection-diffusion phase change problems. For better run in vector computers, The Incomplete LU decomposition (ILU) matrix solver is partially vectorized. The Mflops (million floating point operation per second) number is raised from 60 to over 300. Water freezing in orthogonal and non-orthogonal geometry are studied under the effect of density inversion. All thermo-physical properties of the water are dealt with as temperature-dependent (no Boussinsq approximation). The results show a profound effect of density inversion on the flow/energy field and on the local as well as on the universal freezing rate.

  6. Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenberger, John; Arnott, James; Wright, Alyson

    2014-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Next generation climate change experiments needed to advance knowledge and for assessment of CMIP6,” on August 4-9, 2013 in Aspen, CO. Jerry Meehl (NCAR), Richard Moss (PNNL), and Karl Taylor (LLNL) served as co-chairs for the workshop which included the participation of 32 scientists representing most of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 160 participant days. In August 2013, AGCI gathered a high level meeting of representatives from major climate modeling centers around the world to assess achievements and lessons learned from the most recent generation of coordinated modeling experiments known as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project – 5 (CMIP5) as well as to scope out the science questions and coordination structure desired for the next anticipated phase of modeling experiments called CMIP6. The workshop allowed for reflection on the coordination of the CMIP5 process as well as intercomparison of model results, such as were assessed in the most recent IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Working Group 1. For example, this slide from Masahiro Watanabe examines performance on a range of models capturing Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

  7. Organizational Adaptation and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    1984-01-01

    Organizational adaptation and types of adaptation needed in academe in the future are reviewed and major conceptual approaches to organizational adaptation are presented. The probable environment that institutions will face in the future that will require adaptation is discussed. (MLW)

  8. Challenges and Opportunities for Hydrology Education in a Changing World - The Modular Curriculum for Hydrologic Advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Brian; Wagener, Thorsten; Marshall, Lucy; McGuire, Kevin; Meixner, Thomas; Weiler, Markus; Gooseff, Michael; Kelleher, Christa; Gregg, Susan

    2010-05-01

    ‘It takes a village to raise a child', but who does it take to educate a hydrologist who can solve today's and tomorrow's problems? Hydrology is inherently an interdisciplinary science, and therefore requires interdisciplinary training. We believe that the demands on current and future hydrologists will continue to increase, while training at undergraduate and graduate levels has not kept pace. How do we, as university faculty, educate hydrologists capable of solving complex problems in an interdisciplinary environment considering that current educators have often been taught in narrow traditional disciplines? We suggest a unified community effort to change the way that hydrologists are educated. The complexity of the task is ever increasing. Analysis techniques and tools required for solving emerging problems have to evolve away from focusing mainly on the analysis of past behavior because baselines are shifting as the world changes. The difficulties of providing an appropriate education are also increasing, especially given the growing demands on faculty time. To support hydrology educators and improve hydrology education, we have started a faculty community of educators (REACH) and implemented the Modular Curriculum for Hydrologic Advancement (MOCHA, http://www.mocha.psu.edu/). The goal of this effort is to support hydrology faculty as they educate hydrologists that can solve interdisciplinary problems that go far beyond the traditional disciplinary biased hydrology education most of us have experienced as students. Our current objective is to create an evolving core curriculum for university hydrology education, based on modern pedagogical standards, freely available to and developed and reviewed by the worldwide hydrologic community. We seek to establish an online faculty learning community for hydrology education and capacity building. In this presentation we discuss the results of a recent survey on current hydrology education (to compare with the state of

  9. Organizational Theory and Leadership Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazer, S. David; Kruse, Sharon D.; Conley, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Teaching organizational theory in a way that bridges to leadership practice is vital to preparing deft educational leaders who understand the organizational behavior of schools and districts. Organizational theory guides understanding of the complexities of schools and districts and can be a basis for collaborative and effective decision making.…

  10. Organizational Effectiveness: A Comprehensive Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S., Comp.

    A bibliography on organizational effectiveness that contains approximately 515 references, dated primarily since 1970, is presented. The focus is the organizational level of analysis, rather than individual effectiveness or environmental (e.g., economy) performance. The literature included comes from the organizational sciences, higher education,…

  11. Education and Organizational Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    Because a main educational function is to prepare children for workplace roles, education's organizational forms and functions tend to correspond to those of the workplace. For instance, as the U.S. economy moved from agricultural through industrial to service bases, U.S. education moved from nonpublic schools to public schools to mass higher…

  12. Organizational Effectiveness of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil

    1982-01-01

    Because organizational effectiveness of schools is difficult to define, a model is needed to explain the complexities of the concept. Two models offer some promise. One is the goal model, which defines effectiveness as the degree to which organizations meet or surpass their goals (either official or operational). The other is the system resource…

  13. ORGANIZATIONAL RISK COMMUNICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ris communication tools in organizations differs in several ways from many of tools and techniques developed for public meetings. The traditional view of risk communication seeks to manage the public outrage ssociated with site-based issues. Organizational risk communication seek...

  14. Organizational Management Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendle, Connie

    A handbook on the organizational structure and management practices of the Literacy Volunteers of America, Inc. (LVA), is presented. An outline of LVA's structure and policies is presented as basic training for leaders before they begin the planning and operational phases. The activity of starting an affiliate is described with respect to interim…

  15. Organizational Knowledge Management Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization. Design/methodology/approach: The extant literature on the impact of organizational culture and its link to management structure is examined and used to develop a new knowledge sharing management structure. Roadblocks to…

  16. Employees’ Organizational Identification and Affective Organizational Commitment: An Integrative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stinglhamber, Florence; Marique, Géraldine; Caesens, Gaëtane; Desmette, Donatienne; Hansez, Isabelle; Hanin, Dorothée; Bertrand, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have empirically supported the distinction between organizational identification (OI) and affective commitment (AC), there is still disagreement regarding how they are related. Precisely, little attention has been given to the direction of causality between these two constructs and as to why they have common antecedents and outcomes. This research was designed to fill these gaps. Using a cross-lagged panel design with two measurement times, Study 1 examined the directionality of the relationship between OI and AC, and showed that OI is positively related to temporal change in AC, confirming the antecedence of OI on AC. Using a cross-sectional design, Study 2 investigated the mediating role of OI in the relationship between three work experiences (i.e., perceived organizational support, leader-member exchange, and job autonomy) and AC, and found that OI partially mediates the influence of work experiences on AC. Finally, Study 3 examined longitudinally how OI and AC combine in the prediction of actual turnover, and showed that AC totally mediates the relationship between OI and turnover. Overall, these findings suggest that favorable work experiences operate via OI to increase employees' AC that, in turn, decreases employee turnover. PMID:25875086

  17. Employees' organizational identification and affective organizational commitment: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Stinglhamber, Florence; Marique, Géraldine; Caesens, Gaëtane; Desmette, Donatienne; Hansez, Isabelle; Hanin, Dorothée; Bertrand, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have empirically supported the distinction between organizational identification (OI) and affective commitment (AC), there is still disagreement regarding how they are related. Precisely, little attention has been given to the direction of causality between these two constructs and as to why they have common antecedents and outcomes. This research was designed to fill these gaps. Using a cross-lagged panel design with two measurement times, Study 1 examined the directionality of the relationship between OI and AC, and showed that OI is positively related to temporal change in AC, confirming the antecedence of OI on AC. Using a cross-sectional design, Study 2 investigated the mediating role of OI in the relationship between three work experiences (i.e., perceived organizational support, leader-member exchange, and job autonomy) and AC, and found that OI partially mediates the influence of work experiences on AC. Finally, Study 3 examined longitudinally how OI and AC combine in the prediction of actual turnover, and showed that AC totally mediates the relationship between OI and turnover. Overall, these findings suggest that favorable work experiences operate via OI to increase employees' AC that, in turn, decreases employee turnover. PMID:25875086

  18. Organizational climate in air traffic control Innovative preparedness for implementation of new technology and organizational development in a rule governed organization.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Marcus; Johansson, Curt R; Ek, Asa; Akselsson, Roland

    2006-03-01

    A positive and innovative organizational climate is of great importance in order to manage and adapt to change. Such a climate seldom evolves in organizations closely governed by rules and regulations. Because of ongoing organizational and technical changes within the Swedish Air Navigation Services Provider, a study concerning the organizational climate for changes and innovations was conducted to investigate the organization's capacity to cope with changes. Study locations were the two Swedish main air traffic control centers and parts of the civil aviation administration headquarters. In the study 390 subjects took part and the CCQ questionnaire was used to measure the organizational climate. The results show that the organizational climate is quite positive despite the rule-governed work. The results also show that administrative personnel assess the organizational climate as more positive than operative personnel. Comparisons between management positions did not result in any differences. PMID:16109382

  19. The Changing Work Force. Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina A.

    Economic pressures, work force diversity, and advances in technology are changing the nature of work and organizational policy and management. A predicted decline in the annual growth in gross national product is expected to trigger a slowdown in the labor force, especially in occupations that employ workers with only a high school education.…

  20. The Impact of Organizational Learning on Innovativeness in Spanish Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo González Del Campo, Jesús David Sánchez; Škerlavaj, Miha

    Innovativeness is a key factor regarding the survival and progress of a company in modern business environments. The question is how to facilitate innovativeness in organizations. This article studies the impact of the organizational learning process on innovativeness. We understand innovativeness as a combination of (1) innovative culture and (2) technological and process innovation. Organizational learning is a consecutive process of (1) information acquisition, (2) information distribution, (3) information interpretation, and (4) behavioral and cognitive changes. New knowledge obtained through organizational learning improves innovativeness. As a methodological framework, we use the partial least square (PLS) approach to structural equation modeling on data from 107 Spanish companies. The results show that organizational learning has a strong positive direct impact on process, product, and service innovations. In addition, the impact of organizational learning on innovation is also indirect, via innovative culture.

  1. Advanced High School Biology in an Era of Rapid Change: A Summary of the Biology Panel Report from the NRC Committee on Programs for Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in American High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William B.

    2002-01-01

    A recently released National Research Council (NRC) report, "Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools", evaluated and recommended changes in the Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and other advanced secondary school science programs. As part of this study,…

  2. The ebb and flow model: a philosophy of organizational learning in the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Dimario, Francis J

    2012-02-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) have traditionally been a vibrant locale for cutting-edge medical research, androgogic education and innovative clinical care for the most vexing diseases. While these pursuits have coexisted and flourished, the realities of the health-care business environment have demanded reformatting and emulation of a corporate organizational model. This evolution has impacted the core identities of the AHC and challenged individual medical-educators, clinician-scientists and basic science investigators to persist and succeed in this milieu. The AHC has a unique capacity to muster the innate learning drive of these individuals into an organizational mission as it balances the pressures exerted from both the internal and external environments. The AHC as an organization can be viewed as an experimental condition with modifiable variables to which its professionals can react, adapt to, and transform. Organizational learning and change implementation is in essence an experiment in human behavior modification. While all individuals are subject to change, merely assembling them in a single locale determines neither a predictable homogeneous outcome nor the success of their endeavor. This article highlights some of these propositions and offers a philosophical approach to advance the AHC as an organization through the creativity and innovation of its professional ranks. PMID:22670360

  3. Market orientation and organizational culture in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Proenca, E J

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals have been advised to respond to environmental pressures by changing from a product to a market orientation. Such changes are difficult to accomplish because of the entrenched behaviors and attitudes of hospitals employees. This article proposes organizational cultures as the avenue to a market orientation. It describes the role of hospital culture as an antecedent to market orientation. It also suggests ways to develop and maintain a market-oriented culture in hospitals. PMID:10161845

  4. When goals diverge: Staff consensus and the organizational climate.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Gerald; Ulaszek, Wendy R; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; Wexler, Harry K

    2009-08-01

    A sample of correctional officers and prison substance abuse treatment staff collected by the National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices Survey is used to provide an exploratory study of an aspect of organizational culture consisting of consensus (agreement) among prison personnel regarding their beliefs about rehabilitation in the presence of conflicting organizational goals and aspects of the organizational climate important to change. Findings show that among those staff members responding to the survey, the belief in rehabilitation scale mean score was associated with higher levels of organizational commitment, and interdepartmental coordination. However, an hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis that used an index score derived from the standard deviation for staff consensus regarding these same beliefs about rehabilitation produced a different pattern of results, showing that high levels of consensus were associated with job frustration, cynicism towards the ability of the institution to change, and lower levels of organizational commitment. The authors conclude that, although the sample may not express the beliefs of corrections officers or prison-based treatment staff at large, within the sample, consensus appeared to play a unique role in evaluating the effect of divergent goals on organizational climate as it relates to change, and warrants consideration when considering the effects of organizational climate. PMID:19097709

  5. The 160th national meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science: Science and a changing world

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This is the Conference program for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The overall topic is Science and A Changing World'. Major session areas covered including the following: Evaluating the environment: Where do we Stand ; Could we/should be engineer the Earth's Climate; Pacific Marine Science at Century's close; Predicting, Mitigating, and recovering from disasters; global change update 1994; sustainability from the ground up; energy policy research in Africa; defense conversion and technology transfer; arms control and international security.

  6. Gender Equity in Science and Engineering: Advancing Change in Higher Education. Routledge Studies in Management, Organizations and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilimoria, Diana; Liang, Xiangfen

    2011-01-01

    Women faculty's participation in academic science and engineering is critical for future US global competitiveness, yet their underrepresentation particularly in senior positions remains a widespread problem. To overcome persistent institutional resistance and barriers to change, the "NSF ADVANCE" institutional transformation initiative,…

  7. Organizational Dimensions of Relationship-centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Dana Gelb; Miller, William; Beckman, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Four domains of relationship have been highlighted as the cornerstones of relationship-centered health care. Of these, clinician-patient relationships have been most thoroughly studied, with a rich empirical literature illuminating significant linkages between clinician-patient relationship quality and a wide range of outcomes. This paper explores the realm of clinician-colleague relationships, which we define to include the full array of relationships among clinicians, staff, and administrators in health care organizations. Building on a stream of relevant theories and empirical literature that have emerged over the past decade, we synthesize available evidence on the role of organizational culture and relationships in shaping outcomes, and posit a model of relationship-centered organizations. We conclude that turning attention to relationship-centered theory and practice in health care holds promise for advancing care to a new level, with breakthroughs in quality of care, quality of life for those who provide it, and organizational performance. PMID:16405711

  8. Organizational Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, Hamid R.; Barko, Christopher D.

    Many organizations today possess substantial quantities of business information but have very little real business knowledge. A recent survey of 450 business executives reported that managerial intuition and instinct are more prevalent than hard facts in driving organizational decisions. To reverse this trend, businesses of all sizes would be well advised to adopt Organizational Data Mining (ODM). ODM is defined as leveraging Data Mining tools and technologies to enhance the decision-making process by transforming data into valuable and actionable knowledge to gain a competitive advantage. ODM has helped many organizations optimize internal resource allocations while better understanding and responding to the needs of their customers. The fundamental aspects of ODM can be categorized into Artificial Intelligence (AI), Information Technology (IT), and Organizational Theory (OT), with OT being the key distinction between ODM and Data Mining. In this chapter, we introduce ODM, explain its unique characteristics, and report on the current status of ODM research. Next we illustrate how several leading organizations have adopted ODM and are benefiting from it. Then we examine the evolution of ODM to the present day and conclude our chapter by contemplating ODM's challenging yet opportunistic future.

  9. Thinking Globally, Planning Nationally and Acting Locally: Nested Organizational Fields and the Adoption of Environmental Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasi, Ion Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    The study of the adoption of activities to protect the natural environment has tended to focus on the role of organizational fields. This article advances existing research by simultaneously examining conflicting processes that operate in nested organizational fields at local, national and supra-national levels. It examines the recent spread of an…

  10. Observations of Dynamic Changes at an Advancing Tidewater Glacier: Hubbard Glacier, Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; Stearns, L. A.; Pritchard, M. E.; Bartholomaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    Hubbard Glacier, located in southeast Alaska, is the largest non-polar tidewater glacier in the world and one of a small number of glaciers that is steadily advancing. These attributes make it an intriguing target for observations of variations in ice dynamics over time. We use synthetic aperture radar data (ALOS and TerraSAR-X) and high-resolution optical imagery (WorldView and Quickbird) with a pixel tracking technique to map surface velocities from 2008 to the present, lengthening and broadening the time series of ice velocities presented in previous studies. A key result from our analysis is that Hubbard displays peak speeds of up to 12 m/day during the winter months (December - February) and minimum speeds during late summer (August - September). The times of peak and minimum speeds is quite different from those found in previous studies of Hubbard surface velocities derived from Landsat imagery, GPS, and photogrammetric methods. Those studies found peak speeds during late spring (May - June) and minimum speeds in fall (October-November), a pattern observed generally at tidewater glaciers. A second major feature we observe in our time series is the dramatic seasonal variation in surface speeds. The minimum speeds we find along the terminal lobe of the glacier are much lower than those found in previous studies, with values decreasing to near zero. Such a dramatic slow down of a tidewater glacier has not been widely observed. This result, along with the recent pattern of seasonal velocity peaks and minimas, suggests that Hubbard has undergone a change in ice dynamics.

  11. Past Organizational Change and Managerial Evaluations of Crisis: A Case of Double-Loop Learning Effects in Non-Profit Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mano, Rita S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines the critical effect of learning from past changes on employees' evaluations regarding the extent that a crisis can be controlled and prevented. It is suggested that previous changes incorporate elements of a double-loop learning process that shape managerial perceptions of crisis controllability and crisis prevention.…

  12. Organizational Adaptative Behavior: The Complex Perspective of Individuals-Tasks Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Sun, Duoyong; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Yu

    Organizations with different organizational structures have different organizational behaviors when responding environmental changes. In this paper, we use a computational model to examine organizational adaptation on four dimensions: Agility, Robustness, Resilience, and Survivability. We analyze the dynamics of organizational adaptation by a simulation study from a complex perspective of the interaction between tasks and individuals in a sales enterprise. The simulation studies in different scenarios show that more flexible communication between employees and less hierarchy level with the suitable centralization can improve organizational adaptation.

  13. Advanced composite materials and subcooled liquid change-of-phase (COP) cooling for thermal management in advanced electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.E.; Ehlers, S.L.; Mudawar, I.

    1996-12-31

    High performance, high density airborne and spaceborne electronic systems (both DoD and commercial) are performance and reliability limited by materials and thermal management. There is a continual need to improve performance and reliability in high density systems and to reduce adverse effects induced by excessive weight, dissipated heat, and related environmental incompatibilities. The penalties effected by these limitations prevail from cradle-to-grave in the life of high performance airborne systems, beginning at the development stage, continuing through manufacturing and procurement, and throughout system life, ultimately raising the cost of ownership. The objective of this effort is to investigate the use of selected high specific property composites and change-of-phase (COP) (i.e., liquid to vapor) cooling (using non-CFC, perfluorohexane fluids) to combat these limitations. High density (e.g., 2 kw SEM-E configuration), miniaturized avionics are assumed. Material systems for enclosure and module packaging as well as COP mechanisms will be discussed at this time relative to a retrofit scenario, interfacing with existing aircraft environmental control systems (ECS) for coolant reconditioning.

  14. Organizational interventions in response to duty hour reforms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in resident duty hours in Europe and North America have had a major impact on the internal organizational dynamics of health care organizations. This paper examines, and assesses the impact of, organizational interventions that were a direct response to these duty hour reforms. Methods The academic literature was searched through the SCOPUS database using the search terms “resident duty hours” and “European Working Time Directive,” together with terms related to organizational factors. The search was limited to English-language literature published between January 2003 and January 2012. Studies were included if they reported an organizational intervention and measured an organizational outcome. Results Twenty-five articles were included from the United States (n = 18), the United Kingdom (n = 5), Hong Kong (n = 1), and Australia (n = 1). They all described single-site projects; the majority used post-intervention surveys (n = 15) and audit techniques (n = 4). The studies assessed organizational measures, including relationships among staff, work satisfaction, continuity of care, workflow, compliance, workload, and cost. Interventions included using new technologies to improve handovers and communications, changing staff mixes, and introducing new shift structures, all of which had varying effects on the organizational measures listed previously. Conclusions Little research has assessed the organizational impact of duty hour reforms; however, the literature reviewed demonstrates that many organizations are using new technologies, new personnel, and revised and innovative shift structures to compensate for reduced resident coverage and to decrease the risk of limited continuity of care. Future research in this area should focus on both micro (e.g., use of technology, shift changes, staff mix) and macro (e.g., culture, leadership support) organizational aspects to aid in our understanding of how best to respond to these duty hour reforms

  15. State-of-the-art three-dimensional analysis of soft tissue changes following Le Fort I maxillary advancement.

    PubMed

    Almukhtar, A; Ayoub, A; Khambay, B; McDonald, J; Ju, X

    2016-09-01

    We describe the comprehensive 3-dimensional analysis of facial changes after Le Fort I osteotomy and introduce a new tool for anthropometric analysis of the face. We studied the cone-beam computed tomograms of 33 patients taken one month before and 6-12 months after Le Fort I maxillary advancement with or without posterior vertical impaction. Use of a generic facial mesh for dense correspondence analysis of changes in the soft tissue showed a mean (SD) anteroposterior advancement of the maxilla of 5.9 (1.7) mm, and mean (SD) minimal anterior and posterior vertical maxillary impaction of 0.1 (1.7) mm and 0.6 (1.45) mm, respectively. It also showed distinctive forward and marked lateral expansion around the upper lip and nose, and pronounced upward movement of the alar curvature and columella. The nose was widened and the nostrils advanced. There was minimal forward change at the base of the nose (subnasale and alar base) but a noticeable upward movement at the nasal tip. Changes at the cheeks were minimal. Analysis showed widening of the midface and upper lip which, to our knowledge, has not been reported before. The nostrils were compressed and widened, and the lower lip shortened. Changes at the chin and lower lip were secondary to the limited maxillary impaction. PMID:27325452

  16. Importance of Change Appraisal for Employee Well-being during Organizational Restructuring: Findings from the Finnish Paper Industry’s Extensive Transition

    PubMed Central

    PAHKIN, Krista; NIELSEN, Karina; VÄÄNÄNEN, Ari; MATTILA-HOLAPPA, Pauliina; LEPPÄNEN, Anneli; KOSKINEN, Aki

    2014-01-01

    The global recession has forced the Finnish forest industry to carry out major restructuring activities. Employees have faced different kinds of restructuring, mainly aimed at reducing staff and production. Many studies have shown the negative consequences of restructuring on employee well-being by using negative, ill-health indicators. Our aim is to examine the extent to which change appraisal influences both the negative and positive aspects of work-related well-being among employees who continue working in the organization after the restructuring process. We also examine the role of different actors (top management, immediate supervisor, employees themselves) in how the change is appraised. The study investigated blue-collar employees working in the Finnish forest industry during a period of extensive transition (2008–2009). All six participating factories underwent restructuring between baseline and the follow-up survey (n=369). After adjustment for gender, age and baseline well-being, negative change appraisal increased the risk of experiencing more stress and less work enjoyment. Negative change appraisals thus also damaged the positive, motivational aspects of employee well-being. The results showed the importance of offering employees the opportunity to participate in the planning of changes related to their work as regards positive change appraisal. PMID:24975107

  17. Improvements in diagnosis have changed the incidence of histological types in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kamakura, T.; Haraguchi, Y.; Saku, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The data on 912 patients with early cancer and 1245 with advanced cancer who were seen between 1971 and 1990 were compared. The incidence of undifferentiated-type cancer increased significantly in patients with advanced gastric cancer, but not in patients with early gastric cancer. When the histological types were compared with regard to sex, age and location in patients with early gastric cancer the undifferentiated type was found to increase only in males, while in patients with advanced gastric cancer the undifferentiated type increased in both sexes as well as in younger patients and in both the upper and middle third of the stomach. These differences in the trends between early and advanced cancers are probably due to the different degrees of diagnostic accuracy for the early detection of histological types. PMID:7640228

  18. Error analysis using organizational simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fridsma, D. B.

    2000-01-01

    Organizational simulations have been used by project organizations in civil and aerospace industries to identify work processes and organizational structures that are likely to fail under certain conditions. Using a simulation system based on Galbraith's information-processing theory and Simon's notion of bounded-rationality, we retrospectively modeled a chemotherapy administration error that occurred in a hospital setting. Our simulation suggested that when there is a high rate of unexpected events, the oncology fellow was differentially backlogged with work when compared with other organizational members. Alternative scenarios suggested that providing more knowledge resources to the oncology fellow improved her performance more effectively than adding additional staff to the organization. Although it is not possible to know whether this might have prevented the error, organizational simulation may be an effective tool to prospectively evaluate organizational "weak links", and explore alternative scenarios to correct potential organizational problems before they generate errors. PMID:11079885

  19. Increasing organizational energy conservation behaviors: Comparing the theory of planned behavior and reasons theory for identifying specific motivational factors to target for change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlinson, Scott Michael

    Social scientists frequently assess factors thought to underlie behavior for the purpose of designing behavioral change interventions. Researchers commonly identify these factors by examining relationships between specific variables and the focal behaviors being investigated. Variables with the strongest relationships to the focal behavior are then assumed to be the most influential determinants of that behavior, and therefore often become the targets for change in a behavioral change intervention. In the current proposal, multiple methods are used to compare the effectiveness of two theoretical frameworks for identifying influential motivational factors. Assessing the relative influence of all factors and sets of factors for driving behavior should clarify which framework and methodology is the most promising for identifying effective change targets. Results indicated each methodology adequately predicted the three focal behaviors examined. However, the reasons theory approach was superior for predicting factor influence ratings compared to the TpB approach. While common method variance contamination had minimal impact on the results or conclusions derived from the present study's findings, there were substantial differences in conclusions depending on the questionnaire design used to collect the data. Examples of applied uses of the present study are discussed.

  20. A Cross-Case Study of the Impact of Organizational Change through the Diffusion of the Classrooms for the Future Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slamecka, Brian Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, Governor Edward Rendell announced a three-year, $200 million Classrooms for the Future program to provide technology and technology support to schools across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, beginning in the 2006-2007 school year. The purpose of this research study is to examine the change process of the diffusion of technology within…

  1. Governance processes and change within organizational participants of multi-sectoral community health care alliances: the mediating role of vision, mission, strategy agreement and perceived alliance value.

    PubMed

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-03-01

    Multi-sectoral community health care alliances are organizations that bring together individuals and organizations from different industry sectors to work collaboratively on improving the health and health care in local communities. Long-term success and sustainability of alliances are dependent on their ability to galvanize participants to take action within their 'home' organizations and institutionalize the vision, goals, and programs within participating organizations and the broader community. The purpose of this study was to investigate two mechanisms by which alliance leadership and management processes may promote such changes within organizations participating in alliances. The findings of the study suggest that, despite modest levels of change undertaken by participating organizations, more positive perceptions of alliance leadership, decision making, and conflict management were associated with a greater likelihood of participating organizations making changes as a result of their participation in the alliance, in part by promoting greater vision, mission, and strategy agreement and higher levels of perceived value. Leadership processes had a stronger relationship with change within participating organizations than decision-making style and conflict management processes. Open-ended responses by participants indicated that participating organizations most often incorporated new measures or goals into their existing portfolio of strategic plans and activities in response to alliance participation. PMID:24415003

  2. Missions of Research University and Choice of Its Organizational Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xuan, Yong

    2006-01-01

    This paper delineates the distinctive facets of the research university and further explores the features of scientific research. On this basis, it is established that the mission of the research university is to achieve knowledge creation and academic advances. With a comparison of the organizational framework between the general university and…

  3. Organizational Support of Technology Integration in One School in Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zgheib, Rosine S.

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been at the center of heated debates in educational settings driving schools to compete for the best technological equipments. However, in Lebanon there is a lag in technology integration matching twenty first century advances. Several barriers related to teacher attitudes, lack of technical skills and organizational constraints to…

  4. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  5. Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation. Special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Field, C.B.; Barros, V.; Stocker, T.F.

    2012-07-01

    This Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) has been jointly coordinated by Working Groups I (WGI) and II (WGII) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report focuses on the relationship between climate change and extreme weather and climate events, the impacts of such events, and the strategies to manage the associated risks. This Special Report, in particular, contributes to frame the challenge of dealing with extreme weather and climate events as an issue in decision making under uncertainty, analyzing response in the context of risk management. The report consists of nine chapters, covering risk management; observed and projected changes in extreme weather and climate events; exposure and vulnerability to as well as losses resulting from such events; adaptation options from the local to the international scale; the role of sustainable development in modulating risks; and insights from specific case studies. (LN)

  6. The Effects of Organizational Training on Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulut, Cagri; Culha, Osman

    2010-01-01

    This empirical study investigated the impact of organizational training on employee commitment focusing on employees' emotional and affective responses towards their organization. Organizational training is conceptualized within a multidimensional framework consisting of motivation for training, access to training, benefits from training and…

  7. The Importance of Organizational Learning for Organizational Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Special Issue is intended to heighten awareness of the importance of organizational learning in addressing the demands of organizational sustainability, and in particular triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability. A definition of TBL sustainability is provided, together with an exploration of the practical issues relevant to adopting…

  8. The Relationship between Organizational Commitment and Organizational Climate in Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Adela J.; Scott, D. R.; Pace, R. Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational climate. Subjects were chosen from three large Australian automotive component manufacturing companies. A questionnaire was administered to 1,413 employees from forty-two countries of origin. A 97.8 percent response rate yielded 1,382…

  9. The Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support and Teachers' Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayir, Funda

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: It can be said that one of the key factors ensuring teachers adaptation to developments is teachers' level of commitment to their schools. In this commitment, the teacher is expected to internalize the organizational objectives. The teacher's perception of organizational support is important for him to internalize the…

  10. Perceptions of Organizational Effectiveness over Organizational Life Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.; Whetten, David A.

    1981-01-01

    Student participants at two universities played multisession simulation games involving the development of 18 organizations. Post-session surveys of 583 participants indicated that organizational effectiveness became more important to participants as the organizations developed. This suggests that future organizational effectiveness studies should…

  11. Advanced Prop-fan Engine Technology (APET) single- and counter-rotation gearbox/pitch change mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, C. N.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary design of advanced technology (1992) turboprop engines for single-rotation prop-fans and conceptual designs of pitch change mechanisms for single- and counter-rotation prop-fan application are discussed. The single-rotation gearbox is a split path, in-line configuration. The counter-rotation gearbox is an in-line, differential planetary design. The pitch change mechanisms for both the single- and counter-rotation arrangements are rotary/hydraulic. The advanced technology single-rotation gearbox yields a 2.4 percent improvement in aircraft fuel burn and a one percent improvement in operating cost relative to a current technology gearbox. The 1992 counter-rotation gearbox is 15 percent lighter, 15 percent more reliable, 5 percent lower in cost, and 45 percent lower in maintenance cost than the 1992 single-rotation gearbox. The pitch controls are modular, accessible, and external.

  12. Organizational Climate and Teacher Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Stephen Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of school climate and teacher commitment in elementary schools in Alabama. A total of 67 elementary schools were surveyed and 1353 teachers voluntarily participated in the study. The instruments used in this study were the Organizational Climate Index (OCI) and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ).…

  13. Operations Technology and Organizational Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piernot, Craig A.; Mileti, Dennis S.

    This paper reviews and synthesizes the literature relating operations technology to organizational structure and offers a refined definition of operations technology that is intended to facilitate the comparison of different organizational types. The authors present a theoretical model that imposes consistency on the existing literature and…

  14. Organizational Learning through Transformational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imran, Muhammad Kashif; Ilyas, Muhammad; Aslam, Usman; Ubaid-Ur-Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The transformation of firms from resource-based-view to knowledge-based-view has extended the importance of organizational learning. Thus, this study aims to develop an organizational learning model through transformational leadership with indirect effect of knowledge management process capability and interactive role of…

  15. Organizational Learning in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to make suggestions for primary schools to become organizational learning environments, by searching the relationship between the characteristics and behaviors of school administrators and the formation of an organizational learning environment in primary schools. The author used a survey model in this research and…

  16. The Effect of Organizational Justice and Perceived Organizational Support on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Organizational Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2015-01-01

    Problem of Study: Research on social exchange relationships does not take into account another vital component of organizational life--namely an individual's sense of belonging and identity. Organizational identification is one of the most crucial factors holding employees together and keeping them committed to the organization. Many studies…

  17. Organizational Conflict: Causes and Manifestations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    No group (within an organization) can be entirely harmonious, but conflict is not an altogether disruptive factor. A delicate balance is required to obtain the advantages and restrict the disadvantages of organizational conflict. The causes and forms of organizational conflict are examined. (JMD)

  18. The Nature of Organizational Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Belinda K.; Carpenter, D. Stanley

    1993-01-01

    Examines the role organizational politics play in student affairs. Sees background knowledge of politics as a concept critical to understanding idiosyncratic nature of any organization. Notes that both organizational conditions and individual behavior contribute to organization's political climate. Concludes that professionals who fail to…

  19. Role Clarity and Organizational Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Barry Z.; Butterfield, D. Anthony

    1978-01-01

    Role clarity was examined in terms of its relationship with personal outcomes and organizational effectiveness. Organizational level as moderator of such relationship was also investigated. Hypotheses based on prior research were confirmed. Role clarity was positively related to perceptions of job satisfaction, personal influence, organizational…

  20. [Organizational decision making in health: the case of dengue].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Quesada, F; Méndez-Galván, J F; Ritchie-Dunham, J; Rosado-Muñoz, F J

    1995-01-01

    Intelligent organizations (IO) represent a valuable tool to organize and guide dengue fever surveillance, prevention and control interventions. IO entail state of the art technology in managerial science to generate behavioral frameworks of organizational structures and policies. They present a systematic description of problems and construct computerized models to develop systemic thinking; they produce a shared vision and build progressive mental learning and advancement models. Also, IO promote team building and personal control skills. Scientific-technological advances have produced a wealth of information in medicine, with the corresponding growth of organizations and difficulty of responses because of sudden and incessant change. This new environment calls for the application of IO know-how. This article is oriented to prove the usefulness of the IO technology in the ordering and systematization of the reports about the medical sciences facts. Dengue was chosen to exemplify the use of IO technology as it represents an increasing health problem in America, as well as in Mexico; it is so complex that it can evolve to a more serious problem, besides it can be analyzed within a systemic method. PMID:8599151