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Sample records for advancing solidification front

  1. Quantifying hydrate solidification front advancing using method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; DiCarlo, David; Flemings, Peter B.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation from gas injection into brine-saturated sediments within the hydrate stability zone. Our solution includes fully coupled multiphase and multicomponent flow and the associated advective transport in a homogeneous system. Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic state of the system and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation in gas-rich systems can be estimated by 1-cl0/cle when Darcy flow dominates, where cl0 is the initial mass fraction of salt in brine, and cle is the mass fraction of salt in brine at three-phase (gas, liquid, and hydrate) equilibrium. Hydrate saturation is constant, gas saturation and gas flux decrease, and liquid saturation and liquid flux increase with the distance from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front. The total gas and liquid flux is constant from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front and decreases abruptly at the hydrate solidification front due to gas inclusion into the hydrate phase. The advancing velocity of the hydrate solidification front decreases with hydrate saturation at a fixed gas inflow rate. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas injection (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) at both the laboratory and field scales.

  2. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  3. Solidification fronts in supercooled liquids: how rapid fronts can lead to disordered glassy solids.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Robbins, M J; Thiele, U; Knobloch, E

    2012-09-01

    We determine the speed of a crystallization (or, more generally, a solidification) front as it advances into the uniform liquid phase after the system has been quenched into the crystalline region of the phase diagram. We calculate the front speed by assuming a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) model for the system and applying a marginal stability criterion. Our results also apply to phase field crystal (PFC) models of solidification. As the solidification front advances into the unstable liquid phase, the density profile behind the advancing front develops density modulations and the wavelength of these modulations is a dynamically chosen quantity. For shallow quenches, the selected wavelength is precisely that of the crystalline phase and so well-ordered crystalline states are formed. However, when the system is deeply quenched, we find that this wavelength can be quite different from that of the crystal, so the solidification front naturally generates disorder in the system. Significant rearrangement and aging must subsequently occur for the system to form the regular well-ordered crystal that corresponds to the free energy minimum. Additional disorder is introduced whenever a front develops from random initial conditions. We illustrate these findings with simulation results obtained using the PFC model. PMID:23030925

  4. Advanced cement solidification system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Kuribayashi, H.; Todo, F.

    1993-12-31

    In order to easily and economically store and transport radioactive waste generated at nuclear power stations, it is essential to reduce the waste volume to the maximum extent. It is also necessary to transform the waste into a stable form for final disposal which will maintain its chemical and physical stability over a long period of time. For this purpose, the Advanced Cement Solidification Process (AC-process) was developed. The AC-process, which utilizes portland cement, can be applied to several kinds of waste such as boric acid waste, laboratory drain waste, incineration ash and spent ion exchange resin. In this paper, the key point of the AC-process, the pretreatment concept for each waste, is described. The AC-process has been adopted for two Japanese PWR stations: the Genkai Nuclear Power Station (Kyushu Electric Power Co.) and the Ikata Nuclear Power Station (Shikoku Electric Power Co.). Construction work has almost finished and commissioning tests are under way at both power stations.

  5. A method for flattening the solidification front in directional solidification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yuanyuan; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Nonplanar solidification front causes defects in directional solidification process. The transverse temperature gradient, which can be divided into radial temperature gradient and circumferential temperature gradient, is one of the reasons causing the nonplanar solidification front. This paper presents a method by varying the wall thickness of the mould to decrease the circumferential temperature gradient and hence flatten the solidification front. The equations for calculating the wall thickness were deduced by heat transfer analysis. The optimized mould contour was obtained by solving the equations numerically. It was proved by simulation that the circumferential temperature gradient can be almost reduced by 40%. Furthermore, the starting time difference of solidification at one cross section along the circumferential direction almost reduces by half. Additionally, this paper also researches the influences of parameters of the mould and the furnace etc. on the shape of the mould and the circumferential temperature gradient. The circumferential temperature gradient decreases as the thermal conductivity and the emissivity of the mould increase. And the temperature of the cooling ring impacts little on the circumferential temperature gradient. According to the development trend of the blade manufacturing, this method may be applied widely.

  6. Solidification front shape of the molten metal in a thermally thin cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsun, I. M.

    2013-02-01

    Reported data are reviewed briefly. When a molten metal is extruded to produce a wire directly from the melt, a capillary stream 0.2-3 mm in diameter is directed into a cooling medium so that external heat exchange ensures faster solidification of the metal as compared to capillary disintegration of the stream into drops. The following two assumptions regarding the shape of the solidification front exist: a planar solidification front normal to the axis and a curved axisymmetric front surface. Both assumptions are considered. The assumption of a curved axisymmetric solidification front surface of the molten metal in a cylinder is shown to be more realistic.

  7. Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) with the Experimental Apparatus Container (EAC) attached flew during the USMP-2 mission. This assembly consists of a furnace module, a muffle tube assembly and a translation mechanism which are enclosed in the EAC. During USMP-2, the AADSF was used to study the growth of mercury cadmium telluride crystals in microgravity by directional solidification, a process commonly used on earth to process metals and grow crystals. The furnace is tubular and has three independently controlled temperature zone . The sample travels from the hot zone of the furnace (1600 degrees F) where the material solidifies as it cools. The solidification region, known as the solid/liquid interface, moves from one end of the sample to the other at a controlled rate, thus the term directional solidification.

  8. Solidification process control for advanced superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The importance of understanding and controlling the basic solidification process in high temperature alloy technology as applied to gas turbine engine production is discussed. Resultant tailoring of the superalloy macro- and microstructure offers significant potential for continued advances in superalloy use temperatures in turbine engines. Atomized superalloy powders, rapidly solidified superalloys, microstructural control, and advanced superalloys are discussed.

  9. Advanced solidification system using high performance cement

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Matsuda, Masami; Nishi, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Izumida, Tatsuo

    1995-12-31

    Advanced cement solidification is proposed for the solidification of radioactive waste such as spent ion exchange resin, incineration ash and liquid waste. A new, high performance cement has been developed to raise volume reduction efficiency and lower radioactivity release into the environment. It consists of slag cement, reinforcing fiber, natural zeolite and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}). The fiber allows waste loading to be increased from 20 to 55kg-dry resin/200L. The zeolite, whose main constituent is clinoptilolite, reduces cesium leachability from the waste form to about 1/10. Lithium nitrate prevents alkaline corrosion of the aluminum, contained in ash, and reduces hydrogen gas generation. Laboratory and full-scale pilot plant experiments were performed to evaluate properties of the waste form, using simulated wastes. Emphasis was laid on improvement of solidification of spent resin and ash.

  10. Directional solidification of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Diane (Inventor); Alter, Wendy Sue (Inventor); Hamilton, William David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates to the directional solidification of superalloys, in particular nickel-based superalloys, by imposition of a predetermined temperature profile in the solidification front and, depending on the desired results, a predetermined rate of advance of said solidification front, whereas castings of markedly superior fatigue resistance are produced.

  11. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Reeves, F. A.; Jeter, L. B.; Sledd, J. D.; Cole, J. M.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is a five zone tubular furnace designed for Bridgman-Stockbarger, other techniques of crystal growth involving multiple temperature zones such as vapor transport experiments and other materials science experiments. The five zones are primarily designed to produce uniform hot and cold temperature regions separated by an adiabatic region constructed of a heat extraction plate and an insert to reduce radiation from the hot to the cold zone. The hot and cold zone temperatures are designed to reach 1600 C and 1100 C, respectively. AADSF operates on a Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure (MPESS) within the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle on the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP) missions. Two successful flights, both employing the directional solidification or Bridgman Stockbarger technique for crystal growth have been made, and crystals of HgCdTe and PbSnTe grown in microgravity have been produced on USMP-2 and USMP-3, respectively. The addition of a Sample Exchange Mechanism (SEM) will enable three different samples to be processed on future flights including the USMP-4 mission.

  12. Experimental study of segregation in plane front solidification and its relevance to iron meteorite solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellamuthu, R.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1983-11-01

    A directional solidification technique was developed and applied to the problem of fractional crystallization of an iron meteorite parent body. Samples of Fe-Ni alloys close to meteorite compositions and containing S, P, and C were made. The solidified structures contain secondary phases such as sulphides within the pro-eutectic single crystal austenite (taenite). As a result of these experiments, we propose that the secondary phases observed in iron meteorites were formed during primary solidification of austenite (taenite). The measured composition profiles of Ni, P and C in the alloys were used to explain the elemental distribution within a chemical group of iron meteorites. An analytical procedure was applied to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients as a function of fraction solidified for Ni and P from the composition profiles. The distribution coefficients of Ni and P agree with previous values. These distribution coefficients are of particular interest in the determination of the elemental distributions in iron meteorites.

  13. Experimental study of segregation in plane front solidification and its relevance to iron meteorite solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellamuthu, R.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    A directional solidification technique was developed and applied to the problem of fractional crystallization of an iron meteorite parent body. Samples of Fe-Ni alloys close to meteorite compositions and containing S, P, and C were made. The solidified structures contain secondary phases such as sulphides within the proeutectic single crystal austenite (taenite). As a result of these experiments, we propose that the secondary phases observed in iron meteorites were formed during primary solidification of austenite (taenite). The measured composition profiles of Ni, P and C in the alloys were used to explain the elemental distribution within a chemical group of iron meteorites. An analytical procedure was applied to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients as a function of fraction solidified for Ni and P from the composition profiles. The distribution coefficients of Ni and P agree with previous values. These distribution coefficients are of particular interest in the determination of the elemental distributions in iron meteorites.

  14. Advanced RF Front End Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M. I.; Valas, S.; Katehi, L. P. B.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to achieve low-mass low-cost micro/nanospacecraft for Deep Space exploration requires extensive miniaturization of all subsystems. The front end of the Telecommunication subsystem is an area in which major mass (factor of 10) and volume (factor of 100) reduction can be achieved via the development of new silicon based micromachined technology and devices. Major components that make up the front end include single-pole and double-throw switches, diplexer, and solid state power amplifier. JPL's Center For Space Microsystems - System On A Chip (SOAC) Program has addressed the challenges of front end miniaturization (switches and diplexers). Our objectives were to develop the main components that comprise a communication front end and enable integration in a single module that we refer to as a 'cube'. In this paper we will provide the latest status of our Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches and surface micromachined filter development. Based on the significant progress achieved we can begin to provide guidelines of the proper system insertion for these emerging technologies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  16. AN ADVANCED LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT SYSTEM USING A HIGH EFFICIENCY SOLIDIFICATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Hirayama, S.; Noshita, K.; Yatou, Y.; Huang, C.T.

    2003-02-27

    An advanced system using High Efficiency Solidification Technology (HEST) was developed to treat PWR liquid waste and the first unit is operating in Taiwan (1) and a detailed design is being carried out for the second unit in Japan. The HEST system consists of two subsystems, a super-concentration subsystem and a solidification subsystem. The super-concentration subsystem is able to concentrate the waste solution to a total boron content as high as 130,000 ppm prior to solidification. The higher boron content will result in greater volume reduction efficiency of solidification. The solidification subsystem consists of an in-drum mixing and a conveyor units. Representative features of this advanced system are as follows. (1) Simple system: The system consists of the super-concentration and cement solidification subsystems; it is as simple as the conventional cement solidification system. (2) High volume reduction efficiency: The number of solidified waste drums is about 1/2.5 that of bitumen solidification. (3) Stable Package: Essentially no organic material is used, and the final package will be stable under the final disposal conditions. (4) Zero secondary waste: Washing water used in the in-drum mixer is recycled. This paper describes the outline of HEST technology, treatment system and pilot plant tests.

  17. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; Zhao, Qi; Rutkowski, Stephen F.; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2016-07-05

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yieldedmore » anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7.5% Ti

  18. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; Zhao, Qi; Rutkowski, Stephen F.; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yielded anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7.5% Ti

  19. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes (ICASP - 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Gerhard; Ratke, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes was held in the Rolduc Abbey in the Netherlands a few kilometres away from Aachen. Around 200 scientists from 24 countries come in for the four day meeting. They found a stimulating but also relaxing environment and atmosphere, with beautiful weather and the medieval abbey inviting for walks, discussions, sitting outside and drinking a beer or wine. The contributions given at the conference reflected recent advances in various topics of solidification processes, ranging from fundamental aspects to applied casting technologies. In 20 oral sessions and a large poster session innovative results of segregation phenomena, microstructure evolution, nucleation and growth, phase formation, polyphase solidification, rapid solidification and welding, casting technology, thermophysics of molten alloys, solidification with forced melt flow and growth of single crystals and superalloys together with innovative diagnostic techniques were presented. Thereby, findings from experiments as well as from numerical modeling on different lengths scales were jointly discussed and contribute to new insight in solidification behaviour. The papers presented in this open access proceedings cover about half the oral and poster presentations given. They were carefully reviewed as in classical peer reviewed journals by two independent referees and most of them were revised and thus improved according to the reviewers comments. We think that this collection of papers presented at ICASP-3 gives an impression of the excellent contributions made. The papers embrace both the basic and applied aspects of solidification. We especially wish to express our appreciation for the team around Georg Schmitz and Margret Nienhaus organising this event and giving us their valued advice and support at every stage in preparing the conference. We also thank Lokasenna Lektorat for taking the task of checking all language-associated issues and

  20. (AADSF) Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace Onboard STS-87 USMP-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments for the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is to determine how gravity-driven convection affects the composition and properties of alloys (mixtures of two or more materials, usually metal). During the USMP-4 mission, the AADSF will solidify crystals of lead tin telluride and mercury cadmium telluride, alloys of compound semiconductor materials used to make infrared detectors and lasers, as experiment samples. Although these materials are used for the same type application their properties and compositional uniformity are affected differently during the solidification process.

  1. Experimental ground-based Bridgman CdTe growth in NASA's advanced automated directional solidification furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostrup, G.; Viola, J.; Gertner, E.; Aldrich, W.

    1988-01-01

    The role of gravity-induced phenomena in bulk CdTe crystal growth is studied with emphasis placed on the negative effects of buoyancy-driven convection, container effects, and hydrostatic pressure. An earth-bound crystal growth data base utilizing NASA's prototype advanced automated directional solidification furnace is described. Growth procedures that can be employed in a microgravity environment aboard the Space Shuttle or Space Station are presented. It is found that NASA's directional solidification furnace can produce Bridgman-type CdTe and has the potential for producing it in space.

  2. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  3. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  4. PREFACE: MCWASP XIII: International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Due to fast-paced development in computer technologies during the last three decades, computer-based process modeling has become an important tool for the improvement of existing process technologies and the development of new, innovative technologies. With the help of numerical process simulations, complex and costly experimental trials can now be reduced to a minimum. For metallurgical processes in particular, computer simulations are of outstanding importance, as the flow and solidification of molten alloys or the formation of microstructure and defects can hardly be observed experimentally. Corresponding computer simulations allow us inside views into the key process phenomena and so offer great potential for optimization. In 1980 the conference series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up, and has now been continued by holding the 13th international conference on 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes', MCWASP XIII, in Schladming, Austria, from June 17-22 2012. Around 200 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 20 countries around the globe attended 78 oral and 50 poster presentations on different aspects of solidification-related modeling topics. Besides process-related sessions such as (i) Ingot and Shape Casting, (ii) Continuous Casting and Direct Chill Casting, (iii) Directional Solidification and Zone Melting, (iv) Welding, and (v) Centrifugal Casting, a larger focus was put on (vi) Experimental Investigation and In-Situ Observations. In recent years, this topic has been significantly strengthened as advanced synchrotron technologies allow fantastic in-situ observations of phenomena happening inside small metallic samples. These observations will definitely serve as a benchmark for the modeling community. Further macroscopic aspects of advanced solidification science were tackled in the sessions (vii) Electromagnetic Coupling, (viii) Thermomechanics, (ix

  5. Unstructured viscous grid generation by advancing-front method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1993-01-01

    A new method of generating unstructured triangular/tetrahedral grids with high-aspect-ratio cells is proposed. The method is based on new grid-marching strategy referred to as 'advancing-layers' for construction of highly stretched cells in the boundary layer and the conventional advancing-front technique for generation of regular, equilateral cells in the inviscid-flow region. Unlike the existing semi-structured viscous grid generation techniques, the new procedure relies on a totally unstructured advancing-front grid strategy resulting in a substantially enhanced grid flexibility and efficiency. The method is conceptually simple but powerful, capable of producing high quality viscous grids for complex configurations with ease. A number of two-dimensional, triangular grids are presented to demonstrate the methodology. The basic elements of the method, however, have been primarily designed with three-dimensional problems in mind, making it extendible for tetrahedral, viscous grid generation.

  6. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  7. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  8. Recent advances, trends and new perspectives via enthalpy-based finite element formulations for applications to solidification problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Namburu, Raju R.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes recent advances and trends in finite element developments and applications for solidification problems. In particular, in comparison to traditional methods of approach, new enthalpy-based architectures based on a generalized trapezoidal family of representations are presented which provide different perspectives, physical interpretation and solution architectures for effective numerical simulation of phase change processes encountered in solidification problems. Various numerical test models are presented and the results support the proposition for employing such formulations for general phase change applications.

  9. Front end support systems for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza, J.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The support system designs for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) front ends are complete and will be installed in 1994. These designs satisfy the positioning and alignment requirements of the front end components installed inside the storage ring tunnel, including the photon beam position monitors, fixed masks, photon and safety shutters, filters, windows, and differential pumps. Other components include beam transport pipes and ion pumps. The designs comprise 3-point kinematic mounts and single axis supports to satisfy various multi-direction positioning requirements from course to ultra-precise. The confined space inside the storage ring tunnel has posed engineering challenges in the design of these devices, considering some components weigh as much as 500 kg. These challenges include designing for mobility during commissioning and initial alignment, mechanical and thermal stability, and precise low profile vertical and horizontal positioning. As a result, novel stages and kinematic mounts have emerged with modular and standard designs. This paper will discuss the diverse group of support systems, including specifications and performance data of the prototypes.

  10. Solidification of basaltic magma during flow in a dike.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Pollard, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    A model for time-dependent unsteady heat transfer from magma flowing in a dyke is developed. The ratio of solidification T to magma T is the most important parameter. Observations of volcanic fissure eruptions and study of dykes near Ship Rock, New Mexico, show that the low T at dyke margins and the rapidly advancing solidification front predicted by the model are qualitatively correct.-M.S.

  11. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  12. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  13. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  14. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  15. Nucleation of bubbles on a solidification front—experiment and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Huang, C. C.; Lee, K. W.

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on an advancing solidification front during the freezing of water containing a dissolved gas has been experimentally and analytically studied. The formation of bubbles resulting from supersaturation of liquids is commonly encountered in different fields such as heat transfer, manufacturing, and bioscience. In this work, the sizes of nucleating bubbles and the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the water ahead of the solidification front have been measured. From successful comparisons between the measured and predicted critical radii of nucleating bubbles and distributions of dissolved gas content, the phenomena of heterogeneous nucleation in a binary weak solution during the freezing process are quantitatively confirmed. The results show that an increase in gas content at the solidification front in the liquid decreases the free-energy barrier and critical radii of bubbles that are formed on the solidification front. The sizes of the critical radii decrease and the number of nucleating bubbles increase in the early stage of solidification. As the solidification rates decrease at longer times, the content of the dissolved gas in the liquid on the advancing interface decreases and the critical radii of nucleating bubbles increase.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CAPABILITY FRONT END ON NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, C; Heebner, J; Dawson, J; Fochs, S; Shverdin, M; Crane, J K; Kanz, V K; Halpin, J; Phan, H; Sigurdsson, R; Brewer, W; Britten, J; Brunton, G; Clark, W; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Nguyen, H; Shaw, B; Hackel, R; Hermann, M; Tietbohl, G; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-07-15

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

  17. A Subgrid-Scale Parameterization for Calving-Front Advance and Retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Floating ice shelves fringing most of Antarctica play a key for the flow of ice into the ocean and thereby for global sea level rise. Calving processes at the ice front are highly complex and are often neglected in numerical ice sheet models. Observed accelerated ice discharge after abrupt ice shelf retreat proofs that this is not a viable approach. In order to be able to take ice shelf dynamics into account we have implemented a number of processes into the Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM-PIK). We present a newly developed subgrid-scale parameterization for calving-front advance and retreat which allows the introduction of stress boundary conditions on the ice-ocean front and thereby a proper computation of the stress and strain field along the calving front. With these improvements we compare different calving rate approaches for different realistic ice shelf geometries (Albrecht et al., J Glac., in prep.).

  18. Advancement of X-Ray Microscopy Technology and its Application to Metal Solidification Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    The technique of x-ray projection microscopy is being used to view, in real time, the structures and dynamics of the solid-liquid interface during solidification. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions need to be optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. It turns out that no single imaging technology offers the best solution and traditional methods like radiographic film cannot be used due to specimen motion (solidification). In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast.

  19. Steam Reforming Solidification of Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp; T. G. Garn; R. D. Boardman; J. D. Law

    2006-02-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is conducting research on aqueous separations processes for the nuclear fuel cycle. This research includes development of solvent extraction processes for the separation of cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions to reduce the short-term decay heat load. The cesium/strontium strip solution from candidate separation processes will require treatment and solidification for managed storage. Steam reforming is currently being investigated for stabilization of these streams because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach-resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. These ongoing experimental studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of steam reforming for this application.

  20. Quantifying Spatiotemporal Patterns in the Advancing Front of Twitching Bacterial Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Erin; Giuliani, Max; Burrows, Lori; Dutcher, John

    Type IV pili (T4P) are very thin (5-8 nm in diameter) protein filaments that can be extended and retracted by certain classes of Gram-negative bacteria including P. aeruginosa. These bacteria use T4P to move across viscous interfaces, referred to twitching motility. Twitching can occur for isolated cells or in a collective manner. Using a custom-built, temperature and humidity controlled environmental chamber, together with particle image velocimetry and Fourier analysis techniques, we characterized the evolution of the advancing front of expanding colonies. We find that the advancing front consists of finger-like protrusions consisting of many bacteria, with the cells within the expanding colony arranged in a lattice-like pattern. We have characterized the average speed, width and bacterial orientation within the fingers as a function of agar concentration/stiffness. In addition, we have analyzed the motion of individual cells within the fingers at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  1. Unconstrained plastering : all-hexahedral mesh generation via advancing front geometry decomposition (2004-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Blacker, Teddy Dean; Staten, Matthew L.; Kerr, Robert A.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-03-01

    The generation of all-hexahedral finite element meshes has been an area of ongoing research for the past two decades and remains an open problem. Unconstrained plastering is a new method for generating all-hexahedral finite element meshes on arbitrary volumetric geometries. Starting from an unmeshed volume boundary, unconstrained plastering generates the interior mesh topology without the constraints of a pre-defined boundary mesh. Using advancing fronts, unconstrained plastering forms partially defined hexahedral dual sheets by decomposing the geometry into simple shapes, each of which can be meshed with simple meshing primitives. By breaking from the tradition of previous advancing-front algorithms, which start from pre-meshed boundary surfaces, unconstrained plastering demonstrates that for the tested geometries, high quality, boundary aligned, orientation insensitive, all-hexahedral meshes can be generated automatically without pre-meshing the boundary. Examples are given for meshes from both solid mechanics and geotechnical applications.

  2. The advance of an advantageous allele: Nucleation, front propagation, and seasonal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Lauren

    Both community ecology and conservation biology seek further understanding of factors governing the advance of an invasive species. I model biological invasion as a two-species, individual-based stochastic process on a two-dimensional landscape. The ecologically superior invader and a resident species compete for space preemptively. The invasive species can occur through random, rare mutations of the resident species, or as a repeated introduction into the environment. To understand how individual-level processes may govern population patterns, I invoke the physical theory for nucleation of spatial systems. Nucleation theory discriminates between single-cluster and multi-cluster dynamics. A sufficiently low mutation or introduction rate, or a sufficiently small environment generates single-cluster dynamics, an inherently stochastic process. An increased mutation or introduction rate, or larger system size generates multi-cluster invasion, where spatial averaging produces nearly deterministic global dynamics. For this process, an analytical approximation from nucleation theory, called Avrami's Law, describes the time-dependent behavior for the densities with remarkable accuracy. Once invasive clusters grow large enough, observations of the invasive advance occur only through a small "window" of space, where we can approximate the advance as that of a linear propagating front. One can then employ the concept of a "roughened" front to quantify effects of discreteness and stochasticity on invasion, and thus study roughening of the front using the framework of non-equilibrium interface growth. The analysis, which includes calculating the scaling (roughness and dynamic) exponents, corrections to the asymptotic front velocity, and the probability distribution of both the surface roughness and the front runner's relative position, indicates that initially flat, linear invading fronts exhibit Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) roughening in one transverse dimension. I also study the

  3. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  4. Microwave solidification project overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant Microwave Solidification Project has application potential to the Mixed Waste Treatment Project and the The Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The technical areas being addressed include (1) waste destruction and stabilization; (2) final waste form; and (3) front-end waste handling and feed preparation. This document covers need for such a program; technology description; significance; regulatory requirements; and accomplishments to date. A list of significant reports published under this project is included.

  5. Effects of calcined aluminum salts on the advanced dewatering and solidification/stabilization of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guangyin; Yan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Haiyan; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Tiantao; Zhao, Youcai

    2011-01-01

    The high moisture content (80%) in the sewage dewatered sludge is the main obstacle to disposal and recycling. A chemical dewatering and stabilization/solidification (S/S) alternative for the sludge was developed, using calcined aluminum salts (AS) as solidifier, and CaCl2, Na2SO4 and CaSO4 as accelerators, to enhance the mechanical compressibility making the landfill operation possible. The properties of the resultant matrixes were determined in terms of moisture contents, unconfined compressive strength, products of hydration, and toxicity characteristics. The results showed that AS exhibited a moderate pozzolanic activity, and the mortar AS(0) obtained with 5% AS and 10% CaSO4 of AS by weight presented a moisture contents below 50%-60% and a compressive strength of (51.32 +/- 2.9) kPa after 5-7 days of curing time, meeting the minimum requirement for sanitary landfill. The use of CaSO4 obviously improved the S/S performance, causing higher strength level. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry investigations revealed that a large amount of hydrates (viz., gismondine and CaCO3) were present in solidified sludge, leading to the depletion of evaporable water and the enhancement of the strength. In addition, the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and horizontal vibration (HJ 557-2009) leaching test were conducted to evaluate their environmental compatibility. It was found that the solidified products conformed to the toxicity characteristic criteria in China and could be safely disposed of in a sanitary landfill. PMID:22125919

  6. H-Morph: An indirect approach to advancing front hex meshing

    SciTech Connect

    OWEN,STEVEN J.; SAIGAL,SUNIL

    2000-05-30

    H-Morph is a new automatic algorithm for the generation of a hexahedral-dominant finite element mesh for arbitrary volumes. The H-Morph method starts with an initial tetrahedral mesh and systematically transforms and combines tetrahedral into hexahedra. It uses an advancing front technique where the initial front consists of a set of prescribed quadrilateral surface facets. Fronts are individually processed by recovering each of the six quadrilateral faces of a hexahedron from the tetrahedral mesh. Recovery techniques similar to those used in boundary constrained Delaunay mesh generation are used. Tetrahedral internal to the six hexahedral faces are then removed and a hexahedron is formed. At any time during the H-Morph procedure a valid mixed hexahedral-tetrahedral mesh is in existence within the volume. The procedure continues until no tetrahedral remain within the volume, or tetrahedral remain which cannot be transformed or combined into valid hexahedral elements. Any remaining tetrahedral are typically towards the interior of the volume, generally a less critical region for analysis. Transition from tetrahedral to hexahedra in the final mesh is accomplished through pyramid shaped elements. Advantages of the proposed method include its ability to conform to an existing quadrilateral surface mesh, its ability to mesh without the need to decompose or recognize special classes of geometry, and its characteristic well-aligned layers of elements parallel to the boundary. Example test cases are presented on a variety of models.

  7. Structured background grids for generation of unstructured grids by advancing front method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1991-01-01

    A new method of background grid construction is introduced for generation of unstructured tetrahedral grids using the advancing-front technique. Unlike the conventional triangular/tetrahedral background grids which are difficult to construct and usually inadequate in performance, the new method exploits the simplicity of uniform Cartesian meshes and provides grids of better quality. The approach is analogous to solving a steady-state heat conduction problem with discrete heat sources. The spacing parameters of grid points are distributed over the nodes of a Cartesian background grid by interpolating from a few prescribed sources and solving a Poisson equation. To increase the control over the grid point distribution, a directional clustering approach is used. The new method is convenient to use and provides better grid quality and flexibility. Sample results are presented to demonstrate the power of the method.

  8. Two-terminal longitudinal hotwire sensor for monitoring the position and speed of advancing liquid fronts in microfluidic channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Kee Suk; Shaikh, Kashan; Goluch, Edgar; Liu Chang

    2006-03-06

    We report a simple and practical sensor for monitoring both the absolute position and advancing speed of liquid front in a microfluidic channel. The sensor consists of a longitudinal hot wire element - a two-terminal electrical device, with its length spanning the entire channel. The design, materials, fabrication method, and use of this sensor are extremely simple. Characterization results are presented.

  9. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  10. Kinetics of fiber solidification.

    PubMed

    Mercader, C; Lucas, A; Derré, A; Zakri, C; Moisan, S; Maugey, M; Poulin, P

    2010-10-26

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  11. [Advances in cooperativity and mechanism of combination of Back-shu and Front-mu points].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shen, Guo-Ming

    2011-09-01

    The articles related with combination of Back-shu and Front-mu points searched in CNKI and Pubmed databases during the past 10 years were studied. The conclusions indicate that the application of combination of Back-shu and Front-mu points has solid theoretical basis and experimental evidence, and it is proved that the combination of Back-shu points and Front-mu points is effective in clinic practice. However, the mechanism study still rest on the level of spinal cord, and the breakthrough of combination of Back-Shu and Front-Mu points study is that whether the superior nerve centre involves on the regulation of zang-fu organs by combination of Back-shu and Front-mu points. The key point in future study is to explore the central control mechanism of combination of Back-shu and Front-mu points. PMID:21972656

  12. Progress with simple binary alloy solidification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.G.; Solomon, A.D.; Alexiades, V.

    1981-01-01

    We give a preliminary report of our studies on binary alloy solidification. In what follows we state the mathematical problem, which we assume represents the solidification of a simple binary alloy; we give a very brief introduction to two component phase diagrams, whose relations we assume hold at the solidification front; we describe our phlogiston formulation of the problem, which is derived by analogy with the enthalpy method for simpler problems; we describe the finite difference scheme, with which we computer the various constituents of our phlogiston formulation; and finally we relate our computational experience with the model so far.

  13. Curvature effects in rapid alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Massimo

    2001-04-01

    The growth of a cylindrical or spherical crystal into its undercooled melt is a process whose description is complicated by the lack of a stationary regime. A simple approach to the problem, justified for low growth rates and widely used in the past for both pure substances and alloy solidification, is based on a quasistatic approximation which assumes an instantaneous adaptation of the diffusional field to the interface configuration. For alloy solidification, assuming isothermal conditions and local interface equilibrium, this simplified model predicts a diffusion controlled growth, with the radius of the crystal increasing asymptotically as ~t1/2. However, as pointed out by recent investigations, thermal diffusion and nonequilibrium effects enter as essential ingredients in rapid alloy solidification. In the present paper we use the phase-field model to simulate the cylindrical and spherical growth of a solid germ into a supersaturated alloy melt. The problem is treated in its full time-dependent characteristics, accounting for nonequilibrium effects as well as for the rejection of both heat and solute away from the advancing front. We observe a complex behavior and a rich variety of dynamic regimes: in different regions of parameter space the growth rate is limited by diffusion (either thermal or chemical) or is kinetic controlled. Traversing the boundaries which limit these regions, the process undergoes sharp transitions which leave a trace in the solidified alloy. For realistic values of the Lewis number, thermal effects drive the process into a a diffusive regime, in which the rate limiting mechanism is the rejection of solute.

  14. Melt Flow Control in the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabaras, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Our main project objectives are to develop computational techniques based on inverse problem theory that can be used to design directional solidification processes that lead to desired temperature gradient and growth conditions at the freezing front at various levels of gravity. It is known that control of these conditions plays a significant role in the selection of the form and scale of the obtained solidification microstructures. Emphasis is given on the control of the effects of various melt flow mechanisms on the local to the solidification front conditions. The thermal boundary conditions (furnace design) as well as the magnitude and direction of an externally applied magnetic field are the main design variables. We will highlight computational design models for sharp front solidification models and briefly discuss work in progress toward the development of design techniques for multi-phase volume-averaging based solidification models.

  15. Advanced Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles during Ultrasonic Cavitation Processing and Solidification of 6061-based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Nastac, L.

    2015-06-01

    The metal-matrix-nano-composites (MMNCs) in this study consist of a 6061 alloy matrix reinforced with 1.0 wt.% SiC 50 nm diameter nanoparticles that are dispersed uniformly within the matrix in large volume using an ultrasonic cavitation dispersion technique (UCDS) available in the Solidification Laboratory at UA. The required ultrasonic parameters to achieve the required cavitation for adequate degassing and refining of the aluminium alloy as well as the fluid flow characteristics for uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles into the 6061 matrix are being investigated in this study by using an in-house developed CFD ultrasonic cavitation model. The multiphase CFD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification as well as the complex interaction between the solidifying alloy and nanoparticles by using the Ansys's Fluent Dense Discrete Phase Model (DDPM) and a particle engulfment and pushing (PEP) model. The PEP model accounts for the Brownian motion. SEM analysis was performed on the as-cast MMNC coupons processed via UCDS and confirmed the distribution of the nanoparticles predicted by the current CFD model. A parametric study was performed using the validated CFD model. The study includes the effects of magnitude of the fluid flow and ultrasonic probe location (gravity direction).

  16. The Advanced Exploration Systems Water Recovery Project: Innovation on 2 Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam M.; Neumeyer, Derek; Shull, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    As NASA looks forward to sending humans farther away from Earth, we will have to develop a transportation architecture that is highly reliable and that can sustain life for long durations without the benefit of Earth s proximity for continuous resupply or even operational guidance. NASA has consistently been challenged with performing great feats of innovation, but particularly in this time of economic stress, we are challenged to go farther with less. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) projects were implemented to address both of these needs by not only developing innovative technologies, but by incorporating innovative management styles and processes that foster the needed technical innovation given a small amount of resources. This presentation explains how the AES Water Recovery Project is exhibiting innovation on both fronts; technical and process. The AES Water Recovery Project (WRP) is actively engineering innovative technologies in order to maximize the efficiency of water recovery. The development of reliable, energy-efficient, and low-mass spacecraft systems to provide environmental control and life support (ECLS) is critical to enable long-duration human missions outside of low-Earth orbit. Recycling of life support consumables is necessary to reduce resupply mass and provide for vehicle autonomy. To address this, the WRP is working on a rotary distiller that has shown enhanced performance over the state-of-the-art (SOA). Additionally, the WRP is looking at innovative ways to address issues present in the state-of-the-art (SOA) systems pertaining to toxicity and calcium scale buildup. As an AES project, the WRP has a more streamlined Skunk Works like approach to technology development intended to reduce overhead but achieve a more refined end product. The project has incorporated key partnerships between NASA centers as well as between NASA and industry. A minimal project management style has been implemented such that risks are managed and

  17. Up-front neck dissection followed by concurrent chemoradiation in patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paximadis, Peter A.; Christensen, Michael E.; Dyson, Greg; Kamdar, Dev P.; Sukari, Ammar; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Yoo, George H.; Kim, Harold E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The appropriate management of the neck in patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze our institutional experience with up-front neck dissection followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Methods Fifty-five patients with radiographic evidence of large or necrotic lymph nodes underwent up-front neck dissection followed by definitive chemoradiation. Results The 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated at 71.3% and 64.7%, respectively. There were 2 failures in the dissected neck, for a control rate of 96.7%. There were 7 locoregional failures and 12 distant failures, for locoregional and distant control rates of 87.3% and 78.2%, respectively. Conclusion Up-front neck dissection followed by chemoradiotherapy resulted in excellent locoregional control, OS, and PFS. Utilization of this strategy should be considered in carefully selected patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer. PMID:22307819

  18. Solidification of undercooled liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Shiohara, Y.; Paik, J. S.; Flemmings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    During rapid solidification processing (RSP) the amount of liquid undercooling is an important factor in determining microstructural development by controlling phase selection during nucleation and morphological evolution during crystal growth. While undercooling is an inherent feature of many techniques of RSP, the deepest undercoolings and most controlled studies have been possible in carefully prepared fine droplet samples. From past work and recent advances in studies of nucleation kinetics it has become clear that the initiation of crystallization during RSP is governed usually by heterogeneous sites located at surfaces. With known nucleant sites, it has been possible to identify specific pathways of metastable phase formation and microstructural development in alloys. These advances have allowed for a clearer assessment of the interplay between undercooling, cooling rate and particle size statistics in structure formation. New approaches to the examination of growth processes have been developed to follow the thermal behavior and morphology in small samples in the period of rapid crystallization and recalescence. Based upon the new experimental information from these studies, useful models can be developed for the overall solidification process to include nucleation behavior, thermodynamic constraints, thermal history, growth kinetics, solute redistribution and resulting structures. From the refinement of knowledge concerning the underlying factors that govern RSP a basis is emerging for an effective alloy design and processing strategy.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow.

  20. Explosive bonding and its application in the advanced photon source front-end and beamline components design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, D.; Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T. M.; Brasher, Dave

    1995-02-01

    Explosive bonding is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bonding between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. Since 1991, a number of explosive bonding joints have been designed for high-thermal-load ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) components in the Advanced Photon Source. A series of standardized explosive bonded joint units has also been designed and tested, such as oxygen-free copper (OFHC) to stainless-steel vacuum joints for slits and shutters, GlidCop (GlidCop is a trademark of SCM Metal Products, Inc.) to stainless-steel vacuum joints for fixed masks, and GlidCop to OFHC thermal and mechanical joints for shutter face plates, etc. The design and test results for the explosive bonding units to be used in the Advanced Photon Source front ends and beamlines will be discussed in this paper.

  1. Advances in Light-Front QCD and New Perspectives for QCD from AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2005-10-26

    The light-front quantization of gauge theories in light-cone gauge provides a frame-independent wavefunction representation of relativistic bound states, simple forms for current matrix elements, explicit unitarity, and a Fock space built on a trivial vacuum. The AdS/CFT correspondence has led to important insights into the properties of quantum chromodynamics even though QCD is a broken conformal theory. We have recently shown how a model based on a truncated AdS space can be used to obtain the hadronic spectrum of q{bar q}, qqq and gg bound states, as well as their respective light-front wavefunctions. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state, including orbital angular momentum excitations. The predicted mass spectrum is linear M {proportional_to} L at high orbital angular momentum, in contrast to the quadratic dependence M{sup 2}/L found in the description of spinning strings. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale {Lambda}{sub QCD}, is introduced, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of {Delta} to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeros of Bessel functions. As a specific application of QCD dynamics from AdS/CFT duality, we describe a computation of the proton magnetic form factor in both the space-like and time-like regions. The extended AdS/CFT space-time theory also provides an analytic model for hadronic light-front wavefunctions, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons in QCD at the amplitude level. The model wavefunctions display confinement at large inter-quark separation and conformal symmetry at short distances. In particular, the scaling and conformal properties of the LFWFs at high relative momenta agree with perturbative QCD. These AdS/CFT model wavefunctions could be used as an initial ansatz for a variational treatment of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian.

  2. Slow advance of the weathering front during deep, supply-limited saprolite formation in the tropical Highlands of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewawasam, Tilak; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Dixon, Jean L.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Maekeler, Ricarda

    2013-10-01

    Silicate weathering - initiated by major mineralogical transformations at the base of ten meters of clay-rich saprolite - generates the exceptionally low weathering flux found in streams draining the crystalline rocks of the mountainous and humid tropical Highlands of Sri Lanka. This conclusion is reached from a thorough investigation of the mineralogical, chemical, and Sr isotope compositions of samples within a regolith profile extending >10 m from surface soil through the weathering front in charnockite bedrock (a high-grade metamorphic rock), corestones formed at the weathering front, as well as from the chemical composition of the dissolved loads in nearby streams. Weatherable minerals and soluble elements are fully depleted at the top of the profile, showing that the system is supply-limited, such that weathering fluxes are controlled directly by the supply of fresh minerals. We determine the weathering rates using two independent means: (1) in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides in surface soil and creek sediments in the close vicinity of the regolith combined with immobile element mass balance across the regolith and (2) river dissolved loads. Silicate weathering rates determined from both approaches range from 16 to 36 t km-2 y-1, corresponding to a weathering front advance rate of 6-14 mm ky-1. These rates agree across the 101 to 104 y time scales over which our rate metrics integrate, suggesting that the weathering system operates at steady state. Within error these rates are furthermore compatible with those obtained by modeling the advance rate of the weathering front from chemical gradients and mineral dissolution rates. The silicate weathering flux out of the weathering profile, measured on small creeks, amounts to 84% of the profile’s export flux; the remaining 16% is contributed by non-silicate, atmospheric-derived input. The silicate weathering flux, as measured by dissolved loads in large catchments, amounts to ca. 50% of the total dissolved flux

  3. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  4. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  5. Formation of bands of ultrafine beryllium particles during rapid solidification of Al-Be alloys: Modeling and direct observations

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Tanner, L.E.; Smith, P.M.; Wall, M.A. ); Aziz, M.J. . Div. of Applied Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Rapid solidification of dilute hyper-eutectic and monotectic alloys sometimes produces a dispersion of ultrafine randomly-oriented particles that lie in arrays parallel to the advancing solidification front. The authors characterize this effect in Al-Be where Be-rich particles with diameters on the order of 10 nm form in arrays spaced approximately 25 nm apart, and they present a model of macroscopically steady state but microscopically oscillatory motion of the solidification front to explain this unusual microstructure. The proposed mechanism involves; (i) the build-up of rejected solute in a diffusional boundary layer which slows down the growing crystal matrix, (2) the boundary layer composition entering a metastable liquid miscibility gap, (3) homogeneous nucleation of solute rich liquid droplets in the boundary layer, and crystallization of these droplets, and (4) growth of the matrix past the droplets and its reformation into a planar interface. The size of the Be-rich particles is limited by the beryllium supersaturation in the diffusional boundary layer. A numerical model was developed to investigate this solidification mechanism, and the results of the model are in good agreement with experimental observations of rapidly solidified Al-5 at.% Be.

  6. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the company’s global facility environmental footprint.

  7. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  8. Advanced Optics for a Full Quasi-Optical Front Steering ECRH Upper Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Alessi, E.; Bruschi, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Collazos, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Udintsev, V. S.; Henderson, M. A.

    2009-11-26

    A full quasi-optical setup for the internal optics of the Front Steering Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Upper Launcher for ITER was designed, proving to be feasible and favorable in terms of additional flexibility and cost reduction with respect to the former design. This full quasi-optical solution foresees the replacement of the mitre-bends in the final section of the launcher with dedicated free-space mirrors to realize the last changes of directions in the launcher. A description of the launcher is given and its advantages presented. The parameters of the expected output beams as well as preliminary evaluations of truncation effects with the physical optics GRASP code are shown. Moreover, a study of mitre-bends replacement with single mirrors for multiple beams is described. In principle it could allow the beams to be larger at the mirror locations (with a further decrease of the peak power density due to partial overlapping) and has the additional advantage to get a larger opening with compressed beams to avoid conflicts with side-walls port. Constraints on the setup, arising both from the resulting beam characteristics in the space of free parameters and from mechanical requirements are taken into account in the analysis.

  9. Advances in Front-end Enabling Technologies for Thermal Infrared `THz Torch' Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2016-05-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands (typically 20-40 and 60-100 THz) are best known for remote sensing applications that include temperature measurement (e.g. non-contacting thermometers and thermography), night vision and surveillance (e.g. ubiquitous motion sensing and target acquisition). This unregulated part of the electromagnetic spectrum also offers commercial opportunities for the development of short-range secure communications. The `THz Torch' concept, which fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation by partitioning thermally generated spectral radiance into pre-defined frequency channels, was recently demonstrated by the authors. The thermal radiation within each channel can be independently pulse-modulated, transmitted and detected, to create a robust form of short-range secure communications within the thermal infrared. In this paper, recent progress in the front-end enabling technologies associated with the THz Torch concept is reported. Fundamental limitations of this technology are discussed; possible engineering solutions for further improving the performance of such thermal-based wireless links are proposed and verified either experimentally or through numerical simulations. By exploring a raft of enabling technologies, significant enhancements to both data rate and transmission range can be expected. With good engineering solutions, the THz Torch concept can exploit nineteenth century physics with twentieth century multiplexing schemes for low-cost twenty-first century ubiquitous applications in security and defence.

  10. Advances in Front-end Enabling Technologies for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2016-09-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands (typically 20-40 and 60-100 THz) are best known for remote sensing applications that include temperature measurement (e.g. non-contacting thermometers and thermography), night vision and surveillance (e.g. ubiquitous motion sensing and target acquisition). This unregulated part of the electromagnetic spectrum also offers commercial opportunities for the development of short-range secure communications. The ` THz Torch' concept, which fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation by partitioning thermally generated spectral radiance into pre-defined frequency channels, was recently demonstrated by the authors. The thermal radiation within each channel can be independently pulse-modulated, transmitted and detected, to create a robust form of short-range secure communications within the thermal infrared. In this paper, recent progress in the front-end enabling technologies associated with the THz Torch concept is reported. Fundamental limitations of this technology are discussed; possible engineering solutions for further improving the performance of such thermal-based wireless links are proposed and verified either experimentally or through numerical simulations. By exploring a raft of enabling technologies, significant enhancements to both data rate and transmission range can be expected. With good engineering solutions, the THz Torch concept can exploit nineteenth century physics with twentieth century multiplexing schemes for low-cost twenty-first century ubiquitous applications in security and defence.

  11. The influence of gravity level during directional solidification of immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. B.; Schmale, A. L.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    During directional solidification of immiscible (hypermonotectic) alloys it is theoretically possible to establish a stable macroscopically-planar solidification front, and thus avoid sedimentation. Unfortunately, convective instabilities often occur which interfere with the directional solidification process. In this paper, stability conditions are discussed and results presented from directional solidification studies carried out aboard NASA's KC-135 zero-g aircraft. Samples were directionally solidified while the effective gravity level was varied from approximately 0.01 g for 25 s to 1.8 g for 45 s. Dramatic variations in microstructure were observed with gravity level during solidification.

  12. Modelling direction solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop an improved understanding of some phenomena of importance to directional solidification. The aim of this research is also to help predict differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and solidification in space. In this report, the validity of the Burton-Primslichter equation is explored. The influence of operating variables on grain and twin generation and propagation in single crystals of In sub (x) Ga sub (1-x) Sb is also investigated.

  13. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  14. Boundary-integral simulations of containerless solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaev, Vladimir S.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2003-05-01

    We carry out boundary-integral simulations of a two-dimensional liquid droplet surrounded by air and solidified from a cool point on the boundary. There are three interfaces in the problem: solid-liquid, air-liquid, and air-solid. All three evolve in time in such a way that certain tri-junction conditions must be satisfied. Our numerical method describes the quasi-steady evolution of the interfaces in the limit of zero surface energy on the solidification front. A new iterative technique is developed to describe the interface evolution when mass and total energy are conserved and the local tri-junction conditions are satisfied at every instant in time. A method is also developed for efficient numerical integration over the interfaces by taking advantage of analytical formulas for Green's functions. We start the simulations by studying the case of equal densities of the solid and liquid. This allows us to verify the numerical method and obtain some estimates of the speed of the solidification front. Solid-liquid interface flattening is observed at the intermediate stages of solidification. When the densities of the two phases are different, elongated solidified particles are observed when the solid density is smaller than the liquid density. At the final stages of solidification, a corner is formed in agreement with observations in related experiments.

  15. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  16. Parabolic aircraft solidification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Susan

    1996-01-01

    A number of solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental environment which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Two techniques of interest are directional solidification and isothermal casting. Because of the wide-spread use of these experimental techniques in space-based research, several MSAD experiments have been manifested for space flight. In addition to the microstructural analysis for interpretation of the experimental results from previous work with parabolic flights, it has become apparent that a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible. Our university has performed in several experimental studies such as this in recent years. The most recent was in visualizing the effect of convective flow phenomena on the KC-135 and prior to that were several successive contracts to perform directional solidification and isothermal casting experiments on the KC-135. Included in this work was the modification and utilization of the Convective Flow Analyzer (CFA), the Aircraft Isothermal Casting Furnace (ICF), and the Three-Zone Directional Solidification Furnace. These studies have contributed heavily to the mission of the Microgravity Science and Applications' Materials Science Program.

  17. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1994-01-01

    This grant, NAG8-831, was a continuation of a previous grant, NAG8-541. The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis in the recently completed grant was on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification of InSb and InSb-GaSb alloys. In particular, the objective was to determine the influence of spin-up/spin-down (ACRT), electric current pulses and vibrations on compositional homogeneity and grain size.

  18. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  19. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved understanding of the phenomena of importance to directional solidification is attempted to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis is now on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection. A correlation is sought between heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneities using naphthalene doped with anthracene. The influence of spin-up/spin-down is determined on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide. The effect is determined of imposed melting - freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide. The mechanism behind the increase of grain size caused by using spin-up/spin-down in directional solidification of mercury cadimum telluride is sought.

  20. Nanoparticle Capture During Directional Solidification of Nano-Sized SiC Particle-Reinforced AZ91D Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiaobo; Liu, Hongchang; Li, Wenzhen; Gao, Weiming; Li, Qiushu

    2015-05-01

    The capture/push behavior of a particle in front of a solidification interface was analyzed theoretically and experimentally in this work. Van der Waals force, viscous force, and force due to interfacial energy played important roles in the particle capture/push process. Directional solidification experiments were conducted with nano-sized SiC particle-reinforced AZ91D composites to observe the distribution of nanoparticles in different solidification morphologies under varied cooling rates. When the composite solidified with plane manner, the nanoparticles could be captured by the solidification front and distributed uniformly in the matrix. When solidified with columnar or equiaxial manners, the nanoparticles could be captured by the solidification front but distributed uniformly only in the grain boundary as a result of the difference in interfacial energy and wettability between SiC/α-Mg and SiC/eutectic phase. Theoretical prediction of particle capture was in agreement with the experiment results. PMID:26505023

  1. PUREX Organic Waste Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-12-12

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate solidification/stabilization as an alternative treatment technology for the organic phase of the SRS spent PUREX waste using simulated waste, and to evaluate waste forms prepared with actual spent organic PUREX waste for regulatory classification.

  2. Immiscible phase incorporation during directional solidification of hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Merrick, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification processes in immiscible samples were investigated by directly observing the events taking place at the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification. Visualization of these events was made possible through the use of a transparent metal analog system and a temperature gradient stage assembly fitted to an optical microscope. The immiscible transparent analog system utilized was the succinonitrile-glycerol system. This system has been shown to exhibit the same morphological transitions as observed in metallic alloys of monotectic composition. Both monotectic and hypermonotectic composition samples were directionally solidified in order to gain an improved understanding of the manner in which the excess hypermonotectic liquid is incorporated into the solidifying structure. The processing conditions utilized prevented sedimentation of the excess hypermonotectic liquid by directionally solidifying the samples in very thin (13 microns), horizontally oriented cells. High thermal gradient to growth rate ratios (G/R) were used in an effort to prevent constitutional supercooling and the subsequent formation of L(sub 2) droplets in advance of the solidification front during the growth of fibrous composite structures. Results demonstrated that hypermonotectic composites could be produced in samples up to two weight percent off of the monotectic composition by using a G/R ratio greater than or equal to 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2) to avoid constitutional supercooling. For hypermonotectic samples processed with G/R ratios below 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2), constitutional supercooling occurred and resulted in slight interfacial instability. For these samples, two methods of incorporation of the hypermonotectic liquid were observed and are reported. The correlation between the phase spacing, lambda, and the growth rate, R, was examined and was found to obey a relationship generally associated with a diffusion controlled coupled growth process. For

  3. Why solidification has an S-shaped history

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, A.; Lorente, S.; Yilbas, B. S.; Sahin, A. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show theoretically that the history of solid growth during “rapid” solidification must be S-shaped, in accord with the constructal law of design in nature. In the beginning the rate of solidification increases and after reaching a maximum it decreases monotonically as the volume of solid tends toward a plateau. The S-history is a consequence of four configurations for the flow of heat from the solidification front to the subcooled surroundings, in this chronological order: solid spheres centered at nucleation sites, needles that invade longitudinally, radial growth by conduction, and finally radial lateral conduction to interstices that are warming up. The solid volume (Bs) vs time (t) is an S-curve because it is a power law of type Bs ~ tn where the exponent n first increases and then decreases in time (n = 3/2, 2, 1, …). The initial portion of the S curve is not an exponential.

  4. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis during the period of this grant was on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneties were correlated using naphthalene doped with azulene. In addition the influence of spin-up/spin-down on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide and the effect of imposed melting-freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide are discussed.

  5. Analysis of steady-state shallow cell solidification in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A.

    1996-11-01

    The influence of capillarity on the near-plane front solidification of metal matrix composites is examined by analysis of the one-sided solidification of a binary alloy in a planar interstice of constant width in the limit of low Peclet number. The authors assume that in this limit, solute isoconcentrates in the liquid are everywhere orthogonal to the growth direction. Capillary causes the alloy to solidify in a cellular mode, even in the absence of constitutional supercooling. Two solution branches are derived for this solidification mode, one for shallow symmetric cells, the other for asymmetric cells. Restricting attention to the former solution branch, as the growth velocity increases, or the temperature gradient decreases, the cell amplitude increases gradually, to reach a critical point which depends strongly on the contact angle along the reinforcement/solidification front triple line.

  6. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  7. Solidification mechanism transition of liquid Co-Cu-Ni ternary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, D. Y.; Wang, H. P.; Dai, F. P.; Langevin, D.; Wei, B.

    2011-01-01

    We report a solidification mechanism transition of liquid ternary Co45Cu45Ni10 alloy when it solidifies at a critical undercooling of about 344 K. When undercooling at Δ T<344 K, the solidification process is characterized by primary S (Co) dendritic growth and a subsequent peritectic transition. The dendritic growth velocity of S (Co) dendrite increases with the rise of undercooling. However, once Δ T>344 K, the solidification velocity decreases with the increase of undercooling. In this case, liquid/liquid phase separation takes place prior to solidification. The minor L2 (Cu) droplets hinder the motion of the solidification front, and a monotectic transition may occur in the major L1 phase. These facts caused by metastable phase separation are responsible for the slow growth at high undercoolings.

  8. Directional solidification studies in Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Je-hyun

    1993-05-01

    Three solid phases are involved in the phase equilibria of the intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al near its melting point, {beta}, {gamma}{prime}(Ni{sub 3}Al), and {gamma}. The generally-accepted phase diagram involves a eutectic reaction between {beta}{prime} and {gamma}, but some recent studies agree with an older diagram due to Schramm, which has a eutectic reaction between the {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases. The phase equilibria near Ni{sub 3}Al compositions was evaluated using quenched directional solidification experiments, that preserve the microstructures tonned at the solidification front, and using diffusion couple experiments. These experiments show that eutectic forms between {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases, as in the Schramm diagram. Growth and phase transformations of these three phases are also studied in the directional solidification experiments. Microstructure analysis shows that etching of Ni{sub 3}Al({gamma}{prime}) is very sensitive to small composition variations and crystallographic orientation changes. The eutectic solidification study confirms that the equilibrium eutectic is {gamma}{prime}+{beta}, and that the metastable {gamma}+{beta} eutectic might be also produced in this system according to the impurities, solidification rates, and composition variations.

  9. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  10. Directional solidification of flake and spheroidal graphite cast iron in low and normal gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, J. C.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    A NASA KC-135 research aircraft, flying repeated low-g trajectories that yield 20-30 sec of 0.1-0.001 g microgravity, has been used to study microgravity solidification's elimination of sedimentation and convection (with formation of unique and advantageous microstructures) for the case of eutectic-composition cast irons. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons has been slowly advanced through a 4 mm-diameter rod sample. Sample solidification rates have been correlated with accelerometer data, while independently controlling thermal gradients and solidification rates.

  11. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  12. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lola, Chanceaux; Thierry, Menand

    2015-04-01

    The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (a magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (an elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment. In order to vary the importance of solidification and quantify its effect on sill propagation, the injection flux and temperature are systematically varied between each experiment. Depending on the importance of solidification effects, two extreme behaviours for sill propagation dynamics and geometry are observed. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps. After each propagation step, the sill stalls, thickens progressively by storing hot fluid vegetable oil beneath the partially solidified intrusion, without growing neither in length nor in breadth, and after a pause, the propagation initiates again, soon followed by a new episode of momentary arrest. The geometry of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of surface creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the surface of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. In the same way lower solidification effects promote larger sill surfaces, lower thicknesses, and a lower number of propagation steps. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. Regarding the geometry of sills, 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basins reveal sills with lobate

  14. Experimental investigation of density behaviors in front of the lower hybrid launcher in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Wei, W.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Wu, Z. G.; Zhu, L.; Ma, W. D.; Tong, Y. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Liu, L.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2013-06-15

    A triple Langmuir probe is mounted on the top of the Lower Hybrid (LH) antenna to measure the electron density near the LH grills in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. In this work, the LH power density ranges from 2.3 MWm{sup −2} to 10.3 MWm{sup −2} and the rate of puffing gas varies from 1.7 × 10{sup 20} el/s to 14 × 10{sup 20} el/s. The relation between the edge density (from 0.3 × n{sub e-cutoff} to 20 × n{sub e-cutoff}, where n{sub e-cutoff} is the cutoff density, n{sub e-cutoff} = 0.74 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} for 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive) near the LH grill and the LH power reflection coefficients is investigated. The factors, including the gap between the LH grills and the last closed magnetic flux surface, line-averaged density, LH power, edge safety factor, and gas puffing, are analyzed. The experiments show that injection of LH power is beneficial for increasing edge density. Gas puffing is beneficial for increasing grill density but excess gas puffing is unfavorable for coupling and current drive.

  15. Fundamentals of rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Shiohara, Yuh

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate the continuous change that occurs in the solidification behavior of undercooled melts, as cooling rates increase from 0.0001 K/sec to about 1000 K/sec. At the higher cooling rates, more significant changes occur as the dendrite tip temperature begins to drop from the equilibrium liquidus. Discontinuous solidification behavior changes will occur if absolute stability is reached, or a metastable phase forms, or solidification proceeds to a glass rather than to a crystalline solid, or if there is significant undercooling prior to nucleation.

  16. Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dentrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle flights (STS-62, STS-75, and STS-87) of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dentrites. Shown here is a cutaway of the isothermal bath containing its growth cell at the heart of the TDSE. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Note: an Acrobat PDF version is available from http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery

  17. Morphological stability during solidification of silicon incorporating metallic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.; Mathews, Jay; Recht, Daniel; Smith, Matthew; Gradečak, Silvija; Aziz, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    We study the stability of a planar solidification front during pulsed laser melting-induced rapid solidification of silicon containing high concentrations of ion-implanted metallic impurities. We calculate the critical impurity concentration for destabilizing plane-front solidification, and introduce the "amplification coefficient," which is an empirical parameter describing the degree of amplification that must occur between the time the planar liquid-solid interface first becomes unstable, and the time of formation of morphological features of interface breakdown that is later observed in the microstructure. By connecting our calculations to experimental observations from the literature, we determine this parameter for Au, Co, Cr, Fe, Ga, In, and Zn in (100) Si and Ti in (111) Si, and find that it increases with impurity diffusive speed vD approximately as vD0.56. We present an approximate but simple method of estimating the maximum impurity concentration that may be incorporated in a surface layer of a given thickness without the appearance of cellular breakdown.

  18. Observation of flow regimes and transitions during a columnar solidification experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-Kharicha, M.; Kharicha, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2014-08-01

    Experimental data for the validation of numerical models coupling solidification and hydrodynamics are very rare. Many experiments made in the field of solidifications are performed with pure metals or alloys (Al-Cu, Pb-Sn, etc) which are opaque and do not allow direct observation of the hydrodynamic. Only the results related to solidification such as grain size and orientation, or macro-segregation are usually used for the validation. The present paper is dedicated to the description of well-controlled experiments where both solidification and fluid dynamic can be simultaneously observed. The important point is the almost purely columnar nature of the solidified mushy region. To our knowledge this is the very first reported macro-scale experiment with almost purely columnar solidification where the flow was measured with a PIV technique. The experiments consist in studying the hydrodynamics during the columnar solidification of a H2O-NH4Cl hypereutectic alloy in a die cast cell. Particle image velocimetry was employed to measure the flow velocity in the liquid bulk. Different flow regimes generated by complex thermo-solutal double diffusive convection were observed. In the beginning of the solidification the solutal buoyancy generates a turbulent flow, which is progressively replaced by the development of stratification from the top of the cell. Later, the stratification leads to the development of a long lasting meandering flow, which filled almost all the liquid region. The kinetic energy of the flow was calculated and it was found out that it decreased with time. The solidification front was smooth and no freckles appeared in the mushy zone. The evolution of the thickness of the mushy zone was measured. As this experiment showed a good reproducibility it represents an excellent benchmark for validation of the numerical models that target the simultaneous prediction of flow dynamics and solidification.

  19. Noise and Dynamical Pattern Selection in Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing. "Pattern-forming systems," in this context, are nonequilibrium contina whose state is determined by experimentally adjustable control parameter. Below some critical value of the control system then has available to it a range of linearly stable, spatially periodic steady states, each characterized by a spacing which can lie anywhere within some band of values. These systems like directional solidification, where the solidification front is planar when the ratio of growth velocity to thermal gradient is below its critical value, but takes on a cellular shape above critical. They also include systems without interfaces, such as Benard convection, where it is the fluid velocity field which changes from zero to something spatially periodic as the control parameter is increased through its critical value. The basic question to be addressed was that of how the system chooses one of its myriad possible spacings when the control parameter is above critical, and in particular the role of noise in the selection process. Previous work on explosive crystallization had suggested that one spacing in the range should be preferred, in the sense that weak noise should eventually drive the system to that spacing. That work had also suggested a heuristic argument for identifying the preferred spacing. The project had three main objectives: to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing; to investigate how noise drives a system to its preferred spacing; and to extend the heuristic argument for a preferred spacing in explosive crystallization to other pattern-forming systems.

  20. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  1. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  3. Infiltration kinetics of fibrous preforms by aluminum with solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, T.; Nishida, Y.

    1995-04-01

    The infiltration mechanism of molten aluminum in a fibrous preform was investigated both experimentally and theoretically by using SiC whisker preforms which were deformed during infiltration. To analyze the correlation between applied pressure and infiltration front in the preform, the distribution of hardness along the infiltration direction in the deformed preform were measured and the distribution of volume fraction was calculated. There was a limit in the infiltration distance when pre-heat temperature of the preform was lower than the melting point of aluminum. A theoretical expression was derived to describe fluid flow including solidification in the preform and good agreement with experimental results was obtained.

  4. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  5. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  6. A level set simulation of dendritic solidification of multi-component alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lijian; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    A level set method combining features of front tracking methods and fixed domain methods is presented to model microstructure evolution in the solidification of multi-component alloys. Phase boundaries are tracked by solving the multi-phase level set equations. Diffused interfaces are constructed from these tracked phase boundaries using the level set functions. Based on the assumed diffused interfaces, volume-averaging techniques are applied for energy, species and momentum transport. Microstructure evolution in multi-component alloy systems is predicted using realistic material parameters. The methodology avoids the difficulty of parameter identification needed in other diffused interface models, and allows easy application to various practical alloy systems. Techniques including fast marching, narrow band computing and adaptive meshing are utilized to speed up computations. Several numerical examples are considered to validate the method and examine its potential for modeling solidification of practical alloy systems. These examples include two- and three-dimensional solidification of a binary alloy in an undercooled melt, a study of planar/cellular/dendritic transition in the solidification of a Ni-Cu alloy, and eutectic and peritectic solidification of an Fe-C system. Adaptive mesh refinement in the rapidly varying interface region makes the method practical for coupling the microstructure evolution at the meso-scale with buoyancy driven flow in the macro-scale, which is shown in the solidification of a Ni-Al-Ta ternary alloy.

  7. Validation of a 3D multi-physics model for unidirectional silicon solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Philip; Lankhorst, Adriaan; Habraken, Andries; Faber, Anne-Jans; Tiuleanu, Dumitru; Pingel, Roger

    2012-02-01

    A model for transient movements of solidification fronts has been added to X-stream, an existing multi-physics simulation program for high temperature processes with flow and chemical reactions. The implementation uses an enthalpy formulation and works on fixed grids. First we show the results of a 2D tin solidification benchmark case, which allows a comparison of X-stream to two other codes and to measurements. Second, a complete 3D solar silicon Heat Exchange Method (HEM) furnace, as built by PVA TePla is modeled. Here, it was necessary to model the complete geometry including the quartz crucible, radiative heaters, bottom cooling, inert flushing gas, etc. For one specific recipe of the transient heater power steering, PVA TePla conducted dip-rod measurements of the silicon solidification front position as function of time. This yields a validation of the model when applied to a real life industrial crystallization process. The results indicate that melt convection does influence the energy distribution up to the start of crystallization at the crucible bottom. But from that point on, the release of latent heat seems to dominate the solidification process, and convection in the melt does not significantly influence the transient front shape.

  8. A multi-mode multi-band RF receiver front-end for a TD-SCDMA/LTE/LTE-advanced in 0.18-μm CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Guo; Haiying, Zhang

    2012-09-01

    A fully integrated multi-mode multi-band directed-conversion radio frequency (RF) receiver front-end for a TD-SCDMA/LTE/LTE-advanced is presented. The front-end employs direct-conversion design, and consists of two differential tunable low noise amplifiers (LNA), a quadrature mixer, and two intermediate frequency (IF) amplifiers. The two independent tunable LNAs are used to cover all the four frequency bands, achieving sufficient low noise and high gain performance with low power consumption. Switched capacitor arrays perform a resonant frequency point calibration for the LNAs. The two LNAs are combined at the driver stage of the mixer, which employs a folded double balanced Gilbert structure, and utilizes PMOS transistors as local oscillator (LO) switches to reduce flicker noise. The front-end has three gain modes to obtain a higher dynamic range. Frequency band selection and mode of configuration is realized by an on-chip serial peripheral interface (SPI) module. The front-end is fabricated in a TSMC 0.18-μm RF CMOS process and occupies an area of 1.3 mm2. The measured double-sideband (DSB) noise figure is below 3.5 dB and the conversion gain is over 43 dB at all of the frequency bands. The total current consumption is 31 mA from a 1.8-V supply.

  9. Directional Solidification Of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Singh, A. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions promoting formation of aligned fibers sought. Report describes experiments in directional solidification of Cu/Pb and Bi/Ga monotectic alloys. Study motivated by need to understand physical mechanism governing formation of rodlike or fiberlike aligned structures in solidifying alloy and to determine process conditions favoring such structures.

  10. Uncertainty Quantification in Solidification Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Numerical models have been used to simulate solidification processes, to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to a few or single experiments, in which agreement is dependent on both model and experimental uncertainty. As a first step to quantifying the uncertainty in the models, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis were performed on a simple steady state 1D solidification model of continuous casting of weld filler rod. This model includes conduction, advection, and release of latent heat was developed for use in uncertainty quantification in the calculation of the position of the liquidus and solidus and the solidification time. Using this model, a Smolyak sparse grid algorithm constructed a response surface that fit model outputs based on the range of uncertainty in the inputs to the model. The response surface was then used to determine the probability density functions (PDF's) of the model outputs and sensitivities of the inputs. This process was done for a linear fraction solid and temperature relationship, for which there is an analytical solution, and a Scheil relationship. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient 2D model of solidification in a rectangular domain.

  11. Study on solidification of immisible alloys (M-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamio, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    Alloying of immiscible alloys under microgravity is of interest in metallurgical processes. Several experiments investigating the alloying of immiscible alloys, such as Al-In, Al-Bi, Zn-Bi, and Zn-Pb, were done in space. Homogeneous distribution of small L2 particles in the matrix, such as an emulsion structure, was expected in the space-solidifed alloys. However, the alloys demonstrated an extremely segregated structure. To date insufficient information was obtained to explain these unexpected results. Our experiment was proposed to clarify the solidification manner of immiscible alloys and to obtain fundamental information concerning structural control of the alloys. In space, density differences between the two liquids separated in immiscible regions can be neglected, so that no sedimentation of L(sub 2) phase will take place. When the growth of the alloys is interrupted and this status is frozen by an adequate rapid cooling procedure, it will provide much information concerning decomposing homogeneous liquid and the interaction between the monotectic growth front morphology and the distribution of L(sub 2) phase. It is anticipated that the results will be useful for elucidating the monotectic solidification manner and it will be instructive to explain the segregated structures obtained in the past space experiments.

  12. Solidification in a Supercomputer: From Crystal Nuclei to Dendrite Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Takaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    Thanks to the recent progress in high-performance computational environments, the range of applications of computational metallurgy is expanding rapidly. In this paper, cutting-edge simulations of solidification from atomic to microstructural levels performed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture are introduced with a brief introduction to advances in computational studies on solidification. In particular, million-atom molecular dynamics simulations captured the spontaneous evolution of anisotropy in a solid nucleus in an undercooled melt and homogeneous nucleation without any inducing factor, which is followed by grain growth. At the microstructural level, the quantitative phase-field model has been gaining importance as a powerful tool for predicting solidification microstructures. In this paper, the convergence behavior of simulation results obtained with this model is discussed, in detail. Such convergence ensures the reliability of results of phase-field simulations. Using the quantitative phase-field model, the competitive growth of dendrite assemblages during the directional solidification of a binary alloy bicrystal at the millimeter scale is examined by performing two- and three-dimensional large-scale simulations by multi-GPU computation on the supercomputer, TSUBAME2.5. This cutting-edge approach using a GPU supercomputer is opening a new phase in computational metallurgy.

  13. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  14. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  15. Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.H.

    1996-04-23

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

  16. Morphological instability in rapid directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, G. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    Mullins and Sekerka (1964) showed for fixed temperature gradient that the planar interface is linearly stable for all pulling speeds V above some critical value, the absolute stability limit. Near this limit, where solidification rates are rapid, the assumption of local equilibrium at the interface may be violated. Here, nonequilibrium effects are incorporated into a linear stability analysis of the planar front by allowing the segregation coefficient and interface temperature to depend on V in a thermodynamically consistent way. The absolute stability limit of the cellular mode is modified. A new oscillatory state is formed which, in the absence of latent heat, has a critical wavenumber of zero; by itself this instability would lead to the formation of solute bands in the solid. This mode has its own absolute-stability limit determined by solute trapping and kinetics. Under certain conditions, there exists a window of stability above the steady absolute-stability boundary and below the oscillatory-stability boundary; here the planar segregation-free state is restabilized.

  17. Solidification of a Charged Colloidal Dispersion Investigated Using Microfluidic Pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Nadia; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the dynamics of solidification of a charged colloidal dispersion using an original microfluidic technique referred to as micropervaporation. This technique exploits pervaporation within a microfluidic channel to extract the solvent of a dilute colloidal dispersion. Pervaporation concentrates the colloids in a controlled way up to the tip of the channel until a wet solid made of closely packed colloids grows and invades the microfluidic channel. For the charged dispersion under study, we however evidence a liquid to solid transition (LST) preceding the formation of the solid, owing to the presence of long-range electrostatic interactions. This LST is associated with the nucleation and growth of domains confined in the channel. These domains are then compacted anisotropically up to forming a wet solid of closely packed colloids. This solid then invades the whole channel as in directional drying with a growth rate which depends on the microfluidic geometry. In the final steps of the solidification, we observed the occurrence of cracks and shear bands, the delamination of the wet solid from the channel walls, and its invasion by a receding air front. Interestingly, this air front follows specific patterns within the solid which reveal different microscopic colloidal organizations. PMID:26131999

  18. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Meghan J.; Walker, Brandon A.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). Here, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. While the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there is no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.

  19. Rapid solidification characteristics in melt spinning a Ni-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S. C.; Laforce, R. P.; Ritter, A. M.; Goehner, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The solidification kinetics involved in the process of melt spinning a Ni-base superalloy have been characterized. Through a correlation of ribbon thickness to melt puddle residence time, it was found that the solidification front velocity, V, is typically about 100 mm/sec at the ribbon surface not in contact with the spinning wheel. The rate of solidification varies within the ribbon, increasing with decreasing distance, S, from the wheel-contact surface as V = 3.65/s. Ribbon microstructure and texture characteristics are discussed in light of this kinetics result. The thickness-vs-time correlation was further analyzed to yield information about thermal history during ribbon formation. These thermal results are generally consistent with those deduced from dendrite arm spacing measurements.

  20. Polymer Solidification and Stabilization: Adaptable Processes for Atypical Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.

    2007-07-01

    Vinyl Ester Styrene (VES) and Advanced Polymer Solidification (APS{sup TM}) processes are used to solidify, stabilize, and immobilize radioactive, pyrophoric and hazardous wastes at US Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) sites, and commercial nuclear facilities. A wide range of projects have been accomplished, including in situ immobilization of ion exchange resin and carbon filter media in decommissioned submarines; underwater solidification of zirconium and hafnium machining swarf; solidification of uranium chips; impregnation of depth filters; immobilization of mercury, lead and other hazardous wastes (including paint chips and blasting media); and in situ solidification of submerged demineralizers. Discussion of the adaptability of the VES and APS{sup TM} processes is timely, given the decommissioning work at government sites, and efforts by commercial nuclear plants to reduce inventories of one-of-a-kind wastes. The VES and APS{sup TM} media and processes are highly adaptable to a wide range of waste forms, including liquids, slurries, bead and granular media; as well as metal fines, particles and larger pieces. With the ability to solidify/stabilize liquid wastes using high-speed mixing; wet sludges and solids by low-speed mixing; or bead and granular materials through in situ processing, these polymer will produce a stable, rock-hard product that has the ability to sequester many hazardous waste components and create Class B and C stabilized waste forms for disposal. Technical assessment and approval of these solidification processes and final waste forms have been greatly simplified by exhaustive waste form testing, as well as multiple NRC and CRCPD waste form approvals. (authors)

  1. Waste form development/test. [Low-density polyethylene and modified sulfur cement as solidification agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1983-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate new solidification agents relative to their potential application to wastes generated by advanced high volume reduction technologies, e.g., incinerator ash, dry solids, and ion exchange resins. Candidate materials selected for the solidification of these wastes include a modified sulfur cement and low-density polyethylene, neither of which are currently employed commerically for the solidification of low-level waste (LLW). As both the modified sulfur cement and the polyethylene are thermoplastic materials, a heated screw type extruder is utilized in the production of waste form samples for testing and evaluation. In this regard, work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be satisfactorily applied to the specific LLW streams and to provide information relevant to operating parameters and process control.

  2. Front matter.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    ; Computer-aided Image Analyis in Ophthalmology chaired by Prof Manuel Penedo, University of La Coruña, Spain; and Advances in Data & Knowledge Management for Healthcare chaired by Dr Massimo Esposito, National Research Council of Italy (ICAR-CNR). These proceedings consist of 43 papers that were presented at the conference, each of which was comprehensively reviewed by at least two members of the International Programme Committee. We hope this will form a useful and interesting reference for further research on this topic. The InMed-14 Conference Chairs: Manuel Graña, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain and Carlos Toro. PMID:25488250

  3. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  4. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) Association is the leading organisation in medical informatics in Europe as a federation of national societies of 30 countries. EFMI is organized as a non-profit organization concerned with the theory and practice of information science and technology within health and health science in a European context. The objectives of the EFMI are: • To advance international co-operation and dissemination of information in medical informatics at the European level; • To promote high standards in the application of medical informatics; • To promote research and development in medical informatics; • To encourage high standards in education in medical informatics; • To function as the autonomous European Regional Council of IMIA. This year is a special year for EFMI as it celebrates its 40th anniversary; the Federation was founded in 1976. Therefore, different special events have been organized including several conferences, work shops special issues in journals. In view of this special year for EFMI also the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) conference, one of EFMI's top conferences, is organized in a special way. Considering the complexity and interrelation of the health domain and as a sign of the long-lasting collaboration of major societies in the field a special joint conference was set up that unities the conferences of the German Association for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (GMDS), the German Society for Epidemiology (DGEpi), the International Epidemiological Association - European Region and the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI). The societies involved have longstanding experience in integrating the disciplines of medical informatics, biometry, epidemiology and health data management. The collaboration will not only offer a unique opportunity for integration but also strengthen each of the disciplines involved both on a national and international level. The event is

  5. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  6. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  7. Skaergaard vs Sudbury: Solidification Times and Crystal Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.; Currier, R. M.; Jordon, E.

    2010-12-01

    The overall cooling time of a batch of magma is intimately reflected in the nature of the crystal sizes. The thinner are dikes and sills the finer grained are the crystals they display. And the spatial variations in crystal size and abundance record the spatial progression of solidification. Chilled margins are fine grained because of rapid solidification, and a progressive inward increase in crystal size is perfectly predictable by coupling a law of crystal growth with a suitable solidification front-based cooling model. When observed crystal sizes are much larger than predicted, as in finding phenocrysts near or in chilled margins, this is a clear indication of crystals grown and entrained prior to final emplacement and solidification. This is exactly the process exhibited by volcanics carrying swarms of large crystals. But in plutonic rocks there is frequent confusion over what crystal sizes to expect, especially when the pluton size and shape is poorly known, and there is often an unexpressed feeling that fine grained (i.e., non-phenocryst bearing) bodies almost regardless of size somehow cool fundamentally different than large bodies, especially layered intrusions. An invaluable standard state body to which to compare the crystal sizes of other large bodies is the Sudbury impact melt sheet. Formed in a few minutes, the 3km thick 200 km wide superheated melt sheet cooled and crystallized to produce a systematic and predictable internal variation in crystal size and abundance (Zieg & Marsh, 2002, JPet). Buried by 3km of fallback debris, the sheet took about 100,000 to solidify. The Skaergaard intrusion is of a similar thickness (3.4-4 km), but is much less extensive, being more like a thin-edged elliptical laccolith (Norton et. al., 1984, JGR) or a fault-bounded loaf of bread (7.75 x 10.55 x 3.7 km; Nielsen, 2004, JPet). In spite of its limited extent, the extent is large enough for solidification of the thickest parts time to approach that of an infinite sheet

  8. Influence of forced convection on solidification and remelting in the developing mushy zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Vakhrushev, A.; Ludwig, A.; Kharicha, A.

    2016-03-01

    The mushy zone and solid shell formed during solidification of a continuous casting are mostly uneven, and this unevenness of shell growth might lead to surface defects or breakout. One known example is the unevenness of shell growth at the impingement point between the jet flow (coming from submerged entry nozzle) and the solidification front. This phenomenon is primarily understood as the local remelting caused by the superheat of the melt, which is continuously brought by the jet flow towards the solidification front. A recent study of the authors [Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2014, in press] hinted that, in addition to the aforementioned superheat-induced local remelting (1), two other factors also affect the shell growth. They are (2) the advection of latent heat in the semi-solid mushy zone and (3) the enhanced dissipation rate of energy by turbulence in the bulk-mush transition region. This paper is going to perform a detailed numerical analysis to gain an insight into the flow-solidification interaction phenomena. Contributions of each of the above factors to the shell formation are compared.

  9. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-03-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  10. In-Situ Observation of Directional Solidifications of Al-Cu Alloys During Parabolic Flight Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Khalil, L.; Salloum-Abou-Jaoude, G.; Reinhart, G.; Pickmann, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Janson, O.; Nguyen-Thi, H.

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that the final properties of materials are strongly related to the microstructures formed during growth and to the accompanying segregation, both being very sensitive to the natural hydrodynamic movements in the melt induced by gravity. Therefore, a deeper understanding of gravity effects on the solidification microstructure is of great importance for industrial applications. In the framework of the ESA-MAP project entitled XRMON (in-situ X-Ray MONitoring of advanced metallurgical processes under microgravity and terrestrial conditions), directional solidification experiments with in situ X-ray radiography were carried out during the 60th and 61st ESA — PF campaigns onboard the Airbus A300 operated by Novespace. Parabolic flights offer several successions of periods with normal gravity between two parabolas, and hyper gravity and microgravity during each parabola, which allows the impact of gravity level variations on the solidification microstructures to be investigated. For this purpose, a dedicated apparatus was designed and developed in collaboration with SSC (Swedish Space Corporation). XRMON-PFF (Parabolic Flight Facility) includes a Bridgman furnace dedicated to the solidification of Al-based alloys with an X-ray device that enables in situ characterization. Columnar and/or equiaxed growth of refined and non-refined Al2Owt.%Cu alloys were investigated and X-ray radiography was successfully used to assess the effect of periodic variations of the gravity level on the solidification microstructure formation. Preliminary results confirmed the strong influence of gravity on the solidification microstructure development.

  11. Gravitational influence on eutectic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Robert S.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of gravity on eutectic solidification was investigated experimentally for Pb-Sn binary eutectic alloys. It is found that the separation of the primary crystals of the binary system from the coupled eutectic occurs over a wide range of cooling rates and gravitational fields (100-100,000 g). The separation is strongly influenced by the nucleation behavior of the particular alloy system. A mechanism for the strong phase separation is postulated on the basis of cloud convection models in atmospheric convection.

  12. Directional Solidification of Eutectic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Two major problems associated with structural ceramics are lack of damage tolerance and insufficient strength and creep resistance at very high temperatures of interest for aerospace application. This work demonstrated that the directionally solidified eutectics can have unique poly-phase microstructures and mechanical properties superior to either constituent alone. The constraining effect of unique eutectic microstructures result in higher resistance to slow crack growth and creep. Prospect of achieving superior properties through controlled solidification are presented and this technology can also be beneficial to produce new class of materials.

  13. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-07-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions.

  14. Optimal design of solidification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal design algorithm is presented for the analysis of general solidification processes, and is demonstrated for the growth of GaAs crystals in a Bridgman furnace. The system is optimal in the sense that the prespecified temperature distribution in the solidifying materials is obtained to maximize product quality. The optimization uses traditional numerical programming techniques which require the evaluation of cost and constraint functions and their sensitivities. The finite element method is incorporated to analyze the crystal solidification problem, evaluate the cost and constraint functions, and compute the sensitivities. These techniques are demonstrated in the crystal growth application by determining an optimal furnace wall temperature distribution to obtain the desired temperature profile in the crystal, and hence to maximize the crystal's quality. Several numerical optimization algorithms are studied to determine the proper convergence criteria, effective 1-D search strategies, appropriate forms of the cost and constraint functions, etc. In particular, we incorporate the conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of each algorithm is presented in the example problem.

  15. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  16. Portland cement gives concrete support to solidification/stabilization technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, C.

    1995-05-01

    One waste-treatment method that advanced in the wake of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act`s land-disposal restrictions--cement-based solidification and stabilization technology--rests on a concrete premise. Calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate formed during hydration of portland cement have chemical and physical properties that can safely stabilize hazardous compounds and solidify the varied waste forms in which they occur. Due to the complexity of waste streams, cement-based solidification-stabilization offers no single recipe for all wastes and conditions, and its precise chemical reactions have yet to be determined. However, reports from the federal government, waste generators and treaters underscore the utility of portland cement as a reagent for stabilizing and solidifying waste. Like most solidification systems, cement-based treatment economically eliminates free liquids, reduces hazardous constituent mobility by lowering waste permeability, minimizes constituent leachability, and provides physical stability for handling, transport and disposal. Inorganic wastes amenable to cement-based stabilization include: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, copper, nickel, and zinc.

  17. Solidification process in melt spun Nd-Fe-B type magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.

    1998-02-23

    A generalized solidification model has been developed based on a systematic investigation on the microstructure of melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Melt spinning was conducted on initial stoichiometric and TiC added Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (2-14-1) compositions to produce under, optimally and over quenched microstructures. Microstructural characterization was carried out by TEM, SEM, Optical microscopy, XRD, DTA, VSM and DC SQUID techniques. By taking the dendritic breakup during recalescence into consideration, this generalized model has successfully explained the solidification process of the melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Challenging the conventional homogeneous nucleation models, the new model explains the fine and uniform equiaxed 2-14-1 microstructure in optimally quenched ribbons as a result of the breakup of the 2-14-1 dendrites which nucleate heterogeneously from the wheel surface and grow dendritically across the ribbon thickness due to the recalescence. Besides this dendritic breakup feature, the under quenched microstructure is further featured with another growth front starting with the primary solidification of Fe phase near the free side, which results in a coarsely grained microstructure with Fe dendritic inclusions and overall variation in microstructure across the ribbon thickness. In addition, because a epitaxy exists between the Fe phase and the 2-14-1, the so-formed coarse 2-14-1 grains may be textured. C-axis texturing was observed in under quenched ribbons. As a constraint to solidification models in this system, the cause and characteristics of this phenomenon has been studied in detail to test the authors proposed model, and agreement has been found. An extension has also been made to understand the solidification process when TiC is added, which suggests that Ti and C slow down the growth front of both Fe and 2-14-1 phase.

  18. Solidification microstructures: A conceptual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.; Kurz, W.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed theoretical models have been developed in the literature to correlate microstructural characteristics as a function of processing parameters. These results are examined with a broad perspective to show that various laws for microstructural transitions and microstructural spacings can be represented in terms of three simple characteristic lengths of the important physical processes. Initially, the important physical processes of solute and thermal transport and capillarity effect are considered, and they are related to the microstructural lengths such as dendrite tip radius, primary and secondary spacing, and eutectic spacing. It is shown that these microstructural lengths are simply given by the geometric mean of the characteristic lengths of physical processes that are important in a given problem. New characteristic lengths that become important under rapid solidification are then developed, and how these characteristic lengths influence microstructural transition and microstructural scales is also discussed.

  19. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  20. High gradient directional solidification furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, B. R.; Whitt, W. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high gradient directional solidification furnace is disclosed which includes eight thermal zones throughout the length of the furnace. In the hot end of the furnace, furnace elements provide desired temperatures. These elements include Nichrome wire received in a grooved tube which is encapsulated y an outer alumina core. A booster heater is provided in the hot end of the furnace which includes toroidal tungsten/rhenium wire which has a capacity to put heat quickly into the furnace. An adiabatic zone is provided by an insulation barrier to separate the hot end of the furnace from the cold end. The old end of the furnace is defined by additional heating elements. A heat transfer plate provides a means by which heat may be extracted from the furnace and conducted away through liquid cooled jackets. By varying the input of heat via the booster heater and output of heat via the heat transfer plate, a desired thermal gradient profile may be provided.

  1. Mesoscopic modelling of columnar solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Založnik, M.; Viardin, A.; Souhar, Y.; Combeau, H.; Apel, M.

    2016-03-01

    We used two complementary modeling approaches for the simulation of columnar growth in directional solidification of organic alloys: a phase-field model and a mesoscopic envelope model of dendritic growth. While the phase-field method captures the details of the dendritic structure and of the growth dynamics, the mesoscopic model approximates the complex dendritic morphology by its envelope. The envelope growth is deduced from the velocities of the dendrite tips, calculated by an analytical LGK-type tip model that is matched to the heat and concentration fields in the stagnant film around the envelope. The computational cost of the mesoscopic model is several orders of magnitude lower and can bridge the gap between phase-field and macroscopic models. We demonstrate the applicability of the mesoscopic model to columnar growth and discuss its possibilities and limitations by comparisons with phase-field simulations for the same conditions.

  2. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Expepriment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Expepriment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of TDSE. A similar view is available with labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  3. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior or widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of the TDSE. A similar view is availble without labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  4. Impact-activated solidification of cornstarch and water suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott Russell

    Liquids typically offer little resistance to impacting objects . Surprisingly, dense suspensions of liquids mixed with micron-sized particles can provide tremendous impact resistance, even though they appear liquid like when left at rest or perturbed lightly. The most well-known example is a dense mixture of cornstarch and water, which can easily provide enough impact resistance to allow a full-grown person to run across its surface. Previous studies have linked this so-called ``shear thickening'' to experiments carried out under steady state shear and attributed it to hydrodynamic interactions or granular dilation. However, neither of these explanations alone can account for the stress scales required to keep a running person above the free surface. This thesis investigates the mechanism for this impact resistance in dense suspensions. We begin by studying impact directly and watching a rod as it strikes the surface of a dense suspension of cornstarch and water. Using high-speed video and embedded force and acceleration sensing, we show that the rod motion leads to the rapid growth of a solid-like object below the impact site. With X-ray videography to see the dynamics of the suspension interior and laser sheet measurements of the surface profile, we show how this solid drags on the surrounding suspension, creating substantial peripheral flow and leading to the rapid extraction of the impactor's momentum. Suspecting that the solidification below the rod may be related to jamming of the particle sub-phase, we carry out 2D experiments with macroscopic disks to show how uniaxial compression of an initially unjammed system can lead to dynamic jamming fronts. In doing so, we show how these fronts are sensitive to the system's initial packing fraction relative to the point at which it jams and also discover that the widths of these fronts are related to a diverging correlation length. Finally, we take these results back to the suspension, where we perform careful, speed

  5. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  6. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the publication includes papers entitled: (1) Coupled growth in hypermonotectics; (2) Directional solidification of refined Al-4 wt.% Cu alloys; (3) Effects of convection on interface curvature during growth of concentrated ternary compounds; (4) Directional solidification of Al-1.5 wt.% Ni alloys; (5) Interactive response of advancing phase boundaries to particles; (6) INTeractive Response of Advancing Phase boundaries to Particles-INTRAPP; and (7) Particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces.

  7. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  8. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  9. Microstructure of ceramics fabricated by unidirectional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubo, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unidirectional solidification methods are zone melting, crystal pulling, Bridgemen, and slow cooling. In order to obtain excellent properties (such as transparency), pores, voids and cracks must be avoided, and elimination of such defects is described.

  10. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  11. Container evaluation for microwave solidification project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    This document discusses the development and testing of a suitable waste container and packaging arrangement to be used with the Microwave Solidification System (MSS) and Bagless Posting System (BPS). The project involves the Rocky Flats Plant.

  12. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  13. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  15. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Gershinsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    The generalized problem of determining the temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation was mathematically formulated. Realistic initial and boundary conditions were defined, and a computer program was developed and checked out. The programs computes the positions of two moving boundaries, evaporation and solidification, and their velocities. Temperature and solute concentration profiles in the semiinfinite material body at selected instances of time are also computed.

  16. Effect Of Solidification Speed On Fatigue Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.; Schmidt, D. D.; Hamilton, W. D.; Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Fast solidification increases fatigue life, but failure distribution becomes less predictable. Report describes effects of rate of solidification on nickel-based super-alloy MAR-M246(Hf) used in turbine blades. Based on experiments in which specimens directionally solidified at 5 cm/h and 30 cm/h, then tested for high cycle fatigue. Specimens also inspected by energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis and optical and electron microscopy.

  17. Solidification of an alloy 625 weld overlay

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.

    1996-11-01

    The solidification behavior (microsegregation, secondary phase formation, and solidification temperature range) of an Alloy 625 weld overlay deposited on 2.25Cr-1Mo steel by gas metal arc welding was investigated by light and electron optical microscopy, electron microprobe, and differential thermal analysis techniques. The overlay deposit was found to terminate solidification at {approx}1,216 C by a {gamma}/Laves eutectic-type reaction. The Laves phase was highly enriched in Nb, Mo, and Si. The solidification reaction and microsegregation potential of major alloying elements in the overlay deposit are compared to other Nb-bearing Ni base alloys and found to be very similar to those for Alloy 718. Solidification cracks observed in the overlay were attributed to the wide solidification temperature range ({approx}170 C) and formation of interdendritic ({gamma} + Laves) constituent. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured volume percent ({gamma} + Laves) constituent with the Scheil equation by treating the overlay system as a simple {gamma}-Nb binary and using an experimentally determined k{sub Nb} value from electron microprobe data.

  18. Solidification modeling of Nb bearing superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.; Robino, C.V.

    1997-08-01

    The solidification behavior of experimental Ni base and Fe base superalloys containing Nb, Si, and C was studied using differential thermal analysis (DTA) and microstructural characterization techniques. The solidification reaction sequences responsible for microstructural development were found to be similar to those expected in the Ni-Nb-C ternary system, where the solute-rich interdendritic liquid exhibited two eutectic-type reactions at the terminal stages of solidification: L {yields} ({gamma} + NbC) and L {yields} ({gamma} + Laves). A pseudo ternary {gamma}-Nb-C approach was developed to provide a quantitative description of solidification behavior for these experimental alloys. Solute redistribution calculations in the model are based on a previous approach developed by Mehrabian and Flemings, with modifications made to account for the high diffusion rate of C in the solid. Solidification parameters for Nb and C were determined through DTA and electron probe microanalysis techniques and used as inputs to the model. Reasonable agreement is found between calculated volume fractions of the {gamma}/NbC and {gamma}/Laves constituents and those measured experimentally. The modeling results permit detailed descriptions of the relation between alloy composition and microstructural evolution during solidification.

  19. X-Ray Radiographic Observation of Directional Solidification Under Microgravity: XRMON-GF Experiments on MASER12 Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, G.; NguyenThi, H.; Bogno, A.; Billia, B.; Houltz, Y.; Loth, K.; Voss, D.; Verga, A.; dePascale, F.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Zimmermann, G.

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) - Microgravity Application Promotion (MAP) programme entitled XRMON (In situ X-Ray MONitoring of advanced metallurgical processes under microgravity and terrestrial conditions) aims to develop and perform in situ X-ray radiography observations of metallurgical processes in microgravity and terrestrial environments. The use of X-ray imaging methods makes it possible to study alloy solidification processes with spatio-temporal resolutions at the scales of relevance for microstructure formation. XRMON has been selected for MASER 12 sounding rocket experiment, scheduled in autumn 2011. Although the microgravity duration is typically six minutes, this short time is sufficient to investigate a solidification experiment with X-ray radiography. This communication will report on the preliminary results obtained with the experimental set-up developed by SSC (Swedish Space Corporation). Presented results dealing with directional solidification of Al-Cu confirm the great interest of performing in situ characterization to analyse dynamical phenomena during solidification processes.

  20. Interpreting solidification phenomena and microstructural evolution in metals through the use of transparent model alloy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grugel, R.N. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Trivedi, R. )

    1991-01-01

    It is well established that the material properties of alloys are directly related to the scale and distribution of their microstructural constituents. The advances and applications of metallogrpahic techniques for the examination of solidified microstructures have proven invaluable in ascertaining these structure-property relationships. Unfortunately, many aspects of microstructural evolution can only be inferred from a post-solidification examination. The use of transparent compounds which freeze in a manner analogous to metals circumvents this problem by allowing direct and continual observation of solidification events during both transient and steady-state growth. This paper discusses the role of these compounds in promoting our understanding of solidification phenomena. Examples of dendritic, eutectic, and monotectic microstructural development, pertinent to theory and practice, are presented and compared with their metal counterparts. 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Finite element simulations of thermosolutal convection in vertical solidification of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    Dendritic vertical solidification of a binary alloy is modeled using the finite element method to assess the effect of thermosolutal convection in macrosegregation. The mathematical model assumes steady-state solidification with a planar, undeformable surface defined by the dendrite tips and the eutectic isotherm. The dendritic region is assumed to advance at a constant solidification velocity v. The stability of the modeled system has been investigated and nonlinear calculations performed that show finger-like convection when the system is unstable. Results for lead-tin alloys show that when the system is unstable, convection is only significant in the uppermost part of the mush and is entirely driven by convection in the bulk fluid.

  2. Fronts, fish, and predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Hunt, George L.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Zamon, Jeannette E.; Schick, Robert S.; Prieto, Rui; Brodziak, Jon; Teo, Steven L. H.; Thorne, Lesley; Bailey, Helen; Itoh, Sachihiko; Munk, Peter; Musyl, Michael K.; Willis, Jay K.; Zhang, Wuchang

    2014-09-01

    Ocean fronts play a key role in marine ecosystems. Fronts shape oceanic landscapes and affect every trophic level across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, from meters to thousands of kilometers, and from days to millions of years. At some fronts, there is an elevated rate of primary production, whereas at others, plankton is aggregated by advection and by the behavior of organisms moving against gradients in temperature, salinity, light irradiance, hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical and biological factors. Lower trophic level organisms - phytoplankton and zooplankton - that are aggregated in sufficient densities, attract organisms from higher trophic levels, from planktivorous schooling fish to squid, large piscivorous fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Many species have critical portions of their life stages or behaviors closely associated with fronts, including spawning, feeding, ontogenetic development, migrations, and other activities cued to frontal dynamics. At different life stages, an individual species or population might be linked to different fronts. The nature and strength of associations between fronts and biota depend on numerous factors such as the physical nature and spatio-temporal scales of the front and the species and their life stages in question. In other words, fronts support many different niches and micro/macro-habitats over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  3. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  4. Solidification Microstructure, Segregation, and Shrinkage of Fe-Mn-C Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel by Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Peng; Tang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2016-06-01

    A 3D cellular automaton finite element model with full coupling of heat, flow, and solute transfer incorporating solidification grain nucleation and growth was developed for a multicomponent system. The predicted solidification process, shrinkage porosity, macrosegregation, grain orientation, and microstructure evolution of Fe-22Mn-0.7C twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel match well with the experimental observation and measurement. Based on a new solute microsegregation model using the finite difference method, the thermophysical parameters including solid fraction, thermal conductivity, density, and enthalpy were predicted and compared with the results from thermodynamics and experiment. The effects of flow and solute transfer in the liquid phase on the solidification microstructure of Fe-22Mn-0.7C TWIP steel were compared numerically. Thermal convection decreases the temperature gradient in the liquid steel, leading to the enlargement of the equiaxed zone. Solute enrichment in front of the solid/liquid interface weakens the thermal convection, resulting in a little postponement of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The CET behavior of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel during solidification was fully described and mathematically quantized by grain morphology statistics for the first time. A new methodology to figure out the CET location by linear regression of grain mean size with least-squares arithmetic was established, by which a composition design strategy for Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel according to solidification microstructure, matrix compactness, and homogeneity was developed.

  5. Solidification Microstructure, Segregation, and Shrinkage of Fe-Mn-C Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel by Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Peng; Tang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2016-04-01

    A 3D cellular automaton finite element model with full coupling of heat, flow, and solute transfer incorporating solidification grain nucleation and growth was developed for a multicomponent system. The predicted solidification process, shrinkage porosity, macrosegregation, grain orientation, and microstructure evolution of Fe-22Mn-0.7C twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel match well with the experimental observation and measurement. Based on a new solute microsegregation model using the finite difference method, the thermophysical parameters including solid fraction, thermal conductivity, density, and enthalpy were predicted and compared with the results from thermodynamics and experiment. The effects of flow and solute transfer in the liquid phase on the solidification microstructure of Fe-22Mn-0.7C TWIP steel were compared numerically. Thermal convection decreases the temperature gradient in the liquid steel, leading to the enlargement of the equiaxed zone. Solute enrichment in front of the solid/liquid interface weakens the thermal convection, resulting in a little postponement of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The CET behavior of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel during solidification was fully described and mathematically quantized by grain morphology statistics for the first time. A new methodology to figure out the CET location by linear regression of grain mean size with least-squares arithmetic was established, by which a composition design strategy for Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel according to solidification microstructure, matrix compactness, and homogeneity was developed.

  6. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Ramakrishnan, Suresh; Kota, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long-term goal is to make such detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Detached solidification is more likely when the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall is high, i.e. non-wetting. It has been claimed that impurities increase the contact angle. The objective of the current project is to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. We are focusing on determining the influence of oxygen on the contact angle of molten InSb on clean silica ('quartz'), including the advancing and retreating contact angles in addition to the usual equilibrium contact angle. We have created a gas flow system that allows us to control the oxygen partial pressure over a sessile drop of InSb on a horizontal quartz surface. The cell is slowly tilted while videotaping to reveal the contact angles on the two sides of the drop just prior to it rolling down the surface. Thus far, we have learned the following: (1) Molten InSb readily forms an oxide layer in the presence of the trace amounts of oxygen found in high purity argon; (2) This oxide contains a substantial amount of Ga, which presumably is a trace contaminant that is not detectable in the starting material; (3) The addition of 10% hydrogen to the argon gas is sufficient to reduce the oxide and produce a clean drop; (4) An infrared filter must precede the video camera in order to produce a sharp image of the drop for later image analysis; (5) Tilting the surface on which the drop rests causes the two sides

  7. Production of hybrid granitic magma at the advancing front of basaltic underplating: Inferences from the Sesia Magmatic System (south-western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, Silvano; Quick, James E.; Demarchi, Gabriella; Klötzli, Urs S.

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Sesia Magmatic System of the southwestern Alps displays the plumbing system beneath a Permian caldera, including a deep crustal gabbroic complex, upper crustal granite plutons and a bimodal volcanic field dominated by rhyolitic tuff filling the caldera. Isotopic compositions of the deep crustal gabbro overlap those of coeval andesitic basalts, whereas granites define a distinct, more radiogenic cluster (Sri ≈ 0.708 and 0.710, respectively). AFC computations starting from the best mafic candidate for a starting melt show that Nd and Sr isotopic compositions and trace elements of andesitic basalts may be modeled by reactive bulk assimilation of ≈ 30% of partially depleted crust and ≈ 15%-30% gabbro fractionation. Trace elements of the deep crustal gabbro cumulates require a further ≈ 60% fractionation of the andesitic basalt and loss of ≈ 40% of silica-rich residual melt. The composition of the granite plutons is consistent with a mixture of relatively constant proportions of residual melt delivered from the gabbro and anatectic melt. Chemical and field evidence leads to a conceptual model which links the production of the two granitic components to the evolution of the Mafic Complex. During the growth of the Mafic Complex, progressive incorporation of packages of crustal rocks resulted in a roughly steady state rate of assimilation. Anatectic granite originates in the hot zone of melting crust located above the advancing mafic intrusion. Upward segregation of anatectic melts facilitates the assimilation of the partially depleted restite by stoping. At each cycle of mafic intrusion and incorporation, residual and anatectic melts are produced in roughly constant proportions, because the amount of anatectic melt produced at the roof is a function of volume and latent heat of crystallization of the underplated mafic melt which in turn produces proportional amounts of hybrid gabbro cumulates and residual melt. Such a process can explain the

  8. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  9. A numerical study of infiltration and solidification/remelting of pure metal in a porous preform

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, X.; Khan, J.A.; Hawkins, L.E.

    1995-12-31

    Infiltration and solidification/remelting of pure metal in a preform is modeled numerically. The preform is assumed to be two-dimensional porous media. It is also assumed that under the action of constant applied pressure, the flow of liquid metal through the preform is within the range of the validity of Darcy`s Law. The distinguishing feature of this flow and heat transfer problem is the existence of two moving fronts--the infiltration front and the phase-change front. The governing momentum and energy equations are cast into a Body-Fitted Coordinate (BFC) system to track the transient positions of both fronts during the infiltration process. For the sake of generality the parameters that govern the infiltration process are non-dimensionalized. The dimensionless groups which govern the infiltration process include the applied pressure difference ({Psi}{sub 1}), the melting temperature ({theta}{sub m}), the preform permeability ratio, the porosity ({phi}), and the geometric sizes (inlet gate size {delta}, and the preform aspect ratio L/H). A computational code has been developed to solve the problem and is verified using the available published results. The key parameters describing the physical phenomenon (infiltration front, remelting front, total infiltration time and remelting region size) are presented as a function of the operating variables (i.e., {Psi}{sub 1}, {theta}{sub m}, {phi}, {omega} and {delta}). The results can be used to optimize the infiltration processing of Metal-Matrix Composites and other related manufacturing processes.

  10. Firing up the front line.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Santamaria, J A

    1999-01-01

    For many organizations, achieving competitive advantage means eliciting superior performance from employees on the front line--the burger flippers, hotel room cleaners, and baggage handlers whose work has an enormous effect on customers. That's no easy task. Front line workers are paid low wages, have scant hope of advancement, and--not surprisingly--often care little about the company's performance. But then how do some companies succeed in engaging the emotional energy of rank-and-file workers? A team of researchers at McKinsey & Company and the Conference Board recently explored that question and discovered that one highly effective route is demonstrated by the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines' approach to motivation follows the "mission, values, and pride" path, which researchers say is practical and relevant for the business world. More specifically, the authors say the Marines follow five practices: they over-invest in cultivating core value; prepare every person to lead, including front line supervisors; learn when to create teams and when to create single-leader work groups; attend to all employees, not just the top half; and encourage self-discipline as a way of building pride. The authors admit there are critical differences between the Marines and most businesses. But using vivid examples from companies such as KFC and Marriott International, the authors illustrate how the Marines' approach can be translated for corporate use. Sometimes, the authors maintain, minor changes in a company's standard operating procedure can have a powerful effect on front line pride and can result in substantial payoffs in company performance. PMID:10387573

  11. Containerless undercooling and solidification in drop tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A containerless low-gravity environment, produced within a 32 m drop tube apparatus, has been used to undercool and solidify metals, alloys or glasses by eliminating crucible induced nucleation processes. Niobium droplets with diameters in the range of 2 to 5 mm have been undercooled by 525 K which corresponds to the maximum undercooling reported by Turnbull and others on fine dispersions of low melting point metals. Solidification at large undercooling resulted in single crystalline spheres with the formation of interdendritic shrinkage channels on the sample surface rather than interior shrinkage cavities. The grain refinement as observed for Ni samples undercooled and solidified in fused silica crucibles does not occur in free-falling drops of Nb. A calculated solidification speed of undercooled Nb is compared to Ni. A solidification speed of 320 m/s is found for the Nb drops. This solidification speed is greater than or comparable to the solidification speeds calculated in splat cooled samples. Thus, a drop tube apparatus can be useful in the preparation and study of high temperature metastable compounds or alloys in bulk form.

  12. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  13. Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marin, C.; Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Volz, M.; Luz, P.; Jeter, L.; Spivey, R.; Burton, H.; Smith, G.; Knowles, T. R.; Bonner, W. A.

    2003-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) will be the first materials science experiment conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility at the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha. The launch is schedule for May 31, 2002. Using the specially developed furnace, 10 Te and Zn-doped single crystals of InSb will be directionally solidified in microgravity. A key goal of the SUBSA investigation is to (i) clarify the origin of the melt motion in space laboratories and (ii) to reduce the magnitude of the melt motion to the point that it does not interfere with the transport phenomena. These goals will be accomplished through a special ampoule and furnace design. A disk-shaped baffle, positioned close to the freezing front, is used to reduce melt motion. Furthermore, the solidification will be visualized by using a transparent furnace, with a video camera, continuously sending images to the earth. This allows detection of bubbles and melt de-wetting that could cause surface tension driven convection. In preparation for the space experiments, 30 ground-based experiments were conducted. The results of ground based tests and numerical modeling will be presented. Based on numerical modeling, 12 mm 1D silica ampoules were selected. The small diameter ampoule favors closer placement of the baffle to the interface, without excessive radial segregation caused by forced convection while providing more damping of natural convection. The parts in the silica ampoule include 2 carbon springs made by Energy Science Laboratories, Inc., a pyrocarbon-coated graphite cylinder, pyrocarbon-coated graphite a baffle with the shaft and the InSb charge with the seed crystal grown by W.A. Bonner of Crystallod Inc.

  14. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  15. Rapid solidification under local nonequilibrium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. L.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of local nonequilibrium solute diffusion on a solute concentration field, solute partitioning, interface temperature, and absolute stability limit have been considered. The model incorporates two diffusive speeds, VDb, the bulk-liquid diffusive speed, and VDi, the interface diffusive speed, as the most important parameters governing the solute concentration in the liquid phase and solute partitioning. The analysis of the model predicts a transition from diffusion-controlled solidification to purely thermally controlled regimes, which occurs abruptly when the interface velocity V equals the bulk liquid diffusive speed VDb. The abrupt change in the solidification mechanism is described by the velocity-dependent effective diffusion coefficient D*=D(1-V2/V2Db) and the generalized partition coefficient K*. If V>VDb, then D*=0 and K*=1. This implies an undistributed diffusion field in the liquid (diffusionless solidification) and complete solute trapping at V>VDb.

  16. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  17. Fundamental Studies of Solidification in Microgravity Using Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu; Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, XTM, to image (with resolutions up to 3 micrometers) the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Current high resolution X-ray sources and high contrast X-ray detectors have advanced to allow systematic study of solidification dynamics and the resulting microstructure. We have employed a state-of-the-art sub-micron source with acceleration voltages of 10-100 kV to image solidification of metals. One useful strength of the XTM stems from the manner an image is formed. The radiographic image is a shadow formed by x-ray photons that are not absorbed as they pass through the specimen. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). The ability to image these features in real-time enables more fundamental and detailed understanding of solidification dynamics than has previously been possible. Hence, application of this technique towards microgravity experiments will allow rigorous testing of critical solidification models.

  18. Teaching Front Handsprings from a Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The front handspring is an important gymnastics skill that serves as a transition from beginner-level rolling and static balances to more advanced tumbling. It is, therefore, a skill highly desired by beginners. Early learning requires a great deal of effort during which students experience many failed attempts. Unless they are highly motivated,…

  19. The solidification behavior of an Alloy 625/718 variant

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The solidification behavior of Custom Age 625 PLUS{reg sign} is examined using an integrated analytical approach. Like its predecessors, Alloys 625 and 718, the solidification behavior of this new alloy is dominated by the presence and segregation of Nb, which gives rise to a {gamma}/Laves terminal solidification constituent. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Observations of a monotectic solidification interface morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Frazier, D. O.

    1985-01-01

    For detailed studies of the region around a solidification interface on a microscopic scale, a very thin (essentially two-dimensional) test cell may be translated across two temperature-controlled heating/cooling blocks and viewed with a microscope. Such a device is sometimes referred to as a temperature gradient microscope stage (TGS). Of particular interest in this study is the behavior of a monotectic type solution during solidification. Succinonitrile based model systems for metallic monotectic alloys, when solidified on a TGS, form an unusual 'worm-like' micromorphology. These interfaces are observable in situ under high optical magnification during growth.

  1. Observations of a monotectic solidification interface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Frazier, D. O.

    1985-04-01

    For detailed studies of the region around a solidification interface on a microscopic scale, a very thin (essentially two-dimensional) test cell may be translated across two temperature-controlled heating/cooling blocks and viewed with a microscope. Such a device is sometimes referred to as a temperature gradient microscope stage (TGS). Of particular interest in this study is the behavior of a monotectic type solution during solidification. Succinonitrile based model systems for metallic monotectic alloys, when solidified on a TGS, form an unusual 'worm-like' micromorphology. These interfaces are observable in situ under high optical magnification during growth.

  2. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity driven separation precludes uniform microstructural development during controlled directional solidification (DS) processing of hypermonotectic alloys. It is well established that liquid/liquid suspensions, in which the respective components are immiscible and have significant density differences, can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. A historical introduction to this work is presented with the intent of establishing the basis for applying the phenomena to promote microstructural uniformity during controlled directional solidification processing of immiscible mixtures. Experimental work based on transparent organics, as well as salt systems, will be presented in view of the processing parameters.

  3. Cellular automata modeling of weld solidification structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.; Zacharia, T.; Radhakrishnan, B.

    1993-12-31

    The authors explore the use of cellular automata in modeling arc-welding processes. A brief discussion of cellular automata and their previous use in micro-scale solidification simulations is presented. Macro-scale thermal calculations for arc-welding at a thin plate are shown to give good quantitative and qualitative results. Combining the two calculations in a single cellular array provides a realistic simulation of grain growth in a welding process. Results of simulating solidification in a moving melt pool in a poly-crystalline alloy sheet are presented.

  4. Conditions Of Directional Solidification Affect Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. D.; Alter, W. S.; Hamilton, W. D.; Parr, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of gradient of temperature and rate of solidification on microstructure and fatigue properties of nickel-based superalloy MAR-M246(Hf). Enhancement of properties extends lifespans of objects, including turbo-pump blades of Space Shuttle Main Engines. Results indicate significant improvements in fatigue properties derived through manipulation of parameters of directional solidification. Particularly MAR-M246(Hf) for turbine blades contains small, well-dispersed blocky carbide and microstructure with small distances between dendrite arms, and without eutectic phase.

  5. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  6. An optical study of grain formation: Casting and solidification technology (2-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, Mary H.

    1992-01-01

    By studying the unidirectional growth of a metal-model material in microgravity, an attempt is made to characterize alloy solidification. Using holograms and supporting temperature measurements obtained during processing in the Fluids Experiment System (FES), the solute and thermal fields associated with the dendrite growth front and extraneous nucleation will be measured and compared to a theoretical (computational) model. Ground based supporting experiments include particle tracking to measure the velocity fields, and optical phase shift techniques (confocal optical signal processing, interferometry, and Schlieren) to study thermal and solutal fields.

  7. Effects of Low Gravity on Superalloy Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. H.; Parr, R. A.; Curreri, P. A.; Alter, Wendy

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experiments on directional solidification on MAR-M246(Hf) superalloy in low gravity. Determines effects of reduction in gravity on growth of dendrites and on resultant interdendritic segregation of various constituents, particularly of additive hafnium. Interdendritic spacings and carbide contents increase.

  8. Solidification of oils and organic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    The suitability of selected solidification media for application in the disposal of low-level oil and other organic liquid wastes has been investigated. In the past, these low-level wastes (LLWs) have commonly been immobilized by sorption onto solid absorbents such as vermiculite or diatomaceous earth. Evolving regulations regarding the disposal of these materials encourage solidification. Solidification media which were studied include Portland type I cement; vermiculite plus Portland type I cement; Nuclear Technology Corporation's Nutek 380-cement process; emulsifier, Portland type I cement-sodium silicate; Delaware Custom Materiel's cement process; and the US Gypsum Company's Envirostone process. Waste forms have been evaluated as to their ability to reliably produce free standing monolithic solids which are homogeneous (macroscopically), contain < 1% free standing liquids by volume and pass a water immersion test. Solidified waste form specimens were also subjected to vibratory shock testing and flame testing. Simulated oil wastes can be solidified to acceptable solid specimens having volumetric waste loadings of less than 40 volume-%. However, simulated organic liquid wastes could not be solidified into acceptable waste forms above a volumetric loading factor of about 10 volume-% using the solidification agents studied.

  9. Solidification studies of automotive heat exchanger materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, T.; Jaradeh, M.; Kamgou Kamaga, H.

    2006-11-01

    Modifications of the aluminum alloy AA 3003 have been studied to improve and tailorits properties for applications in automotive heat exchangers. Laboratory techniques have been applied to simulate industrial direct-chill casting, and some basic solidification studies have been conducted. The results are coupled to structures observed in industrial-size ingots and discussed in terms of structure-property relations.

  10. Visualizing weld metal solidification using organic analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Rogers, Gary Ray

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise are to allow the student to observe the solidification of a low melting temperature transparent crystalline organic compound that exhibits behavior similar to that of weld metal. A list of equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  11. Detached growth of germanium by directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2005-04-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  12. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION: IS IT ALWAYS APPROPRIATE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The findings of recent research and evaluation efforts are assessed to determine whether solidification/stabilization (S/S) has been properly and appropriately applied for different types of hazardous wastes. Results from these studies are mixed and, as a result, the need for pro...

  13. Uncertainty Quantification of Modelling of Equiaxed Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metal alloy solidification are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to sparse experimental data, to which agreement can be misinterpreted due to both model and experimental uncertainty. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis are performed on a transient model of solidification of Al-4.5 wt.% Cu in a rectangular cavity, with equiaxed (grain refined) solidification morphology. This model solves equations for momentum, temperature, and species conservation; UQ and sensitivity analysis are performed for the degree of macrosegregation. A Smolyak sparse grid algorithm is used to select input values to construct a response surface fit to model outputs. The response surface is then used as a surrogate for the solidification model to determine the sensitivities and probability density functions of the model outputs. Uncertain model inputs of interest include the secondary dendrite arm spacing, equiaxed particle size, and fraction solid at which the rigid mushy zone forms. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient model of direct chill casting of the same alloy.

  14. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  15. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION: IS IT ALWAYS APPROPRIATE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing use of solidification/stabilization (S/S) technologies in the United States, especially for remediation of sites under the Superfund program, has raised several questions about the overall appropriateness of S/S. or many types of hazardous waste, notably for heavy ...

  16. Steps, kinetic anisotropy, and long-wavelength instabilities in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, H. P.; Davis, S. H.; McFadden, G. B.

    1999-05-01

    We consider the effect of anisotropic interface kinetics on long-wavelength instabilities during the directional solidification of a binary alloy having a vicinal interface. Linear theory predicts that a planar solidification front is stabilized under the effect of anisotropy as long as the segregation coefficient is small enough, whereas a novel instability appears at high rates of solidification. Furthermore, the neutral stability curve, indicating the values of the principal control parameter (here the morphological number) for which the growth rate of a sinusoidal perturbation of a given wavelength changes its sign, is shown to have up to three branches, two of them combining to form an isola for certain values of the control parameters. We identify conditions for which linear stability theory predicts the instability of the planar interface to long-wavelength traveling waves. A number of distinguished limits provide evolution equations that describe the resulting dynamical behavior of the crystal-melt interface and generalize previous work by Sivashinsky, Brattkus, and Davis and Riley and Davis. Bifurcation analysis and numerical computations for the derived evolution equations show that the anisotropy is able to promote the tendency to supercritical bifurcation, and also leads to the development of strongly preferred interface orientations for finite-amplitude deformations.

  17. Real-Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy for Fundamental Studies Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu; Peters, Palmer

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 4OX to 16OX. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 micrometers. We have applied this system to study of the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys to observe a previously unreported velocity dependent thermo-capillary depletion mechanism for Bi rich liquid which can penetrate many fiber diameters into the solid-liquid interface. In this talk we will discuss application of the XTM to the study the fundamentals of monotectic and eutectic solidification, the enhancement of XTM data with precise solid liquid interfacial temperature and thermal gradient measurement techniques, and the application of this technology to the study of the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity,

  18. In-situ Monitoring of Dynamic Phenomena during Solidification and Phase Transformation Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Patterson, Brian M.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Lee, Wah Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Tucker, Tim J.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Teter, David F.; Beard, Timothy V.; Hudson, Richard W.; Freibert, Franz J.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.; Farrow, Adam M.; Cross, Carl E.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Lookman, Turab; Hunter, Abigail; Choudhury, Samrat; Karma, Alain; Ott, Thomas J. Jr.; Barker, Martha R.; O'Neill, Finian; Hill, Joshua; Emigh, Megan G.

    2012-07-30

    The purpose of this project is to: (1) Directly observe phase transformations and microstructure evolution using proton (and synchrotron x-ray) radiography and tomography; (2) Constrain phase-field models for microstructure evolution; (3) Experimentally control microstructure evolution during processing to enable co-design; and (4) Advance toward the MaRIE vision. Understand microstructure evolution and chemical segregation during solidification {yields} solid-state transformations in Pu-Ga.

  19. Stories from the Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Blake

    2002-01-01

    Shares some of the author's personal experiences from the "front line" to illustrate the potential of computer-supported learning environments. Concludes that technology, if used in conjunction with sound pedagogy, allows students to tep outside the confines of the traditional classroom and school structure and take responsibility for both their…

  20. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  1. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  2. Interaction of Porosity with an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: a Real-Time Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W.; Catalina, A.; Stefanescu, D.; Curreri, P.

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with formation of porosity during solidification continue to have a daily impact on the metal forming industry. Several past investigations have dealt with the nucleation and growth aspects of porosity. However, investigations related to the interaction of porosity with that of a solidification front has been limited mostly to organic analogues. In this paper we report on real time experimental observations of such interactions in metal alloys. Using a state of the art X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) we have been able to observe and record the dynamics of the interaction. This includes distortion of the solid/liquid interface near a poro.sity, solute segr,egation patterns surrounding a porosity and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing solid/liquid interface. Results will be presented for different Al alloys and growth conditions. The experimental data will be compared to theory using a recently developed 2D numerical model. The model employs a finite difference approach where the solid/liquid interface is defined through the points at which the interface intersects the grid lines. The transport variables are calculated at these points and the motion of the solidification front is determined by the magnitude of the transport variables. The model accounts for the interplay of the thermal and solutal field and the influence of capilarity to predict the shape of the solid/liquid interface with time in the vicinity of porosity. One can further calculate the perturbation of the solutal field by the presence of porosity in the melt.

  3. Progress in front propagation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  4. A Real Time Investigation of Morphological Evolution During Solidification of Different Alloy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification phenomenon which occur at the solid/liquid (s/I) interface play a major role in the determination of structure and hence the technologically important properties of a casting. However, metals being opaque, conclusions related to several important phenomenon such as boundary layer thickness, morphological evolution, and eutectic and cell spacing are deduced from quenching experiments and subsequent post solidification metallographic analysis. Consequently, limited information is obtained about the dynamics of the process. This paper will discuss the recent efforts at the Space Science Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, to view and quantify in-situ and in real time the dynamics of the solidification process and to measure interfacial undercooling. First, a high resolution x-ray transmission microscope (XTM) has been developed to monitor fundamental interfacial phenomena during directional solidification of metals and alloys. The XTM operates in the range of 10-100 KeV and through projection is capable of achieving magnification of up to 16OX. Secondly, an innovative collapsible furnace has been designed to quantify interfacial undercooling by measuring the temperature of a moving s/I interface in reference to a fixed s/l interface. This measurement technique is non-intrusive in nature and is based on the Seebeck principle. In this paper real time results obtained to characterize the dynamics of irregular eutectic spacing will be presented. As an example fiber to lamella or plate transition in the Al-Al2Au eutectic system will be discussed. Further, a resolution limit of 25 micron has permitted viewing in real time morphological instability and cellular growth in Al-Au and Al-Ag systems. Simultaneously, a systematic investigation has been carried out to measure interfacial undercooling for Pb-1 wt.% Sn at and near the marginal stability regime. In conjunction with the XTM observations this study attempts to validate existing relationships

  5. Directional Solidification and Characterization of Hg(0.89) Mn(0.11)Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. W.; Scripa, R. N.; Lehoczky. S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Su, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    Two boules of Hg(0.89)Mn(0.11)Te(MMT) were solidified using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Translation rates of 0.09 and 0. 18 microns/s were used. The influence of growth rate on axial compositional homogeneity in the MMT boules was evaluated experimentally by conducting precision density measurements on radial slices taken from each boule. In addition, Plane Front Solidification theory and segregation coefficient (k) data for the Hg(1-x)Mn(x)Te system were used to fit theoretical composition profiles to the measured MMT axial composition profiles. The strong correlation between the measured and calculated MMT axial composition profiles indicates diffusion dominated axial solute redistribution in the boules under the applied growth conditions. The analysis of the MMT axial composition profiles by Plane Front Solidification theory allowed the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient (D(eff) = 3.5 x l0(exp -5) sq cm/s). The k-values for the Hg(1-x)Mn(x)Te system and the D(sub eff) - value were then used to verify that both boules were solidified under conditions which did not exceed the Constitutional Supercooling Criteria under ideal conditions. Finally, a preliminary examination of the radial compositional variation in each MMT was made using Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The radial homogeneity in the MMT boules was found to be comparable for both translation rates.

  6. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does. PMID:27090239

  7. 35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front of powerhouse and car barn. 'Annex' is right end of building. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY (LEFT) AND BLANK WALL (CENTER) CORRESPONDING TO LOCATION OF INTERIOR VAULTS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  9. View of portion of the front entry on the front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of portion of the front entry on the front (west) side of the Mueller house, looking northeast. Sheds are in the background. - Ernst Mueller House, 6563 East Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side elevation. Note gasoline sign post added. Flush store window not altered, 1900 clapboard siding and panelling remaining. - 510 Central Avenue (Commercial Building), Ridgely, Caroline County, MD

  11. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  12. Solidification processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frier, Nancy L.; Shiohara, Yuh; Russell, Kenneth C.

    1989-01-01

    Directionally solidified aluminum-indium alloys of the monotectic composition were found to form an in situ rod composite which obeys a lambda exp 2 R = constant relation. The experimental data shows good agreement with previously reported results. A theoretical boundary between cellular and dendritic growth conditions was derived and compared with experiments. The unique wetting characteristics of the monotectic alloys can be utilized to tailor the interface structure in metal matrix composites. Metal matrix composites with monotectic and hypermonotectic Al-In matrices were made by pressure infiltration, remelted and directionally solidified to observe the wetting characteristics of the alloys as well as the effect on structure of solidification in the constrained field of the fiber interstices. Models for monotectic growth are modified to take into account solidification in these constrained fields.

  13. Experimental Verification of Solidification Stress Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, C W; Morrison, M C; SImpson, M F; Bateman, K J

    2012-04-01

    A research program is being conducted to develop a crack-free ceramic waste form (CWF) to be used for long term encasement of fission products and actinides resulting from processing spent nuclear fuel. Cracking usually occurs in the cooldown phase of the glass or ceramic formations. A crack-free formation should have more resistance to leaching than one with many cracks. In the research leading up to producing a CWF, a model was developed that proposes a permanent stress develops when the melt solidifies and that this stress can cause failure as the CWF nears room temperature. This paper reports on how the formation, CWF2, confirms the existence of this stress. The solidification stress is in addition to and of opposite sign of the thermal stress. Its derivation is reported on in Ref. 1. Cracking of the CWF would occur at low temperatures if solidification stress exists but at high temperatures if it doesn’t. If solidification stress occurs, then the cooldown rate during solidification should be reduced. If not, it should be reduced when the thermal stresses are highest. Recording cracking sounds confirm the existence of this solidification stress since cracking occurred during the low temperature phase of the cooldown. As a side purpose of this paper, a cooldown rate is proposed that should eliminate cracking in the next experiment, CWF3. CWF2 is a prototype vertical ceramic waste cylinder formed over a period of 10 days by heating a mixture of 75% zeolite, 25% glass frit in an argon atmosphere furnace through melting to 925 C and then cooling through solidification to room temperature. It is approximately 1 m high, 0.5 m in diameter, weighs about 400 kg, and is formed in a stainless steel can 0.5 cm thick. This cylinder developed many cracks on cooldown. At least 15 loud cracks were recorded over a period of 4 days at the end of cooldown when the temperatures were below 400 C. The CWF2 surface and centerline temperatures at mid height were measured which

  14. Undercooling of materials during solidification in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical research program was undertaken on the under cooling and solidification of materials under variable external field conditions. A catalog of theories and models of nucleation of solid phases in the melt is provided, as is a discussion of the relation of undercooling to intermolecular potentials, the dependence of growth rate on undercooling, the influence of undercooling on liquid-solid interface stability and solid structure, the direct effects of external fields on melts, the relation of solid physical properties to structure and the role of nucleants in solidification. Results of the theoretical analysis of several experiments related to the space processing applications program are given, and recommendations for future experiments and further theoretical developments along with procedures for correlation of theory and experiment are specified.

  15. Beyond Finite Size Scaling in Solidification Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Streitz, F H; Glosli, J N; Patel, M V

    2005-05-19

    Although computer simulation has played a central role in the study of nucleation and growth since the earliest molecular dynamics simulations almost 50 years ago, confusion surrounding the effect of finite size on such simulations have limited their applicability. Modeling solidification in molten tantalum on the BlueGene/L computer, we report here on the first atomistic simulation of solidification that verifies independence from finite size effects during the entire nucleation and growth process, up to the onset of coarsening. We show that finite size scaling theory explains the observed maximal grain sizes for systems up to about 8,000,000 atoms. For larger simulations, a cross-over from finite size scaling to more physical size-independent behavior is observed.

  16. TEMHD Effects on Solidification Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Andrew; Pericleous, Koulis

    2012-01-01

    An unexplored potential exists to control microstructure evolution through the use of external DC magnetic fields. Thermoelectric currents form during solidification and interact with this external field to drive microscopic fluid dynamics within the inter-dendritic region. The convective heat and mass transport can lead to profound changes on the dendritic structure. In this paper the effect of high magnetic fields is demonstrated through the use of both 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional numerical models. The results show that the application of a magnetic field causes significant disruption to the dendritic morphology. Investigation into the underlying mechanism gives initial indicators of how external magnetic fields can either lead to unexpected growth behaviour, or alternatively can be used to control the evolution of microstructure in undercooled melts as encountered in levitated droplet solidification.

  17. Positive ion induced solidification of 4He.

    PubMed

    Moroshkin, P; Lebedev, V; Weis, A

    2009-03-20

    We have observed bulk solidification of 4He induced by nucleation on positive alkali ions in pressurized superfluid helium. The ions are extracted into the liquid from alkali-doped solid He by a static electric field. The experiments prove the existence of charged particles in a solid structure composed of doped He that was recently shown to coexist with superfluid helium below the He solidification pressure. This supports our earlier suggestion that the Coulomb interaction of positive ions surrounded by a solid He shell (snowballs) and electrons trapped in spherical cavities (electron bubbles), together with surface tension, is responsible for the stability of that structure against melting. We have determined the density of charges in the sample by two independent methods. PMID:19392211

  18. IJEMS: Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendle, John R.; Mashl, Steven J.; Hardin, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification (IJEMS) is a cooperative effort between Iowa State University and the University of Iowa to study the formation of metal-matrix composites in a microgravity environment. Of particular interest is the interaction between the solid/liquid interface and the particles in suspension. The experiment is scheduled to fly on STS-69, Space Shuttle Endeavor on August 3, 1995. This project is unique in its heavy student participation and cooperation between the universities involved.

  19. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V.

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

  20. Phosphate bonded solidification of radioactive incinerator wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B. W.; Langton, C. A.; Singh, D.

    1999-12-03

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Complex banded structures in directional solidification processes.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, A L; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J

    2016-01-27

    A combination of theory and numerical simulation is used to investigate impurity superstructures that form in rapid directional solidification (RDS) processes in the presence of a temperature gradient and a pulling velocity with an oscillatory component. Based on a capillary wave model, we show that the RDS processes are associated with a rich morphology of banded structures, including frequency locking and the transition to chaos. PMID:26704726

  2. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  3. ARIEL front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Baartman, R. A.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF will greatly expand the variety and availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) (Laxdal, Nucl Inst Methods Phys Res B 204:400-409, 2003). The ARIEL front end connects the two ARIEL target stations to the existing ISAC facility to expand delivery to two and eventually three simultaneous RIB beams with up to two simultaneous accelerated beams (Laxdal et al. 2008). The low-energy beam transport lines and mass separators are designed for maximum flexibility to allow a variety of operational modes in order to optimize the radioactive ion beam delivery. A new accelerator path is conceived for high mass delivery from an EBIS charge state breeder. The front-end design utilizes the experience gained in 15 years of ISAC beam delivery.

  4. Front Range Report, Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, William

    The second regional conference of the Front Range Branch, AGU, was attended by more than 80 professionals and some 20 outstanding high school students. The conference included 2 days of interdisciplinary talks, and lots of discussion, that primarily were keyed to geophysical studies of Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Other talks reported on nonregional, and sometimes global, studies being done by geophypsicists of the Front Range region.Topics included tectonics of the Front Range and the Colorado Plateau, pollution of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and a supreme polluting event that caused the late-Cretaceous extinctions. Other notable talks were on toxic cleanup, microburst (wind shear) detection at U.S. airports, and other meteorological studies. Several talks treated the audience to the excitement of new work and surprise discoveries. The meeting was multimedia, including the playing of two videos through a projection TV and the playing of a fascinating tape between an airport control tower and incoming pilots during a severe microburst event.

  5. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  6. Theory of pinned fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of a front between two different phases in the presence of a smoothly inhomogeneous external field that takes its critical value at the crossing point is analyzed. Two generic scenarios are studied. In the first, the system admits a bistable solution and the external field governs the rate in which one phase invades the other. The second mechanism corresponds to a continuous transition that, in the case of reactive systems, takes the form of a transcritical bifurcation at the crossing point. We solve for the front shape and for the response of competitive fronts to external noise, showing that static properties and also some of the dynamical features cannot discriminate between the two scenarios. A reliable indicator turns out to be the fluctuation statistics. These take a Gaussian form in the bifurcation case and a double-peaked shape in a bistable system. Our results are discussed in the context of biological processes, such as species and communities dynamics in the presence of a resource gradient.

  7. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-07-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  8. Change of the kinetics of solidification and microstructure formation induced by convection in the Ni-Al system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutzel, S.; Hartmann, H.; Galenko, P. K.; Schneider, S.; Herlach, D. M.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the velocity of dendrite growth in undercooled Ni-Al alloy melts as a function of undercooling. The experiments were performed both by containerless electromagnetic levitation on Earth and under reduced gravity conditions during parabolic flight campaigns. While under terrestrial conditions, strong magnetic fields are required to compensate the gravitational force, the forces to compensate disturbing accelerations are decreased by orders of magnitude in reduced gravity. In turn, the alternating electromagnetic fields induce convection, which is strong under terrestrial conditions while much weaker in reduced gravity. The heat and mass transport in front of the solid-liquid interface during solidification controls the dynamics of dendrite growth. By comparing results obtained on Earth and in reduced gravity, it was demonstrated that the change of transport conditions by convection significantly alters the kinetics of solidification and the evolution of grain refined microstructures at undercoolings less than 100K.

  9. Prediction inverse d'un front de solidification dans un four de transformation a haute temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Marc-Andre

    Ce projet de recherche porte sur une methode numerique permettant de predire l'evolution du profil 2D de la couche solide qui recouvre l'interieur des parois de plusieurs fours de transformation a haute temperature. Un modele mathematique base sur la formulation faible de l'energie est d'abord developpe et valide. Une methode de transfert thermique inverse reposant sur ce modele est ensuite developpee afin d'obtenir une mesure rapide et continue de l'evolution du profil de cette couche solide. Vu la grande inertie thermique du systeme a l'etude, differentes strategies sont proposees afin de faciliter la mise en uvre de cette methode numerique. Finalement, cette approche inverse est confrontee aux resultats experimentaux obtenus a l'aide d'un reacteur metallurgique. Une etude preliminaire montre que les fours de transformation presentent une tres grande inertie thermique qui limite grandement l'utilisation des methodes inverses. En effet, la sensibilite de cette methode numerique repose essentiellement sur le delai temporel observe entre la variation du profil du banc et la fluctuation de la temperature a la surface externe de la paroi du four. Les resultats obtenus demontrent qu'une partie de ce delai est proportionnel a la chaleur latente de fusion lorsque le materiau a changement de phase est constitue d'un melange non eutectique. Afin de limiter l'impact de ce delai temporel, deux astuces numeriques sont proposees : reutiliser plus d'une fois les mesures de temperature et modifier le probleme thermique dans les regions pateuse et liquide. D'une part, le concept de chevauchement propose permet de reduire le temps d'acquisition des donnees entre chacune des predictions. D'autre part, l'approche virtuelle developpee permet de reduire l'inertie thermique du systeme et, par le fait meme, le delai temporel associe a la diffusion de la chaleur. Ces deux strategies ont permis de predire efficacement l'evolution 1D de l'epaisseur de la couche de gelee qui se solidifie a l'interieur des cuves d'electrolyse. Par ailleurs, l'important temps de calcul associe a la mise en oeuvre de la methode inverse a ete reduit en utilisant une approche pseudo 2D pour resoudre le probleme inverse 2D. Cette approche consiste a diviser le domaine a l'etude en plusieurs tranches unidimensionnelles pour lesquelles la methode inverse 1D est rapidement mise en oeuvre. L'ensemble des solutions est ensuite combine pour mener a la prediction de l'evolution du profil de l'interface de changement de phase. Il est a noter que la validite de cette methode depend fortement de l'importance des effets 2D dans le systeme. Un abaque portant sur le domaine d'application de cette methode est d'ailleurs presente dans cet ouvrage. Finalement, l'efficacite de cette methode numerique a ete validee a l'aide d'un montage experimental s'apparentant a une cuve d'electrolyse reelle. Les resultats obtenus permettent de conclure que la methode inverse proposee peut etre efficacement implementee dans un dispositif de mesure permettant de predire rapidement et a moindre cout l'evolution du profil de la couche protectrice que l'on retrouve dans ces cuves d'electrolyse. Mots-cles : Methode inverse, cuve d'electrolyse, temps de diffusion, four de transformation, chevauchement, domaine virtuel

  10. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lechoczhy, Sandor L.; Gillies, Donald C.; Szofran, Frank R.; Watring, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) has been directionally solidified for ten days in the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) on the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2). A second growth experiment is planned for the USMP-4 mission in November 1997. Results from USMP-2 demonstrated significant changes between microgravity and ground-based experiments, particularly in the compositional homogeneity. Changes were also observed during the microgravity mission which were dependent on the attitude of the space shuttle and the relative magnitudes of axial and transverse residual accelerations with respect to the growth axis of the crystal. Issues of shuttle operation, especially those concerned with safety and navigation, and the science needs of other payloads dictated the need for changes in attitude. One consequence for solidification of MCT in the USMP4 mission is the desire for a shorter growth time to complete the experiment without subjecting the sample to shuttle maneuvers. By using a seeded technique and a pre-processed boule of MCT with an established diffusion layer quenched into the solid, equilibrium steady state growth can be established within 24 hours, rather than the three days needed in USMP-2. The growth of MCT in AADSF during the USMP-4 mission has been planned to take less than 72 hours with 48 hours of actual growth time. A review of the USMP-2 results will be presented, and the rationale for the USMP-4 explained. Pre-mission ground based tests for the USN4P-4 mission will be presented, as will any available preliminary flight results from the mission.

  11. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guérin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  12. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Tourret, D; Debierre, J-M; Song, Y; Mota, F L; Bergeon, N; Guérin, R; Trivedi, R; Billia, B; Karma, A

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  13. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  14. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  15. Modeling of detached and unsteady eutectic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri I.

    Detached solidification provides a new possibility to grow crystals with improved quality. However, it has not been reproducible. The first part of this dissertation is dedicated to discussion of the mechanisms and conditions that would help to bring detached solidification from a space laboratory to a terrestrial factory. The possibility of a steady-state gap during detached solidification was proved by solving the mass transport and Navier-Stokes equations. A high contact angle of the melt with the ampoule wall, appreciable gas atmosphere, and a low freezing rate are needed to obtain detachment. Stability analysis showed that mass transfer of volatile species from the melt into the gap and heat transfer stabilize detached configuration. In vertical solidification on earth, a convex freezing interface was shown to provide enhanced transport of volatile species towards the gap, and, therefore, supports detachment. The influence of convection on eutectic microstructure selection has been a question for many years. Both experiment and theory have shown that buoyancy-driven convection alone is not enough to explain the difference in microstructure of earth- and space-grown eutectics. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to a study of the influence of temperature oscillations on microstructure selection. Two different models were chosen. The first, a sharp-interface model, was able to give a solution for the excess compositional undercooling for different leading conditions of both lamellar and rod eutectics. The limitation of this model is that it's not able to set the conditions for catastrophic morphological changes. Application of the principle of minimum entropy production to stationary eutectic growth predicts a decrease in eutectic spacing due to freezing rate oscillations. The second, a phase-field model, was developed for the evolution of the microstructure. This phase-field model correctly describes unsteady eutectic solidification, as well as

  16. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  17. Solidification behavior of superalloy IN 939 in melt spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.; Sahm, P.R. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports on the rapid solidification behavior of a ni-base superalloy (IN 939) that has been investigated by means of melt spinning. An attempt was made to determine the variation of the thermal parameters during the solidification in the melt puddle. The microstructure development, especially the segregationlessly solidified layer at the bottom of the ribbons, was studied. The absolute stability theory was used to calculate the critical condition for stability of the used alloy and then compared with the experimental results. By combination with the solidification data of the same alloy in the conventional regime a complete solidification diagram has been mapped out.

  18. A Numerical Study of Directional Solidification and Melting in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. Y. P.; Timchenko, V.; Leonardi E.; deVahlDavis, G.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1998-01-01

    A computational model is presented for the study of the solidification and melting of a pure substance and of a binary alloy. The enthalpy method has been used, and incorporated into a commercial CFD code. Three examples of the use of the model are described: the three-dimensional solidification of a pure substance (succinonitrile), the results of which are compared with experiment; an example of the solidification of a bismuth-tin alloy; and a simulation of a solidification and melting experiment done in space known as the MEPHISTO program.

  19. Containerless solidification of acoustically levitated Ni-Sn eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2012-10-01

    Containerless solidification of Ni-18.7at%Sn eutectic alloy has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The temperature, motion, and oscillation of the sample were monitored by a high speed camera. The temperature of the sample can be determined from its image brightness, although the sample moves vertically and horizontally during levitation. The experimentally observed frequency of vertical motion is in good agreement with theoretical prediction. The sample undergoes shape oscillation before solidification finishes. The solidification microstructure of this alloy consists of a mixture of anomalous eutectic plus regular lamellar eutectic. This indicates the achievement of rapid solidification under acoustic levitation condition.

  20. Minimizing Segregation During the Controlled Directional Solidification of Dendritic Alloys Publication: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Kim, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Gravity-driven thermosolutal convection that arises during controlled directional solidification (DS) of dendritic alloys promotes detrimental macro-segregation (e.g. freckles and steepling) in products such as turbine blades. Considerable time and effort has been spent to experimentally and theoretically investigate this phenomena; although our knowledge has advanced to the point where convection can be modeled and accurately compared to experimental results, little has been done to minimize its onset and deleterious effects. The experimental work demonstrates that segregation can be. minimized and microstructural uniformity promoted when a slow axial rotation is applied to the sample crucible during controlled directional solidification processing. Numerical modeling utilizing continuation and bifurcation methods have been employed to develop accurate physical and mathematical models with the intent of identifying and optimizing processing parameters.

  1. Real Time Observation of Dendritic Solidification in Real Alloys by Synchrotron Microradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Brody, H.D.; Kazimirov, A.; Black, D.R.; Burdette, H.E.; Rau, C.

    2007-10-12

    A third generation synchrotron x-ray source and advanced imaging facilities were used to study dendritic solidification in metallic alloys in real time. A digital camera and a video camera with different time and spatial resolution were tested to capture growing dendrites during solidification of Sn-13 wt%Bi and Al-25 wt%Cu alloys. The captured digital images show that the morphology of the dendrites can be resolved with satisfactory resolution and contrast. The trade-off between spatial resolution and time resolution was discussed. The effect of beam characteristics such as intensity, parallelism and coherency on both spatial and time resolution was analysed, and potential improvements with higher image quality with reduced exposure time were also discussed.

  2. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  3. Experience of Non-Technological Waste Solidification with Polymers at Radium Institute - 13530

    SciTech Connect

    Babain, V.; Pokhitonov, Yu.; Alyapyshev, M.

    2013-07-01

    In the run of scientific and production activities in Radium Institute there are generated the liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) of the most various compositions, which are partially processed (with the use of cementation technology) as accumulated and removed to the special-purpose enterprise ('Radon') for a long-term storage. The process of cementation has wide practical application including the use for a long time at Radium Institute for solidification of aqueous solutions. One of the problems appearing at laboratory waste processing consists in a presence of organic substances in aqueous solutions and high acid concentration. Solidification of such waste (water-organic) also runs into a number of serious difficulties due to organic liquid and cement incompatibility. In this connection, development of advanced technologies with using high-tech polymers seems to be quite justified. (authors)

  4. Seismic Precursors to Space Shuttle Shock Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrells, G.; Bonner, J.; Herrin, E. T.

    - Seismic precursors to space shuttle re-entry shock fronts are detected at TXAR in Southwest Texas when the ground track of the orbiter vehicle passes within 150-200km of the observatory. These precursors have been termed ``shuttle-quakes'' because their seismograms superficially mimic the seismograms of small earthquakes from shallow sources. Analysis of the ``shuttle-quake'' seismograms, however, reveals one important difference. Unlike ordinary earthquakes, the propagation azimuths and horizontal phase velocities of the individual phases of the ``shuttle-quakes'' are functionally related. From a theoretical model developed to account for the origin of these precursors it is found that the seismic phases of ``shuttle-quakes'' are ``bow'' waves. A ``bow'' wave originates at the advancing tip of the shock front trace (i.e., intersection of the re-entry shock front with the surface of the earth) when the ground speed of the orbiter vehicle exceeds the horizontal phase velocity of a particular seismic phase. ``Bow'' waves are shown to differ in two important respects from the ordinary seismic phases. They vanish ahead of the advancing tip of the shock front trace and their propagation azimuths and horizontal phase velocities are functionally related. The ground speed of the orbiter vehicle exceeds the horizontal phase velocities of crustal seismic phase over much of the re-entry flight profile. As a result, P,S, and Rg``bow'' waves will be seen as precursors to the re-entry shock front at stations located within a few hundred km of its ground track.

  5. Mapping real time growth of experimental laccoliths: The effect of solidification on the mechanics of magmatic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currier, Ryan M.; Marsh, Bruce D.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of solidification front growth along the margins of magmas have been widely found to be fundamental in controlling magma transport and emplacement. In this vein, the role of solidification fronts in determining the basic growth mechanics of laccoliths are investigated here in a series of scaled experiments using two contrasting magma analogs, water and molten wax that are injected into a visco-elastic gelatin based crustal analog. In non-solidifying, water-style experiments, intrusion is a relatively simple process. In contrast, wax magma emplacement displays a vast palette of compelling behaviors: propagation can slow, stop, and reactivate, and the directionality of lateral growth becomes much more variable. Small flow deviations in water-based intrusions are likely the product of flow instabilities, the result of injecting a viscous fluid along an interface (similar to Hele-Shaw cell experiments). However, the much more complex emplacement style of the wax experiments is attributed to solidification at the leading edge of the crack. The overall effects of solidification during emplacement can be described by a non-dimensional parameter measuring the relative competition between the rates of crack propagation and solidification at the crack leading edge. In this context, laccolith growth mechanics can be separated into three distinctive characteristic stages. Namely, I: A thin pancake style sill initially emanating radially from a central feeder zone, II: As solidification stalls magma propagation at the leading edges, enhanced thickening begins, forming a true, low aspect ratio laccolith, and III: As stresses accumulate, tears and disruptions readily occur in the solidified margin causing fresh breakouts, thus reactivating lateral growth into new lobes. The competitive combination of these latter stages often leads to a characteristic pulsatile growth. The unexpected richness of these results promises to add fundamentally to the basic understanding

  6. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  7. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming.

    PubMed

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  8. From the front

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The causes of recent dynamic thinning of Greenland's outlet glaciers have been debated. Realistic simulations suggest that changes at the marine fronts of these glaciers are to blame, implying that dynamic thinning will cease once the glaciers retreat to higher ground. For the last decade, many outlet glaciers in Greenland that terminate in the ocean have accelerated, thinned, and retreated. To explain these dynamic changes, two hypotheses have been discussed. Atmospheric warming has increased surface melting and may also have increased the amount of meltwater reaching the glacier bed, increasing lubrication at the base and hence the rate of glacier sliding. Alternatively, a change in the delicate balance of forces where the glacier fronts meet the ocean could trigger the changes. Faezeh Nick and colleagues5 present ice-sheet modeling experiments that mimic the observations on Helheim glacier, East Greenland, and suggest that the dynamic behaviour of outlet glaciers follows from perturbations at their marine fronts. Greenland's ice sheet loses mass partly through surface melting and partly through fast flowing outlet glaciers that connect the vast plateau of inland ice with the ocean. Earlier ice sheet models have failed to reproduce the dynamic variability exhibited by ice sheets over time. It has therefore not been possible to distinguish with confidence between basal lubrication from surface meltwater and changes at the glaciers' marine fronts as causes for the observed changes on Greenland's outlet glaciers. But this distinction bears directly on future sea-level rise, the raison d'etre of much of modern-day glaciology: If the recent dynamic mass loss Greenland's outlet glaciers is linked to changing atmospheric temperatures, it may continue for as long as temperatures continue to increase. On the other hand, if the source of the dynamic mass loss is a perturbation at the ice-ocean boundary, these glaciers will lose contact with that perturbation after a finite

  9. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  10. Solidification phenomena of binary organic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.

    1982-01-01

    The coalescence rates and motion of liquid bubbles in binary organic mixtures were studied. Several factors such as temperature gradient, composition gradient, interfacial tension, and densities of the two phases play important roles in separation of phases of immiscible liquids. An attempt was made to study the effect of initial compositions on separation rates of well-dispersed organic mixtures at different temperatures and, ultimately, on the homogeneity of solidification of the immiscible binary organic liquids. These organic mixtures serve as models for metallic pseudo binary systems under study. Two specific systems were investigated: ethyl salicylate - diethyl glycol and succinonitrile - water.

  11. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study. PMID:25975033

  12. Simulation of solidification in a Bridgman cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakhoul, Y. M.; Farmer, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Bridgman-type crystal growth techniques are attractive methods for producing homogeneous, high-quality infrared detector and junction device materials. However, crystal imperfections and interface shapes still must be controlled through modification of the temperature and concentration gradients created during solidification. The objective of this investigation was to study the temperature fields generated by various cell and heatpipe configurations and operating conditions. Continuum's numerical model of the temperature, species concentrations, and velocity fields was used to describe the thermal characteristics of Bridgman cell operation.

  13. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  14. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  15. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  16. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  17. Solidification processing of metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, A.; Cornie, J.A.; Flemings, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    Infiltration of fibers with molten metal and metal/reinforcement slurry casting have been developed for the net-shape solidification processing of MMCs, the largest portion of whose production costs are associated with processing. The low viscosity of liquid metals renders the fabrication of MMCs by casting much easier than that of polymer matrix composites. Attention is given to the methods developed to date to deal with problems that arise from fiber/matrix reactivity and porosity due to poor infiltration. 219 references.

  18. Undercooling, Rapid Solidification, and Relations to Processing in Low Earth Orbit (A Review of the Works of Bingbo Wei)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    1999-01-01

    This is a survey of the published works of Prof. Bingbo Wei of the Department of Applied Physics at Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian P.R. China. Transformations among solid - liquid - and vapor are fundamental to the foundations of life and culture on Earth. The development and understanding of materials has lead the evolution and advancement of the human race since antiquity. Materials and fluids research is continuing today, with us standing on the shoulders of those that have gone before us. Technological and scientific breakthroughs continue due to studies of greater and greater complexity, that include for example, research done at high pressures, in high magnetic fields, at temperatures near absolute zero, and in the low gravity environment of low Earth orbit. Of particular technological importance is the liquid to solid transformation of metals and alloys. Solidification processing is generally the most important factor in the final properties of objects made of metal; and undercooling is the fundamental driving force for all solidification. The interest and resources dedicated to the study of solidification and undercooling are great and World wide. For many years B. Wei and his coworkers have been studying undercooling and rapid solidification and have amassed a significant body of published research in this important field, contributing to the leading edge of the state-of-the-art. It is the goal of this memorandum to provide a review of the research of B. Wei et al.; publications in Chinese are included in the reference list but are not discussed. The bulk of Wei's work has been in the area of undercooling and rapid solidification [1-11, 13-16, 24-36] with papers dating back to 1989, the same year he earned his Ph.D. Below, discussions of Wei's undercooling and rapid solidification research have been grouped together mostly on the basis of alloy type, such as eutectic, intermetallic, or monotectic.

  19. Dendritic solidification of undercooled Cu-20%Pb hypomonotectic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, C.; Wei, B.

    1996-05-15

    The Cu-Pb monotectic system is the basis of an important category of wear-resistant materials especially bearing alloys. Its industrially interesting composition ranges from 10 to 50%Pb. In order to produce aligned composites or homogeneous dispersions, extensive research has been performed to investigate the solidification mechanism of Cu-Pb monotectic alloys under directional solidification or microgravity conditions. The preliminary nature of the current space experiments on Cu-Pb monotectic solidification excludes the possibility to draw any really definite conclusions about the influences of microgravity. In contrast, so far still little has been known about the undercooling behavior and rapid solidification kinetics of Cu-Pb monotectic alloys. The objective of the present work is to undercool bulk samples of Cu-Pb alloys to a significant extent and investigate their subsequent rapid solidification process. and this paper reports the related results obtained for Cu-20%Pb hypomonotectic alloy.

  20. Improved Crystal Quality by Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of our work on detached solidification have been to: 1) Develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification; 2) Make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; and 3) Increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. Specifically, we aimed in this project to: 1) Identify a system and develop methods that would allow viewing of the melt surface and convection in the melt during detached solidification in microgravity; 2) Improve understanding of the origination and evolution of detachment through experiments and theoretical treatments; and 3) Achieve detachment on earth. The project resulted in 14 publications, 15 presentations, completion of 2 Ph.D. theses, and completion of 2 M.S. theses. Two additional papers are currently being reviewed for publication. Copies of most of the papers are included as appendices.

  1. Solute trapping and diffusionless solidification in a binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galenko, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Numerous experimental data on the rapid solidification of binary systems exhibit the formation of metastable solid phases with initial (nominal) chemical composition. This fact is explained by complete solute trapping leading to diffusionless (chemically partitionless) solidification at a finite growth velocity of crystals. Special attention is paid to developing a model of rapid solidification which describes a transition from chemically partitioned to diffusionless growth of crystals. Analytical treatments lead to the condition for complete solute trapping which directly follows from the analysis of the solute diffusion around the solid-liquid interface and atomic attachment and detachment at the interface. The resulting equations for the flux balance at the interface take into account two kinetic parameters: diffusion speed VDI on the interface and diffusion speed VD in bulk phases. The model describes experimental data on nonequilibrium solute partitioning in solidification of Si-As alloys for the whole range of solidification velocity investigated.

  2. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  3. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  4. Method for treating materials for solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.

    1995-07-18

    A method is described for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils. 4 figs.

  5. Method for treating materials for solidification

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils.

  6. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; et al

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  7. Bubble behavior during solidification in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Wilcox, W. R.; Gutowski, R.

    1979-01-01

    The trapping and behavior of gas bubbles were studied during low-gravity solidification of carbon tetrabromide, a transparent metal-model material. The experiment was performed during a NASA-sponsored sounding rocket flight and involved gradient freeze solidification of a gas-saturated melt. Gas bubbles were evolved at the solid-liquid interface during the low-gravity interval. No large-scale thermal migration of bubbles, bubble pushing by the solid-liquid interface, or bubble detachment from the interface were observed during the low-gravity experiment. A unique bubble motion-fluid flow event occurred in one specimen: a large bubble moved downward and caused some circulation of the melt. The gas bubbles that were trapped by the solid in commercial-purity material formed voids that had a cylindrical shape, in contrast to the spherical shape that had been observed in a prior low-gravity experiment. These shapes were not influenced by the gravity level (0.0001 g-0 vs g-0), but were dependent upon the initial temperature gradient. In higher purity material, however, the shape of the voids changed from cylindrical in 1g to spherical in low gravity.

  8. An enthalpy method for modeling eutectic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anirban; Kiran, Apoorva; Karagadde, Shyamprasad; Dutta, Pradip

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new micro-scale model for solidification of eutectic alloys. The model is based on the enthalpy method and simulates the growth of adjacent α and β phases from a melt of eutectic composition in a two-dimensional Eulerian framework. The evolution of the two phases is obtained from the solution of volume averaged energy and species transport equations which are formulated using the nodal enthalpy and concentration potential values. The three phases are tracked using the β-phase fraction and the liquid fraction values in all the computational nodes. Solutal convection flow field in the domain is obtained from the solution of volume-averaged momentum and continuity equations. The governing equations are solved using a coupled explicit-implicit scheme. The model is qualitatively validated with Jackson-Hunt theory. Results show expected eutectic growth pattern and proper species transfer and diffusion field ahead of the interface. Capabilities of the model such as lamella width selection, division of lamella into thinner lamellae and the presence of solutal convection are successfully demonstrated. The present model can potentially be incorporated into the existing framework of enthalpy based micro-scale dendritic solidification models thus leading to an efficient generalized microstructure evolution model.

  9. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  10. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Junior Officers' Quarters Type, 9-10 Hale Alii Avenue, 1-2 Eighth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Characterization of Transport and Solidification in the Metal Recycling Processes

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C. Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1997-08-06

    The characterization of the transport and solidification of metal in the melting and casting processes is significant for the optimization of the radioactively contaminated metal recycling and refining processes. . In this research project, the transport process in the melting and solidification of metal was numerically predicted, and the microstructure and radionuclide distribution have been characterized by scanning electron microscope/electron diffractive X-ray (SEWEDX) analysis using cesium chloride (CSC1) as the radionuclide surrogate. In the melting and solidification process, a resistance furnace whose heating and cooling rates are program- controlled in the helium atmosphere was used. The characterization procedures included weighing, melting and solidification, weighing after solidification, sample preparation, and SEM/EDX analysis. This analytical methodology can be used to characterize metal recycling and refining products in order to evaluate the performance of the recycling process. The data obtained provide much valuable information that is necessary for the enhancement of radioactive contaminated metal decontamination and recycling technologies. The numerical method for the prediction of the melting and solidification process can be implemented in the control and monitoring system-of the melting and casting process in radioactive contaminated metal recycling. The use of radionuclide surrogates instead of real radionuclides enables the research to be performed without causing harmfid effects on people or the community. This characterization process has been conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University since October 1995. Tests have been conducted on aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) using cesium chloride (CSCI) as a radionuclide surrogate, and information regarding the radionuclide transfer and distribution in melting and solidification process has been obtained. The numerical simulation of

  13. Non-monotonic changes in critical solidification rates for stability of liquid-solid interfaces with static magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ren, W. L.; Fan, Y. F.; Feng, J. W.; Zhong, Y. B.; Yu, J. B.; Ren, Z. M.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic field dependence of the critical solidification rate for the stability of liquid-solid interfaces. For a certain temperature gradient, the critical solidification rate first increases, then decreases, and subsequently increases with increasing magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field on the critical solidification rate is more pronounced at low than at high temperature gradients. The numerical simulations show that the magnetic-field dependent changes of convection velocity and contour at the interface agree with the experimental results. The convection velocity first increases, then decreases, and finally increases again with increasing the magnetic field intensity. The variation of the convection contour at the interface first decreases, then increases slightly, and finally increases remarkably with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) plays the role of micro-stirring the melt and is responsible for the increase of interface stability within the initially increasing range of magnetic field intensity. The weak and significant extents of the magneto-hydrodynamic damping (MHD)-dependent solute build-up at the interface front result, respectively, in the gradual decrease and increase of interfacial stability with increasing the magnetic field intensity. The variation of the liquid-side concentration at the liquid-solid interface with the magnetic field supports the proposed mechanism. PMID:26846708

  14. In situ X-ray observations of gas porosity interactions with dendritic microstructures during solidification of Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Browne, D. J.; Houltz, Y.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-radiography solidification experiments were performed on Al-based alloys, using both synchrotron and laboratory-based X-ray sources, in conjunction with a gradient furnace and a newly developed isothermal furnace, respectively. The effect of gas porosity nucleation and growth within the semi-solid mush during both columnar and equiaxed solidification was thereby observed. In all experimental cases examined, gas porosity was observed to nucleate and grow within the field-of-view (FOV) causing various levels of distortion to the semi-solid mush, and thereafter disappearing from the sample leaving no permanent voids within the solidified microstructure. During columnar growth, a single bubble caused severe remelting and destruction of primary trunks leading to secondary fragmentation and evidence of blocking of the columnar front. Equiaxed solidification was performed under microgravity-like conditions with restricted grain motion in the FOV. The degree to which the nucleated gas bubbles affected the surrounding grain structure increased with increasing solid fraction. However, bubble sphericity remained unaffected by apparent solid fraction or grain coherency.

  15. Non-monotonic changes in critical solidification rates for stability of liquid-solid interfaces with static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ren, W L; Fan, Y F; Feng, J W; Zhong, Y B; Yu, J B; Ren, Z M; Liaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic field dependence of the critical solidification rate for the stability of liquid-solid interfaces. For a certain temperature gradient, the critical solidification rate first increases, then decreases, and subsequently increases with increasing magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field on the critical solidification rate is more pronounced at low than at high temperature gradients. The numerical simulations show that the magnetic-field dependent changes of convection velocity and contour at the interface agree with the experimental results. The convection velocity first increases, then decreases, and finally increases again with increasing the magnetic field intensity. The variation of the convection contour at the interface first decreases, then increases slightly, and finally increases remarkably with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) plays the role of micro-stirring the melt and is responsible for the increase of interface stability within the initially increasing range of magnetic field intensity. The weak and significant extents of the magneto-hydrodynamic damping (MHD)-dependent solute build-up at the interface front result, respectively, in the gradual decrease and increase of interfacial stability with increasing the magnetic field intensity. The variation of the liquid-side concentration at the liquid-solid interface with the magnetic field supports the proposed mechanism. PMID:26846708

  16. Progress on Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles During Ultrasonic Processing and Solidification of Al-Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2016-08-01

    In present study, 6061- and A356-based nano-composites are fabricated by using the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST) in a coreless induction furnace. SiC nanoparticles are used as the reinforcement. Nanoparticles are added into the molten metal and then dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming assisted by electromagnetic stirring. The applied UST parameters in the current experiments are used to validate a recently developed magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) model, which is capable of modeling the cavitation and nanoparticle dispersion during UST processing. The MHD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification, and electromagnetic field, as well as the complex interaction between the nanoparticles and both the molten and solidified alloys by using ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Fluent. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to analyze the complex interactions between the nanoparticle and the liquid/solid interface. The current modeling results demonstrate that a strong flow can disperse the nanoparticles relatively well during molten metal and solidification processes. MD simulation results prove that ultrafine particles (10 nm) will be engulfed by the solidification front instead of being pushed, which is beneficial for nano-dispersion.

  17. Interaction mechanism of in-situ nano-TiN-AlN particles and solid/liquid interface during solidification.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chunxiang; Li, Yanchun; Shen, Yutian; Sun, Jibing; Wang, Ru

    2003-10-01

    This paper deals with the interaction mechanism between in situ nanometer-grade TiN-AlN particles and the solid/liquid (S/L) interface during the solidification of an in situ TiN-AlN/Al composite. According to the setting of a force balance for the particles in front of the S/L interface during solidification, F = F(buoyant) + F(repulsive) + F(viscous). We obtained the relationship between the critical cooling velocity of the liquid composite, Vr, and the size of the ceramic particle, rp. By this relationship formula, we can know that the S/L interface engulfs particles or pushes them to the crystal grain boundary during the solidification of a TiN-AlN/Al composite. It is found that Vr is proportional to the radius of ceramic particles by transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. The TEM test indicates that the smaller the particle is, the more easily the S/L interface engulfs particles. PMID:14733152

  18. Non-monotonic changes in critical solidification rates for stability of liquid-solid interfaces with static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, W. L.; Fan, Y. F.; Feng, J. W.; Zhong, Y. B.; Yu, J. B.; Ren, Z. M.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    We report the magnetic field dependence of the critical solidification rate for the stability of liquid-solid interfaces. For a certain temperature gradient, the critical solidification rate first increases, then decreases, and subsequently increases with increasing magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field on the critical solidification rate is more pronounced at low than at high temperature gradients. The numerical simulations show that the magnetic-field dependent changes of convection velocity and contour at the interface agree with the experimental results. The convection velocity first increases, then decreases, and finally increases again with increasing the magnetic field intensity. The variation of the convection contour at the interface first decreases, then increases slightly, and finally increases remarkably with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) plays the role of micro-stirring the melt and is responsible for the increase of interface stability within the initially increasing range of magnetic field intensity. The weak and significant extents of the magneto-hydrodynamic damping (MHD)-dependent solute build-up at the interface front result, respectively, in the gradual decrease and increase of interfacial stability with increasing the magnetic field intensity. The variation of the liquid-side concentration at the liquid-solid interface with the magnetic field supports the proposed mechanism.

  19. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts. [effects of evaporation and solidification on crystalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs are developed and used in the study of the combined effects of evaporation and solidification in space processing. The temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation were mathematically formulated. Computer results are included along with an econotechnical model of crystal growth. This model allows: prediction of crystal size, quality, and cost; systematic selection of the best growth equipment or alloy system; optimization of growth or material parameters; and a maximization of zero-gravity effects. Segregation in GaAs crystals was examined along with vibration effects on GaAs crystal growth. It was found that a unique segregation pattern and strong convention currents exist in GaAs crystal growth. Some beneficial effects from vibration during GaAs growth were discovered. The implications of the results in space processing are indicated.

  20. Improved Crystal Quality By Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Wang, Yaz-Hen; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long term goals have been: (1) To develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification.; (2) To make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; (3) To increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. We have three major achievements to report here: (1) We obtained a new material balance solution for the Moving Meniscus Model of detached solidification. This solution greatly clarifies the physics as well as the roles of the parameters in the system; (2) We achieved detached solidification of InSb growing on earth in BN-coated ampoules; (3) We performed an extensive series of experiments on freezing water that showed how to form multiple gas bubbles or tubes on the ampoule wall. However, these did not propagate around the wall and lead to fully detached solidification unless the ampoule wall was extremely rough and non-wetted.

  1. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created a demand for new fabrication methods with an emphasis on simple, low-cost techniques. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) is an unconventional approach in comparison to low-temperature biomimetic approaches. A technical challenge for DSE is producing microstructural architectures on the nanometer scale. In both processes, the driving force is the minimization of Gibb's free energy. Selfassembly by biomimetic approaches depends on weak interaction forces between organic molecules to define the architectural structure. The architectural structure for solidification depends on strong chemical bonding between atoms. Constituents partition into atomic-level arrangements at the liquid-solid interface to form polyphase structures, and this atomic-level arrangement at the liquid-solid interface is controlled by atomic diffusion and total undercooling due to composition (diffusion), kinetics, and curvature of the boundary phases. Judicious selection of the materials system and control of the total undercooling are the keys to producing structures on the nanometer scale. The silicon-titanium silicide (Si-TiSi2) eutectic forms a rod structure under isothermal cooling conditions. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, directional solidification was employed along with a thermal gradient to promote uniform rods oriented with the thermal gradient. The preceding photomicrograph shows the typical transverse microstructure of a solidified Si-TiSi2 eutectic composition. The dark and light gray regions are Si and TiSi2, respectively. Preferred rod orientation along the thermal gradient was poor. The ordered TiSi2 rods have a narrow distribution in diameter of 2 to 3 m, as shown. The rod diameter showed a weak dependence on process conditions. Anisotropic etch behavior between different phases provides the opportunity to fabricate structures with high aspect ratios. The photomicrographs show the resulting microstructure after a wet chemical etch and a

  2. Surface properties of ocean fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, P. M.; Hubert, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Background information on oceanic fronts is presented and the results of several models which were developed to study the dynamics of oceanic fronts and their effects on various surface properties are described. The details of the four numerical models used in these studies are given in separate appendices which contain all of the physical equations, program documentation and running instructions for the models.

  3. MMS Observations of Dipolarization Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K. J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Sibeck, D. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Nakamura, R.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.; Ergun, R. E.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present MMS observations of dipolarization fronts. Dipolarization fronts commonly observed in Earth's plasma sheet are characterized by intense gradients in the current sheet-normal component of the magnetic field and plasma/magnetic pressure across the front. These fronts are often embedded within fast earthward flows, i.e., bursty bulk flows. Analysis using data from all four spacecraft shows the presence of both typical and atypical dipolarization fronts. Typically dipolarization fronts propagate earthward and their normals point radially inward, however, we have identified dipolarization fronts propagating tailward with normals pointing significantly away from the radial direction. Atypical dipolarization fronts observed on 7 May 2015 and 21 July 2015 are preceded or accompanied by a rapid decrease in the Bx or By components of the magnetic field. These decreases indicate that the magnetotail is first thinning and then thickening. The resulting magnetic pile-up can cause the local Bz to increase rapidly, indicating propagation tailward, as observed. These new high time resolution field and plasma observations from MMS provide exciting new insights about the dynamical changes of magnetotail topology.

  4. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  5. Investigation of microgravity effects on solidification phenomena of selected materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Hansen, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    A Get Away Special (GAS) experiment payload to investigate microgravity effects on solidification phenomena of selected experimental samples has been designed for flight. It is intended that the first flight of the assembly will (1) study the p-n junction characteristics for advancing semiconductor device applications, (2) study the effects of gravity-driven convection on the growth of HgCd crystals, (3) compare the textures of the sample which crystallizes in microgravity with those found in chondrite meteorites, and (4) modify glass optical characteristics through divalent oxygen exchange. The space flight experiment consists of many small furnaces. While the experiment payload is in the low gravity environment of orbital flight, the payload controller will sequentially activate the furnaces to heat samples to their melt state and then allow cooling to resolidification in a controlled fashion. The materials processed in the microgravity environment of space will be compared to the same materials processed on earth in a one-gravity environment. This paper discusses the design of all subassemblies (furnance, electronics, and power systems) in the experiment. A complete description of the experimental materials is also presented.

  6. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al2Au eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 μm. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity.

  7. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al{sub 2}Au eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-15

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 {mu}m. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity.

  8. Numerical modelling on stress and dislocation generation in multi-crystalline silicon during directional solidification for PV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Karuppasamy, P.; Ramasamy, P.; Barua, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical modelling has emerged as a powerful tool for the development and optimization of directional solidification process for mass production of multicrystalline silicon. A transient global heat transfer model is performed to investigate the effect of bottom grooved furnace upon the directional solidification (DS) process of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si). The temperature distribution, von Mises stress, residual stress and dislocation density rate in multi-crystalline silicon ingots grown by modified directional solidification method have been investigated for five growth stages using finite volume method at the critical Prandtl number, Pr = 0.01. This paper discusses bottom groove furnace instead of seed crystal DS method. It achieves an advanced understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviour in grown multi-crystalline ingot by bottom grooved directional solidification method. The von Mises stress and dislocation density were reduced while using the bottom grooved furnace. This work was carried out in the different grooves of radius 30 mm, 60 mm and 90 mm of the heat exchanger block of the DS furnace. In this paper, the results are presented for 60 mm radius groove only because it has got better results compared to the other grooves. Also, the computational results of bottom grooved DS method show better performance compared the conventional DS method for stress and dislocation density in grown ingot. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. The Hatteras Front: August 2004 velocity and density structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savidge, Dana K.; Austin, Jay A.

    2007-07-01

    The Hatteras Front is a persistent mesoscale cross-shelf oriented front off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is the boundary between relatively cool, fresh Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters and warmer, saltier shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight, which both converge along-shelf upon Cape Hatteras year round. The Frontal Interaction Near Cape Hatteras (FINCH) project was conducted in 2004-2005 to intensively sample the Hatteras Front with shipboard ADCP and undulating towed CTD. This paper documents velocity and density structures associated with the cross-shelf oriented zone of Hatteras Front during the August 2004 field season. Property gradients across the Hatteras Front are large, with temperature (T) and salinity (S) differences of ˜4-6°C, 2-5 psu, respectively over distances of 1-2 km. The T and S are not completely compensating, and a strong density (ρ) gradient also exists, with Δρ of ˜2 kg/m3 across a gentler 10 km wide front. The density gradient results in a steric sea-level height gradient of ˜1-2 cm across the Front, which is in approximate geostrophic balance with a surface intensified jet, directed shoreward along the cross-shelf oriented Front. The velocity is sheared with depth at 3.0 × 10-2 to 5.0 × 10-2 s-1 in the upper 5 m of the jet; a rate consistent with the density gradient according to the thermal wind relationship. Shoreward transport of ˜4.8 × 104 m3/s results from the surface intensified jet. The structure of the velocity field associated with the Hatteras Front resembles that of a slope-controlled buoyant plume, as described by Lentz and Helfrich (2002). Velocity and density structures are similar during both advancing (southwestward) and retreating (northeastward) motion of the Front.

  10. Improved Crystal Quality by Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past four years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification, both in microgravity and on earth. A discussion of models of detachment, the meniscus models and results of theoretical modeling, and future plans are presented.

  11. Solidification Conditions and Microstructure in Continuously Cast Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, K.; Gold, E.

    1982-04-01

    The well-known relationship between cell size or dendrite spacing and local solidification time gives the possibility of calculating the thermal parameters of solidification from the microstructure of the as-cast product. As a basis for such calculations, the dendrite spacing of different aluminum castings (DC cast ingots of different diameters, cast in conventional and electromagnetic molds; cast strip from roll casters, belt casters, and block casters; and Properzi cast rod) has been measured through their cross sections. Based on these measurements, a qualitative discussion of the thermal conditions during the solidification of these products is given, and the influence of a variation in the casting conditions discussed.

  12. Fronts in Large Marine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Cornillon, Peter C.; Sherman, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    Oceanic fronts shape marine ecosystems; therefore front mapping and characterization are among the most important aspects of physical oceanography. Here we report on the first global remote sensing survey of fronts in the Large Marine Ecosystems (LME). This survey is based on a unique frontal data archive assembled at the University of Rhode Island. Thermal fronts were automatically derived with the edge detection algorithm of Cayula and Cornillon (1992, 1995, 1996) from 12 years of twice-daily, global, 9-km resolution satellite sea surface temperature (SST) fields to produce synoptic (nearly instantaneous) frontal maps, and to compute the long-term mean frequency of occurrence of SST fronts and their gradients. These synoptic and long-term maps were used to identify major quasi-stationary fronts and to derive provisional frontal distribution maps for all LMEs. Since SST fronts are typically collocated with fronts in other water properties such as salinity, density and chlorophyll, digital frontal paths from SST frontal maps can be used in studies of physical-biological correlations at fronts. Frontal patterns in several exemplary LMEs are described and compared, including those for: the East and West Bering Sea LMEs, Sea of Okhotsk LME, East China Sea LME, Yellow Sea LME, North Sea LME, East and West Greenland Shelf LMEs, Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf LME, Northeast and Southeast US Continental Shelf LMEs, Gulf of Mexico LME, and Patagonian Shelf LME. Seasonal evolution of frontal patterns in major upwelling zones reveals an order-of-magnitude growth of frontal scales from summer to winter. A classification of LMEs with regard to the origin and physics of their respective dominant fronts is presented. The proposed classification lends itself to comparative studies of frontal ecosystems.

  13. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  14. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing.

  15. Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

  16. SURVEY OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stabilization/solidification or fixation is a process for treating industrial solid wastes (primarily sludges) that contain hazardous constituents to prevent dissolution and loss of toxic materials into the environment. Most of these treatment processes are designed to produce a ...

  17. A benchmark for the validation of solidification modelling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; Heugenhauser, S.; Schumacher, P.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents two three-dimensional solidification models, which were solved by several commercial solvers (MAGMASOFT, FLOW-3D, ProCAST, WinCast, ANSYS, and OpenFOAM). Surprisingly, the results show noticeable differences. The results are analyzed similar to a round-robin test procedure to obtain reference values for temperatures and their uncertainties at selected positions in the model. The first model is similar to an adiabatic calorimeter with an aluminum alloy solidifying in a copper block. For this model, an analytical solution for the overall temperature at steady state can be calculated. The second model implements additional heat transfer boundary conditions at outer faces. The geometry of the models, the initial and boundary conditions as well as the material properties are kept as simple as possible but, nevertheless, close to a realistic solidification situation. The gained temperature results can be used to validate self-written solidification solvers and check the accuracy of commercial solidification programs.

  18. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  19. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  20. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation outlines the Superfund program approach to site cleanup, then provides information from actual insitu and exsitu solidification/stabilization remediations to illustrate technology, equipment, field implementation, performance evaluation, cleanup specifications, ...

  1. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANICS AND INORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refe...

  2. Fundamentals of Alloy Solidification Applied to Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solidification processes and phenomena, segregation, porosity, gravity effects, fluid flow, undercooling, as well as processing of materials in the microgravity environment of space, now available on space shuttle flights were discussed.

  3. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC. - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report evaluates the Chemfix Technologies, Inc. (Chemfix), solidification/stabilization technology for on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The Chemfix ...

  4. On the front lines.

    PubMed

    Lipley, Nick

    2016-06-10

    Why did you become an emergency nurse? After qualifying as a registered adult nurse in 2003, I started my nursing career as a theatre nurse, which I enjoyed for six years. Here I developed my anaesthetic and recovery nursing skills which gave me great grounding for my career in ED. I had the opportunity to complete an advanced standing children's nursing programme from which I qualified in 2010 as a dual trained adult/paediatric nurse. I then consolidated my knowledge on an acute paediatric ward, before moving to emergency care where I could use my dual training best. PMID:27286031

  5. Flame front as hydrodynamic discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2012-11-01

    We applied generalized Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to study the dynamics of unsteady and curved fronts as a hydrodynamic discontinuity. It is shown that the front is unstable and Landau-Darrieus instability develops only if three conditions are satisfied (1) large-scale vorticity is generated in the fluid bulk; (2) energy flux across the front is imbalanced; (3) the energy imbalance is large. The structure of the solution is studied in details. Flows with and without gravity and thermal diffusion are analyzed. Stabilization mechanisms are identified. NSF 1004330.

  6. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement. PMID:26172647

  7. Eutectic-Free Superalloy Made By Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Dianne

    1995-01-01

    By suitable control of thermal conditions in directional-solidification process, supperalloy structural and machine components (e.g., turbine blades) cast with microstructures enhancing resistance to fatigue. Specific version of process and thermal conditions chosen to reduce micro-segregation during solidification and to minimize or eliminate script carbide and eutectic-phase inclusions, which are brittle inclusions found to decrease resistance to fatigue.

  8. Numerical modelling of the solidification of ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Elliott, R.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented describing the solidification of a ductile iron based on the Stefanescu macroscopic heat transfer-microscopic solidification kinetic model but using a different kinetic model than that used by Stefanescu. The results show that the kinetic model used influences the recalescence behaviour predicted by the modelling. Cooling curves calculated with the present model show reasonable agreement with experimentally measured cooling curves for four different cooling rates.

  9. [Front Block distraction].

    PubMed

    Esnault, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    The contribution of the segmental osteotomies in the ortho-surgical protocols is no longer to demonstrate and found a new lease of life thanks to the combination with the bone distraction techniques. The osteotomy of Köle, initially described to close infraclusies, and then used to level very marked curves of Spee has more recently been used to correct anterior crowding. This support is therefore aimed at patients with an incisor and canine Class 2 but molar Class 1 with an isolated mandibular footprint. With minimal orthodontic preparation we can create in two weeks bilateral diastemas that will then be used to align the incisivocanin crowding without stripping or bicuspid extractions. Dental orthodontic movements can be resumed one month after the end of the distraction. This technique is therefore likely to avoid bicuspid extraction and replace some sagittal osteotomy advancement by correction of the overjet. It also helps to correct a incisors labial or lingual tipping playing on differential activation of the cylinders and the distractor. This segmental surgery can be combined with Le Fort 1 surgeries with correction of the transverse and associated meanings, but in a second time, to a mandibular advancement and/or a genioplasty. PMID:25888045

  10. Study on the solidification condition of exudation penetration occurrence in grey cast iron castings based on solidification simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianmin; Hansen, S. F.

    2000-11-01

    The solidification condition of eutectic exudation penetration occurrence, a kind of casting defect in grey cast-iron castings, is studied with computer solidification simulation and experiments on specially designed castings. A hot hole refers to the solidification condition when the temperature gradient or solidifying time gradient from the centre to the surface at some location in a casting is positive during the solidification process. It is a term proposed in this paper to better describe the condition of exudation penetration occurrence and for predicting its location at hot spots in a casting. The term is useful for improving the foundry technology used for solving the penetration problem with the help of computer simulation.

  11. Investigation of Melting and Solidification of Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Films via Mixed-Phase Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    Melting and solidification constitute the fundamental pathways through which a thin-film material is processed in many beam-induced crystallization methods. In this thesis, we investigate and leverage a specific beam-induced, melt-mediated crystallization approach, referred to as Mixed-Phase Solidification (MPS), to examine and scrutinize how a polycrystalline Si film undergoes the process of melting and solidification. On the one hand, we develop a more general understanding as to how such transformations can transpire in polycrystalline films. On the other hand, by investigating how the microstructure evolution is affected by the thermodynamic properties of the system, we experimentally reveal, by examining the solidified microstructure, fundamental information about such properties (i.e., the anisotropy in interfacial free energy). Specifically, the thesis consists of two primary parts: (1) conducting a thorough and extensive investigation of the MPS process itself, which includes a detailed characterization and analysis of the microstructure evolution of the film as it undergoes MPS cycles, along with additional development and refinement of a previously proposed thermodynamic model to describe the MPS melting-and-solidification process; and (2) performing MPS-based experiments that were systematically designed to reveal more information on the anisotropic nature of Si-SiO2 interfacial energy (i.e., sigma Si-SiO2). MPS is a recently developed radiative-beam-based crystallization technique capable of generating Si films with a combination of several sought-after microstructural characteristics. It was conceived, developed, and characterized within our laser crystallization laboratory at Columbia University. A preliminary thermodynamic model was also previously proposed to describe the overall melting and solidification behavior of a polycrystalline Si film during an MPS cycle, wherein the grain-orientation-dependent solid-liquid interface velocity is identified

  12. Radiative magnetized thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of plane-parallel magnetized thermal conduction fronts in the interstellar medium (ISM) was studied. Separating the coronal ISM phase and interstellar clouds, these fronts have been thought to be the site of the intermediate-temperature regions whose presence was inferred from O VI absorption-line studies. The front evolution was followed numerically, starting from the initial discontinuous temperature distribution between the hot and cold medium, and ending in the final cooling stage of the hot medium. It was found that, for the typical ISM pressure of 4000 K/cu cm and the hot medium temperature of 10 to the 6th K, the transition from evaporation to condensation in a nonmagnetized front occurs when the front thickness is 15 pc. This thickness is a factor of 5 smaller than previously estimated. The O VI column densities in both evaporative and condensation stages agree with observations if the initial hot medium temperature Th exceeds 750,000 K. Condensing conduction fronts give better agreement with observed O VI line profiles because of lower gas temperatures.

  13. Restless rays, steady wave fronts.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2007-12-01

    Observations of underwater acoustic fields with vertical line arrays and numerical simulations of long-range sound propagation in an ocean perturbed by internal gravity waves indicate that acoustic wave fronts are much more stable than the rays comprising these wave fronts. This paper provides a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon of wave front stability in a medium with weak sound-speed perturbations. It is shown analytically that at propagation ranges that are large compared to the correlation length of the sound-speed perturbations but smaller than ranges at which ray chaos develops, end points of rays launched from a point source and having a given travel time are scattered primarily along the wave front corresponding to the same travel time in the unperturbed environment. The ratio of root mean square displacements of the ray end points along and across the unperturbed wave front increases with range as the ratio of ray length to correlation length of environmental perturbations. An intuitive physical explanation of the theoretical results is proposed. The relative stability of wave fronts compared to rays is shown to follow from Fermat's principle and dimensional considerations. PMID:18247745

  14. Vertical solidification of dendritic binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three numerical techniques are employed to analyze the influence of thermosolutal convection on defect formation in directionally solidified (DS) alloys. The finite-element models are based on the Boussinesq approximation and include the plane-front model and two plane-front models incorporating special dendritic regions. In the second model the dendritic region has a time-independent volume fraction of liquid, and in the last model the dendritic region evolves as local conditions dictate. The finite-element models permit the description of nonlinear thermosolutal convection by treating the dendritic regions as porous media with variable porosities. The models are applied to lead-tin alloys including DS alloys, and severe segregation phenomena such as freckles and channels are found to develop in the DS alloys. The present calculations and the permeability functions selected are shown to predict behavior in the dendritic regions that qualitatively matches that observed experimentally.

  15. 13. CLOSEUP OF FRONT OF BUNKER SHOWING DOOR, TANK, GENERATOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. CLOSE-UP OF FRONT OF BUNKER SHOWING DOOR, TANK, GENERATOR, LIGHT FIXTURE OVER DOOR. CAMERA FACING EAST. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6174, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. 9. EXTERIOR VIEW OF FRONT ENTRANCE TO BUNKER. CAMERA FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. EXTERIOR VIEW OF FRONT ENTRANCE TO BUNKER. CAMERA FACING EAST. TANK COVER AND FRAME TO THE REAR OF VIEW. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6170, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. 4. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW OF EQUIPMENT IN FRONT PART OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW OF EQUIPMENT IN FRONT PART OF CONTROL BUNKER (TRANSFORMER, HYDRAULIC TANK, PUMP, MOTOR). SHOWS UNLINED CORRUGATED METAL WALL. CAMERA FACING EAST. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-5433, TAKEN OCTOBER 20, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Lizee, Arnaud

    1996-01-01

    The object of this work, started in March of 1995, is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involves using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, 1-D models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The experiments conducted in the MEPHISTO furnace facility during the USMP-3 spaceflight which took place earlier this year (22 Feb. - 6 Mar. 1996). This experiment represents an unprecedented opportunity to make a quantitative correlation between residual accelerations and the response of an actual experimental solidification system

  19. Directional and single-crystal solidification of Ni-base superalloys: Part I. The role of curved isotherms on grain selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, N.; Ardakani, M. G.; McLean, M.; Shollock, B. A.

    2000-11-01

    The development of crystallographic texture during directional solidification has been quantitatively analyzed in columnar castings of the Ni-base superalloys, CMSX4 and CM186LC, produced with a range of cooling rates and liquidus front curvatures. It is proposed that the more diffuse crystallographic texture developed in CMSX4 relative to CM186LC results from a combination of the differing local orientation stability condition and the alloys’ solidification characteristics. The implications of these additional factors on the evolution of the axial grain texture, the grain orientations produced in singlecrystal processing, and the stability of spurious grains in processing CMSX4 are discussed. An experimental method is presented to quantitatively analyze the grain selection process in the case of curved liquidus isotherms by retaining the stereology of the primary <001> dendrite growth direction and the local thermal gradient vector. This can account for the stability of spuriously nucleated edge grains in a single-crystal matrix.

  20. The mechanisms of formation and prevention of channel segregation during alloy solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.; Sample, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Using a base chilled configuration, conditions for the formation and prevention of segregation channels are studied in the ammonium chloride-water and lead-tin systems. Such channels develop when the rejected solute is less dense than the solvent and are therefore a result of density inversion, but slow (less than 5 rpm) rates of mold rotation, about axes inclined to the vertical by 20 to 30 deg, throughout the time of solidification, effectively prevent the formation or propagation of these channels. In experiments with artificially created or blocked channels, a simultaneous solute plume in the bulk liquid must be present in order for a channel to develop. The results indicate that channels originate not within the dendritic array, but immediately ahead of the growth front as a result of perturbation from the less dense boundary layer into the bulk liquid. The effect of mold movement is to translate laterally the bulk liquid relative to the growth front so that perturbations are sheared off. The nature of the liquid movement is considered and shown to be a function of the mold dimensions.

  1. Directional solidification and {delta}/{gamma} solid state transformation in Fe-3% Ni alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Vandyoussefi, M.; Kerr, H.W.; Kurz, W.

    1997-10-01

    Directional growth experiments were carried out to study the solidification behavior of {delta}-Fe and the {delta}-{gamma} solid state transformation in Fe-Ni alloys containing about 3 at.% Ni. Depending on the growth conditions, the solid-liquid interface morphology ranged from planar to cellular. In the solid state transformation, {gamma} grew from {delta} phase as plate like cells with small tip radii at low growth rates but as wider cells with flat interface at a velocity of 30 {micro}m/s. Volume diffusion-controlled plane front and dendritic growth models were applied to both transformations. This was possible as the diffusion coefficient of Ni in the parent {delta} phase is much larger than that of forming {gamma} phase. Good agreement was obtained between theory and experimental observations. The flat-tipped cells in the solid state transformations at a velocity of 30 {micro}m/s showed little overall change in composition, similar to a massive transformation. This composition-invariant transformation is consistent with a plane front growing with solute partitioning at the limit of absolute stability.

  2. X-Ray Videomicroscopy Studies of Eutectic Al-Si Solidification in Al-Si-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiesen, R. H.; Arnberg, L.; Li, Y.; Meier, V.; Schaffer, P. L.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Dahle, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Al-Si eutectic growth has been studied in-situ for the first time using X-ray video microscopy during directional solidification (DS) in unmodified and Sr-modified Al-Si-Cu alloys. In the unmodified alloys, Si is found to grow predominantly with needle-like tip morphologies, leading a highly irregular progressing eutectic interface with subsequent nucleation and growth of Al from the Si surfaces. In the Sr-modified alloys, the eutectic reaction is strongly suppressed, occurring with low nucleation frequency at undercoolings in the range 10 K to 18 K. In order to transport Cu rejected at the eutectic front back into the melt, the modified eutectic colonies attain meso-scale interface perturbations that eventually evolve into equiaxed composite-structure cells. The eutectic front also attains short-range microscale interface perturbations consistent with the characteristics of a fibrous Si growth. Evidence was found in support of Si nucleation occurring on potent particles suspended in the melt. Yet, both with Sr-modified and unmodified alloys, Si precipitation alone was not sufficient to facilitate the eutectic reaction, which apparently required additional undercooling for Al to form at the Si-particle interfaces.

  3. Modelling the solidification of hypermonotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghuai; Ludwig, Andreas; Ratke, Lorenz

    2003-09-01

    A two-phase model is developed to simulate the decomposition and spatial phase separation (microstructure evolution) during solidification of hypermonotectic alloys. The minority liquid phase, decomposing in morphology of droplets from the parent melt, is treated as the second phase, L2, while the parent melt, including the solidified monotectic matrix, is the first phase, L1. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, solute and enthalpy for both phases, and an additional transport equation for the droplets are solved. Nucleation of the droplets, diffusion-controlled growth (coarsening) and dissolution of the droplets, interphase interactions such as Marangoni (thermocapillary) force, Stokes force, solute partitioning and heat release of decomposition are modelled by the corresponding source and exchange terms in the conservation equations. The monotectic reaction is modelled by adding the latent heat on the L1 phase and applying a suitable large viscosity to the solidified monotectic matrix. The simulation results of a two-dimensional square casting with hypermonotectic composition (Al-10 wt.% Bi) under normal terrestrial and weightless conditions are presented and discussed.

  4. Interface Pattern Selection in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, Rohit; Tewari, Surendra N.

    2001-01-01

    The central focus of this research is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. Ground-based studies have established that the conditions under which cellular and dendritic microstructures form are precisely where convection effects are dominant in bulk samples. Thus, experimental data can not be obtained terrestrially under pure diffusive regime. Furthermore, reliable theoretical models are not yet possible which can quantitatively incorporate fluid flow in the pattern selection criterion. Consequently, microgravity experiments on cellular and dendritic growth are designed to obtain benchmark data under diffusive growth conditions that can be quantitatively analyzed and compared with the rigorous theoretical model to establish the fundamental principles that govern the selection of specific microstructure and its length scales. In the cellular structure, different cells in an array are strongly coupled so that the cellular pattern evolution is controlled by complex interactions between thermal diffusion, solute diffusion and interface effects. These interactions give infinity of solutions, and the system selects only a narrow band of solutions. The aim of this investigation is to obtain benchmark data and develop a rigorous theoretical model that will allow us to quantitatively establish the physics of this selection process.

  5. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized.

  6. Stabilization/solidification of TSCA incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Trotter, D.R.; Francis, C.L.; Morgan, I.L.

    1994-06-01

    Stabilization/solidification is a well-known waste treatment technique that utilizes different additives and processes. The Phoenix Ash Technology of the Technical Innovation Development Engineering Company is such a technique that uses Cass C fly ash and mechanical pressure to make brick waste forms out of solid wastes, such as the bottom ash from the Toxic Substances Control Act incinerator at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. One advantage of this technique is that no volume increase over the bulk volume of the bottom ash occurs. This technique should have the same high pH stabilization for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals as similar techniques. Also, consolidation of the bottom ash minimizes the potential problems of material dispersion and container corrosion. The bottom ash was spiked with {sup 99}{Tc} to test the effectiveness of the bricks as a physical barrier. The {sup 99}{Tc} leachability index measured for these bricks was 6.8, typical for the pertechnetate anion in cementitious waste forms, indicating that these bricks have accessible porosity as high as that of other cementitious waste forms, despite the mechanical compression, higher waste form density, and water resistant polymer coating.

  7. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ,ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  8. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  9. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  10. Successful pond closure utilizing novel solidification/stabilization technology

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, J.R.; Webster, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    Davy International, in joint venture with International Technology Corporation (IT-Davy), has recently completed the RCRA closure of wastewater impoundments at a major Gulf Coast refinery. These surface impoundments contained a mixture of petroleum waste sediments, free water and standing oil. In-situ solidification/stabilization (solidification) was used to produce a material which met the regulatory criteria of: achieving a bearing capacity sufficient to support earth moving equipment, the final multi-layer cap and the soil cover, immobilizing contaminants of concern namely, benzene, toluene, chrysene, naphthalene, 1-methyl naphthalene, chromium and lead. Ex-situ solidification was specified in the initial bid documents to meet the above criteria. Solidified material was to achieve an unconfined compressive strength of greater than 20 pounds per square inch (psi) and a permeability of less than 1 {times}10{sup {minus}5} centimeters per second after 7 days of curing. During the project proposal stage, IT-Davy developed a conceptual design for in-situ solidification which reduced the estimated project cost by approximately $10 million (or 33 percent). This paper reviews key elements of the project and presents results of the use of a novel solidification/stabilization process to achieve project closure criteria. Bench and field demonstration test data are given.

  11. Self-turbulizing flame fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavin, P.; Searby, G.

    A heuristic derivation of a flame front model is presented that takes into account the effects of gravity, nonlinear effects introduced by advection of the front, and gradients in the tangential component of the flow. A local equation is defined to relate the normal flame speed to the upstream gas flow characteristics. Jump conditions are obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the local structure of the wrinkled flame in order to address the hydrodynamic problem possed by the front being treated as a free boundary between fresh and burnt gases. The expression for the jump conditions is defined in Fourier space. The model extends the equations defined in Fourier space. The model extends the equations defined by Sivashinsky (1977) to cover the effects of gas expansion.

  12. Basis Light-Front Quantization: Recent Progress and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vary, James P.; Adhikari, Lekha; Chen, Guangyao; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Zhao, Xingbo

    2016-08-01

    Light-front Hamiltonian field theory has advanced to the stage of becoming a viable non-perturbative method for solving forefront problems in strong interaction physics. Physics drivers include hadron mass spectroscopy, generalized parton distribution functions, spin structures of the hadrons, inelastic structure functions, hadronization, particle production by strong external time-dependent fields in relativistic heavy ion collisions, and many more. We review selected recent results and future prospects with basis light-front quantization that include fermion-antifermion bound states in QCD, fermion motion in a strong time-dependent external field and a novel non-perturbative renormalization scheme.

  13. Basis Light-Front Quantization: Recent Progress and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vary, James P.; Adhikari, Lekha; Chen, Guangyao; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Zhao, Xingbo

    2016-05-01

    Light-front Hamiltonian field theory has advanced to the stage of becoming a viable non-perturbative method for solving forefront problems in strong interaction physics. Physics drivers include hadron mass spectroscopy, generalized parton distribution functions, spin structures of the hadrons, inelastic structure functions, hadronization, particle production by strong external time-dependent fields in relativistic heavy ion collisions, and many more. We review selected recent results and future prospects with basis light-front quantization that include fermion-antifermion bound states in QCD, fermion motion in a strong time-dependent external field and a novel non-perturbative renormalization scheme.

  14. Initial solidification phenomena in continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Adam

    Continuous casting is the main process route for the mass production of steel today, yielding in excess of 560 million tons annually, corresponding to 80% of total steel production worldwide. As with any process, as improvements are introduced and quality is enhanced, there is the ever greater push to reduce problems that were once minor. The restrictions on quality for certain products require that defects be kept to a minimum. Currently, the industry has developed a wealth of experience in how to deal with slabs with oscillation marks. However, these practices are circumventions of the symptoms of the problems, not solutions for the causes. By understanding the formation mechanism, one can then develop practices based on a logical consideration oft he causes. The goals of this current work were to develop a mold simulator that could replicate the surface quality of industrial slabs. The techniques developed allowed for a more detailed examination of the heat transfer interactions during continuous casting, such that the variations of heat flux due to irregular solidification could be observed. It is shown that the mechanisms proposed in the literature are not individually sufficient for the formation of an oscillation mark, but several are necessary and must occur in concert for one to form. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of oscillation marks based upon the experimental results. This hypothesis is formulated as a series of necessary conditions that must be satisfied for an oscillation mark to be formed. This hypothesis is described, and shown to be in agreement with the trends observed and reported in the literature. It can explain both the overflow- and depression-type mark seen in industrial slabs. Additionally, this hypothesis was successfully used as a method of predicting the locations of oscillation marks on cast shells based upon the mold heat transfer measurements.

  15. Impact-activated solidification of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Shear-thickening, non-Newtonian fluids have typically been investigated under steady-state conditions. This approach has produced two pictures for suspension response to imposed forcing. In the weak shear-thickening picture, the response is typically attributed to the hydrodynamic interactions giving rise to hydroclusters, small groups of particles interacting through lubrication forces. At the other end of the spectrum, in the discontinuous shear-thickening regime, the response can be seen as a system-wide jamming that is ultimately limited in strength by the system boundaries. While these steady-state pictures have proven extremely useful, some of the most interesting phenomena associated with dense suspensions is transient and local in character. A prototypical example is the extraordinarily large impact resistance of dense suspensions such as cornstarch and water. When poked lightly these materials respond like a fluid, but when punched or kicked they seem to temporarily ``solidify'' and provide enormous resistance to the motion of the impacting object. Using an array of experimental techniques, including high-speed video, embedded force and acceleration sensing, and x-ray imaging, we are able to investigate the dynamic details this process as it unfolds. We find that an impacting object drives the rapid growth of a jammed, solid-like region directly below the impact site. Being coupled to the surrounding fluid by grain-mediated lubrication forces, this creates substantial peripheral flow and ultimately leads to the sudden extraction of the impactor's momentum. With a simple jamming picture to describe the solidification and an added mass model to explain the force on the rod, we are able to predict the forces on the impactor quantitatively. These findings highlight the importance of the non-equilibrium character of dense suspensions near jamming and might serve as a bridge between the weak and discontinuous shear-thickening pictures.

  16. Lagrangian fronts in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    We introduce the concept of Lagrangian fronts (LFs) in the ocean and describe their importance for analyzing water mixing and transport and the specific features and differences from hydrological fronts. A method of calculating LFs in a given velocity field is proposed. Based on altimeter velocity fields from AVISO data in the northwestern Pacific, we calculate the Lagrangian synoptic maps and identify LFs of different spatial and temporal scales. Using statistical analysis of saury catches in different years according to the Goskomrybolovstvo (State Fisheries Committee of the Russian Federation), we show that LFs can serve as good indicators of places that are favorable for fishing.

  17. Functional description of APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-02-01

    Traditional synchrotron sources were designed to produce bending magnet radiation and have proven to be an essential scientific tool. Currently, a new generation of synchrotron sources is being built that will be able to accommodate a large number of insertion device (ID) and high quality bending magnet (BM) sources. One example is the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The research and development effort at the APS is designed to fully develop the potential of this new generation of synchrotron sources. Of the 40 straight sections in the APS storage ring, 34 will be available for IDs. The remaining six sections are reserved for the storage ring hardware and diagnostics. Although the ring incorporates 80 BMs, only 40 of them can be used to extract radiation. The accelerator hardware shadows five of these 40 bending magnets, so the maximum number of BM sources on the lattice is 35. Generally, a photon beamline consists of four functional sections. The first section is the ID or the BM, which provides the radiation source. The second section, which is immediately outside the storage ring but inside a concrete shielding tunnel, is the front end, which is designed to control, define, and/or confine the x-ray beam. In the case of the APS, the front ends are designed to confine the photon beam. The third section, just outside the concrete shielding tunnel and on the experimental floor, is the first optics enclosure, which contains optics to filter and monochromatize the photon beam. The fourth section of a beamline consists of beam transports, additional optics, and experiment stations to do the scientific investigations. This document describes only the front ends of the APS beamlines.

  18. Investigation of Melting and Solidification of Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Films via Mixed-Phase Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    Melting and solidification constitute the fundamental pathways through which a thin-film material is processed in many beam-induced crystallization methods. In this thesis, we investigate and leverage a specific beam-induced, melt-mediated crystallization approach, referred to as Mixed-Phase Solidification (MPS), to examine and scrutinize how a polycrystalline Si film undergoes the process of melting and solidification. On the one hand, we develop a more general understanding as to how such transformations can transpire in polycrystalline films. On the other hand, by investigating how the microstructure evolution is affected by the thermodynamic properties of the system, we experimentally reveal, by examining the solidified microstructure, fundamental information about such properties (i.e., the anisotropy in interfacial free energy). Specifically, the thesis consists of two primary parts: (1) conducting a thorough and extensive investigation of the MPS process itself, which includes a detailed characterization and analysis of the microstructure evolution of the film as it undergoes MPS cycles, along with additional development and refinement of a previously proposed thermodynamic model to describe the MPS melting-and-solidification process; and (2) performing MPS-based experiments that were systematically designed to reveal more information on the anisotropic nature of Si-SiO2 interfacial energy (i.e., sigma Si-SiO2). MPS is a recently developed radiative-beam-based crystallization technique capable of generating Si films with a combination of several sought-after microstructural characteristics. It was conceived, developed, and characterized within our laser crystallization laboratory at Columbia University. A preliminary thermodynamic model was also previously proposed to describe the overall melting and solidification behavior of a polycrystalline Si film during an MPS cycle, wherein the grain-orientation-dependent solid-liquid interface velocity is identified

  19. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The software developed for the solidification model is presented. A link between the calculations and the FORTRAN code is provided, primarily in the form of global flow diagrams and data structures. A complete listing of the solidification code is given.

  20. Front Matter and Contents.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    ATCG model described in [1] ('Applied Theory accounting for human moleCular Genetics'), which constitutes a solid foundation for the present work. The author has a master degree in biochemistry, a master degree in computer science (systems development, informatics) and a European Doctorate and PhD in health informatics. The author has had a full-time research position for about 35 years, divided on a university hospital, the software industry and a university, while cross-fertilising the two professions; the time in the industry and the university mainly was dedicated to participation in large and advanced EU R&D Research projects. This combination of professional experience has enabled the present study. The present study was performed outside of any job or grant affiliation, while the author had an emeritus position at the Aalborg University. The author has since the year 2000 been a member of the scientific team describing the Mereon Matrix (for this, see [2]), went on early retirement in 2011 to work full time on the Mereon Matrix, and is independently continuing such scientific investigations on the matrix. Contact information: jytte@brender.dk and jbr@hst.aau.dk. Acknowledgements The author is deeply grateful for her position as Emeritus Assoc. Professor at her former university affiliation at Aalborg University, Dept. of Health Science and Technology, as this enabled a full and free access to most of the original scientific literature. Without this, the present study would have been critically hampered. The author is deeply grateful for continuous brainstorming and constructive feedback on and in the process with her husband, Dr. Peter McNair, retired director of the Medical Genetics Laboratory, KennedyCenter (DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark). Conflicting Interests The author declares that there was and is no conflicting interests, financial or otherwise, that would or could have influenced the outcome of the study. The author's work on the Mereon Matrix was not

  1. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  2. Solidification Dynamics of Spherical Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 meter drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By varying a drop s initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approx. 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance ,of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  3. Stabilization/Solidification Remediation Method for Contaminated Soil: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Azmi, M. A. M.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is typically a process that involves a mixing of waste with binders to reduce the volume of contaminant leachability by means of physical and chemical characteristics to convert waste in the environment that goes to landfill or others possibly channels. Stabilization is attempts to reduce the solubility or chemical reactivity of the waste by changing the physical and chemical properties. While, solidification attempt to convert the waste into easily handled solids with low hazardous level. These two processes are often discussed together since they have a similar purpose of improvement than containment of potential pollutants in treated wastes. The primary objective of this review is to investigate the materials used as a binder in Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) method as well as the ability of these binders to remediate the contaminated soils especially by heavy metals.

  4. Specimen analysis of Skylab, M553 experiment, flight specimens, phase C.. [on metals melting containerless solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Skylab 2 flight samples were analyzed to study containerless solidification and the effects of weightlessness on the process. A record of solute redistribution processes and of solidification terracing is reported. The solute redistribution process was highly localized, and low index, crystallographic system were suggested. Samples demonstrated that under reduced pressure and gravity conditions the anticipated solid/liquid solidification process was perturbed and superseded by solid/liquid/gas reactions during melting and solidification.

  5. Transparent metal model study of the use of a cellular growth front to form aligned monotectic composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to resolve a scientific controversy in the understanding of how second phase particles become aligned during unidirectional growth of a monotectic alloy. A second aspect was to make the first systematic observations of the solidification behavior of a monotectic alloy during cellular growth in-situ. This research provides the first systematic transparent model study of cellular solidification. An interface stability diagram was developed for the planar to cellular transition of the succinonitrile glycerol (SNG) system. A method was developed utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy which allows quantitative compositional analysis of directionally solidified SNG along the growth axis. To determine the influence of cellular growth front on alignment for directionally solidified monotectic alloys, the planar and cellular growth morphology was observed in-situ for SNG between 8 and 17 percent glycerol and for a range of over two orders of magnitude G/R.

  6. Align the Front End First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of management styles and front-end analysis focuses on a review of Douglas McGregor's theories. Topics include Theories X, Y, and Z; leadership skills; motivational needs of employees; intrinsic and extrinsic rewards; and faulty implementation of instructional systems design processes. (LRW)

  7. Teaching the French Popular Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Irwin M.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the French Popular Front of 1936 as a vehicle to investigate the turbulent decade of the 1930s. Reviews current historiography and discusses various facets of Leon Blum's government, examining the interrelationship of major economic and political forces. Concludes that the French Left still faces Blum's dilemma of implementing socialism…

  8. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 3: Operating manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of solidification model 1 is described. Model 1 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The calculation is restricted to steady-state solidification; there is no variation in final local average composition in the direction of isotherm movement. The physics of the model are given.

  9. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Lee, Wah -Keat; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Papin, Pallas A.; et al

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. This x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  10. Theory for the curvature dependence of delta front progradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Wun-Tao; Capart, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    When Gilbert-type deltas respond to uneven sediment supply or advance over irregular basin bathymetry, they develop curved, creased fronts prograding at speeds that vary with location along the shoreline. Relations governing the progradation rate, however, have so far been proposed only for simple special cases. In this paper, we exploit the special properties of solutions to the eikonal equation to derive a general progradation relation, applicable to delta fronts of finite angle of repose and arbitrary shoreline planform. In these circumstances, the theory explicitly relates the progradation rate to the local shoreline curvature. We illustrate the resulting morphodynamics with numerical and analytical solutions for a sinuous delta front. The proposed relation can be used to model deltaic evolution or deduce spanwise distributions of sediment supply rates from observations of foreset evolution.

  11. An alloy solidification experiment conducted on Shenzhou spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Q.; Luo, X.-H.; Li, Y.-Y.

    To gain a better understanding of how gravity-driven phenomena affect the solidification and crystal growth of metallic materials, directional solidification experiments have been performed on an Al-Al 3Ni eutectic alloy and an Al-Bi monotectic alloy on board the unmanned Chinese Shenzhou III spacecraft during its flight. For sake of comparison, identical experiments were also performed in the laboratory on earth. The results of investigations applying metallographic, SEM, EPMA and image analysis techniques are reported. Some interesting differences between the samples solidified in space and their counterparts solidified on the ground are described.

  12. Polymer solidification national program. Letter report on FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings.

  13. Solidification study of some Ni- and Co-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanfils, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    An ongoing research program aims to characterize the solidification of several Ni- and Co-based commercial wrought type alloys. The techniques used and the data items sought are: (1) thermal analysis, liquidus, nonequilibrium solidus as a function of cooling rate, secondary reactions temperatures, incipient melting, progress of solidification as a function of temperature; (2) optical metallography, characteristic structures and secondary dendrite arm spacing as a function of cooling rate; (3) X-ray diffraction, identification of precipitates; and (4) SEM/EDAX, measure of microsegregation.

  14. Solidification of radioactive waste in a cement/lime mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of a cement/lime mixture for use as a solidification agent for different types of wastes was investigated. This work includes studies directed towards determining the wasted/binder compositional field over which successful solidification occurs with various wastes and the measurement of some of the waste from properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment. In this study, four types of low-level radioactive wastes were simulated for incorporation into a cement/lime mixture. These were boric acid waste, sodium sulfate wastes, aion exchange resins and incinerator ash. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. External Horizontally Uniform Magnetic Field Applied to Steel Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechighel, Farid; Kadja, Mahfoud

    Based on continuum model, a mathematical model for convection flow during directional solidification of steel, Fe-0.42wt%C, in an applied magnetic field is presented. The model includes mass, momentum, energy, species and electrical potential conservation equations. The geometry under study is rectangular. The permeability in the mushy zone is treated by means of the Blake-Kozeny equation. The system of equation has been discretized by means of Finite volume method. For solution of discretized equations SIMPLER Algorithm is used. The results show the strong effect of the magnetic field on the solidification process.

  16. Fluctuation-controlled front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Douglas Thacher

    1997-09-01

    A number of fundamental pattern-forming systems are controlled by fluctuations at the front. These problems involve the interaction of an infinite dimensional probability distribution with a strongly nonlinear, spatially extended pattern-forming system. We have examined fluctuation-controlled growth in the context of the specific problems of diffusion-limited growth and biological evolution. Mean field theory of diffusion-limited growth exhibits a finite time singularity. Near the leading edge of a diffusion-limited front, this leads to acceleration and blowup. This may be resolved, in an ad hoc manner, by introducing a cutoff below which growth is weakened or eliminated (8). This model, referred to as the BLT model, captures a number of qualitative features of global pattern formation in diffusion-limited aggregation: contours of the mean field match contours of averaged particle density in simulation, and the modified mean field theory can form dendritic features not possible in the naive mean field theory. The morphology transition between dendritic and non-dendritic global patterns requires that BLT fronts have a Mullins-Sekerka instability of the wavefront shape, in order to form concave patterns. We compute the stability of BLT fronts numerically, and compare the results to fronts without a cutoff. A significant morphological instability of the BLT fronts exists, with a dominant wavenumber on the scale of the front width. For standard mean field fronts, no instability is found. The naive and ad hoc mean field theories are continuum-deterministic models intended to capture the behavior of a discrete stochastic system. A transformation which maps discrete systems into a continuum model with a singular multiplicative noise is known, however numerical simulations of the continuum stochastic system often give mean field behavior instead of the critical behavior of the discrete system. We have found a new interpretation of the singular noise, based on maintaining

  17. Directional solidification of mercury cadmium telluride during the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, D.C.; Lehoczky, S.L.; Szofran, F.R.; Watring, D.A.; Alexander, H.A.; Jerman, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    As a solid solution semiconductor having a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  18. In Situ Solidification and Encapsulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plant, DOE and DOD Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.; Werner, P.; Jensen, C.

    2006-07-01

    This paper looks at applications of Advanced Polymer Solidification (APS TM) for stabilization of ion exchange media, as well as application of the related Vinyl Ester Resin In Situ (VERI{sup TM}) process for encapsulation of filters, irradiated hardware and other large-scale objects. The documented uses include projects at US commercial nuclear sites and DOE/DOD facilities, and extensive work in the UK for impregnation of filters for waste form stabilization. We detail ongoing enhancements to the process, including modification of liner internals for better containment of fines during solidification, and improved fill head configuration to reduce the tendency of sluiced resin beads to adhere to the underside of the fill head. We also report on experience with stabilization of (n,p) Energy, Inc.'s PRC-01 and Purolite's 501P resins. Updates are provided on the tensile creep analysis testing being conducted to permit application of the APS{sup TM} system for encapsulation, and on the continued full-scale application of the technology at Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). Finally, we offer a brief analysis of the potential impact that loss of access to the Barnwell, SC facility will have on future treatment and on-site storage of Class B and C wastes. (authors)

  19. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  20. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  1. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    solute trapping models are not rigorously verified due to the difficulty in experimentally measuring under rapid growth conditions. Moreover, since these solute trapping models include kinetic parameters which are difficult to directly measure from experiments, application of the solute trapping models or the associated analytic rapid solidification model is limited. These theoretical models for steady state rapid solidification which incorporate the solute trapping models do not describe the interdependency of solute diffusion, interface kinetics, and alloy thermodynamics. The phase-field approach allows calculating, spontaneously, the non-equilibrium growth effects of alloys and the associated time-dependent growth dynamics, without making the assumptions that solute partitioning is an explicit function of velocity, as is the current convention. In the research described here, by utilizing the phase-field model in the thin-interface limit, incorporating the anti-trapping current term, more quantitatively valid interface kinetics and solute diffusion across the interface are calculated. In order to sufficiently resolve the physical length scales (i.e. interface thickness and diffusion boundary length), grid spacings are continually adjusted in calculations. The full trajectories of transient planar growth dynamics under rapid directional solidification conditions with different pulling velocities are described. As a validation of a model, the predicted steady state conditions are consistent with the analytic approach for rapid growth. It was confirmed that rapid interface dynamics exhibits the abrupt acceleration of the planar front when the effect of the non-equilibrium solute partitioning at the interface becomes signi ficant. This is consistent with the previous linear stability analysis for the non-equilibrium interface dynamics. With an appropriate growth condition, the continuous oscillation dynamics was able to be simulated using continually adjusting grid

  2. Potential Flow Interactions With Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buddhavarapu, Sudhir S.; Meiburg, Eckart

    1999-01-01

    The effect of convective melt motion on the growth of morphological instabilities in crystal growth has been the focus of many studies in the past decade. While most of the efforts have been directed towards investigating the linear stability aspects, relatively little attention has been devoted to experimental and numerical studies. In a pure morphological case, when there is no flow, morphological changes in the solid-liquid interface are governed by heat conduction and solute distribution. Under the influence of a convective motion, both heat and solute are redistributed, thereby affecting the intrinsic morphological phenomenon. The overall effect of the convective motion could be either stabilizing or destabilizing. Recent investigations have predicted stabilization by a flow parallel to the interface. In the case of non-parallel flows, e.g., stagnation point flow, Brattkus and Davis have found a new flow-induced morphological instability that occurs at long wavelengths and also consists of waves propagating against the flow. Other studies have addressed the nonlinear aspects (Konstantinos and Brown, Wollkind and Segel)). In contrast to the earlier studies, our present investigation focuses on the effects of the potential flow fields typically encountered in Hele-Shaw cells. Such a Hele-Shaw cell can simulate a gravity-free environment in the sense that buoyancy-driven convection is largely suppressed, and hence negligible. Our interest lies both in analyzing the linear stability of the solidification process in the presence of potential flow fields, as well as in performing high-accuracy nonlinear simulations. Linear stability analysis can be performed for the flow configuration mentioned above. It is observed that a parallel potential flow is stabilizing and gives rise to waves traveling downstream. We have built a highly accurate numerical scheme which is validated at small amplitudes by comparing with the analytically predicted results for the pure

  3. Life on the front lines.

    PubMed

    Hern, W M

    1993-01-01

    honor those who advanced the cause of women's rights. They honored the physician who had to shout over hecklers to make his remarks heard. After a year of operation, the physician encountered differences with the Board of Directors of the clinic. Soon after that, he resigned and opened his own clinic with a bank loan of $7000. Within 4 years, his clinic had expanded, and he purchased its building. The harassment from antiabortion protesters continued, with broken windows, pickets, and, in February 1988, bullets fired through the front windows of the waiting room. This necessitated the installation of bullet-proof glass and a security system which cost $17,000. As of March 1, 1993, there had been 1285 acts of violence towards abortion clinics, which led to the destruction of more than 100. On March 10 of that year, a physician who performed abortions in Florida was gunned down by an anti-abortion protestor. People who provide abortions hope for legal protection and respect for their civil liberties, but they will continue to provide this service even if conditions do not improve. PMID:8274868

  4. Traveling waves, two-phase fingers, and eutectic colonies in thin-sample directional solidification of a ternary eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Silvère; Faivre, Gabriel

    2000-04-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the morphological transition of lamellar eutectic growth fronts called ``formation of eutectic colonies'' by the method of thin-sample directional solidification of a transparent model alloy, CBr4-C2Cl6. This morphological transition is due to the presence in the melt of traces of chemical components other than those of the base binary alloy (impurities). In this study, we use naphthalene as an impurity. The formation of eutectic colonies has generally been viewed as an impurity-driven Mullins-Sekerka instability of the envelope of the lamellar front. This traditional view neglects the strong interaction existing between the Mullins-Sekerka process and the dynamics of the lamellar pattern. This investigation brings to light several original features of the formation of eutectic colonies, in particular, the emission of long-wavelength traveling waves, and the appearance of dendritelike structures called two-phase fingers, which are connected with this interaction. We study the part played by these phenomena in the transition to eutectic colonies as a function of the impurity concentration. Recent theoretical results on the linear stability of ternary lamellar eutectic fronts [Plapp and Karma, Phys. Rev. E 60, 6865 (1999)] shed light on some aspects of the observed phenomena.

  5. Evolution of density compensated fronts in simulated ocean mixed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helber, R. W.; Hebert, D. A.; Koch, A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations within the ocean surface mixed layer indicate a tendency for temperature gradients to form that are compensated for their effect on density by salinity gradients. These density compensated fronts tend to occur in the absence of strong surface forcing and thus weak vertical mixing. Observations show that density compensated fronts are quickly erased by surface cooling events. The presence of density compensated gradients in the surface mixed layer, however, are not well represented in regional and global ocean circulation model predictions. In these models, subgrid-scale processes are parameterized with minimal ability to represent double diffusion. Recent advances in parameterizations have been developed to model the re-stratification of the mixed layer by sub-mesoscale eddies. These ageostrophic dynamics can lead to long filaments that are governed by process on length scales from 100 m to 10 km and time scales near a day. The impact of these processes in model physics on density compensated fronts is unclear. To improve our understanding of compensated front evolution in the ocean, three different mixing schemes are tested to evaluate the creation of horizontally density compensated gradients in model simulations. One scheme extracts potential energy of ocean fronts for mixing dependent on horizontal and vertical buoyancy gradients, mixed layer depth, and inertial period. The other two schemes mix temperature and salinity horizontally dependent on the buoyancy gradient. All schemes provide a three dimensional approach to mixing that differentiates the horizontal eddy diffusion of temperature and salinity.

  6. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura B.; Winstanley, Henry F.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Fowler, Andrew C.; Sander, Graham C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  7. The effects of gravity level during directional solidification on the microstructure of hypermonotectic Al-In-Sn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Five hypermonotectic Al-In-Sn compositions were directionally solidified in a Bridgman-type furnace at normal gravity and during aircraft low-gravity maneuvers. The tendency of the Al-30In alloy to form an indium-rich band at the start of unidirectional growth (SUG) made it difficult to study the integration of L sub 2 into the solidification interface. Hypermonotectic compositions closer to monotectic slightly hypermonotectic caused only a partial band on L sub 2 to form at SUG and allowed the study of such variables as gravity, composition, and monotectic dome height on integration of excess L sub 2 into the solid plus L sub 2 interface. It was found that formation of aligned composite structures for the Al-In-Sn system is not only a function of G and R but also of the degree to which the composition varies from monotectic. Most of the aligned fibrous structures formed from hypermonotectic Al-In-Sn had spacings that were of the order of irregular fibrous structures reported for on monotectic Al-In-Sn. The spacings for the large fibers and aligned globules found for ground and low-gravity processed Al-In-18-Sn-22, respectively, were significantly larger than the others measured and were of the order expected for cell spacings under the growth conditions utilized. It was found that the integration into the solidification front of excess L sub 2 in low gravity was a function of the Sn composition of the alloy.

  8. Microstructure Evolution and Rapid Solidification Behavior of Blended Nickel-Based Superalloy Powders Fabricated by Laser Powder Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Laser powder deposition was performed on a substrate of Inconel 738 using blended powders of Mar M247 and Amdry DF3 with a ratio of 4:1 for repairing purposes. In the as-deposited condition, continuous secondary phases composed of γ-Ni3B eutectics and discrete (Cr, W)B borides were observed in inter-dendritic regions, and time-dependent nucleation simulation results confirmed that (Cr, W)B was the primary secondary phase formed during rapid solidification. Supersaturated solid solution of B was detected in the γ solid solution dendritic cores. The Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi model was performed to predict the interfacial morphology and correlate the solidification front velocity (SFV) with dendrite tip radius. It was observed from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy that the dendrite tip radius of the upper region was in the range of 15 to 30 nm, which yielded a SFV of approx 30 cm/s. The continuous growth model for solute trapping behavior developed by Aziz and Kaplan was used to determine that the effective partition coefficient of B was approximately 0.025. Finally, the feasibility of the modeling results were rationalized with the Clyne-Kurz segregation simulation of B, where Clyne-Kurz prediction using a partition coefficient of 0.025 was in good agreement with the electron probe microanalysis results.

  9. Four-phase fully-coupled mold-filling and solidification simulation for gas porosity prediction in aluminum sand casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakumeit, J.; Jana, S.; Waclawczyk, T.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Sadiki, A.; Jouani, J.

    2012-07-01

    The impact of mold-filling and oxide film enclosure on gas porosity in A356 was investigated using a three-phase, fully-coupled, mold-filling and solidification simulation. For the prediction of gas porosity, a fourth hydrogen phase was added. At the solidification front hydrogen is rejected from the solid and accumulates in the melt. Pores nucleate if the solute gas exceeds the solubility limit. Air and melt are separated by a volume of fluid interface and special treatment of the hydrogen phase convection was necessary to limit the hydrogen to the melt. Folding of the melt surface was used as a source for oxide film entrainment. These oxide films were transported with the melt and used as nucleation sites for gas porosity formation. The influence of melt flow due to filling and oxide film distribution was analyzed using a simple 3-block test geometry. The test geometry was cast in A356 and analyzed by computer tomography to validate the porosity prediction.

  10. Microstructure Evolution and Rapid Solidification Behavior of Blended Nickel-Based Superalloy Powders Fabricated by Laser Powder Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2016-04-01

    Laser powder deposition was performed on a substrate of Inconel 738 using blended powders of Mar M247 and Amdry DF3 with a ratio of 4:1 for repairing purposes. In the as-deposited condition, continuous secondary phases composed of γ-Ni3B eutectics and discrete (Cr, W)B borides were observed in inter-dendritic regions, and time-dependent nucleation simulation results confirmed that (Cr, W)B was the primary secondary phase formed during rapid solidification. Supersaturated solid solution of B was detected in the γ solid solution dendritic cores. The Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi model was performed to predict the interfacial morphology and correlate the solidification front velocity (SFV) with dendrite tip radius. It was observed from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy that the dendrite tip radius of the upper region was in the range of 15 to 30 nm, which yielded a SFV of approx 30 cm/s. The continuous growth model for solute trapping behavior developed by Aziz and Kaplan was used to determine that the effective partition coefficient of B was approximately 0.025. Finally, the feasibility of the modeling results were rationalized with the Clyne-Kurz segregation simulation of B, where Clyne-Kurz prediction using a partition coefficient of 0.025 was in good agreement with the electron probe microanalysis results.

  11. Weather fronts and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kveton, Vit

    1991-03-01

    Some methodological aspects are discussed of the investigation of acute infarct myocarditis (AIM) in relation to weather fronts. Results of a new method of analysis are given. Data were analysed from about the hour of the onset of symptoms, and led to the diagnosis of AIM either immediately or within a few hours or days (3019 cases observed over 4.5 years during 1982 1986 in Plzen, Czechoslovakia). Weather classification was based on three factors (the type of the foregoing front, the type of the subsequent front, the time section of the time interval demarcated by the passage of the surfaces of the fronts). AIM occurrence increased in particular types of weather fronts: (i) by 30% during 7 12 h after a warm front, if the time span between fronts exceeded 24 h; (ii) by 10% in time at least 36 h distant from the foregoing cold or occlusion front and from the succeeding warm or occlusion front; (iii) by 20% during 0 2 h before the passage of the front, provided the foregoing front was not warm and the interval between fronts exceeded 5 h. AIM occurrence decreased by 15% 20% for time span between fronts > 24 h at times 6 11, 6 23 and 6 35 h before a coming warm or occlusion front (for interfrontal intervals 25 48, 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), and also at 12 23 and possibly 12 35 h before a cold front (for intervals 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), if the foregoing front was cold or an occlusion front.

  12. An alloy solidification experiment conducted on shenzhou spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-H.; Huang, Q.

    To gain a better understanding of how gravity-driven phenomena affect the solidification and crystal growth of metallic materials, directional solidification of Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy and Al-Bi monotectic alloy were performed in the Multi-functional Crystal Growing Furnace on board the unmanned Chinese Shenzhou III spacecraft and on the ground respectively. The specimens were investigated applying metallographic, SEM, XRD and image analysis techniques. The results show that, for the Al-Al3Ni eutectic alloy, 1) microgravity condition is beneficial to eliminate solidification defects; 2) the Al3Ni rods precipitated in the space sample are shorter in length, larger in diameter and inhomogenous in inter-rod spacing distribution, compared with those in the ground sample, which are more homogenous and parallel with each other to the growth direction; 3) the mean spacing between Al3Ni rods obtained under microgravity is larger than that in normal gravity, which attributes to many large inter-rod spacing distributions existing in space sample rather than in ground sample; 4) preferred crystal directions in the sample solidified in space were found different to that on the ground. While, in the Al-Bi monotectic alloys, different sizes and distributions of Bi particles were obtained in space and on the earth, respectively. Some special Bi particle distribution patterns were also found in the space sample. It could be concluded that gravity condition had a strong influence on the solidification behavior of materials.

  13. Flow Effects during Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Murray, B. T.; McFadden, G. B.; Andrews, J. B.

    2000-11-01

    In monotectic alloy solidification, two phases, a solid phase, α, and a liquid phase, L_2, grow cooperatively from a single liquid phase L_1. For example, during the directional solidification of the aluminum-indium monotectic system, a solid-liquid two-phase structure consisting of liquid indium rods in an aluminum rich solid matrix can be grown from an aluminum-indium melt. The indium rods subsequently solidify at a lower temperature, forming a composite material. Theoretical models developed to quantitatively predict the inter-rod spacing observed in monotectic systems are largely based on diffusive solute transport. The role played by transport due to fluid flow is not well understood. Bulk flow may result from density change upon solidification or buoyancy-driven thermosolutal convection due to the thermal and solutal gradients inherent to the solidification process. We have developed numerical models to investigate the impact of an imposed flow on the solute field in the L1 phase. In addition, we propose to model the coupled flow at the L_1--L2 interface driven by surface tension variation. For monotectic growth, since phase equilibrium is maintained at the L_1--L2 interface, the temperature, compositions, pressures, and interface curvature are related by thermodynamic constraints that do not apply in a simple mechanical system.

  14. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  15. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Amber Lynn Genau

    2004-12-19

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  16. The Effect of Solidification Rate on Morphological Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    At low solidification rates, the criterion for the onset of morphological instability parallels closely the criterion of constitutional supercooling. At somewhat larger rates of solidification, however, the results of the perturbation theory of morphological instability differ significantly from the predictions of constitutional supercooling. This arises because the critical wave length for instability decreases as solidification rate increases and thus the effects of capillarity (solid-liquid surface tension) play a strong stabilizing role. This gives rise to the concept of absolute stability, according to which the system will always be stable for a sufficiently large rate of solidification. This enhanced stabilization by capillarity is present only so long as local equilibrium is maintained at the solid-liquid interface. If the interfacial temperature drops below its equilibrium value by an amount dependent on growth rate, oscillatory morphological instabilities can occur. The differences among these various stability criteria are illustrated by means of some simple two-dimensional diagrams that should supplant the conventional plots of (temperature gradient)/(growth rate) vs. alloy concentration.

  17. STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF CERCLA AND RCRA WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides U.S. EPA regional staff responsible for reviewing CERCLA remedial action plans and RCRA permit applications with a tool for interpreting information on stabilization/solidification treatment. As a practical day-to-day reference guide, it will also provide t...

  18. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  19. INTERFERENCE MECHANISMS IN WASTE STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes involves a series of chemical treatment procedures. The waste is normally treated so as to complex or bind the contaminants into a stable, insoluble form (stabilization), or to entrap the waste material in a solid and/or crysta...

  20. Multi-crystalline silicon solidification under controlled forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cablea, M.; Zaidat, K.; Gagnoud, A.; Nouri, A.; Chichignoud, G.; Delannoy, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-crystalline silicon wafers have a lower production cost compared to mono-crystalline wafers. This comes at the price of reduced quality in terms of electrical properties and as a result the solar cells made from such materials have a reduced efficiency. The presence of different impurities in the bulk material plays an important role during the solidification process. The impurities are related to different defects (dislocations, grain boundaries) encountered in multi-crystalline wafers. Applying an alternative magnetic field during the solidification process has various benefits. Impurities concentration in the final ingot could be reduced, especially metallic species, due to a convective term added in the liquid that reduces the concentration of impurities in the solute boundary layer. Another aspect is the solidification interface shape that is influenced by the electromagnetic stirring. A vertical Bridgman type furnace was used in order to study the solidification process of Si under the influence of a travelling magnetic field able to induce a convective flow in the liquid. The furnace was equipped with a Bitter type three-phase electromagnet that provides the required magnetic field. A numerical model of the furnace was developed in ANSYS Fluent commercial software. This paper presents experimental and numerical results of this approach, where interface markings were performed.

  1. Solidification of a Vacuum Arc-Remelted Zirconium Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil-Baudard, Matthieu; Jardy, Alain; Combeau, Hervé; Leclerc, Faustine; Rebeyrolle, Véronique

    2013-10-01

    As the quality of vacuum arc-remelted (VAR) zirconium ingots is directly linked to their chemical homogeneity and their metallurgical structure after solidification, it is important to predictively relate these factors to the operating conditions. Therefore, a detailed modeling study of the solidification process during VAR has been undertaken. To this purpose, the numerical macromodel SOLAR has been used. Assuming axisymmetrical geometry, this model is based on the solution of the coupled transient heat, momentum, and solute transport equations, under turbulent flow conditions during the remelting, hot-topping, and cooling of a cylindrical ingot. The actual operating parameters are defined as inputs for the model. Each of them, mainly the melting current sequence, melting rate sequence, and stirring parameters (current and period), is allowed to vary with time. Solidification mechanisms recently implemented in the model include a full coupling between energy and solute transport in the mushy zone. This modeling can be applied to actual multicomponent alloys. In this article, the macrosegregation induced by solidification in a zirconium alloy ingot is investigated. In order to validate the model results, a full-scale homogeneous Zy4 electrode has been remelted, and the resulted ingot has been analyzed. The model results show a general good agreement with the chemistry analyses, as soon as thermosolutal convection is accounted for to simulate accurately the interdendritic fluid flow in the central part of the ingot.

  2. Hazcon Solidification Process, Douglassville, Pa.: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the HAZCON solidification technology and its applicability as an on-site treatment method for waste site cleanup. A Demonstration was held at the Douglassville, Pennsylvania Superfund site in the fall of 1987. Operational data and sampling and an...

  3. Digested sewage sludge solidification by converter slag for landfill cover.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung-Ho; Cho, Jin-Kyu; Yim, Soobin

    2005-04-01

    A new technology for solidification of digested sewage sludge referred to as converter slag solidification (CSS) has been developed using converter slag as the solidifying agent and quick lime as the solidifying aid. The CSS technology was investigated by analyzing the physicochemical properties of solidified sludge and determining its microstructural characteristics. The feasibility of using solidified sludge as a landfill cover material was considered in the context of the economical recycling of waste. Sludge solidified using the CSS technology exhibited geotechnical properties that are appropriate for replacing currently used cover soil. Microscopic analyses using XRD, SEM and EDS revealed that the main hydrated product of solidification was CSH (CaO . SiO2 . nH2O), which may play an important role in the effective setting process. Negligible leaching of heavy metals from the solidified sludge was observed. The solidification process of the hydrated sludge, slag and quicklime eliminated the coliform bacteria. Recycled sewage sludge solidified using CCS technology could be used as an effective landfill cover. PMID:15763091

  4. Numerical study of solidification of a nano-enhanced phase change material (NEPCM) in a thermal storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, S.; Ranjbar, A. A.; Madani, M. M.; Mastiani, M.; Jalaly, H.

    2013-09-01

    The effects of nanoparticle dispersion on solidification of a Cu- n-hexadecane nanofluid inside a vertical enclosure are investigated numerically for different temperatures of the left vertical wall. An enthalpy porosity technique is used to trace the solid-liquid interface. The resulting nanoparticle-enhanced phase change materials (NEPCMs) exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity in comparison to the base material. The effect of the wall temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction are studied in terms of the solid fraction and the shape of the solid-liquid phase front. It has been found that a lower wall temperature and a higher nanoparticle volume fraction result in a larger solid fraction. The increase in the heat release rate of the NEPCM shows its great potential for diverse thermal energy storage applications.

  5. Simulation of Channel Segregation During Directional Solidification of In—75 wt pct Ga. Qualitative Comparison with In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ali; Gandin, Charles-André; Bellet, Michel; Shevchenko, Natalia; Eckert, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Freckles are common defects in industrial casting. They result from thermosolutal convection due to buoyancy forces generated from density variations in the liquid. The present paper proposes a numerical analysis for the formation of channel segregation using the three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton (CA)—finite element (FE) model. The model integrates kinetics laws for the nucleation and growth of a microstructure with the solution of the conservation equations for the casting, while introducing an intermediate modeling scale for a direct representation of the envelope of the dendritic grains. Directional solidification of a cuboid cell is studied. Its geometry, the alloy chosen as well as the process parameters are inspired from experimental observations recently reported in the literature. Snapshots of the convective pattern, the solute distribution, and the morphology of the growth front are qualitatively compared. Similitudes are found when considering the coupled 3D CAFE simulations. Limitations of the model to reach direct simulation of the experiments are discussed.

  6. Evolution of a physical and biological front from upwelling to relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwu; Bellingham, James G.; Ryan, John P.; Godin, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Fronts influence the structure and function of coastal marine ecosystems. Due to the complexity and dynamic nature of coastal environments and the small scales of frontal gradient zones, frontal research is difficult. To advance this challenging research we developed a method enabling an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect and track fronts, thereby providing high-resolution observations in the moving reference frame of the front itself. This novel method was applied to studying the evolution of a frontal zone in the coastal upwelling environment of Monterey Bay, California, through a period of variability in upwelling intensity. Through 23 frontal crossings in four days, the AUV detected the front using real-time analysis of vertical thermal stratification to identify water types and the front between them, and the vehicle tracked the front as it moved more than 10 km offshore. The physical front coincided with a biological front between strongly stratified phytoplankton-enriched water inshore of the front, and weakly stratified phytoplankton-poor water offshore of the front. While stratification remained a consistent identifier, conditions on both sides of the front changed rapidly as regional circulation responded to relaxation of upwelling winds. The offshore water type transitioned from relatively cold and saline upwelled water to relatively warm and fresh coastal transition zone water. The inshore water type exhibited an order of magnitude increase in chlorophyll concentrations and an associated increase in oxygen and decrease in nitrate. It also warmed and freshened near the front, consistent with the cross-frontal exchange that was detected in the high-resolution AUV data. AUV-observed cross-frontal exchanges beneath the surface manifestation of the front emphasize the importance of AUV synoptic water column surveys in the frontal zone.

  7. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    SciTech Connect

    Halim Meco

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  8. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Ramakrishnan; Kota, Arun; Anand, Gaurav

    2004-01-01

    Our long term goal has been to make detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Thus, the objective of the current project was to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. Our focus was on the influence of oxygen on indium antimonide on clean silica ("quartz"). The research was performed by three chemical engineering graduate students, the third of whom will complete his research in the summer of 2005. Originally, we had planned to use a sealed silica cell containing a zirconia electrochemical element to control the oxygen partial pressure. However, zirconia requires an operating temperature above the 530 C melting point of InSb and is difficult to form a gas-tight seal with silica. Thus, we decided instead to flow an oxygen-containing gas through the cell. A special apparatus was designed, built and perfected. A piece of InSb was placed on a horizontal silica plate in a quartz cell. High purity argon, helium or hydrogen-containing gas is passed continuously through the cell while the oxygen concentration in the effluent gas is measured. The shape of the resulting drop was used to determine contact angle and surface tension of Ga-doped and high purity InSb. Oxygen appeared to decrease the contact angle, and definitely did not increase it. The following section gives the background for the research. Section 2 summarizes the results obtained on Ga-doped InSb with relatively high oxygen concentrations. Section 3 describes recent improvements made to the apparatus and methods of analysis. Section 4 gives recent results for high-purity InSb at low oxygen concentrations. Final results will be obtained only this summer (2005). Each section

  9. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending.

  10. Thermoelectric Magnetohydrodynamic Flows and Their Induced Change of Solid-Liquid Interface Shape in Static Magnetic Field-Assisted Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiang; Fautrelle, Yves; Nguyen-Thi, Henri; Reinhart, Guillaume; Liao, Hanlin; Li, Xi; Zhong, Yunbo; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-03-01

    Applying static magnetic field can produce flows (thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flows, TEMHDF) in the melt by interacting with the thermoelectric currents (TEC) during solidification of metals. A physical model was proposed to interpret how these TEC appear at the solid-liquid interface and verified by a corresponding simulation. The influences of TEMHDF on solidification were investigated through both ex-situ experiments and n situ observations by means of synchrotron X-ray radiography. The 3D numerical simulations of TEMHDF were performed for these two cases, respectively, and suggested that both the change of interface shape with different transverse static magnetic fields demonstrated by the ex-situ experiments and the real time observed interface shape varying under a 0.08 T transverse static magnetic field could attribute to the TEMHDF advanced solid-liquid interface in the static magnetic field-assisted directional solidification. The TEMHDF produced by an axial static magnetic field were also computed along with the interface change predicted based on which is good in line with the published experimental results. This study of TEMHDF and their impacts on the solid-liquid interface shape provides a method to tailor the structure during directional solidification using static magnetic field.

  11. Phyllotaxis, Pushed Pattern-Forming Fronts, and Optimal Packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennybacker, Matthew; Newell, Alan C.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate that the pattern forming partial differential equation derived from the auxin distribution model proposed by Meyerowitz, Traas, and others gives rise to all spiral phyllotaxis properties observed on plants. We show how the advancing pushed pattern front chooses spiral families enumerated by Fibonacci sequences with all attendant self-similar properties, a new amplitude invariant curve, and connect the results with the optimal packing based algorithms previously used to explain phyllotaxis. Our results allow us to make experimentally testable predictions.

  12. Modeling ice front Dynamics of Greenland outlet glaciers using ISSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlighem, M.; Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H. L.; Rignot, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The recent increase in the rate of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet is primarily due to the acceleration and thinning of outlet glaciers along the coast. This acceleration is a dynamic response to the retreat of calving fronts, which leads to a loss in resistive stresses. These processes need to be included in ice sheet models in order to be able to accurately reproduce current trends in mass loss, and in the long term reduce the uncertainty in the contribution of ice sheets to sea level rise. Today, the vast majority of ice sheet models that include moving boundaries are one dimensional flow line and vertical flow band models, that are not adapted to the complex geometries of Greenland outlet glaciers, as they do not accurately capture changes in lateral stresses. Here, we use the level set method to track moving boundaries within a 2D plane view model of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), and investigate the sensitivity of Store Glacier, in western Greenland, to the amount of melting occurring at its calving front. We explore different calving laws and obtain the best results with a new simple calving law adapted from von Mises yield criterion. We show that the ocean circulation near the front and the amount of runoff are able to trigger ice front advance and retreat depending on the amount of melting that they produce at the calving face, but the bed topography controls the stable positions of the ice front. The modeled calving front of Store Glacier, for which we have quality bed topography and sea floor bathymetry data, is particularly stable because of the presence of a large sill at the glacier terminus. If the ice front detaches from this stabilizing sill due to larger amounts of melting at the front or due to large calving events, the glacier front starts to retreat as the bed deepens inland, until it finds another stabilizing feature in the bed topography. The new bed topography maps based on mass conservation make it possible to model more

  13. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Left Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's left front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  14. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Right Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's right front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  15. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min-1 up to 10 K min-1 can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K-1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ˜4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  16. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M. Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min{sup −1} up to 10 K min{sup −1} can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K–1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  17. Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy into a Cellular Convective Flow: Localized Morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.- J.; Davis, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    A steady, two dimensional cellular convection modifies the morphological instability of a binary alloy that undergoes directional solidification. When the convection wavelength is far longer than that of the morphological cells, the behavior of the moving front is described by a slow, spatial-temporal dynamics obtained through a multiple-scale analysis. The resulting system has a "parametric-excitation" structure in space, with complex parameters characterizing the interactions between flow, solute diffusion, and rejection. The convection stabilizes two dimensional disturbances oriented with the flow, but destabilizes three dimensional disturbances in general. When the flow is weak, the morphological instability behaves incommensurably to the flow wavelength, but becomes quantized and forced to fit into the flow-box as the flow gets stronger. At large flow magnitudes the instability is localized, confined in narrow envelopes with cells traveling with the flow. In this case the solutions are discrete eigenstates in an unbounded space. Their stability boundary and asymptotics are obtained by the WKB analysis.

  18. An examination of effects of solidification parameters on permeability of a mushy zone in castings

    SciTech Connect

    Danylo B. Oryshchyn; Ömer N. Doğan

    2007-12-01

    A model describing the development of dendritic structure and the resulting gradient of flow resistance to interdendritic liquid is presented. The Hagen–Pousielle version of D’Arcy’s equation for flow through a porous structure is developed as a function of cooling rate and liquid volume fraction. Applied to finite elements in a unidirectionally cooled casting model, permeability gradient, feeding flow-rate required to prevent porosity, and mushy-zone liquid pressure drop at this flow rate are evaluated for the simple Fe–2Cr–0.5C and Al–5Cu castings exhibiting asymptotic and linear temperature profiles, respectively. The model shows permeability of the dendritic structure in the mushy zone dropping sharply, approaching the root of solidification front (solidus). Also shown is the effect of relative magnitude of primary and secondary arm spacing. If secondary dendrite arm spacing approaches primary arm spacing, the permeability for flow normal to primary dendrite arms approaches or even surpasses the permeability for flow parallel to primary dendrite arms.

  19. An examination of effects of solidification parameters on permeability of a mushy zone in castings

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshchyn, D.B.; Dogan, O.N.

    2008-02-01

    A model describing the development of dendritic structure and the resulting gradient of flow resistance to interdendritic liquid is presented. The Hagen–Pousielle version of D’Arcy’s equation for flow through a porous structure is developed as a function of cooling rate and liquid volume fraction. Applied to finite elements in a unidirectionally cooled casting model, permeability gradient, feeding flow-rate required to prevent porosity, and mushy-zone liquid pressure drop at this flow rate are evaluated for the simple Fe–2Cr–0.5C and Al–5Cu castings exhibiting asymptotic and linear temperature profiles, respectively. The model shows permeability of the dendritic structure in the mushy zone dropping sharply, approaching the root of solidification front (solidus). Also shown is the effect of relative magnitude of primary and secondary arm spacing. If secondary dendrite arm spacing approaches primary arm spacing, the permeability for flow normal to primary dendrite arms approaches or even surpasses the permeability for flow parallel to primary dendrite arms.

  20. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments.

    PubMed

    Becker, M; Dreißigacker, C; Klein, S; Kargl, F

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min(-1) up to 10 K min(-1) can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K-1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured. PMID:26133847

  1. Shock-front broadening in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, J. L.; Kadau, K.

    2008-04-01

    We analyze a model for the evolution of shock fronts in polycrystalline materials. This model is based on the idea of Meyers and Carvalho [Mater. Sci. Eng. 24, 131 (1976)] that the shock velocity anisotropy within the polycrystal is the most important factor in shock front broadening. Our analysis predicts that the shock front width increases as the 1/2 power of the front penetration distance into the crystal. Our theoretical prediction is in plausible agreement with previous experimental results for the elastic precursor rise time, and it should therefore provide a useful shock width estimate. Furthermore, our theoretical framework is also applicable to other problems involving front propagation in heterogeneous media.

  2. Developpement de mesures non destructives, par ondes ultrasonores, d'epaisseurs de fronts de solidification dans les reacteurs metallurgiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floquet, Jimmy

    Dans les cuves d'electrolyse d'aluminium, le milieu de reaction tres corrosif attaque les parois de la cuve, ce qui diminue leur duree de vie et augmente les couts de production. Le talus, qui se forme sous l'effet des pertes de chaleur qui maintiennent un equilibre thermique dans la cuve, sert de protection naturelle a la cuve. Son epaisseur doit etre controlee pour maximiser cet effet. Advenant la resorption non voulue de ce talus, les degats generes peuvent s'evaluer a plusieurs centaines de milliers de dollars par cuve. Aussi, l'objectif est de developper une mesure ultrasonore de l'epaisseur du talus, car elle serait non intrusive et non destructive. La precision attendue est de l'ordre du centimetre pour des mesures d'epaisseurs comprenant 2 materiaux, allant de 5 a 20 cm. Cette precision est le facteur cle permettant aux industriels de controler l'epaisseur du talus de maniere efficace (maximiser la protection des parois tout en maximisant l'efficacite energetique du procede), par l'ajout d'un flux thermique. Cependant, l'efficacite d'une mesure ultrasonore dans cet environnement hostile reste a demontrer. Les travaux preliminaires ont permis de selectionner un transducteur ultrasonore a contact ayant la capacite a resister aux conditions de mesure (hautes temperatures, materiaux non caracterises...). Differentes mesures a froid (traite par analyse temps-frequence) ont permis d'evaluer la vitesse de propagation des ondes dans le materiau de la cuve en graphite et de la cryolite, demontrant la possibilite d'extraire l'information pertinente d'epaisseur du talus in fine. Fort de cette phase de caracterisation des materiaux sur la reponse acoustique des materiaux, les travaux a venir ont ete realises sur un modele reduit de la cuve. Le montage experimental, un four evoluant a 1050 °C, instrumente d'une multitude de capteurs thermique, permettra une comparaison de la mesure intrusive LVDT a celle du transducteur, dans des conditions proches de la mesure industrielle. Mots-cles : Ultrasons, CND, Haute temperature, Aluminium, Cuve d'electrolyse.

  3. Double-Front Detonation Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Sumskoi, S. I.; Victorov, S. B.

    According to the theory of detonation, in a detonation wave there is a sound plane, named Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) plane. There are certain stationary parameters for this plane. In this work the possibility of the second CJ plane is shown. This second CJ plane is stationary as well. The physical mechanism of non-equilibrium transition providing the existence of the second CJ plane is presented. There is a non-equilibrium state, when the heat is removed from the reaction zone and the heat capacity decreases sharply. As a result of this non-equilibrium state, the sound velocity increases, and the local supersonic zone with second sonic plane (second CJ plane) appears. So the new mode of detonation wave is predicted. Equations describing this mode of detonation are presented. The exact analytical solution for the second CJ plane parameters is obtained. The example of double-front detonation in high explosive (TNT) is presented. In this double-front structure "nanodiamond-nanographite" phase transition takes place in condensed particles of detonation products.

  4. Dipolarization Fronts from Reconnection Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Swisdak, M. M.; Merkin, V. G.; Buzulukova, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts observed in the magnetotail are often viewed as signatures of bursty magnetic reconnection. However, until recently spontaneous reconnection was considered to be fully prohibited in the magnetotail geometry because of the linear stability of the ion tearing mode. Recent theoretical studies showed that spontaneous reconnection could be possible in the magnetotail geometries with the accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the thin current sheet, a distinctive feature of the magnetotail prior to substorm onset. That result was confirmed by open-boundary full-particle simulations of 2D current sheet equilibria, where two magnetotails were separated by an equilibrium X-line and weak external electric field was imposed to nudge the system toward the instability threshold. To investigate the roles of the equilibrium X-line, driving electric field and other parameters in the reconnection onset process we performed a set of 2D PIC runs with different initial settings. The investigated parameter space includes the critical current sheet thickness, flux tube volume per unit magnetic flux and the north-south component of the magnetic field. Such an investigation is critically important for the implementation of kinetic reconnection onset criteria into global MHD codes. The results are compared with Geotail visualization of the magnetotail during substorms, as well as Cluster and THEMIS observations of dipolarization fronts.

  5. Structural Properties of Liquid SiC during Rapid Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Yan, WanJun; Gao, TingHong; Guo, XiaoTian; Qin, YunXiang; Xie, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid solidification of liquid silicon carbide (SiC) is studied by molecular dynamic simulation using the Tersoff potential. The structural properties of liquid and amorphous SiC are analyzed by the radial distribution function, angular distribution function, coordination number, and visualization technology. Results show that both heteronuclear and homonuclear bonds exist and no atomic segregation occurs during solidification. The bond angles of silicon and carbon atoms are distributed at around 109° and 120°, respectively, and the average coordination number is <4. Threefold carbon atoms and fourfold silicon atoms are linked together by six typical structures and ultimately form a random network of amorphous structure. The simulated results help understand the structural properties of liquid and amorphous SiC, as well as other similar semiconductor alloys. PMID:24288474

  6. Convection and solidification influenced by thermo-electric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Abou-Jaoude, G. S.; Budenkova, O.; Reinhart, G.; Mangelinck, N.; Li, X.; Nguyen-Thi, H.; Ren, Z.-M.; Fautrelle, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the thermo-electric-magnetic (TEM) forces both on the liquid metal and immersed solid particles which mimics equiaxed grains. Firstly, we provide a summary of analytical works performed in a previous paper. Then, we present experimental works on in situ and real time visualization of the directional solidification of Al-10wt%Cu alloy by means of synchrotron X-ray radiography during directional solidification under a transverse 0.08 T permanent magnetic field. The experiments bring definite evidence of the existence of various phenomena which could be related to the thermoelectric effect acting directly on equiaxed grains. Comparisons between the predicted and observed horizontal deviations of the particles are in fairly good agreement.

  7. Property measurements and solidification studies by electrostatic levitation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Paul-François; Yu, Jianding; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2004-11-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan has recently developed several electrostatic levitation furnaces and implemented new techniques and procedures for property measurement, solidification studies, and atomic structure research. In addition to the contamination-free environment for undercooled and liquid metals and semiconductors, the newly developed facilities possess the unique capabilities of handling ceramics and high vapor pressure materials, reducing processing time, and imaging high luminosity samples. These are exemplified in this paper with the successful processing of BaTiO(3). This allowed measurement of the density of high temperature solid, liquid, and undercooled phases. Furthermore, the material resulting from containerless solidification consisted of micrometer-size particles and a glass-like phase exhibiting a giant dielectric constant exceeding 100,000. PMID:15644375

  8. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes in hydraulic cement

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Kalb, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Work has been conducted to investigate the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes with portland cements. These efforts have been directed toward the development of acceptable formulations for the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes and the characterization of the resultant waste forms. This paper describes formulation development work and defines acceptable formulations in terms of ternary phase compositional diagrams. The effects of cement type, resin type, resin loading, waste/cement ratio and water/cement ratio are described. The leachability of unsolidified and solidified resin waste forms and its relationship to full-scale waste form behavior is discussed. Gamma irradiation was found to improve waste form integrity, apparently as a result of increased resin crosslinking. Modifications to improve waste form integrity are described. 3 tables.

  9. Phosphorus Removal from Silicon by Vacuum Refining and Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dachuan; Ren, Shiqiang; Shi, Shuang; Dong, Wei; Qiu, Jieshan; TAN, Yi; Li, Jiayan

    2014-02-01

    Silicon is widely used as a raw material for production of solar cells. As a major impurity in silicon, phosphorus must be removed to 1 × 10-5 wt.%. In the present study, based on the distribution of phosphorus in a silicon ingot obtained by vacuum refining and directional solidification, the mechanism for removal of phosphorus from silicon is investigated. The results show that the distribution is controlled not only by segregation at the solid-liquid interface but also by evaporation at the gas-liquid interface, showing some deviation from Scheil's equation. A modified model which considers both segregation and evaporation is used to simulate the distribution, matching quite well with the experimental results. The temperature and solidification rate are two important parameters that affect the overall mass transfer coefficient and the effective segregation coefficient and thus the distribution of phosphorus. A high removal efficiency and a homogeneous distribution can be obtained by adjusting these two parameters.

  10. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  11. Structural properties of liquid SiC during rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Yan, WanJun; Gao, TingHong; Guo, XiaoTian; Qin, YunXiang; Xie, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid solidification of liquid silicon carbide (SiC) is studied by molecular dynamic simulation using the Tersoff potential. The structural properties of liquid and amorphous SiC are analyzed by the radial distribution function, angular distribution function, coordination number, and visualization technology. Results show that both heteronuclear and homonuclear bonds exist and no atomic segregation occurs during solidification. The bond angles of silicon and carbon atoms are distributed at around 109° and 120°, respectively, and the average coordination number is <4. Threefold carbon atoms and fourfold silicon atoms are linked together by six typical structures and ultimately form a random network of amorphous structure. The simulated results help understand the structural properties of liquid and amorphous SiC, as well as other similar semiconductor alloys. PMID:24288474

  12. Pulsatile instability in rapid directional solidification: Strongly-nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Richard J.; Merchant, G. J.; Brattkus, K.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In models of rapid directional solidification, non-equilibrium interfacial conditions are employed. As a result, there is an oscillatory mode of instability, as well as the steady cellular mode, found in the equilibrium model of Mullins and Sekerka. When the temperature field is decoupled from the problem, the preferred wave number for the oscillatory mode is zero, and the interface pulsates in time while remaining spatially uniform. Results from multiple scale analyses in the two limiting cases of the parameters are reported. In these limits, it is found that the instability is a bifurcation to relaxation oscillations; these nonlinear oscillations may be related to the observed microstructure that results from rapid solidification processes such as laser surface remelting.

  13. Crystallization and saturation front propagation in silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan T.

    2013-12-01

    The cooling and crystallization style of silicic magma bodies in the upper crust falls on a continuum between whole-chamber processes of convection, crystal settling, and cumulate formation and interface-driven processes of conduction and crystallization front migration. In the end-member case of vigorous convection and crystal settling, volatile saturation advances downward from the roof and upward from the floor throughout the chamber. In the end-member case of stagnant magma bodies, volatile saturation occurs along an inward propagating front from all sides of the chamber. Ambient thermal gradient primarily controls the propagation rate; warm (⩾40 °C/km) geothermal gradients lead to thick (1200+ m) crystal mush zones and slow crystallization front propagation. Cold (<40 °C/km) geothermal gradients lead to rapid crystallization front propagation and thin (<1000 m) mush zones. Magma chamber geometry also exerts a first-order control on propagation rates; bodies with high surface to magma volume ratio and large Earth-surface-parallel faces exhibit more rapid propagation and thinner mush zones. Crystallization front propagation occurs at speeds of greater than 10 cm/yr (rhyolitic magma; 1 km thick sill geometry in a 20 °C/km geotherm), far faster than diffusion of volatiles in magma and faster than bubbles can nucleate, grow, and ascend through the chamber. Numerical simulations indicate saturation front propagation is determined primarily by pressure and magma crystallization rate; above certain initial water contents (4.4 wt.% in a dacite) the mobile magma is volatile-rich enough above 10 km depth to always contains a saturation front. Saturation fronts propagate down from the magma chamber roof at lower water contents (3.3 wt.% in a dacite at 5 km depth), creating an upper saturated interface for most common (4-6 wt.%) magma water contents. This upper interface promotes the production of a fluid pocket underneath the apex of the magma chamber. If the fluid

  14. Solidification Effects in MAR-M246(Hf) Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. H.; Parr, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Fatigue properties degraded with crystallographic orientations greater than 10 degrees from {001} axis. Influence of solidification and heat-treatment parameters on structure and fatigue properties of nickel-based superalloy MAR-M246(Hf) described in 24-page report. Superalloys have high strength and corrosion resistance at temperatures up to 1,400 degrees C; their uses range from petrochemical equipment to marine, industrial, aircraft, and vehicular gas turbines.

  15. Development Of A Magnetic Directional-Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Bill R.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes development of directional-solidification furnace in which axial magnetic field is imposed by surrounding ring permanent magnets and/or electromagnets and pole pieces. Furnace provides controlled axial temperature gradients in multiple zones, through which ampoule containing sample of material to be solidified is translated at controlled speed by low-vibration, lead-screw, stepping-motor-driven mechanism. Intended for use in low-gravity (spaceflight) experiments on melt growth of high-purity semiconductor crystals.

  16. Directional solidification at ultra-high thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Lee, D. S.; Neff, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A high gradient controlled solidification (HGC) furnace was designed and operated at gradients up to 1800 C/cm to continuously produce aluminum alloys. Rubber '0' rings for the water cooling chamber were eliminated, while still maintaining water cooling directly onto the solidified metal. An HGC unit for high temperature ferrous alloys was also designed. Successful runs were made with cast iron, at thermal gradients up to 500 C/cm.

  17. Intense magnetic field generation by solidification and crustal delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that asteroidal magnetic fields are a common feature of the early solar system [1,2]. The iron cores of different asteroids may solidify in different ways [3]. For the IVA iron meteorite parent body the rapid cooling rates and correlation with Ni concentrations further suggest that their parent body was entirely metal, and that solidification of their parent asteroid proceeded from the top down. Here we present model constraints on the thermo-chemical evolution of such rapidly cooled iron asteroids. We show that the temperature of the liquid is rapidly well mixed, and equal to the composition-dependent freezing point, and that thermal convection contributes only at early times to generation of intense magnetic fields and is therefore not sufficient to explain the generation of a dynamo. Instead, we propose that viscous delamination [4] at the base of the solidifying, dense crust provides a sufficient buoyancy flux to generate a magnetic field with properties consistent with those inferred from paleomagnetic measurements of the two IVA meteorites [5]. A model that captures the aggregate effect of episodic delamination events predicts the evolution of the crust and the formation and growth of the asteroid core, the intensity and directional evolution of the magnetic field through time, and the times at which magnetic field generation ceases and total asteroid solidification occur. These predictions can be compared directly with recent measurements of IVA iron meteorites [5] with implications for top-down solidification, the solid structure of the IVA parent core, and magnetic field generation both on the IVA parent body, and wider implications for top-down core solidification generally. [1] Weiss et al. Space Sci. Rev. 152, 341-390 (2010). [2] Tarduno et al. Science. 338, 939-942 (2012). [3] Williams Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 284, 564-569 (2009) [4] Molnar et al. Geophys. J. Int. 133, 568-584 (1998) [5] Bryson et

  18. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  19. Fluid mechanics and solidification investigations in low-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Lundquist, C. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid mechanics of gases and liquids and solidification processes were investigated under microgravity conditions during Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Electromagnetic, acoustic, and aerodynamic levitation devices, drop tubes, aircraft parabolic flight trajectories, and vertical sounding rockets were developed for low-g simulation. The Spacelab 3 mission will be carried out in a gravity gradient flight attitude; analyses of sources of vehicle dynamic accelerations with associated g-levels and angular rates will produce results for future specific experiments.

  20. Further analysis of field effects on liquids and solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, R. F.; Miller, R. I.; Chen, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the magnitude of external field effects on liquids are presented to describe how external fields can influence the substructure of the field. Quantitative estimates of magnetic and gravitational effects are reported on melts of metals and semiconductors. The results are condensed in tables which contain the input data for calculation of the field effects on diffusion coefficient, solidification rate and for calculation of field forces on individual molecules in the melt.

  1. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Relating Global Precipitation to Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, J. L.; Jakob, C.; Nicholls, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric fronts are important for the day-to-day variability of weather in the midlatitudes, particularly during winter when extratropical storm-tracks are at their maximum intensity. Fronts are often associated with heavy rain, and strongly affect the local space-time distribution of rainfall. Although global climate models should be expected to represent the baroclinic systems within which the fronts are embedded, the fronts themselves and precipitation processes within them are of much smaller scale. As a consequence, models with the typical horizontal resolution of contemporary climate models do not necessarily accurately capture these features. A recently developed objective front identification method applied to reanalysis data is combined with global rainfall data to investigate how precipitation and extremes of precipitation around the globe are associated with atmospheric fronts. Having established the observed distribution of fronts and their role in producing precipitation and extremes, the occurrence of fronts and the associated precipitation can then be evaluated in state-of-the-art climate models. This provides a process-oriented method of model evaluation where the errors in the model can be decomposed into contributions from errors in front frequency and errors in frontal and non-frontal precipitation intensity. Finally, how fronts and their associated precipitation, may change in the future, especially the extremes, can be investigated.

  3. Microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the widespread commercial use of peritectic alloys (e.g., steels, brass, bronze, intermetallic compounds, Co based superalloys and A3B type superconductors), the characterization of the microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectics has historically lagged behind similar efforts directed towards other types of binary invariant reactions such as eutectic or monotectic. A wide variety of possible microstructures has been shown to form in peritectics depending upon the imposed temperature gradient, G, the solidification velocity, V, as well as the presence or absence of convection in the melt. This has important technological implications since many commercially important alloys exhibit peritectics and processing methods such as casting and welding often involve widely changing conditions. It has been the aim of this project to examine, in a systematic fashion, both experimentally and theoretically, the influence of gravitationally driven convection on segregation and microstructural development during solidification in peritectic systems under terrestrial conditions. The scientific results of the project will be used to establish ground based data in support of a meaningful microgravity flight experiment.

  4. Solidification microstructure formation in HK40 and HH40 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xian-fei; Liu, Dong-fang; Guo, Pei-liang; Zheng, Yun-rong; Feng, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure formation processes in HK40 and HH40 alloys were investigated through JmatPro calculations and quenching performed during directional solidification. The phase transition routes of HK40 and HH40 alloys were determined as L → L + γ → L + γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 + M23C6→ γ + M23C6 and L → L + δ → L + δ + γ→ L + δ + γ + M23C6 δ + γ + M23C6, respectively. The solidification mode was determined to be the austenitic mode (A mode) in HK40 alloy and the ferritic-austenitic solidification mode (FA mode) in HH40 alloy. In HK40 alloy, eutectic carbides directly precipitate in a liquid and coarsen during cooling. The primary γ dendrites grow at the 60° angle to each other. On the other hand, in HH40 alloy, residual δ forms because of the incomplete transformation from δ to γ. Cr23C6 carbide is produced in solid delta ferrite δ but not directly in liquid HH40 alloy. Because of carbide formation in the solid phase and no rapid growth of the dendrite in a non-preferential direction, HH40 alloy is more resistant to cast defect formation than HK40 alloy.

  5. Solidification of EPICOR-II resin waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Jr, R M; McConnell, Jr, J W

    1984-08-01

    One goal of the EPICOR-II Research and Disposition Program is to investigate methods of immobilizing ion exchange resin wastes by solidification. Formulations were developed for the solidification of EPICOR-II prefilter wastes from Three Mile Island Unit-2 using Portland type I-II cement and vinyl ester-styrene. In developing formulations, ion exchange resins and zeolite simulating those in EPICOR-II prefilters were used. Once suitable formulations were defined, radioactive wastes from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-7 (organic ion exchange resins) and PF-24 (organic ion exchange resins with zeolite) were solidified. A total of 267 radioactive waste form specimens were prepared in hot cell solidification operations. That total includes 136 Portland cement specimens (72 incorporating prefilter PF-7 waste and 64 with prefilter PF-24 waste) and 131 vinyl ester-styrene specimens (71 incorporating prefilter PF-7 waste and 60 with prefilter PF-24 waste). The methodologies used and products produced are described and evaluated in this report.

  6. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  7. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  8. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L ..-->.. L + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma... In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions.

  9. Research on metal solidification in zero-g state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The containerless solidification of several pure metals and metallic alloys was studied in a low gravity environment. The tests were performed in the MSFC 4.2 s drop tower using a rapid wire melting apparatus designed and built for this purpose. Pure iron and nickel, and alloys of iron-nickel, iron-carbon, nickel-aluminum and tungsten-rhenium were all melted and solidified at a gravity level of approximately 100.000/-4 g. Interpretation of the results has led to an appreciation of the factors controlling the successful execution of this drop test experiment and to a delineation of the limits of applicability of the apparatus. Preliminary metallurgical evaluations are presented of the overall shapes, lattice parameters, surface microstructure,, cross-sectional microstructures, solidification and transformation sequences, evaporative segregation, and localized solute redistribution observed in the low-gravity specimens. The effects of low gravity on metallic solidification are discussed with particular emphasis on observations of spontaneous undercooling and evaporative segregation in uncontained melts.

  10. A multiphase solute diffusion model for dendritic alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Beckermann, C.

    1993-12-01

    A solute diffusion model, aimed at predicting microstructure formation in metal castings, is proposed for dendritic solidification of alloys. The model accounts for the different length scales existing in a dendritic structure. This is accomplished by utilizing a multiphase approach, in which not only the various physical phases but also phases associated with different length scales are considered separately. The macroscopic conservation equations are derived for each phase using the volume averaging technique, with constitutive relations developed for the interfacial transfer terms. It is shown that the multiphase model can rigorously incorporate the growth of dendrite tips and coarsening of dendrite arms. In addition, the distinction of different length scales enables the inclusion of realistic descriptions of the dendrite topology and relations to key metallurgical parameters. Another novel aspect of the model is that a single set of conservation equations for solute diffusion is developed for both equiaxed and columnar dendritic solidification. Finally, illustrative calculations for equiaxed, columnar, and mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification are carried out to provide quantitative comparisons with previous studies, and a variety of fundamental phenomena such as recalescence, dendrite tip undercooling, and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) are predicted.

  11. Microstructural development of rapid solidification in Al-Si powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, F.

    1995-11-01

    The microstructure and the gradient of microstructure that forms in rapidly solidificated powder were investigated for different sized particles. High pressure gas atomization solidification process has been used to produce a series of Al-Si alloys powders between 0.2 {mu}m to 150 {mu}m diameter at the eutectic composition (12.6 wt pct Si). This processing technique provides powders of different sizes which solidify under different conditions (i.e. interface velocity and interface undercooling), and thus give different microstructures inside the powders. The large size powder shows dendritic and eutectic microstructures. As the powder size becomes smaller, the predominant morphology changes from eutectic to dendritic to cellular. Microstructures were quantitatively characterized by using optical microscope and SEM techniques. The variation in eutectic spacing within the powders were measured and compared with the theoretical model to obtain interface undercooling, and growth rate during the solidification of a given droplet. Also, nucleation temperature, which controls microstructures in rapidly solidified fine powders, was estimated. A microstructural map which correlates the microstructure with particle size and processing parameters is developed.

  12. A fully coupled 2D model of equiaxed eutectic solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Charbon, Ch.; LeSar, R.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a model of equiaxed eutectic solidification that couples the macroscopic level of heat diffusion with the microscopic level of nucleation and growth of the eutectic grains. The heat equation with the source term corresponding to the latent heat release due to solidification is calculated numerically by means of an implicit finite difference method. In the time stepping scheme, the evolution of solid fraction is deduced from a stochastic model of nucleation and growth which uses the local temperature (interpolated from the FDM mesh) to determine the local grain density and the local growth rate. The solid-liquid interface of each grain is tracked by using a subdivision of each grain perimeter in a large number of sectors. The state of each sector (i.e. whether it is still in contact with the liquid or already captured by an other grain) and the increase of radius of each grain during one time step allows one to compute the increase of solid fraction. As for deterministic models, the results of the model are the evolution of temperature and of solid fraction at any point of the sample. Moreover the model provides a complete picture of the microstructure, thus not limiting the microstructural information to the average grain density but allowing one to compute any stereological value of interest. We apply the model to the solidification of gray cast iron.

  13. Transient Effects in Planar Solidification of Dilute Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    The initial transient during planar solidification of dilute binary alloys is studied in the framework of the boundary integral method that leads to the non-linear Volterra integral governing equation. An analytical solution of this equation is obtained for the case of a constant growth rate which constitutes the well-known Tiller's formula for the solute transient. The more physically relevant, constant ramping down temperature case has been studied both numerically and analytically. In particular, an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained for the initial transient behavior. A numerical technique to solve the non-linear Volterra equation is developed and the solution is obtained for a family of the governing parameters. For the rapid solidification condition, growth rate spikes have been observed even for the infinite kinetics model. When recirculating fluid flow is included into the analysis, the spike feature is dramatically diminished. Finally, we have investigated planar solidification with a fluctuating temperature field as a possible mechanism for frequently observed solute trapping bands.

  14. Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The relation between the hadronic short-distance constituent quark and gluon particle limit and the long-range confining domain is yet one of the most challenging aspects of particle physics due to the strong coupling nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, the fundamental theory of the strong interactions. The central question is how one can compute hadronic properties from first principles; i.e., directly from the QCD Lagrangian. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time. Lattice numerical results follow from computation of frame-dependent moments of distributions in Euclidean space and dynamical observables in Minkowski spacetime, such as the time-like hadronic form factors, are not amenable to Euclidean lattice computations. The Dyson-Schwinger methods have led to many important insights, such as the infrared fixed point behavior of the strong coupling constant, but in practice, the analyses are limited to ladder approximation in Landau gauge. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. New theoretical tools are thus of primary interest for the interpretation of the results expected at the new mass scale and kinematic regions accessible to the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gravity or string theory on a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and conformal field theories in physical space-time has led to a semiclassical approximation for strongly-coupled QCD, which provides physical insights into its nonperturbative dynamics. The correspondence is holographic in the sense that it determines a duality between theories in different number of space-time dimensions. This geometric approach leads in fact to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front

  15. Solidification Studies from the Electrostatic Levitation System at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation (ESL) provides a means to study molten materials in a high-purity environment, free from contact with a container. Many phenomena important to materials science can be studied in the ESL. Solidification of metals, alloys and undercooled materials represent an important topic for research in the ESL. Recent studies of metals and alloys during solidification in the ESL are reported. Measurements include time, temperature and transformation of metallic glass-forming alloys, solidification velocities, and microstructure,

  16. Rapid solidification of levitation melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets with high undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Yuh; Flemings, Merton C.; Wu, Yanzhong; Piccone, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by high-speed optical temperature sensing for the rapid solidification of highly undercooled, levitation-melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets are presented. These data suggest a solidification model proceeding according to overlapping steps: (1) dendritic growth within the bulk undercooled melt, (2) continued recalescence as supersaturation of the interdendritic liquid dissipates, (3) fine-scale remelting within the dendrites, (4) ripening of the fine structure, and (5) solidification of remaining liquid at the end of recalescence.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of dendritic growth kinetics in a Bridgman furnace front tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, R. P.; McFadden, S.

    2016-03-01

    A directional solidification experiment of a Ti-Al-Nb-B-C alloy by power down method is simulated using a Bridgman furnace front tracking model. The effect of varying the dendritic growth parameters; C, the columnar dendrite growth coefficient, and n, the undercooling exponent, is investigated. A matrix of growth coefficients and undercooling exponents - at three levels each, based around a growth law for Ti-46wt.%Al - is applied in simulations, and the effect on columnar dendrite tip temperature, tip velocity, and tip temperature gradient is observed. The simulation results show that the dendrite tip velocity and temperature gradient at the tip are practically unaffected by the use of different growth parameters. However, the predicted columnar dendrite tip undercooling did vary to give the required dendrite tip velocity. This finding has implications for the analysis of microstructural transitions, such as the Columnar to Equiaxed Transition (CET). In conclusion, it is suggested that, for transient solidification conditions, a CET prediction criterion based on tip undercooling is preferable to one that uses growth velocity.

  18. Is particulate air pollution at the front door a good proxy of residential exposure?

    PubMed

    Zauli Sajani, Stefano; Trentini, Arianna; Rovelli, Sabrina; Ricciardelli, Isabella; Marchesi, Stefano; Maccone, Claudio; Bacco, Dimitri; Ferrari, Silvia; Scotto, Fabiana; Zigola, Claudia; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cavallo, Domenico Maria; Lauriola, Paolo; Poluzzi, Vanes; Harrison, Roy M

    2016-06-01

    The most advanced epidemiological studies on health effects of air pollution assign exposure to individuals based on residential outdoor concentrations of air pollutants measured or estimated at the front-door. In order to assess to what extent this approach could cause misclassification, indoor measurements were carried out in unoccupied rooms at the front and back of a building which fronted onto a major urban road. Simultaneous measurements were also carried out at adjacent outdoor locations to the front and rear of the building. Two 15-day monitoring campaigns were conducted in the period June-December 2013 in a building located in the urban area of Bologna, Italy. Particulate matter metrics including PM2.5 mass and chemical composition, particle number concentration and size distribution were measured. Both outdoor and indoor concentrations at the front of the building substantially exceeded those at the rear. The highest front/back ratio was found for ultrafine particles with outdoor concentration at the front door 3.4 times higher than at the rear. A weak influence on front/back ratios was found for wind direction. Particle size distribution showed a substantial loss of particles within the sub-50 nm size range between the front and rear of the building and a further loss of this size range in the indoor data. The chemical speciation data showed relevant reductions for most constituents between the front and the rear, especially for traffic related elements such as Elemental Carbon, Iron, Manganese and Tin. The main conclusion of the study is that gradients in concentrations between the front and rear, both outside and inside the building, are relevant and comparable to those measured between buildings located in high and low traffic areas. These findings show high potential for misclassification in the epidemiological studies that assign exposure based on particle concentrations estimated or measured at subjects' home addresses. PMID:26925757

  19. Transport processes in directional solidification and their effects on microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Prantik

    1999-11-08

    The processing of materials with unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties plays a crucial role in modern technology. The quality of these materials depend strongly on the microstructure and the solute/dopant fields in the solid product, that are strongly influenced by the intricate coupling of heat and mass transfer and melt flow in the growth systems. An integrated research program is developed that include precisely characterized experiments and detailed physical and numerical modeling of the complex transport and dynamical processes. Direct numerical simulation of the solidification process is carried out that takes into account the unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth system, and accurately models the thermal interaction between the furnace and the ampoule by appropriately using experimentally measured thermal profiles. The flow instabilities and transitions and the nonlinear evolution following the transitions are investigated by time series and flow pattern analysis. A range of complex dynamical behavior is predicted with increasing thermal Rayleigh number. The route to chaos appears as: steady convection {r_arrow} transient mono-periodic {r_arrow} transient bi-periodic {r_arrow} transient quasi-periodic {r_arrow} transient intermittent oscillation-relaxation {r_arrow} stable intermittent oscillation-relaxation attractor. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the melt flow is found to be directly related to the spatial patterns observed experimentally in the solidified crystals. The application of the model to two phase Sn-Cd peritectic alloys showed that a new class of tree-like oscillating microstructure develops in the solid phase due to unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the liquid melt. These oscillating layered structures can give the illusion of band structures on a plane of polish. The model is applied to single phase solidification in the Al-Cu and Pb-Sn systems to characterize the effect of

  20. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  1. Front pinning in single vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We study fronts propagating in 2D fluid flows and show that there exist stable invariant front configurations for fairly generic flows. Here we examine the simple flow which combines a single vortex with an overall ``wind.'' We discuss how the invariant front can be derived from a simple 3D ODE. Existence of this front can then be understood in terms of bifurcations of fixed points, and the behavior of the invariant ``sliding front'' submanifold. Interestingly, the front bifurcation precedes the saddle-node bifurcation which gives rise to the vortex. This elementary structure has application in chemical reactor beds and laminar combustion in well-mixed fluids. We request that this talk follow the related talks by our collaborators Tom Solomon, Savannah Gowen, and Sarah Holler.

  2. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front. PMID:25461883

  3. Front propagation and rejuvenation in flipping processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, P I; Antal, T; Ben - Avrahm, D

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess {Delta}{sub k} increases logarithmically, {Delta}{sub k} {approx_equal}ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing -- young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations.

  4. The Solidification Mode of Fe-Mn-Al-C Lightweight Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan-Young; Lee, Young-Kook

    2014-09-01

    Solidification behavior and solid-state transformation were investigated in Fe-Mn-Al-C lightweight steel. The solidification mode of the Fe-9.3Mn-5.6Al-0.2C (wt.%) lightweight steel was predicted to be the F mode (liquid → liquid + δ-ferrite → δ-ferrite → δ-ferrite + γ-austenite), according to the classification of the solidification modes of stainless steels. However, the microstructures of an ingot of the lightweight steel showed that the solidification occurred by the FA mode (liquid → liquid + δ-ferrite → liquid + δ-ferrite + γ-austenite → δ-ferrite + γ-austenite). To examine the difference between predicted and actual solidification modes, some specimens were annealed at various temperatures ranging from 1200°C to 1450°C for 10 min and then quenched. The microstructures of the annealed specimens exhibited that there were the narrow ranges of single δ-ferrite and solidification sections. This result indicates that the solidification mode of the present steel was the F mode, matching well with the predicted solidification mode. The reason for the FA mode, which was observed in the ingot, was because the liquid passed by a narrow solidification section and a single δ-ferrite region, and it directly entered the dual-phase region of δ-ferrite and γ-austenite during cooling.

  5. Evolutions of lamellar structure during melting and solidification of Fe9577 nanoparticle from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongquan; Shen, Tong; Lu, Xionggang

    2013-03-01

    A structural evolution during solidification and melting processes of nanoparticle Fe9577 was investigated from MD simulations. A perfect lamellar structure, consisting alternately of fcc and hcp layers, was obtained from solidification process. A structural heredity of early embryo is proposed to explain the structural preference of solidification. Defects were found inside the solid core and play the same role as surface premelting on melting. hcp was found more stable than fcc in high temperature. The difference between melting and solidification points can be deduced coming fully from the overcoming of thermodynamic energy barrier, instead of kinetic delay of structural relaxation.

  6. The Solidification Velocity of Undercooled Nickel and Titanium Alloys with Dilute Solute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algoso, Paul R.; Altgilbers, A. S.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of solidification velocity is important for two reasons. First, understanding the manner in which the degree of undercooling of the liquid and solidification velocity affect the microstructure of the solid is fundamental. Second, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions of the relationship between undercooling and solidification velocity and experimental results. Thus, the objective of this research is to accurately and systematically quantify the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling for dilute nickel-and titanium-based alloys. The alloys chosen for study cover a wide range of equilibrium partition coefficients, and the results are compared to current theory.

  7. MPS Solidification Model. Volume 2: Operating guide and software documentation for the unsteady model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of solidification Model 2 is described and documentation of the software associated with the model is provided. Model 2 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of unsteady horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The solidification program allows interactive modification of calculation parameters as well as selection of graphical and tabular output. In batch mode, parameter values are input in card image form and output consists of printed tables of solidification functions. The operational aspects of Model 2 that differ substantially from Model 1 are described. The global flow diagrams and data structures of Model 2 are included. The primary program documentation is the code itself.

  8. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. T.; Stratakis, D.; Prior, G.; Gilardoni, S.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Alekou, A.; Pasternak, J.

    2013-04-01

    In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  9. Evaluation of the Use of Synroc to Solidify the Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Tripp; Vince Maio

    2006-03-01

    This report is a literature evaluation on the Synroc process for determining the potential for application to solidification of the Cs/Sr strip product from advanced aqueous fuel separations activities.

  10. Effects of fluctuations on propagating fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    Propagating fronts are seen in varieties of nonequilibrium pattern forming systems in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In the last two decades, many researchers have contributed to the understanding of the underlying dynamics of the propagating fronts. Of these, the deterministic and mean-field dynamics of the fronts were mostly understood in late 1980s and 1990s. On the other hand, although the earliest work on the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts dates back to early 1980s, the subject of fluctuating fronts did not reach its adolescence until the mid 1990s. From there onwards the last few years witnessed a surge in activities in the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts. Scores of papers have been written on this subject since then, contributing to a significant maturity of our understanding, and only recently a full picture of fluctuating fronts has started to emerge. This review is an attempt to collect all the works on fluctuating (propagating) fronts in a coherent and cogent manner in proper perspective. It is based on the idea of making our knowledge in this field available to a broader audience, and it is also expected to help to collect bits and pieces of loose thread-ends together for possible further investigation.

  11. Front end for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess Brooks (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The front end in GPS receivers has the functions of amplifying, down-converting, filtering and sampling the received signals. In the preferred embodiment, only two operations, A/D conversion and a sum, bring the signal from RF to filtered quadrature baseband samples. After amplification and filtering at RF, the L1 and L2 signals are each sampled at RF at a high selected subharmonic rate. The subharmonic sample rates are approximately 900 MHz for L1 and 982 MHz for L2. With the selected subharmonic sampling, the A/D conversion effectively down-converts the signal from RF to quadrature components at baseband. The resulting sample streams for L1 and L2 are each reduced to a lower rate with a digital filter, which becomes a straight sum in the simplest embodiment. The frequency subsystem can be very simple, only requiring the generation of a single reference frequency (e.g. 20.46 MHz minus a small offset) and the simple multiplication of this reference up to the subharmonic sample rates for L1 and L2. The small offset in the reference frequency serves the dual purpose of providing an advantageous offset in the down-converted carrier frequency and in the final baseband sample rate.

  12. Stability of cosmological detonation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    The steady-state propagation of a phase-transition front is classified, according to hydrodynamics, as a deflagration or a detonation, depending on its velocity with respect to the fluid. These propagation modes are further divided into three types, namely, weak, Jouguet, and strong solutions, according to their disturbance of the fluid. However, some of these hydrodynamic modes will not be realized in a phase transition. One particular cause is the presence of instabilities. In this work we study the linear stability of weak detonations, which are generally believed to be stable. After discussing in detail the weak detonation solution, we consider small perturbations of the interface and the fluid configuration. When the balance between the driving and friction forces is taken into account, it turns out that there are actually two different kinds of weak detonations, which behave very differently as functions of the parameters. We show that the branch of stronger weak detonations are unstable, except very close to the Jouguet point, where our approach breaks down.

  13. Stability of cosmological deflagration fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    In a cosmological first-order phase transition, bubbles of the stable phase nucleate and expand in the supercooled metastable phase. In many cases, the growth of bubbles reaches a stationary state, with bubble walls propagating as detonations or deflagrations. However, these hydrodynamical solutions may be unstable under corrugation of the interface. Such instability may drastically alter some of the cosmological consequences of the phase transition. Here, we study the hydrodynamical stability of deflagration fronts. We improve upon previous studies by making a more careful and detailed analysis. In particular, we take into account the fact that the equation of motion for the phase interface depends separately on the temperature and fluid velocity on each side of the wall. Fluid variables on each side of the wall are similar for weakly first-order phase transitions, but differ significantly for stronger phase transitions. As a consequence, we find that, for large enough supercooling, any subsonic wall velocity becomes unstable. Moreover, as the velocity approaches the speed of sound, perturbations become unstable on all wavelengths. For smaller supercooling and small wall velocities, our results agree with those of previous works. Essentially, perturbations on large wavelengths are unstable, unless the wall velocity is higher than a critical value. We also find a previously unobserved range of marginally unstable wavelengths. We analyze the dynamical relevance of the instabilities, and we estimate the characteristic time and length scales associated with their growth. We discuss the implications for the electroweak phase transition and its cosmological consequences.

  14. Minimizing Segregation during the Controlled Directional Solidification of Dendric Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, Alex; Kim, Shin-Woo

    2003-01-01

    Gravity-driven convection induced in the liquid by density gradients of temperature or composition disrupts uniform dendritic growth during controlled directional solidification and promotes severe macrosegregation. The solute-rich region about the dendrite tip appears to play a pivotal role in channel initiation. Allen and Hunt referred to this region as an "initial transient" or dynamic region constituting steep concentration gradients. Experimental investigation also point to the role the tip region plays in developing microstructure. Hellawell and co-workers showed that flow-through dendritic channels could be effectively disrupted, and segregation minimized, during the gradient freezing of bulk castings by rotating the melt through a slight angle with respect to Earth's gravity vector. Adapting this principle to controlled directional solidification, it has been shown" that segregation in dendritic alloys can be minimized, and properties improved, by processing the sample near horizontal in conjunction with a slow axial rotation of the crucible. It is postulated that the observed microstructural uniformity arises by maintaining the developing solute field about the dendrite tip. Solute rejected during vertical directional solidification will rise or sink parallel to the primary dendrite arms during axial rotation setting the stage for accumulation, instabilities, and segregation. In contrast, during horizontal growth, the rejected solute will sink or rise perpendicular to the primary dendrite. Now, in the presence of a slight axial rotation, solute that was initially sinking (or rising) will find itself above (or below) its parent dendrite, i.e., still about the tip region. The following is intended to experimentally demonstrate the viability of this concept in coordination with a model that gives predictive insight regarding solute distribution about growing dendrites. Alloys based on the lead-tin eutectic system were used in this study. The system is well

  15. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard; Motakef, Shariar

    2001-01-01

    TMF is based on imposing a controlled phase-shift in a train of electromagnets, forming a stack. Thus, the induced magnetic field can be considered to be travelling along the axis of the stack. The coupling of this traveling wave with an electrically conducting fluid results in a basic flow in a form of a single axisymmetric roll. The magnitude and direction of this flow can be remotely controlled. Furthermore, it is possible to localize the effect of this force field though activating only a number of the magnets. This force field generated in the fluid can, in principle, be used to control and modify convection in the molten material. For example, it can be used to enhance convective mixing in the melt, and thereby modify the interface shape, and macrosegregation. Alternatively, it can be used to counteract thermal and/or solutal buoyancy forces. High frequency TMF can be used in containerless processing techniques, such as float zoning, to affect the very edge of the fluid so that Marangoni flow can be counter balanced. The proposed program consists of basic fundamentals and applications. Our goal in conducting the following experiments and analyses is to establish the validity of TMF as a new tool for solidification processes. Due to its low power consumption and simplicity of design, this tool may find wide spread use in a variety of space experiments. The proposed ground based experiments are intended to establish the advantages and limitations of employing this technique. In the fundamentals component of the proposed program, we will use theoretical tools and experiments with mercury to establish the fundamental aspects of TMF-induced convection through a detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of flow field. In this work, we will conduct a detailed parametric study involving the effects of magnetic field strength, frequency, wave vector, and the fluid geometry. The applications component of this work will be focused on

  16. Shock front broadening in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John; Kadau, Kai

    2008-03-01

    We analyze a model for the evolution of weak shock fronts (or elastic precursor waves) in polycrystalline materials. This model is based on the idea of Meyers and Carvalho [Mater. Sci. Eng. 24, 131 (1976)] that the shock velocity anisotropy within the polycrystal is the most important factor in shock front broadening. Our analysis predicts that the shock front width increases as the 1/2 power of the front penetration distance into the crystal. Our theoretical prediction is in plausible agreement with previous experimental results for the elastic precursor rise time, and it should therefore provide a useful shock width estimate. Furthermore, our theoretical framework is also applicable to other problems involving front propagation in heterogeneous media.

  17. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  18. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    SciTech Connect

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  19. Effects of gravity level during directional solidification on the microstructure of hypermonotectic Al-In-Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, P.A.; Kaukler, W.F.

    1986-11-01

    Five hypermonotectic Al-In-Sn compositions were directionally solidified in a Bridgman-type furnace at normal gravity and during aircraft low-gravity maneuvers. The tendency of the Al-30In alloy to form an indium-rich band at the start of unidirectional growth (SUG) made it difficult to study the integration of L/sub 2/into the solidification interface. Hypermonotectic compositions closer to monotectic slightly hypermonotectic caused only a partial band on L/sub 2/to form at SUG and allowed the study of such variables as gravity, composition, and monotectic dome height on integration of excess L /sub 2/into the solid plus L/sub 2/interface. It was found that formation of aligned composite structures for the Al-In-Sn system is not only a function of G and R but also of the degree to which the composition varies from monotectic. Most of the aligned fibrous structures formed from hypermonotectic Al-In-Sn had spacings that were of the order of irregular fibrous structures reported for on monotectic Al-In-Sn. The spacings for the large fibers and aligned globules found for ground and low-gravity processed Al-In-18-Sn-22, respectively, were significantly larger than the others measured and were of the order expected for cell spacings under the growth conditions utilized. It was found that the integration into the solidification front of excess L/sub 2/in low gravity was a function of the Sn composition of the alloy.

  20. Simulation of unidirectional solidification with a tilted crystalline axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomohiro; Saito, Yukio

    1996-07-01

    Tilting of the crystal profile during directional solidification is studied numerically, when the crystalline axis is misoriented from the temperature gradient and the pulling direction. Only with the anisotropy in surface stiffness is the crystal shown to tilt to an angle φ smaller than the misorientation of the crystalline axis ψ. The angle φ approaches ψ on increasing the pulling velocity V, as is often observed in experiments. The V dependence of the tilting φ thus does not necessarily mean that the tilting is caused by the kinetic effect. With ψ=45° we observe tip splitting and double fingers, a constituent of the compact seaweed pattern.

  1. Solidification in direct metal deposition by LENS processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, William; Griffith, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    Thermal imaging and metallographic analysis were used to study Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) processing of 316 stainless steel and H13 tool steel. The cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface were measured over a range of conduction conditions. The length scale of the molten zone controls cooling rates during solidification in direct metal deposition. In LENS processing, the molten zone ranges from 0.5 mm in length to 1.5 mm, resulting in cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface ranging from 200 6,000 Ks-1.

  2. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  3. Applications of the directional solidification in magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Liu, J.; Hu, Q. D.; Liu, Q. H.; Karaman, I.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    A zone melting liquid metal cooling (ZMLMC) method of directional solidification was applied to prepare highly-oriented Ni52Fe17Ga27Co4 magnetic shape memory alloys. At high temperature gradient and low growth velocity, the well-developed preferred orientation for coarse columnar crystals was obtained. Such a structure leads to a large complete pseudoelastic recovery of 5% at 348 K. Moreover, the pseudoelastic behaviours and the kinetics of the martensitic transformation (MT) are significantly affected by the intersection angle between the loading direction and the grain boundaries.

  4. Densities of Pb-Sn alloys during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Data for the densities and expansion coefficients of solid and liquid alloys of the Pb-Sn system are consolidated in this paper. More importantly, the data are analyzed with the purpose of expressing either the density of the solid or of the liquid as a function of its composition and temperature. In particular, the densities of the solid and of the liquid during dendritic solidification are derived. Finally, the solutal and thermal coefficients of volume expansion for the liquid are given as functions of temperature and composition.

  5. Crystal Growth and Fluid Mechanics Problems in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, Saleh A.; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Our work in directional solidification has been in the following areas: (1) Dynamics of dendrites including rigorous mathematical analysis of the resulting equations; (2) Examination of the near-structurally unstable features of the mathematically related Hele-Shaw dynamics; (3) Numerical studies of steady temperature distribution in a vertical Bridgman device; (4) Numerical study of transient effects in a vertical Bridgman device; (5) Asymptotic treatment of quasi-steady operation of a vertical Bridgman furnace for large Rayleigh numbers and small Biot number in 3D; and (6) Understanding of Mullins-Sererka transition in a Bridgman device with fluid dynamics is accounted for.

  6. Cellular instability in rapid directional solidification - Bifurcation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, R. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    Merchant and Davis performed a linear stability analysis on a model for the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy valid for all speeds. The analysis revealed that nonequilibrium segregation effects modify the Mullins and Sekerka cellular mode, whereas attachment kinetics has no effect on these cells. In this paper, the nonlinear stability of the steady cellular mode is analyzed. A Landau equation is obtained that determines the amplitude of the cells. The Landau coefficient here depends on both nonequilibrium segregation effects and attachment kinetics. This equation gives the ranges of parameters for subcritical bifurcation (jump transition) or supercritical bifurcation (smooth transition) to cells.

  7. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz body force induced in electrically conducting fluids can be utilized for a number of materials processing technologies. An application of strong static magnetic fields can be beneficial for damping convection present during solidification. On the other hand, alternating magnetic fields can be used to reduce as well as to enhance convection. However, only special types of time dependent magnetic fields can induce a non-zero time averaged Lorentz force needed for convection control. One example is the rotating magnetic field. This field configuration induces a swirling flow in circular containers. Another example of a magnetic field configuration is the traveling magnetic field (TMF). It utilizes axisymmetric magnetostatic waves. This type of field induces an axial recirculating flow that can be advantageous for controlling axial mass transport, such as during solidification in long cylindrical tubes. Incidentally, this is the common geometry for crystal growth research. The Lorentz force induced by TMF can potentially counter-balance the buoyancy force, diminishing natural convection, or even setting up the flow in reverse direction. Crystal growth process in presence of TMF can be then significantly modified. Such properties as the growth rate, interface shape and macro segregation can be affected and optimized. Melt homogenization is the other potential application of TMF. It is a necessary step prior to solidification. TMF can be attractive for this purpose, as it induces a basic flow along the axis of the ampoule. TMF can be a practical alloy mixing method especially suited for solidification research in space. In the theoretical part of this work, calculations of the induced Lorentz force in the whole frequency range have been completed. The basic flow characteristics for the finite cylinder geometry are completed and first results on stability analysis for higher Reynolds numbers are obtained. A theoretical model for TMF mixing is also developed

  8. Bulk nanostructured alloys prepared by flux melting and melt solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T.D.; Schwarz, R.B.; Zhang, X.

    2005-10-03

    We have prepared bulk nanostructured Ag{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} alloys by a flux-melting and melt-solidification technique. The flux purifies the melts, leading to a large undercooling and nanometer-sized microstructure. The as-prepared alloys are composed of nanolayered Ag and Cu within micrometer-sized grains. The bulk nanostructured alloys have an ultimate tensile strength of approximately 560 MPa, similar yield strength in tension and compression, elongation of 7% in tension, strain hardening exponent of 0.1, and relatively high mechanical and thermal stability up to 400 deg. C.

  9. A reusable mold in directional solidification for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T.; Shimura, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    1983-12-01

    Directional solidification of silicon was achieved by using a SiC coated carbon mold together with Si3N4 powder mold releasing agent. Crack-free polycrystalline silicon ingots were able to be extracted easily out of the mold. The mold was easily able to withstand more than 12 utilizations. Silicon ingot impurity contents were less than 3 ppm and the average polycrystalline grain diameter was 0.8 mm. Solar cells made of this material gave an AM1 maximum conversion of 10.8 deg.

  10. Two timescales in polymer solidification: processing vs polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccarolo, Stefano; Poulose, Anesh M.; Carbone, Domenico

    2010-06-01

    In this work we compare the influence of a plasticizer on the density drop, and therefore on the disappearance of any long range order crystalline phases, observed after fast controlled quenching of PET and PBT. The plasticizer enhances significantly the maximum cooling rate at which PET still shows long range order crystalline phases while barely modifies the situation for PBT. The results are discussed on the basis of an interpretation of polymer crystallization strongly determined by the topology of the polymer, a view unconventional with respect to most of the well established interpretations of polymer crystallization all based on data obtained in a time scale much longer with respect to solidification in processing.

  11. Thermomechanical analysis in directional solidification of CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, F.M.; Lee, T.; Moosbrugger, J.C.; Larson, D.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Thermoelastic calculations for CdTe grown by the vertical Bridgman method are presented. Finite element calculations are verified by some experimental data. Solidification interface velocity, charge temperature and stress distributions are computed for prescribed ampoule withdrawal rates and several ampoule support systems. The support systems include various materials and seed-wafer transition zone geometries. Crystal stress in excess of the critical resolved shear stress is used as the figure of merit to judge the performance of a particular system. Emphasis is focused on the transition region between the seed and wafer. A processing strategy is proposed and desirable support system characteristics are presented.

  12. Micro/macro solidification modeling of columnar eutectic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judson, Ward Michael

    2000-11-01

    A general multidimensional model of alloy solidification is presented in which a velocity-dependent freezing temperature is coupled with the macroscale energy equation. The velocity dependence of the freezing temperature ( Tf˜v ) results from the microscale species diffusion for microstructures with coupled eutectic growth. At solidification rates ( ˜ 1--10 mm/s) that are representative of gravity permanent mold and die casting processes, consideration of the nonequilibrium conditions at the interface affects the prediction of the macroscale thermal field. Near-eutectic alloys freeze with a macroscopically discrete solid-liquid interface at a temperature below the equilibrium eutectic temperature. The model is illustrated with unidirectional solidification of a near-eutectic alloy in a finite domain and solved numerically with a fixed-grid Galerkin finite element method. The numerical algorithm includes inexpensive steps to compute the interface speed explicitly. By nondimensionalizing the governing equations the effect of coupled eutectic growth on heat transport is clearly identified so that the model's sensitivity to important parameters can be investigated. Additionally, the average eutectic spacing can be determined with the temperature field, rather than post-determination from a standard, uncoupled solution of the energy equation. The eutectic coupling results indicate that the predicted solid-liquid interface location lags behind the uncoupled solution; therefore, decreasing the amount of solid formed, increasing the total solidification time, and increasing the average eutectic spacing. A procedure is also illustrated for computing mechanical properties using experimental correlations and the computed interface velocity history. The effect of the eutectic undercooling is then studied in a square domain and a realistic three-dimensional production casting geometry. In order to address the multidimensional cases, a phase-field formulation is developed

  13. The time-variable position of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current salinity fronts from Aquarius data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, D.; Dong, S.; Goni, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    SSH records and can potentially advance our knowledge about the complex structure of the ACC fronts.

  14. Technology Performance Review: Selecting And Using Solidification/Stabilization Treatment For Site Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) is a widely used treatment technology to prevent migration and exposure of contaminants from a contaminated media (i.e., soil, sludge and sediment). Solidification refers to a process that binds a contaminated media with a reagent changing its ...

  15. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION FOR REMEDIATON OF WOOD PRESERVING SITES: TREATMENT FOR DIOXINS, PCP, CREOSOTE, AND METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article discusses the use of solidification/stabilization (S/S) to treat soils contaminated with organic and inorganic chemicals at wood preserving sites. Solidification is defined for this article as making a material into a free standing solid. Stabilization is defined as ...

  16. Phyllotaxis, pushed pattern-forming fronts, and optimal packing.

    PubMed

    Pennybacker, Matthew; Newell, Alan C

    2013-06-14

    We demonstrate that the pattern forming partial differential equation derived from the auxin distribution model proposed by Meyerowitz, Traas, and others gives rise to all spiral phyllotaxis properties observed on plants. We show how the advancing pushed pattern front chooses spiral families enumerated by Fibonacci sequences with all attendant self-similar properties, a new amplitude invariant curve, and connect the results with the optimal packing based algorithms previously used to explain phyllotaxis. Our results allow us to make experimentally testable predictions. PMID:25165965

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification During the Twin-Roll Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-02-01

    The commercialization of aluminum twin-roll casting was realized in the early 1950s, while it is still a dream for engineers to produce steel strip by this process. In the present paper, a two-dimensional mathematical model is employed to study the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification during the twin-roll casting for both steel and aluminum. The turbulent flow in the pool is examined using the Lam and Bremhorst low-Reynolds-number turbulence model. In order to facilitate the comparison and analysis, a new transformed coordinate system ( r, φ) is established. Characteristics of the momentum boundary layer and the solidification front are described. Reasons of the formation of the wedge-shaped zone near the surface of rotating roll are given. In the transformed coordinate system ( r, φ), the effect of the centrifugal force induced by the rotating roll is presented using the velocity component in the r direction and the pressure gradient in the r direction. At last, the evaluation of the solidified shell in the pool is analyzed. The results show that the twin-roll casting is a roll-rotating-driven process. The variation of the thickness of the momentum boundary layer can be divided into three stages and its thickness is very uniform at the last stage. Near the roll surface, there exists a wedge-shaped zone induced by the near-roll-surface shear flow that washes the mushy zone front, which increases the depth of the liquid pool and decreases the length of the rolling region. The rotating roll gives rise to the stirring effect to the pool region and the metal is moving away from the roll surface in the positive radial velocity region, and the effect of the centrifugal force becomes weak in the lower part of the pool. At the solidification front, the non-dimensional effective heat transfer coefficient distribution in steel twin-roll casting is larger than that in aluminum twin-roll casting. Considering that the turbulence level is determined by the flow

  18. Io in Front of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.

    Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.

    This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.

    The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  19. Front Range of the Rockies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These MISR images from May 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 7447) include portions of southern Wyoming, central Colorado, and western Nebraska. The top view is from the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. The bottom image is a stereo 'anaglyph' generated using data from the nadir and 46-degree-forward cameras. Viewing the anaglyph with red/blue glasses (red filter over your left eye) gives a 3-D effect. To facilitate stereo viewing, the images have been oriented with north at the left. Each image measures 422 kilometers x 213 kilometers.

    The South Platte River enters just to the right of center at the top of the images. It wends its way westward (down), then turns southward (right) where it flows through the city of Denver. Located at the western edge of the Great Plains, Denver is nicknamed the 'Mile High City', a consequence of its 1609-meter (5280-foot) elevation above sea level. It shows up in the imagery as a grayish patch surrounded by numerous agricultural fields to the north and east. Denver is situated just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, located in the lower right of the images. The Rockies owe their present forms to tectonic uplift and sculpting by millions of years of erosion. Scattered cumulus clouds floating above the mountain peaks are visible in these images, and stand out most dramatically in the 3-D stereo view.

    To the north of Denver, other urban areas included within these images are Boulder, Greeley, Longmont, and Fort Collins, Colorado; Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyoming; and Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  20. Life on the front lines.

    PubMed

    Hern, W M

    1994-01-01

    Warren Hern's reminiscences about his experiences as medical director of the Boulder (Colorado) Abortion Clinic and as an abortion provider in private practice provide support for his statement, "Every doctor in America who does abortions lives under a death threat." Shortly after the clinic was opened, a group of anti-abortion physicians pressured the Boulder County Medical Society to pass a resolution declaring the clinic a "clear and present danger" that should be shut down by local health boards. As the only freestanding abortion clinic in the state in the mid-1970's, the Boulder center was targeted by the Right-to-Life Committee picketers and Dr. Hern was harassed in his home and in public. When Dr. Hern left the clinic a year later to establish a private practice specializing in pregnancy termination, the picketers followed. After release of a textbook he prepared on abortion practice, the publisher was deluged with hate mail and threats of boycott, leading them to withdraw the text from its list. Violent attacks on abortion clinics accelerated after Reagan's election and bullets were fired into Hern's waiting room. Randall Terry, national head of Operation Rescue, prayed for Hern's death at a rally in front of his clinic. By the time Dr. David Gunn was assassinated by an anti-abortionist in March 1993, there had been over 1285 acts of violence against abortion facilities and more than 100 facilities had been completely destroyed. The transgression for which Dr. Gunn was murdered was that he sought to save the lives and futures of countless women and support their right to become full participants in society. PMID:8186726

  1. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100--1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  2. Study on Solidification of Phase Change Material in Fractal Porous Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Liangyu; Chen, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The Sierpinski fractal is introduced to construct the porous metal foam. Based on this fractal description, an unsteady heat transfer model accompanied with solidification phase change in fractal porous metal foam embedded with phase change material (PCM) is developed and numerically analyzed. The heat transfer processes associated with solidification of PCM embedded in fractal structure is investigated and compared with that in single-pore structure. The results indicate that, for the solidification of phase change material in fractal porous metal foam, the PCM is dispersedly distributed in metal foam and the existence of porous metal matrix provides a fast heat flow channel both horizontally and vertically, which induces the enhancement of interstitial heat transfer between the solid matrix and PCM. The solidification performance of the PCM, which is represented by liquid fraction and solidification time, in fractal structure is superior to that in single-pore structure.

  3. Simulation of microsegregation and the solid/liquid interface progression in the concentric solidification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminorroaya, Sima; Reid, Mark; Dippenaar, Rian

    2011-03-01

    A concentric solidification technique was employed to simulate experimentally the segregation of alloying elements during solidification at the centerline of continuously cast steel. Microstructural development of low carbon steel upon solidification has been observed in situ in a laser-scanning confocal microscope. Microscopic analyses following in situ observations, demonstrate that segregation occurring at steel slabs can reasonably be simulated by the use of the concentric solidification technique. The validity of these experimental simulations has been correlated with mathematical analyses using the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA (Diffusion Controlled Transformation) modeling tools. The effect of cooling rate on the sequence of events during solidification of Fe-0.18%C and Fe-4.2 wt%Ni peritectic alloys was studied and compared with the experimental observations.

  4. Effect of Ce melt treatment on solidification path of ZA8 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, R.; Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    The solidification path of ZA8 alloy with Ce addition was characterized using Newtonian technique of thermal analysis. The solidification events were determined using cooling curve and its first derivative curve. The microstructure and chemical composition of various phases in the alloy were studied using EDS, SEM and XRD techniques. It was found that the addition of Ce did not cause formation of new phases. However, it hinders the nucleation of stable β dendrites in the alloy. The presence of Ce promotes the eutectoid phase transformation and increases the hardness of the alloy. Latent heat of solidification and heat of eutectoid transformation were found to increase on Ce addition. The upward solidification of the alloy against Cu chill was analysed. Chilling had significant influence on solidification parameters, and caused refinement of the microstructure. The addition of Ce to the melt had no effect during chill casting of the alloy.

  5. Core solidification and dynamo evolution in a mantle-stripped planetesimal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinberg, A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Schubert, G.; Bercovici, D.

    2016-01-01

    The physical processes active during the crystallization of a low-pressure, low-gravity planetesimal core are poorly understood but have implications for asteroidal magnetic fields and large-scale asteroidal structure. We consider a core with only a thin silicate shell, which could be analogous to some M-type asteroids including Psyche, and use a parameterized thermal model to predict a solidification timeline and the resulting chemical profile upon complete solidification. We then explore the potential strength and longevity of a dynamo in the planetesimal's early history. We find that cumulate inner core solidification would be capable of sustaining a dynamo during solidification, but less power would be available for a dynamo in an inward dendritic solidification scenario. We also model and suggest limits on crystal settling and compaction of a possible cumulate inner core.

  6. A Life Cycle Assessment of a Magnesium Automotive Front End

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit; Dubreuil, Alain; Bushi, Lindita; Tharumarajah, Ambalavanar

    2009-01-01

    The Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project under the sponsorship of Canada, China and USA aims to develop key technologies and a knowledge base for increased use of magnesium in automobile. The goal of this life cycle assessment (LCA) study is to compare the energy and potential environmental impacts of advanced magnesium based front end parts of a North America built 2007 GM-Cadillac CTS with the standard carbon steel based design. This LCA uses the 'cradle-to-grave' approach by including primary material production, semi-fabrication production, autoparts manufacturing and assembly, transportation, use phase and end-of-life processing of autoparts. This LCA study was done in compliance with international standards ISO 14040:2006 and ISO 14044:2006. Furthermore, the LCA results for aluminum based front end autopart are presented. While weight savings result in reductions in energy use and carbon dioxide emissions during the use of the car, the impacts of fabrication and recycling of lightweight materials are substantial in regard to steel. Pathways for improving sustainability of magnesium use in automobiles through material management and technology improvements including recycling are also discussed.

  7. Pulse front adaptive optics: a new method for control of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-07-27

    Ultrafast lasers enable a wide range of physics research and the manipulation of short pulses is a critical part of the ultrafast tool kit. Current methods of laser pulse shaping are usually considered separately in either the spatial or the temporal domain, but laser pulses are complex entities existing in four dimensions, so full freedom of manipulation requires advanced forms of spatiotemporal control. We demonstrate through a combination of adaptable diffractive and reflective optical elements - a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) and a deformable mirror (DM) - decoupled spatial control over the pulse front (temporal group delay) and phase front of an ultra-short pulse was enabled. Pulse front modulation was confirmed through autocorrelation measurements. This new adaptive optics technique, for the first time enabling in principle arbitrary shaping of the pulse front, promises to offer a further level of control for ultrafast lasers. PMID:26367595

  8. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  9. Solidification/Stabilization of Elemental Mercury Waste by Amalgamation

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Lee, C. K.

    2003-02-24

    Experiments on solidification of elemental mercury waste were conducted by amalgamation with several metal powders such as copper, zinc, tin, brass and bronze. Unlike the previous studies which showed a dispersible nature after solidification, the waste forms were found to possess quite large compressive strengths in both copper and bronze amalgam forms. The durability was also confirmed by showing very minor changes of strength after 90 days of water immersion. Leachability from the amalgam forms is also shown to be low: measured mercury concentration in the leachate by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was well below the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit. Long term leaching behavior by Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) has shown that the leaching process was dominated by diffusion and the effective diffusion coefficient was quite low (around 10-19 cm2/sec). The mercury vapor concentration from the amalgam forms were reduced to a 20% level of that for elemental mercury and to one-hundredth after 3 months.

  10. A Metric for the Quantification of Macrosegregation During Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle; Plotkowski, Alex; Krane, Matthew J. M.

    2016-06-01

    A metric for quantifying the degree of solidification macrosegregation is proposed that statistically fits compositional data from experiments and simulations to a three-parameter Weibull distribution. The method for fitting such a distribution is described and examples are presented. The new metrics are compared to existing macrosegregation measures and the Weibull distribution is shown to be the best fit to data. The fitted three-parameter Weibull distribution is generally found to have better agreement with the composition data than a Gaussian distribution, upon which the macrosegregation number is based, because the Weibull better accounts for asymmetry in the dataset. Trends in macrosegregation results are identified using the new metrics, specifically the normalized Weibull deviation, and compared to the trends identified by the macrosegregation number. A grid dependence study is performed using both metrics as tests for convergence. The utility of the Weibull distribution is demonstrated by comparing composition data with different degrees of asymmetry due to different solidification cooling rates. The difference between the values of the two metrics is a measure of the asymmetry in the compositional distribution.

  11. Modelling morphology evolution during solidification of IPP in processing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pantani, R. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; De Santis, F. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; Speranza, V. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; Titomanlio, G. E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it

    2014-05-15

    During polymer processing, crystallization takes place during or soon after flow. In most of cases, the flow field dramatically influences both the crystallization kinetics and the crystal morphology. On their turn, crystallinity and morphology affect product properties. Consequently, in the last decade, researchers tried to identify the main parameters determining crystallinity and morphology evolution during solidification In processing conditions. In this work, we present an approach to model flow-induced crystallization with the aim of predicting the morphology after processing. The approach is based on: interpretation of the FIC as the effect of molecular stretch on the thermodynamic crystallization temperature; modeling the molecular stretch evolution by means of a model simple and easy to be implemented in polymer processing simulation codes; identification of the effect of flow on nucleation density and spherulites growth rate by means of simple experiments; determination of the condition under which fibers form instead of spherulites. Model predictions reproduce most of the features of final morphology observed in the samples after solidification.

  12. Convective and interfacial instabilities during solidification of succinonitrile containing ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Coriell, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Even though slow convective flow is difficult to detect in solidifying metals, it can readily be observed in transparent materials by observing the motion of small neutrally buoyant particles. Succinonitrile, which solidifies with an unfaceted solid/liquid interface and has well characterized physical properties, is considered an excellent material for such studies. For studies of solute-induced convection, ethanol is a useful addition to succinonitrile since it has a lower density and a somewhat similar molecular structure. Samples of high purity and ethanol-doped succinonitrile are unidirectionally solidified in a vertical temperature gradient. Latex mimcrospheres 2 microns in diameter are suspended in the liquid to reveal the convective flow. Convective and morphological stability is observed as a function of solute concentration and growth velocity. These measurements are compared with theoretical calculations that predict the transition from stability to instability as a function of solidification conditions. The predicted transitions occur at low concentrations and solidification velocities; for this reason, extreme care must be taken in order to eliminate the effects of impurities or thermally induced convection.

  13. Crystallographic investigation of grain selection during initial solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaka, H.; Kataoka, Y.; Shinozuka, K.

    2016-03-01

    Normally, macroscopic solidified structure consists of chill, columnar and equiaxed zones. In a chill zone, many fine grains nucleate on the mold surface and grow their own preferred growth direction. Only a few of them continue to grow because of grain selection. In order to understand the grain selection process, crystallographic investigation has been carried out in the zone of initial solidification in this study. 10 g of Al-6 wt%Si alloy was melted at 850 °C and poured on the thick copper plate. Longitudinal cross section of the solidified shell was observed by a SEM and analyzed by EBSD. The result of EBSD mapping reveals that crystallographic orientation was random in the range of initial solidification. Further, some grains are elongated along their <100> direction. Columnar grains, whose growth directions are almost parallel to the heat flow direction, develop via grain selection. Here, a dendrite whose growth direction is close to the heat flow direction overgrows the other dendrite whose growth direction is far from the heat flow direction. However, sometimes we observed that dendrite, whose zenith angle is large, overgrew the other dendrite. It can be deduced that the time of nucleation on the mold surface is not constant.

  14. Directional solidification of eutectic composites in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic and a nickel-base alloy containing 30 wt pct Ta were solidified unidirectionally in an electron beam floating zone melting apparatus. It was found that the volume fraction of the Ni3Ta phase in the Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic mixture was increased from 7.6 to 36 volume pct in agreement with the theory as predicted. Tensile properties of the randomly solidified and unidirectionally solidified Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic were determined as function of solidification rate and temperature. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength decreased as both the test temperature and solidification rate increased. An elongation of 40 pct was obtained for a nickelbase alloy containing 30 wt at room temperature. This unusually large elongation was attributed to the superplastic behavior of the alloy. The critical currents versus the external fields at 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.2 deg for the unidirectionally solidified Pb-Sn eutectic were measured. The values of critical fields at zero critical currents were obtained by extrapolation.

  15. Solidification and crystal growth of solid solution semiconducting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Problems associated with the solidification and crytal growth of solid-solution semiconducting alloy crystals in a terrestrial environment are described. A detailed description is given of the results for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) alloy crystals by directional solidification, because of their considerable technological importance. A series of HgCdTe alloy crystals are grown from pseudobinary melts by a vertical Bridgman method using a wide range of growth rates and thermal conditions. Precision measurements are performed to establish compositional profiles for the crystals. The compositional variations are related to compositional variations in the melts that can result from two-dimensional diffusion or density gradient driven flow effects ahead of the growth interface. These effects are discussed in terms of the alloy phase equilibrium properties, the recent high temperature thermophysical data for the alloys and the highly unusual heat transfer characteristics of the alloy/ampule/furnace system that may readily lead to double diffusive convective flows in a gravitational environment.

  16. Directional solidification of lead antimony alloy assisted by pressure pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, Joao Paulo Pinto

    Directional solidification processes assisted with pressure pulses were performed with the goal of producing a novel process capable of introducing changes in dendritic microstructure morphologies. The alloy used in these experiments was a Pb-7wt% Sb, with a liquidus temperature of approximately 280°C. Various melt pressure profiles were investigated with maximum pressures of -266.3 to -1452.8psi and oscillation frequencies ranging from 0 (constant force) to 7.4Hz. It was found that application of pressure decreased the secondary dendrite arms spacing (lambda2) when compared with the no pressure experiments and cyclic pressure oscillations cause a resonance effect in the lambda 2 values when the pressure pulse frequency matches the arms' natural frequency of formation. It is not yet clear if this resonance behavior is strong enough or reliable enough to be of potential interest for industrial applications seeking to employ novel approaches to controlling microstructural length scales during directional or equiaxed dendritic solidification processes.

  17. Microstructural Development during Directional Solidification of Peritectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the microstructures produced through solidification in peritectic systems has yet to be achieved, even though a large number of industrially and scientifically significant materials are in this class. One type of microstructure frequently observed during directional solidification consists of alternating layers of primary solid and peritectic solid oriented perpendicular to the growth direction. This layer formation is usually reported for alloy compositions within the two-phase region of the peritectic isotherm and for temperature gradient and growth rate conditions that result in a planar solid-liquid interface. Layered growth in peritectic alloys has not previously been characterized on a quantitative basis, nor has a mechanism for its formation been verified. The mechanisms that have been proposed for layer formation can be categorized as either extrinsic or intrinsic to the alloy system. The extrinsic mechanisms rely on externally induced perturbations to the system for layer formation, such as temperature oscillations, growth velocity variations, or vibrations. The intrinsic mechanisms approach layer formation as an alternative type of two phase growth that is inherent for certain peritectic systems and solidification conditions. Convective mixing of the liquid is an additional variable which can strongly influence the development and appearance of layers due to the requisite slow growth rate. The first quantitative description of layer formation is a model recently developed by Trivedi based on the intrinsic mechanism of cyclic accumulation and depiction of solute in the liquid ahead of the interface, linked to repeated nucleation events in the absence of convection. The objective of this research is to characterize the layered microstructures developed during ground-based experiments in which external influences have been minimized as much as possible and to compare these results to the current the model. Also, the differences

  18. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are

  19. Volatile trapping by the freezing front hygrostat in the Hadean mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hier-Majumder, S.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Rudra, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's deep interior contains significant reservoirs of volatiles such as H, C, and N. Due to the incompatible nature of these volatile species, it has been difficult to reconcile their storage in the residual mantle immediately following crystallization of the terrestrial magma ocean. As the magma ocean freezes, it is commonly assumed, very small amounts of melt is retained in the residual mantle, limiting the trapped volatile concentration in the primordial mantle. In this presentation, we show that inefficient melt drainage out of the freezing front can retain large amounts of volatiles in the residual mantle while creating a thick early atmosphere. Using a two-phase flow model, we demonstrate that compaction within the moving freezing front is inefficient over time scales characteristic of magma ocean solidification. We employ a scaling relation between the trapped melt fraction, the rate of compaction, and the rate of freezing in our magma ocean evolution model. For cosmochemically plausible fractions of volatiles delivered during the later stages of accretion, our calculations suggest that up to 76% of total H2O and 11% of CO2 could have been trapped in the mantle during magma ocean crystallization. The assumption of a constant trapped melt fraction underestimates the mass of volatiles in the residual mantle by up to a factor of 15. Further, owing to particularly rapid magma ocean crystallization rates, the deepest mantle and the transition zone likely accumulate excess volatiles.

  20. Advanced Canard in 12 Foot Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Advanced-concepts model plane with front canards, winglets and pusher propellers, in 12 Foot Low-Speed Tunnel. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, (page 12), by James Schultz.