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Sample records for advancing solidification front

  1. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  2. Shear stabilization of solidification fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephen H.; Schulze, T. P.

    1994-01-01

    A linear-stability analysis is performed on the interface formed during the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy in the presence of a time-periodic flow. In general, the flow is generated by the elliptical motion of the crystal parallel to the interface. The presence of the flow can either stabilize or destabilize the system relative to the case without flow with the result depending on the frequency and amplitude of the oscillations as well as the properties of the material. In the particular, we find that the morphological instability present in the absence of flow can be entirely suppressed with respect to disturbances of the same frequency as the oscillation.

  3. Solidification fronts in supercooled liquids: how rapid fronts can lead to disordered glassy solids.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Robbins, M J; Thiele, U; Knobloch, E

    2012-09-01

    We determine the speed of a crystallization (or, more generally, a solidification) front as it advances into the uniform liquid phase after the system has been quenched into the crystalline region of the phase diagram. We calculate the front speed by assuming a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) model for the system and applying a marginal stability criterion. Our results also apply to phase field crystal (PFC) models of solidification. As the solidification front advances into the unstable liquid phase, the density profile behind the advancing front develops density modulations and the wavelength of these modulations is a dynamically chosen quantity. For shallow quenches, the selected wavelength is precisely that of the crystalline phase and so well-ordered crystalline states are formed. However, when the system is deeply quenched, we find that this wavelength can be quite different from that of the crystal, so the solidification front naturally generates disorder in the system. Significant rearrangement and aging must subsequently occur for the system to form the regular well-ordered crystal that corresponds to the free energy minimum. Additional disorder is introduced whenever a front develops from random initial conditions. We illustrate these findings with simulation results obtained using the PFC model.

  4. Effects of the location of a cast in the furnace on flatness of the solidification front in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yuanyuan; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Many defects of single crystals are caused by the nonplanar solidification front. The transverse temperature gradient at melt-crystal interface results in nonplanar solidification fronts. The location of a cast in the directional solidification furnace affects heat dissipation and thus influences the transverse temperature gradient. This paper presents a criterion and a searching algorithm to find the optimal location of the cast for flattening the solidification front. A numerical simulation was employed for the verification of our method. Additionally, the effects of the size of the cooling device of the furnace on the optimal location, the transverse temperature gradient and the solidification time were discussed. The transverse temperature gradient is reduced about 50% without increasing much solidification time when setting the cast with a varying thickness mould at the optimal location. In addition, the optimal location is mainly influenced by the radius of the cooling ring.

  5. Stability of a directional solidification front in subdiffusive media.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohammad Abu; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of crystal growth in alloys is limited by the morphological instability, which is caused by a positive feedback between the interface deformation and the diffusive flux of solute at the front of the phase transition. Usually this phenomenon is described in the framework of the normal diffusion equation, which stems from the linear relation between time and the mean squared displacement of molecules 〈x2(t)〉∼K1t (K1 is the classical diffusion coefficient) that is characteristic of Brownian motion. However, in some media (e.g., in gels and porous media) the random walk of molecules is hindered by obstacles, which leads to another power law, 〈x2(t)〉∼Kαtα, where 0<α≤1. As a result, the diffusion is anomalous, and it is governed by an integro-differential equation including a fractional derivative in time variable, i.e., a memory. In the present work, we investigate the stability of a directional solidification front in the case of an anomalous diffusion. Linear stability of a moving planar directional solidification front is studied, and a generalization of the Mullins-Sekerka stability criterion is obtained. Also, an asymptotic nonlinear long-wave evolution equation of Sivashinsky's type, which governs the cellular structures at the interface, is derived.

  6. Solidification fronts in large magma chambers: insights from the anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of hot viscous magma into the cold rigid crust causes a thermal disturbance within both the country rock and the magma. With time, heat loss from the molten interior to the walls causes solidification at the floor, roof and margins of the magma chamber. As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of heat is lost via conduction through the roof of the intrusion. In basaltic sills and layered mafic intrusions (LMIs), this solidification front is manifest in the deposition of mineral assemblages and compositions that become progressively more evolved from the floor of the intrusion upwards (the 'Layered Series'; LS) and from the roof downwards (the UBS) such that the most chemically evolved rocks are found in the interior of the magma body at a 'Sandwich Horizon'. The formation of a UBS, as typified by the Skaergaard Intrusion, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique LMIs for which little or no UBS exists. Convection of the molten magma, reinjection and mixing of new magma, compaction of cumulates, and porous flow of interstitial liquid, among other processes, can affect the final location and composition of the most differentiated liquids; but ultimately, all are linked to the nature of heat loss from the magma chamber. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution of several classic LMIs as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series; 'UBS'). For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate

  7. Modelling and experiments for the convecto-diffusive removal of impurities from the solidification front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberend, J.; Delannoy, Y.; Nehari, A.; Chichignoud, G.; Zaidat, K.

    2017-01-01

    During crystal growth, the fluid flow plays an important role on the quantity and distribution of impurities in the crystal. This study examines with modelling and experiments the removal of impurities from the solidification front for the case where a turbulent fluid flow increases the effective diffusivity. The theoretical model is based on the properties of turbulent boundary layers. It predicts a transition between the diffusive regime (no segregation) and the convective regime (efficient segregation) when the stirring velocity is higher than a threshold depending on the solidification rate. Efficient segregation is generally obtained when the stirring velocity is 105 times higher than the solidification rate. Silicon solidification experiments in a Taylor-Couette flow showed that concentrations in the crystal are close to the thermodynamic minimum for stirring velocities above the threshold. This result shows that the turbulent fluid flow efficiently removes impurities from the solidification front and validates the theoretical model.

  8. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Reeves, F. A.; Jeter, L. B.; Sledd, J. D.; Cole, J. M.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is a five zone tubular furnace designed for Bridgman-Stockbarger, other techniques of crystal growth involving multiple temperature zones such as vapor transport experiments and other materials science experiments. The five zones are primarily designed to produce uniform hot and cold temperature regions separated by an adiabatic region constructed of a heat extraction plate and an insert to reduce radiation from the hot to the cold zone. The hot and cold zone temperatures are designed to reach 1600 C and 1100 C, respectively. AADSF operates on a Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure (MPESS) within the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle on the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP) missions. Two successful flights, both employing the directional solidification or Bridgman Stockbarger technique for crystal growth have been made, and crystals of HgCdTe and PbSnTe grown in microgravity have been produced on USMP-2 and USMP-3, respectively. The addition of a Sample Exchange Mechanism (SEM) will enable three different samples to be processed on future flights including the USMP-4 mission.

  9. Numerical study of dendritic growth during solidification using front-tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, Mohamad Ali; Gibout, Stéphane; Rousse, Daniel; Bédécarrats, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    A two dimensional front-tracking method is developed in order to model dendritic growth during solidification processes of pure substances. The method uses a sequential set of moving marker points to describe and track the liquid-solid interface which evolves over a fixed background mesh describing the whole medium. The code behaviour is first checked by a simple stable case of solidification to provide homogeneous velocity at the interface. Then, test examples of unstable solidification cases considering different modes of anisotropy are performed. Finally, interface evolution, with primary and secondary branches, is described, showing the ability of the code to study realistic dendritic growth characteristics.

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Particle-Solidification Front Dynamics, Part 3: Theoretical Aspects and Parametric Study (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    TH T d TT ρ κγλ −⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜ ⎝ ⎛−= 3 (5) The last term on the right accounts for the Gibbs- Thomson effect . The γsl is the solid-liquid interfacial...fusion per unit mass. The Gibbs- Thomson effect reduces the magnitude of the curvature of the solidification front (i.e. it tends to flatten the...affects the temperature at which the solidification front solidifies through the Gibbs- Thomson effect , viz.: mm sl sl mi Td T H TT 3 ⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜ ⎝ ⎛−−= λ

  11. Experimental study of segregation in plane front solidification and its relevance to iron meteorite solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellamuthu, R.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    A directional solidification technique was developed and applied to the problem of fractional crystallization of an iron meteorite parent body. Samples of Fe-Ni alloys close to meteorite compositions and containing S, P, and C were made. The solidified structures contain secondary phases such as sulphides within the proeutectic single crystal austenite (taenite). As a result of these experiments, we propose that the secondary phases observed in iron meteorites were formed during primary solidification of austenite (taenite). The measured composition profiles of Ni, P and C in the alloys were used to explain the elemental distribution within a chemical group of iron meteorites. An analytical procedure was applied to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients as a function of fraction solidified for Ni and P from the composition profiles. The distribution coefficients of Ni and P agree with previous values. These distribution coefficients are of particular interest in the determination of the elemental distributions in iron meteorites.

  12. Thermal analysis of HGFQ using FIDAP(trademark): Solidification front motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Keith A.

    1996-01-01

    The High Gradient Furnace with Quench (HGFQ) is being designed by NASA/MSFC for flight on the International Space Station. The furnace is being designed specifically for solidification experiments in metal and metallic alloy systems. The HGFQ Product development Team (PDT) has been active since January 1994 and their effort is now in early Phase B. Thermal models have been developed both by NASA and Sverdrup (support contractor) to assist in the HGFQ design effort. Both these models use SINDA as a solution engine, but the NASA model was developed using PATRAN and includes more detail than the Sverdrup model. These models have been used to guide design decisions and have been validated through experimentation on a prototypical 'Breadboard' furnace at MSFC. One facet of the furnace operation of interest to the designers is the sensitivity of the solidification interface location to changes in the furnace setpoint. Specifically of interest is the motion (position and velocity) of the solidification front due to a small perturbation in the furnace temperature. FIDAP(TM) is a commercially available finite element program for analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow processes. Its strength is in solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow, but among its capabilities is the analysis of transient processes involving radiation and solidification. The models presently available from NASA and Sverdrup are steady-state models and are incapable of computing the motion of the solidification front. The objective of this investigation is to use FIDAP(TM) to compute the motion of the solidification interface due to a perturbation in the furnace setpoint.

  13. Translational genetics: advancing fronts for craniofacial health.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, R N; Dunnwald, M; Dunnvald, M; Frazier-Bowers, S; Polverini, P J; Wright, J T; de Rouen, T; Vieira, A R

    2013-12-01

    Scientific opportunities have never been better than today! The completion of the Human Genome project has sparked hope and optimism that cures for debilitating conditions can be achieved and tailored to individuals and communities. The availability of reference genome sequences and genetic variations as well as more precise correlations between genotype and phenotype have facilitated the progress made in finding solutions to clinical problems. While certain craniofacial and oral diseases previously deemed too difficult to tackle have benefited from basic science and technological advances over the past decade, there remains a critical need to translate the fruits of several decades' worth of basic and clinical research into tangible therapies that can benefit patients. The fifth Annual Fall Focused Symposium, "Translational Genetics - Advancing Fronts for Craniofacial Health", was created by the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) to foster its mission to advance interdisciplinary research that is directed toward improving oral health. The symposium showcased progress made in identifying molecular targets that are potential therapeutics for common and rare dental diseases and craniofacial disorders. Speakers focused on translational and clinical applications of their research and, where applicable, on strategies for new technologies and therapeutics. The critical needs to transfer new knowledge to the classroom and for further investment in the field were also emphasized. The symposium underscored the importance of basic research, chairside clinical observations, and population-based studies in driving the new translational connections needed for the development of cures for the most common and devastating diseases involving the craniofacial complex.

  14. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; Zhao, Qi; Rutkowski, Stephen F.; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2016-07-05

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yielded anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying

  15. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; ...

    2016-07-05

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yieldedmore » anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7.5% Ti

  16. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; Zhao, Qi; Rutkowski, Stephen F.; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yielded anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7.5% Ti

  17. A front tracking model of the MAXUS-8 microgravity solidification experiment on a Ti-45.5at.% Al-8at.%Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, R. P.; McFadden, S.; Rebow, M.; Browne, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    On 26th March 2010 the MAXUS-8 sounding rocket was launched from the Esrange Space Center in Sweden. As part of the Intermetallic Materials Processing in Relation to Earth and Space Solidification (IMPRESS) project, a solidification experiment was conducted on a Ti-45.5at.%Al-8at.%Nb intermetallic alloy in a module on this rocket. The experiment was designed to investigate columnar and equiaxed microstructures in the alloy. A furnace model of the MAXUS 8 experiment with a Front Tracking Model of solidification has been developed to determine the macrostructure and thermal history of the samples in the experiment. This paper gives details of results of the front tracking model applied to the MAXUS 8 microgravity experiment. A model for columnar growth is presented and compared to experimental results for furnace A of the experiment module.

  18. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes (ICASP - 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Gerhard; Ratke, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes was held in the Rolduc Abbey in the Netherlands a few kilometres away from Aachen. Around 200 scientists from 24 countries come in for the four day meeting. They found a stimulating but also relaxing environment and atmosphere, with beautiful weather and the medieval abbey inviting for walks, discussions, sitting outside and drinking a beer or wine. The contributions given at the conference reflected recent advances in various topics of solidification processes, ranging from fundamental aspects to applied casting technologies. In 20 oral sessions and a large poster session innovative results of segregation phenomena, microstructure evolution, nucleation and growth, phase formation, polyphase solidification, rapid solidification and welding, casting technology, thermophysics of molten alloys, solidification with forced melt flow and growth of single crystals and superalloys together with innovative diagnostic techniques were presented. Thereby, findings from experiments as well as from numerical modeling on different lengths scales were jointly discussed and contribute to new insight in solidification behaviour. The papers presented in this open access proceedings cover about half the oral and poster presentations given. They were carefully reviewed as in classical peer reviewed journals by two independent referees and most of them were revised and thus improved according to the reviewers comments. We think that this collection of papers presented at ICASP-3 gives an impression of the excellent contributions made. The papers embrace both the basic and applied aspects of solidification. We especially wish to express our appreciation for the team around Georg Schmitz and Margret Nienhaus organising this event and giving us their valued advice and support at every stage in preparing the conference. We also thank Lokasenna Lektorat for taking the task of checking all language-associated issues and

  19. (AADSF) Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace Onboard STS-87 USMP-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments for the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is to determine how gravity-driven convection affects the composition and properties of alloys (mixtures of two or more materials, usually metal). During the USMP-4 mission, the AADSF will solidify crystals of lead tin telluride and mercury cadmium telluride, alloys of compound semiconductor materials used to make infrared detectors and lasers, as experiment samples. Although these materials are used for the same type application their properties and compositional uniformity are affected differently during the solidification process.

  20. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  1. PREFACE: MCWASP XIII: International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Due to fast-paced development in computer technologies during the last three decades, computer-based process modeling has become an important tool for the improvement of existing process technologies and the development of new, innovative technologies. With the help of numerical process simulations, complex and costly experimental trials can now be reduced to a minimum. For metallurgical processes in particular, computer simulations are of outstanding importance, as the flow and solidification of molten alloys or the formation of microstructure and defects can hardly be observed experimentally. Corresponding computer simulations allow us inside views into the key process phenomena and so offer great potential for optimization. In 1980 the conference series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up, and has now been continued by holding the 13th international conference on 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes', MCWASP XIII, in Schladming, Austria, from June 17-22 2012. Around 200 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 20 countries around the globe attended 78 oral and 50 poster presentations on different aspects of solidification-related modeling topics. Besides process-related sessions such as (i) Ingot and Shape Casting, (ii) Continuous Casting and Direct Chill Casting, (iii) Directional Solidification and Zone Melting, (iv) Welding, and (v) Centrifugal Casting, a larger focus was put on (vi) Experimental Investigation and In-Situ Observations. In recent years, this topic has been significantly strengthened as advanced synchrotron technologies allow fantastic in-situ observations of phenomena happening inside small metallic samples. These observations will definitely serve as a benchmark for the modeling community. Further macroscopic aspects of advanced solidification science were tackled in the sessions (vii) Electromagnetic Coupling, (viii) Thermomechanics, (ix

  2. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  4. Unstructured viscous grid generation by advancing-front method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1993-01-01

    A new method of generating unstructured triangular/tetrahedral grids with high-aspect-ratio cells is proposed. The method is based on new grid-marching strategy referred to as 'advancing-layers' for construction of highly stretched cells in the boundary layer and the conventional advancing-front technique for generation of regular, equilateral cells in the inviscid-flow region. Unlike the existing semi-structured viscous grid generation techniques, the new procedure relies on a totally unstructured advancing-front grid strategy resulting in a substantially enhanced grid flexibility and efficiency. The method is conceptually simple but powerful, capable of producing high quality viscous grids for complex configurations with ease. A number of two-dimensional, triangular grids are presented to demonstrate the methodology. The basic elements of the method, however, have been primarily designed with three-dimensional problems in mind, making it extendible for tetrahedral, viscous grid generation.

  5. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  6. Recent advances, trends and new perspectives via enthalpy-based finite element formulations for applications to solidification problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Namburu, Raju R.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes recent advances and trends in finite element developments and applications for solidification problems. In particular, in comparison to traditional methods of approach, new enthalpy-based architectures based on a generalized trapezoidal family of representations are presented which provide different perspectives, physical interpretation and solution architectures for effective numerical simulation of phase change processes encountered in solidification problems. Various numerical test models are presented and the results support the proposition for employing such formulations for general phase change applications.

  7. General advancing front packing algorithm for the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfa, Carlos A. Recarey; Pérez Morales, Irvin Pablo; de Farias, Márcio Muniz; de Navarra, Eugenio Oñate Ibañez; Valera, Roberto Roselló; Casañas, Harold Díaz-Guzmán

    2016-11-01

    A generic formulation of a new method for packing particles is presented. It is based on a constructive advancing front method, and uses Monte Carlo techniques for the generation of particle dimensions. The method can be used to obtain virtual dense packings of particles with several geometrical shapes. It employs continuous, discrete, and empirical statistical distributions in order to generate the dimensions of particles. The packing algorithm is very flexible and allows alternatives for: 1—the direction of the advancing front (inwards or outwards), 2—the selection of the local advancing front, 3—the method for placing a mobile particle in contact with others, and 4—the overlap checks. The algorithm also allows obtaining highly porous media when it is slightly modified. The use of the algorithm to generate real particle packings from grain size distribution curves, in order to carry out engineering applications, is illustrated. Finally, basic applications of the algorithm, which prove its effectiveness in the generation of a large number of particles, are carried out.

  8. An advancing front Delaunay triangulation algorithm designed for robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A new algorithm is described for generating an unstructured mesh about an arbitrary two-dimensional configuration. Mesh points are generated automatically by the algorithm in a manner which ensures a smooth variation of elements, and the resulting triangulation constitutes the Delaunay triangulation of these points. The algorithm combines the mathematical elegance and efficiency of Delaunay triangulation algorithms with the desirable point placement features, boundary integrity, and robustness traditionally associated with advancing-front-type mesh generation strategies. The method offers increased robustness over previous algorithms in that it cannot fail regardless of the initial boundary point distribution and the prescribed cell size distribution throughout the flow-field.

  9. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  10. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  11. Investigation of advancing front method for generating unstructured grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1992-06-01

    The advancing front technique is used to generate an unstructured grid about simple aerodynamic geometries. Unstructured grids are generated using VGRID2D and VGRID3D software. Specific problems considered are a NACA 0012 airfoil, a bi-plane consisting of two NACA 0012 airfoil, a four element airfoil in its landing configuration, and an ONERA M6 wing. Inviscid time dependent solutions are computed on these geometries using USM3D and the results are compared with standard test results obtained by other investigators. A grid convergence study is conducted for the NACA 0012 airfoil and compared with a structured grid. A structured grid is generated using GRIDGEN software and inviscid solutions computed using CFL3D flow solver. The results obtained by unstructured grid for NACA 0012 airfoil showed an asymmetric distribution of flow quantities, and a fine distribution of grid was required to remove this asymmetry. On the other hand, the structured grid predicted a very symmetric distribution, but when the total number of points were compared to obtain the same results it was seen that structured grid required more grid points.

  12. Investigation of advancing front method for generating unstructured grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    The advancing front technique is used to generate an unstructured grid about simple aerodynamic geometries. Unstructured grids are generated using VGRID2D and VGRID3D software. Specific problems considered are a NACA 0012 airfoil, a bi-plane consisting of two NACA 0012 airfoil, a four element airfoil in its landing configuration, and an ONERA M6 wing. Inviscid time dependent solutions are computed on these geometries using USM3D and the results are compared with standard test results obtained by other investigators. A grid convergence study is conducted for the NACA 0012 airfoil and compared with a structured grid. A structured grid is generated using GRIDGEN software and inviscid solutions computed using CFL3D flow solver. The results obtained by unstructured grid for NACA 0012 airfoil showed an asymmetric distribution of flow quantities, and a fine distribution of grid was required to remove this asymmetry. On the other hand, the structured grid predicted a very symmetric distribution, but when the total number of points were compared to obtain the same results it was seen that structured grid required more grid points.

  13. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  14. Advanced Oxy-Fuel-Fired Front-End System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-01

    Oxy-gas-fired front-end technology promises significantly reduced energy usage. The glass industry is widely recognized as one of the most energy-intensive manufacturing industries in the United States.

  15. Nucleation of bubbles on a solidification front—experiment and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Huang, C. C.; Lee, K. W.

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on an advancing solidification front during the freezing of water containing a dissolved gas has been experimentally and analytically studied. The formation of bubbles resulting from supersaturation of liquids is commonly encountered in different fields such as heat transfer, manufacturing, and bioscience. In this work, the sizes of nucleating bubbles and the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the water ahead of the solidification front have been measured. From successful comparisons between the measured and predicted critical radii of nucleating bubbles and distributions of dissolved gas content, the phenomena of heterogeneous nucleation in a binary weak solution during the freezing process are quantitatively confirmed. The results show that an increase in gas content at the solidification front in the liquid decreases the free-energy barrier and critical radii of bubbles that are formed on the solidification front. The sizes of the critical radii decrease and the number of nucleating bubbles increase in the early stage of solidification. As the solidification rates decrease at longer times, the content of the dissolved gas in the liquid on the advancing interface decreases and the critical radii of nucleating bubbles increase.

  16. Advancement of X-Ray Microscopy Technology and its Application to Metal Solidification Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    The technique of x-ray projection microscopy is being used to view, in real time, the structures and dynamics of the solid-liquid interface during solidification. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions need to be optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. It turns out that no single imaging technology offers the best solution and traditional methods like radiographic film cannot be used due to specimen motion (solidification). In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast.

  17. Conceptual Design of Front Ends for the Advanced Photon Source Multi-bend Achromats Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Jaski, Y.; Westferro, F.; Lee, S. H.; Yang, B.; Abliz, M.; Ramanathan, M.

    2016-07-27

    The proposed Advanced Photon Source (APS) upgrade from a double-bend achromats (DBA) to multi-bend achromats (MBA) lattice with ring energy change from 7 GeV to 6 GeV and beam current from 100 mA to 200 mA poses new challenges for front ends. All front ends must be upgraded to fulfill the following requirements: 1) handle the high heat load from two insertion devices in either inline or canted configuration, 2) include a clearing magnet in the front end to deflect and dump any electrons in case the electrons escape from the storage ring during swap-out injection with the safety shutters open, 3) incorporate the next generation x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) into the front end to meet the new stringent beam stability requirements. This paper presents the evaluation of the existing APS front ends and standardizes the insertion device (ID) front ends into two types: one for the single beam and one for the canted beams. The conceptual design of high heat load front end (HHLFE) and canted undulator front end (CUFE) for APS MBA upgrade is presented.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CAPABILITY FRONT END ON NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, C; Heebner, J; Dawson, J; Fochs, S; Shverdin, M; Crane, J K; Kanz, V K; Halpin, J; Phan, H; Sigurdsson, R; Brewer, W; Britten, J; Brunton, G; Clark, W; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Nguyen, H; Shaw, B; Hackel, R; Hermann, M; Tietbohl, G; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-07-15

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

  19. A Subgrid-Scale Parameterization for Calving-Front Advance and Retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Floating ice shelves fringing most of Antarctica play a key for the flow of ice into the ocean and thereby for global sea level rise. Calving processes at the ice front are highly complex and are often neglected in numerical ice sheet models. Observed accelerated ice discharge after abrupt ice shelf retreat proofs that this is not a viable approach. In order to be able to take ice shelf dynamics into account we have implemented a number of processes into the Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM-PIK). We present a newly developed subgrid-scale parameterization for calving-front advance and retreat which allows the introduction of stress boundary conditions on the ice-ocean front and thereby a proper computation of the stress and strain field along the calving front. With these improvements we compare different calving rate approaches for different realistic ice shelf geometries (Albrecht et al., J Glac., in prep.).

  20. Steam Reforming Solidification of Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp; T. G. Garn; R. D. Boardman; J. D. Law

    2006-02-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is conducting research on aqueous separations processes for the nuclear fuel cycle. This research includes development of solvent extraction processes for the separation of cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions to reduce the short-term decay heat load. The cesium/strontium strip solution from candidate separation processes will require treatment and solidification for managed storage. Steam reforming is currently being investigated for stabilization of these streams because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach-resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. These ongoing experimental studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of steam reforming for this application.

  1. Generation of three-dimensional unstructured grids by the advancing-front method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohner, Rainald; Parikh, Paresh

    1988-01-01

    The generation of three-dimensional unstructured grids using the advancing-front technique is described. While this generation technique has been shown to be effective for the generation of unstructured grids in two dimensions, its extension to three-dimensional regions required the development of surface definition software and sophisticated data structures to avoid excessive CPU-time overheads for the search operations involved. After obtaining an initial triangulation of the surfaces, tetrahedrons are generated by successively deleting faces from the generation front. Details of the mesh generation algorithm are given, together with examples and timings.

  2. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  3. Unconstrained plastering : all-hexahedral mesh generation via advancing front geometry decomposition (2004-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Blacker, Teddy Dean; Staten, Matthew L.; Kerr, Robert A.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-03-01

    The generation of all-hexahedral finite element meshes has been an area of ongoing research for the past two decades and remains an open problem. Unconstrained plastering is a new method for generating all-hexahedral finite element meshes on arbitrary volumetric geometries. Starting from an unmeshed volume boundary, unconstrained plastering generates the interior mesh topology without the constraints of a pre-defined boundary mesh. Using advancing fronts, unconstrained plastering forms partially defined hexahedral dual sheets by decomposing the geometry into simple shapes, each of which can be meshed with simple meshing primitives. By breaking from the tradition of previous advancing-front algorithms, which start from pre-meshed boundary surfaces, unconstrained plastering demonstrates that for the tested geometries, high quality, boundary aligned, orientation insensitive, all-hexahedral meshes can be generated automatically without pre-meshing the boundary. Examples are given for meshes from both solid mechanics and geotechnical applications.

  4. Effects of calcined aluminum salts on the advanced dewatering and solidification/stabilization of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guangyin; Yan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Haiyan; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Tiantao; Zhao, Youcai

    2011-01-01

    The high moisture content (80%) in the sewage dewatered sludge is the main obstacle to disposal and recycling. A chemical dewatering and stabilization/solidification (S/S) alternative for the sludge was developed, using calcined aluminum salts (AS) as solidifier, and CaCl2, Na2SO4 and CaSO4 as accelerators, to enhance the mechanical compressibility making the landfill operation possible. The properties of the resultant matrixes were determined in terms of moisture contents, unconfined compressive strength, products of hydration, and toxicity characteristics. The results showed that AS exhibited a moderate pozzolanic activity, and the mortar AS(0) obtained with 5% AS and 10% CaSO4 of AS by weight presented a moisture contents below 50%-60% and a compressive strength of (51.32 +/- 2.9) kPa after 5-7 days of curing time, meeting the minimum requirement for sanitary landfill. The use of CaSO4 obviously improved the S/S performance, causing higher strength level. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry investigations revealed that a large amount of hydrates (viz., gismondine and CaCO3) were present in solidified sludge, leading to the depletion of evaporable water and the enhancement of the strength. In addition, the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and horizontal vibration (HJ 557-2009) leaching test were conducted to evaluate their environmental compatibility. It was found that the solidified products conformed to the toxicity characteristic criteria in China and could be safely disposed of in a sanitary landfill.

  5. The advance of an advantageous allele: Nucleation, front propagation, and seasonal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Lauren

    Both community ecology and conservation biology seek further understanding of factors governing the advance of an invasive species. I model biological invasion as a two-species, individual-based stochastic process on a two-dimensional landscape. The ecologically superior invader and a resident species compete for space preemptively. The invasive species can occur through random, rare mutations of the resident species, or as a repeated introduction into the environment. To understand how individual-level processes may govern population patterns, I invoke the physical theory for nucleation of spatial systems. Nucleation theory discriminates between single-cluster and multi-cluster dynamics. A sufficiently low mutation or introduction rate, or a sufficiently small environment generates single-cluster dynamics, an inherently stochastic process. An increased mutation or introduction rate, or larger system size generates multi-cluster invasion, where spatial averaging produces nearly deterministic global dynamics. For this process, an analytical approximation from nucleation theory, called Avrami's Law, describes the time-dependent behavior for the densities with remarkable accuracy. Once invasive clusters grow large enough, observations of the invasive advance occur only through a small "window" of space, where we can approximate the advance as that of a linear propagating front. One can then employ the concept of a "roughened" front to quantify effects of discreteness and stochasticity on invasion, and thus study roughening of the front using the framework of non-equilibrium interface growth. The analysis, which includes calculating the scaling (roughness and dynamic) exponents, corrections to the asymptotic front velocity, and the probability distribution of both the surface roughness and the front runner's relative position, indicates that initially flat, linear invading fronts exhibit Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) roughening in one transverse dimension. I also study the

  6. Overview of the Tusas Code for Simulation of Dendritic Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, Amelia J.; Newman, Christopher Kyle; Francois, Marianne M.

    2016-01-07

    The aim of this project is to conduct a parametric investigation into the modeling of two dimensional dendrite solidification, using the phase field model. Specifically, we use the Tusas code, which is for coupled heat and phase-field simulation of dendritic solidification. Dendritic solidification, which may occur in the presence of an unstable solidification interface, results in treelike microstructures that often grow perpendicular to the rest of the growth front. The interface may become unstable if the enthalpy of the solid material is less than that of the liquid material, or if the solute is less soluble in solid than it is in liquid, potentially causing a partition [1]. A key motivation behind this research is that a broadened understanding of phase-field formulation and microstructural developments can be utilized for macroscopic simulations of phase change. This may be directly implemented as a part of the Telluride project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), through which a computational additive manufacturing simulation tool is being developed, ultimately to become part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program within the U.S. Department of Energy [2].

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Modelling polycrystalline solidification using phase field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gránásy, László; Pusztai, Tamás; Warren, James A.

    2004-10-01

    We review recent advances made in the phase field modelling of polycrystalline solidification. Areas covered include the development of theory from early approaches that allow for only a few crystal orientations, to the latest models relying on a continuous orientation field and a free energy functional that is invariant to the rotation of the laboratory frame. We discuss a variety of phenomena, including homogeneous nucleation and competitive growth of crystalline particles having different crystal orientations, the kinetics of crystallization, grain boundary dynamics, and the formation of complex polycrystalline growth morphologies including disordered ('dizzy') dendrites, spherulites, fractal-like polycrystalline aggregates, etc. Finally, we extend the approach by incorporating walls, and explore phenomena such as heterogeneous nucleation, particle-front interaction, and solidification in confined geometries (in channels or porous media).

  8. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  9. The Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front updated: Advances from a decade of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polovina, Jeffrey J.; Howell, Evan A.; Kobayashi, Donald R.; Seki, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic ocean feature called the Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF) was first described fifteen years ago based on an empirical association between the apparent habitat of loggerhead sea turtles and albacore tuna linked to a basin-wide chlorophyll front observed with remotely sensed ocean color data. Subsequent research has provided considerable evidence that the TZCF is an indicator for a dynamic ocean feature with important physical and biological characteristics. New insights into the seasonal dynamics of the TZCF suggest that in the summer it is located at the southern boundary of the subarctic gyre while its position in the winter and spring is defined by the extent of the southward transport of surface nutrients. While the TZCF is defined as the dynamic boundary between low and high surface chlorophyll, it appears to be a boundary between subtropical and subarctic phytoplankton communities. Furthermore, the TZCF is also characterized as supporting enhanced phytoplankton net community production throughout its seasonal migration. Lastly, the TZCF is important to the growth rate of neon flying squid and to the survival of monk seal pups in the northern atolls of the Hawaiian Archipelago. This paper reviews these and other findings that advance our current understanding of the physics and biology of the TZCF from research over the past decade.

  10. Structured background grids for generation of unstructured grids by advancing front method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1991-01-01

    A new method of background grid construction is introduced for generation of unstructured tetrahedral grids using the advancing-front technique. Unlike the conventional triangular/tetrahedral background grids which are difficult to construct and usually inadequate in performance, the new method exploits the simplicity of uniform Cartesian meshes and provides grids of better quality. The approach is analogous to solving a steady-state heat conduction problem with discrete heat sources. The spacing parameters of grid points are distributed over the nodes of a Cartesian background grid by interpolating from a few prescribed sources and solving a Poisson equation. To increase the control over the grid point distribution, a directional clustering approach is used. The new method is convenient to use and provides better grid quality and flexibility. Sample results are presented to demonstrate the power of the method.

  11. Melt Flow Control in the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabaras, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Our main project objectives are to develop computational techniques based on inverse problem theory that can be used to design directional solidification processes that lead to desired temperature gradient and growth conditions at the freezing front at various levels of gravity. It is known that control of these conditions plays a significant role in the selection of the form and scale of the obtained solidification microstructures. Emphasis is given on the control of the effects of various melt flow mechanisms on the local to the solidification front conditions. The thermal boundary conditions (furnace design) as well as the magnitude and direction of an externally applied magnetic field are the main design variables. We will highlight computational design models for sharp front solidification models and briefly discuss work in progress toward the development of design techniques for multi-phase volume-averaging based solidification models.

  12. Advanced Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles during Ultrasonic Cavitation Processing and Solidification of 6061-based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Nastac, L.

    2015-06-01

    The metal-matrix-nano-composites (MMNCs) in this study consist of a 6061 alloy matrix reinforced with 1.0 wt.% SiC 50 nm diameter nanoparticles that are dispersed uniformly within the matrix in large volume using an ultrasonic cavitation dispersion technique (UCDS) available in the Solidification Laboratory at UA. The required ultrasonic parameters to achieve the required cavitation for adequate degassing and refining of the aluminium alloy as well as the fluid flow characteristics for uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles into the 6061 matrix are being investigated in this study by using an in-house developed CFD ultrasonic cavitation model. The multiphase CFD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification as well as the complex interaction between the solidifying alloy and nanoparticles by using the Ansys's Fluent Dense Discrete Phase Model (DDPM) and a particle engulfment and pushing (PEP) model. The PEP model accounts for the Brownian motion. SEM analysis was performed on the as-cast MMNC coupons processed via UCDS and confirmed the distribution of the nanoparticles predicted by the current CFD model. A parametric study was performed using the validated CFD model. The study includes the effects of magnitude of the fluid flow and ultrasonic probe location (gravity direction).

  13. Solidification of undercooled liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Shiohara, Y.; Paik, J. S.; Flemmings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    During rapid solidification processing (RSP) the amount of liquid undercooling is an important factor in determining microstructural development by controlling phase selection during nucleation and morphological evolution during crystal growth. While undercooling is an inherent feature of many techniques of RSP, the deepest undercoolings and most controlled studies have been possible in carefully prepared fine droplet samples. From past work and recent advances in studies of nucleation kinetics it has become clear that the initiation of crystallization during RSP is governed usually by heterogeneous sites located at surfaces. With known nucleant sites, it has been possible to identify specific pathways of metastable phase formation and microstructural development in alloys. These advances have allowed for a clearer assessment of the interplay between undercooling, cooling rate and particle size statistics in structure formation. New approaches to the examination of growth processes have been developed to follow the thermal behavior and morphology in small samples in the period of rapid crystallization and recalescence. Based upon the new experimental information from these studies, useful models can be developed for the overall solidification process to include nucleation behavior, thermodynamic constraints, thermal history, growth kinetics, solute redistribution and resulting structures. From the refinement of knowledge concerning the underlying factors that govern RSP a basis is emerging for an effective alloy design and processing strategy.

  14. The Advanced Exploration Systems Water Recovery Project: Innovation on 2 Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam M.; Neumeyer, Derek; Shull, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    As NASA looks forward to sending humans farther away from Earth, we will have to develop a transportation architecture that is highly reliable and that can sustain life for long durations without the benefit of Earth s proximity for continuous resupply or even operational guidance. NASA has consistently been challenged with performing great feats of innovation, but particularly in this time of economic stress, we are challenged to go farther with less. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) projects were implemented to address both of these needs by not only developing innovative technologies, but by incorporating innovative management styles and processes that foster the needed technical innovation given a small amount of resources. This presentation explains how the AES Water Recovery Project is exhibiting innovation on both fronts; technical and process. The AES Water Recovery Project (WRP) is actively engineering innovative technologies in order to maximize the efficiency of water recovery. The development of reliable, energy-efficient, and low-mass spacecraft systems to provide environmental control and life support (ECLS) is critical to enable long-duration human missions outside of low-Earth orbit. Recycling of life support consumables is necessary to reduce resupply mass and provide for vehicle autonomy. To address this, the WRP is working on a rotary distiller that has shown enhanced performance over the state-of-the-art (SOA). Additionally, the WRP is looking at innovative ways to address issues present in the state-of-the-art (SOA) systems pertaining to toxicity and calcium scale buildup. As an AES project, the WRP has a more streamlined Skunk Works like approach to technology development intended to reduce overhead but achieve a more refined end product. The project has incorporated key partnerships between NASA centers as well as between NASA and industry. A minimal project management style has been implemented such that risks are managed and

  15. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  16. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  17. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  18. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the company’s global facility environmental footprint.

  19. Modelling direction solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop an improved understanding of some phenomena of importance to directional solidification. The aim of this research is also to help predict differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and solidification in space. In this report, the validity of the Burton-Primslichter equation is explored. The influence of operating variables on grain and twin generation and propagation in single crystals of In sub (x) Ga sub (1-x) Sb is also investigated.

  20. Variable-Temperature-Gradient Device for Solidification Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Device for research in solidification and crystal growth allows crystallization of melt observed as occurs. Temperature gradient across melt specimen increased or decreased rapidly while solidification front proceeds at constant speed across sample. Device moves sample at same speed, thereby holding position of liquid/solid interface stationary within field of optical microscope. Device, variabletemperature-gradient microscope stage, used to study crystal growth at constant rate while thermal driving force is varied.

  1. Capillary-wave description of rapid directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, Alexander L; Bausch, Richard; Schmitz, Rudi

    2012-02-01

    A recently introduced capillary-wave description of binary-alloy solidification is generalized to include the procedure of directional solidification. For a class of model systems a universal dispersion relation of the unstable eigenmodes of a planar steady-state solidification front is derived, which readjusts previously known stability considerations. We moreover establish a differential equation for oscillatory motions of a planar interface that offers a limit-cycle scenario for the formation of solute bands and, taking into account the Mullins-Sekerka instability, of banded structures.

  2. Advanced Optics for a Full Quasi-Optical Front Steering ECRH Upper Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Alessi, E.; Bruschi, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Collazos, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Udintsev, V. S.; Henderson, M. A.

    2009-11-26

    A full quasi-optical setup for the internal optics of the Front Steering Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Upper Launcher for ITER was designed, proving to be feasible and favorable in terms of additional flexibility and cost reduction with respect to the former design. This full quasi-optical solution foresees the replacement of the mitre-bends in the final section of the launcher with dedicated free-space mirrors to realize the last changes of directions in the launcher. A description of the launcher is given and its advantages presented. The parameters of the expected output beams as well as preliminary evaluations of truncation effects with the physical optics GRASP code are shown. Moreover, a study of mitre-bends replacement with single mirrors for multiple beams is described. In principle it could allow the beams to be larger at the mirror locations (with a further decrease of the peak power density due to partial overlapping) and has the additional advantage to get a larger opening with compressed beams to avoid conflicts with side-walls port. Constraints on the setup, arising both from the resulting beam characteristics in the space of free parameters and from mechanical requirements are taken into account in the analysis.

  3. Advances in Front-end Enabling Technologies for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2016-09-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands (typically 20-40 and 60-100 THz) are best known for remote sensing applications that include temperature measurement (e.g. non-contacting thermometers and thermography), night vision and surveillance (e.g. ubiquitous motion sensing and target acquisition). This unregulated part of the electromagnetic spectrum also offers commercial opportunities for the development of short-range secure communications. The ` THz Torch' concept, which fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation by partitioning thermally generated spectral radiance into pre-defined frequency channels, was recently demonstrated by the authors. The thermal radiation within each channel can be independently pulse-modulated, transmitted and detected, to create a robust form of short-range secure communications within the thermal infrared. In this paper, recent progress in the front-end enabling technologies associated with the THz Torch concept is reported. Fundamental limitations of this technology are discussed; possible engineering solutions for further improving the performance of such thermal-based wireless links are proposed and verified either experimentally or through numerical simulations. By exploring a raft of enabling technologies, significant enhancements to both data rate and transmission range can be expected. With good engineering solutions, the THz Torch concept can exploit nineteenth century physics with twentieth century multiplexing schemes for low-cost twenty-first century ubiquitous applications in security and defence.

  4. Flame front tracking by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and advanced image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Gharbieh, Rafeef; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Gustavsson, Thomas; Kaminski, Clemens

    2001-02-01

    This paper presents advanced image analysis methods for extracting information from high speed Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) data obtained from turbulent flames. The application of non-linear anisotropic diffusion filtering and of Active Contour Models (Snakes) is described to isolate flame boundaries. In a subsequent step, the detected flame boundaries are tracked in time using a frequency domain contour interpolation scheme. The implementations of the methods are described and possible applications of the techniques are discussed.

  5. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  6. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  7. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  8. Solidification of Portland Cement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solidification of materials is introduced, and the constitution and hydration of portland cement is reviewed. Microstructural zones are introduced...100, 171, and 384 days age. Similar micrographs for tricalcium silicate pastes and commercial portland cement pastes are shown and discussed. The...hardening of portland cement is discussed as a solidification process. The potential flaws and stress concentrators within the cement paste are identified and their effect on mechanical properties is discussed. (Author)

  9. Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide is intended to inform site cleanup managers of recently-published materials such as field reports and guidance documents that address issues relevant to solidification/stabilization technologies.

  10. Solidification science in cast MMCs: The influence of merton flemings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, Pradeep; Asthana, Rajiv

    2001-09-01

    The solidification science of cast metalmatrix composites (MMC) evolved as a subset of the broad field of solidification of monolithic alloys pioneered by Merton Flemings and his students. As a result of advances in solidification, the cast MMC field has evolved from its early incarnation—employing empirical research to engineer novel materials using versatile and cost-effective casting techniques—to using solidification-science-based approaches to tailor advanced materials for application-specific needs. The current and emerging applications of cast MMCs in a variety of automotive, aerospace, electronic packaging, and consumer-good industries exemplify the maturity of the field and the materials. Innovations in composite-forming techniques and efforts at wider industrial acceptance of MMCs will undoubtedly continue. However, the scientific principles underlying the solidification microstructure evolution that governs the composite properties have become well established, to a great extent, due to Flemings’ early, pioneering work on monolithic alloys and some of his more recent studies on solidification of reinforced metals. This paper reviews some aspects of solidification of discontinuously reinforced cast metals that owe their current understanding to Flemings’ contributions, in particular, the scientific understanding of macro- and microsegregation, fluidity and rheology of multiphase slurries, and stircasting, semi-solid casting, and preform infiltration. Current research to develop and test prototype components made from cast composites, including Al-flyash, Cu-graphite, Al-graphite, Al-alumina, and SiC-Al, is also presented, along with directions for future research.

  11. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved understanding of the phenomena of importance to directional solidification is attempted to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis is now on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection. A correlation is sought between heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneities using naphthalene doped with anthracene. The influence of spin-up/spin-down is determined on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide. The effect is determined of imposed melting - freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide. The mechanism behind the increase of grain size caused by using spin-up/spin-down in directional solidification of mercury cadimum telluride is sought.

  12. Models of Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, G. H.; Broughton, J. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Laser annealing studies provide much information on various consequences of rapid solidification, including the trapping of impurities in the crystal, the generation of vacancies and twins, and on the fundamental limits to the speed of the crystal-melt interface. Some results obtained by molecular dynamics methods of the solidification of a Lennard-Jones liquid are reviewed. An indication of the relationship of interface speed to undercooling for certain materials can be derived from this model. Ising model simulations of impurity trapping in silicon are compared with some of the laser annealing results. The consequences of interface segregation and atomic strain are discussed.

  13. Immiscible phase incorporation during directional solidification of hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Merrick, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification processes in immiscible samples were investigated by directly observing the events taking place at the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification. Visualization of these events was made possible through the use of a transparent metal analog system and a temperature gradient stage assembly fitted to an optical microscope. The immiscible transparent analog system utilized was the succinonitrile-glycerol system. This system has been shown to exhibit the same morphological transitions as observed in metallic alloys of monotectic composition. Both monotectic and hypermonotectic composition samples were directionally solidified in order to gain an improved understanding of the manner in which the excess hypermonotectic liquid is incorporated into the solidifying structure. The processing conditions utilized prevented sedimentation of the excess hypermonotectic liquid by directionally solidifying the samples in very thin (13 microns), horizontally oriented cells. High thermal gradient to growth rate ratios (G/R) were used in an effort to prevent constitutional supercooling and the subsequent formation of L(sub 2) droplets in advance of the solidification front during the growth of fibrous composite structures. Results demonstrated that hypermonotectic composites could be produced in samples up to two weight percent off of the monotectic composition by using a G/R ratio greater than or equal to 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2) to avoid constitutional supercooling. For hypermonotectic samples processed with G/R ratios below 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2), constitutional supercooling occurred and resulted in slight interfacial instability. For these samples, two methods of incorporation of the hypermonotectic liquid were observed and are reported. The correlation between the phase spacing, lambda, and the growth rate, R, was examined and was found to obey a relationship generally associated with a diffusion controlled coupled growth process. For

  14. Why solidification has an S-shaped history

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, A.; Lorente, S.; Yilbas, B. S.; Sahin, A. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show theoretically that the history of solid growth during “rapid” solidification must be S-shaped, in accord with the constructal law of design in nature. In the beginning the rate of solidification increases and after reaching a maximum it decreases monotonically as the volume of solid tends toward a plateau. The S-history is a consequence of four configurations for the flow of heat from the solidification front to the subcooled surroundings, in this chronological order: solid spheres centered at nucleation sites, needles that invade longitudinally, radial growth by conduction, and finally radial lateral conduction to interstices that are warming up. The solid volume (Bs) vs time (t) is an S-curve because it is a power law of type Bs ~ tn where the exponent n first increases and then decreases in time (n = 3/2, 2, 1, …). The initial portion of the S curve is not an exponential.

  15. Analysis of steady-state shallow cell solidification in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A.

    1996-11-01

    The influence of capillarity on the near-plane front solidification of metal matrix composites is examined by analysis of the one-sided solidification of a binary alloy in a planar interstice of constant width in the limit of low Peclet number. The authors assume that in this limit, solute isoconcentrates in the liquid are everywhere orthogonal to the growth direction. Capillary causes the alloy to solidify in a cellular mode, even in the absence of constitutional supercooling. Two solution branches are derived for this solidification mode, one for shallow symmetric cells, the other for asymmetric cells. Restricting attention to the former solution branch, as the growth velocity increases, or the temperature gradient decreases, the cell amplitude increases gradually, to reach a critical point which depends strongly on the contact angle along the reinforcement/solidification front triple line.

  16. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis during the period of this grant was on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneties were correlated using naphthalene doped with azulene. In addition the influence of spin-up/spin-down on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide and the effect of imposed melting-freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide are discussed.

  17. Solidification of undercooled metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the subject of undercooling (i.e., supercooling) in the case of metal alloys, taking into account the effects of undercooling on microstructure and microsegregation in alloys which solidify in a crystalline manner. Techniques for obtaining a large degree of undercooling are discussed. These techniques make it possible to eliminate heterogeneous nucleants from the melt and to remove container nucleation effects. The nucleation behavior of small metal droplets is considered along with the formation of a dispersion of fine droplets in a suitable inert medium, the mixing of fine metal powders with glass powder, and the levitation melting technique. Attention is given to solidification with rapid interface velocity, aspects of dendritic morphology, and thermal measurements during solidification of undercooled droplets.

  18. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  19. Directional solidification studies in Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Je-hyun

    1993-05-01

    Three solid phases are involved in the phase equilibria of the intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al near its melting point, {beta}, {gamma}{prime}(Ni{sub 3}Al), and {gamma}. The generally-accepted phase diagram involves a eutectic reaction between {beta}{prime} and {gamma}, but some recent studies agree with an older diagram due to Schramm, which has a eutectic reaction between the {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases. The phase equilibria near Ni{sub 3}Al compositions was evaluated using quenched directional solidification experiments, that preserve the microstructures tonned at the solidification front, and using diffusion couple experiments. These experiments show that eutectic forms between {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases, as in the Schramm diagram. Growth and phase transformations of these three phases are also studied in the directional solidification experiments. Microstructure analysis shows that etching of Ni{sub 3}Al({gamma}{prime}) is very sensitive to small composition variations and crystallographic orientation changes. The eutectic solidification study confirms that the equilibrium eutectic is {gamma}{prime}+{beta}, and that the metastable {gamma}+{beta} eutectic might be also produced in this system according to the impurities, solidification rates, and composition variations.

  20. Low-cost silicon substrates by directional solidification. Third quarterly report, September 1-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.; Basaran, M.

    1980-12-01

    Plane front solidification and refining of metallurgical grade silicon (Mg-Si) by the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) were examined experimentally and theoretically. Better crystallinity was obtained from the Mg-Si if melt turbulence occurs during solidification. This was also verified by theoretical analyses. Experimental measurements indicate that vacuum purification of Mg-Si can be improved by increasing the holding time under vacuum, by using silica powder and/or increasing its amount. It has been shown that simple directional solidification by HEM of commercially available Mg-Si can produce material for 7.2% conversion efficiency solar cells.

  1. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  2. Thermophysical property sensitivity effects in steel solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Tony

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of advanced solidification processes via digital computer techniques has gained widespread acceptance during the last decade or so. Models today can predict transient temperature fields, fluid flow fields, important microstructural parameters, and potential defects in castings. However, the lack of accurate thermophysical property data on important industrial alloys threatens to limit the ability of manufacturers to fully capitalize on the technology's benefits. A study of the sensitivity of one such numerical model of a steel plate casting to imposed variations in the data utilized for the thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heat of fusion is described. The sensitivity of the data's variability is characterized by its effects on the net solidification time of various points along the centerline of the plate casting. Recommendations for property measurements are given and the implications of data uncertainty for modelers are discussed.

  3. Directional solidification of white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.

    1996-08-01

    Several studies of the ledeburite eutectic (Fe-Fe3C), in pure Fe-C alloys have shown that it has a lamellar morphology under plane front growth conditions. The structure of ledeburite in white cast irons, Fe-C-Si, consists of a rod morphology. It is generally not possible to produce plane front growth of Fe-C-Si eutectic alloys in the Fe-Fe3C form, because at the slow growth rates required for plane front growth, the Fe3C phase is replaced by graphite. By using small additions of Te, the growth of graphite was suppressed, and the plane front growth of the ledeburite eutectic in Fe-C-Si alloys was carried out with Si levels up to 1 wt pct. It was found that the growth morphology became a faceted rod morphology at 1 wt pct Si, but in contrast to the usual rod morphology of white cast irons, the rod phase was Fe3C rather than iron. It was shown that the usual rod morphology only forms at the sides of the two-phase cellular or dendritic growth fronts in Fe-C-Si alloys. Possible reasons for the inability of plane front directional solidification to produce the usual rod morphology in Fe-C-Si alloys are discussed. Also, data are presented on the spacing of the lamellar eutectic in pure Fe-C ledeburite, which indicates that this system does not follow the usual λ2 V = constant relation of regular eutectics.

  4. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  5. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lola, Chanceaux; Thierry, Menand

    2015-04-01

    The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (a magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (an elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment. In order to vary the importance of solidification and quantify its effect on sill propagation, the injection flux and temperature are systematically varied between each experiment. Depending on the importance of solidification effects, two extreme behaviours for sill propagation dynamics and geometry are observed. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps. After each propagation step, the sill stalls, thickens progressively by storing hot fluid vegetable oil beneath the partially solidified intrusion, without growing neither in length nor in breadth, and after a pause, the propagation initiates again, soon followed by a new episode of momentary arrest. The geometry of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of surface creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the surface of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. In the same way lower solidification effects promote larger sill surfaces, lower thicknesses, and a lower number of propagation steps. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. Regarding the geometry of sills, 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basins reveal sills with lobate

  7. Fundamentals of rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Shiohara, Yuh

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate the continuous change that occurs in the solidification behavior of undercooled melts, as cooling rates increase from 0.0001 K/sec to about 1000 K/sec. At the higher cooling rates, more significant changes occur as the dendrite tip temperature begins to drop from the equilibrium liquidus. Discontinuous solidification behavior changes will occur if absolute stability is reached, or a metastable phase forms, or solidification proceeds to a glass rather than to a crystalline solid, or if there is significant undercooling prior to nucleation.

  8. Time resolved small angle X-ray scattering experiments performed on detonating explosives at the advanced photon source: Calculation of the time and distance between the detonation front and the x-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Watkins, E. B.; Firestone, M. A.; Podlesak, D. W.; Jensen, B. J.; Ringstrand, B. S.; Huber, R. C.; Mang, J. T.; Johnson, C. E.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Willey, T. M.; Hansen, D. W.; May, C. M.; Hodgin, R. L.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; van Buuren, A. W.; Lauderbach, L. M.; Jones, A. C.; Graber, T. J.; Sinclair, N.; Seifert, S.; Gog, T.

    2017-03-01

    Time resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments on detonating explosives have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source Dynamic Compression Sector. The purpose of the experiments is to measure the SAXS patterns at tens of ns to a few μs behind the detonation front. Corresponding positions behind the detonation front are of order 0.1-10 mm. From the scattering patterns, properties of the explosive products relative to the time behind the detonation front can be inferred. This report describes how the time and distance from the x-ray probe location to the detonation front is calculated, as well as the uncertainties and sources of uncertainty associated with the calculated times and distances.

  9. Morphological stability during solidification of silicon incorporating metallic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.; Mathews, Jay; Recht, Daniel; Smith, Matthew; Gradečak, Silvija; Aziz, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    We study the stability of a planar solidification front during pulsed laser melting-induced rapid solidification of silicon containing high concentrations of ion-implanted metallic impurities. We calculate the critical impurity concentration for destabilizing plane-front solidification, and introduce the "amplification coefficient," which is an empirical parameter describing the degree of amplification that must occur between the time the planar liquid-solid interface first becomes unstable, and the time of formation of morphological features of interface breakdown that is later observed in the microstructure. By connecting our calculations to experimental observations from the literature, we determine this parameter for Au, Co, Cr, Fe, Ga, In, and Zn in (100) Si and Ti in (111) Si, and find that it increases with impurity diffusive speed vD approximately as vD0.56. We present an approximate but simple method of estimating the maximum impurity concentration that may be incorporated in a surface layer of a given thickness without the appearance of cellular breakdown.

  10. Flight 1 technical report for experiment 74-36: Thermal migration of bubbles and their interaction with solidification interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimens of gas saturated carbon tetrabromide were directionally solidified in a transparent furnace using a gradient freeze technique. The original temperature gradient was 5 C/cm and the cooling rate was 40 C/h. Progress of the experiment was monitored photographically. Gas bubbles were generated at the advancing solidification front in each of the three specimens. The gas bubbles were observed to increase in size, coalesce, and eventually be grown into the solid specimen under low gravity conditions. No bubble detachment from the interface was observed. Identical specimens processed in the laboratory showed bubble nucleation, bubble growth, and eventual bubble detachment due to buoyancy forces. Examination of the specimens showed a significantly greater void content in the low gravity processed samples. The grain size was observed to be finer in the low gravity processed samples.

  11. Noise and Dynamical Pattern Selection in Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing. "Pattern-forming systems," in this context, are nonequilibrium contina whose state is determined by experimentally adjustable control parameter. Below some critical value of the control system then has available to it a range of linearly stable, spatially periodic steady states, each characterized by a spacing which can lie anywhere within some band of values. These systems like directional solidification, where the solidification front is planar when the ratio of growth velocity to thermal gradient is below its critical value, but takes on a cellular shape above critical. They also include systems without interfaces, such as Benard convection, where it is the fluid velocity field which changes from zero to something spatially periodic as the control parameter is increased through its critical value. The basic question to be addressed was that of how the system chooses one of its myriad possible spacings when the control parameter is above critical, and in particular the role of noise in the selection process. Previous work on explosive crystallization had suggested that one spacing in the range should be preferred, in the sense that weak noise should eventually drive the system to that spacing. That work had also suggested a heuristic argument for identifying the preferred spacing. The project had three main objectives: to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing; to investigate how noise drives a system to its preferred spacing; and to extend the heuristic argument for a preferred spacing in explosive crystallization to other pattern-forming systems.

  12. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  13. Model transport directional solidification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.T.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    A model transport directional solidification apparatus is described. It has three functional components, each of which are described: the temperature gradient stage, the motor and drive mechanism, and the measuring systems. A small amount of sample is held between two glass slides on the temperature gradient stage so that the portion of sample in the hot chamber is molten and the portion in the cold chamber is solidified. Conditions are set so that the solid-liquid interface occurs in the gap between the chambers and can be observed through the microscope system. In-situ directional solidification is observed by driving the sample from the hot chamber to the cold chamber and observing the solidification process as it occurs. (LEW)

  14. Rapid Solidification of Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalonji, G.; Deguire, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The enhanced control over microstructural evolution inherent in rapid solidification processing techniques are exploited to create novel ceramic magnetic materials. The great sensitivity of magnetic properties to local structure provides a powerful probe both for the study of structure and of microscopic solidification mechanisms. The first system studied is the SrO-Fe2O3 binary, which contains the commercially important hard magnetic compound strontium hexaferrite. The products were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and differential thermal analysis. As-quenched ribbons contain high concentrations of super-paramagnetic particles, 80 to 250 Angstroms in diameter, in a glassy matrix. This suggests the possibility of crystallizing monodomain strontium hexaferrite during subsequent heat treatment, with a resulting increase in coercivity over conventionally processed ferrite magnets. That magnetic properties can be controlled in solidification processing by varying the quench rate is demonstrated.

  15. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  16. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  17. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  18. Study on solidification of immisible alloys (M-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamio, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    Alloying of immiscible alloys under microgravity is of interest in metallurgical processes. Several experiments investigating the alloying of immiscible alloys, such as Al-In, Al-Bi, Zn-Bi, and Zn-Pb, were done in space. Homogeneous distribution of small L2 particles in the matrix, such as an emulsion structure, was expected in the space-solidifed alloys. However, the alloys demonstrated an extremely segregated structure. To date insufficient information was obtained to explain these unexpected results. Our experiment was proposed to clarify the solidification manner of immiscible alloys and to obtain fundamental information concerning structural control of the alloys. In space, density differences between the two liquids separated in immiscible regions can be neglected, so that no sedimentation of L(sub 2) phase will take place. When the growth of the alloys is interrupted and this status is frozen by an adequate rapid cooling procedure, it will provide much information concerning decomposing homogeneous liquid and the interaction between the monotectic growth front morphology and the distribution of L(sub 2) phase. It is anticipated that the results will be useful for elucidating the monotectic solidification manner and it will be instructive to explain the segregated structures obtained in the past space experiments.

  19. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  20. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  1. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Meghan J.; Walker, Brandon A.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). Here, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. While the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there is no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.

  2. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Meghan Jane; Walker, Brandon A.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-09-25

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). In this paper, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. Finally, while the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there is no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.

  3. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). In this paper, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. Finally, while the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there ismore » no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.« less

  4. Solidification of a Charged Colloidal Dispersion Investigated Using Microfluidic Pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Nadia; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the dynamics of solidification of a charged colloidal dispersion using an original microfluidic technique referred to as micropervaporation. This technique exploits pervaporation within a microfluidic channel to extract the solvent of a dilute colloidal dispersion. Pervaporation concentrates the colloids in a controlled way up to the tip of the channel until a wet solid made of closely packed colloids grows and invades the microfluidic channel. For the charged dispersion under study, we however evidence a liquid to solid transition (LST) preceding the formation of the solid, owing to the presence of long-range electrostatic interactions. This LST is associated with the nucleation and growth of domains confined in the channel. These domains are then compacted anisotropically up to forming a wet solid of closely packed colloids. This solid then invades the whole channel as in directional drying with a growth rate which depends on the microfluidic geometry. In the final steps of the solidification, we observed the occurrence of cracks and shear bands, the delamination of the wet solid from the channel walls, and its invasion by a receding air front. Interestingly, this air front follows specific patterns within the solid which reveal different microscopic colloidal organizations.

  5. Waste form development/test. [Low-density polyethylene and modified sulfur cement as solidification agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1983-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate new solidification agents relative to their potential application to wastes generated by advanced high volume reduction technologies, e.g., incinerator ash, dry solids, and ion exchange resins. Candidate materials selected for the solidification of these wastes include a modified sulfur cement and low-density polyethylene, neither of which are currently employed commerically for the solidification of low-level waste (LLW). As both the modified sulfur cement and the polyethylene are thermoplastic materials, a heated screw type extruder is utilized in the production of waste form samples for testing and evaluation. In this regard, work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be satisfactorily applied to the specific LLW streams and to provide information relevant to operating parameters and process control.

  6. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  8. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  9. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  10. Skaergaard vs Sudbury: Solidification Times and Crystal Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.; Currier, R. M.; Jordon, E.

    2010-12-01

    The overall cooling time of a batch of magma is intimately reflected in the nature of the crystal sizes. The thinner are dikes and sills the finer grained are the crystals they display. And the spatial variations in crystal size and abundance record the spatial progression of solidification. Chilled margins are fine grained because of rapid solidification, and a progressive inward increase in crystal size is perfectly predictable by coupling a law of crystal growth with a suitable solidification front-based cooling model. When observed crystal sizes are much larger than predicted, as in finding phenocrysts near or in chilled margins, this is a clear indication of crystals grown and entrained prior to final emplacement and solidification. This is exactly the process exhibited by volcanics carrying swarms of large crystals. But in plutonic rocks there is frequent confusion over what crystal sizes to expect, especially when the pluton size and shape is poorly known, and there is often an unexpressed feeling that fine grained (i.e., non-phenocryst bearing) bodies almost regardless of size somehow cool fundamentally different than large bodies, especially layered intrusions. An invaluable standard state body to which to compare the crystal sizes of other large bodies is the Sudbury impact melt sheet. Formed in a few minutes, the 3km thick 200 km wide superheated melt sheet cooled and crystallized to produce a systematic and predictable internal variation in crystal size and abundance (Zieg & Marsh, 2002, JPet). Buried by 3km of fallback debris, the sheet took about 100,000 to solidify. The Skaergaard intrusion is of a similar thickness (3.4-4 km), but is much less extensive, being more like a thin-edged elliptical laccolith (Norton et. al., 1984, JGR) or a fault-bounded loaf of bread (7.75 x 10.55 x 3.7 km; Nielsen, 2004, JPet). In spite of its limited extent, the extent is large enough for solidification of the thickest parts time to approach that of an infinite sheet

  11. Influence of forced convection on solidification and remelting in the developing mushy zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Vakhrushev, A.; Ludwig, A.; Kharicha, A.

    2016-03-01

    The mushy zone and solid shell formed during solidification of a continuous casting are mostly uneven, and this unevenness of shell growth might lead to surface defects or breakout. One known example is the unevenness of shell growth at the impingement point between the jet flow (coming from submerged entry nozzle) and the solidification front. This phenomenon is primarily understood as the local remelting caused by the superheat of the melt, which is continuously brought by the jet flow towards the solidification front. A recent study of the authors [Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2014, in press] hinted that, in addition to the aforementioned superheat-induced local remelting (1), two other factors also affect the shell growth. They are (2) the advection of latent heat in the semi-solid mushy zone and (3) the enhanced dissipation rate of energy by turbulence in the bulk-mush transition region. This paper is going to perform a detailed numerical analysis to gain an insight into the flow-solidification interaction phenomena. Contributions of each of the above factors to the shell formation are compared.

  12. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  13. In-Situ Observation of Directional Solidifications of Al-Cu Alloys During Parabolic Flight Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Khalil, L.; Salloum-Abou-Jaoude, G.; Reinhart, G.; Pickmann, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Janson, O.; Nguyen-Thi, H.

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that the final properties of materials are strongly related to the microstructures formed during growth and to the accompanying segregation, both being very sensitive to the natural hydrodynamic movements in the melt induced by gravity. Therefore, a deeper understanding of gravity effects on the solidification microstructure is of great importance for industrial applications. In the framework of the ESA-MAP project entitled XRMON (in-situ X-Ray MONitoring of advanced metallurgical processes under microgravity and terrestrial conditions), directional solidification experiments with in situ X-ray radiography were carried out during the 60th and 61st ESA — PF campaigns onboard the Airbus A300 operated by Novespace. Parabolic flights offer several successions of periods with normal gravity between two parabolas, and hyper gravity and microgravity during each parabola, which allows the impact of gravity level variations on the solidification microstructures to be investigated. For this purpose, a dedicated apparatus was designed and developed in collaboration with SSC (Swedish Space Corporation). XRMON-PFF (Parabolic Flight Facility) includes a Bridgman furnace dedicated to the solidification of Al-based alloys with an X-ray device that enables in situ characterization. Columnar and/or equiaxed growth of refined and non-refined Al2Owt.%Cu alloys were investigated and X-ray radiography was successfully used to assess the effect of periodic variations of the gravity level on the solidification microstructure formation. Preliminary results confirmed the strong influence of gravity on the solidification microstructure development.

  14. Spasmodic growth during the rapid solidification of undercooled Ag-Cu eutectic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clopet, C. R.; Cochrane, R. F.; Mullis, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A melt fluxing technique has been used to undercool Ag-Cu eutectic alloy by 10-70 K and the subsequent recalescence has been studied using high speed imaging. Spasmodic growth of the solidification front was observed, in which the growth front would make a series of quasi-periodic jumps separated by extended periods during which time growth appeared to arrest. Evidence of this previously unreported mode of growth is presented. The high speed images and microstructural evidence support the theory that anomalous eutectics form by the growth and subsequent remelting of eutectic dendrites.

  15. On the interest of microgravity experimentation for studying convective effects during the directional solidification of metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Thi, Henri; Reinhart, Guillaume; Billia, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Under terrestrial conditions, solidification processes are often affected by gravity effects, which can significantly influence the final characteristics of the grown solid. The low-gravity environment of space offers a unique and efficient way to eliminate these effects, providing valuable benchmark data for the validation of models and numerical simulations. Moreover, a comparative study of solidification experiments on earth and in low-gravity conditions can significantly enlighten gravity effects. The aim of this paper is to give a survey of solidification experiments conducted in low-gravity environment on metal alloys, with advanced post-mortem analysis and eventually by in situ and real-time characterization.

  16. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-07-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions.

  17. Optimal design of solidification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal design algorithm is presented for the analysis of general solidification processes, and is demonstrated for the growth of GaAs crystals in a Bridgman furnace. The system is optimal in the sense that the prespecified temperature distribution in the solidifying materials is obtained to maximize product quality. The optimization uses traditional numerical programming techniques which require the evaluation of cost and constraint functions and their sensitivities. The finite element method is incorporated to analyze the crystal solidification problem, evaluate the cost and constraint functions, and compute the sensitivities. These techniques are demonstrated in the crystal growth application by determining an optimal furnace wall temperature distribution to obtain the desired temperature profile in the crystal, and hence to maximize the crystal's quality. Several numerical optimization algorithms are studied to determine the proper convergence criteria, effective 1-D search strategies, appropriate forms of the cost and constraint functions, etc. In particular, we incorporate the conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of each algorithm is presented in the example problem.

  18. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Steinbach, I.; Karma, A.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during solidification of an assemblage of equiaxed dendritic crystals. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology (i.e., tip radii, branch spacings, etc.) and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of initial supercoolings and, thus, interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment thus extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and coworkers for steady growth of a single dendrite [Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), first flown on USMP-2] to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation more close to actual casting conditions. Corresponding earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will primarily be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  19. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during equiaxed dendritic solidification. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion-dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and co-workers isothermal dendritic growth experiment (IDGE) for steady growth of a single dendrite to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation closer to actual casting conditions. Corresponding Earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  20. Containerless Solidification and Characterization of Industrial Alloys (NEQUISOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbagi, A.; Henein, H.; Chen, J.; Herlach, D. M.; Lengsdorf, R.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Tourret, D.; Garcia-Escorial, A.

    2011-12-01

    Containerless solidification using electromagnetic levitator (EML), gas atomization and an instrumented drop tube, known as impulse atomization is investigated for Al-Fe and Al-Ni alloys. The effects of primary phase and eutectic undercooling on the microstructure of Al-Fe alloys are investigated using the impulse drop tube and parabolic flight. The TEM characterization on the eutectic microstructure of impulse-atomized Al-Fe powders with two compositions showed that the metastable AlmFe formed in these alloys. Also, the growth undercooling that the dendritic front experiences during the solidification of the droplet resulted in variation of dendrite growth direction from <100> to <111>. For Al-4 at%Fe, it was found that in reduced-gravity and in the impulse-atomized droplets the primary intermetallic forms with a flower-like morphology, whereas in the terrestrial EML sample it has a needle like morphology. For Al-Ni, the effect of primary phase undercooling on dendrite growth velocity under terrestrial and reduced-gravity condition is discussed. It is shown that under terrestrial conditions, in the Ni-rich alloys with increasing undercooling the growth velocity increases, whereas in the Al-rich alloys the growth velocity decreases. However, the Al-rich alloy that was studied in reduced-gravity showed similar behavior to that of Ni-rich alloys. Furthermore, the effect of cooling rate on the phase fractions and metastable phase formation of impulse-atomized Al-Ni alloys is compared with EML. A microsegregation model for the solidification of Al-Ni alloys is applied to impulse atomized powders. The model accounts for the occurrence of several phase transformations, including one or several peritectic reactions and one eutectic reaction.

  1. Solidification process in melt spun Nd-Fe-B type magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changping

    1998-02-23

    A generalized solidification model has been developed based on a systematic investigation on the microstructure of melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Melt spinning was conducted on initial stoichiometric and TiC added Nd2Fe14B (2-14-1) compositions to produce under, optimally and over quenched microstructures. Microstructural characterization was carried out by TEM, SEM, Optical microscopy, XRD, DTA, VSM and DC SQUID techniques. By taking the dendritic breakup during recalescence into consideration, this generalized model has successfully explained the solidification process of the melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Challenging the conventional homogeneous nucleation models, the new model explains the fine and uniform equiaxed 2-14-1 microstructure in optimally quenched ribbons as a result of the breakup of the 2-14-1 dendrites which nucleate heterogeneously from the wheel surface and grow dendritically across the ribbon thickness due to the recalescence. Besides this dendritic breakup feature, the under quenched microstructure is further featured with another growth front starting with the primary solidification of Fe phase near the free side, which results in a coarsely grained microstructure with Fe dendritic inclusions and overall variation in microstructure across the ribbon thickness. In addition, because a epitaxy exists between the Fe phase and the 2-14-1, the so-formed coarse 2-14-1 grains may be textured. C-axis texturing was observed in under quenched ribbons. As a constraint to solidification models in this system, the cause and characteristics of this phenomenon has been studied in detail to test the authors proposed model, and agreement has been found. An extension has also been made to understand the solidification process when TiC is added, which suggests that Ti and C slow down the growth front of both Fe and 2-14-1 phase.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Microstructural Development During Weld Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    Techniques for numerical calculations of phase transformation kinetics have recently become available. These methods are integrated with computational thermodynamics to allow for the description of diffusion-controlled transformations as a function of time. Such calculations have been applied to the modeling of solidification behavior in the current study. Three examples are considered which relate to the prediction of microstructure development and solute redistribution during conditions corresponding to welding conditions. The examples evaluate dendritic growth, planar growth, and competition between alternate solidification modes. It is shown that these techniques are particularly powerful when dealing with multi-component (>2) alloy systems. For such multi-component alloys, new considerations must be taken into account to describe the solute redistribution and the conditions leading to planar front growth. Finally, when studying global behavior covering a wide range of alloy compositions and thermal conditions, individual computations become impractical. For such calculations, neural network analysis may be beneficial and an example is given where such an analysis is shown to be suitable in describing a complex series of phase transformations.

  3. Pressure transient method for front tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1983-08-01

    A pressure transient technique for tracking the advance of cold water fronts during water flooding and goethermal injection operations has been developed. The technique is based on the concept that the steady state pressure buildup in the reservoir region inside the front can be calculated by a fluid skin factor. By analyzing successive pressure falloff tests, the advance of the front in the reservoir can be monitored. The validity of the methods is demonstrated by application to three numerically simulated data sets, a nonisothermal step-rate injection test, a series of pressure falloffs in a multilayered reservoir, and a series of pressure falloff tests in a water flooded oil reservoir.

  4. Solidification Structure and Macrosegregation of Billet Continuous Casting Process with Dual Electromagnetic Stirrings in Mold and Final Stage of Solidification: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Coupling macroscale heat transfer and fluid flow with microscale grain nucleation and crystal growth, a mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was established to study the SWRT82B steel solidification structure and macrosegregation in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting with dual electromagnetic stirrings in mold and final stage of solidification (M-EMS and F-EMS). In the model, the phases of liquid, columnar, and equiaxed were treated separately and the initial growing equiaxed phase, which could move freely with liquid, was regarded as slurry. To obtain the equiaxed grains nucleation and columnar front evolution, the unit tracking method and the columnar front tracking model were built. The model was validated by magnetic induction intensity of stirrer, billet surface temperature, and carbon segregation. The equiaxed phase evolution and the solute transport with effect of fluid flow and grains transport were described in this article. The results show that the equiaxed phase ratio will not increase obviously with higher current intensity of M-EMS, while the negative segregation near the strand surface becomes more serious. The negative segregation zone near the billet center and the center positive segregation come into being with the effect of equiaxed grains sedimentation and liquid thermosolutal flow. It is also found that the liquid solute transport in the F-EMS zone becomes the main factor with higher current intensity rather than the solidification rate, and therefore, the final billet center segregation decreases first and then turns to rise with the current intensity. The optimal current intensities of M-EMS and F-EMS proposed for SWRT82B billet continuous casting are 200 and 400 A, respectively.

  5. Solidification of gold nanoparticles in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, S; Walther, J H; Poulikakos, D; Passerone, D; Koumoutsakos, P

    2005-03-18

    The structure and the solidification of gold nanoparticles in a carbon nanotube are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations indicate that the predicted solidification temperature of the enclosed particle is lower than its bulk counterpart, but higher than that observed for clusters placed in vacuum. A comparison with a phenomenological model indicates that, in the considered range of tube radii (R(CNT)) of 0.5 < R(CNT) < 1.6 nm, the solidification temperature depends mainly on the length of the particle with a minor dependence on R(CNT).

  6. Eutectic solidification patterns: Interest of microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Faivre, Gabriel; Akamatsu, Silvère

    2017-01-01

    The solidification of binary eutectic alloys produces two-phase composite materials in which the microstructure, that is, the geometrical distribution of the two solid phases, results from complex pattern-formation processes at the moving solid-liquid interface. Since the volume fraction of the two solids depends on the local composition, solidification dynamics can be strongly influenced by thermosolutal convection in the liquid. In this contribution, we review our experimental and numerical work devoted to the understanding of eutectic solidification under purely diffusive conditions, which will soon be tested and extended during the microgravity experiment TRANSPARENT ALLOYS planned by the European Space Agency (ESA). xml:lang="fr"

  7. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  8. Solidification microstructures: A conceptual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.; Kurz, W.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed theoretical models have been developed in the literature to correlate microstructural characteristics as a function of processing parameters. These results are examined with a broad perspective to show that various laws for microstructural transitions and microstructural spacings can be represented in terms of three simple characteristic lengths of the important physical processes. Initially, the important physical processes of solute and thermal transport and capillarity effect are considered, and they are related to the microstructural lengths such as dendrite tip radius, primary and secondary spacing, and eutectic spacing. It is shown that these microstructural lengths are simply given by the geometric mean of the characteristic lengths of physical processes that are important in a given problem. New characteristic lengths that become important under rapid solidification are then developed, and how these characteristic lengths influence microstructural transition and microstructural scales is also discussed.

  9. Impact-activated solidification of cornstarch and water suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott Russell

    Liquids typically offer little resistance to impacting objects . Surprisingly, dense suspensions of liquids mixed with micron-sized particles can provide tremendous impact resistance, even though they appear liquid like when left at rest or perturbed lightly. The most well-known example is a dense mixture of cornstarch and water, which can easily provide enough impact resistance to allow a full-grown person to run across its surface. Previous studies have linked this so-called ``shear thickening'' to experiments carried out under steady state shear and attributed it to hydrodynamic interactions or granular dilation. However, neither of these explanations alone can account for the stress scales required to keep a running person above the free surface. This thesis investigates the mechanism for this impact resistance in dense suspensions. We begin by studying impact directly and watching a rod as it strikes the surface of a dense suspension of cornstarch and water. Using high-speed video and embedded force and acceleration sensing, we show that the rod motion leads to the rapid growth of a solid-like object below the impact site. With X-ray videography to see the dynamics of the suspension interior and laser sheet measurements of the surface profile, we show how this solid drags on the surrounding suspension, creating substantial peripheral flow and leading to the rapid extraction of the impactor's momentum. Suspecting that the solidification below the rod may be related to jamming of the particle sub-phase, we carry out 2D experiments with macroscopic disks to show how uniaxial compression of an initially unjammed system can lead to dynamic jamming fronts. In doing so, we show how these fronts are sensitive to the system's initial packing fraction relative to the point at which it jams and also discover that the widths of these fronts are related to a diverging correlation length. Finally, we take these results back to the suspension, where we perform careful, speed

  10. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  11. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  12. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the publication includes papers entitled: (1) Coupled growth in hypermonotectics; (2) Directional solidification of refined Al-4 wt.% Cu alloys; (3) Effects of convection on interface curvature during growth of concentrated ternary compounds; (4) Directional solidification of Al-1.5 wt.% Ni alloys; (5) Interactive response of advancing phase boundaries to particles; (6) INTeractive Response of Advancing Phase boundaries to Particles-INTRAPP; and (7) Particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces.

  13. Solidification/Stabilization Use at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To provide interested stakeholders such as project managers, technology service providers, consulting engineers, site owners, and the general public with the most recent information about solidification/stabilization applications at Superfund sites...

  14. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  15. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  16. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  17. A Citizen's Guide to Solidification and Stabilization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how solidification and stabilization refer to a group of cleanup methods that prevent or slow the release of harmful chemicals from wastes, such as contaminated soil, sediment, and sludge.

  18. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wei, H L; Mazumder, J; DebRoy, T

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  19. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; Debroy, T.

    2015-11-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  20. Microstructure of ceramics fabricated by unidirectional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubo, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unidirectional solidification methods are zone melting, crystal pulling, Bridgemen, and slow cooling. In order to obtain excellent properties (such as transparency), pores, voids and cracks must be avoided, and elimination of such defects is described.

  1. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  2. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Gershinsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    The generalized problem of determining the temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation was mathematically formulated. Realistic initial and boundary conditions were defined, and a computer program was developed and checked out. The programs computes the positions of two moving boundaries, evaporation and solidification, and their velocities. Temperature and solute concentration profiles in the semiinfinite material body at selected instances of time are also computed.

  3. Interface dynamics and coupled growth in directional solidification in presence of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamgotchian, H.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.

    1993-12-01

    The formation and dynamics of gas bubbles in Bridgman growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys is examined. The experimental results show for the first time the rich dynamics that are associated with the formation and propagation of bubbles during directional solidification of alloys. The strong coupling of bubbles with the solid-liquid interface is found to result in the growth of elongated bubbles, either attached to a flat solidification front or forming localized cellular as well as dendritic duplexes (bubbles wrapped by a solid envelope). The coupling of the bubble with the solidification front is shown to cause oscillations in the bubble, which are characterized by fast Fourier transforms. When several duplexes are formed, coupled growth and screening may occur. The basic factors that give rise to oscillations, namely competition between source and sink of acetone assisted by capillary convection at the bubble cap, are discussed qualitatively through the development of an internal oscillator model. Coherent sidebranching observed on dendritic duplexes is shown to be due to resonant modes between the bubble cap and the solid envelope.

  4. X-Ray Radiographic Observation of Directional Solidification Under Microgravity: XRMON-GF Experiments on MASER12 Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, G.; NguyenThi, H.; Bogno, A.; Billia, B.; Houltz, Y.; Loth, K.; Voss, D.; Verga, A.; dePascale, F.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Zimmermann, G.

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) - Microgravity Application Promotion (MAP) programme entitled XRMON (In situ X-Ray MONitoring of advanced metallurgical processes under microgravity and terrestrial conditions) aims to develop and perform in situ X-ray radiography observations of metallurgical processes in microgravity and terrestrial environments. The use of X-ray imaging methods makes it possible to study alloy solidification processes with spatio-temporal resolutions at the scales of relevance for microstructure formation. XRMON has been selected for MASER 12 sounding rocket experiment, scheduled in autumn 2011. Although the microgravity duration is typically six minutes, this short time is sufficient to investigate a solidification experiment with X-ray radiography. This communication will report on the preliminary results obtained with the experimental set-up developed by SSC (Swedish Space Corporation). Presented results dealing with directional solidification of Al-Cu confirm the great interest of performing in situ characterization to analyse dynamical phenomena during solidification processes.

  5. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  6. Numerical investigation of a binary solidification design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Scott Wayne

    This exposition presents the development and application of a methodology for control of unidirectional solidification of a binary alloy. In particular, it is desired to produce a casting that has a uniform cast structure throughout its entire length. Furthermore, the methodology allows the specification, a priori, of the cast structure with respect to both scale, i.e., fine or coarse, and morphology, i.e., dentritic or cellular. This specification is in the form of a map that relates solidification characteristics, i.e., scale and morphology, to the solidification velocity and liquid-side interfacial temperature gradient. Thus design is accomplished by controlling these two parameters during the solidification process. With this in mind, the goal of what is termed the binary solidification design problem is the prediction of a set of boundary temperatures and heat fluxes which when applied will result in the desired interfacial motion and temperature gradient and therefore cast structure. Mathematical models for problems of this type lead to what are termed ill-posed systems in that they may not exhibit existence, uniqueness, or continuous dependence on boundary data. The resolution of this class of problems requires advanced techniques to overcome the instabilities encountered due to their ill-posed nature. The methodology developed herein employs the classical weight residual approach in a innovative manner. Normally, in the solution of a parabolic partial differential equation, such as the heat equation, a spatial series expansion with time varying coefficients is utilized along with a minimization technique to reduce the partial differential equation to a set of first order ordinary differential equations. This set can be solved using any number of numerical technique, i.e., Runge-Kutta, to obtain the temporal variation of the coefficients. These types of time stepping techniques eventually lead to the onset of instability when employed for the resolution of

  7. Directional solidification of Bi-Mn alloys using an applied magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Off-eutectic compositions of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified in applied transverse magnetic fields up to 3 kG, to determine the effects on thermal and solutal convection. Plane front directional solidification of eutectic and near-eutectic Bi-Mn results in a two-phase rodlike morphology consisting of ferromagnetic MnBi rods in a Bi solid solution matrix. Compositions of either side of the eutectic were studied in growth orientations vertically up and down. Temperature gradient was monitored during growth by means of an in-situ thermocouple. For Bi-rich compositions, the magnetic field appeared to increase mixing as determined from thermal, morphological, chemical, and magnetic analyses. For Mn-rich compositions, morphological and chemical analyses suggest some reduction in mixing due to application of the magnetic force. The capability for carrying out directional solidification of Bi-Mn in high longitudinal magnetic fields was established.

  8. Solidification Microstructure, Segregation, and Shrinkage of Fe-Mn-C Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel by Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Peng; Tang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2016-06-01

    A 3D cellular automaton finite element model with full coupling of heat, flow, and solute transfer incorporating solidification grain nucleation and growth was developed for a multicomponent system. The predicted solidification process, shrinkage porosity, macrosegregation, grain orientation, and microstructure evolution of Fe-22Mn-0.7C twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel match well with the experimental observation and measurement. Based on a new solute microsegregation model using the finite difference method, the thermophysical parameters including solid fraction, thermal conductivity, density, and enthalpy were predicted and compared with the results from thermodynamics and experiment. The effects of flow and solute transfer in the liquid phase on the solidification microstructure of Fe-22Mn-0.7C TWIP steel were compared numerically. Thermal convection decreases the temperature gradient in the liquid steel, leading to the enlargement of the equiaxed zone. Solute enrichment in front of the solid/liquid interface weakens the thermal convection, resulting in a little postponement of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The CET behavior of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel during solidification was fully described and mathematically quantized by grain morphology statistics for the first time. A new methodology to figure out the CET location by linear regression of grain mean size with least-squares arithmetic was established, by which a composition design strategy for Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel according to solidification microstructure, matrix compactness, and homogeneity was developed.

  9. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Ramakrishnan, Suresh; Kota, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long-term goal is to make such detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Detached solidification is more likely when the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall is high, i.e. non-wetting. It has been claimed that impurities increase the contact angle. The objective of the current project is to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. We are focusing on determining the influence of oxygen on the contact angle of molten InSb on clean silica ('quartz'), including the advancing and retreating contact angles in addition to the usual equilibrium contact angle. We have created a gas flow system that allows us to control the oxygen partial pressure over a sessile drop of InSb on a horizontal quartz surface. The cell is slowly tilted while videotaping to reveal the contact angles on the two sides of the drop just prior to it rolling down the surface. Thus far, we have learned the following: (1) Molten InSb readily forms an oxide layer in the presence of the trace amounts of oxygen found in high purity argon; (2) This oxide contains a substantial amount of Ga, which presumably is a trace contaminant that is not detectable in the starting material; (3) The addition of 10% hydrogen to the argon gas is sufficient to reduce the oxide and produce a clean drop; (4) An infrared filter must precede the video camera in order to produce a sharp image of the drop for later image analysis; (5) Tilting the surface on which the drop rests causes the two sides

  10. Solidification of DOE problem wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1986-01-01

    Sodium nitrate waste has been successfully solidified in two types of polymeric materials: polyethylene, a thermoplastic material, and polyester styrene (PES), a thermosetting material. Waste form property evaluation tests such as ANS 16.1 leaching test and compressive strength measurements were performed on the waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate. A single-screw extruder was employed for incorporating dry waste into polyethylene at its melt temperature of 120/sup 0/C to produce a homogenous mixture. Results of the leaching test for polyethylene waste forms containing 30, 50, 60 and 70 wt% sodium nitrate are presented as cumulative fraction leached and leaching indices ranging from 11 to 7.8. Two PES systems are discussed. The first is for solidification of dry salt wastes and the second is a water extendible system that is compatible with wet waste streams. Leaching data for PES and water extendible PES waste forms containing 30 wt% sodium nitrate are presented as cumulative fraction leached and leaching indices of approximately 9. Results from compressive strength measurements are also included.

  11. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  12. Fundamental Studies of Solidification in Microgravity Using Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu; Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, XTM, to image (with resolutions up to 3 micrometers) the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Current high resolution X-ray sources and high contrast X-ray detectors have advanced to allow systematic study of solidification dynamics and the resulting microstructure. We have employed a state-of-the-art sub-micron source with acceleration voltages of 10-100 kV to image solidification of metals. One useful strength of the XTM stems from the manner an image is formed. The radiographic image is a shadow formed by x-ray photons that are not absorbed as they pass through the specimen. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). The ability to image these features in real-time enables more fundamental and detailed understanding of solidification dynamics than has previously been possible. Hence, application of this technique towards microgravity experiments will allow rigorous testing of critical solidification models.

  13. Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marin, C.; Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Volz, M.; Luz, P.; Jeter, L.; Spivey, R.; Burton, H.; Smith, G.; Knowles, T. R.; Bonner, W. A.

    2003-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) will be the first materials science experiment conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility at the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha. The launch is schedule for May 31, 2002. Using the specially developed furnace, 10 Te and Zn-doped single crystals of InSb will be directionally solidified in microgravity. A key goal of the SUBSA investigation is to (i) clarify the origin of the melt motion in space laboratories and (ii) to reduce the magnitude of the melt motion to the point that it does not interfere with the transport phenomena. These goals will be accomplished through a special ampoule and furnace design. A disk-shaped baffle, positioned close to the freezing front, is used to reduce melt motion. Furthermore, the solidification will be visualized by using a transparent furnace, with a video camera, continuously sending images to the earth. This allows detection of bubbles and melt de-wetting that could cause surface tension driven convection. In preparation for the space experiments, 30 ground-based experiments were conducted. The results of ground based tests and numerical modeling will be presented. Based on numerical modeling, 12 mm 1D silica ampoules were selected. The small diameter ampoule favors closer placement of the baffle to the interface, without excessive radial segregation caused by forced convection while providing more damping of natural convection. The parts in the silica ampoule include 2 carbon springs made by Energy Science Laboratories, Inc., a pyrocarbon-coated graphite cylinder, pyrocarbon-coated graphite a baffle with the shaft and the InSb charge with the seed crystal grown by W.A. Bonner of Crystallod Inc.

  14. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  15. Rapid solidification of Nb-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Javed, K. R.; Abbaschian, G. J.; Lewis, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    New Nb-base alloys are of interest for aerospace structural applications at high temperatures, viz, 800 to 1650 C. Fundamental information regarding the effects of rapid solidification in achieving greatly refined microstructures, extended solid solubility, suppression of embrittling equilibrium phases, and formation of new phases is desired in a number of Nb-X alloys. The microstructures and selected properties of Nb-Si and other Nb-base alloys are presented for materials both rapidly quenched from the equilibrium liquidus and rapidly solidified following deep supercooling. Electromagnetic levitation was used to achieve melting and supercooling in a containerless inert gas environment. A variety of solidification conditions were employed including splatting or drop casting of supercooled samples. The morphology and composition of phases formed are discussed in terms of both solidification history and bulk composition.

  16. Solidification in syntectic and monotectic systems.

    PubMed

    Hüter, C; Boussinot, G; Brener, E A; Spatschek, R

    2012-08-01

    We present theoretical studies of syntectic and monotectic solidification scenarios. Steady-state solidification along the liquid-liquid interface in a syntectic system is considered by means of a boundary-integral technique developed previously. We study the case of small asymmetry of the pattern and extract from the results the scaling relations in terms of the undercooling and the asymmetry parameter. We also investigate monotectic solidification using the phase-field method. We present two kinds of two-phase fingers, with the solid phase being either the exterior phase or the interior phase, and the pattern corresponding to the growth along the solid-liquid interface. We finally analyze the asymptotic shape of these new morphologies far behind their tip.

  17. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  18. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity driven separation precludes uniform microstructural development during controlled directional solidification (DS) processing of hypermonotectic alloys. It is well established that liquid/liquid suspensions, in which the respective components are immiscible and have significant density differences, can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. A historical introduction to this work is presented with the intent of establishing the basis for applying the phenomena to promote microstructural uniformity during controlled directional solidification processing of immiscible mixtures. Experimental work based on transparent organics, as well as salt systems, will be presented in view of the processing parameters.

  19. Production of hybrid granitic magma at the advancing front of basaltic underplating: Inferences from the Sesia Magmatic System (south-western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, Silvano; Quick, James E.; Demarchi, Gabriella; Klötzli, Urs S.

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Sesia Magmatic System of the southwestern Alps displays the plumbing system beneath a Permian caldera, including a deep crustal gabbroic complex, upper crustal granite plutons and a bimodal volcanic field dominated by rhyolitic tuff filling the caldera. Isotopic compositions of the deep crustal gabbro overlap those of coeval andesitic basalts, whereas granites define a distinct, more radiogenic cluster (Sri ≈ 0.708 and 0.710, respectively). AFC computations starting from the best mafic candidate for a starting melt show that Nd and Sr isotopic compositions and trace elements of andesitic basalts may be modeled by reactive bulk assimilation of ≈ 30% of partially depleted crust and ≈ 15%-30% gabbro fractionation. Trace elements of the deep crustal gabbro cumulates require a further ≈ 60% fractionation of the andesitic basalt and loss of ≈ 40% of silica-rich residual melt. The composition of the granite plutons is consistent with a mixture of relatively constant proportions of residual melt delivered from the gabbro and anatectic melt. Chemical and field evidence leads to a conceptual model which links the production of the two granitic components to the evolution of the Mafic Complex. During the growth of the Mafic Complex, progressive incorporation of packages of crustal rocks resulted in a roughly steady state rate of assimilation. Anatectic granite originates in the hot zone of melting crust located above the advancing mafic intrusion. Upward segregation of anatectic melts facilitates the assimilation of the partially depleted restite by stoping. At each cycle of mafic intrusion and incorporation, residual and anatectic melts are produced in roughly constant proportions, because the amount of anatectic melt produced at the roof is a function of volume and latent heat of crystallization of the underplated mafic melt which in turn produces proportional amounts of hybrid gabbro cumulates and residual melt. Such a process can explain the

  20. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION: IS IT ALWAYS APPROPRIATE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The findings of recent research and evaluation efforts are assessed to determine whether solidification/stabilization (S/S) has been properly and appropriately applied for different types of hazardous wastes. Results from these studies are mixed and, as a result, the need for pro...

  1. Grain Refining and Microstructural Modification during Solidification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    and 100 ml of distilled water (called etchant A) for 5 to 15 seconds. The others were etched with aqua regia (called etchant B) for 10 to 25 seconds... reverse lide It noceoav. aid IduntIty by block um-bet) Grain refining, microstructure, solidification, phase diagrams, electromagnetic stirring, Cu-Fe

  2. Direct Simulation of a Solidification Benchmark Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzani, Tommy; Gandin, Charles-André; Digonnet, Hugues; Bellet, Michel; Zaidat, Kader; Fautrelle, Yves

    2013-02-01

    A solidification benchmark experiment is simulated using a three-dimensional cellular automaton—finite element solidification model. The experiment consists of a rectangular cavity containing a Sn-3 wt pct Pb alloy. The alloy is first melted and then solidified in the cavity. A dense array of thermocouples permits monitoring of temperatures in the cavity and in the heat exchangers surrounding the cavity. After solidification, the grain structure is revealed by metallography. X-ray radiography and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry are also conducted to access a distribution map of Pb, or macrosegregation map. The solidification model consists of solutions for heat, solute mass, and momentum conservations using the finite element method. It is coupled with a description of the development of grain structure using the cellular automaton method. A careful and direct comparison with experimental results is possible thanks to boundary conditions deduced from the temperature measurements, as well as a careful choice of the values of the material properties for simulation. Results show that the temperature maps and the macrosegregation map can only be approached with a three-dimensional simulation that includes the description of the grain structure.

  3. Solidification behavior during directed light fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, D.J.; Lewis, G.K.; Nemec, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    Directed light fabrication (DLF) is a process that fuses gas delivered metal powders within a focal zone of a laser beam to produce fully dense, 3-dimensional metal components. A variety of materials have been processed with DLF, ranging from steels to tungsten, and including intermetallics such as NiAl and MoSi{sub 2}. To evaluate the processing parameters and resulting microstructures, solidification studies have been performed on defined alloy systems. For example, solidification cooling rates have been determined based upon secondary dendrite arm spacings in Fe-based alloys. In addition, eutectic spacings have been used to define growth velocities during solidification. Cooling rates vary from 10{sup 1}-10{sup 5} K s{sup {minus}1} and growth rates vary between 1--50 mm s{sup {minus}1}. As a result, process definition has been developed based upon the microstructural development during solidification. The materials explored were Ag-19Cu, Fe-24.8Ni, 316 stainless steel, Al-33Cu, W, MoSi{sub 2} and NiAl.

  4. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - USEPA SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA experience in using Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) Technology to remediate Superfund sites is reviewed. Included are several case studies for insitu and exsitu treatment and sites containing both metals and organics, both separately, and mixed on the same site. Co...

  5. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-20

    thermodynamics . 2) Experimental verify the effectiveness of possible nucleating compounds. 3) Extend grain refinement theory and solidification...knowledge through experimental data. 4) Determine structure property relationships for the examined grain refiners. 5) Formulate processing techniques for...using grain refiners in the steel casting industry. During Fiscal Year 2010, this project worked on determining structure property -relationships

  6. Uncertainty Quantification of Modelling of Equiaxed Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metal alloy solidification are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to sparse experimental data, to which agreement can be misinterpreted due to both model and experimental uncertainty. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis are performed on a transient model of solidification of Al-4.5 wt.% Cu in a rectangular cavity, with equiaxed (grain refined) solidification morphology. This model solves equations for momentum, temperature, and species conservation; UQ and sensitivity analysis are performed for the degree of macrosegregation. A Smolyak sparse grid algorithm is used to select input values to construct a response surface fit to model outputs. The response surface is then used as a surrogate for the solidification model to determine the sensitivities and probability density functions of the model outputs. Uncertain model inputs of interest include the secondary dendrite arm spacing, equiaxed particle size, and fraction solid at which the rigid mushy zone forms. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient model of direct chill casting of the same alloy.

  7. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  8. Solidification of oils and organic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    The suitability of selected solidification media for application in the disposal of low-level oil and other organic liquid wastes has been investigated. In the past, these low-level wastes (LLWs) have commonly been immobilized by sorption onto solid absorbents such as vermiculite or diatomaceous earth. Evolving regulations regarding the disposal of these materials encourage solidification. Solidification media which were studied include Portland type I cement; vermiculite plus Portland type I cement; Nuclear Technology Corporation's Nutek 380-cement process; emulsifier, Portland type I cement-sodium silicate; Delaware Custom Materiel's cement process; and the US Gypsum Company's Envirostone process. Waste forms have been evaluated as to their ability to reliably produce free standing monolithic solids which are homogeneous (macroscopically), contain < 1% free standing liquids by volume and pass a water immersion test. Solidified waste form specimens were also subjected to vibratory shock testing and flame testing. Simulated oil wastes can be solidified to acceptable solid specimens having volumetric waste loadings of less than 40 volume-%. However, simulated organic liquid wastes could not be solidified into acceptable waste forms above a volumetric loading factor of about 10 volume-% using the solidification agents studied.

  9. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  10. Firing up the front line.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Santamaria, J A

    1999-01-01

    For many organizations, achieving competitive advantage means eliciting superior performance from employees on the front line--the burger flippers, hotel room cleaners, and baggage handlers whose work has an enormous effect on customers. That's no easy task. Front line workers are paid low wages, have scant hope of advancement, and--not surprisingly--often care little about the company's performance. But then how do some companies succeed in engaging the emotional energy of rank-and-file workers? A team of researchers at McKinsey & Company and the Conference Board recently explored that question and discovered that one highly effective route is demonstrated by the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines' approach to motivation follows the "mission, values, and pride" path, which researchers say is practical and relevant for the business world. More specifically, the authors say the Marines follow five practices: they over-invest in cultivating core value; prepare every person to lead, including front line supervisors; learn when to create teams and when to create single-leader work groups; attend to all employees, not just the top half; and encourage self-discipline as a way of building pride. The authors admit there are critical differences between the Marines and most businesses. But using vivid examples from companies such as KFC and Marriott International, the authors illustrate how the Marines' approach can be translated for corporate use. Sometimes, the authors maintain, minor changes in a company's standard operating procedure can have a powerful effect on front line pride and can result in substantial payoffs in company performance.

  11. In-situ Monitoring of Dynamic Phenomena during Solidification and Phase Transformation Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J; Mariam, Fesseha G; Patterson, Brian M.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Lee, Wah Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Tucker, Tim J.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Teter, David F.; Beard, Timothy V.; Hudson, Richard W.; Freibert, Franz J.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.; Farrow, Adam M.; Cross, Carl E.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Lookman, Turab; Hunter, Abigail; Choudhury, Samrat; Karma, Alain; Ott, Jr., Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; O'Neill, Finian; Hill, Joshua; Emigh, Megan G.

    2012-07-30

    The purpose of this project is to: (1) Directly observe phase transformations and microstructure evolution using proton (and synchrotron x-ray) radiography and tomography; (2) Constrain phase-field models for microstructure evolution; (3) Experimentally control microstructure evolution during processing to enable co-design; and (4) Advance toward the MaRIE vision. Understand microstructure evolution and chemical segregation during solidification {yields} solid-state transformations in Pu-Ga.

  12. Teaching Front Handsprings from a Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The front handspring is an important gymnastics skill that serves as a transition from beginner-level rolling and static balances to more advanced tumbling. It is, therefore, a skill highly desired by beginners. Early learning requires a great deal of effort during which students experience many failed attempts. Unless they are highly motivated,…

  13. A Real Time Investigation of Morphological Evolution During Solidification of Different Alloy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification phenomenon which occur at the solid/liquid (s/I) interface play a major role in the determination of structure and hence the technologically important properties of a casting. However, metals being opaque, conclusions related to several important phenomenon such as boundary layer thickness, morphological evolution, and eutectic and cell spacing are deduced from quenching experiments and subsequent post solidification metallographic analysis. Consequently, limited information is obtained about the dynamics of the process. This paper will discuss the recent efforts at the Space Science Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, to view and quantify in-situ and in real time the dynamics of the solidification process and to measure interfacial undercooling. First, a high resolution x-ray transmission microscope (XTM) has been developed to monitor fundamental interfacial phenomena during directional solidification of metals and alloys. The XTM operates in the range of 10-100 KeV and through projection is capable of achieving magnification of up to 16OX. Secondly, an innovative collapsible furnace has been designed to quantify interfacial undercooling by measuring the temperature of a moving s/I interface in reference to a fixed s/l interface. This measurement technique is non-intrusive in nature and is based on the Seebeck principle. In this paper real time results obtained to characterize the dynamics of irregular eutectic spacing will be presented. As an example fiber to lamella or plate transition in the Al-Al2Au eutectic system will be discussed. Further, a resolution limit of 25 micron has permitted viewing in real time morphological instability and cellular growth in Al-Au and Al-Ag systems. Simultaneously, a systematic investigation has been carried out to measure interfacial undercooling for Pb-1 wt.% Sn at and near the marginal stability regime. In conjunction with the XTM observations this study attempts to validate existing relationships

  14. Columnar- Equiaxed Transition in Solidification processing: The ESA-MAP CETSOL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billia, Bernard; Gandin, Charles-André; Zimmermann, Gerhard; Browne, David; Dupouy, Marie-Danielle

    2005-03-01

    Many castings are the result of a competition between the growth of columnar and equiaxed grains. Indeed, microstructures are at the center of materials science and engineering, and solidification is the most important processing route for structural materials, especially metals and alloys. Presently, microstructure models remain mostly based on diffusive transport mechanisms so that there is a need of critical benchmark data to test fundamental theories of microstructure formation, which often necessitates to have recourse to solidification experiments in the reduced-gravity environment of space. Accordingly, the CETSOL (Columnar-Equiaxed Transition in SOLidification processing)-MAP project of ESA is gathering together European groups with complementary skills to carry out experiments and model the processes, in particular in view of the utilization of reduced-gravity environment that will be afforded by the International Space Station (ISS) to get benchmark data. The ultimate objective of the CETSOL research program is to significantly contribute to the improvement of integrated modeling of grain structure in industrially important castings. To reach this goal, the approach is devised to deepen the quantitative understanding of the basic physical principles that, from the microscopic to the macroscopic scales, govern microstructure formation in solidification processing under diffusive conditions and with fluid flow in the melt. Pending questions are attacked by well-defined model experiments on technical alloys and/or on model transparent systems, physical modeling at microstructure and mesoscopic scales (e.g. large columnar front or equiaxed crystals) and numerical simulation at all scales, up to the macroscopic scales of casting with integrated numerical models.

  15. Interaction of Porosity with an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: a Real-Time Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W.; Catalina, A.; Stefanescu, D.; Curreri, P.

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with formation of porosity during solidification continue to have a daily impact on the metal forming industry. Several past investigations have dealt with the nucleation and growth aspects of porosity. However, investigations related to the interaction of porosity with that of a solidification front has been limited mostly to organic analogues. In this paper we report on real time experimental observations of such interactions in metal alloys. Using a state of the art X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) we have been able to observe and record the dynamics of the interaction. This includes distortion of the solid/liquid interface near a poro.sity, solute segr,egation patterns surrounding a porosity and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing solid/liquid interface. Results will be presented for different Al alloys and growth conditions. The experimental data will be compared to theory using a recently developed 2D numerical model. The model employs a finite difference approach where the solid/liquid interface is defined through the points at which the interface intersects the grid lines. The transport variables are calculated at these points and the motion of the solidification front is determined by the magnitude of the transport variables. The model accounts for the interplay of the thermal and solutal field and the influence of capilarity to predict the shape of the solid/liquid interface with time in the vicinity of porosity. One can further calculate the perturbation of the solutal field by the presence of porosity in the melt.

  16. Grain control in directional solidification of photovoltaic silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, C. W.; Lan, W. C.; Lee, T. F.; Yu, A.; Yang, Y. M.; Hsu, W. C.; Hsu, B.; Yang, A.

    2012-12-01

    Directional solidification (DS) has become the major process for growing multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) for solar cells in the photovoltaic industry. The control of grains, as well as the grain boundaries, is particularly important to the crystal quality, and thus the solar cell efficiency. In this paper, we review the progress in the grain control of DS mc-Si from lab-scale to industrial-scale experiments. The control of the growth front was found effective in improving the grain size, but the grain size was found decreased with growth due to the sub-grain formation. With a better control of nucleation and grain competition by increasing the undercooling through enhanced uniform or spot cooling, grains with more Σ3 or twin boundaries were obtained. As the grain size increased with height, the growth of dislocations was found much slower than that without grain growth. The conversion efficiency of the solar cells fabricated from the wafers with grain control was significantly improved. Moreover, the seeded growth was also discussed.

  17. Directional Solidification and Characterization of Hg(0.89) Mn(0.11)Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. W.; Scripa, R. N.; Lehoczky. S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Su, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    Two boules of Hg(0.89)Mn(0.11)Te(MMT) were solidified using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Translation rates of 0.09 and 0. 18 microns/s were used. The influence of growth rate on axial compositional homogeneity in the MMT boules was evaluated experimentally by conducting precision density measurements on radial slices taken from each boule. In addition, Plane Front Solidification theory and segregation coefficient (k) data for the Hg(1-x)Mn(x)Te system were used to fit theoretical composition profiles to the measured MMT axial composition profiles. The strong correlation between the measured and calculated MMT axial composition profiles indicates diffusion dominated axial solute redistribution in the boules under the applied growth conditions. The analysis of the MMT axial composition profiles by Plane Front Solidification theory allowed the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient (D(eff) = 3.5 x l0(exp -5) sq cm/s). The k-values for the Hg(1-x)Mn(x)Te system and the D(sub eff) - value were then used to verify that both boules were solidified under conditions which did not exceed the Constitutional Supercooling Criteria under ideal conditions. Finally, a preliminary examination of the radial compositional variation in each MMT was made using Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The radial homogeneity in the MMT boules was found to be comparable for both translation rates.

  18. Direct observation of microbubbles in directional solidification of salol

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.M.; Srinivasan, M.R.; Cummins, H.Z. )

    1990-03-26

    Dynamic light scattering at the crystal-melt interface of solidifying salol was followed for 14 days. The hydrodynamic radius deduced from intensity correlation data increased continuously from {approx}1 to {approx}100 {mu}m. When the scattering layer was trapped by the advancing crystal front, microscopic observation revealed bubbles as inclusions whose size agreed with the light-scattering value. Scattering was also observed to disappear after prolonged pumping on the sample.

  19. TEMHD Effects on Solidification Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Andrew; Pericleous, Koulis

    2012-01-01

    An unexplored potential exists to control microstructure evolution through the use of external DC magnetic fields. Thermoelectric currents form during solidification and interact with this external field to drive microscopic fluid dynamics within the inter-dendritic region. The convective heat and mass transport can lead to profound changes on the dendritic structure. In this paper the effect of high magnetic fields is demonstrated through the use of both 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional numerical models. The results show that the application of a magnetic field causes significant disruption to the dendritic morphology. Investigation into the underlying mechanism gives initial indicators of how external magnetic fields can either lead to unexpected growth behaviour, or alternatively can be used to control the evolution of microstructure in undercooled melts as encountered in levitated droplet solidification.

  20. Undercooling of materials during solidification in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical research program was undertaken on the under cooling and solidification of materials under variable external field conditions. A catalog of theories and models of nucleation of solid phases in the melt is provided, as is a discussion of the relation of undercooling to intermolecular potentials, the dependence of growth rate on undercooling, the influence of undercooling on liquid-solid interface stability and solid structure, the direct effects of external fields on melts, the relation of solid physical properties to structure and the role of nucleants in solidification. Results of the theoretical analysis of several experiments related to the space processing applications program are given, and recommendations for future experiments and further theoretical developments along with procedures for correlation of theory and experiment are specified.

  1. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  2. Interface solidification of impinging metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Soto, Dan; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    Molten metal droplet deposition is important in manufacturing techniques such as spray deposition and metal inkjet printing. Key parameters are the final splat morphology and its adhesion to the base substrate. How to control these parameters is still poorly understood, since droplet deformation, cooling and solidification happen simultaneously. Here, we studied the contact patch formed between the metal drop and the base substrate, varying the thermal properties and the initial temperature of the substrate, and the initial temperature of the drop. We identify various scenarios for interface solidification, including smooth liquid-spread contact patches, entrapment of air pockets, and transient re-melting of the interface. The transitions between various scenarios can be rationalized from the interfacial temperature estimated by heat conduction, and taking into account the flow of liquid metal.

  3. Directional solidification in an imperfect furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brattkus, K.; Davis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The upward directional solidification of a binary alloy in which the rejected solute is more dense than the solvent is considered. The system is stably stratified both thermally and solutally. If heat is lost through the sidewalls, horizontal thermal gradients drive a steady double-diffusive convection. Solidification cells with small aspect ratios (width/length) A are considered, and asymptotic solutions to the steady double-diffusive system are obtained as A tends to 0 under the assumption heat losses are also small. When the thermal Grashof number is large, buoyancy boundary layers are at the sidewalls. The shape of the crystal-melt interface is determined by the coupled effects of local thermodynamic equilibrium, diffusion and convection.

  4. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V.

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

  5. IJEMS: Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendle, John R.; Mashl, Steven J.; Hardin, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification (IJEMS) is a cooperative effort between Iowa State University and the University of Iowa to study the formation of metal-matrix composites in a microgravity environment. Of particular interest is the interaction between the solid/liquid interface and the particles in suspension. The experiment is scheduled to fly on STS-69, Space Shuttle Endeavor on August 3, 1995. This project is unique in its heavy student participation and cooperation between the universities involved.

  6. The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Dendrites growing at .4 supercooling from a 2 stinger growth chamber for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  7. Phosphate Bonded Solidification of Radioactive Incinerator Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B. W.

    1999-04-13

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  9. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guérin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  10. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; ...

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  11. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  12. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  13. Experience of Non-Technological Waste Solidification with Polymers at Radium Institute - 13530

    SciTech Connect

    Babain, V.; Pokhitonov, Yu.; Alyapyshev, M.

    2013-07-01

    In the run of scientific and production activities in Radium Institute there are generated the liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) of the most various compositions, which are partially processed (with the use of cementation technology) as accumulated and removed to the special-purpose enterprise ('Radon') for a long-term storage. The process of cementation has wide practical application including the use for a long time at Radium Institute for solidification of aqueous solutions. One of the problems appearing at laboratory waste processing consists in a presence of organic substances in aqueous solutions and high acid concentration. Solidification of such waste (water-organic) also runs into a number of serious difficulties due to organic liquid and cement incompatibility. In this connection, development of advanced technologies with using high-tech polymers seems to be quite justified. (authors)

  14. Minimizing Segregation During the Controlled Directional Solidification of Dendritic Alloys Publication: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Kim, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Gravity-driven thermosolutal convection that arises during controlled directional solidification (DS) of dendritic alloys promotes detrimental macro-segregation (e.g. freckles and steepling) in products such as turbine blades. Considerable time and effort has been spent to experimentally and theoretically investigate this phenomena; although our knowledge has advanced to the point where convection can be modeled and accurately compared to experimental results, little has been done to minimize its onset and deleterious effects. The experimental work demonstrates that segregation can be. minimized and microstructural uniformity promoted when a slow axial rotation is applied to the sample crucible during controlled directional solidification processing. Numerical modeling utilizing continuation and bifurcation methods have been employed to develop accurate physical and mathematical models with the intent of identifying and optimizing processing parameters.

  15. Mapping real time growth of experimental laccoliths: The effect of solidification on the mechanics of magmatic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currier, Ryan M.; Marsh, Bruce D.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of solidification front growth along the margins of magmas have been widely found to be fundamental in controlling magma transport and emplacement. In this vein, the role of solidification fronts in determining the basic growth mechanics of laccoliths are investigated here in a series of scaled experiments using two contrasting magma analogs, water and molten wax that are injected into a visco-elastic gelatin based crustal analog. In non-solidifying, water-style experiments, intrusion is a relatively simple process. In contrast, wax magma emplacement displays a vast palette of compelling behaviors: propagation can slow, stop, and reactivate, and the directionality of lateral growth becomes much more variable. Small flow deviations in water-based intrusions are likely the product of flow instabilities, the result of injecting a viscous fluid along an interface (similar to Hele-Shaw cell experiments). However, the much more complex emplacement style of the wax experiments is attributed to solidification at the leading edge of the crack. The overall effects of solidification during emplacement can be described by a non-dimensional parameter measuring the relative competition between the rates of crack propagation and solidification at the crack leading edge. In this context, laccolith growth mechanics can be separated into three distinctive characteristic stages. Namely, I: A thin pancake style sill initially emanating radially from a central feeder zone, II: As solidification stalls magma propagation at the leading edges, enhanced thickening begins, forming a true, low aspect ratio laccolith, and III: As stresses accumulate, tears and disruptions readily occur in the solidified margin causing fresh breakouts, thus reactivating lateral growth into new lobes. The competitive combination of these latter stages often leads to a characteristic pulsatile growth. The unexpected richness of these results promises to add fundamentally to the basic understanding

  16. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  17. Stories from the Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Blake

    2002-01-01

    Shares some of the author's personal experiences from the "front line" to illustrate the potential of computer-supported learning environments. Concludes that technology, if used in conjunction with sound pedagogy, allows students to tep outside the confines of the traditional classroom and school structure and take responsibility for both their…

  18. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does.

  19. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  20. Prediction inverse d'un front de solidification dans un four de transformation a haute temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Marc-Andre

    Ce projet de recherche porte sur une methode numerique permettant de predire l'evolution du profil 2D de la couche solide qui recouvre l'interieur des parois de plusieurs fours de transformation a haute temperature. Un modele mathematique base sur la formulation faible de l'energie est d'abord developpe et valide. Une methode de transfert thermique inverse reposant sur ce modele est ensuite developpee afin d'obtenir une mesure rapide et continue de l'evolution du profil de cette couche solide. Vu la grande inertie thermique du systeme a l'etude, differentes strategies sont proposees afin de faciliter la mise en uvre de cette methode numerique. Finalement, cette approche inverse est confrontee aux resultats experimentaux obtenus a l'aide d'un reacteur metallurgique. Une etude preliminaire montre que les fours de transformation presentent une tres grande inertie thermique qui limite grandement l'utilisation des methodes inverses. En effet, la sensibilite de cette methode numerique repose essentiellement sur le delai temporel observe entre la variation du profil du banc et la fluctuation de la temperature a la surface externe de la paroi du four. Les resultats obtenus demontrent qu'une partie de ce delai est proportionnel a la chaleur latente de fusion lorsque le materiau a changement de phase est constitue d'un melange non eutectique. Afin de limiter l'impact de ce delai temporel, deux astuces numeriques sont proposees : reutiliser plus d'une fois les mesures de temperature et modifier le probleme thermique dans les regions pateuse et liquide. D'une part, le concept de chevauchement propose permet de reduire le temps d'acquisition des donnees entre chacune des predictions. D'autre part, l'approche virtuelle developpee permet de reduire l'inertie thermique du systeme et, par le fait meme, le delai temporel associe a la diffusion de la chaleur. Ces deux strategies ont permis de predire efficacement l'evolution 1D de l'epaisseur de la couche de gelee qui se solidifie a l'interieur des cuves d'electrolyse. Par ailleurs, l'important temps de calcul associe a la mise en oeuvre de la methode inverse a ete reduit en utilisant une approche pseudo 2D pour resoudre le probleme inverse 2D. Cette approche consiste a diviser le domaine a l'etude en plusieurs tranches unidimensionnelles pour lesquelles la methode inverse 1D est rapidement mise en oeuvre. L'ensemble des solutions est ensuite combine pour mener a la prediction de l'evolution du profil de l'interface de changement de phase. Il est a noter que la validite de cette methode depend fortement de l'importance des effets 2D dans le systeme. Un abaque portant sur le domaine d'application de cette methode est d'ailleurs presente dans cet ouvrage. Finalement, l'efficacite de cette methode numerique a ete validee a l'aide d'un montage experimental s'apparentant a une cuve d'electrolyse reelle. Les resultats obtenus permettent de conclure que la methode inverse proposee peut etre efficacement implementee dans un dispositif de mesure permettant de predire rapidement et a moindre cout l'evolution du profil de la couche protectrice que l'on retrouve dans ces cuves d'electrolyse. Mots-cles : Methode inverse, cuve d'electrolyse, temps de diffusion, four de transformation, chevauchement, domaine virtuel

  1. 3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side elevation. Note gasoline sign post added. Flush store window not altered, 1900 clapboard siding and panelling remaining. - 510 Central Avenue (Commercial Building), Ridgely, Caroline County, MD

  2. 9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY (LEFT) AND BLANK WALL (CENTER) CORRESPONDING TO LOCATION OF INTERIOR VAULTS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  3. 35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front of powerhouse and car barn. 'Annex' is right end of building. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Undercooling, Rapid Solidification, and Relations to Processing in Low Earth Orbit (A Review of the Works of Bingbo Wei)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    1999-01-01

    This is a survey of the published works of Prof. Bingbo Wei of the Department of Applied Physics at Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian P.R. China. Transformations among solid - liquid - and vapor are fundamental to the foundations of life and culture on Earth. The development and understanding of materials has lead the evolution and advancement of the human race since antiquity. Materials and fluids research is continuing today, with us standing on the shoulders of those that have gone before us. Technological and scientific breakthroughs continue due to studies of greater and greater complexity, that include for example, research done at high pressures, in high magnetic fields, at temperatures near absolute zero, and in the low gravity environment of low Earth orbit. Of particular technological importance is the liquid to solid transformation of metals and alloys. Solidification processing is generally the most important factor in the final properties of objects made of metal; and undercooling is the fundamental driving force for all solidification. The interest and resources dedicated to the study of solidification and undercooling are great and World wide. For many years B. Wei and his coworkers have been studying undercooling and rapid solidification and have amassed a significant body of published research in this important field, contributing to the leading edge of the state-of-the-art. It is the goal of this memorandum to provide a review of the research of B. Wei et al.; publications in Chinese are included in the reference list but are not discussed. The bulk of Wei's work has been in the area of undercooling and rapid solidification [1-11, 13-16, 24-36] with papers dating back to 1989, the same year he earned his Ph.D. Below, discussions of Wei's undercooling and rapid solidification research have been grouped together mostly on the basis of alloy type, such as eutectic, intermetallic, or monotectic.

  5. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  6. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  7. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  8. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  9. Transient magmatic convection prolonged by solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandeis, Genevieve; Marsh, Bruce D.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments have been conducted on the solidification of a paraffin layer, in order to elucidate the transient stage of convection created in cooling magma by the fact that strong changes in viscosity with crystallization lock up within an inwardly propagating crust much buoyancy that would otherwise be available to drive convection. The interior of the magma remains isothermal, and the temperature decreases uniformly until it is locked at the convective liquidus; the crystals are fine hairlike dendrites without major compositional differentiations. Measurements over time are presented of crust thickness, convective velocity, and heat transfer.

  10. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  11. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  12. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-18

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  13. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  14. ARIEL front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Baartman, R. A.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF will greatly expand the variety and availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) (Laxdal, Nucl Inst Methods Phys Res B 204:400-409, 2003). The ARIEL front end connects the two ARIEL target stations to the existing ISAC facility to expand delivery to two and eventually three simultaneous RIB beams with up to two simultaneous accelerated beams (Laxdal et al. 2008). The low-energy beam transport lines and mass separators are designed for maximum flexibility to allow a variety of operational modes in order to optimize the radioactive ion beam delivery. A new accelerator path is conceived for high mass delivery from an EBIS charge state breeder. The front-end design utilizes the experience gained in 15 years of ISAC beam delivery.

  15. Theory of pinned fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of a front between two different phases in the presence of a smoothly inhomogeneous external field that takes its critical value at the crossing point is analyzed. Two generic scenarios are studied. In the first, the system admits a bistable solution and the external field governs the rate in which one phase invades the other. The second mechanism corresponds to a continuous transition that, in the case of reactive systems, takes the form of a transcritical bifurcation at the crossing point. We solve for the front shape and for the response of competitive fronts to external noise, showing that static properties and also some of the dynamical features cannot discriminate between the two scenarios. A reliable indicator turns out to be the fluctuation statistics. These take a Gaussian form in the bifurcation case and a double-peaked shape in a bistable system. Our results are discussed in the context of biological processes, such as species and communities dynamics in the presence of a resource gradient.

  16. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-07-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  17. Front Range Report, Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, William

    The second regional conference of the Front Range Branch, AGU, was attended by more than 80 professionals and some 20 outstanding high school students. The conference included 2 days of interdisciplinary talks, and lots of discussion, that primarily were keyed to geophysical studies of Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Other talks reported on nonregional, and sometimes global, studies being done by geophypsicists of the Front Range region.Topics included tectonics of the Front Range and the Colorado Plateau, pollution of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and a supreme polluting event that caused the late-Cretaceous extinctions. Other notable talks were on toxic cleanup, microburst (wind shear) detection at U.S. airports, and other meteorological studies. Several talks treated the audience to the excitement of new work and surprise discoveries. The meeting was multimedia, including the playing of two videos through a projection TV and the playing of a fascinating tape between an airport control tower and incoming pilots during a severe microburst event.

  18. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  19. Cellular Model Simulations of Solidification Structures in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsoruji, Ghazi H.

    Solidification processes are an important part of many modem manufacturing processes. They can be found in different casting and welding processes. The solidification structure is very important for the quality of any product manufactured by such processes. This is so because the casting or weldment microstructure determines their mechanical properties. For welding processes, solidification theories can explain the evolution of the fusion zone microstructure and how this microstructure is influenced by the solidification parameters such as the temperature gradient and the solidification rate. In order to investigate the solidification parameters' effect on the microstructure, a numerical model based on Cellular Automaton combined with the finite difference method (CA-FD) is presented in this thesis. The simulation is conducted on a finite three dimensional control volume of the fusion zone. The model takes into account the solute-, curvature-, and kinetic undercooling. The temperatures are assumed to be distributed linearly within the control volume. The model predicts the morphology and density of the microstructure according to different values of the cooling rate and initial temperatures. It is demonstrated that the solidification structure has a columnar morphology at high temperature gradients and low cooling rates. The morphology changes to dendritic as the temperature gradient decreases and/or the cooling rate increases. It is also shown that an increase in the cooling rate results in the densification of the solidification structure. The results demonstrate that an increase in the initial substrate roughness can result in the increase in the density of the solidification structure. The simulation results show an agreement with the constitutional undercooling theory of solidification structures.

  20. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  1. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  2. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  3. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  4. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  5. Carburizer Effect on Cast Iron Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janerka, Krzysztof; Kondracki, Marcin; Jezierski, Jan; Szajnar, Jan; Stawarz, Marcin

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the effect of carburizing materials on cast iron solidification and crystallization. The studies consisted of cast iron preparation from steel scrap and different carburizers. For a comparison, pig iron was exclusively used in a solid charge. Crystallization analysis revealed the influence of the carburizer material on the crystallization curves as well as differences in the solidification paths of cast iron prepared with the use of different charge materials. The carburizers' influence on undercooling during the eutectic crystallization process was analyzed. The lowest undercooling rate was recorded for the melt with pig iron, then for synthetic graphite, natural graphite, anthracite, and petroleum coke (the highest undercooling rate). So a hypothesis was formulated that eutectic cells are created most effectively with the presence of carbon from pig iron (the highest nucleation potential), and then for the graphite materials (crystallographic similarity with the carbon precipitation in the cast iron). The most difficult eutectic crystallization is for anthracite and petroleum coke (higher undercooling is necessary). This knowledge can be crucial when the foundry plant is going to change the solid charge composition replacing the pig iron by steel scrap and the recarburization process.

  6. Method for treating materials for solidification

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils.

  7. The effect of natural and forced melt convection on dendritic solidification in Ga-In alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, N.; Roshchupkina, O.; Sokolova, O.; Eckert, S.

    2015-05-01

    The directional solidification of Ga-25 wt%In alloys within a Hele-Shaw cell was visualized by means of X-ray radioscopy. The experimental investigations are especially focused on the impact of melt convection on the dendritic growth. Natural convection occurs during a bottom up solidification because lighter solute is rejected at the solid-liquid interface leading to an unstable density stratification. Forced convection was produced by a rotating wheel with two parallel disks containing at their inner sides a set of permanent NdFeB magnets with alternating polarization. The direction of forced melt flow is almost horizontal at the solidification front whereas local flow velocities in the range between 0.1 and 1.0 mm/s were achieved by controlling the rotation speed of the magnetic wheel. Melt flow induces various effects on the grain morphology primarily caused by the convective transport of solute. Our observations show a facilitation of the growth of primary trunks or lateral branches, suppression of side branching, dendrite remelting and fragmentation. The manifestation of all phenomena depends on the dendrite orientation, local direction and intensity of the flow. The forced flow eliminates the solutal plumes and damps the local fluctuations of solute concentration. It provokes a preferential growth of the secondary arms at the upstream side of the primary dendrite arms, whereas the high solute concentration at the downstream side of the dendrites can inhibit the formation of secondary branches completely. Moreover, the flow changes the inclination angle of the dendrites and the angle between primary trunks and secondary arms.

  8. Characterization of Transport and Solidification in the Metal Recycling Processes

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C. Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1997-08-06

    The characterization of the transport and solidification of metal in the melting and casting processes is significant for the optimization of the radioactively contaminated metal recycling and refining processes. . In this research project, the transport process in the melting and solidification of metal was numerically predicted, and the microstructure and radionuclide distribution have been characterized by scanning electron microscope/electron diffractive X-ray (SEWEDX) analysis using cesium chloride (CSC1) as the radionuclide surrogate. In the melting and solidification process, a resistance furnace whose heating and cooling rates are program- controlled in the helium atmosphere was used. The characterization procedures included weighing, melting and solidification, weighing after solidification, sample preparation, and SEM/EDX analysis. This analytical methodology can be used to characterize metal recycling and refining products in order to evaluate the performance of the recycling process. The data obtained provide much valuable information that is necessary for the enhancement of radioactive contaminated metal decontamination and recycling technologies. The numerical method for the prediction of the melting and solidification process can be implemented in the control and monitoring system-of the melting and casting process in radioactive contaminated metal recycling. The use of radionuclide surrogates instead of real radionuclides enables the research to be performed without causing harmfid effects on people or the community. This characterization process has been conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University since October 1995. Tests have been conducted on aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) using cesium chloride (CSCI) as a radionuclide surrogate, and information regarding the radionuclide transfer and distribution in melting and solidification process has been obtained. The numerical simulation of

  9. Terfenol: A study of the phase equilibrium diagram and the solidification process

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.

    1993-12-07

    Terfenol is a rare earth-iron alloy that was first developed at the Naval Ordinance Laboratory because of its rare magnetostrictive properties. Terfenol is composed of terbium and dysprosium combined with iron in a composition Tb{sub x}Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Fe{sub 2}, where x{approximately}0.3. The objective of this work was to determine the growth characteristics of Terfenol and its dependence on solidification rate, temperature gradient, and stoichiometry. Specific goals of this work were to verify the phase equilibria that is currently accepted for the systems DyFe{sub 2} and TbFe{sub 2}, and establish the phase equilibria near the composition Tb{sub 0.3}Dy{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 2}; establish that Terfenol grows directly from the liquid and that the reaction is occurring under metastable conditions; evaluate whether or not Terfenol can be grown under plane front conditions with a new radiofrequency float zone apparatus, and; determine whether or not <111> seeded crystals can be grown and <111> single crystals produced by elimination of dendrites employing growth methods capable of achieving high gradient/solidification rate ratios.

  10. On the spheroidal graphite growth and the austenite solidification in ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jingjing

    Evolutions of austenite and nodular/spheroidal graphite particles during solidifications of ductile irons were experimentally investigated. Spheroidal graphite particle and austenite dendrite were found nucleated independently in liquid. Austenite dendrite engulfed the spheroidal graphite particles after contact and an austenite shell formed around a spheroidal graphite particle. The graphite diameter at which the austenite shell closed around nodule was determined. Statistically determined graphite size distributions indicated multiple graphite nucleation events during solidification. Structures in a graphite nodule varied depending on the growth stages of the nodule in ductile iron. Curved graphene layers appearing as faceted growth ledges swept circumferentially around the surface of a graphite nodule at early growth stages. Mismatches between the growth fronts created gaps which divided a nodule into radially oriented conical substructures (3-D). Columnar substructure was observed in the periphery of a nodule (formed during the intermediate growth stages) on its 2-D cross section. A columnar substructure consisted of parallel peripheral grains, with their c-axes approximately parallel. Graphene layers continued building up in individual conical substructure, and a graphite nodule increased its size accordingly. Method for characterizing the crystal structures of graphite based on the selected area diffraction pattern was developed. Both hexagonal structure and rhombohedral structure were found in the spheroidal graphite particles. Possible crystallographic defects associated with hexagonal-rhombohedral structure transition were discussed. Schematic models for introducing tilt angles to the graphite lattice with basal plane tilt boundaries were constructed.

  11. Effective transport rates and transport-induced melting and solidification in mushy layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Mushy layers are known to occur in magma chambers, sea-ice, and metal castings. They are often modeled as a porous layer in which a fluid and solid matrix exist in thermal and compositional equilibria. In nonreactive porous media, both advective and diffusive transport rates for heat and solute differ. In mushy layers, however, the temperature and composition of the fluid phase are constrained by the liquidus relationship giving rise to effective transport rates that are intermediate between those for heat and solute in passive porous layers. The transport of heat and solute, even if the invading fluid is itself in equilibrium, is also accompanied by a degree of solidification or melting due to the difference in the transport rates for these two quantities. In this paper, analytical expressions for the effective velocity and diffusivity in a mushy layer and for the degree of melting or solidification accompanying the passage of a front with a different temperature and composition are derived and compared with the predictions of a numerical model and found to be in very good agreement. Characteristic parameters for a few mushy systems are calculated and appropriate transport and melting/freezing regimes are indicated.

  12. Surface rippling during solidification of binary polycrystalline alloy: Insights from 3-D phase-field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit, Kumar; Xing, Hui; Selzer, Michael; Nestler, Britta; Glicksman, Martin E.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms by which crystalline imperfections initiate breakdown of a planar front during directional solidification remain a topic of longstanding interest. Previous experimental findings show that the solid-liquid interface adjacent to a grain boundary provides a potential site where morphological instabilities initiate. However, interpretation of experimental data is difficult for complex 3-D diffusion fields that develop around grain multi-junctions and boundary ridges. We apply a phase-field approach to investigate factors that induce interfacial instabilities during directional solidification of a binary polycrystalline alloy. Using 2-D simulations, we establish the influence of solid-liquid interfacial energies on the spatial localization of initial interfacial perturbations. Based on parametric studies, we predict that grain misorientation and supersaturation in the melt provide major crystal growth factors determining solute segregation responsible for surface rippling. Subsequent breakdown of boundary ridges into periodic rows of hills, as simulated in 3-D, conform well with experiments. Finally, the significance of crystal misorientation relationships is elucidated in inducing spatial alignment of surface ripples.

  13. Progress on Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles During Ultrasonic Processing and Solidification of Al-Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2016-12-01

    In present study, 6061- and A356-based nano-composites are fabricated by using the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST) in a coreless induction furnace. SiC nanoparticles are used as the reinforcement. Nanoparticles are added into the molten metal and then dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming assisted by electromagnetic stirring. The applied UST parameters in the current experiments are used to validate a recently developed magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) model, which is capable of modeling the cavitation and nanoparticle dispersion during UST processing. The MHD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification, and electromagnetic field, as well as the complex interaction between the nanoparticles and both the molten and solidified alloys by using ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Fluent. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to analyze the complex interactions between the nanoparticle and the liquid/solid interface. The current modeling results demonstrate that a strong flow can disperse the nanoparticles relatively well during molten metal and solidification processes. MD simulation results prove that ultrafine particles (10 nm) will be engulfed by the solidification front instead of being pushed, which is beneficial for nano-dispersion.

  14. In situ X-ray observations of gas porosity interactions with dendritic microstructures during solidification of Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Browne, D. J.; Houltz, Y.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-radiography solidification experiments were performed on Al-based alloys, using both synchrotron and laboratory-based X-ray sources, in conjunction with a gradient furnace and a newly developed isothermal furnace, respectively. The effect of gas porosity nucleation and growth within the semi-solid mush during both columnar and equiaxed solidification was thereby observed. In all experimental cases examined, gas porosity was observed to nucleate and grow within the field-of-view (FOV) causing various levels of distortion to the semi-solid mush, and thereafter disappearing from the sample leaving no permanent voids within the solidified microstructure. During columnar growth, a single bubble caused severe remelting and destruction of primary trunks leading to secondary fragmentation and evidence of blocking of the columnar front. Equiaxed solidification was performed under microgravity-like conditions with restricted grain motion in the FOV. The degree to which the nucleated gas bubbles affected the surrounding grain structure increased with increasing solid fraction. However, bubble sphericity remained unaffected by apparent solid fraction or grain coherency.

  15. Improved Crystal Quality By Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Wang, Yaz-Hen; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long term goals have been: (1) To develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification.; (2) To make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; (3) To increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. We have three major achievements to report here: (1) We obtained a new material balance solution for the Moving Meniscus Model of detached solidification. This solution greatly clarifies the physics as well as the roles of the parameters in the system; (2) We achieved detached solidification of InSb growing on earth in BN-coated ampoules; (3) We performed an extensive series of experiments on freezing water that showed how to form multiple gas bubbles or tubes on the ampoule wall. However, these did not propagate around the wall and lead to fully detached solidification unless the ampoule wall was extremely rough and non-wetted.

  16. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts. [effects of evaporation and solidification on crystalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs are developed and used in the study of the combined effects of evaporation and solidification in space processing. The temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation were mathematically formulated. Computer results are included along with an econotechnical model of crystal growth. This model allows: prediction of crystal size, quality, and cost; systematic selection of the best growth equipment or alloy system; optimization of growth or material parameters; and a maximization of zero-gravity effects. Segregation in GaAs crystals was examined along with vibration effects on GaAs crystal growth. It was found that a unique segregation pattern and strong convention currents exist in GaAs crystal growth. Some beneficial effects from vibration during GaAs growth were discovered. The implications of the results in space processing are indicated.

  17. Simple front tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J.W.; Li, X.; Zhao, N.

    1999-04-01

    A new and simplified front tracking algorithm has been developed as an aspect of the extension of this algorithm to three dimensions. Here the authors emphasize two main results: (1) a simplified description of the microtopology of the interface, based on interface crossings with cell block edges, and (2) an improved algorithm for the interaction of a tracked contact discontinuity with an untracked shock wave. For the latter question, they focus on the post interaction jump at the contact, which is a purely 1D issue. Comparisons to other methods, including the level set method, are included.

  18. Numerical modelling on stress and dislocation generation in multi-crystalline silicon during directional solidification for PV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Karuppasamy, P.; Ramasamy, P.; Barua, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical modelling has emerged as a powerful tool for the development and optimization of directional solidification process for mass production of multicrystalline silicon. A transient global heat transfer model is performed to investigate the effect of bottom grooved furnace upon the directional solidification (DS) process of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si). The temperature distribution, von Mises stress, residual stress and dislocation density rate in multi-crystalline silicon ingots grown by modified directional solidification method have been investigated for five growth stages using finite volume method at the critical Prandtl number, Pr = 0.01. This paper discusses bottom groove furnace instead of seed crystal DS method. It achieves an advanced understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviour in grown multi-crystalline ingot by bottom grooved directional solidification method. The von Mises stress and dislocation density were reduced while using the bottom grooved furnace. This work was carried out in the different grooves of radius 30 mm, 60 mm and 90 mm of the heat exchanger block of the DS furnace. In this paper, the results are presented for 60 mm radius groove only because it has got better results compared to the other grooves. Also, the computational results of bottom grooved DS method show better performance compared the conventional DS method for stress and dislocation density in grown ingot. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created a demand for new fabrication methods with an emphasis on simple, low-cost techniques. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) is an unconventional approach in comparison to low-temperature biomimetic approaches. A technical challenge for DSE is producing microstructural architectures on the nanometer scale. In both processes, the driving force is the minimization of Gibb's free energy. Selfassembly by biomimetic approaches depends on weak interaction forces between organic molecules to define the architectural structure. The architectural structure for solidification depends on strong chemical bonding between atoms. Constituents partition into atomic-level arrangements at the liquid-solid interface to form polyphase structures, and this atomic-level arrangement at the liquid-solid interface is controlled by atomic diffusion and total undercooling due to composition (diffusion), kinetics, and curvature of the boundary phases. Judicious selection of the materials system and control of the total undercooling are the keys to producing structures on the nanometer scale. The silicon-titanium silicide (Si-TiSi2) eutectic forms a rod structure under isothermal cooling conditions. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, directional solidification was employed along with a thermal gradient to promote uniform rods oriented with the thermal gradient. The preceding photomicrograph shows the typical transverse microstructure of a solidified Si-TiSi2 eutectic composition. The dark and light gray regions are Si and TiSi2, respectively. Preferred rod orientation along the thermal gradient was poor. The ordered TiSi2 rods have a narrow distribution in diameter of 2 to 3 m, as shown. The rod diameter showed a weak dependence on process conditions. Anisotropic etch behavior between different phases provides the opportunity to fabricate structures with high aspect ratios. The photomicrographs show the resulting microstructure after a wet chemical etch and a

  20. Improved Crystal Quality by Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past four years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification, both in microgravity and on earth. A discussion of models of detachment, the meniscus models and results of theoretical modeling, and future plans are presented.

  1. Desertification by front propagation?

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Uecker, Hannes; Feudel, Ulrike; Meron, Ehud

    2017-04-07

    Understanding how desertification takes place in different ecosystems is an important step in attempting to forecast and prevent such transitions. Dryland ecosystems often exhibit patchy vegetation, which has been shown to be an important factor on the possible regime shifts that occur in arid regions in several model studies. In particular, both gradual shifts that occur by front propagation, and abrupt shifts where patches of vegetation vanish at once, are a possibility in dryland ecosystems due to their emergent spatial heterogeneity. However, recent theoretical work has suggested that the final step of desertification - the transition from spotted vegetation to bare soil - occurs only as an abrupt shift, but the generality of this result, and its underlying origin, remain unclear. We investigate two models that detail the dynamics of dryland vegetation using a markedly different functional structure, and find that in both models the final step of desertification can only be abrupt. Using a careful numerical analysis, we show that this behavior is associated with the disappearance of confined spot-pattern domains as stationary states, and identify the mathematical origin of this behavior. Our findings show that a gradual desertification to bare soil due to a front propagation process can not occur in these and similar models, and opens the question of whether these dynamics can take place in nature.

  2. New Front End Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D; Jovanovic, I; Comaskey, B J

    2001-02-01

    The next generation of Petawatt class lasers will require the development of new laser technology. Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) holds a potential to increase the peak power level to >10 PW with existing grating technology through ultrashort pulses. Furthermore, by utilizing a new type of front-end system based on optical parametric amplification, pulses can be produced with substantially higher contrast than with Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier technology. We performed extensive study of OPCPA using a single crystal-based OPA. We developed a replacement for Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier for high peak power lasers based on OPCPA, with an output of 30 mJ, at 10 Hz repetition rate and 16.5 nm spectral bandwidth. We developed a 3D numerical model for OPCPA and we performed a theoretical study of influences of pump laser beam quality on optical parametric amplification. Our results indicate that OPCPA represents a valid replacement for Ti:sapphire in the front end of high energy short pulse lasers.

  3. From the front

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The causes of recent dynamic thinning of Greenland's outlet glaciers have been debated. Realistic simulations suggest that changes at the marine fronts of these glaciers are to blame, implying that dynamic thinning will cease once the glaciers retreat to higher ground. For the last decade, many outlet glaciers in Greenland that terminate in the ocean have accelerated, thinned, and retreated. To explain these dynamic changes, two hypotheses have been discussed. Atmospheric warming has increased surface melting and may also have increased the amount of meltwater reaching the glacier bed, increasing lubrication at the base and hence the rate of glacier sliding. Alternatively, a change in the delicate balance of forces where the glacier fronts meet the ocean could trigger the changes. Faezeh Nick and colleagues5 present ice-sheet modeling experiments that mimic the observations on Helheim glacier, East Greenland, and suggest that the dynamic behaviour of outlet glaciers follows from perturbations at their marine fronts. Greenland's ice sheet loses mass partly through surface melting and partly through fast flowing outlet glaciers that connect the vast plateau of inland ice with the ocean. Earlier ice sheet models have failed to reproduce the dynamic variability exhibited by ice sheets over time. It has therefore not been possible to distinguish with confidence between basal lubrication from surface meltwater and changes at the glaciers' marine fronts as causes for the observed changes on Greenland's outlet glaciers. But this distinction bears directly on future sea-level rise, the raison d'etre of much of modern-day glaciology: If the recent dynamic mass loss Greenland's outlet glaciers is linked to changing atmospheric temperatures, it may continue for as long as temperatures continue to increase. On the other hand, if the source of the dynamic mass loss is a perturbation at the ice-ocean boundary, these glaciers will lose contact with that perturbation after a finite

  4. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  5. Directional solidification of large cross-section nickel-base superalloy castings via liquid-metal cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Andrew J.

    . It also was determined that the location of the solidification front during the LMC process is a crucial parameter that must be controlled to produce a high quality casting. Additionally, a floating thermal baffle used with the LMC-Sn process was established as an indispensable element of the LMC process.

  6. Fundamentals of Alloy Solidification Applied to Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solidification processes and phenomena, segregation, porosity, gravity effects, fluid flow, undercooling, as well as processing of materials in the microgravity environment of space, now available on space shuttle flights were discussed.

  7. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC. - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report evaluates the Chemfix Technologies, Inc. (Chemfix), solidification/stabilization technology for on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The Chemfix ...

  8. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANICS AND INORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refe...

  9. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  10. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation outlines the Superfund program approach to site cleanup, then provides information from actual insitu and exsitu solidification/stabilization remediations to illustrate technology, equipment, field implementation, performance evaluation, cleanup specifications, ...

  11. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION CASE STUDIES AT USEPA SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oral presentation dicumenting several completed Superfund remediations using solidification/stabilization, both in situ and ex-situ, to treat soils containing metals and organics.
    65 slide presentation.

  12. Observation of alloy solidification using high-speed video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassler, B. T.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.; Gorenflo, R.; Bergman, T.; Stockum, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-speed video instrumentation system was used to observe solidification of undercooled Ti-51 at. pct Al. The camera system developed by Battelle is capable of operation at rates up to 12,000 frames per second. The system digitizes and stores video images acquired by a 64 x 64 pixel silicon photodiode array. In a joint effort with Vanderbilt University the camera was used to observe three transformations of the undercooled alloys, using containerless processing by electromagnetic levitation. The first was solidification where nucleation was induced at an undercooling of 9 percent Tl, where Tl is the liquidus temperature of the alloy, and the second was solidification where nucleation was spontaneous at an undercooling of 15 percent Tl. The third event was a solid-state nucleation and growth transformation following the solidification at an undercooling of 15 percent Tl.

  13. A benchmark for the validation of solidification modelling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; Heugenhauser, S.; Schumacher, P.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents two three-dimensional solidification models, which were solved by several commercial solvers (MAGMASOFT, FLOW-3D, ProCAST, WinCast, ANSYS, and OpenFOAM). Surprisingly, the results show noticeable differences. The results are analyzed similar to a round-robin test procedure to obtain reference values for temperatures and their uncertainties at selected positions in the model. The first model is similar to an adiabatic calorimeter with an aluminum alloy solidifying in a copper block. For this model, an analytical solution for the overall temperature at steady state can be calculated. The second model implements additional heat transfer boundary conditions at outer faces. The geometry of the models, the initial and boundary conditions as well as the material properties are kept as simple as possible but, nevertheless, close to a realistic solidification situation. The gained temperature results can be used to validate self-written solidification solvers and check the accuracy of commercial solidification programs.

  14. Spacing of crack patterns driven by steady-state cooling or drying and influenced by a solidification boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Martin; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiss, Hans-Jürgen; Bahr, Ute; Balke, Herbert

    2011-03-01

    Regular columnar joints that originate from networklike crack patterns can be observed in basalt and, on a much smaller scale, in dried starch slurry. Here, the basalt columns are idealized by a periodic array of parallel cracks driven by steady-state cooling. By means of a bifurcation analysis, the minimal possible crack spacing for sustained propagation of the crack array is calculated. It can be shown qualitatively that the minimal possible crack spacing for sustained propagation increases with decreasing velocity. This is confirmed by numerical calculations. The latent heat released at the solidification front is taken into account in the thermomechanical linear-elastic model of propagating shrinkage. Our calculations show that the solidification front is positioned not far ahead of the crack tips, which influences the result considerably. The results agree reasonably well with new measured data of basalt columns. By use of the analogy between contraction due to cooling and that due to drying the model is applied for columns in dried cornstarch, too, showing good agreement with recent experimental data.

  15. Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

  16. Slow Progress in Dune (Left Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The left front wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's front hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  17. Slow Progress in Dune (Right Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The right front wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's front hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

  18. On a front line.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L.

    1995-01-01

    Like the patients, doctors in Sarajevo depend largely on humanitarian aid; everyone in the public sector has worked without pay for almost three years. The hospital is on a front line; yet the psychiatric department continues to function, even conducting large scale studies of psychosocial aspects of war in Bosnia-Hercegovina. The type of inpatient morbidity and treatment patterns have changed. A plethora of psychosocial rehabilitation programmes has emerged, including counselling, drop in centres, and attending to special needs of elderly people, schoolchildren, and women. The most prominent psychological symptoms were exhaustion at the prospect of a third winter of war and bewilderment at the Western stereotype of Bosnians as Muslim fundamentalists. Images p1052-a p1053-a PMID:7728062

  19. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of weld solidification cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. H.; Dong, Z. B.; Liu, R. P.; Dong, Z. J.

    2005-04-01

    It is difficult to measure mechanical strain in the vicinity of a moving weld pool owing to the complex solidification process. Computational modelling of the welding process provides an effective method to study the stress/strain distributions of the weldment. In this paper, the driving force to weld solidification cracking, i.e. mechanical strain versus temperature at the trail of a weld molten pool, was modelled with the three-dimensional finite element analysis procedure. The dynamic stress/strain evolutions that contribute to the formation of solidification cracking have been calculated in the cracking susceptible temperature range. In the mechanical model, solidification effects, namely deformation in the weld pool, change of initial temperature for thermal stress/strain calculation, were treated by means of a dynamic element rebirth scheme. Solidification shrinkage was also taken into consideration in simulation. The results of comparison between the calculated driving force and the experimental measurements of the material resistance predict the susceptibility of solidification cracking.

  20. FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Junior Officers' Quarters Type, 9-10 Hale Alii Avenue, 1-2 Eighth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Crystal morphology and gas evolution during solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marcus Vinicius Andrade

    A theoretical and experimental study of the solidification process has been performed to obtain fundamental understanding relevant to metal casting, solidification of alloys, freezing of biological materials and other areas. The emphasis is on the effect of the morphology of the crystals on the solidification of binary systems and the role of dissolved gas evolution on gas porosity formation. Of specific interest is the effect of gas bubble nucleation and of crystal morphology on the effective thermal conductivity of the solidifying system. An analytical and a semi-analytical method are used to calculate the gas species redistribution due to the movement of the solid-liquid interface during the freezing processes. The gas segregation at the interface strongly depends on the solidification rate (i.e., the interface velocity). The results are important to predict the formation of gas voids in castings and, most importantly, to avoid them. It is found that for a constant solidification rate, bubble nucleation always occurs at the interface despite the magnitude of the interface velocity. On the other hand, when the solidification rate is inversely proportional to the square root of time bubble nucleation can be avoided by ensuring that the initial gas concentration is smaller than a ratio involving the gas solubilities in the liquid and in the solid. An experimental apparatus is designed and constructed to study solidification on a microscopic scale. The temperature gradient and the solidification rate are controlled and aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride of different initial concentrations are frozen in a controlled manner in order to measure the microscopic characteristic lengths of the crystals grown from ammonium chloride solutions of low initial concentrations. Air-saturated water is also solidified and the dissolved gas bubble nucleation observed. Microscopic geometric lengths of the crystal that form the mushy zone are correlated with the velocity of the

  2. Surface properties of ocean fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, P. M.; Hubert, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Background information on oceanic fronts is presented and the results of several models which were developed to study the dynamics of oceanic fronts and their effects on various surface properties are described. The details of the four numerical models used in these studies are given in separate appendices which contain all of the physical equations, program documentation and running instructions for the models.

  3. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Lizee, Arnaud

    1996-01-01

    The object of this work, started in March of 1995, is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involves using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, 1-D models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The experiments conducted in the MEPHISTO furnace facility during the USMP-3 spaceflight which took place earlier this year (22 Feb. - 6 Mar. 1996). This experiment represents an unprecedented opportunity to make a quantitative correlation between residual accelerations and the response of an actual experimental solidification system

  4. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  5. Examination of Spheroidal Graphite Growth and Austenite Solidification in Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jingjing; Richards, Von L.; Van Aken, David C.

    2016-12-01

    Microstructures of a ductile iron alloy at different solidification stages were captured in quenching experiments. Etched microstructures showed that spheroidal graphite particles and austenite dendrites nucleated independently to a significant extent. Growth of the austenite dendrite engulfed the spheroidal graphite particles after first contacting the nodule and then by forming an austenite shell around the spheroidal graphite particle. Statistical analysis of the graphite size distribution was used to determine the nodule diameter when the austenite shell was completed. In addition, multiple graphite nucleation events were discerned from the graphite particle distributions. Majority of graphite growth occurred when the graphite was in contact with the austenite. Circumferential growth of curved graphene layers appeared as faceted growth fronts sweeping around the entire surface of a spheroidal graphite particle which was at the early growth stage. Mismatches between competing graphene growth fronts created gaps, which divided the spheroidal graphite particle into radially oriented conical substructures. Graphene layers continued growing in each conical substructure to further extend the size of the spheroidal graphite particle.

  6. The mechanisms of formation and prevention of channel segregation during alloy solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.; Sample, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Using a base chilled configuration, conditions for the formation and prevention of segregation channels are studied in the ammonium chloride-water and lead-tin systems. Such channels develop when the rejected solute is less dense than the solvent and are therefore a result of density inversion, but slow (less than 5 rpm) rates of mold rotation, about axes inclined to the vertical by 20 to 30 deg, throughout the time of solidification, effectively prevent the formation or propagation of these channels. In experiments with artificially created or blocked channels, a simultaneous solute plume in the bulk liquid must be present in order for a channel to develop. The results indicate that channels originate not within the dendritic array, but immediately ahead of the growth front as a result of perturbation from the less dense boundary layer into the bulk liquid. The effect of mold movement is to translate laterally the bulk liquid relative to the growth front so that perturbations are sheared off. The nature of the liquid movement is considered and shown to be a function of the mold dimensions.

  7. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  8. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  9. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ,ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  10. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  11. Effect of Shrinkage on Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing during Binary Al-Si Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongda; Hamed, Mohamed S.; Shankar, Sumanth

    2011-08-01

    Upward and downward directional solidification of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys were numerically simulated inside a cylindrical container. Undercooling of the liquidus temperature prior to the solidification event was introduced in the numerical model. The finite-volume method was used to solve the energy, concentration, momentum, and continuity equations. Temperature and liquid concentrations inside the mushy zone were coupled with local equilibrium assumptions. An energy equation was applied to determine the liquid fraction inside the mushy zone while considering the temperature undercooling at the solidifying dendrite/liquid interface. Momentum and continuity equations were coupled by the SIMPLE algorithm. Flow velocity distribution at various times, G, R, λ 1, and solidification time at mushy zone/liquid interface during solidification were predicted. The effect of shrinkage during solidification on these solidification parameters was quantified. Transient temperature distribution, solidification time for the mushy zone/liquid interface, and λ 1 were validated by laboratory experiments. It was found that better agreement could be achieved when the fluid flow due to solidification shrinkage was considered. Considering shrinkage in upward solidification was found to only have a marginal effect on solidification parameters, such as G, R, and λ 1; whereas, in the downward solidification, fluid flow due to shrinkage had a significant effect on these solidification parameters. Considering shrinkage during downward solidification resulted in a smaller R, stronger fluid flow, and increased solidification time at the mushy zone/liquid interface. Further, the flow pattern was significantly altered when solidification shrinkage was considered in the simulation. The effect of shrinkage on G and λ 1 strongly depended on the instantaneous location of the mushy zone/liquid interface in the computational domain. The numerical results could be validated by experimental data

  12. Preparation of the initial solid liquid interface and melt in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Thi, H.; Drevet, B.; Debierre, J. M.; Camel, D.; Dabo, Y.; Billia, B.

    2003-06-01

    The preparation of the initial conditions (solid-liquid interface morphology and solute segregation in the liquid phase) on which growth is started is a very critical step in directional-solidification experiments. Dedicated experiments on Al-1.5 wt% Ni consisting in directional melting followed by thermal stabilisation with different lengths, show that precise control is in practice not straightforward. Indeed, in the mushy zone created by melting the original solid sample, temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM) causes migration of solute-rich liquid droplets and channels. A model is proposed to describe this process and validate the physical interpretation of the experiments through numerical simulation. Knowing the status of the preparation, the intriguing observations in the partially melted region of the Al-1.5 wt% Ni alloys solidified in the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility of European Space Agency during the LMS and STS-95 space missions can now be explained. Finally, the influence of initial interface morphology and melt segregation on directional-solidification transient is discussed, based on a comparison of Al-Ni alloys with hypoeutectic Al-Li alloys previously grown on Earth and in space. It follows that for experiments achieved on original rods with equiaxed microstructure, the efficiency of the preparatory melting and stabilisation phases can be evaluated from the solute macrosegregation profile in the region in between the non-melted solid and directional solidification. The major conclusion is that when the melt is mixed by fluid flow, the initial conditions are near to their asymptotic state at the end of TGZM whereas, when solute diffusion is the mode of transport into the bulk liquid, the condition of homogeneous melt becomes limiting and too much time-consuming to be fulfilled, which in particular holds for the 3D-experiments carried out in the reduced-gravity environment of space.

  13. Predicting weld solidification cracking using damage mechanics -- LDRD summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.; Krafcik, J.S.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the efforts to develop and validate a finite element based model to predict weld solidification cracking behavior. Such a model must capture the solidification behavior, the thermal behavior in the weld pool region, the material mechanical response, and some failure criteria to determine when solidification cracking will occur. For such a program to be successful, each aspect of the model had to be accurately modeled and verified since the output of one portion of the model served as the input to other portions of the model. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was developed and used in both the thermal and mechanical finite element analysis. High magnification video techniques were developed to measure strains for validation of the mechanical predictions using a strain rate and temperature dependent constitutive model. This model was coupled with a ductile void growth damage model and correlated with experimental observations to determine capabilities of predicting cracking response. A two phase (solid + liquid) material model was also developed that can be used to more accurately capture the mechanics of weld solidification cracking. In general, reasonable agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment for location of crack initiation and extent of cracking for 6061-T6 aluminum. 35 refs.

  14. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage. PMID:28098147

  15. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement.

  16. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement.

  17. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The software developed for the solidification model is presented. A link between the calculations and the FORTRAN code is provided, primarily in the form of global flow diagrams and data structures. A complete listing of the solidification code is given.

  18. Initial solidification phenomena in continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Adam

    Continuous casting is the main process route for the mass production of steel today, yielding in excess of 560 million tons annually, corresponding to 80% of total steel production worldwide. As with any process, as improvements are introduced and quality is enhanced, there is the ever greater push to reduce problems that were once minor. The restrictions on quality for certain products require that defects be kept to a minimum. Currently, the industry has developed a wealth of experience in how to deal with slabs with oscillation marks. However, these practices are circumventions of the symptoms of the problems, not solutions for the causes. By understanding the formation mechanism, one can then develop practices based on a logical consideration oft he causes. The goals of this current work were to develop a mold simulator that could replicate the surface quality of industrial slabs. The techniques developed allowed for a more detailed examination of the heat transfer interactions during continuous casting, such that the variations of heat flux due to irregular solidification could be observed. It is shown that the mechanisms proposed in the literature are not individually sufficient for the formation of an oscillation mark, but several are necessary and must occur in concert for one to form. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of oscillation marks based upon the experimental results. This hypothesis is formulated as a series of necessary conditions that must be satisfied for an oscillation mark to be formed. This hypothesis is described, and shown to be in agreement with the trends observed and reported in the literature. It can explain both the overflow- and depression-type mark seen in industrial slabs. Additionally, this hypothesis was successfully used as a method of predicting the locations of oscillation marks on cast shells based upon the mold heat transfer measurements.

  19. [Front Block distraction].

    PubMed

    Esnault, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    The contribution of the segmental osteotomies in the ortho-surgical protocols is no longer to demonstrate and found a new lease of life thanks to the combination with the bone distraction techniques. The osteotomy of Köle, initially described to close infraclusies, and then used to level very marked curves of Spee has more recently been used to correct anterior crowding. This support is therefore aimed at patients with an incisor and canine Class 2 but molar Class 1 with an isolated mandibular footprint. With minimal orthodontic preparation we can create in two weeks bilateral diastemas that will then be used to align the incisivocanin crowding without stripping or bicuspid extractions. Dental orthodontic movements can be resumed one month after the end of the distraction. This technique is therefore likely to avoid bicuspid extraction and replace some sagittal osteotomy advancement by correction of the overjet. It also helps to correct a incisors labial or lingual tipping playing on differential activation of the cylinders and the distractor. This segmental surgery can be combined with Le Fort 1 surgeries with correction of the transverse and associated meanings, but in a second time, to a mandibular advancement and/or a genioplasty.

  20. Specimen analysis of Skylab, M553 experiment, flight specimens, phase C.. [on metals melting containerless solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Skylab 2 flight samples were analyzed to study containerless solidification and the effects of weightlessness on the process. A record of solute redistribution processes and of solidification terracing is reported. The solute redistribution process was highly localized, and low index, crystallographic system were suggested. Samples demonstrated that under reduced pressure and gravity conditions the anticipated solid/liquid solidification process was perturbed and superseded by solid/liquid/gas reactions during melting and solidification.

  1. Effect of dendrite coarsening on the solidification of interdendritic liquid in iron alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, V. A.; Kostyleva, L. V.; Goremykina, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    The solidification of the interdendritic liquid in austenitic 110G13L steel and white cast iron is studied. In the absence of dendrite coarsening, the solidification mechanism of the interdendritic liquid in the manganese steel is shown to change and solidification occurs in the form of polycrystalline aggregates around dendrites from different centers. The relation between the standard solidification of the interdendritic liquid and the dendrite coarsening in iron alloys is grounded.

  2. 4. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW OF EQUIPMENT IN FRONT PART OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW OF EQUIPMENT IN FRONT PART OF CONTROL BUNKER (TRANSFORMER, HYDRAULIC TANK, PUMP, MOTOR). SHOWS UNLINED CORRUGATED METAL WALL. CAMERA FACING EAST. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-5433, TAKEN OCTOBER 20, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Spinning the Web: The Design of Yale's Front Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callum, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The process of designing the Yale University (Connecticut) World Wide Web page "front door" is described, including its conceptualization, evolution through technological advances and attitudinal change, achievement of consensus through an interdepartmental advisory team, constituency response, and expectations about future change. (MSE)

  4. Analysis of solidification microstructures in Fe-Ni-Cr single-crystal welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaz, M.; David, S. A.; Vitek, J. M.; Boatner, L. A.

    1990-06-01

    A geometric analysis technique for the evaluation of the microstructures in autogenous single-crystal electron beam welds has been previously developed. In the present work, these analytical methods are further extended, and a general procedure for predicting the solidification microstructure of single-crystal welds with any arbitrary orientation is established. Examples of this general analysis are given for several welding orientations. It is shown that a nonsymmetric cell structure is expected in transverse micrographs for most welding geometries. The development of steady-state conditions in the weld pool is also examined in terms of the weld pool size, its shape (as revealed by the dendritic growth pattern), and the size of the dendritic cells. It is found that steady state is established within a few millimeters of the beginning of the weld. Furthermore, steady state is achieved faster in welds made at higher welding speeds. A general analysis of the three-dimensional (3-D) weld pool shape based on the dendritic structure as revealed in the two-dimensional (2-D) transverse micrographs is also developed. It is shown that in combination with information on the preferred growth direction as a function of the solidification front orientation, the entire dendritic growth pattern in single-crystal welds can be predicted. A comparison with the actual weld micrographs shows a reasonable agreement between the theory and experiment. Finally, the theoretical analysis of the dendrite tip radius is extended from binary systems to include the case of ternary systems. The theoretical dendrite trunk spacing in a ternary Fe-Ni-Cr alloy is calculated from the dendrite tip radius and is compared with the experimental values for several weld conditions. Good agreement between experiment and theory is found.

  5. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  6. Energy conversion at dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Divin, A.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Markidis, S.

    2017-02-01

    We use multispacecraft observations by Cluster in the Earth's magnetotail and 3-D particle-in-cell simulations to investigate conversion of electromagnetic energy at the front of a fast plasma jet. We find that the major energy conversion is happening in the Earth (laboratory) frame, where the electromagnetic energy is being transferred from the electromagnetic field to particles. This process operates in a region with size of the order several ion inertial lengths across the jet front, and the primary contribution to E·j is coming from the motional electric field and the ion current. In the frame of the front we find fluctuating energy conversion with localized loads and generators at sub-ion scales which are primarily related to the lower hybrid drift instability excited at the front; however, these provide relatively small net energy conversion.

  7. Solidification Dynamics of Silver Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    1999-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the initial superheat condition of the drop the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  8. Solidification Dynamics of Spherical Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 meter drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By varying a drop s initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approx. 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance ,of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  9. Solidification Dynamics of Metal Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Brush, L. N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of experimental observations were made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with the cooling of a molten drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Experimentally, silver drops (99.9%, 4-9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the drops initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  10. Stabilization/Solidification Remediation Method for Contaminated Soil: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Azmi, M. A. M.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is typically a process that involves a mixing of waste with binders to reduce the volume of contaminant leachability by means of physical and chemical characteristics to convert waste in the environment that goes to landfill or others possibly channels. Stabilization is attempts to reduce the solubility or chemical reactivity of the waste by changing the physical and chemical properties. While, solidification attempt to convert the waste into easily handled solids with low hazardous level. These two processes are often discussed together since they have a similar purpose of improvement than containment of potential pollutants in treated wastes. The primary objective of this review is to investigate the materials used as a binder in Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) method as well as the ability of these binders to remediate the contaminated soils especially by heavy metals.

  11. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  12. Shear Stabilization of a Solidifying Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephen H.; Schulze, Timothy P.

    1996-01-01

    The manufacturing of multi-component single crystals with uniform material properties is frequently hampered by the presence of morphological instabilities during the solidification. We discuss the influence of shear flows on the linear and nonlinear stability of the solid/liquid interface during the directional solidification of binary alloys. The flows are generated by nonplanar harmonic translations of the crystal parallel to the mean interface position. Oscillations with physically realizable amplitudes and frequencies are found useful for stabilization purposes.

  13. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 3: Operating manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of solidification model 1 is described. Model 1 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The calculation is restricted to steady-state solidification; there is no variation in final local average composition in the direction of isotherm movement. The physics of the model are given.

  14. Solidification-Rate Effects In MAR-M-246+Hf Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David

    1988-01-01

    Under slower solidification, primary-dendrite-arm spacing increases. Report discusses experiments on influence of solidification rates on crystallographic orientation and mechanical properties of superalloy MAR-M-246+Hf. Specimens grown in directional-solidification furnace, visually examined for microstructure, and stretched to failure in tensile-testing machine. Back-reflection Laue x-ray photographs taken to determine growth orientations.

  15. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Lee, Wah -Keat; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Papin, Pallas A.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Smith, James L.

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. This x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  16. Mathematical modeling of solidification phenomena in electromagnetically stirred melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Gregory Michael

    A methodology is presented to simulate the electromagnetic, heat transfer, and fluid flow phenomena for two dimensional electromagnetic solidification processes. For computation of the electromagnetic field, the model utilizes the mutual inductance technique to limit the solution domain to the molten metal and magnetic shields, commonly present in solidification systems. The temperature and velocity fields were solved using the control volume method in the metal domain. The developed model employs a two domain formulation for the mushy zone. Mathematical formulations are presented for turbulent flow in the bulk liquid and the suspended particle region, along with rheological behavior. An expression has been developed---for the first time---to describe damping of the flow in the suspended particle region as a result of the interactions between the particles and the turbulent eddies. The flow in the fixed particle region is described using Darcy's law. Calculations were carried out for globular and dendritic solidification morphologies of an electromagnetically-stirred melt in a bottom-chill mold. The coherency solid fraction for the globular solidification morphology was taken to be 0.5, while the coherency for dendritic morphology was 0.25. The results showed the flow intensity in the suspended particle region was reduced by an order of magnitude. The effect of the heat extraction rate on solidification time was investigated using three different heat transfer coefficients. The results showed that the decrease in solidification time is nonlinear with respect to increasing heat transfer coefficient. The influence of the final grain size on the damping of the flow in the suspended particle region was examined, and it was found that larger grain sizes reduce the extent of flow damping.

  17. Radiative magnetized thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of plane-parallel magnetized thermal conduction fronts in the interstellar medium (ISM) was studied. Separating the coronal ISM phase and interstellar clouds, these fronts have been thought to be the site of the intermediate-temperature regions whose presence was inferred from O VI absorption-line studies. The front evolution was followed numerically, starting from the initial discontinuous temperature distribution between the hot and cold medium, and ending in the final cooling stage of the hot medium. It was found that, for the typical ISM pressure of 4000 K/cu cm and the hot medium temperature of 10 to the 6th K, the transition from evaporation to condensation in a nonmagnetized front occurs when the front thickness is 15 pc. This thickness is a factor of 5 smaller than previously estimated. The O VI column densities in both evaporative and condensation stages agree with observations if the initial hot medium temperature Th exceeds 750,000 K. Condensing conduction fronts give better agreement with observed O VI line profiles because of lower gas temperatures.

  18. Subcritical-supercritical bifurcation crossover in directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Williams, L.; Cummins, H. )

    1994-12-01

    The Mullins-Sekerka planar-cellular instability in directional solidification should be subcritical when the partition coefficient [ital k][lt]0.45 and latent heat is ignored. However, Merchant and Davis [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 63], 573 (1989)] predicted that as the solute concentration is reduced, the increasingly important thermal diffusion field would lead to a crossover from a subcritical to a supercritical bifurcation. We have performed directional solidification experiments on a series of succinonitrile samples containing different concentrations of Coumarin 152, and have found preliminary evidence for the predicted crossover at a concentration [ital C][sub [ital t

  19. Performance of a Solidification Furnace Developed for Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Chen Y.; Boschetti, Cesar; Ribeiro, Manuel F.; Toledo, Rafael C.; Freitas, Filipe E.; Bandeira, Iraja N.

    2011-11-01

    Brazil has a Microgravity Program mainly based on experiments using sounding rockets. This paper presents a brief account of the Program and the experiments made on the Brazilian rockets. Up to now three missions carrying a total of 26 experiments were made. In all flights a fast solidification furnace, capable of producing temperatures up to 900°C, was tested with semiconductor and metal alloys. This paper describes the construction and the performance of that furnace during the last parabolic flight, occurred in 2010. The solidification furnace is now qualified and ready to be used by other institutions in sounding rocket flights.

  20. Polymer solidification national program. Letter report on FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings.

  1. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  2. A solutal interaction mechanism for the columnar-to-equiaxed transition in alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorano, M. A.; Beckermann, C.; Gandin, C.-A.

    2003-08-01

    A multiphase/multiscale model is used to predict the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) during solidification of binary alloys. The model consists of averaged energy and species conservation equations, coupled with nucleation and growth laws for dendritic structures. A new mechanism for the CET is proposed based on solutal interactions between the equiaxed grains and the advancing columnar front—as opposed to the commonly used mechanical blocking criterion. The resulting differences in the CET prediction are demonstrated for cases where a steady state can be assumed, and a revised isotherm velocity (V T ) vs temperature gradient (G) map for the CET is presented. The model is validated by predicting the CET in previously performed unsteady, unidirectional solidification experiments involving Al-Si alloys of three different compositions. Good agreement is obtained between measured and predicted cooling curves. A parametric study is performed to investigate the dependence of the CET position on the nucleation undercooling and the density of nuclei in the equiaxed zone. Nucleation undercoolings are determined that provide the best agreement between measured and calculated CET positions. It is found that for all three alloy compositions, the nucleation undercoolings are very close to the maximum columnar dendrite tip undercoolings, indicating that the origin of the equiaxed grains may not be heterogeneous nucleation, but rather a breakdown or fragmentation of the columnar dendrites.

  3. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  4. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    solute trapping models are not rigorously verified due to the difficulty in experimentally measuring under rapid growth conditions. Moreover, since these solute trapping models include kinetic parameters which are difficult to directly measure from experiments, application of the solute trapping models or the associated analytic rapid solidification model is limited. These theoretical models for steady state rapid solidification which incorporate the solute trapping models do not describe the interdependency of solute diffusion, interface kinetics, and alloy thermodynamics. The phase-field approach allows calculating, spontaneously, the non-equilibrium growth effects of alloys and the associated time-dependent growth dynamics, without making the assumptions that solute partitioning is an explicit function of velocity, as is the current convention. In the research described here, by utilizing the phase-field model in the thin-interface limit, incorporating the anti-trapping current term, more quantitatively valid interface kinetics and solute diffusion across the interface are calculated. In order to sufficiently resolve the physical length scales (i.e. interface thickness and diffusion boundary length), grid spacings are continually adjusted in calculations. The full trajectories of transient planar growth dynamics under rapid directional solidification conditions with different pulling velocities are described. As a validation of a model, the predicted steady state conditions are consistent with the analytic approach for rapid growth. It was confirmed that rapid interface dynamics exhibits the abrupt acceleration of the planar front when the effect of the non-equilibrium solute partitioning at the interface becomes signi ficant. This is consistent with the previous linear stability analysis for the non-equilibrium interface dynamics. With an appropriate growth condition, the continuous oscillation dynamics was able to be simulated using continually adjusting grid

  5. Potential Flow Interactions With Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buddhavarapu, Sudhir S.; Meiburg, Eckart

    1999-01-01

    The effect of convective melt motion on the growth of morphological instabilities in crystal growth has been the focus of many studies in the past decade. While most of the efforts have been directed towards investigating the linear stability aspects, relatively little attention has been devoted to experimental and numerical studies. In a pure morphological case, when there is no flow, morphological changes in the solid-liquid interface are governed by heat conduction and solute distribution. Under the influence of a convective motion, both heat and solute are redistributed, thereby affecting the intrinsic morphological phenomenon. The overall effect of the convective motion could be either stabilizing or destabilizing. Recent investigations have predicted stabilization by a flow parallel to the interface. In the case of non-parallel flows, e.g., stagnation point flow, Brattkus and Davis have found a new flow-induced morphological instability that occurs at long wavelengths and also consists of waves propagating against the flow. Other studies have addressed the nonlinear aspects (Konstantinos and Brown, Wollkind and Segel)). In contrast to the earlier studies, our present investigation focuses on the effects of the potential flow fields typically encountered in Hele-Shaw cells. Such a Hele-Shaw cell can simulate a gravity-free environment in the sense that buoyancy-driven convection is largely suppressed, and hence negligible. Our interest lies both in analyzing the linear stability of the solidification process in the presence of potential flow fields, as well as in performing high-accuracy nonlinear simulations. Linear stability analysis can be performed for the flow configuration mentioned above. It is observed that a parallel potential flow is stabilizing and gives rise to waves traveling downstream. We have built a highly accurate numerical scheme which is validated at small amplitudes by comparing with the analytically predicted results for the pure

  6. Transparent metal model study of the use of a cellular growth front to form aligned monotectic composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to resolve a scientific controversy in the understanding of how second phase particles become aligned during unidirectional growth of a monotectic alloy. A second aspect was to make the first systematic observations of the solidification behavior of a monotectic alloy during cellular growth in-situ. This research provides the first systematic transparent model study of cellular solidification. An interface stability diagram was developed for the planar to cellular transition of the succinonitrile glycerol (SNG) system. A method was developed utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy which allows quantitative compositional analysis of directionally solidified SNG along the growth axis. To determine the influence of cellular growth front on alignment for directionally solidified monotectic alloys, the planar and cellular growth morphology was observed in-situ for SNG between 8 and 17 percent glycerol and for a range of over two orders of magnitude G/R.

  7. Removal of Phosphorus in Silicon by the Formation of CaAl2Si2 Phase at the Solidification Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liyuan; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Hang; Wang, Dong; Qian, Guoyu

    2017-02-01

    To fully understand the role of CaAl2Si2 phase in concentrating the non-metallic impurity phosphorus, an experiment of directional solidification of Al-70 at. pct Si alloy with extreme small lowering rate 0.05 mm min-1 was carried out. With good dynamic condition for the diffusion of impurity (Ca, Al, P) from silicon to the S/L interface, the CaAl2Si2 phase with 0.6-0.7 at. pct P was successfully observed by Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA), and its distribution character was originally presented. This impurity phase was widely detected in the refined sample but only at the interface of silicon crystal and Al-Si alloy which contributed to the deep removal of impurity P. The formation mechanism of CaAl2Si2-P phase was thus explored, in which the microsegregation and concentration of element P, Ca, Al in front of S/L interface were crucial. After acid leaching, the P content decreased from the original 23 ppm to below 5 ppm. Compared with normal solidification, a 16 pct higher removal efficiency of P was obtained in this study.

  8. Microstructure Evolution and Rapid Solidification Behavior of Blended Nickel-Based Superalloy Powders Fabricated by Laser Powder Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Laser powder deposition was performed on a substrate of Inconel 738 using blended powders of Mar M247 and Amdry DF3 with a ratio of 4:1 for repairing purposes. In the as-deposited condition, continuous secondary phases composed of γ-Ni3B eutectics and discrete (Cr, W)B borides were observed in inter-dendritic regions, and time-dependent nucleation simulation results confirmed that (Cr, W)B was the primary secondary phase formed during rapid solidification. Supersaturated solid solution of B was detected in the γ solid solution dendritic cores. The Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi model was performed to predict the interfacial morphology and correlate the solidification front velocity (SFV) with dendrite tip radius. It was observed from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy that the dendrite tip radius of the upper region was in the range of 15 to 30 nm, which yielded a SFV of approx 30 cm/s. The continuous growth model for solute trapping behavior developed by Aziz and Kaplan was used to determine that the effective partition coefficient of B was approximately 0.025. Finally, the feasibility of the modeling results were rationalized with the Clyne-Kurz segregation simulation of B, where Clyne-Kurz prediction using a partition coefficient of 0.025 was in good agreement with the electron probe microanalysis results.

  9. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  10. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Genau, Amber Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  11. STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF CERCLA AND RCRA WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides U.S. EPA regional staff responsible for reviewing CERCLA remedial action plans and RCRA permit applications with a tool for interpreting information on stabilization/solidification treatment. As a practical day-to-day reference guide, it will also provide t...

  12. Digested sewage sludge solidification by converter slag for landfill cover.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung-Ho; Cho, Jin-Kyu; Yim, Soobin

    2005-04-01

    A new technology for solidification of digested sewage sludge referred to as converter slag solidification (CSS) has been developed using converter slag as the solidifying agent and quick lime as the solidifying aid. The CSS technology was investigated by analyzing the physicochemical properties of solidified sludge and determining its microstructural characteristics. The feasibility of using solidified sludge as a landfill cover material was considered in the context of the economical recycling of waste. Sludge solidified using the CSS technology exhibited geotechnical properties that are appropriate for replacing currently used cover soil. Microscopic analyses using XRD, SEM and EDS revealed that the main hydrated product of solidification was CSH (CaO . SiO2 . nH2O), which may play an important role in the effective setting process. Negligible leaching of heavy metals from the solidified sludge was observed. The solidification process of the hydrated sludge, slag and quicklime eliminated the coliform bacteria. Recycled sewage sludge solidified using CCS technology could be used as an effective landfill cover.

  13. Hazcon Solidification Process, Douglassville, Pa.: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the HAZCON solidification technology and its applicability as an on-site treatment method for waste site cleanup. A Demonstration was held at the Douglassville, Pennsylvania Superfund site in the fall of 1987. Operational data and sampling and an...

  14. The Effect of Solidification Rate on Morphological Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    At low solidification rates, the criterion for the onset of morphological instability parallels closely the criterion of constitutional supercooling. At somewhat larger rates of solidification, however, the results of the perturbation theory of morphological instability differ significantly from the predictions of constitutional supercooling. This arises because the critical wave length for instability decreases as solidification rate increases and thus the effects of capillarity (solid-liquid surface tension) play a strong stabilizing role. This gives rise to the concept of absolute stability, according to which the system will always be stable for a sufficiently large rate of solidification. This enhanced stabilization by capillarity is present only so long as local equilibrium is maintained at the solid-liquid interface. If the interfacial temperature drops below its equilibrium value by an amount dependent on growth rate, oscillatory morphological instabilities can occur. The differences among these various stability criteria are illustrated by means of some simple two-dimensional diagrams that should supplant the conventional plots of (temperature gradient)/(growth rate) vs. alloy concentration.

  15. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  16. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    SciTech Connect

    Meco, Halim

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  17. Modeling transport phenomena and uncertainty quantification in solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle S.

    Direct chill (DC) casting is the primary processing route for wrought aluminum alloys. This semicontinuous process consists of primary cooling as the metal is pulled through a water cooled mold followed by secondary cooling with a water jet spray and free falling water. To gain insight into this complex solidification process, a fully transient model of DC casting was developed to predict the transport phenomena of aluminum alloys for various conditions. This model is capable of solving mixture mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations during multicomponent solidification. Various DC casting process parameters were examined for their effect on transport phenomena predictions in an alloy of commercial interest (aluminum alloy 7050). The practice of placing a wiper to divert cooling water from the ingot surface was studied and the results showed that placement closer to the mold causes remelting at the surface and increases susceptibility to bleed outs. Numerical models of metal alloy solidification, like the one previously mentioned, are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. However, uncertainty in model inputs cause uncertainty in results and those insights. The analysis of model assumptions and probable input variability on the level of uncertainty in model predictions has not been calculated in solidification modeling as yet. As a step towards understanding the effect of uncertain inputs on solidification modeling, uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis were first performed on a transient solidification model of a simple binary alloy (Al-4.5wt.%Cu) in a rectangular cavity with both columnar and equiaxed solid growth models. This analysis was followed by quantifying the uncertainty in predictions from the recently developed transient DC casting model. The PRISM Uncertainty Quantification (PUQ) framework quantified the uncertainty and sensitivity in macrosegregation, solidification

  18. Melting and solidification processes in a moving graphite-covered titanium surface subjected to multi-pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, B.; Hantzpergue, J.-J.; Benayoun, S.; L'Huillier, J.-P.

    2001-05-01

    Experimental results of surface melting by pulsed Nd-YAG laser irradiation of titanium covered with graphite powder were analysed in comparison with the results of numerical simulations. The simulations of the thermal events, such as the maximum of temperature gradient at the surface and the duration of the liquid state after irradiation, were found due to a semi-analytic model of the space-time temperature distributions which were induced by the irradiation treatments. These simulations were required in order to calculate a series of integrals by Simpson's numerical method. They have allowed us to explain the experimental results such as the incorporation of carbon in melted zone, which produces titanium carbide and possible graphite inclusions, as a function of the irradiation parameters. The perpetual absence in the thickness and the exceptional presence at the surface of the solidification structure resulting from the plane-front growth of titanium carbide have, moreover, been justified.

  19. Simulation of Channel Segregation During Directional Solidification of In—75 wt pct Ga. Qualitative Comparison with In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ali; Gandin, Charles-André; Bellet, Michel; Shevchenko, Natalia; Eckert, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Freckles are common defects in industrial casting. They result from thermosolutal convection due to buoyancy forces generated from density variations in the liquid. The present paper proposes a numerical analysis for the formation of channel segregation using the three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton (CA)—finite element (FE) model. The model integrates kinetics laws for the nucleation and growth of a microstructure with the solution of the conservation equations for the casting, while introducing an intermediate modeling scale for a direct representation of the envelope of the dendritic grains. Directional solidification of a cuboid cell is studied. Its geometry, the alloy chosen as well as the process parameters are inspired from experimental observations recently reported in the literature. Snapshots of the convective pattern, the solute distribution, and the morphology of the growth front are qualitatively compared. Similitudes are found when considering the coupled 3D CAFE simulations. Limitations of the model to reach direct simulation of the experiments are discussed.

  20. Functional description of APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-02-01

    Traditional synchrotron sources were designed to produce bending magnet radiation and have proven to be an essential scientific tool. Currently, a new generation of synchrotron sources is being built that will be able to accommodate a large number of insertion device (ID) and high quality bending magnet (BM) sources. One example is the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The research and development effort at the APS is designed to fully develop the potential of this new generation of synchrotron sources. Of the 40 straight sections in the APS storage ring, 34 will be available for IDs. The remaining six sections are reserved for the storage ring hardware and diagnostics. Although the ring incorporates 80 BMs, only 40 of them can be used to extract radiation. The accelerator hardware shadows five of these 40 bending magnets, so the maximum number of BM sources on the lattice is 35. Generally, a photon beamline consists of four functional sections. The first section is the ID or the BM, which provides the radiation source. The second section, which is immediately outside the storage ring but inside a concrete shielding tunnel, is the front end, which is designed to control, define, and/or confine the x-ray beam. In the case of the APS, the front ends are designed to confine the photon beam. The third section, just outside the concrete shielding tunnel and on the experimental floor, is the first optics enclosure, which contains optics to filter and monochromatize the photon beam. The fourth section of a beamline consists of beam transports, additional optics, and experiment stations to do the scientific investigations. This document describes only the front ends of the APS beamlines.

  1. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Ramakrishnan; Kota, Arun; Anand, Gaurav

    2004-01-01

    Our long term goal has been to make detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Thus, the objective of the current project was to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. Our focus was on the influence of oxygen on indium antimonide on clean silica ("quartz"). The research was performed by three chemical engineering graduate students, the third of whom will complete his research in the summer of 2005. Originally, we had planned to use a sealed silica cell containing a zirconia electrochemical element to control the oxygen partial pressure. However, zirconia requires an operating temperature above the 530 C melting point of InSb and is difficult to form a gas-tight seal with silica. Thus, we decided instead to flow an oxygen-containing gas through the cell. A special apparatus was designed, built and perfected. A piece of InSb was placed on a horizontal silica plate in a quartz cell. High purity argon, helium or hydrogen-containing gas is passed continuously through the cell while the oxygen concentration in the effluent gas is measured. The shape of the resulting drop was used to determine contact angle and surface tension of Ga-doped and high purity InSb. Oxygen appeared to decrease the contact angle, and definitely did not increase it. The following section gives the background for the research. Section 2 summarizes the results obtained on Ga-doped InSb with relatively high oxygen concentrations. Section 3 describes recent improvements made to the apparatus and methods of analysis. Section 4 gives recent results for high-purity InSb at low oxygen concentrations. Final results will be obtained only this summer (2005). Each section

  2. Interface dynamics and anisotropy effects in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cheveigné, S.; Guthmann, C.

    1992-02-01

    A study of the dynamics of the cellular solid-liquid interface in directional solidification of dilute CBr{4} alloy has allowed us to observe a number of secondary instabilities (travelling states, optical modes, anomalous cells, etc.) some of which were well known and traditionally attributed to the effect of crystalline anisotropy. However, most of these instabilities are also observed in a hydrodynamic analog of directional solidification, directional viscous fingering (M. Rabaud, S. Michalland and Y. Couder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64 (1990) 184). This analogy enables us to discuss the interplay of crystalline anisotropy and of the dynamics generic to one-dimensional systems in directional solidification. Une étude de la dynamique de l'interface cellulaire en solidification directionnelle d'un alliage binaire dilué de CBr4 nous a permis d'observer un certain nombre d'instabilités secondaires (propagation de cellules inclinées, modes optiques, cellules anormales, etc.) dont certaines étaient bien connues et traditionnellement attribuées à des effets de l'anisotropie cristalline. Cependant, la plupart de ces instabilités sont observables dans une expérience qui est l'analogue hydrodynamique de la solidification directionnelle, la digitation visqueuse dirigée ou instabilité de l'imprimeur (M. Rabaud, S. Michalland and Y. Couder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64 (1990) 184). Cette analogie va nous permettre de discuter les rôles respectifs de l'anisotropie cristalline et de la dynamique propre aux systèmes uni-dimentionnels.

  3. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending.

  4. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni{sub 5}Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results.

  5. Modeling fluid interactions with the rigid mush in alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkowski, Alexander J.

    Macrosegregation is a casting defect characterized by long range composition differences on the length scale of the ingot. These variations in local composition can lead to the development of unwanted phases that are detrimental to mechanical properties. Unlike microsegregation, in which compositions vary over the length scale of the dendrite arms, macrosegregation cannot be removed by subsequent heat treatment, and so it is critical to understand its development during solidification processing. Due to the complex nature of the governing physical phenomena, many researchers have turned to numerical simulations for these predictions, but properly modeling alloy solidification presents a variety of challenges. Among these is the appropriate treatment of the interface between the bulk fluid and the rigid mushy zone. In this region, the non-linear and coupled behavior of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solute transport, and alloy thermodynamics has a dramatic effect on macrosegregation predictions. This work investigates the impact of numerical approximations at this interface in the context of a mixture model for alloy solidification. First, the numerical prediction of freckles in columnar solidification is investigated, and the predictive ability of the model is evaluated. The model is then extended to equiaxed solidification, in which the analogous interface is the transition of free-floating solid particles to a rigid dendritic network. Various models for grain attachment are investigated, and found to produce significant artifacts caused by the discrete nature of their implementation on the numerical grid. To reduce the impact of these artifacts, a new continuum grain attachment model is proposed and evaluated. The differences between these models are compared using uncertainty quantification, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  6. Theory for the curvature dependence of delta front progradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Wun-Tao; Capart, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    When Gilbert-type deltas respond to uneven sediment supply or advance over irregular basin bathymetry, they develop curved, creased fronts prograding at speeds that vary with location along the shoreline. Relations governing the progradation rate, however, have so far been proposed only for simple special cases. In this paper, we exploit the special properties of solutions to the eikonal equation to derive a general progradation relation, applicable to delta fronts of finite angle of repose and arbitrary shoreline planform. In these circumstances, the theory explicitly relates the progradation rate to the local shoreline curvature. We illustrate the resulting morphodynamics with numerical and analytical solutions for a sinuous delta front. The proposed relation can be used to model deltaic evolution or deduce spanwise distributions of sediment supply rates from observations of foreset evolution.

  7. Front Matter and Contents.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    ATCG model described in [1] ('Applied Theory accounting for human moleCular Genetics'), which constitutes a solid foundation for the present work. The author has a master degree in biochemistry, a master degree in computer science (systems development, informatics) and a European Doctorate and PhD in health informatics. The author has had a full-time research position for about 35 years, divided on a university hospital, the software industry and a university, while cross-fertilising the two professions; the time in the industry and the university mainly was dedicated to participation in large and advanced EU R&D Research projects. This combination of professional experience has enabled the present study. The present study was performed outside of any job or grant affiliation, while the author had an emeritus position at the Aalborg University. The author has since the year 2000 been a member of the scientific team describing the Mereon Matrix (for this, see [2]), went on early retirement in 2011 to work full time on the Mereon Matrix, and is independently continuing such scientific investigations on the matrix. Contact information: jytte@brender.dk and jbr@hst.aau.dk. Acknowledgements The author is deeply grateful for her position as Emeritus Assoc. Professor at her former university affiliation at Aalborg University, Dept. of Health Science and Technology, as this enabled a full and free access to most of the original scientific literature. Without this, the present study would have been critically hampered. The author is deeply grateful for continuous brainstorming and constructive feedback on and in the process with her husband, Dr. Peter McNair, retired director of the Medical Genetics Laboratory, KennedyCenter (DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark). Conflicting Interests The author declares that there was and is no conflicting interests, financial or otherwise, that would or could have influenced the outcome of the study. The author's work on the Mereon Matrix was not

  8. Rotatable crucible for rapid solidification process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for producing filament, fiber, ribbon or film from a molten material, comprising a preferably heat extracting crucible which contains a pool of molten material at a selected horizontal level in the pool. The crucible has an opening extending from above the free surface level to a bottom edge of the opening, the bottom edge being sufficiently below the free surface level so that the molten material cannot form and hold a meniscus by surface tension between the edge and the level of the free surface and further comprises a heat extracting substrate laterally disposed with respect to the crucible and which rotates about an axis of rotation. The substrate is positioned adjacent the edge of the opening which confines the molten material and prevents it from overflowing downwardly out of the crucible. The invention features rotating means which includes a first drive means for tiltably rotating the crucible about an axis of rotation which is coaxial with the axis of rotation of the substrate, so the crucible edge can be maintained a predetermined constant distance from the substrate. The distance chosen is suitable for depositing molten material on the substrate and the apparatus also has a second drive means which is drivingly connected to the substrate for continuously moving the surface of the substrate upwardly past the edge and a melt front formed at the interface of the molten material and the substrate surface.

  9. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-02-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  10. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-03-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  11. Align the Front End First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of management styles and front-end analysis focuses on a review of Douglas McGregor's theories. Topics include Theories X, Y, and Z; leadership skills; motivational needs of employees; intrinsic and extrinsic rewards; and faulty implementation of instructional systems design processes. (LRW)

  12. Multiple WH-Fronting Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudin, Catherine

    The unique position of WH words in Slavic languages is discussed, with specific reference to Bulgarian and Serbo-Croatian. The multiple fronting characteristics of Bulgarian and Serbo-Croatian differ in terms of the following positions and behaviors: extraction from embedded questions; clitic placement and other indications of constituent status;…

  13. Biological Activity at Oceanic Fronts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    al. (1974) in a tidal (shallow sea) front in the English Channel. Most interestingly, a small *-. S jellyfish caught in the downwelling zone sank 28 m...and R.P. Harris. 1984. Photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogen supply of plankton populations in stratified, frontal, and tidally mixed she’-; waters

  14. Fluctuation-controlled front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Douglas Thacher

    1997-09-01

    A number of fundamental pattern-forming systems are controlled by fluctuations at the front. These problems involve the interaction of an infinite dimensional probability distribution with a strongly nonlinear, spatially extended pattern-forming system. We have examined fluctuation-controlled growth in the context of the specific problems of diffusion-limited growth and biological evolution. Mean field theory of diffusion-limited growth exhibits a finite time singularity. Near the leading edge of a diffusion-limited front, this leads to acceleration and blowup. This may be resolved, in an ad hoc manner, by introducing a cutoff below which growth is weakened or eliminated (8). This model, referred to as the BLT model, captures a number of qualitative features of global pattern formation in diffusion-limited aggregation: contours of the mean field match contours of averaged particle density in simulation, and the modified mean field theory can form dendritic features not possible in the naive mean field theory. The morphology transition between dendritic and non-dendritic global patterns requires that BLT fronts have a Mullins-Sekerka instability of the wavefront shape, in order to form concave patterns. We compute the stability of BLT fronts numerically, and compare the results to fronts without a cutoff. A significant morphological instability of the BLT fronts exists, with a dominant wavenumber on the scale of the front width. For standard mean field fronts, no instability is found. The naive and ad hoc mean field theories are continuum-deterministic models intended to capture the behavior of a discrete stochastic system. A transformation which maps discrete systems into a continuum model with a singular multiplicative noise is known, however numerical simulations of the continuum stochastic system often give mean field behavior instead of the critical behavior of the discrete system. We have found a new interpretation of the singular noise, based on maintaining

  15. Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy into a Cellular Convective Flow: Localized Morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.- J.; Davis, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    A steady, two dimensional cellular convection modifies the morphological instability of a binary alloy that undergoes directional solidification. When the convection wavelength is far longer than that of the morphological cells, the behavior of the moving front is described by a slow, spatial-temporal dynamics obtained through a multiple-scale analysis. The resulting system has a "parametric-excitation" structure in space, with complex parameters characterizing the interactions between flow, solute diffusion, and rejection. The convection stabilizes two dimensional disturbances oriented with the flow, but destabilizes three dimensional disturbances in general. When the flow is weak, the morphological instability behaves incommensurably to the flow wavelength, but becomes quantized and forced to fit into the flow-box as the flow gets stronger. At large flow magnitudes the instability is localized, confined in narrow envelopes with cells traveling with the flow. In this case the solutions are discrete eigenstates in an unbounded space. Their stability boundary and asymptotics are obtained by the WKB analysis.

  16. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments.

    PubMed

    Becker, M; Dreißigacker, C; Klein, S; Kargl, F

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min(-1) up to 10 K min(-1) can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K-1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  17. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M. Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min{sup −1} up to 10 K min{sup −1} can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K–1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Infiltration and Solidification Processes for Squeeze Cast Al Composites with Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. K.; Jang, J. H.; Han, K. S.

    2008-11-01

    An axisymmetric finite element (FE) model is developed for the process of squeeze casting the metal-matrix composites (MMCs). The flow in the mold, the infiltration into the porous preform, and the solidification of the molten metal are studied numerically. The saturated porous flow model is adopted to simulate metal infiltration into the fibrous preform. To track the fluid front during the mold filling and infiltration, the level-set method is used. The enthalpy method is used to deal with transient heat transfer, including phase changes. Also, a simple preform deformation model is used to predict the permeability change caused by preform compression during infiltration. A numerical model representing the experiment setup is proposed. The infiltration and cooling behaviors during a process were calculated using pure aluminum as the matrix and a Saffil fiber preform. To validate the assumptions used in the numerical model, a series of infiltration experiments was carried out. The infiltration kinetics and the preform deformation were studied at different inlet pressures and at different preheat temperatures of the aluminum and the mold. A comparison with the experimental data shows that the developed FE program successfully predicts the actual squeeze casting process.

  19. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  20. Evolution of a physical and biological front from upwelling to relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwu; Bellingham, James G.; Ryan, John P.; Godin, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Fronts influence the structure and function of coastal marine ecosystems. Due to the complexity and dynamic nature of coastal environments and the small scales of frontal gradient zones, frontal research is difficult. To advance this challenging research we developed a method enabling an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect and track fronts, thereby providing high-resolution observations in the moving reference frame of the front itself. This novel method was applied to studying the evolution of a frontal zone in the coastal upwelling environment of Monterey Bay, California, through a period of variability in upwelling intensity. Through 23 frontal crossings in four days, the AUV detected the front using real-time analysis of vertical thermal stratification to identify water types and the front between them, and the vehicle tracked the front as it moved more than 10 km offshore. The physical front coincided with a biological front between strongly stratified phytoplankton-enriched water inshore of the front, and weakly stratified phytoplankton-poor water offshore of the front. While stratification remained a consistent identifier, conditions on both sides of the front changed rapidly as regional circulation responded to relaxation of upwelling winds. The offshore water type transitioned from relatively cold and saline upwelled water to relatively warm and fresh coastal transition zone water. The inshore water type exhibited an order of magnitude increase in chlorophyll concentrations and an associated increase in oxygen and decrease in nitrate. It also warmed and freshened near the front, consistent with the cross-frontal exchange that was detected in the high-resolution AUV data. AUV-observed cross-frontal exchanges beneath the surface manifestation of the front emphasize the importance of AUV synoptic water column surveys in the frontal zone.

  1. Weather fronts and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kveton, Vit

    1991-03-01

    Some methodological aspects are discussed of the investigation of acute infarct myocarditis (AIM) in relation to weather fronts. Results of a new method of analysis are given. Data were analysed from about the hour of the onset of symptoms, and led to the diagnosis of AIM either immediately or within a few hours or days (3019 cases observed over 4.5 years during 1982 1986 in Plzen, Czechoslovakia). Weather classification was based on three factors (the type of the foregoing front, the type of the subsequent front, the time section of the time interval demarcated by the passage of the surfaces of the fronts). AIM occurrence increased in particular types of weather fronts: (i) by 30% during 7 12 h after a warm front, if the time span between fronts exceeded 24 h; (ii) by 10% in time at least 36 h distant from the foregoing cold or occlusion front and from the succeeding warm or occlusion front; (iii) by 20% during 0 2 h before the passage of the front, provided the foregoing front was not warm and the interval between fronts exceeded 5 h. AIM occurrence decreased by 15% 20% for time span between fronts > 24 h at times 6 11, 6 23 and 6 35 h before a coming warm or occlusion front (for interfrontal intervals 25 48, 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), and also at 12 23 and possibly 12 35 h before a cold front (for intervals 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), if the foregoing front was cold or an occlusion front.

  2. Growth directions of microstructures in directional solidification of crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, J; Georgelin, M; Pocheau, A

    2008-07-01

    In directional solidification, as the solidification velocity increases, the growth direction of cells or dendrites rotates from the direction of the thermal gradient to that of a preferred cristalline orientation. Meanwhile, their morphology varies with important implications for microsegregation. Here, we experimentally document the growth directions of these microstructures in a succinonitrile alloy in the whole accessible range of directions, velocities, and spacings. For this, we use a thin sample made of a single crystal on which the direction of the thermal gradient can be changed. This allows a fine monitoring of the misorientation angle between thermal gradient and preferred crystalline orientation. Data analysis shows evidence of an internal symmetry which traces back to a scale invariance of growth directions with respect to a Péclet number. This enables the identification of the relationship between growth directions and relevant variables, in fair agreement with experiment. Noticeable variations of growth directions with misorientation angles are evidenced and linked to a single parameter.

  3. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  4. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizingmore » the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.« less

  5. Solidification zoning and metallographic cooling rates of chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, J.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1981-01-01

    The cooling rates of chondrites have been determined according to the cooling rate method of Wood (1967) which involves the measurement of the concentration of nickel in the interiors of taenite grains of various sizes. The present paper presents an investigation of the effect of zoning produced during solidification on the use of the Wood method. Cooling rate curves were obtained in a computer simulation based on a model of kamacite formation on the outer edge of a taenite sphere of uniform initial composition, followed by the inward radial progression of the kamacite-taenite interface. When a concentration gradient produced by solidification is present in the initial conditions, deviations from the cooling rate curves for uniform 10% Ni are obtained only at cooling rates greater than 1000 K/million years, which would result in an overestimation of the cooling rates based on observed Ni gradients in grains of radius greater than 20 microns.

  6. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizing the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.

  7. Directional solidification at ultra-high thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Lee, D. S.; Neff, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A high gradient controlled solidification (HGC) furnace was designed and operated at gradients up to 1800 C/cm to continuously produce aluminum alloys. Rubber '0' rings for the water cooling chamber were eliminated, while still maintaining water cooling directly onto the solidified metal. An HGC unit for high temperature ferrous alloys was also designed. Successful runs were made with cast iron, at thermal gradients up to 500 C/cm.

  8. Further analysis of field effects on liquids and solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, R. F.; Miller, R. I.; Chen, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the magnitude of external field effects on liquids are presented to describe how external fields can influence the substructure of the field. Quantitative estimates of magnetic and gravitational effects are reported on melts of metals and semiconductors. The results are condensed in tables which contain the input data for calculation of the field effects on diffusion coefficient, solidification rate and for calculation of field forces on individual molecules in the melt.

  9. [Application of solidification technology in ecological protection of rural riverbank].

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong-bing; Chen, Xiao-hua; Luo, Qi-shi; Zhang, Shu-jiu; Li, Xiao-ping; Geng, Chun-nü

    2008-08-01

    A self-developed binder was used for the solidification of construction refuse piles and whole soil matrix, and a technology of this solidification combining with grass-planting was adopted to ecologically protect the rural riverbanks at Tianshan Village of Shanghai. This technology and other ecological engineering techniques were also employed to reconstruct the ecological environment of a sewage pond at the Village. The results showed that the solidified piles had an anti-compression strength of up to 7.3 MPa, with good hydraulic permeability, fast hardening rate, and low drying shrinkage, which met the requirements for ecological safety. The solidified stakes could be used at a low temperature of above -18 degrees C with addition of certain anti-freezing agents. The riverbank underpinned with the solidified stakes had higher anti-compressive strength, higher ability of anti-soil erosion, and better hydraulic permeability; and its soil had the similar moisture content to bare riverbank soil, with no detrimental effects on the root growth of planted grass. After soil solidification, the shearing strength of the riverbank increased by 50 times, and its soil loss was only 5% of the bare riverbank. In the first 10 days after adopting this technology, parts of Cynodon dactylon roots on the surface of solidified soil matrix began to extend into soil; after one month, 60% of the roots penetrated into deeper soil layer; and 11 months later, the grass roots completely grew in-depth in the soil. The combination of our solidification technique with vegetation reconstruction satisfied the requirements of both stabilizing riverbank and improving riparian habitat.

  10. Intense magnetic field generation by solidification and crustal delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that asteroidal magnetic fields are a common feature of the early solar system [1,2]. The iron cores of different asteroids may solidify in different ways [3]. For the IVA iron meteorite parent body the rapid cooling rates and correlation with Ni concentrations further suggest that their parent body was entirely metal, and that solidification of their parent asteroid proceeded from the top down. Here we present model constraints on the thermo-chemical evolution of such rapidly cooled iron asteroids. We show that the temperature of the liquid is rapidly well mixed, and equal to the composition-dependent freezing point, and that thermal convection contributes only at early times to generation of intense magnetic fields and is therefore not sufficient to explain the generation of a dynamo. Instead, we propose that viscous delamination [4] at the base of the solidifying, dense crust provides a sufficient buoyancy flux to generate a magnetic field with properties consistent with those inferred from paleomagnetic measurements of the two IVA meteorites [5]. A model that captures the aggregate effect of episodic delamination events predicts the evolution of the crust and the formation and growth of the asteroid core, the intensity and directional evolution of the magnetic field through time, and the times at which magnetic field generation ceases and total asteroid solidification occur. These predictions can be compared directly with recent measurements of IVA iron meteorites [5] with implications for top-down solidification, the solid structure of the IVA parent core, and magnetic field generation both on the IVA parent body, and wider implications for top-down core solidification generally. [1] Weiss et al. Space Sci. Rev. 152, 341-390 (2010). [2] Tarduno et al. Science. 338, 939-942 (2012). [3] Williams Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 284, 564-569 (2009) [4] Molnar et al. Geophys. J. Int. 133, 568-584 (1998) [5] Bryson et

  11. Fluid mechanics and solidification investigations in low-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Lundquist, C. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid mechanics of gases and liquids and solidification processes were investigated under microgravity conditions during Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Electromagnetic, acoustic, and aerodynamic levitation devices, drop tubes, aircraft parabolic flight trajectories, and vertical sounding rockets were developed for low-g simulation. The Spacelab 3 mission will be carried out in a gravity gradient flight attitude; analyses of sources of vehicle dynamic accelerations with associated g-levels and angular rates will produce results for future specific experiments.

  12. Development Of A Magnetic Directional-Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Bill R.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes development of directional-solidification furnace in which axial magnetic field is imposed by surrounding ring permanent magnets and/or electromagnets and pole pieces. Furnace provides controlled axial temperature gradients in multiple zones, through which ampoule containing sample of material to be solidified is translated at controlled speed by low-vibration, lead-screw, stepping-motor-driven mechanism. Intended for use in low-gravity (spaceflight) experiments on melt growth of high-purity semiconductor crystals.

  13. Phyllotaxis, Pushed Pattern-Forming Fronts, and Optimal Packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennybacker, Matthew; Newell, Alan C.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate that the pattern forming partial differential equation derived from the auxin distribution model proposed by Meyerowitz, Traas, and others gives rise to all spiral phyllotaxis properties observed on plants. We show how the advancing pushed pattern front chooses spiral families enumerated by Fibonacci sequences with all attendant self-similar properties, a new amplitude invariant curve, and connect the results with the optimal packing based algorithms previously used to explain phyllotaxis. Our results allow us to make experimentally testable predictions.

  14. Microstructural development of rapid solidification in Al-Si powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng

    1995-09-26

    The microstructure and the gradient of microstructure that forms in rapidly solidificated powder were investigated for different sized particles. High pressure gas atomization solidification process has been used to produce a series of Al-Si alloys powders between 0.2 μm to 150 μm diameter at the eutectic composition (12.6 wt pct Si). This processing technique provides powders of different sizes which solidify under different conditions (i.e. interface velocity and interface undercooling), and thus give different microstructures inside the powders. The large size powder shows dendritic and eutectic microstructures. As the powder size becomes smaller, the predominant morphology changes from eutectic to dendritic to cellular. Microstructures were quantitatively characterized by using optical microscope and SEM techniques. The variation in eutectic spacing within the powders were measured and compared with the theoretical model to obtain interface undercooling, and growth rate during the solidification of a given droplet. Also, nucleation temperature, which controls microstructures in rapidly solidified fine powders, was estimated. A microstructural map which correlates the microstructure with particle size and processing parameters is developed.

  15. Solidification of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumanth, G. S.; Irons, G. A.

    1996-08-01

    The solidification behavior of ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is different from that of the bare matrix, not only because of the presence of the ceramic particles, but also due to their redistribution in the melt that results in nonhomogeneous thermophysical properties. The MMCs comprised of 10-to 15-μm SiC particles of varying volume fractions, dispersed uniformly in a modified aluminum A356 alloy by the melt stirring technique, were solidified unidirectionally in a thermocouple-instrumented cylindrical steel mold. The cooling rates were continually monitored by measuring temperatures at different depths in the melt, and the solidified MMCs were sectioned into disks and chemically analyzed for SiC volume fraction. The results point out that the cooling rate increased with increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. A small increase in the bulk SiC volume fraction of the cast MMC was observed due to particle settling during solidification. A one-dimensional enthalpy model of MMC solidification was formulated, wherein particle settling occurring in the solidifying matrix was coupled to the enthalpy equation by means of the Richardson-Zaki hindered settling correlation. A comparative study of simulations with experiments suggested that the thermal response of SiC particles used in this study was similar to that of single crystals, and their presence increased the effective thermal conductivity of the composite.

  16. Impact of Metal Droplets: A Numerical Approach to Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldeweij, Robin; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Layer-wise deposition of material to produce complex products is a subject of increasing technological relevance. Subsequent deposition of droplets is one of the possible 3d printing technologies to accomplish this. The shape of the solidified droplet is crucial for product quality. We employ the volume-of-fluid method (in the form of the open-source code Gerris) to study liquid metal (in particular tin) droplet impact. Heat transfer has been implemented based on the enthalpy approach for the liquid-solid phase. Solidification is modeled by adding a sink term to the momentum equations, reducing Navier-Stokes to Darcy's law for high solid fraction. Good agreement is found when validating the results against experimental data. We then map out a phase diagram in which we distinguish between solidification behavior based on Weber and Stefan number. In an intermediate impact regime impact, solidification due to a retracting phase occurs. In this regime the maximum spreading diameter almost exclusively depends on Weber number. Droplet shape oscillations lead to a broad variation of the morphology of the solidified droplet and determine the final droplet height. TNO.

  17. Research on metal solidification in zero-g state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The containerless solidification of several pure metals and metallic alloys was studied in a low gravity environment. The tests were performed in the MSFC 4.2 s drop tower using a rapid wire melting apparatus designed and built for this purpose. Pure iron and nickel, and alloys of iron-nickel, iron-carbon, nickel-aluminum and tungsten-rhenium were all melted and solidified at a gravity level of approximately 100.000/-4 g. Interpretation of the results has led to an appreciation of the factors controlling the successful execution of this drop test experiment and to a delineation of the limits of applicability of the apparatus. Preliminary metallurgical evaluations are presented of the overall shapes, lattice parameters, surface microstructure,, cross-sectional microstructures, solidification and transformation sequences, evaporative segregation, and localized solute redistribution observed in the low-gravity specimens. The effects of low gravity on metallic solidification are discussed with particular emphasis on observations of spontaneous undercooling and evaporative segregation in uncontained melts.

  18. Prediction of grain structures in various solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Desbiolles, J.L.; Thevoz, P.

    1996-03-01

    Grain structure formation during solidification can be simulated via the use of stochastic models providing the physical mechanisms of nucleation and dendrite growth are accounted for. With this goal in mind, a physically based cellular automaton (CA) model has been coupled with finite element (FE) heat flow computations and implemented into the code 3-MOS. The CA enmeshment of the solidifying domain with small square cells is first generated automatically from the FE mesh. Within each time-step, the variation of enthalpy at each node of the FE mesh is calculated using an implicit scheme and a Newton-type linearization method. After interpolation of the explicit temperature and of the enthalpy variation at the cell location, the nucleation and growth of grains are simulated using the CA algorithm. This algorithm accounts for the heterogeneous nucleation in the bulk and at the surface of the ingot, for the growth and preferential growth directions of the dendrites, and for microsegregation. The variation of volume fraction of solid at the cell location are then summed up at the FE nodes in order to find the new temperatures. This CAFE model, which allows the prediction and the visualization of grain structures during and after solidification, is applied to various solidification processes: the investment casting of turbine blades, the continuous casting of rods, and the laser remelting or welding of plates. Because the CAFE model is yet two-dimensional (2-D), the simulation results are compared in a qualitative way with experimental findings.

  19. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  20. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  1. Transient Effects in Planar Solidification of Dilute Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    The initial transient during planar solidification of dilute binary alloys is studied in the framework of the boundary integral method that leads to the non-linear Volterra integral governing equation. An analytical solution of this equation is obtained for the case of a constant growth rate which constitutes the well-known Tiller's formula for the solute transient. The more physically relevant, constant ramping down temperature case has been studied both numerically and analytically. In particular, an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained for the initial transient behavior. A numerical technique to solve the non-linear Volterra equation is developed and the solution is obtained for a family of the governing parameters. For the rapid solidification condition, growth rate spikes have been observed even for the infinite kinetics model. When recirculating fluid flow is included into the analysis, the spike feature is dramatically diminished. Finally, we have investigated planar solidification with a fluctuating temperature field as a possible mechanism for frequently observed solute trapping bands.

  2. Nucleation and solidification in static arrays of monodisperse drops.

    PubMed

    Edd, Jon F; Humphry, Katherine J; Irimia, Daniel; Weitz, David A; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-07-07

    The precise measurement of nucleation and non-equilibrium solidification are vital to fields as diverse as atmospheric science, food processing, cryopreservation and metallurgy. The emulsion technique, where the phase under study is partitioned into many droplets suspended within an immiscible continuous phase, is a powerful method for uncovering rates of nucleation and dynamics of phase changes as it isolates nucleation events to single droplets. However, averaging the behavior of many drops in a bulk emulsion leads to the loss of any drop-specific information, and drop polydispersity clouds the analysis. Here we adapt a microfluidic technique for trapping monodisperse drops in planar arrays to characterize solidification of highly supercooled aqueous solutions of glycerol. This system measured rates of nucleation between 10(-5) and 10(-2) pL(-1) s(-1), yielded an ice-water interfacial energy of 33.4 mJ m(-2) between -38 and -35 degrees C, and enabled the specific dynamics of solidification to be observed for over a hundred drops in parallel without any loss of specificity. In addition to the physical insights gained, the ability to observe the time and temperature of nucleation and subsequent growth of the solid phase in static arrays of uniform drops provides a powerful tool to discover thermodynamic protocols that generate desirable crystal structures.

  3. Microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the widespread commercial use of peritectic alloys (e.g., steels, brass, bronze, intermetallic compounds, Co based superalloys and A3B type superconductors), the characterization of the microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectics has historically lagged behind similar efforts directed towards other types of binary invariant reactions such as eutectic or monotectic. A wide variety of possible microstructures has been shown to form in peritectics depending upon the imposed temperature gradient, G, the solidification velocity, V, as well as the presence or absence of convection in the melt. This has important technological implications since many commercially important alloys exhibit peritectics and processing methods such as casting and welding often involve widely changing conditions. It has been the aim of this project to examine, in a systematic fashion, both experimentally and theoretically, the influence of gravitationally driven convection on segregation and microstructural development during solidification in peritectic systems under terrestrial conditions. The scientific results of the project will be used to establish ground based data in support of a meaningful microgravity flight experiment.

  4. Unidirectional solidification of Sn- Pb alloys under forced melt flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, J.; Rogozsán, B.; Rónaföldi, A.; Roósz, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical Sn-Pb alloy samples of different compositions (10, 20 and 30 wt.-% Pb) were prepared from high purity (4N) components. After metals have been melted, a rotating magnetic field (RMF) with an induction of 150 mT and a frequency of 50 Hz was switched on in order to homogenize the liquid. The electromagnetic field was generated by a 3-phase, 2-pole inductor. Just before the start of the solidification process, the magnetic field was switched off to achieve a microstructure free of melt flow influence. The sample translation velocity was constant (0.05 mm/s), and the temperature gradient changed from 7 to 3 K/mm during the solidification process. The first half part of each sample solidified without influence of rotating magnetic field while solidification of the second half part proceeded under the action of the RMF. The columnar microstructure formed in the absence of RMF induced fluid flow was replaced after switching on the RMF by a characteristic "Christmas tree"- like macro-segregated structure with equiaxed dendrites. The secondary dendrite arm spacing and the volume fraction of primary tin phase (dendrite) were measured by an automatic image analyzer on the longitudinal polished sections along the whole length of the samples. The effect of the forced melt flow and alloy composition on its micro- and macrostructure development was investigated.

  5. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Kostryzhev, A. G.; Slater, C. D.; Marenych, O. O.; Davis, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1–50 Cs−1. The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs−1. This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate. PMID:27759109

  6. Rapid solidification of levitation melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets with high undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Yuh; Flemings, Merton C.; Wu, Yanzhong; Piccone, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by high-speed optical temperature sensing for the rapid solidification of highly undercooled, levitation-melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets are presented. These data suggest a solidification model proceeding according to overlapping steps: (1) dendritic growth within the bulk undercooled melt, (2) continued recalescence as supersaturation of the interdendritic liquid dissipates, (3) fine-scale remelting within the dendrites, (4) ripening of the fine structure, and (5) solidification of remaining liquid at the end of recalescence.

  7. Solidification Studies from the Electrostatic Levitation System at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation (ESL) provides a means to study molten materials in a high-purity environment, free from contact with a container. Many phenomena important to materials science can be studied in the ESL. Solidification of metals, alloys and undercooled materials represent an important topic for research in the ESL. Recent studies of metals and alloys during solidification in the ESL are reported. Measurements include time, temperature and transformation of metallic glass-forming alloys, solidification velocities, and microstructure,

  8. MPS Solidification Model. Volume 2: Operating guide and software documentation for the unsteady model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of solidification Model 2 is described and documentation of the software associated with the model is provided. Model 2 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of unsteady horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The solidification program allows interactive modification of calculation parameters as well as selection of graphical and tabular output. In batch mode, parameter values are input in card image form and output consists of printed tables of solidification functions. The operational aspects of Model 2 that differ substantially from Model 1 are described. The global flow diagrams and data structures of Model 2 are included. The primary program documentation is the code itself.

  9. The Solidification Velocity of Undercooled Nickel and Titanium Alloys with Dilute Solute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algoso, Paul R.; Altgilbers, A. S.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of solidification velocity is important for two reasons. First, understanding the manner in which the degree of undercooling of the liquid and solidification velocity affect the microstructure of the solid is fundamental. Second, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions of the relationship between undercooling and solidification velocity and experimental results. Thus, the objective of this research is to accurately and systematically quantify the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling for dilute nickel-and titanium-based alloys. The alloys chosen for study cover a wide range of equilibrium partition coefficients, and the results are compared to current theory.

  10. Developpement de mesures non destructives, par ondes ultrasonores, d'epaisseurs de fronts de solidification dans les reacteurs metallurgiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floquet, Jimmy

    Dans les cuves d'electrolyse d'aluminium, le milieu de reaction tres corrosif attaque les parois de la cuve, ce qui diminue leur duree de vie et augmente les couts de production. Le talus, qui se forme sous l'effet des pertes de chaleur qui maintiennent un equilibre thermique dans la cuve, sert de protection naturelle a la cuve. Son epaisseur doit etre controlee pour maximiser cet effet. Advenant la resorption non voulue de ce talus, les degats generes peuvent s'evaluer a plusieurs centaines de milliers de dollars par cuve. Aussi, l'objectif est de developper une mesure ultrasonore de l'epaisseur du talus, car elle serait non intrusive et non destructive. La precision attendue est de l'ordre du centimetre pour des mesures d'epaisseurs comprenant 2 materiaux, allant de 5 a 20 cm. Cette precision est le facteur cle permettant aux industriels de controler l'epaisseur du talus de maniere efficace (maximiser la protection des parois tout en maximisant l'efficacite energetique du procede), par l'ajout d'un flux thermique. Cependant, l'efficacite d'une mesure ultrasonore dans cet environnement hostile reste a demontrer. Les travaux preliminaires ont permis de selectionner un transducteur ultrasonore a contact ayant la capacite a resister aux conditions de mesure (hautes temperatures, materiaux non caracterises...). Differentes mesures a froid (traite par analyse temps-frequence) ont permis d'evaluer la vitesse de propagation des ondes dans le materiau de la cuve en graphite et de la cryolite, demontrant la possibilite d'extraire l'information pertinente d'epaisseur du talus in fine. Fort de cette phase de caracterisation des materiaux sur la reponse acoustique des materiaux, les travaux a venir ont ete realises sur un modele reduit de la cuve. Le montage experimental, un four evoluant a 1050 °C, instrumente d'une multitude de capteurs thermique, permettra une comparaison de la mesure intrusive LVDT a celle du transducteur, dans des conditions proches de la mesure industrielle. Mots-cles : Ultrasons, CND, Haute temperature, Aluminium, Cuve d'electrolyse.

  11. Transport processes in directional solidification and their effects on microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Prantik

    1999-11-08

    The processing of materials with unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties plays a crucial role in modern technology. The quality of these materials depend strongly on the microstructure and the solute/dopant fields in the solid product, that are strongly influenced by the intricate coupling of heat and mass transfer and melt flow in the growth systems. An integrated research program is developed that include precisely characterized experiments and detailed physical and numerical modeling of the complex transport and dynamical processes. Direct numerical simulation of the solidification process is carried out that takes into account the unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth system, and accurately models the thermal interaction between the furnace and the ampoule by appropriately using experimentally measured thermal profiles. The flow instabilities and transitions and the nonlinear evolution following the transitions are investigated by time series and flow pattern analysis. A range of complex dynamical behavior is predicted with increasing thermal Rayleigh number. The route to chaos appears as: steady convection → transient mono-periodic → transient bi-periodic → transient quasi-periodic → transient intermittent oscillation-relaxation → stable intermittent oscillation-relaxation attractor. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the melt flow is found to be directly related to the spatial patterns observed experimentally in the solidified crystals. The application of the model to two phase Sn-Cd peritectic alloys showed that a new class of tree-like oscillating microstructure develops in the solid phase due to unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the liquid melt. These oscillating layered structures can give the illusion of band structures on a plane of polish. The model is applied to single phase solidification in the Al-Cu and Pb-Sn systems to characterize the effect of convection on the macroscopic

  12. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Right Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's right front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  13. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Left Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's left front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  14. Evaluation of the Use of Synroc to Solidify the Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Tripp; Vince Maio

    2006-03-01

    This report is a literature evaluation on the Synroc process for determining the potential for application to solidification of the Cs/Sr strip product from advanced aqueous fuel separations activities.

  15. Ion acceleration in dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2014-12-01

    The electric field associated with flow bursts and dipolarization fronts has been shown to be an efficient mechanism for producing energetic ions and electrons. Using an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection, flow bursts and dipolarization, we investigate the acceleration of test particles to suprathermal energies. Particular emphasis of this presentation is on spatial, temporal, and angular variations of the modeled energetic ion fluxes. The test particle simulations reproduce characteristic features of observed injection events, such as a fast rise of energetic particle fluxes, limitations in energy, and demonstrate the large variability of energetic ion features.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of dendritic growth kinetics in a Bridgman furnace front tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, R. P.; McFadden, S.

    2016-03-01

    A directional solidification experiment of a Ti-Al-Nb-B-C alloy by power down method is simulated using a Bridgman furnace front tracking model. The effect of varying the dendritic growth parameters; C, the columnar dendrite growth coefficient, and n, the undercooling exponent, is investigated. A matrix of growth coefficients and undercooling exponents - at three levels each, based around a growth law for Ti-46wt.%Al - is applied in simulations, and the effect on columnar dendrite tip temperature, tip velocity, and tip temperature gradient is observed. The simulation results show that the dendrite tip velocity and temperature gradient at the tip are practically unaffected by the use of different growth parameters. However, the predicted columnar dendrite tip undercooling did vary to give the required dendrite tip velocity. This finding has implications for the analysis of microstructural transitions, such as the Columnar to Equiaxed Transition (CET). In conclusion, it is suggested that, for transient solidification conditions, a CET prediction criterion based on tip undercooling is preferable to one that uses growth velocity.

  17. Crystallization and saturation front propagation in silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan T.

    2013-12-01

    The cooling and crystallization style of silicic magma bodies in the upper crust falls on a continuum between whole-chamber processes of convection, crystal settling, and cumulate formation and interface-driven processes of conduction and crystallization front migration. In the end-member case of vigorous convection and crystal settling, volatile saturation advances downward from the roof and upward from the floor throughout the chamber. In the end-member case of stagnant magma bodies, volatile saturation occurs along an inward propagating front from all sides of the chamber. Ambient thermal gradient primarily controls the propagation rate; warm (⩾40 °C/km) geothermal gradients lead to thick (1200+ m) crystal mush zones and slow crystallization front propagation. Cold (<40 °C/km) geothermal gradients lead to rapid crystallization front propagation and thin (<1000 m) mush zones. Magma chamber geometry also exerts a first-order control on propagation rates; bodies with high surface to magma volume ratio and large Earth-surface-parallel faces exhibit more rapid propagation and thinner mush zones. Crystallization front propagation occurs at speeds of greater than 10 cm/yr (rhyolitic magma; 1 km thick sill geometry in a 20 °C/km geotherm), far faster than diffusion of volatiles in magma and faster than bubbles can nucleate, grow, and ascend through the chamber. Numerical simulations indicate saturation front propagation is determined primarily by pressure and magma crystallization rate; above certain initial water contents (4.4 wt.% in a dacite) the mobile magma is volatile-rich enough above 10 km depth to always contains a saturation front. Saturation fronts propagate down from the magma chamber roof at lower water contents (3.3 wt.% in a dacite at 5 km depth), creating an upper saturated interface for most common (4-6 wt.%) magma water contents. This upper interface promotes the production of a fluid pocket underneath the apex of the magma chamber. If the fluid

  18. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. Double-Front Detonation Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Sumskoi, S. I.; Victorov, S. B.

    According to the theory of detonation, in a detonation wave there is a sound plane, named Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) plane. There are certain stationary parameters for this plane. In this work the possibility of the second CJ plane is shown. This second CJ plane is stationary as well. The physical mechanism of non-equilibrium transition providing the existence of the second CJ plane is presented. There is a non-equilibrium state, when the heat is removed from the reaction zone and the heat capacity decreases sharply. As a result of this non-equilibrium state, the sound velocity increases, and the local supersonic zone with second sonic plane (second CJ plane) appears. So the new mode of detonation wave is predicted. Equations describing this mode of detonation are presented. The exact analytical solution for the second CJ plane parameters is obtained. The example of double-front detonation in high explosive (TNT) is presented. In this double-front structure "nanodiamond-nanographite" phase transition takes place in condensed particles of detonation products.

  20. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard; Motakef, Shariar

    2001-01-01

    TMF is based on imposing a controlled phase-shift in a train of electromagnets, forming a stack. Thus, the induced magnetic field can be considered to be travelling along the axis of the stack. The coupling of this traveling wave with an electrically conducting fluid results in a basic flow in a form of a single axisymmetric roll. The magnitude and direction of this flow can be remotely controlled. Furthermore, it is possible to localize the effect of this force field though activating only a number of the magnets. This force field generated in the fluid can, in principle, be used to control and modify convection in the molten material. For example, it can be used to enhance convective mixing in the melt, and thereby modify the interface shape, and macrosegregation. Alternatively, it can be used to counteract thermal and/or solutal buoyancy forces. High frequency TMF can be used in containerless processing techniques, such as float zoning, to affect the very edge of the fluid so that Marangoni flow can be counter balanced. The proposed program consists of basic fundamentals and applications. Our goal in conducting the following experiments and analyses is to establish the validity of TMF as a new tool for solidification processes. Due to its low power consumption and simplicity of design, this tool may find wide spread use in a variety of space experiments. The proposed ground based experiments are intended to establish the advantages and limitations of employing this technique. In the fundamentals component of the proposed program, we will use theoretical tools and experiments with mercury to establish the fundamental aspects of TMF-induced convection through a detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of flow field. In this work, we will conduct a detailed parametric study involving the effects of magnetic field strength, frequency, wave vector, and the fluid geometry. The applications component of this work will be focused on

  1. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    SciTech Connect

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  2. Technology Performance Review: Selecting And Using Solidification/Stabilization Treatment For Site Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) is a widely used treatment technology to prevent migration and exposure of contaminants from a contaminated media (i.e., soil, sludge and sediment). Solidification refers to a process that binds a contaminated media with a reagent changing its ...

  3. Closed solutions to a differential-difference equation and an associated plate solidification problem.

    PubMed

    Layeni, Olawanle P; Akinola, Adegbola P; Johnson, Jesse V

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct and novel formalisms for deriving exact closed solutions of a class of variable-coefficient differential-difference equations arising from a plate solidification problem are introduced. Thereupon, exact closed traveling wave and similarity solutions to the plate solidification problem are obtained for some special cases of time-varying plate surface temperature.

  4. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION FOR REMEDIATON OF WOOD PRESERVING SITES: TREATMENT FOR DIOXINS, PCP, CREOSOTE, AND METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article discusses the use of solidification/stabilization (S/S) to treat soils contaminated with organic and inorganic chemicals at wood preserving sites. Solidification is defined for this article as making a material into a free standing solid. Stabilization is defined as ...

  5. Applications of the directional solidification in magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Liu, J.; Hu, Q. D.; Liu, Q. H.; Karaman, I.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    A zone melting liquid metal cooling (ZMLMC) method of directional solidification was applied to prepare highly-oriented Ni52Fe17Ga27Co4 magnetic shape memory alloys. At high temperature gradient and low growth velocity, the well-developed preferred orientation for coarse columnar crystals was obtained. Such a structure leads to a large complete pseudoelastic recovery of 5% at 348 K. Moreover, the pseudoelastic behaviours and the kinetics of the martensitic transformation (MT) are significantly affected by the intersection angle between the loading direction and the grain boundaries.

  6. MELTING, SOLIDIFICATION, REMELTING, AND SEPARATION OF GLASS AND METAL

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. A basic knowledge of the thermal, transport, and metallurgical phenomena that occur in the melting and solidification of glass, metal, and their mixtures is the foundation of the development of the separation methods. In association with this project, an innovative liquid-liquid extractor/separator will be developed to meet the separation needs for efficient extraction/separation devices for the various DOE liquid waste treatment processes.

  7. Crystal Growth and Fluid Mechanics Problems in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, Saleh A.; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Our work in directional solidification has been in the following areas: (1) Dynamics of dendrites including rigorous mathematical analysis of the resulting equations; (2) Examination of the near-structurally unstable features of the mathematically related Hele-Shaw dynamics; (3) Numerical studies of steady temperature distribution in a vertical Bridgman device; (4) Numerical study of transient effects in a vertical Bridgman device; (5) Asymptotic treatment of quasi-steady operation of a vertical Bridgman furnace for large Rayleigh numbers and small Biot number in 3D; and (6) Understanding of Mullins-Sererka transition in a Bridgman device with fluid dynamics is accounted for.

  8. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  9. Solidification of NaCl-NaF eutectic in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yu, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous NaF fibers, embedded in a NaCl matrix, have been produced in space and on earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convection current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of NaF fibers along the ingot axis.

  10. Solidification along the interface between demixed liquids in monotectic systems.

    PubMed

    Hüter, C; Boussinot, G; Brener, E A; Temkin, D E

    2011-05-01

    The steady-state solidification along the liquid-liquid interface in the monotectic system is discussed. A boundary-integral formulation describing the diffusion in the two liquid phases is given and the corresponding equations for the three interfaces (two solid-liquid interfaces and one liquid-liquid interface) are solved. Scaling relations are extracted from the results and supported by analytic arguments in the limit of small deviation from the monotectic temperature. We present also a complementary phase-field simulation, which proves the stability of the process.

  11. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz body force induced in electrically conducting fluids can be utilized for a number of materials processing technologies. An application of strong static magnetic fields can be beneficial for damping convection present during solidification. On the other hand, alternating magnetic fields can be used to reduce as well as to enhance convection. However, only special types of time dependent magnetic fields can induce a non-zero time averaged Lorentz force needed for convection control. One example is the rotating magnetic field. This field configuration induces a swirling flow in circular containers. Another example of a magnetic field configuration is the traveling magnetic field (TMF). It utilizes axisymmetric magnetostatic waves. This type of field induces an axial recirculating flow that can be advantageous for controlling axial mass transport, such as during solidification in long cylindrical tubes. Incidentally, this is the common geometry for crystal growth research. The Lorentz force induced by TMF can potentially counter-balance the buoyancy force, diminishing natural convection, or even setting up the flow in reverse direction. Crystal growth process in presence of TMF can be then significantly modified. Such properties as the growth rate, interface shape and macro segregation can be affected and optimized. Melt homogenization is the other potential application of TMF. It is a necessary step prior to solidification. TMF can be attractive for this purpose, as it induces a basic flow along the axis of the ampoule. TMF can be a practical alloy mixing method especially suited for solidification research in space. In the theoretical part of this work, calculations of the induced Lorentz force in the whole frequency range have been completed. The basic flow characteristics for the finite cylinder geometry are completed and first results on stability analysis for higher Reynolds numbers are obtained. A theoretical model for TMF mixing is also developed

  12. Effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front in a fluid-saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Lai, Geng-Xin; Ni, Chuen-Fa

    2009-06-01

    SummaryThe dissolution-induced finger or wormhole patterns in porous medium or fracture rock play a crucial role in a variety of scientific, industrial, and engineering practices. Although previous studies have extensively presented a number of numerical models which couples a system of nonlinear governing equations of porosity change due to mineral dissolution, the conservations of groundwater flow and transport of chemical species to investigate the morphological pattern of a chemical dissolution front within a fluid-saturated porous medium, whereas the mechanical dispersion effect has generally been neglected in the model development. This study addresses the effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front for a variety of cases. Mechanical dispersion processes is incorporated with the coupled nonlinear governing equation system so as to rebuild a newly numerical model. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that mechanical dispersion has pronounced impacts on the morphological pattern of the chemical dissolution front. For single local non-uniformity case, mechanical dispersion reduces the finger length of an unstable single-fingering front or retains the shape of a stable planar front while speeding up the front advancement. In the case of two local non-uniformities, adding mechanical dispersion with different flow conditions can yield one of the following results: (1) the shape of the stable planar front is maintained but its advancement is accelerated; (2) the shape of the unstable single-fingering front is maintained but its length is reduced; (3) the unstable double-fingering front is merged into an unstable single-fingering front; and (4) the shape of the unstable double-fingering front is preserved but its fingering length is reduced. A comparison between the behavior diagrams of dissolution front morphology (with and without considering mechanical dispersion) shows that the double-fingering front

  13. Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The relation between the hadronic short-distance constituent quark and gluon particle limit and the long-range confining domain is yet one of the most challenging aspects of particle physics due to the strong coupling nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, the fundamental theory of the strong interactions. The central question is how one can compute hadronic properties from first principles; i.e., directly from the QCD Lagrangian. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time. Lattice numerical results follow from computation of frame-dependent moments of distributions in Euclidean space and dynamical observables in Minkowski spacetime, such as the time-like hadronic form factors, are not amenable to Euclidean lattice computations. The Dyson-Schwinger methods have led to many important insights, such as the infrared fixed point behavior of the strong coupling constant, but in practice, the analyses are limited to ladder approximation in Landau gauge. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. New theoretical tools are thus of primary interest for the interpretation of the results expected at the new mass scale and kinematic regions accessible to the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gravity or string theory on a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and conformal field theories in physical space-time has led to a semiclassical approximation for strongly-coupled QCD, which provides physical insights into its nonperturbative dynamics. The correspondence is holographic in the sense that it determines a duality between theories in different number of space-time dimensions. This geometric approach leads in fact to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front

  14. Microstructural evolution in Mg-Zn alloys during solidification: An experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive microstructural evolution of Mg-1.5, 4.0 and 5.5 wt% Zn alloys with respect to the solidification parameters such as thermal gradient (G), solidification velocity (V), cooling rate (GV) and solute (Zn) content were investigated in the present study. Solidification techniques such as directional solidification and wedge casting were employed in order to obtain cooling rates between 0.05 and 250 K/s. Microstructural features such as secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), microsegregration along the secondary dendrites and secondary phase fractions were experimentally determined. A solidification model that incorporates solute back diffusion, secondary arm coarsening, dendrite tip undercooling and dynamically linked with accurate thermodynamic databases is used to explain the experimental results.

  15. The effect of heat transfer on local solidification kinetics of eutectic Al-Si cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rivera, C.; H. Cruz, M.; A. García, H.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    1999-02-01

    Recently, Fourier thermal analysis (FTA) has been proposed as a suitable technique to obtain information about local solidification kinetics in casting alloys. In this work, FTA was applied to a near-eutectic aluminum-silicon cast alloy in order to seek experimental evidence supporting the solidification kinetics obtained from this method. Also, a heat-transfer/solidification-kinetics model was used to compare predictions with experimental results. The metallographic findings, focused on interlamellar eutectic spacings in different locations within a cylindrical casting, support the solidification kinetics obtained from FTA. The model and experimental outcome including FTA results and metallographic observations suggest that local solidification kinetics depend strongly on local heat transfer, and the analysis of this dependence may be used to explain the observed changes in microstructural characteristics at different locations within castings.

  16. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Matthew G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100-1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  17. Effect of Ce melt treatment on solidification path of ZA8 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, R.; Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    The solidification path of ZA8 alloy with Ce addition was characterized using Newtonian technique of thermal analysis. The solidification events were determined using cooling curve and its first derivative curve. The microstructure and chemical composition of various phases in the alloy were studied using EDS, SEM and XRD techniques. It was found that the addition of Ce did not cause formation of new phases. However, it hinders the nucleation of stable β dendrites in the alloy. The presence of Ce promotes the eutectoid phase transformation and increases the hardness of the alloy. Latent heat of solidification and heat of eutectoid transformation were found to increase on Ce addition. The upward solidification of the alloy against Cu chill was analysed. Chilling had significant influence on solidification parameters, and caused refinement of the microstructure. The addition of Ce to the melt had no effect during chill casting of the alloy.

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification During the Twin-Roll Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-02-01

    The commercialization of aluminum twin-roll casting was realized in the early 1950s, while it is still a dream for engineers to produce steel strip by this process. In the present paper, a two-dimensional mathematical model is employed to study the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification during the twin-roll casting for both steel and aluminum. The turbulent flow in the pool is examined using the Lam and Bremhorst low-Reynolds-number turbulence model. In order to facilitate the comparison and analysis, a new transformed coordinate system ( r, φ) is established. Characteristics of the momentum boundary layer and the solidification front are described. Reasons of the formation of the wedge-shaped zone near the surface of rotating roll are given. In the transformed coordinate system ( r, φ), the effect of the centrifugal force induced by the rotating roll is presented using the velocity component in the r direction and the pressure gradient in the r direction. At last, the evaluation of the solidified shell in the pool is analyzed. The results show that the twin-roll casting is a roll-rotating-driven process. The variation of the thickness of the momentum boundary layer can be divided into three stages and its thickness is very uniform at the last stage. Near the roll surface, there exists a wedge-shaped zone induced by the near-roll-surface shear flow that washes the mushy zone front, which increases the depth of the liquid pool and decreases the length of the rolling region. The rotating roll gives rise to the stirring effect to the pool region and the metal is moving away from the roll surface in the positive radial velocity region, and the effect of the centrifugal force becomes weak in the lower part of the pool. At the solidification front, the non-dimensional effective heat transfer coefficient distribution in steel twin-roll casting is larger than that in aluminum twin-roll casting. Considering that the turbulence level is determined by the flow

  19. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  20. Directional solidification of eutectic composites in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic and a nickel-base alloy containing 30 wt pct Ta were solidified unidirectionally in an electron beam floating zone melting apparatus. It was found that the volume fraction of the Ni3Ta phase in the Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic mixture was increased from 7.6 to 36 volume pct in agreement with the theory as predicted. Tensile properties of the randomly solidified and unidirectionally solidified Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic were determined as function of solidification rate and temperature. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength decreased as both the test temperature and solidification rate increased. An elongation of 40 pct was obtained for a nickelbase alloy containing 30 wt at room temperature. This unusually large elongation was attributed to the superplastic behavior of the alloy. The critical currents versus the external fields at 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.2 deg for the unidirectionally solidified Pb-Sn eutectic were measured. The values of critical fields at zero critical currents were obtained by extrapolation.

  1. Crystallographic investigation of grain selection during initial solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaka, H.; Kataoka, Y.; Shinozuka, K.

    2016-03-01

    Normally, macroscopic solidified structure consists of chill, columnar and equiaxed zones. In a chill zone, many fine grains nucleate on the mold surface and grow their own preferred growth direction. Only a few of them continue to grow because of grain selection. In order to understand the grain selection process, crystallographic investigation has been carried out in the zone of initial solidification in this study. 10 g of Al-6 wt%Si alloy was melted at 850 °C and poured on the thick copper plate. Longitudinal cross section of the solidified shell was observed by a SEM and analyzed by EBSD. The result of EBSD mapping reveals that crystallographic orientation was random in the range of initial solidification. Further, some grains are elongated along their <100> direction. Columnar grains, whose growth directions are almost parallel to the heat flow direction, develop via grain selection. Here, a dendrite whose growth direction is close to the heat flow direction overgrows the other dendrite whose growth direction is far from the heat flow direction. However, sometimes we observed that dendrite, whose zenith angle is large, overgrew the other dendrite. It can be deduced that the time of nucleation on the mold surface is not constant.

  2. Solidification and convective instability during early sea ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchen, Joseph; Wells, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Growing sea ice rejects large amounts of cold, salty water into the underlying ocean which contributes to the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water, North Atlantic Deep Water, and maintaining the cold halocline in the Arctic ocean. This cold, salty water is formed by the partial solidification of sea water to form porous sea ice, which is an example of a mushy layer. Convection within the porous ice interior drives the drainage of dense brine into the underlying ocean. We consider how realistic surface cooling and variations in physical properties affect the time-dependent development of early sea ice growth, and the impact on solidification and convective instability within the ice. Whilst many previous studies of mushy layers have focussed on growth at a steady rate, we here model geophysically-motivated settings where the growth rate evolves with time. We quantify how the onset of convection in sea ice depends on the initial salinity of the sea water and the rate of heat loss to the overlying atmosphere, and show that slower cooling rates can promote the formation of larger convection cells within the ice.

  3. Convective and interfacial instabilities during solidification of succinonitrile containing ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Coriell, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Even though slow convective flow is difficult to detect in solidifying metals, it can readily be observed in transparent materials by observing the motion of small neutrally buoyant particles. Succinonitrile, which solidifies with an unfaceted solid/liquid interface and has well characterized physical properties, is considered an excellent material for such studies. For studies of solute-induced convection, ethanol is a useful addition to succinonitrile since it has a lower density and a somewhat similar molecular structure. Samples of high purity and ethanol-doped succinonitrile are unidirectionally solidified in a vertical temperature gradient. Latex mimcrospheres 2 microns in diameter are suspended in the liquid to reveal the convective flow. Convective and morphological stability is observed as a function of solute concentration and growth velocity. These measurements are compared with theoretical calculations that predict the transition from stability to instability as a function of solidification conditions. The predicted transitions occur at low concentrations and solidification velocities; for this reason, extreme care must be taken in order to eliminate the effects of impurities or thermally induced convection.

  4. Solidification and crystal growth of solid solution semiconducting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Problems associated with the solidification and crytal growth of solid-solution semiconducting alloy crystals in a terrestrial environment are described. A detailed description is given of the results for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) alloy crystals by directional solidification, because of their considerable technological importance. A series of HgCdTe alloy crystals are grown from pseudobinary melts by a vertical Bridgman method using a wide range of growth rates and thermal conditions. Precision measurements are performed to establish compositional profiles for the crystals. The compositional variations are related to compositional variations in the melts that can result from two-dimensional diffusion or density gradient driven flow effects ahead of the growth interface. These effects are discussed in terms of the alloy phase equilibrium properties, the recent high temperature thermophysical data for the alloys and the highly unusual heat transfer characteristics of the alloy/ampule/furnace system that may readily lead to double diffusive convective flows in a gravitational environment.

  5. Solidification/Stabilization of Elemental Mercury Waste by Amalgamation

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Lee, C. K.

    2003-02-24

    Experiments on solidification of elemental mercury waste were conducted by amalgamation with several metal powders such as copper, zinc, tin, brass and bronze. Unlike the previous studies which showed a dispersible nature after solidification, the waste forms were found to possess quite large compressive strengths in both copper and bronze amalgam forms. The durability was also confirmed by showing very minor changes of strength after 90 days of water immersion. Leachability from the amalgam forms is also shown to be low: measured mercury concentration in the leachate by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was well below the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit. Long term leaching behavior by Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) has shown that the leaching process was dominated by diffusion and the effective diffusion coefficient was quite low (around 10-19 cm2/sec). The mercury vapor concentration from the amalgam forms were reduced to a 20% level of that for elemental mercury and to one-hundredth after 3 months.

  6. Modelling morphology evolution during solidification of IPP in processing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pantani, R. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; De Santis, F. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; Speranza, V. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; Titomanlio, G. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it

    2014-05-15

    During polymer processing, crystallization takes place during or soon after flow. In most of cases, the flow field dramatically influences both the crystallization kinetics and the crystal morphology. On their turn, crystallinity and morphology affect product properties. Consequently, in the last decade, researchers tried to identify the main parameters determining crystallinity and morphology evolution during solidification In processing conditions. In this work, we present an approach to model flow-induced crystallization with the aim of predicting the morphology after processing. The approach is based on: interpretation of the FIC as the effect of molecular stretch on the thermodynamic crystallization temperature; modeling the molecular stretch evolution by means of a model simple and easy to be implemented in polymer processing simulation codes; identification of the effect of flow on nucleation density and spherulites growth rate by means of simple experiments; determination of the condition under which fibers form instead of spherulites. Model predictions reproduce most of the features of final morphology observed in the samples after solidification.

  7. Solidification of Trapped Liquid in Rocks and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Trapped liquid in an igneous cumulate solidifies over a range of time and temperature that can be retrieved by use of the lever rule in binary solutions applied to plagioclase using the range in the An content found for the individual rock studied. The resident crystals in the cumulate count in the phase equilibria as though deposited by the resident liquid in pure fractional crystallization at the moment of trapping. The An range (Morse JPet 53:891, 2012) when measured in sufficient detail, defines the solidification history. The instantaneous solid composition along the solidus defines the zoning of the plagioclase as it follows the trapped liquid on the liquidus. The reference bulk composition of the trapped liquid is given by an intercept on the initial solid-liquid lever, defined by the fraction of plagioclase in the trapped parent magma times the residual porosity. The mafic fraction is assumed to solidify by reaction independently of the plagioclase zoning. The residual porosity is calculated from the An range when that is calibrated to a value independently determined from the evolved components. Examples from a recent treatment of residual porosity (cited above) will be given for the solidification of selected rock compositions from the Kiglapait and Skaergaard intrusions. The same principles apply to the solidification of melt inclusions, with the difference that the latter tend to sample an evolved sheath by capture, rather than a parent magma trapped by closure of a cumulate. Melt inclusions are evolved from birth, and then are likely to evolve further with continued growth and re-equilibration of the container. The cumulate, by contrast, given any small degree of adcumulus growth, has had time to exchange the evolved rejected solute owing to its slow solidification, so its trapped liquid is the contemporaneous magma at the cumulate interface. Experimental results on melt inclusions in mafic magma demonstrate their intrinsic evolved nature. For example

  8. Microstructural Development during Directional Solidification of Peritectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the microstructures produced through solidification in peritectic systems has yet to be achieved, even though a large number of industrially and scientifically significant materials are in this class. One type of microstructure frequently observed during directional solidification consists of alternating layers of primary solid and peritectic solid oriented perpendicular to the growth direction. This layer formation is usually reported for alloy compositions within the two-phase region of the peritectic isotherm and for temperature gradient and growth rate conditions that result in a planar solid-liquid interface. Layered growth in peritectic alloys has not previously been characterized on a quantitative basis, nor has a mechanism for its formation been verified. The mechanisms that have been proposed for layer formation can be categorized as either extrinsic or intrinsic to the alloy system. The extrinsic mechanisms rely on externally induced perturbations to the system for layer formation, such as temperature oscillations, growth velocity variations, or vibrations. The intrinsic mechanisms approach layer formation as an alternative type of two phase growth that is inherent for certain peritectic systems and solidification conditions. Convective mixing of the liquid is an additional variable which can strongly influence the development and appearance of layers due to the requisite slow growth rate. The first quantitative description of layer formation is a model recently developed by Trivedi based on the intrinsic mechanism of cyclic accumulation and depiction of solute in the liquid ahead of the interface, linked to repeated nucleation events in the absence of convection. The objective of this research is to characterize the layered microstructures developed during ground-based experiments in which external influences have been minimized as much as possible and to compare these results to the current the model. Also, the differences

  9. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1998-01-01

    The research accomplishments summarized in this Final Report during the period from 3/95 to 3/98, which included a 12 months no-cost extension granted at the end of the nominal 2 year period of performance. The report has 5 sections, in section 1 the objectives are presented, a task description is given and the background and significance of the work is outlined. In section 2 the research accomplishments are summarized. In section 3 publications and presentations are listed. Student participation is listed in 4. The work is summarized in section 5. and references for sections 1 and 2 are supplied in section 6. The object of this work, is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involved using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, ID models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The experiments conducted in the MEPHISTO furnace facility during the USW-3 space flight which took place between February 22 through March 6, 199). This experiment represents an unprecedented opportunity to make a quantitative correlation between residual accelerations and the response of an actual experimental solidification

  10. The Role of Front-Back Features in Children's 'Front', 'Back', and 'Beside' Placements of Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lauren; Strommen, Ellen

    1970-01-01

    In a study of spatial orientation, 40 boys and 40 girls from kindergarten and first grade placed a series of objects in front, behind, and beside themselves, and in front, behind, and beside other objects. Some objects had distinguishable front and back sides; others lacked such features. Placements were highly consistent within and across…

  11. Simulation of weld solidification microstructure and its coupling to the macroscopic heat and fluid flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyk, Vitaliy; Dilthey, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure exerts a strong influence on the mechanical properties and on the integrity of welded joints. Prediction of the formation of the microstructure during welding and of other solidification processes may be an important and supporting factor for technology optimization. Nowadays, increasing computing power allows direct simulations of the dendritic and cell morphology of columnar grains in the molten zone for specific temperature conditions. Modelling is carried out, on the one hand, with the finite difference—cellular automata and, on the other hand, with the phase field method. Determination of the solidification conditions during fusion welding (temperature gradient, local solidification rate, weld pool shape) is carried out with a numerical macroscopic finite element modelling calculation of the weld pool fluid flow and of the temperature distribution, as presented in this paper. As with the use of accurate physical models, the simulations are carried out with a spatial resolution of the microstructure, and many assumptions and restrictions from traditional, analytical or phenomenological models may be eliminated. The possibilities of using numerical algorithms for generation and visualization of microstructure formation during solidification are demonstrated. The spectrum of applications extends from welding and casting to processes with rapid solidification. In particular, computer simulations of the solidification conditions and the formation of a dendritic morphology during the directional solidification in gas-tungsten-arc welding are described. Moreover, the simulation results are compared with the experimental findings.

  12. Effects of fluctuations on propagating fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    Propagating fronts are seen in varieties of nonequilibrium pattern forming systems in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In the last two decades, many researchers have contributed to the understanding of the underlying dynamics of the propagating fronts. Of these, the deterministic and mean-field dynamics of the fronts were mostly understood in late 1980s and 1990s. On the other hand, although the earliest work on the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts dates back to early 1980s, the subject of fluctuating fronts did not reach its adolescence until the mid 1990s. From there onwards the last few years witnessed a surge in activities in the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts. Scores of papers have been written on this subject since then, contributing to a significant maturity of our understanding, and only recently a full picture of fluctuating fronts has started to emerge. This review is an attempt to collect all the works on fluctuating (propagating) fronts in a coherent and cogent manner in proper perspective. It is based on the idea of making our knowledge in this field available to a broader audience, and it is also expected to help to collect bits and pieces of loose thread-ends together for possible further investigation.

  13. Effect of Crucible Diameter Reduction on the Convection, Macrosegregation, and Dendritic Morphology during Directional Solidification of Pb-2.2 Wt Pct Sb Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jun; Tewari, S. N.; Magadi, G.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    The Pb-2.2 wt pct Sb alloy has been directionally solidified in 1-, 2-, 3-, and 7-mm-diameter crucibles with planar and dendritic liquid-solid interface orphology. For plane front solidification, the experimentally observed macrosegregation along the solidified length follows the relationship proposed by Favier. Application of a 0.4 T transverse magnetic field has no effect on the extent of convection. Reducing the ampoule diameter appears to decrease the extent of convection. However, extensive convection is still present even in the 1-mm-diameter crucible. An extrapolation of the observed behavior indicated that nearly diffusive transport conditions require ampoules that are about 40 microns in diameter. Reduction of the crucible diameter does not appear to have any significant effect on the primary dendrite spacing. However, it results in considerable distortion of the dendrite morphology and ordering. This is especially true for the 1-mm diameter samples.

  14. Diffusion-controlled solidification of a ternary melt from a cooled boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitta, Anneli; Huppert, Herbert E.; Grae Worster, M.

    2001-04-01

    We present details of an experimental study of crystallization adjacent to a cooled boundary from an aqueous solution of potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate. This transparent system is typical of many ternary melts that do not form solid solutions, including examples in igneous petrology and metallurgy. We have measured the rates of advance of the front of crystallization and the eutectic front, behind which the system is completely solid. From careful measurements of the concentration and temperature fields, we have been able to infer the location of an internal phase boundary: the cotectic front separating a region in which only one component of the ternary system forms crystals from a region in which two components form crystals. Our experiments were conducted under conditions in which fluid flow is minimal, so that rates of crystallization are determined principally by the diffusive transport of heat. We have confirmed that the thicknesses of the various regions all grow in proportion to the square root of time, as is expected of diffusion-limited growth, and have determined the constants of proportionality for a range of different initial concentrations and boundary temperatures. We have found evidence to suggest that there may be a significant nucleation delay in the secondary and tertiary crystallization. Our measurements of concentration provide much more information about the ternary phase diagram than has hitherto been available.

  15. Studying electric fields in dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-11-01

    In Earth's magnetotail, sharp increases in the magnetic field known as dipolarization fronts are associated with high-speed plasma flows that connect Earth's ionosphere via electric currents. Some aspects of these dipolarization fronts have puzzled scientists; in particular, the dip in magnetic field that occurs just ahead of the dipolarization front layer is not well understood. Sun et al. analyze observations made using the Cluster satellites to elucidate the details of electric fields associated with dipolarization fronts. The study shows that a type of electric current known as a Hall current dominates in the dipolarization front region and in the region where the magnetic field dips, but this current flows in opposite directions in these two regions.

  16. A study of solidification with a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roplekar, Jayant K.

    Due to the drive for weight reduction in the automobile industry, near net shape parts produced by semi-solid processing of aluminum alloys are increasingly replacing traditional steel parts. Magnetohydrodynamic direct chill casting (MHD-DC) process, developed in the mid-eighties, is the method of choice to produce rheocast metal alloys for semi-solid applications. In spite of commercial applicability of the MHD-DC process there is no integrated process model available for this process. In the present work we use an experimental setup that combines directional solidification with magnetic stirring to develop a numerical model for the MHD-DC process. We use the finite element method to solve the coupled equations of turbulent fluid flow, species transport and heat transfer with solidification on a fixed grid. Effects of the rotating magnetic field are incorporated through a body-force term which is determined a priori based on a detailed analytical study and experimental data. Due to the nature of temperature-solute coupling and the advection dominated evolution of the liquid fraction, special numerical procedures had to be implemented in the present work. The numerical procedure used in the present work is validated against two validation problems. In the first validation problem, we apply the two-phase methodology to solve the classical problem of diffusion-dominated solidification. The good agreement between the finite element solution and the analytical solution establishes soundness of the two-phase formulation developed in this work. In the second validation problem, a finite element prediction of the flow induced in a cylindrical cavity due to a rotating magnetic field is compared with an independent spectral solution. The close agreement between two radically different solution procedures establishes the accuracy in the formulation and implementation of the both procedures. We then simulate the experiments using the numerical model. The numerical model

  17. Direct measurement of the wetting front capillary pressure in a clay brick ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, Ioannis; Hall, Christopher; Wilson, Moira A.; Hoff, William D.; Carter, Margaret A.

    2003-12-01

    The absorption of a liquid into a rectangular bar of an initially dry porous material that is sealed on all surfaces except the inflow face is analysed in terms of Sharp Front theory. Sharp Front models are developed for both complete and incomplete displacement of air ahead of the advancing wetting front. Experiments are described from which a characteristic capillary potential of the material is obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure of the air displaced and compressed ahead of the advancing wetting front. Results for the absorption of water and n-heptane by a fired clay brick ceramic suggest that this wetting front capillary pressure (or capillary potential) scales approximately with the surface tension and also that the permeability scales inversely with the liquid viscosity. The pressure of the air trapped in the wetted region is found to be the same as the pressure of the displaced air. For this material the wetting front capillary pressure for water at 20°C is 0.113 MPa, equivalent to a hydraulic tension head of 11.5 m and to a Young-Laplace pore diameter of 2.6 µm. The capillary pressure so measured is apparently a fundamental percolation property of the material that can be interpreted as the air pressure at which liquid phase continuity and unsaturated conductivity both vanish. The method described can be applied generally to porous materials.

  18. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of Ultrasound Cavitation and Its Effect on Solidification Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Jiawei; Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik

    2015-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in studying the mechanism and effectiveness of using ultrasound waves to manipulate the solidification microstructures of metallic alloys. However, uncertainties remain in both the underlying physics of how microstructures evolve under ultrasonic waves, and the best technological approach to control the final microstructures and properties. We used the ultrafast synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging facility housed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US to study in situ the highly transient and dynamic interactions between the liquid metal and ultrasonic waves/bubbles. The dynamics of ultrasonic bubbles in liquid metal and their interactions with the solidifying phases in a transparent alloy were captured in situ. The experiments were complemented by the simulations of the acoustic pressure field, the pulsing of the bubbles, and the associated forces acting onto the solidifying dendrites. The study provides more quantitative understanding on how ultrasonic waves/bubbles influence the growth of dendritic grains and promote the grain multiplication effect for grain refinement.

  19. Casting Simulation Within the Framework of ICME: Coupling of Solidification, Heat Treatment, and Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianzheng; Scott, Sam; Cao, Weisheng; Köser, Ole

    2016-05-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is becoming a compulsory practice for developing advanced materials, re-thinking manufacturing processing, and engineering components to meet challenging design goals quickly and cost-effectively. As a key component of the ICME approach, a numerical approach is being developed for the prediction of casting microstructure, defects formation and mechanical properties from solidification to heat treatment. Because of the processing conditions and complexity of geometry, material properties of a cast part are not normally homogeneous. This variation and the potential weakening inherent in manufacturing are currently accommodated by incorporating large safety factors that counter design goals. The simulation of the different manufacturing process stages is integrated such that the resultant microstructure of the previous event is used as the initial condition of the following event, ensuring the tracking of the component history while maintaining a high level of accuracy across these manufacturing stages. This paper explains the significance of integrated analytical prediction to obtain more precise simulation results and sets out how available techniques may be applied accordingly.

  20. Interaction of a cold front with a sea-breeze front Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brümmer, B.; Hennemuth, B.; Rhodin, A.; Thiemann, S.

    1995-08-01

    On 9 May 1989, during the field experiment FRONTEX, a synoptic-scale cold front was observed which moved from the North Sea to Northern Germany and interacted with a sea-breeze front. The modification of the cold front is documented by satellite images and measurements over the sea, at the coast and further inland. The synoptic-scale front was characterized by weak frontal gradients over the sea. It was aligned approximately parallel to the coast as was approximately the wind ahead of it. While the synoptic-scale front approached the coast during the forenoon hours, a strong temperature contrast developed between sea and land due to solar heating of the land surface. This led to the formation of a sea-breeze front associated with a stronger temperature gradient than the synoptic-scale front. At about noon, when the synoptic-scale front almost reached the coast, the sea-breeze front began to move inland. The onshore wind behind the sea-breeze front and ahead of the synoptic-scale front was so large that the wind field at the synoptic-scale front changed from confluence to difluence. This process was supported by a shallow inversion ahead of the synoptic-scale front which confined the vertical depth of the sea-breeze. The former sea-breeze front overtook the main frontal characteristics, continued its inland propagation and was the only frontal event observed over the land. As a result of the interaction, the synoptic-scale front was significantly intensified in the boundary layer.

  1. Dendritic solidification. I - Analysis of current theories and models. II - A model for dendritic growth under an imposed thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1985-01-01

    A critical review of the present dendritic growth theories and models is presented. Mathematically rigorous solutions to dendritic growth are found to rely on an ad hoc assumption that dendrites grow at the maximum possible growth rate. This hypothesis is found to be in error and is replaced by stability criteria which consider the conditions under which a dendrite tip advances in a stable fashion in a liquid. The important elements of a satisfactory model for dendritic solidification are summarized and a theoretically consistent model for dendritic growth under an imposed thermal gradient is proposed and described. The model is based on the modification of an analysis due to Burden and Hunt (1974) and predicts correctly in all respects, the transition from a dendritic to a planar interface at both very low and very large growth rates.

  2. Cooling and solidification of liquid-metal drops in a gaseous atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J. K.; Markworth, A. J.; Collings, E. W.; Brodkey, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The free fall of a liquid-metal drop, heat transfer from the drop to its environment, and solidification of the drop are described for both gaseous and vacuum atmospheres. A simple model, in which the drop is assumed to fall rectilinearly, with behavior like that of a rigid particle, is developed to describe cooling behavior. Recalescence of supercooled drops is assumed to occur instantaneously when a specified temperature is passed. The effects of solidification and experimental parameters on drop cooling are calculated and discussed. Major results include temperature as a function of time, and of drag, time to complete solidification, and drag as a function of the fraction of the drop solidified.

  3. Numerical simulation of freckle formation in directional solidification of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Poirier, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification is presented which simulates the formation of segregation models known as 'freckles' during directional solidification of binary alloys. The growth of the two-phase or dendritic zone is calculated by solving the coupled equations of momentum, energy, and solute transport, as well as maintaining the thermodynamic constraints dictated by the phase diagram of the alloy. Calculations for lead-tin alloys show that the thermosolutal convection in the dendritic zone during solidification can produce heavily localized inhomogeneities in the composition of the final alloy.

  4. Solidification and phase equilibria in the Fe-C-Cr-NbC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregolin, J. A. R.; Alcantara, N. G.

    1991-10-01

    A solidification model is developed and experimentally checked for Fe-C-Cr-Nb alloys in the white cast irons range. It is based on a partial quaternary Fe-C-Cr-NbC phase diagram and predicts the possible solidification paths for the alloys containing γ, with (Fe,Cr)7C3 and NbC as the microconstituents at room temperature. The dendritic γ to massive (Fe,Cr)7C3 transition in experimental alloy microstructures with NbC contents up to 22 pet is explained by this model. Thermal analysis is also used to compare the solidification paths and model approach.

  5. Solidification rate influence on orientation and mechanical properties of MAR-M-246+Hf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of solidification rates on the orientation and mechanical properties of MAR-M-246+Hf was studied. The preferred orientation was found to be (001) for single crystals, with all samples with 45 degrees of (001). Tensile tests were performed at room temperature. The anisotropy of directionally solidified MAR-M-246+Hf was demonstrated by gage section deformation. Dendrite arm spacing and crystal growth were found to depend on solidification rates and source material conditions. The greatest strength occurred at lower solidification rates. Some single crystals were grown by control of growth rates without seeding.

  6. The solidification under zero gravity conditions of binary alloys exhibiting solid state immiscibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. A.; Anantatmula, R. P.; Horylev, R. J.; Gupta, S. P.; Vatne, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The solidification behavior of gold-silicon alloys containing up to 25 at. % silicon was studied, and a mathematical model of gravity segregation during solidification was developed. A background of knowledge is provided which can be used in the design of zero gravity solidification experiments to be carried out in the 300-ft drop tower, in Aerobee rockets and in future space missions. Such experiments are needed to develop the basic scientific knowledge required for the design of economically viable space manufacturing processes. Some preliminary zero gravity experiments were carried out on a gold-25 at. % silicon alloy using the drop tower facility.

  7. Onshore propagation of a buoyant ocean front observed using a shore-based marine radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Cooper, A. L.; Mied, R. P.; Lindemann, G. J.; Trizna, D. B.; Porter, D. L.

    2004-06-01

    An analysis is presented of a 2-h-long time series of X-band marine radar images, collected at Duck, North Carolina (USA), that captured the evolution of a buoyant ocean front as it propagated onshore, following a period of upwelling-favorable winds. In plan view, the front exhibits a scallop-shaped structure similar to that previously observed along strongly convergent fronts. This alongshore structure consists of broad frontal crests (a few hundred meters in length) alternating with sharply angled troughs, or frontal cusps. The evolution of these frontal shapes is explored using a reduced-gravity model (Cooper et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans 106 (2001) 16887) that allows for nonlinear self-interaction of a propagating front. A model simulation shows cusps that develop quickly from initially broad troughs and that point toward the buoyant water, features resembling the observations. However, the simulation also shows a continuous oscillation of frontal shapes, while the observed front reaches a quasi-steady plan form. We attribute this difference in behavior to the gradual shoaling of the observed front as it steadily advances, ultimately reaching water depths of less than 2 m, which is comparable to the thickness of the buoyant layer. As a consequence of the shoaling, we suggest the cusps become sites of enhanced mixing, where water inshore of the front is also accelerated seaward.

  8. Pulse front adaptive optics: a new method for control of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-07-27

    Ultrafast lasers enable a wide range of physics research and the manipulation of short pulses is a critical part of the ultrafast tool kit. Current methods of laser pulse shaping are usually considered separately in either the spatial or the temporal domain, but laser pulses are complex entities existing in four dimensions, so full freedom of manipulation requires advanced forms of spatiotemporal control. We demonstrate through a combination of adaptable diffractive and reflective optical elements - a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) and a deformable mirror (DM) - decoupled spatial control over the pulse front (temporal group delay) and phase front of an ultra-short pulse was enabled. Pulse front modulation was confirmed through autocorrelation measurements. This new adaptive optics technique, for the first time enabling in principle arbitrary shaping of the pulse front, promises to offer a further level of control for ultrafast lasers.

  9. A Life Cycle Assessment of a Magnesium Automotive Front End

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit; Dubreuil, Alain; Bushi, Lindita; Tharumarajah, Ambalavanar

    2009-01-01

    The Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project under the sponsorship of Canada, China and USA aims to develop key technologies and a knowledge base for increased use of magnesium in automobile. The goal of this life cycle assessment (LCA) study is to compare the energy and potential environmental impacts of advanced magnesium based front end parts of a North America built 2007 GM-Cadillac CTS with the standard carbon steel based design. This LCA uses the 'cradle-to-grave' approach by including primary material production, semi-fabrication production, autoparts manufacturing and assembly, transportation, use phase and end-of-life processing of autoparts. This LCA study was done in compliance with international standards ISO 14040:2006 and ISO 14044:2006. Furthermore, the LCA results for aluminum based front end autopart are presented. While weight savings result in reductions in energy use and carbon dioxide emissions during the use of the car, the impacts of fabrication and recycling of lightweight materials are substantial in regard to steel. Pathways for improving sustainability of magnesium use in automobiles through material management and technology improvements including recycling are also discussed.

  10. Experiments and simulations of RT and RM fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, P.; Gushkov, S.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or non-mixing front occurring at a density interface due to gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the front. The experimental configuration consists on a unstable two layer system held by a removable plate in a box for the Rayleigh-Taylor fronts and shock tube high Mach number impulse across a density interface air/SF6. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied taking into account the dependence on the initial modes at the early stages and its spectral, self-similar information. Most models of the turbulent mixing evolution generated by hydrodynamics instabilities do not include any dependence on initial conditions, but in many relevant physical problems this dependence is very important, for instance, in Inertial Confinement Fussion target implosion. We discuss simple initial conditions (such as a jet array versus a plate removal) with the aid of numerical models. The analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and of accelerated instabilities is presented locally, and seen to dominate the turbulent cascade mixing zone differently under different initial conditions. Fractal and neuron network analysis of Turbulent Mixing under RT and RM instabilities are presented comparing the different experiments and numerical simulations.

  11. Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene.

  12. Assessment of mathematical models for the flow in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jay W.; Chen, Falin

    1997-02-01

    In a binary solution unidirectionally solidified from below, the bulk melt and the eutectic solid is separated by a dendritic mushy zone. The mathematical formulation governing the fluid motion shall thus consist of the equations in the bulk melt and the mushy zone and the associated boundary conditions. In the bulk melt, assuming that the melt is a Newtonian fluid, the governing equations are the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, the heat conservation equation, and the solute conservation equation. In the mushy layer, however, the formulation of the momentum equation and the associated boundary conditions are diversified in previous investigations. In this paper, we discuss three mathematical models, which had been previously applied to study the flow induced by the solidification of binary solutions cooling from below. The assessment is given on the bases of the stability characteristics of the convective flow and the comparison between the numerical and experimental results.

  13. Modeling the flow in diffuse interface methods of solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhedar, A.; Steinbach, I.; Varnik, F.

    2015-08-01

    Fluid dynamical equations in the presence of a diffuse solid-liquid interface are investigated via a volume averaging approach. The resulting equations exhibit the same structure as the standard Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid with a constant viscosity, the effect of the solid phase fraction appearing in the drag force only. This considerably simplifies the use of the lattice Boltzmann method as a fluid dynamics solver in solidification simulations. Galilean invariance is also satisfied within this approach. Further, we investigate deviations between the diffuse and sharp interface flow profiles via both quasiexact numerical integration and lattice Boltzmann simulations. It emerges from these studies that the freedom in choosing the solid-liquid coupling parameter h provides a flexible way of optimizing the diffuse interface-flow simulations. Once h is adapted for a given spatial resolution, the simulated flow profiles reach an accuracy comparable to quasiexact numerical simulations.

  14. Existence of needle crystals in local models of solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    The way in which surface tension acts as a singular perturbation to destroy the continuous family of needle-crystal solutions of the steady-state growth equations is analyzed in detail for two local models of solidification. All calculations are performed in the limit of small surface tension or, equivalently, small velocity. The basic mathematical ideas are introduced in connection with a quasilinear, isotropic version of the geometrical model of Brower et al., in which case the continuous family of solutions dissappears completely. The formalism is then applied to a simplified boundary-layer model with an anisotropic kinetic attachment coefficient. In the latter case, the solvability condition for the existence of needle crystals can be satisfied whenever the coefficient of anisotropy is arbitrarily small but nonzero.

  15. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  16. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Laird, G.

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  17. Factors affecting hazardous waste solidification/stabilization: a review.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Rachana; Chaudhary, Rubina

    2006-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization is accepted as a well-established disposal technique for hazardous waste. As a result many different types of hazardous wastes are treated with different binders. The S/S products have different property from waste and binders individually. The effectiveness of S/S process is studied by physical, chemical and microstructural methods. This paper summarizes the effect of different waste stream such as heavy metals bearing sludge, filter cake, fly ash, and slag on the properties of cement and other binders. The factors affecting strength development is studied using mix designs, including metal bearing waste alters the hydration and setting time of binders. Pore structure depends on relative quantity of the constituents, cement hydration products and their reaction products with admixtures. Carbonation and additives can lead to strength improvement in waste-binder matrix.

  18. Solidification of hypermonotectic Al-In alloys under microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potard, C.

    1982-01-01

    Four samples of the Al-In system having monotectic and hypermonotectic compositions that were solidified under microgravity during the NASA-SPAR IX flight of January 20, 1981, are considered. The experimental thermal and physicochemical conditions that were actually achieved are analyzed. Radiographic and metallographic observations of the samples reveal a nonregular dispersed primary phase inside the monotectic matrix. These observations are discussed in relation to capillarity and solidification aspects. A key finding is the preservation of a certain degree of dispersion of the indium primary phase. This result differs fundamentally from the results obtained under microgravity conditions on the same system and compositions (Gelles and Markworth, 1980; Alborn and Loehberg, 1979). The results are seen as clearly establishing that the space environment can be used to obtain dispersed structures from hypermonotectic alloys.

  19. Benard convection in binary mixtures with Soret effects and solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, G.; Mueller, U.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    Benard convection was studied in a two-component liquid which displayed Soret effects (Soret, 1879; DeGroot and Mazur, 1969) and in which the temperatures of the horizontal boundaries spanned the solidification temperature of the mixture. A steady basic state was observed, in which the layer is partly liquid (near the lower, heated plate) and partly solid (near the upper, cooled plate) with the interface being planar, and in which all transport is by conduction and diffusion. Linear stability of the basic state was examined to determine how the presence of solid and the ability of the material to solidify or melt under disturbance affects the critical conditions from the onset of instability. The theoretical results obtained for cases when the phase change is absent and when the Soret effects are absent (but the phase change is present) are compared with an experiment using alcohol-water mixtures.

  20. Detached Solidification of InSb on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianbin; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2003-01-01

    Detached solidification of lightly gallium-doped indium antimonide was achieved in the laboratory only when the ampoule was coated with hexagonal boron nitride and when the material appeared to be oxide-free. A furnace was constructed with the temperature increasing with height in order to minimize bouyancy-driven convection, so as to maximize transport of segregated dissolved gases into the gap between the growing solid and the ampoule wall. There appeared to be no difference in results with freezing rates of 5 mmh and 10 mm/h. Best results were obtained when the ampoule was backfilled with 20 kPa of Ar-10%H2 prior to sealing. The detached portions were depressed by several pm from adjacent attached regions, were rough, and sometimes had microfacets and steps.

  1. Solidification behavior and structure of Al-Cu alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.A.; Li, M.; Yang, N.C.Y.

    1997-09-01

    The microsegregation behavior of electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds of Al-Cu alloys covering a range from 0.19 to 7.74 wt% Cu were characterized for dendrite core concentrations and fraction eutectic solidification. Although a single weld speed of 12.7 mm/sec was used, some differences were observed in the segregation behavior of the two weld types. The microsegregation behavior was also modeled using a finite differences technique considering dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling and solid state diffusion. Fairly good agreement was observed between measured and calculated segregation behavior although differences between the two weld types could not be completely accounted for. The concept of dendrite tip undercooling was used to explain the formation of a single through thickness centerline grain in the higher alloy content GTA welds.

  2. Interactions between solidification and compositional convection in mushy layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae

    1994-01-01

    Mushy layers are ubiquitous during the solidification of alloys. They are regions of mixed phase wherein solid crystals are bathed in the melt from which they grew. The matrix of crystals forms a porous medium through which the melt can flow, driven either by external forces or by its own buoyancy in a gravitational field. Buoyancy-driven convection of the melt depends both on temperature gradients, which are necessary for solidification, and on compositional gradients, which are generated as certain components of the alloy are preferentially incorporated in the solid phase and the remaining components are expelled into the melt. In fully liquid regions, the combined action of temperature and concentration on the density of the liquid can cause various forms of double-diffusive convection. However, in the interior of mushy regions the temperature and concentration are thermodynamically coupled so only single-diffusive convection can occur. Typically, the effect of composition on the buoyancy of the melt is much greater than the effect of temperature, and thus convection in mushy layers in driven primarily by the computational gradients within them. The rising interstitial liquid is relatively dilute, having come from colder regions of the mushy layer, where the liquidus concentration is lower, and can dissolve the crystal matrix through which it flows. This is the fundamental process by which chimneys are formed. It is a nonlinear process that requires the convective velocities to be sufficiently large, so fully fledged chimneys (narrow channels) might be avoided by means that weaken the flow. Better still would be to prevent convection altogether, since even weak convection will cause lateral, compositional inhomogeneities in castings. This report outlines three studies that examine the onset of convection within mushy layers.

  3. Directional solidification of the alumina-zirconia ceramic eutectic system

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, Christopher

    1994-07-27

    It is possible to produce alumina-zirconia ceramic samples through existing solidification techniques. The resulting microstructures typically consist of rods of zirconia in an alumina matrix, although a lamellar structure has been noted in some cases. In nearly all cases, colony growth was present which may possibly result from grain size, repeated nucleation events, and lamellar oscillations. In the same vein, it appears that the amount of impurities within the system might be the underlying cause for the colony growth. Colony growth was diminished through impurity control as the higher purity samples exhibited colony free behavior. In addition to colony formations, faceted alumina dendrites or nonfaceted zirconia dendrites may result in the ceramic if the sample is solidified out of the coupled zone. In all cases, for larger-sized Bridgman samples, a lower limit in the eutectic spacing was noted. The solidification model which includes the kinetic effect has been developed, although the effect appears to be negligible under present experimental conditions. A spacing limit might also occur due to the result of heat flow problems. Heat flow out of the ceramic is difficult to control, often causing radial and not axial growth. This behavior is exaggerated in the presence of impurities. Thus, higher purity powders should always be used. Higher purity samples, in addition to yielding a more microstructurally uniform ceramic, also showed increased directionality. In the future, the kinetic model needs to be examined in more detail, and further research needs to be accomplished in the area of molten ceramics. Once better system constants are in place, the kinetic model will give a better indication of the behavior in the alumina-zirconia system.

  4. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  5. Volatile trapping by the freezing front hygrostat in the Hadean mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hier-Majumder, S.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Rudra, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's deep interior contains significant reservoirs of volatiles such as H, C, and N. Due to the incompatible nature of these volatile species, it has been difficult to reconcile their storage in the residual mantle immediately following crystallization of the terrestrial magma ocean. As the magma ocean freezes, it is commonly assumed, very small amounts of melt is retained in the residual mantle, limiting the trapped volatile concentration in the primordial mantle. In this presentation, we show that inefficient melt drainage out of the freezing front can retain large amounts of volatiles in the residual mantle while creating a thick early atmosphere. Using a two-phase flow model, we demonstrate that compaction within the moving freezing front is inefficient over time scales characteristic of magma ocean solidification. We employ a scaling relation between the trapped melt fraction, the rate of compaction, and the rate of freezing in our magma ocean evolution model. For cosmochemically plausible fractions of volatiles delivered during the later stages of accretion, our calculations suggest that up to 76% of total H2O and 11% of CO2 could have been trapped in the mantle during magma ocean crystallization. The assumption of a constant trapped melt fraction underestimates the mass of volatiles in the residual mantle by up to a factor of 15. Further, owing to particularly rapid magma ocean crystallization rates, the deepest mantle and the transition zone likely accumulate excess volatiles.

  6. Magmatic construction and duration of solidification of Searchlight pluton, Eldorado Mountains, Nevada (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. S.; Cates, N. L.; Miller, C. F.; Wooden, J. L.; Means, M. A.; Ericksen, S.

    2003-12-01

    The process of chamber construction and the residence time of magma in mid- to upper crustal magma bodies have been illuminated by recent advances in high-resolution geochronology. Most work has so far concentrated on young volcanic systems; few geochrononlogic data have addressed magma chamber longevity and history from studying plutons. Plutons offer an important complementary record of magma processing and solidification, and can therefore reveal much about the internal workings of magma chambers. The Miocene Searchlight pluton (Nevada, USA) is a spectacular example of a very thick magma chamber (10-12 km). Crystal accumulation (mafic quartz monzonite cumulate), coupled with roof-down solidification (upper quartz monzonite) resulted in segregation of evolved felsic melt in the chamber interior (middle granite). Initially horizontal and gradational internal contacts and coplanar magmatic fabrics between all major units, geochemical mass balance, and very limited isotopic variation among major units, suggest that the entire pluton was molten at one time. However, the time inteval over which the chamber solidified was not well known. New TIMS and in situ ion microprobe U/Pb dating of zircon, combined with our earlier and ongoing field and isotopic studies, now appear to document a protracted magma chamber history. TIMS and ion microprobe dating (Stanford/USGS SHRIMP-RG) was done on two samples, and a third sample was dated by ion microprobe only. A multi-grain, multi-fraction discordia lower intercept age of 16.7+/-0.5 Ma (MSWD=22) was obtained by TIMS from the lower mafic quartz monzonite cumulate. Ion probe dating of zircons from the same sample yielded a 206Pb/238U age of 16.9+/-0.2 Ma (MSWD=1.3; N=24) in agreement with the TIMS lower intercept age. A discordia lower intercept age of 15.7+/-0.4 Ma (MSWD=3.7, one concordant point at 15.8 Ma) was obtained from the middle granite unit. Ion probe dating of zircons from the same sample yielded a 206Pb/238U age of 16

  7. Dipolarization front and current disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    The modification of current density on the dawn-dusk cross section of the magnetotail with the earthward approach of a dipolarization front (DF) is examined through the recently published results of a three-dimensional (3-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the current density intensifies by 37% abruptly within 1.5 ion gyrotime as the DF approaches and shows localized regions with north-south extrusions. After reaching its peak value, it undergoes a drastic current reduction (DCR) by 65% within 2 ion gyrotime. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurs in the neutral sheet region in association with DCR, demonstrating the non-MHD behavior of the phenomenon. The evolution of current density from this 3-D PIC simulation bears several similarities to those observed for the current disruption (CD) phenomenon, such as explosive growth and disruption of the current density leading to a breakdown of the frozen-in condition. The evolution is also similar to those from a previous two-dimensional (2-D) PIC simulation specially designed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the cross-field current instability for CD. One interpretation of these findings is that CD and substorm triggering can be associated with earthward intrusion of a DF into the near-Earth plasma sheet as indicated by previous Cluster and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. An alternative interpretation is that both DF and CD are consequences of a global evolution from an ion-tearing-like instability of the magnetotail.

  8. Io in Front of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.

    Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.

    This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.

    The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  9. The influence of Cu, Mg and Ni on the solidification and microstructure of Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlapudi, A.; McDonald, S. D.; StJohn, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of alloying elements (Cu, Mg, and Ni) on eutectic nucleation, eutectic grain morphology and the final microstructure of an Al-10Si commercial purity alloy in unmodified and Sr-modified conditions was investigated. It was found that the nucleation and eutectic grain growth morphologies of both the unmodified and Sr-modified Al-Si eutectic were significantly influenced by the addition of ternary alloying elements to a degree dependent on when the intermetallic phase formed during the solidification of the alloy with respect to the Al-Si eutectic. In cases where an intermetallic phase nucleated prior to the onset of the Al-Si eutectic reaction, the eutectic nucleation frequency was affected by changes to the available nuclei population. In cases where the intermetallic nucleated after the Al-Si eutectic, segregation of the ternary solutes in front of the Al-Si eutectic interface changed the nucleation and macroscopic growth dynamics. The changes in nucleation and growth dynamics of the Al-Si eutectic due to the presence of solute altered the morphology of the eutectic silicon considerably. This study has revealed a number of insights into the mechanisms of nucleation and growth of the Al-Si eutectic.

  10. SUMMARY OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION SITE DEMONSTRATIONS AT UNCONTROLLED HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four large-scale solidification/stabilization demonstrations have occurred under EPA's SITE program. In general, physical testing results have been acceptable. Reduction in metal leachability, as determined by the TCLP test, has been observed. Reduction in organic leachability ha...

  11. Variations of Microsegregation and Second Phase Fraction of Binary Mg-Al Alloys with Solidification Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Kang, Dae Hoon; Essadiqi, Elhachmi; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-07-01

    A systematic experimental investigation on microsegregation and second phase fraction of Mg-Al binary alloys (3, 6, and 9 wt pct Al) has been carried out over a wide range of cooling rates (0.05 to 700 K/s) by employing various casting techniques. In order to explain the experimental results, a solidification model that takes into account dendrite tip undercooling, eutectic undercooling, solute back diffusion, and secondary dendrite arm coarsening was also developed in dynamic linkage with an accurate thermodynamic database. From the experimental data and solidification model, it was found that the second phase fraction in the solidified microstructure is not determined only by cooling rate but varied independently with thermal gradient and solidification velocity. Lastly, the second phase fraction maps for Mg-Al alloys were calculated from the solidification model.

  12. Macrosegregation and Grain Formation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification Through Cross-Section Increase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghods, Masoud; Lauer, Mark; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David; Grugel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical Al-7 wt% Silicon, Al-19 wt% Copper and Lead-6 wt% Antimony alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS) with liquid above, solid below, and gravity pointing down, in graphite crucibles having an abrupt cross-sectional increase. These alloys have similar solidification shrinkage but are expected to have different degrees of thermosolutal convection during solidification. Microstructures in the DS samples in the vicinity of the section change have been studied in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal effects and solidification shrinkage. Extensive radial and axial macrosegregation associated with cross-section change is observed. It also appears that steepling and local primary alpha-phase remelting resulting from convection are responsible for stray grain formation at the reentrant corners. Preliminary results from a numerical model, which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone, indicate that these regions are prone to solutal remelting of dendrites.

  13. THE SITE DEMONSTRATION OF CHEMFIX SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS AT THE PORTABLE EQUIPMENT SALVAGE COMPANY SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the GHEMFIX solidification/stabilization process was conducted under the United States Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The demonstration was conducted in March 1989, at the Portable Equipment Sa...

  14. Evolution of Secondary Phases Formed upon Solidification of a Ni-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Qiang; Liu, Feng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Changfeng

    2013-07-01

    The solidification of UNS N08028 alloy subjected to different cooling rates was studied, where primary austenite dendrites occur predominantly and different amounts of sigma phase form in the interdendritic regions. The solidification path and elemental segregation upon solidification were simulated using the CALPHAD method, where THERMO-CALC software packages and two classical segregation models were employed to predict the real process. It is thus revealed that the interdendritic sigma phase is formed via eutectic reaction at the last stage of solidification. On this basis, an analytical model was developed to predict the evolution of nonequilibrium eutectic phase, while the isolated morphology of sigma phase can be described using divorced eutectic theory. Size, fraction, and morphology of the sigma phase were quantitatively studied by a series of experiments; the results are in good agreement with the model prediction.

  15. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST SOLIDITECH, INC. SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the Soliditech, Inc., solidification/ stabilization process for the on-site treatment of waste materials. The Soliditech process mixes and chemically treats waste material with Urrichem (a proprietary reagent), additives, pozzolanic mat...

  16. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP, AND CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory condcuted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stablization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. For one o...

  17. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP AND CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's NRMRL conducted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stabilization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. Formulations developed during these studies wer...

  18. Technology Demonstration Summary Site Program Demonstration Test Soliditech Inc Solidification-stabilization Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of the Soliditech, Inc., SITE demonstration was to develop reliable performance and cost information about the Soliditech solidification, stabilization technology. The Soliditech process mixes hazardous waste materials with Portland cement or pozzolanic m...

  19. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  20. In situ and real time characterization of interface microstructure in 3D alloy solidification: benchmark microgravity experiments in the DECLIC-Directional Solidification Insert on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A.; Chen, L.; Bergeon, N.; Billia, B.; Gu, Jiho; Trivedi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamical microstructure formation and selection during solidification processing, which has a major influence on the properties in the use of elaborated materials, occur during the growth process. In situ observation of the solid-liquid interface morphology evolution is thus necessary. On earth, convection effects dominate in bulk samples and may strongly interact with microstructure dynamics and alter pattern characterization. Series of solidification experiments with 3D cylindrical sample geometry were conducted in succinonitrile (SCN) -0.24 wt%camphor (model transparent system), in microgravity environment in the Directional Solidification Insert of the DECLIC facility of CNES (French space agency) on the International Space Station (ISS). Microgravity enabled homogeneous values of control parameters over the whole interface allowing the obtaining of homogeneous patterns suitable to get quantitative benchmark data. First analyses of the characteristics of the pattern (spacing, order, etc.) and of its dynamics in microgravity will be presented.

  1. B Removal by Zr Addition in Electromagnetic Solidification Refinement of Si with Si-Al Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yun; Ma, Wenhui; Sun, Luen; Dai, Yongnian; Morita, Kazuki

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated a new process of enhancing B removal by adding small amounts of Zr in the electromagnetic solidification refinement of Si with Si-Al melt. B in Si was removed by as much as 97.2 pct by adding less than 1057 ppma Zr, and the added Zr was removed by as much as 99.7 pct. In addition, Zr is more effective in enhancing B removal than Ti in the same electromagnetic solidification refining process.

  2. Mechanics of transport phenomena in multi-component sessile drops with solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Yeong-Jen; Yang, Wen-Jei; Liu, Jiaching

    1990-01-01

    The mechanics of transport phenomena in multicomponent sessile drops with internal solidification is determined on the basis of an experimental study. A shadowgraph-schlieren system and a microscope-video system are used for the study. It is suggested that present data can be used to enhance the solid or crystal quality in a reduced-gravity environment where both thermo- and diffuso-capillary effects of solidification and crystal growth are dominant.

  3. Control of solidification boundary in continuous casting by asymmetric cooling and mold offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution, developed to obtain solidification-interface shapes for complex situations in which both the ingot cooling and mold geometry are asymmetric, is analyzed. The effect of mold offsett and of unequal ingot side temperatures on the interface shapes is illustrated in graphs. The results of the analysis show how the solidification interface in continuous casting can be controlled by asymmetries in both mold geometry and cooling of the ingot sides.

  4. Rapid Solidification Effects on the Development of an HCP Matrix in a Co-20Cr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Ledesma, A. L.; Lopez, H. F.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, it is experimentally found that rapid solidification enhances significantly the γ-FCC → ɛ-HCP transformation by generating a high density of ɛ-martensite embryo nucleating defects in a Co-20Cr alloy. Conclusive evidence based on X-ray diffraction determinations combined with SEM and TEM observations indicates that the formation of athermal ɛ-martensite is strongly influenced by rapid solidification conditions ( i.e., up to 89.6 vol pct).

  5. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry.

  6. Leap Day 2012 Severe Storm Front

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie was created using GOES-13 visible and infrared satellite imagery from Feb. 28 at 1245 UTC (7:45 a.m. EST) through March 1, and shows the progression of the cold front and associated low ...

  7. Perturbative High Harmonic Wave Front Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Brown, Graham; Ko, Dong Hyuk; Kong, Fanqi; Arissian, Ladan; Corkum, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    We pattern the wave front of a high harmonic beam by intersecting the intense driving laser pulse that generates the high harmonic with a weak control pulse. To illustrate the potential of wave-front control, we imprint a Fresnel zone plate pattern on a harmonic beam, causing the harmonics to focus and defocus. The quality of the focus that we achieve is measured using the spectral wave-front optical reconstruction by diffraction method. We will show that it is possible to enhance the peak intensity by orders of magnitude without a physical optical element in the path of the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) beam. Through perturbative wave-front control, XUV beams can be created with a flexibility approaching what technology allows for visible and infrared light.

  8. Nonperturbative light-front Hamiltonian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the current state-of-the-art in nonperturbative calculations done with Hamiltonians constructed in light-front quantization of various field theories. The language of light-front quantization is introduced, and important (numerical) techniques, such as Pauli-Villars regularization, discrete light-cone quantization, basis light-front quantization, the light-front coupled-cluster method, the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, sector-dependent renormalization, and the Lanczos diagonalization method, are surveyed. Specific applications are discussed for quenched scalar Yukawa theory, ϕ4 theory, ordinary Yukawa theory, supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, quantum electrodynamics, and quantum chromodynamics. The content should serve as an introduction to these methods for anyone interested in doing such calculations and as a rallying point for those who wish to solve quantum chromodynamics in terms of wave functions rather than random samplings of Euclidean field configurations.

  9. On the stability of subsonic thermal fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.; Shchekinov, Yuri; Bessega L, Maria C.

    2005-08-15

    The stability of subsonic thermal fronts against corrugation is analyzed and an exact dispersion relation is obtained taking into account the compressibility of the gas. For heat fronts, this dispersion equation has an unstable root ({omega}{sub ex}) corresponding to the Landau-Darrieus unstable mode ({omega}{sub 0}) modified by the compressional effects. In particular, the exact solution shows a conspicuous maximum very close to the value of the intake Mach number M{sub 1} at which a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration wave behind the heat front is formed. Cooling fronts are stable for corrugation-like disturbances. A maximum damping as well as a maximum in the frequency occur at a value of M{sub 1} depending on the value of the normalized cooling q.

  10. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  11. Speed of pulled fronts with a cutoff.

    PubMed

    Benguria, R D; Depassier, M C

    2007-05-01

    We study the effect of a small cutoff epsilon on the velocity of a pulled front in one dimension by means of a variational principle. We obtain a lower bound on the speed dependent on the cutoff, for which the two leading order terms correspond to the Brunet-Derrida expression. To do so we cast a known variational principle for the speed of propagation of fronts in different variables which makes it more suitable for applications.

  12. Speed of pulled fronts with a cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguria, R. D.; Depassier, M. C.

    2007-05-01

    We study the effect of a small cutoff γ on the velocity of a pulled front in one dimension by means of a variational principle. We obtain a lower bound on the speed dependent on the cutoff, for which the two leading order terms correspond to the Brunet-Derrida expression. To do so we cast a known variational principle for the speed of propagation of fronts in different variables which makes it more suitable for applications.

  13. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money.

  14. Effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of the reaction front during transport in a homogeneous porous medium with initial small non-uniformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-S.; Lai, G.-X.

    2009-04-01

    The morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front is an important topic in geological processes and engineering practices. Although previous studies have extensively presented a number of numerical models which couples a system of nonlinear governing equations of porosity change due to mineral dissolution, the conservations of groundwater flow and transport of chemical species to investigate the morphological pattern of a chemical dissolution front within a fluid-saturated porous medium, whereas the mechanical dispersion effect has generally been neglected in the model development. This study addresses the effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front for a variety of cases. Mechanical dispersion processes is incorporated with the coupled nonlinear governing equation system so as to rebuild a newly numerical model. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that mechanical dispersion has pronounced impacts on the morphological pattern of the chemical dissolution front. For single local non-uniformity case, mechanical dispersion reduces the finger length of an unstable single-fingering front or retains the shape of a stable planar front while speeding up the front advancement. In the case of two local non-uniformities, adding mechanical dispersion with different flow conditions can yield one of the following results: (1) the shape of the stable planar front is maintained but its advancement is accelerated; (2) the shape of the unstable single-fingering front is maintained but its length is reduced; (3) the unstable double-fingering front is merged into an unstable single-fingering front; and (4) the shape of the unstable double-fingering front is preserved but its fingering length is reduced.. A comparison between the behavior diagrams of dissolution front morphology (with and without considering mechanical dispersion) shows that the double-fingering front occurs under condition where the upstream

  15. Turbulent transport model of wind shear in thunderstorm gust fronts and warm fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, W. S.; Teske, M. E.; Segur, H. C. O.

    1978-01-01

    A model of turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer was used to simulate the low-level wind and turbulence profiles associated with both local thunderstorm gust fronts and synoptic-scale warm fronts. Dimensional analyses of both type fronts provided the physical scaling necessary to permit normalized simulations to represent fronts for any temperature jump. The sensitivity of the thunderstorm gust front to five different dimensionless parameters as well as a change from axisymmetric to planar geometry was examined. The sensitivity of the warm front to variations in the Rossby number was examined. Results of the simulations are discussed in terms of the conditions which lead to wind shears which are likely to be most hazardous for aircraft operations.

  16. IFA - INTELLIGENT FRONT ANNOTATION PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    An important aspect of an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) design process is verification. The design must not only be functionally accurate, but it must also maintain the correct timing. After a circuit has been laid out, one can utilize the Back Annotation (BA) method to simulate the design and obtain an accurate estimate of performance. However, this can lead to major design changes. It is therefore preferable to eliminate potential problems early in this process. IFA, the Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying the timing of the ASIC early in the design process. Many difficulties can arise during ASIC design. In a synchronous design, both long path and short path problems can be present. In modern ASIC technologies, the delay through a gate is very dependent on loading. This loading has two main components, the capacitance of the gates being driven and the capacitance of the metal tracks (wires). When using GaAs gate arrays, the metal line capacitance is often the dominating factor. Additionally, the RC delay through the wire itself is significant in sub-micron technologies. Since the wire lengths are unknown before place and route of the entire chip, this would seem to postpone any realistic timing verification until towards the end of the design process, obviously an undesirable situation. The IFA program estimates the delays in an ASIC before layout. Currently the program is designed for Vitesse GaAs gate arrays and, for input, requires the expansion file which is output by the program GED; however, the algorithm is appropriate for many different ASIC types and CAE platforms. IFA is especially useful for devices whose delay is extremely dependent on the interconnection wiring. It estimates the length of the interconnects using information supplied by the user and information in the netlist. The resulting wire lengths are also used to constrain the Place and Route program, ensuring reasonable results. IFA takes locality into

  17. Interaction of a cold front with a sea-breeze front Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, A.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of a front which passed the coast between the North Sea and northern Germany and thereby experienced some modifications of its mesoscale characteristics. The event was observed during the field experiment FRONTEX'89. The two-dimensional non-hydrostatic simulations presented in this paper resemble some of the observed characteristics and yield a detailed description of the evolution of the surface front. Over the sea several narrow frontal rain bands develop in the boundary layer which becomes unstable due to the increasing sea surface temperature near the coast. The rain bands move forward relative to the front due to the cross frontal circulation which is enhanced by the release of latent heat in the ascending warm air and by the cooling of the cold air below by evaporating precipitation. Over the heated land surface a sea-breeze front develops ahead of the synoptic-scale cold front. The strong frontal gradients of the sea-breeze front mask the broader frontal zone of the cold front at the ground. The sea-breeze front triggers deep convection ahead of the cold front in the afternoon and takes over all characteristics of the synoptic-scale front in the evening. The simulations show the mechanisms that caused the observed evolution and modification of the synoptic-scale cold front. They emphasize the strong influence of the surface heat fluxes on the characteristics of fronts on the mesoscale. The most important feature of the numerical model, necessary for the proper representation of the frontal characteristics on the mesoscale, is its high resolution. The simulations are restricted by the difficulties of finding an initial state and appropriate boundary conditions so that the results fit the observations for a long time period and that spin-up problems are avoided.

  18. Front instability and energy of the free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of research devoted to the formation of preferential flow paths occurring without macroscopic heterogeneity of the porous media. DiCarlo (2013) points out the connection between "overshoot" and the front instability. Extension of the standard Richards equation is required to capture this phenomenon. In most of the improvements, interfacial phenomena as the triple line at the front are considered. For instance, velocity dependent contact angle (Wang et al., 2013) or contact angle hysteresis (Rätz and Schweizer, 2012) allow to simulate successfully the instability. Another approach proposed by Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes (2009) introduces a macroscopic surface tension related to the existence of the water/air interface. As previously, the simulation of an advancing front displays physical looking fingering displacements. The goal of this contribution is to better understand the role of the different surface energies in the emergence of the front instability. We propose a model involving both the macroscopic surface tension and the soil wettability. This latter allows to define a contact angle and possibly hysteresis using heterogeneous wettability (Beltrame et al., 2011). Therefore, we employ the phase field approach developed by Felgueroso and Juanes, 2009 to which we add a free energy term corresponding to the wettability: a disjoining or conjoining pressure resulting from effective molecular interactions between the substrate and the free surface (DeGennes, 1985). The difference with the classical suction pressure is the hydrophobic behavior for ultra-thin film (small water saturation). Such a water repellency was recently estimated in the soil (Diamantopoulos et al. 2013). Stability analysis of an advancing front in an uniform porous media shows that macroscopic surface tension and wettability may independently produce the instability growth. In contrast, for a front stopping when reaching the layers interface of

  19. Deformation of Magma-Filled Bodies during Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Damjanac, B.

    2007-12-01

    As magma or lava solidifies, volatiles are concentrated in the residual liquid. The result will be expansion (including venting) or pressurization. The mechanism behind this is well-described. A rough hand calculation indicates that an alkali basalt with 4 wt% volatiles would attain attain 12 MPa with 50% crystallization at constant volume. Such pressures would easily be enough to break through the roof of a typical lava tube. If confined in a tunnel deeper in the ground, even in a relatively weak rock, crystallization would be virtually isochoric. However, in a sill at depths of only a few hundred meters, expansion could result in more nearly isobaric crystallization. In either event, before cooling enough to become a brittle solid, the outer portions of the magma would reach a viscoplastic state that could seal in any remaining vapor phase. This would allow pressures to increase further as solidification progressed. Using PELE, a computer code developed to calculate the progress of solidification (Boudreau, 2005), we calculate isochoric and isobaric equilibrium crystallization of alkali basalt and obtain pressures and viscosities as a function of temperature. For an initial pressure of 6 MPa and 0.85 weight percent water, the liquidus is 1433 K. The isochoric pressure reaches 11 MPa at 1293 K with 57% of the mass crystallized; the bulk viscosity is about 3 MPa-s, but that of the residual liquid is only 1 kPa-s. At the same temperature, the isobaric path results in 60% crystallization and a viscosity on the order of 10 kPa-s. A tabular body with these properties would be easily deformed by sagging of the roof if the viscoplastic seal were breached, resulting in a saucer shape. With 91% of the mass crystallized, the isochoric pressure exceeds 28 MPa at 1173 K. By that time, the bulk viscosity of the nearly crystallized mass is on the order of 1025 Pa-s, effectively solid, and the viscosity of the residual liquid (there is also a vapor phase) is about 50 k

  20. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Lee, C.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    The position of active volcanism relative to the trench in arcs depends on melt focusing processes within the mantle wedge and the geometric parameters of subduction. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where backarc extension dominates, exhibit a more stationary front in time relative to the trench. In addition, crustal indices of magmatism as measured by the ratio of trace elements La/Yb or isotopes 87}Sr/{86Sr covary with arc front migration (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust. Thickening proceeds through intrusive as well as extrusive volcanism, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. Migration rate is set by the mantle melt flux into the crust, which decreases as thickening occurs. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop an analytic model of this process that produces migration rates consistent with published data and explains arc fronts that do not move (dominated by extension, such as in the case of intra-oceanic arcs). We present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are also consistent with

  1. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The location of volcanic arcs, relative to the trench evolves over time. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where back-arc extension dominates, migrate more slowly, if at all. Coupled with arc migration there are systematic changes in the geochemistry of magmas such as the ratio of trace elements La/Yb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). The position of active volcanic arcs relative to the trench is controlled by the location where melt is generated in the mantle wedge, in turn controlled by the geometry of subduction, and the processes that focus rising melt. Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust and lithosphere. Thickening rate is determined by the mantle melt flux into the crust, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. It is not steady in time, as crustal thickening progressively truncates the mantle melt column and eventually shuts it off. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop a quantitative model for arc front migration that is consistent with published arc front data, and explains why arc fronts do not move when there is extension, such

  2. QCD and Light-Front Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Costa Rica U.

    2011-01-10

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a dilaton-modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. Higher Fock states with extra quark-anti quark pairs also arise. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the nonperturbative effective coupling and its {beta}-function. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method to systematically include QCD interaction terms. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  3. Light-Front Holography and the Light-Front Schrodinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy

    2012-08-15

    One of the most important nonperturbative methods for solving QCD is quantization at fixed light-front time {tau} = t+z=c - Dirac's 'Front Form'. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian predict the hadron spectrum and the eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure. More generally, we show that the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrodinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. We outline a method for computing the required potential from first principles in QCD. The holographic mapping of gravity in AdS space to QCD, quantized at fixed light-front time, yields the same light front Schrodinger equation; in fact, the soft-wall AdS/QCD approach provides a model for the light-front potential which is color-confining and reproduces well the light-hadron spectrum. One also derives via light-front holography a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. The elastic and transition form factors of the pion and the nucleons are found to be well described in this framework. The light-front AdS/QCD holographic approach thus gives a frame-independent first approximation of the color-confining dynamics, spectroscopy, and excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark bound states in QCD.

  4. Urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate reaction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, D. T.; Redden, G. D.; Henriksen, J.; Fujita, Y.; Guo, L.; Huang, H.

    2010-12-01

    , characterized by the pH profile and hydrolysis reaction species, was extended downstream of the enzyme zone. Downstream extension of the reaction profile was due partially to the partial mobility of the enzyme in the column. The experiments are helping to illustrate the complexity of transient reaction fronts as well as the needs and challenges for advanced modeling approaches. A modeling platform developed at the Idaho National Laboratory, which is capable of simulating tightly coupled physical-chemical processes (the Reactive Transport simulator), is being applied to pre-experimental simulations and post-experimental interpretation of results.

  5. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  6. Stabilization/solidification of munition destruction waste by asphalt emulsion.

    PubMed

    Cervinkova, Marketa; Vondruska, Milan; Bednarik, Vratislav; Pazdera, Antonin

    2007-04-02

    Destruction of discarded military munitions in an explosion chamber produces two fractions of hazardous solid waste. The first one is scrap waste that remains in the chamber after explosion; the second one is fine dust waste, which is trapped on filters of gas products that are exhausted from the chamber after explosion. The technique of stabilization/solidification of the scrap waste by asphalt emulsion is described in this paper. The technique consists of simple mixing of the waste with anionic asphalt emulsion, or two-step mixing of the waste with cationic asphalt emulsion. These techniques are easy to use and the stabilized scrap waste proves low leachability of contained heavy metals assessed by TCLP test. Hence, it is possible to landfill the scrap waste stabilized by asphalt emulsion. If the dust waste, which has large specific surface, is stabilized by asphalt emulsion, it is not fully encapsulated; the results of the leaching tests do not meet the regulatory levels. However, the dust waste solidified by asphalt emulsion can be deposited into an asphalted disposal site of the landfill. The asphalt walls of the disposal site represent an efficient secondary barrier against pollutant release.

  7. Interface Shape and Convection During Solidification and Melting of Succinonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Henry C., III; Lindstrom, Tiffany

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted of the crystal growth of succinonitrile during solidification, melting, and no-growth conditions using a horizontal Bridgman furnace and square glass ampoule. For use as input boundary conditions to numerical codes, thermal profiles on the outside of the ampoule at five locations around its periphery were measured along the ampoule's length. Temperatures inside the ampoule were also measured. The shapes of the s/l interface in various two dimensional planes were quantitatively determined. Though interfaces were nondendritic and noncellular, they were not flat, but were highly curved and symmetric in only one unique longitudinal y-z plane (at x=O). The shapes of the interface were dominated by the primary longitudinal flow cell characteristic of shallow cavity flow in horizontal Bridgman; this flow cell was driven by the imposed furnace temperature gradient and caused a 'radical' thermal gradient such that the upper half of the ampoule was hotter than the bottom half. We believe that due to the strong convection, the release of latent heat does not significantly influence the thermal conditions near the interface. We hope that the interface shape and thermal data presented in this paper can be used to optimize crystal growth processes and validate numerical models.

  8. Experimental study of directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.; Chen, Falin

    1991-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been carried out using the analog casting system of NH4Cl-H2O solution by cooling it from below with a constant-temperature surface ranging from -31.5 C to +11.9 C. The NH4Cl concentration was 26 percent in all solutions, with a liquidus temperature of 15 C. It was found that finger convection occurred in the fluid region just above the mushy layer in all experiments. Plume convection with associated chimneys in the mush occurred in experiments with bottom temperatures as high as +11.0 C. However, when the bottom temperature was raised to +11.9 C, no plume convection was observed, although finger convection continued as usual. A method has been devised to determine the porosity of the mush by computed tomography. Using the mean value of the porosity across the mush layer and the permeability calculated by the Kozeny-Carman relationship, the critical solute Rayleigh number across the mush layer for onset of plume convection was estimated to be between 200 and 250.

  9. Interactions Between Solidification and Compositional Convection in Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Worster, M. G.; Chiareli, A. O. P.; Anderson, D. M.; Schultze, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    This project combined theoretical and experimental ground-based studies of the interactions between convection and solidification of binary melts. Particular attention was focused on the alteration of the composition and microstructure of castings caused by convective flows through the interstices of mushy layers. Two different mechanisms causing convection were investigated. (i) Compositional, buoyancy driven convection is known to cause chimneys and freckles in directionally cast alloys on Earth. The analytical studies provide quantitative criteria for the formation of chimneys that can be used to assess the expediency of producing alloys in Space. (ii) Flow of the melt is also driven by the contraction (expansion) that typically occurs during change of phase. Such convection will occur even in the absence of gravity, and may indeed be the primary cause of macrosegregation during the production of alloys in Space. The studies will employed asymptotic methods in order to determine conditions for the stability of various states of solidifying systems. Further, simple macroscopic models of complete systems were developed and solved. These analytical studies were augmented by laboratory experiments using aqueous solutions, in which the convective flows could be easily observed and the effects of convection could be readily measured. These y experiments guided the development of the theoretical models and provided data against which the predictions of the models can be tested.

  10. Melt flow effect on interface stability during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, O. P.; Mashkovskiy, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the phenomenological macroscopic continuum theory using the approximation of a flat frontier layer the stability of solid-liquid interface at the directional solidification under melt motion along the interface is studied. The stability conditions are reduced to determination of eigenvalues of boundary value problem for infinitesimal disturbances of stationary process. In case of stagnant melt it is shown that in the plane "wave number-pulling rate" there are two areas of instability for low and large pulling rates divided by the area of steady-steady growth. Neutral stability curve calculated for rather large pulling rates for succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-Ac) system is close to the relevant values received by Mullins and Sekerka, while the absolute values of critical growth rates are of the same order of magnitude as the experimental ones. Melt flow along the interface leads to emergence of the third area of instability which is characterized by small values of wave numbers. When increasing the melt flow rate the area of instability extends towards great values of wave numbers.

  11. Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Voskresenskaya, Elena N.; Kostin, Eduard M.; Pavlov, Vyacheslav F.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2002-01-01

    Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

  12. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.; Conway, R.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  13. A phenomenological approach of solidification of polymeric phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Seyed Amir; Royon, Laurent; Abou, Bérengère; Osipian, Rémy; Azzouz, Kamel; Bontemps, André

    2017-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are widely used in thermal energy storage and thermal management systems due to their small volume for a given stored energy and their capability for maintaining nearly constant temperatures. However, their performance is limited by their low thermal conductivity and possible leaks while in the liquid phase. One solution is to imprison the PCM inside a polymer mesh to create a Polymeric Phase Change Material (PPCM). In this work, we have studied the cooling and solidification of five PPCMs with different PCMs and polymer fractions. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms involved, we have carried out micro- and macrorheological measurements in which Brownian motion of tracers embedded in PPCMs has been depicted and viscoelastic moduli have been measured, respectively. Beyond a given polymer concentration, it was shown that the Brownian motion of the tracers is limited by the polymeric chains and that the material exhibits an elastic behavior. This would suggest that heat transfer essentially occurs by conduction, instead of convection. Experiments were conducted to measure temperature variation during cooling of the five samples, and a semi-empirical model based on a phenomenological approach was proposed as a practical tool to choose and size PPCMs.

  14. Superior metallic alloys through rapid solidification processing (RSP) by design

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid solidification processing using powder atomization methods and the control of minor elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon can provide metallic alloys with superior properties and performance compared to conventionally processing alloys. Previous studies on nickel- and iron-base superalloys have provided the baseline information to properly couple RSP with alloy composition, and, therefore, enable alloys to be designed for performance improvements. The RSP approach produces powders, which need to be consolidated into suitable monolithic forms. This normally involves canning, consolidation, and decanning of the powders. Canning/decanning is expensive and raises the fabrication cost significantly above that of conventional, ingot metallurgy production methods. The cost differential can be offset by the superior performance of the RSP metallic alloys. However, without the performance database, it is difficult to convince potential users to adopt the RSP approach. Spray casting of the atomized molten droplets into suitable preforms for subsequent fabrication can be cost competitive with conventional processing. If the fine and stable microstructural features observed for the RSP approach are preserved during spray casing, a cost competitive product can be obtained that has superior properties and performance that cannot be obtained by conventional methods.

  15. Directional Solidification of Bi-Sn on USMP-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbaschian, Reza; deGroh, H., III; Leonardi, E.; Timchenko, V.; deVahlDavis, G.

    1999-01-01

    The experiments used MEPHISTO hardware to study the solidification and melting behavior of bismuth alloyed with 1 at% tin. Three samples, each approximately 900 mm long and 6mm in diameter, were used. A portion of each sample also included a 2 mm diameter growth capillary, to assist in the formation of a single grain. One sample provided the Seebeck voltage generated during melting and freezing processes. Another provided temperature data and Peltier pulsed demarcation of the interface shape for post flight analysis. The third sample provided resistance and growth velocity measurements, as well as additional thermal data. The third sample was also quenched at the end of the mission to preserve the composition of the liquid near the interface for post flight determination. A total of 450mm of directionally solidified samples were preserved for post mission structural and compositional characterization. Substantial differences were observed in the Seebeck signal between the ground-based experiments and the space-based experiments. The temperature gradient in the liquid for the ground-based experiments was significantly lower than the temperature gradient in the liquid for the space-based experiments.

  16. Solidification microstructures in single-crystal stainless steel melt pools

    SciTech Connect

    Sipf, J.B.; Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.

    1994-03-01

    Development of microstructure of stationary melt pools of oriented stainless steel single crystals (70%Fe-15%Ni-15%Cr was analyzed. Stationary melt pools were formed by electron-beam and gas-tungsten-arc heating on (001), (011), and (111) oriented planes of the austenitic, fcc-alloy crystals. Characterization and analysis of resulting microstructure was carried out for each crystallographic plane and welding method. Results showed that crystallography which favors ``easy growth`` along the <100> family of directions is a controlling factor in the microstructural formation along with the melt-pool shape. The microstructure was found to depend on the melting method, since each method forms a unique melt-pool shape. These results are used in making a three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure for each plane and melting method employed. This investigation also suggests avenues for future research into the microstructural properties of electron-beam welds as well as providing an experimental basis for mathematical models for the prediction of solidification microstructures.

  17. Multiple sensor multifrequency eddy current monitor for solidification and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, John

    1990-01-01

    A compact cylindrical multisensor eddy current measuring system with integral furnace was develop to monitor II-VI crystal growth to provide interfacial information, solutal segregation, and conductivities of the growth materials. The use of an array of sensors surrounding the furnace element allows one to monitor the volume of interest. Coupling these data with inverse multifrequency analysis allows radial conductivity profiles to be generated at each sensor position. These outputs were incorporated to control the processes within the melt volume. The standard eddy current system functions with materials whose electric conductivities are as low as 2E2 Mhos/m. A need was seen to extend the measurement range to poorly conducting media so the unit was modified to allow measurement of materials conductivities 4 order of magnitude lower and bulk dielectric properties. Typically these included submicron thick films and semiinsulating GaAs. This system was used to monitor complex heat transfer in grey bodies as well as semiconductor and metallic solidification.

  18. Crystal growth and fluid mechanics problems in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, Saleh; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Broadly speaking, our efforts have been concentrated in two aspects of directional solidification: (A) a more complete theoretical understanding of convection effects in a Bridgman apparatus; and (B) a clear understanding of scalings of various features of dendritic crystal growth in the sensitive limit of small capillary effects. For studies that fall within class A, the principal objectives are as follows: (A1) Derive analytical formulas for segregation, interfacial shape and fluid velocities in mathematically amenable asymptotic limits. (A2) Numerically verify and extend asymptotic results to other ranges of parameter space with a view to a broader physical understanding of the general trends. With respect to studies that fall within class B, the principal objectives include answering the following questions about dendritic crystal growth: (B1) Are there unsteady dendrite solutions in 2-D to the completely nonlinear time evolving equations in the small surface tension limit with only a locally steady tip region with well defined tip radius and velocity? Is anisotropy in surface tension necessary for the existence of such solutions as it is for a true steady state needle crystal? How does the size of such a local region depend on capillary effects, anisotropy and undercooling? (B2) How do the different control parameters affect the nonlinear amplification of tip noise and dendritic side branch coarsening?

  19. Towards the understanding of cytoskeleton fluidisation-solidification regulation.

    PubMed

    López-Menéndez, Horacio; Rodríguez, José Félix

    2017-01-28

    The understanding of the self-regulation of the mechanical properties in non-sarcomeric cells, such as lung cells or cells during tissue development, remains an open research problem with many unresolved issues. Their behaviour is far from the image of the traditionally studied sarcomeric cells, since the crosstalk between the signalling pathways and the complexity of the mechanical properties creates an intriguing mechano-chemical coupling. In these situations, the inelastic effects dominate the cytoskeletal structure showing phenomena like fluidisation and subsequent solidification. Here, we proposes the inelastic contractile unit framework as an attempt to reconciles these effects. The model comprises a mechanical description of the nonlinear elasticity of the cytoskeleton incorporated into a continuum-mechanics framework using the eighth-chains model. In order to address the inelastic effect, we incorporate the dynamic of crosslinks, considering the [Formula: see text]-actinin and the active stress induced by the myosin molecular motors. Finally, we introduce a hypothesis that links the ability to fluidise and re-solidify as a consequence of the interaction between the active stress and the gelation state defined by the crosslinks. We validate the model with data obtained from experiments of drug-induced relaxation reported in the literature.

  20. Light-Front Quantization of Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskey, Stanley

    2002-12-01

    Light-front wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their physical quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The light-front Hamiltonian formalism provides new nonperturbative methods for obtaining the QCD spectrum and eigensolutions, including resolvant methods, variational techniques, and discretized light-front quantization. A new method for quantizing gauge theories in light-cone gauge using Dirac brackets to implement constraints is presented. In the case of the electroweak theory, this method of light-front quantization leads to a unitary and renormalizable theory of massive gauge particles, automatically incorporating the Lorentz and 't Hooft conditions as well as the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented by the appearance of zero modes of the Higgs field leaving the light-front vacuum equal to the perturbative vacuum. I also discuss an ''event amplitude generator'' for automatically computing renormalized amplitudes in perturbation theory. The importance of final-state interactions for the interpretation of diffraction, shadowing, and single-spin asymmetries in inclusive reactions such as deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering is emphasized.