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Sample records for advecting material contours

  1. Contour advection with surgery: A technique for investigating finescale structure in tracer transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Plumb, R. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We present a trajectory technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), for tracing the evolution of material contours in a specified (including observed) evolving flow. CAS uses the algorithms developed by Dritschel for contour dynamics/surgery to trace the evolution of specified contours. The contours are represented by a series of particles, which are advected by a specified, gridded, wind distribution. The resolution of the contours is preserved by continually adjusting the number of particles, and finescale features are produced that are not present in the input data (and cannot easily be generated using standard trajectory techniques). The reliability, and dependence on the spatial and temporal resolution of the wind field, of the CAS procedure is examined by comparisons with high-resolution numerical data (from contour dynamics calculations and from a general circulation model), and with routine stratospheric analyses. These comparisons show that the large-scale motions dominate the deformation field and that CAS can accurately reproduce small scales from low-resolution wind fields. The CAS technique therefore enables examination of atmospheric tracer transport at previously unattainable resolution.

  2. Material properties from contours: New insights on object perception.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Deiana, Katia

    2015-10-01

    In this work we explored phenomenologically the visual complexity of the material attributes on the basis of the contours that define the boundaries of a visual object. The starting point is the rich and pioneering work done by Gestalt psychologists and, more in detail, by Rubin, who first demonstrated that contours contain most of the information related to object perception, like the shape, the color and the depth. In fact, by investigating simple conditions like those used by Gestalt psychologists, mostly consisting of contours only, we demonstrated that the phenomenal complexity of the material attributes emerges through appropriate manipulation of the contours. A phenomenological approach, analogous to the one used by Gestalt psychologists, was used to answer the following questions. What are contours? Which attributes can be phenomenally defined by contours? Are material properties determined only by contours? What is the visual syntactic organization of object attributes? The results of this work support the idea of a visual syntactic organization as a new kind of object formation process useful to understand the language of vision that creates well-formed attribute organizations. The syntax of visual attributes can be considered as a new way to investigate the modular coding and, more generally, the binding among attributes, i.e., the issue of how the brain represents the pairing of shape and material properties.

  3. Kull ALE: I. Unstructured Mesh Advection, Interface Capturing, and Multiphase 2T RHD with Material Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-02-11

    Several advection algorithms are presented within the remap framework for unstructured mesh ALE codes. The methods discussed include a generic advection scheme based on a finite volume approach, and three groups of algorithms for the treatment of material boundary interfaces. The interface capturing algorithms belong to the Volume of Fluid (VoF) class of methods to approximate material interfaces from the local fractional volume of fluid distribution in arbitrary unstructured polyhedral meshes appropriate for the Kull code. Also presented are several schemes for extending single material radiation diffusion solvers to account for multi-material interfaces.

  4. Controlling cavitation in the 1990s: Contours, materials, monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, E.

    1996-10-01

    Case studies of cavitation control methods at hydroelectric power plants are presented in the article. The control methods described include contouring of turbine blades, stainless steel runners and overlays (including 309L) and super-resistant alloys (Hydroloy 914), and cavitation monitoring equipment. Hydroelectric plants highlighted in the article include Central Maine Power Company`s Hiram Unit 2, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers` Dworshak Dam, Transalta Utilities` Spray Station, and Tennessee Valley Authority`s Raccoon Mountain. The development and testing of new materials is also highlighted.

  5. Multiphase Advection and Radiation Diffusion with Material Interfaces on Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-10-03

    A collection of numerical methods are presented for the advection or remapping of material properties on unstructured and staggered polyhedral meshes in arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian calculations. The methods include several new procedures to track and capture sharp interface boundaries, and to partition radiation energy into multi-material thermal states. The latter is useful for extending and applying consistently single material radiation diffusion solvers to multi-material problems.

  6. A numerical treatment of geodynamic viscous flow problems involving the advection of material interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenardic, A.; Kaula, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Effective numerical treatment of multicomponent viscous flow problems involving the advection of sharp interfaces between materials of differing physical properties requires correction techniques to prevent spurious diffusion and dispersion. We develop a particular algorithm, based on modern shock-capture techniques, employing a two-step nonlinear method. The first step involves the global application of a high-order upwind scheme to a hyperbolic advection equation used to model the distribution of distinct material components in a flow field. The second step is corrective and involves the application of a global filter designed to remove dispersion errors that result from the advection of discontinuities (e.g., material interfaces) by high-order, minimally dissipative schemes. The filter introduces no additional diffusion error. Nonuniform viscosity across a material interface is allowed for by the implementation of a compositionally weighted-inverse interface viscosity scheme. The combined method approaches the optimal accuracy of modern shock-capture techniques with a minimal increase in computational time and memory. A key advantage of this method is its simplicity to incorporate into preexisting codes be they finite difference, element, or volume of two or three dimensions.

  7. Chaotic Advection in Multi-component Melts for the Manufacture of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumbrunnen, David

    2011-10-01

    Several forces arise when different liquids are placed into contact. The relative importance of these forces depends on the sizes and shapes of liquid domains and also on molecular characteristics of the liquids. When the liquids are agitated and in the absence of interdiffusion, a composite structure results that is defined by the spatial extent and size of each liquid domain in the presence of the other. Shaking a bottle with about equal parts of water and oil gives a structure that resembles a household sponge, for example. If the oil volume is much smaller than the water volume, oil droplets result instead. In polymer blends and composites, the structure can have feature sizes at the micron scale or smaller. Little has been known about the variety of structural types that can be formed because current information is based on mixing machinery that intrinsically restricts structural outcomes. This shortcoming has important consequences because physical properties of composite materials obtained by solidifying the structured liquids depend appreciably on structure characteristics. A recent approach to overcome this shortcoming makes use of chaotic advection to establish conditions that organize liquid domains into numerous thin layers. A multi-layer construction undergoes morphological changes in situ. Progressive structure development arises, whereby a specific structure leads in sequence to a morphologically different structure. A new manufacturing technology has resulted which allows control of the internal structure in extruded plastic materials. Micro- and nanostructured materials have been obtained. On-line process control allows rapid optimization of physical properties. In this presentation, the underlying physics will be described, examples of novel materials and their applications will be shown, and research opportunities will be highlighted.

  8. A three-dimensional volume-of-fluid method for reconstructing and advecting three-material interfaces forming contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a piecewise-linear, volume-of-fluid method for reconstructing and advecting three-dimensional interfaces and contact lines formed by three materials. The new method employs a set of geometric constructs that can be used in conjunction with any volume-tracking scheme. In this work, we used the mass-conserving scheme of Youngs to handle two-material cells, perform interface reconstruction in three-material cells, and resolve the contact line. The only information required by the method is the available volume fraction field. Although the proposed method is order dependent and requires a priori information on material ordering, it is suitable for typical contact line applications, where the material representing the contact surface is always known. Following the reconstruction of the contact surface, to compute the interface orientation in a three-material cell, the proposed method minimizes an error function that is based on volume fraction distribution around that cell. As an option, the minimization procedure also allows the user to impose a contact angle. Performance of the proposed method is assessed via both static and advection test cases. The tests show that the new method preserves the accuracy and mass-conserving property of the Youngs method in volume-tracking three materials.

  9. Contour complexity and contour detection.

    PubMed

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Itis well-known that "smooth" chains of oriented elements-contours-are more easily detected amid background noise than more undulating (i.e., "less smooth") chains. Here, we develop a Bayesian framework for contour detection and show that it predicts that contour detection performance should decrease with the contour's complexity, quantified as the description length (DL; i.e., the negative logarithm of probability integrated along the contour). We tested this prediction in two experiments in which subjects were asked to detect simple open contours amid pixel noise. In Experiment 1, we demonstrate a consistent decline in performance with increasingly complex contours, as predicted by the Bayesian model. In Experiment 2, we confirmed that this effect is due to integrated complexity along the contour, and does not seem to depend on local stretches of linear structure. The results corroborate the probabilistic model of contours, and show how contour detection can be understood as a special case of a more general process-the identification of organized patterns in the environment.

  10. Pathways for Advective Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-19

    the approach is given and an application to the Gulf of Mexico is described where the analysis precisely identifies the boundaries of coherent vortical structures as well as pathways for advective transport.

  11. Contour Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Ohio State University Center for Mapping, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), developed a system for mobile mapping called the GPSVan. While driving, the users can map an area from the sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. George J. Igel and Company and the Ohio State University Center for Mapping advanced the technology for use in determining the contours of a construction site. The new system reduces the time required for mapping and staking, and can monitor the amount of soil moved.

  12. HEMP advection model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R.W. Jr.; Barton, R.T.

    1981-01-21

    A continuous rezoning procedure has been implemented in the computational cycle of a version of the HEMP two-dimensional, Lagrange, fluid dynamics code. The rezoning problem is divided into two steps. The first step requires the solving of ordinary Lagrange equations of motion; the second step consists of adding equipotential grid relaxation along with an advective remapping scheme.

  13. Contoured Surface Eddy Current Inspection System

    DOEpatents

    Batzinger, Thomas James; Fulton, James Paul; Rose, Curtis Wayne; Perocchi, Lee Cranford

    2003-04-08

    Eddy current inspection of a contoured surface of a workpiece is performed by forming a backing piece of flexible, resiliently yieldable material with a contoured exterior surface conforming in shape to the workpiece contoured surface. The backing piece is preferably cast in place so as to conform to the workpiece contoured surface. A flexible eddy current array probe is attached to the contoured exterior surface of the backing piece such that the probe faces the contoured surface of the workpiece to be inspected when the backing piece is disposed adjacent to the workpiece. The backing piece is then expanded volumetrically by inserting at least one shim into a slot in the backing piece to provide sufficient contact pressure between the probe and the workpiece contoured surface to enable the inspection of the workpiece contoured surface to be performed.

  14. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  15. LAYER DEPENDENT ADVECTION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advection methods used in CMAQ require that the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition be satisfied for numerical stability and accuracy. In CMAQ prior to version 4.3, the ADVSTEP algorithm established CFL-safe synchronization and advection timesteps that were uniform throu...

  16. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  17. Contour integration with corners.

    PubMed

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2016-10-01

    Contour integration refers to the ability of the visual system to bind disjoint local elements into coherent global shapes. In cluttered images containing randomly oriented elements a contour becomes salient when its elements are coaligned with a smooth global trajectory, as described by the Gestalt law of good continuation. Abrupt changes of curvature strongly diminish contour salience. Here we show that by inserting local corner elements at points of angular discontinuity, a jagged contour becomes as salient as a straight one. We report results from detection experiments for contours with and without corner elements which indicate their psychophysical equivalence. This presents a challenge to the notion that contour integration mostly relies on local interactions between neurons tuned to single orientations, and suggests that a site where single orientations and more complex local features are combined constitutes the early basis of contour and 2D shape processing.

  18. Distributed Contour Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther H.

    2014-03-31

    Topological techniques provide robust tools for data analysis. They are used, for example, for feature extraction, for data de-noising, and for comparison of data sets. This chapter concerns contour trees, a topological descriptor that records the connectivity of the isosurfaces of scalar functions. These trees are fundamental to analysis and visualization of physical phenomena modeled by real-valued measurements. We study the parallel analysis of contour trees. After describing a particular representation of a contour tree, called local{global representation, we illustrate how di erent problems that rely on contour trees can be solved in parallel with minimal communication.

  19. Visualizing Vector Fields Using Line Integral Convolution and Dye Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1996-01-01

    We present local and global techniques to visualize three-dimensional vector field data. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method to image the global vector field, our new algorithm allows the user to introduce colored 'dye' into the vector field to highlight local flow features. A fast algorithm is proposed that quickly recomputes the dyed LIC images. In addition, we introduce volume rendering methods that can map the LIC texture on any contour surface and/or translucent region defined by additional scalar quantities, and can follow the advection of colored dye throughout the volume.

  20. Variable contour securing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebus, P. P.; Packer, P. N.; Haynie, C. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A variable contour securing system has a retaining structure for a member whose surface contains a variable contour. The retaining mechanism includes a spaced array of adjustable spindles mounted on a housing. Each spindle has a base member support cup at one end. A vacuum source is applied to the cups for seating the member adjacent to the cups. A locking mechanism sets the spindles in a predetermined position once the member has been secured to the spindle support cups.

  1. GENERALIZED DIGITAL CONTOURING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    This is a digital computer contouring program developed by combining desirable characteristics from several existing contouring programs. It can easily be adapted to many different research requirements. The overlaid structure of the program permits desired modifications to be made with ease. The contouring program performs both the task of generating a depth matrix from either randomly or regularly spaced surface heights and the task of contouring the data. Each element of the depth matrix is computed as a weighted mean of heights predicted at an element by planes tangent to the surface at neighboring control points. Each contour line is determined by its intercepts with the sides of geometrical figures formed by connecting the various elements of the depth matrix with straight lines. Although contour charts are usually thought of as being two-dimensional pictorial representations of topographic formations of land masses, they can also be useful in portraying data which are obtained during the course of research in various scientific disciplines and which would ordinarily be tabulated. Any set of data which can be referenced to a two-dimensional coordinate system can be graphically represented by this program. This program is written in FORTRAN IV and ASSEMBLER for batch execution and has been implemented on the CDC 6000 Series. This program was developed in 1971.

  2. Reconstruction of surfaces from planar contours through contour interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Kyle; Woo, Boyeong; Pinter, Csaba; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Segmented structures such as targets or organs at risk are typically stored as 2D contours contained on evenly spaced cross sectional images (slices). Contour interpolation algorithms are implemented in radiation oncology treatment planning software to turn 2D contours into a 3D surface, however the results differ between algorithms, causing discrepancies in analysis. Our goal was to create an accurate and consistent contour interpolation algorithm that can handle issues such as keyhole contours, rapid changes, and branching. This was primarily motivated by radiation therapy research using the open source SlicerRT extension for the 3D Slicer platform. The implemented algorithm triangulates the mesh by minimizing the length of edges spanning the contours with dynamic programming. The first step in the algorithm is removing keyholes from contours. Correspondence is then found between contour layers and branching patterns are determined. The final step is triangulating the contours and sealing the external contours. The algorithm was tested on contours segmented on computed tomography (CT) images. Some cases such as inner contours, rapid changes in contour size, and branching were handled well by the algorithm when encountered individually. There were some special cases in which the simultaneous occurrence of several of these problems in the same location could cause the algorithm to produce suboptimal mesh. An open source contour interpolation algorithm was implemented in SlicerRT for reconstructing surfaces from planar contours. The implemented algorithm was able to generate qualitatively good 3D mesh from the set of 2D contours for most tested structures.

  3. Dissociable neural correlates of contour completion and contour representation in illusory contour perception.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; He, Sheng; Bushara, Khalaf; Zeng, Feiyan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Daren

    2012-10-01

    Object recognition occurs even when environmental information is incomplete. Illusory contours (ICs), in which a contour is perceived though the contour edges are incomplete, have been extensively studied as an example of such a visual completion phenomenon. Despite the neural activity in response to ICs in visual cortical areas from low (V1 and V2) to high (LOC: the lateral occipital cortex) levels, the details of the neural processing underlying IC perception are largely not clarified. For example, how do the visual areas function in IC perception and how do they interact to archive the coherent contour perception? IC perception involves the process of completing the local discrete contour edges (contour completion) and the process of representing the global completed contour information (contour representation). Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to dissociate contour completion and contour representation by varying each in opposite directions. The results show that the neural activity was stronger to stimuli with more contour completion than to stimuli with more contour representation in V1 and V2, which was the reverse of that in the LOC. When inspecting the neural activity change across the visual pathway, the activation remained high for the stimuli with more contour completion and increased for the stimuli with more contour representation. These results suggest distinct neural correlates of contour completion and contour representation, and the possible collaboration between the two processes during IC perception, indicating a neural connection between the discrete retinal input and the coherent visual percept.

  4. Contour detection based on brightness and contour completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lamei; Wan, Min; Jin, Liujia; Gao, Yahong; Yang, Weidong

    2015-12-01

    The further research of visual processing mechanism provides a new idea for contour detection. On the primary visual cortex, the non-classical receptive field of the neurons has the orientation selectivity exerts suppression effect on the response of classical receptive field, which influences edge or line perception. Based on the suppression property of non-classical receptive field and contour completion, this paper proposed a contour detection method based on brightness and contour completion. The experiment shows that the proposed method can not only effectively eliminate clutter information, but also connect the broken contour points by taking advantage of contour completion.

  5. Contour Completion Without Region Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2016-08-01

    Contour completion plays an important role in visual perception, where the goal is to group fragmented low-level edge elements into perceptually coherent and salient contours. Most existing methods for contour completion have focused on pixelwise detection accuracy. In contrast, fewer methods have addressed the global contour closure effect, despite psychological evidences for its importance. This paper proposes a purely contour-based higher order CRF model to achieve contour closure, through local connectedness approximation. This leads to a simplified problem structure, where our higher order inference problem can be transformed into an integer linear program and be solved efficiently. Compared with the methods based on the same bottom-up edge detector, our method achieves a superior contour grouping ability (measured by Rand index), a comparable precision-recall performance, and more visually pleasing results. Our results suggest that contour closure can be effectively achieved in contour domain, in contrast to a popular view that segmentation is essential for this purpose.

  6. The Development of Contour Interpolation: Evidence from Subjective Contours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadad, Bat-Sheva; Maurer, Daphne; Lewis, Terri L.

    2010-01-01

    Adults are skilled at perceiving subjective contours in regions without any local image information (e.g., [Ginsburg, 1975] and [Kanizsa, 1976]). Here we examined the development of this skill and the effect thereon of the support ratio (i.e., the ratio of the physically specified contours to the total contour length). Children (6-, 9-, and…

  7. [Body-contouring surgery].

    PubMed

    Pitanguy, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Concepts of beauty have been continuously evolving throughout the history of mankind. The voluptuous figures that were idealized by artists in the past have been substituted by slimmer forms. Medical advances in this century have permitted safe and efficient surgical correction of contour deformities. Until recently, these alterations were mostly hidden under heavy clothing or were reluctantly accepted. Current fashion trends generally promote body-revealing attire. The media frequently encourages the importance of fitness and good health linking these qualities with youthfulness and beauty. The subliminal as well as overt message is that these are necessary and desirable requirements for social acceptance and professional success. On the other hand, current sedentary lifestyle and dietary excesses, associated with factors such as genetic determination, pregnancy and the aging process, contribute to alterations of body contour that result in the loss of the individual's body image. This creates a strong psychological motivation for surgical correction. Localized fat deposits and skin flaccidity are sometimes resistant to the most sincere efforts in weight loss and sport activities. This ever-increasing request for contour surgery has been favorably met by safe and effective anesthesiology as well as efficient surgical techniques, resulting in a high degree of patient satisfaction. It is essential that today's aesthetic surgeon understand the motivations of patients who present with body contour deformities. A request for surgical treatment should be seen as a legitimate desire to achieve a physical form that approximates the individual with his or her ideal self-image. Additionally, the surgeon must always consider the possible benefit of including the participation of a multidisciplinary team approach. Depending on each case, this team should include consultants in endocrinology, dermatology, oculoplastics, pediatrics and other appropriate specialties.

  8. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  9. Evolution and advection of solar mesogranulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard; Auffret, Herve; Roudier, Thierry; Vigneau, Jean; Simon, George W.; Frank, Zoe; Shine, Richard A.; Title, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    A three-hour sequence of observations at the Pic du Midi observatory has been obtained which shows the evolution of solar mesogranules from appearance to disappearance with unprecedented clarity. It is seen that the supergranules, which are known to advect the granules with their convective motion, also advect the mesogranules to their boundaries. This process controls the evolution and disappearance of mesogranules.

  10. Contoured Orifice for Silicon-Ribbon Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    Die configuration encourages purity and stable growth. Contour of die orifice changes near ribbon edges. As result, silicon ribbon has nearly constant width and little carbon contamination. Die part of furnace being developed to produce high-quality, low-cost material for solar cells.

  11. Molding Compound For Inspection Of Internal Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim; Ricklefs, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Material clean, sets rapidly, and easy to use. Silicone elastomer, Citrocon or equivalent, commonly used in dentistry, in combination with mold-release agent (Also see MFS-29240), speeds and facilitates making of impressions of interior surfaces so surface contours examined. Elastomer easily moved around in cavity until required location found.

  12. Prostate Contouring Variation: Can It Be Fixed?

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, Eric L.H.; Schick, Karlissa; Plank, Ashley W.; Poulsen, Michael; Wong, Winnie W.G.; Middleton, Mark; Martin, Jarad M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an education program on CT and MRI prostate anatomy would reduce inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variation among experienced radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Three patient CT and MRI datasets were selected. Five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate for each patient on CT first, then MRI, and again between 2 and 4 weeks later. Three education sessions were then conducted. The same contouring process was then repeated with the same datasets and oncologists. The observer variation was assessed according to changes in the ratio of the encompassing volume to intersecting volume (volume ratio [VR]), across sets of target volumes. Results: For interobserver variation, there was a 15% reduction in mean VR with CT, from 2.74 to 2.33, and a 40% reduction in mean VR with MRI, from 2.38 to 1.41 after education. A similar trend was found for intraobserver variation, with a mean VR reduction for CT and MRI of 9% (from 1.51 to 1.38) and 16% (from 1.37 to 1.15), respectively. Conclusion: A well-structured education program has reduced both inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variations. The impact was greater on MRI than on CT. With the ongoing incorporation of new technologies into routine practice, education programs for target contouring should be incorporated as part of the continuing medical education of radiation oncologists.

  13. Modeling of Convective-Stratiform Precipitation Processes: Sensitivity to Partitioning Methods and Numerical Advection Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Steve; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Ferrier, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Six different convective-stratiform separation techniques, including a new technique that utilizes the ratio of vertical and terminal velocities, are compared and evaluated using two-dimensional numerical simulations of a tropical [Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE)] and midlatitude continental [Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRESTORM)] squall line. The simulations are made using two different numerical advection schemes: 4th order and positive definite advection. Comparisons are made in terms of rainfall, cloud coverage, mass fluxes, apparent heating and moistening, mean hydrometeor profiles, CFADs (Contoured Frequency with Altitude Diagrams), microphysics, and latent heating retrieval. Overall, it was found that the different separation techniques produced results that qualitatively agreed. However, the quantitative differences were significant. Observational comparisons were unable to conclusively evaluate the performance of the techniques. Latent heating retrieval was shown to be sensitive to the use of separation technique mainly due to the stratiform region for methods that found very little stratiform rain. The midlatitude PRESTORM simulation was found to be nearly invariant with respect to advection type for most quantities while for TOGA COARE fourth order advection produced numerous shallow convective cores and positive definite advection fewer cells that were both broader and deeper penetrating above the freezing level.

  14. Contour Completion without Region Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2016-05-06

    Contour completion plays an important role in visual perception, where the goal is to group fragmented low-level edge elements into perceptually coherent and salient contours. Most existing methods for contour completion have focused on pixelwise detection accuracy. In contrast, fewer methods have addressed the global contour closure effect, despite of psychological evidences for its importance. This paper proposes a purely contour-based higher-order CRF model to achieve contour closure, through local connectedness approximation. This leads to a simplified problem structure, where our higher-order inference problem can be transformed into an integer linear program (ILP) and be solved efficiently. Compared with methods based on the same bottom-up edge detector, our method achieves a superior contour grouping ability (measured by Rand index), a comparable precision-recall performance, and more visually pleasing results. Our results suggest that contour closure can be effectively achieved in contour domain, in contrast to a popular view that segmentation is essential for this purpose.

  15. Contour matching by epipolar geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Lin; Zhang, Damin; Wei, Sui

    2003-09-01

    Matching features computed in images is an important process in multiview image analysis. When the motion between two images is large, the matching problem becomes very difficult. In this paper, we propose a contour matching algorithm based on geometric constraints. With the assumption that the contours are obtained from images taken from a moving camera with static scenes, we apply the epipolar constraint between two sets of contours and compute the corresponding points on the contours. From the initial epipolar constraints obtained from comer point matching, candidate contours are selected according to the epipolar geometry, the linear relation among tangent vectors of the contour. In order to reduce the possibility of false matches, the curvature of the contour of match points on a contour is also used as a selection method. The initial epipolar constraint is refined from the matched sets of contours. The algorithm can be applied to a pair or two pairs of images. All of the processes are fully automatic and successfully implemented and tested with various synthetic images.

  16. Method for contour extraction for object representation

    DOEpatents

    Skourikhine, Alexei N.; Prasad, Lakshman

    2005-08-30

    Contours are extracted for representing a pixelated object in a background pixel field. An object pixel is located that is the start of a new contour for the object and identifying that pixel as the first pixel of the new contour. A first contour point is then located on the mid-point of a transition edge of the first pixel. A tracing direction from the first contour point is determined for tracing the new contour. Contour points on mid-points of pixel transition edges are sequentially located along the tracing direction until the first contour point is again encountered to complete tracing the new contour. The new contour is then added to a list of extracted contours that represent the object. The contour extraction process associates regions and contours by labeling all the contours belonging to the same object with the same label.

  17. Evolution and Advection of Solar Mesogranulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    unprecedented clarity. We see that the supergranules, which are known to carry along (advect) the granules with their convective motion, also advect...I Solar mesogranulation, Solar observations, Solar super- 2 granulation 16. PRICE COCE 1i7. SECJ-3T LSiIATO 8 EUITY CLASSIFICA ION 19. SECURITY CLAS...mo~iesý sho~ed that granules are adl~ectedl b• Richard Muller*, Hers& Auffret*, Thierry Roudiert, the larger-scale consectie flowss. and thu, could

  18. Advection, diffusion, and delivery over a network.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Luke L M; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K; Fricker, Mark D; Jones, Nick S

    2012-08-01

    Many biological, geophysical, and technological systems involve the transport of a resource over a network. In this paper, we present an efficient method for calculating the exact quantity of the resource in each part of an arbitrary network, where the resource is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. The key conceptual step is to partition the resource into material that does or does not reach a node over a given time step. As an example application, we consider resource allocation within fungal networks, and analyze the spatial distribution of the resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, and such growth necessarily involves the movement of fluid. We develop a model of delivery in growing fungal networks, and find good empirical agreement between our model and experimental data gathered using radio-labeled tracers. Our results lead us to suggest that in foraging fungi, growth-induced mass flow is sufficient to account for long-distance transport, if the system is well insulated. We conclude that active transport mechanisms may only be required at the very end of the transport pathway, near the growing tips.

  19. Precision contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1990-12-11

    An apparatus for gaging the contour of a machined part includes a rotary slide assembly, a kinematic mount to move the apparatus into and out of position for measuring the part while the part is still on the machining apparatus, a linear probe assembly with a suspension arm and a probe assembly including as probe tip for providing a measure of linear displacement of the tip on the surface of the part, a means for changing relative positions between the part and the probe tip, and a means for recording data points representing linear positions of the probe tip at prescribed rotation intervals in the position changes between the part and the probe tip.

  20. Precision contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1990-12-11

    An apparatus for gaging the contour of a machined part includes a rotary slide assembly, a kinematic mount to move the apparatus into and out of position for measuring the part while the part is still on the machining apparatus, a linear probe assembly with a suspension arm and a probe assembly including as probe tip for providing a measure of linear displacement of the tip on the surface of the part, a means for changing relative positions between the part and the probe tip, and a means for recording data points representing linear positions of the probe tip at prescribed rotation intervals in the position changes between the part and the probe tip. 5 figs.

  1. Optically-initiated silicon carbide high voltage switch with contoured-profile electrode interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, James S.; Hawkins, Steven A.

    2012-09-04

    An improved photoconductive switch having a SiC or other wide band gap substrate material with opposing contoured profile cavities which have a contoured profile selected from one of Rogowski, Bruce, Chang, Harrison, and Ernst profiles, and two electrodes with matching contoured-profile convex interface surfaces.

  2. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  3. Advective-diffusive contaminant migration in unsaturated sand and gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, R.K.; Badv, K.

    1996-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating the diffusion coefficients for chloride and sodium in unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel based on parameters obtained from saturated diffusion tests conducted for similar material. The method is tested by comparing the observed and predicted diffusion profiles through unsaturated soil. The method is shown to work well for predicting the advective-diffusive migration of chloride and sodium through a two-layer soil system consisting of a compacted clayey silt underlain by an unsaturated fine gravel. Over the range of conditions examined, it is concluded that existing solute transport theory along with the proposed procedure for estimating the unsaturated diffusion coefficients can adequately predict chloride and sodium diffusion through both unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel as well as predict advective-diffusive transport through a compacted clayey layer and underlying unsaturated fine gravel.

  4. Sensory Information and Subjective Contour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brussell, Edward M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The possibility that subjective contours are an artifact of brightness contrast was explored. Concludes that subjective contour and brightness contrast are distinct perceptual phenomena but share a dependency on the processing of edge information transmitted through the achromatic channels of the visual system. (Editor/RK)

  5. Contour integration across spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Persike, Malte; Olzak, Lynn A; Meinhardt, Günter

    2009-12-01

    Association field models of contour integration suggest that local band-pass elements are spatially grouped to global contours within limited bands of spatial frequency (Field, Hayes, & Hess, 1993). While results for local orientation and spacing variation render support for AF models, effects of spatial frequency (SF) have rarely been addressed. To explore whether contour integration occurs across SF, we studied human contour detection in Gabor random fields with SF jitter along the contour, and in the embedding field. Results show no impairment of contour detection when the contour elements are 1.25 octaves apart. Even with a SF separation of 2.25 octaves there is only moderate impairment. Because SF tuning functions measured for contextual interactions of neighbored single band-pass elements indicate much smaller bandwidths (Polat & Sagi, 1993), the results imply that contour integration cannot rest solely on local locking among neighbored orientation and SF tuned mechanisms. Robustness across spatial frequency, and across color and depth, as found recently, indicates that local orientation based grouping integrates across other basic features. This suggests an origin in not too distal brain regions.

  6. Contour Integration across Spatial Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persike, Malte; Olzak, Lynn A.; Meinhardt, Gunter

    2009-01-01

    Association field models of contour integration suggest that local band-pass elements are spatially grouped to global contours within limited bands of spatial frequency (Field, Hayes, & Hess, 1993). While results for local orientation and spacing variation render support for AF models, effects of spatial frequency (SF) have rarely been addressed.…

  7. Three-Dimensional Contour Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Edward

    2005-01-01

    In summary, this highly conceptual activity helps middle school students understand that the lines on the contour map represent intersections of the surface of the landform with regularly spaced horizontal planes. Building the landform and relating its features to the contour map offer many opportunities for visualization, all grounded in concrete…

  8. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  9. Contour Error Map Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis; Lane, John; Immer, Christopher; Case, Jonathan; Manobianco, John

    2005-01-01

    The contour error map (CEM) algorithm and the software that implements the algorithm are means of quantifying correlations between sets of time-varying data that are binarized and registered on spatial grids. The present version of the software is intended for use in evaluating numerical weather forecasts against observational sea-breeze data. In cases in which observational data come from off-grid stations, it is necessary to preprocess the observational data to transform them into gridded data. First, the wind direction is gridded and binarized so that D(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on forecast data and d(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on gridded observational data. Here, i and j are spatial indices representing 1.25-km intervals along the west-to-east and south-to-north directions, respectively; and n is a time index representing 5-minute intervals. A binary value of D or d = 0 corresponds to an offshore wind, whereas a value of D or d = 1 corresponds to an onshore wind. CEM includes two notable subalgorithms: One identifies and verifies sea-breeze boundaries; the other, which can be invoked optionally, performs an image-erosion function for the purpose of attempting to eliminate river-breeze contributions in the wind fields.

  10. Evaluation of Dosimetric Consequences of Seroma Contour Variability in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Constructed Representative Seroma Contour

    SciTech Connect

    Kosztyla, Robert; Olson, Robert; Carolan, Hannah; Balkwill, Susan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Kwan, Winkle

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Contouring variability of the seroma can have important implications in the planning and delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). This study aimed to quantify the dosimetric impact of these interobserver and intraobserver contouring variations by construction of a representative seroma contour (RSC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with a seroma suitable for APBI underwent four computed tomography (CT) scans: one planning CT and three additional CTs on the first, third, and fifth days of treatment. Three radiation oncologists contoured the seroma on each CT scan. For 3 patients, oncologists repeated contouring twice to assess intraobserver variations. Seroma contour variability was quantified by construction of an RSC. In addition, the percent volume overlap (PVO) was calculated. Root-mean-square (RMS) differences in seroma volume, size, and center of mass position compared to those of the RSC were calculated. Treatment fields from the original plan were applied to the repeated CTs by using the same isocenter shifts as the original plan. The dosimetric impact of the contour variations was assessed using V{sub 95} (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Results: Interobserver RMS volume differences were, on average, 5.6 times larger than intraobserver differences. The median interobserver RMS seroma volume difference was 1.48 cm{sup 3}. The median PVO was 51.6%. V{sub 95} and EUD of the seroma contours were similar for all patients. The median RMS differences of the seroma V{sub 95} and EUD were 0.01% (range, 0%-3.99%) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0-0.98 Gy). Conclusions: Construction of the RSC showed that interobserver variations were most responsible for contour variations of the seroma. Current planning margins provided adequate dose coverage of the seroma despite these contour variations.

  11. Non-contact contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1990-12-18

    A fluid probe for measuring the surface contour of a machined part is provided whereby the machined part can remain on the machining apparatus during surface contour measurement. A measuring nozzle in a measuring probe directs a measuring fluid flow onto the surface. The measuring nozzle is on the probe situated midway between two guide nozzles that direct guide fluid flows onto the surface. When the guide fluid flows interact with the surface, they cause the measuring flow and measuring probe to be oriented perpendicular to the surface. The measuring probe includes a pressure chamber whose pressure is monitored. As the measuring fluid flow encounters changes in surface contour, pressure changes occur in the pressure chamber. The surface contour is represented as data corresponding to pressure changes in the pressure chamber as the surface is scanned.

  12. Optimality of human contour integration.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Udo A; Mandon, Sunita; Schinkel-Bielefeld, Nadja; Neitzel, Simon D; Kreiter, Andreas K; Pawelzik, Klaus R

    2012-01-01

    For processing and segmenting visual scenes, the brain is required to combine a multitude of features and sensory channels. It is neither known if these complex tasks involve optimal integration of information, nor according to which objectives computations might be performed. Here, we investigate if optimal inference can explain contour integration in human subjects. We performed experiments where observers detected contours of curvilinearly aligned edge configurations embedded into randomly oriented distractors. The key feature of our framework is to use a generative process for creating the contours, for which it is possible to derive a class of ideal detection models. This allowed us to compare human detection for contours with different statistical properties to the corresponding ideal detection models for the same stimuli. We then subjected the detection models to realistic constraints and required them to reproduce human decisions for every stimulus as well as possible. By independently varying the four model parameters, we identify a single detection model which quantitatively captures all correlations of human decision behaviour for more than 2000 stimuli from 42 contour ensembles with greatly varying statistical properties. This model reveals specific interactions between edges closely matching independent findings from physiology and psychophysics. These interactions imply a statistics of contours for which edge stimuli are indeed optimally integrated by the visual system, with the objective of inferring the presence of contours in cluttered scenes. The recurrent algorithm of our model makes testable predictions about the temporal dynamics of neuronal populations engaged in contour integration, and it suggests a strong directionality of the underlying functional anatomy.

  13. Winding number constrained contour detection.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2015-01-01

    Salient contour detection can benefit from the integration of both contour cues and region cues. However, this task is difficult due to different nature of region representations and contour representations. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an energy minimization framework based on winding number constraints. In this framework, both region cues, such as color/texture homogeneity, and contour cues, such as local contrast and continuity, are represented in a joint objective function, which has both region and contour labels. The key problem is how to design constraints that ensure the topological consistency of the two kinds of labels. Our technique is based on the topological concept of winding number. Using a fast method for winding number computation, a small number of linear constraints are derived to ensure label consistency. Our method is instantiated by ratio-based energy functions. By successfully integrating both region and contour cues, our method shows advantages over competitive methods. Our method is extended to incorporate user interaction, which leads to further improvements.

  14. Diffusion and Advection using Cellular Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Glazier, James

    2005-03-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a robust cell level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Standard diffusion solvers in the CPM use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. These methods have difficulty in simulating local advection in the ECM due to physiology and morphogenesis. To circumvent the problem of instabilities we simulate advection-diffusion within the framework of CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalised fluid "cells" or particles which separate advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid cells by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. CPM movement of the cells by spin flips handles the advection. The extension allows the CPM to model viscosity explicitly by including a relative velocity constraint on the fluid. The extended CPM correctly reproduces flow profiles of viscous fluids in cylindrical tube, during Stokes flow across a sphere and in flow in concentric cylindrical shells. We illustrate various conditions for diffusion including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation by comparing with analytical and established numerical solutions.

  15. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  16. The Effect of Contouring Variability on Dosimetric Parameters for Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Julia; Dunscombe, Peter; Lau, Harold; Burns, Paul; Lim, Gerald; Liu, Hong-Wei; Nordal, Robert; Starreveld, Yves; Valev, Boris; Voroney, Jon-Paul; Spencer, David P.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of contouring variation on stereotactic radiosurgery plan quality metrics for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Fourteen metastases, each contoured by 8 physicians, formed the basis of this study. A template-based dynamic conformal 5-arc dose distribution was developed for each of the 112 contours, and each dose distribution was applied to the 7 other contours in each patient set. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) plan quality metrics and the Paddick conformity index were calculated for each of the 896 combinations of dose distributions and contours. Results: The ratio of largest to smallest contour volume for each metastasis varied from 1.25 to 4.47, with a median value of 1.68 (n=8). The median absolute difference in RTOG conformity index between the value for the reference contour and the values for the alternative contours was 0.35. The variation of the range of conformity index for all contours for a given tumor varied with the tumor size. Conclusions: The high degree of interobserver contouring variation strongly suggests that peer review or consultation should be adopted to standardize tumor volume prescription. Observer confidence was not reflected in contouring consistency. The impact of contouring variability on plan quality metrics, used as criteria for clinical trial protocol compliance, was such that the category of compliance was robust to interobserver effects only 70% of the time.

  17. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  18. Entropy reduction via simplified image contourization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The process of contourization is presented which converts a raster image into a set of plateaux or contours. These contours can be grouped into a hierarchical structure, defining total spatial inclusion, called a contour tree. A contour coder has been developed which fully describes these contours in a compact and efficient manner and is the basis for an image compression method. Simplification of the contour tree has been undertaken by merging contour tree nodes thus lowering the contour tree's entropy. This can be exploited by the contour coder to increase the image compression ratio. By applying general and simple rules derived from physiological experiments on the human vision system, lossy image compression can be achieved which minimizes noticeable artifacts in the simplified image.

  19. Sonority contours in word recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLennan, Sean

    2003-04-01

    Contrary to the Generativist distinction between competence and performance which asserts that speech or perception errors are due to random, nonlinguistic factors, it seems likely that errors are principled and possibly governed by some of the same constraints as language. A preliminary investigation of errors modeled after the child's ``Chain Whisper'' game (a degraded stimulus task) suggests that a significant number of recognition errors can be characterized as an improvement in syllable sonority contour towards the linguistically least-marked, voiceless-stop-plus-vowel syllable. An independent study of sonority contours showed that approximately half of the English lexicon can be uniquely identified by their contour alone. Additionally, ``sororities'' (groups of words that share a single sonority contour), surprisingly, show no correlation to familiarity or frequency in either size or membership. Together these results imply that sonority contours may be an important factor in word recognition and in defining word ``neighborhoods.'' Moreover, they suggest that linguistic markedness constraints may be more prevalent in performance-related phenomena than previously accepted.

  20. Global contour processing in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Dennis M.; Yu, Cong; Kuai, Shu-Guang; Rislove, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments described here was to investigate global image processing using methods that require global processing while eliminating or compensating for low level abnormalities: visibility, shape perception and positional uncertainty. In order to accomplish this we used a closed figure made up of Gabor patches either in noise or on a blank field. The stimuli were circular or elliptical contours, formed by N equally spaced Gabor patches. We performed two separate experiments: In one experiment we fixed N and varied the aspect ratio using a staircase to determine the threshold aspect ratio; in the second experiment we held the aspect ratio constant (at twice the threshold aspect ratio) and varied N in order to measure the threshold number of elements required to judge the shape. Our results confirm and extend previous studies showing that humans with naturally occurring amblyopia show deficits in contour processing. Our results show that the deficits depend strongly on spatial scale (target size and spatial frequency). The deficit in global contour processing is substantially greater in noise (where contour-linking is required) than on a blank field. The magnitude of the deficits is modest when low-level deficits (reduced visibility, increased positional uncertainty, and abnormal shape perception) are minimized, and does not seem to depend much on acuity, crowding or stereoacuity. The residual deficits reported here cannot be simply ascribed to reduced visibility or increased positional uncertainty, and we therefore conclude that these are genuine deficits in global contour segregation and integration. PMID:17223155

  1. Checking Surface Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velega, D.

    1983-01-01

    Rubber impressions viewed with optical comparator. Simple mold constructed from aluminum sheet or any other easily shaped material compatible with silicone rubber ingredients. Mold placed over surface to be measured. Newly-mixed silicone rubber compound poured in mold and allowed to cure.

  2. Capillary deposition of advected floating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Debaisieux, Aymeric; Gregori, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The deposition and aggregation of particles flowing through a confined environment can dramatically hinder the transport of suspensions. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of particles in shear flow are not fully understood. Here, we use an experimental model system in which floating particles are advected on the surface of a water channel and deposited on fixed obstacles through attractive capillary effects. By varying the flow rate of the liquid, the wetting properties and size of the particles and obstacles, we can tune the magnitude of the capillary and hydrodynamic forces that determine the probability of deposition and the equilibrium position on the substrate. We show that arrays of obstacles can be designed to efficiently capture the floating particles advected by the flow.

  3. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  4. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  5. Topological Cacti: Visualizing Contour-based Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2011-05-26

    Contours, the connected components of level sets, play an important role in understanding the global structure of a scalar field. In particular their nestingbehavior and topology-often represented in form of a contour tree-have been used extensively for visualization and analysis. However, traditional contour trees onlyencode structural properties like number of contours or the nesting of contours, but little quantitative information such as volume or other statistics. Here we use thesegmentation implied by a contour tree to compute a large number of per-contour (interval) based statistics of both the function defining the contour tree as well asother co-located functions. We introduce a new visual metaphor for contour trees, called topological cacti, that extends the traditional toporrery display of acontour tree to display additional quantitative information as width of the cactus trunk and length of its spikes. We apply the new technique to scalar fields ofvarying dimension and different measures to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  6. Ferrofluid Photonic Dipole Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Michael; Frederick, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Understanding magnetic fields is important to facilitate magnetic applications in diverse fields in industry, commerce, and space exploration to name a few. Large electromagnets can move heavy loads of metal. Magnetic materials attached to credit cards allow for fast, accurate business transactions. And the Earth's magnetic field gives us the colorful auroras observed near the north and south poles. Magnetic fields are not visible, and therefore often hard to understand or characterize. This investigation describes and demonstrates a novel technique for the visualization of magnetic fields. Two ferrofluid Hele-Shaw cells have been constructed to facilitate the imaging of magnetic field lines [1,2,3,4]. We deduce that magnetically induced photonic band gap arrays similar to electrostatic liquid crystal operation are responsible for the photographed images and seek to mathematically prove the images are of exact dipole nature. We also note by comparison that our photographs are very similar to solar magnetic Heliosphere photographs.

  7. Algorithm for Constructing Contour Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Silva, F.

    1984-01-01

    General computer algorithm developed for construction of contour plots. algorithm accepts as input data values at set of points irregularly distributed over plane. Algorithm based on interpolation scheme: points in plane connected by straight-line segments to form set of triangles. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  8. Gage for 3-d contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Simple gage, used with template, can help inspectors determine whether three-dimensional curved surface has correct contour. Gage was developed as aid in explosive forming of Space Shuttle emergency-escape hatch. For even greater accuracy, wedge can be made of metal and calibrated by indexing machine.

  9. MULTISCALE DISCRETIZATION OF SHAPE CONTOURS

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, L.; Rao, R.

    2000-09-01

    We present an efficient multi-scale scheme to adaptively approximate the continuous (or densely sampled) contour of a planar shape at varying resolutions. The notion of shape is intimately related to the notion of contour, and the efficient representation of the contour of a shape is vital to a computational understanding of the shape. Any polygonal approximation of a planar smooth curve is equivalent to a piecewise constant approximation of the parameterized X and Y coordinate functions of a discrete point set obtained by densely sampling the curve. Using the Haar wavelet transform for the piecewise approximation yields a hierarchical scheme in which the size of the approximating point set is traded off against the morphological accuracy of the approximation. Our algorithm compresses the representation of the initial shape contour to a sparse sequence of points in the plane defining the vertices of the shape's polygonal approximation. Furthermore, it is possible to control the overall resolution of the approximation by a single, scale-independent parameter.

  10. Measuring and Plotting Surface-Contour Deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Lino A.; Shuck, Thomas; Crockett, Leroy K.

    1987-01-01

    Hand-held device measures deviation of contour of surface from desired contour and provides output to x-y plotter. Carriage on device rolled along track representing desired contour, while spring-loaded stylus on device deflects perpendicularly to track to follow surface. Operator moves carriage of contour-measuring device on beamlike track. Stylus on carriage traces contour of surface above it. Carriage of measuring device holds transducer measuring cross-track displacement of surface from desired contour, and multiple-turn potentiometer measuring position along track.

  11. Contamination Barrier For Contour-Molding Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Release agent prevents molding compound from adhering to or contaminating surface. Cleaning agent, Turco 4215 NCLT, forms barrier preventing silicone molding compound from sticking to surface and leaving contaminating residue. Also see MFS-29243.

  12. The distortion of the level set gradient under advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Mario F.; Anumolu, Lakshman; Ryddner, Doug

    2017-04-01

    The practice of periodically reinitializing the level set function is well established in two-phase flow applications as a way of controlling the growth of anomalies and/or numerical errors. In the present work, the underlying roots of this anomalous growth are studied, where it is established that the augmentation of the magnitude of the level set gradient (| ∇ϕ |) is directly connected to the nature of the flow field; hence, it is not necessarily the result of some type of numerical error. More specifically, for a general flow field advecting the level set function, it is shown that the eigenpairs of the strain rate tensor are responsible for the rate of change of | ∇ϕ | along a fluid particle trajectory. This straining action not only affects the magnitude of | ∇ϕ |, but the general character of ϕ, and consequently contributes to the growth in numerical error. These numerical consequences are examined by adopting the Gradient Augmented Level Set method. Specifically, it is shown that the local error for ϕ is directly connected to the size of | ∇ϕ | and to the magnitude of the second and fourth order derivatives of ϕ. These analytical findings are subsequently supported by various examples. The role of reinitialization is discussed, where it is shown that in cases where the zero level set contour has a local radius of curvature that is below the local grid resolution, reinitialization exacerbates rather than diminishes the degree of error. For other cases, where the interface is well resolved, reinitialization helps stabilize the error as intended.

  13. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  14. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    PubMed Central

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  15. Striated populations in disordered environments with advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.; Succi, Sauro

    2017-01-01

    Growth in static and controlled environments such as a Petri dish can be used to study the spatial population dynamics of microorganisms. However, natural populations such as marine microbes experience fluid advection and often grow up in heterogeneous environments. We investigate a generalized Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov (FKPP) equation describing single species population subject to a constant flow field and quenched random spatially inhomogeneous growth rates with a fertile overall growth condition. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that the non-equilibrium steady-state population density develops a flow-driven striation pattern. The striations are highly asymmetric with a longitudinal correlation length that diverges linearly with the flow speed and a transverse correlation length that approaches a finite velocity-independent value. Linear response theory is developed to study the statistics of the steady states. Theoretical predictions show excellent agreement with the numerical steady states of the generalized FKPP equation obtained from Lattice Boltzmann simulations. These findings suggest that, although the growth disorder can be spatially uncorrelated, correlated population structures with striations emerge naturally at sufficiently strong advection.

  16. Waves, advection, and cloud patterns on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Smith, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The stable layers adjacent to the nearly neutral layer within the Venus clouds are found to be capable of supporting vertically trapped, horizontally propagating waves with horizontal wavelengths of about 10 km and speeds of a few meters per second relative to the mean wind in the neutral layer. These waves may possibly be excited by turbulence within the neutral layer. Here, the properties of the waves, and the patterns which they might produce within the visible clouds if excited near the subsolar point are examined. The patterns can be in agreement with many features in images. The waves are capable of transferring momentum latitudinally to help maintain the general atmospheric spin, but at present we are not able to evaluate wave amplitudes. We also examine an alternative possibility that the cloud patterns are produced by advection and shearing by the mean zonal and meridional flow of blobs formed near the equator. It is concluded that advection and shearing by the mean flow is the most likely explanation for the general pattern of small scale striations.

  17. Parallel algorithms for semi-lagrangian advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevsky, A. V.; Thomas, S. J.

    1997-08-01

    Numerical time step limitations associated with the explicit treatment of advection-dominated problems in computational fluid dynamics are often relaxed by employing Eulerian-Lagrangian methods. These are also known as semi-Lagrangian methods in the atmospheric sciences. Such methods involve backward time integration of a characteristic equation to find the departure point of a fluid particle arriving at a Eulerian grid point. The value of the advected field at the departure point is obtained by interpolation. Both the trajectory integration and repeated interpolation influence accuracy. We compare the accuracy and performance of interpolation schemes based on piecewise cubic polynomials and cubic B-splines in the context of a distributed memory, parallel computing environment. The computational cost and interprocessor communication requirements for both methods are reported. Spline interpolation has better conservation properties but requires the solution of a global linear system, initially appearing to hinder a distributed memory implementation. The proposed parallel algorithm for multidimensional spline interpolation has almost the same communication overhead as local piecewise polynomial interpolation. We also compare various techniques for tracking trajectories given different values for the Courant number. Large Courant numbers require a high-order ODE solver involving multiple interpolations of the velocity field.

  18. What is in a contour map? A region-based logical formalization of contour semantics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E. Lynn; Hahmann, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses and formalizes contour semantics in a first-order logic ontology that forms the basis for enabling computational common sense reasoning about contour information. The elicited contour semantics comprises four key concepts – contour regions, contour lines, contour values, and contour sets – and their subclasses and associated relations, which are grounded in an existing qualitative spatial ontology. All concepts and relations are illustrated and motivated by physical-geographic features identifiable on topographic contour maps. The encoding of the semantics of contour concepts in first-order logic and a derived conceptual model as basis for an OWL ontology lay the foundation for fully automated, semantically-aware qualitative and quantitative reasoning about contours.

  19. Grouping by proximity in haptic contour detection.

    PubMed

    Overvliet, Krista E; Krampe, Ralf Th; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Gestalt principle of perceptual grouping by proximity in the haptic modality. To do so, we investigated the influence of element proximity on haptic contour detection. In the course of four sessions ten participants performed a haptic contour detection task in which they freely explored a haptic random dot display that contained a contour in 50% of the trials. A contour was defined by a higher density of elements (raised dots), relative to the background surface. Proximity of the contour elements as well as the average proximity of background elements was systematically varied. We hypothesized that if proximity of contour elements influences haptic contour detection, detection will be more likely when contour elements are in closer proximity. This should be irrespective of the ratio with the proximity of the background elements. Results showed indeed that the closer the contour elements were, the higher the detection rates. Moreover, this was the case independent of the contour/background ratio. We conclude that the Gestalt law of proximity applies to haptic contour detection.

  20. Grouping by Proximity in Haptic Contour Detection

    PubMed Central

    Overvliet, Krista E.; Krampe, Ralf Th.; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Gestalt principle of perceptual grouping by proximity in the haptic modality. To do so, we investigated the influence of element proximity on haptic contour detection. In the course of four sessions ten participants performed a haptic contour detection task in which they freely explored a haptic random dot display that contained a contour in 50% of the trials. A contour was defined by a higher density of elements (raised dots), relative to the background surface. Proximity of the contour elements as well as the average proximity of background elements was systematically varied. We hypothesized that if proximity of contour elements influences haptic contour detection, detection will be more likely when contour elements are in closer proximity. This should be irrespective of the ratio with the proximity of the background elements. Results showed indeed that the closer the contour elements were, the higher the detection rates. Moreover, this was the case independent of the contour/background ratio. We conclude that the Gestalt law of proximity applies to haptic contour detection. PMID:23762364

  1. BUOYANT ADVECTION OF GASES IN UNSATURATED SOIL

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Gregory E.; Falta, Ronald W.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    In unsaturated soil, methane and volatile organic compounds can significantly alter the density of soil gas and induce buoyant gas flow. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a two-dimensional, homogeneous sand pack with gas permeabilities ranging from 110 to 3,000 darcy. Pure methane gas was injected horizontally into the sand and steady-state methane profiles were measured. Experimental results are in close agreement with a numerical model that represents the advective and diffusive components of methane transport. Comparison of simulations with and without gravitational acceleration permits identification of conditions where buoyancy dominates methane transport. Significant buoyant flow requires a Rayleigh number greater than 10 and an injected gas velocity sufficient to overcome dilution by molecular diffusion near the source. These criteria allow the extension of laboratory results to idealized field conditions for methane as well as denser-than-air vapors produced by volatilizing nonaqueous phase liquids trapped in unsaturated soil. PMID:20396624

  2. Shape from equal thickness contours

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, G.; Parvin, B.

    1998-05-10

    A unique imaging modality based on Equal Thickness Contours (ETC) has introduced a new opportunity for 3D shape reconstruction from multiple views. We present a computational framework for representing each view of an object in terms of its object thickness, and then integrating these representations into a 3D surface by algebraic reconstruction. The object thickness is inferred by grouping curve segments that correspond to points of second derivative maxima. At each step of the process, we use some form of regularization to ensure closeness to the original features, as well as neighborhood continuity. We apply our approach to images of a sub-micron crystal structure obtained through a holographic process.

  3. Both predictability and familiarity facilitate contour integration.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Michaël; Demeyer, Maarten; Machilsen, Bart; Putzeys, Tom; Wagemans, Johan

    2014-05-30

    Research has shown that contour detection is impaired in the visual periphery for snake-shaped Gabor contours but not for circular and elliptical contours. This discrepancy in findings could be due to differences in intrinsic shape properties, including shape closure and curvature variation, as well as to differences in stimulus predictability and familiarity. In a detection task using only circular contours, the target shape is both more familiar and more predictable to the observer compared with a detection task in which a different snake-shaped contour is presented on each trial. In this study, we investigated the effects of stimulus familiarity and predictability on contour integration by manipulating and disentangling the familiarity and predictability of snakelike stimuli. We manipulated stimulus familiarity by extensively training observers with one particular snake shape. Predictability was varied by alternating trial blocks with only a single target shape and trial blocks with multiple target shapes. Our results show that both predictability and familiarity facilitated contour integration, which constitutes novel behavioral evidence for the adaptivity of the contour integration mechanism in humans. If familiarity or predictability facilitated contour integration in the periphery specifically, this could explain the discrepant findings obtained with snake contours as compared with circles or ellipses. However, we found that their facilitatory effects did not differ between central and peripheral vision and thus cannot explain that particular discrepancy in the literature.

  4. Brightness alteration with interweaving contours.

    PubMed

    Roncato, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation) or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect) or adjacent (watercolour) to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread). The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975) and Kanizsa (1979) in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  5. Antenna surface contour control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahl, Elvin L. (Inventor); Miller, James B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a system for automatically controlling the surface contour of a deployable and restowable antenna having a mesh reflector surface supported by a circular, folding hoop affixed to a central, telescoping column. The antenna, when deployed, forms a quad-aperture reflector with each quadrant of the mesh surface shaped to provide an offset parabolic radio frequency (RF) reflector. The hoop is supported and positioned by quartz support cords attached to the top of a column and by lower graphite hoop control cords that extend between the hoop and base of the column. The antenna, an RF reflective surface, is a gold plated molybdenum wire mesh supported on a graphite cord truss structure that includes the hoop control cords and a plurality of surface control cords attached at selected points on the surface and to the base of the column. The contour of the three-dimensional surface of the antenna is controlled by selectively adjusting the lengths of the surface control cords and the graphite hoop control cords by means of novel actuator assemblies that automatically sense and change the lengths of the lower hoop control cords and surface control cords.

  6. Projection moire for remote contour analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Remote projection and viewing of moire contours are examined analytically for a system employing separate projection and viewing optics, with specific attention paid to the practical limitations imposed by the optical systems. It is found that planar contours are possible only when the optics are telecentric (exit pupil at infinity) but that the requirement for spatial separability of the contour fringes from extraneous fringes is independent of the specific optics and is a function only of the angle separating the two optic axes. In the nontelecentric case, the contour separation near the object is unchanged from that of the telecentric case, although the contours are distorted into low-eccentricity (near-circular) ellipses. Furthermore, the minimum contour spacing is directly related to the depth of focus through the resolution of the optics.

  7. Contouring variability of human- and deformable-generated contours in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Kim, Jinkoo; Liu, Chang; Pradhan, Deepak; Aref, Ibrahim; Cattaneo, Richard, II; Vance, Sean; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate contouring variability of human-and deformable-generated contours on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT for ten patients with low-or intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For each patient in this study, five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate, bladder, and rectum, on one PCT dataset and five CBCT datasets. Consensus contours were generated using the STAPLE method in the CERR software package. Observer contours were compared to consensus contour, and contour metrics (Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, Contour Distance, Center-of-Mass [COM] Deviation) were calculated. In addition, the first day CBCT was registered to subsequent CBCT fractions (CBCTn: CBCT2-CBCT5) via B-spline Deformable Image Registration (DIR). Contours were transferred from CBCT1 to CBCTn via the deformation field, and contour metrics were calculated through comparison with consensus contours generated from human contour set. The average contour metrics for prostate contours on PCT and CBCT were as follows: Dice coefficient—0.892 (PCT), 0.872 (CBCT-Human), 0.824 (CBCT-Deformed); Hausdorff distance—4.75 mm (PCT), 5.22 mm (CBCT-Human), 5.94 mm (CBCT-Deformed); Contour Distance (overall contour)—1.41 mm (PCT), 1.66 mm (CBCT-Human), 2.30 mm (CBCT-Deformed); COM Deviation—2.01 mm (PCT), 2.78 mm (CBCT-Human), 3.45 mm (CBCT-Deformed). For human contours on PCT and CBCT, the difference in average Dice coefficient between PCT and CBCT (approx. 2%) and Hausdorff distance (approx. 0.5 mm) was small compared to the variation between observers for each patient (standard deviation in Dice coefficient of 5% and Hausdorff distance of 2.0 mm). However, additional contouring variation was found for the deformable-generated contours (approximately 5.0% decrease in Dice coefficient and 0.7 mm increase in Hausdorff distance relative to human-generated contours on CBCT). Though deformable contours provide a reasonable starting point for contouring on

  8. Creation of digital contours that approach the characteristics of cartographic contours

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyler, Dean J.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    The capability to easily create digital contours using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software has existed for decades. Out-of-the-box raw contours are suitable for many scientific applications without pre- or post-processing; however, cartographic applications typically require additional improvements. For example, raw contours generally require smoothing before placement on a map. Cartographic contours must also conform to certain spatial/logical rules; for example, contours may not cross waterbodies. The objective was to create contours that match as closely as possible the cartographic contours produced by manual methods on the 1:24,000-scale, 7.5-minute Topographic Map series. This report outlines the basic approach, describes a variety of problems that were encountered, and discusses solutions. Many of the challenges described herein were the result of imperfect input raster elevation data and the requirement to have the contours integrated with hydrographic features from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD).

  9. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Deville, Curtiland; Chen, Yen-Lin; Finkelstein, Steven E.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  10. Interval and Contour Processing in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    High functioning children with autism and age and intelligence matched controls participated in experiments testing perception of pitch intervals and musical contours. The finding from the interval study showed superior detection of pitch direction over small pitch distances in the autism group. On the test of contour discrimination no group…

  11. Top-down control in contour grouping.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Wutz, Andreas; Greenlee, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Human observers tend to group oriented line segments into full contours if they follow the Gestalt rule of 'good continuation'. It is commonly assumed that contour grouping emerges automatically in early visual cortex. In contrast, recent work in animal models suggests that contour grouping requires learning and thus involves top-down control from higher brain structures. Here we explore mechanisms of top-down control in perceptual grouping by investigating synchronicity within EEG oscillations. Human participants saw two micro-Gabor arrays in a random order, with the task to indicate whether the first (S1) or the second stimulus (S2) contained a contour of collinearly aligned elements. Contour compared to non-contour S1 produced a larger posterior post-stimulus beta power (15-21 Hz). Contour S2 was associated with a pre-stimulus decrease in posterior alpha power (11-12 Hz) and in fronto-posterior theta (4-5 Hz) phase couplings, but not with a post-stimulus increase in beta power. The results indicate that subjects used prior knowledge from S1 processing for S2 contour grouping. Expanding previous work on theta oscillations, we propose that long-range theta synchrony shapes neural responses to perceptual groupings regulating lateral inhibition in early visual cortex.

  12. Tongue Motion Averaging from Contour Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Min; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a method to get the best representation of a speech motion from several repetitions is presented. Each repetition is a representation of the same speech captured at different times by sequence of ultrasound images and is composed of a set of 2D spatio-temporal contours. These 2D contours in different repetitions are time aligned…

  13. Designing for chaos: applications of chaotic advection at the microscale.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, F R; Aref, Hassan

    2004-05-15

    Chaotic advection can play an important role in efficient microfluidic mixers. We discuss a design paradigm that exploits chaotic advection and illustrate by two recent examples, namely enhancing gene expression profiling and constructing an in-line microfluidic mixing channel, how application of this paradigm has led to successful micromixers. We suggest that 'designing for chaos', that is, basing practical mixer design on chaotic advection analysis, is a promising approach to adopt in this developing field which otherwise has little to guide it and is constrained by issues of scale and manufacturability.

  14. Contour detection and hierarchical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Arbeláez, Pablo; Maire, Michael; Fowlkes, Charless; Malik, Jitendra

    2011-05-01

    This paper investigates two fundamental problems in computer vision: contour detection and image segmentation. We present state-of-the-art algorithms for both of these tasks. Our contour detector combines multiple local cues into a globalization framework based on spectral clustering. Our segmentation algorithm consists of generic machinery for transforming the output of any contour detector into a hierarchical region tree. In this manner, we reduce the problem of image segmentation to that of contour detection. Extensive experimental evaluation demonstrates that both our contour detection and segmentation methods significantly outperform competing algorithms. The automatically generated hierarchical segmentations can be interactively refined by user-specified annotations. Computation at multiple image resolutions provides a means of coupling our system to recognition applications.

  15. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  16. Overcoming diffusion-limited processes using enhanced advective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Many subsurface cleanup activities focus on the remediation of organic contaminants using induced advective fields. Subsurface heterogeneities cause most advective transport to occur in more permeable zones, with transport from the lower permeability units being limited by diffusion to the higher permeable units. While diffusion rates can be enhanced using thermal sources, many of the treatment strategies, including pump and treat, vapor extraction and bioremediation, are limited by mass exchange rates between the higher and lower permeability sand and clay mixtures. Instead of relying on the enhancement of diffusion rates, it is proposed that remediation strategies should focus on the enhancement of induced advective transport rates through the lower permeability units. Injection-extraction strategies using crosshole and huff-and-puff methods are presented for maximizing advective transport through lower permeability units. Optimization of the design can incorporate diffusion-enhancement technologies, bionourishment, capillary confinement in the unsaturated zone, and DNAPL slurping.

  17. Constraints upon water advection in sediments of the Mariana Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.H.; Menke, W.; Morin, R.

    1983-02-10

    Thermal gradient measurements, consolidation tests, and pore water compositions from the Mariana Trough imply that water is moving through the sediments in areas with less than about 100 m of sediment cover. The maximum advection rates implied by the thermal measurements and consolidation tests may be as high as 10/sup -5/ cm s/sup -1/ but are most commonly in the range of 1 to 5 x 10/sup -6/ cm s/sup -1/. Theoretical calculations of the effect of the highest advection rates upon carbonate dissolution indicate that dissolution may be impeded or enhanced (depending upon the direction of flow) by a factor of 2 to 5 times the rate for diffusion alone. The average percentage of carbonate is consistently higher in two cores from the area with no advection or upward advection than the average percentage of carbonate in three cores from the area with downward advection. This increase in average amount of carbonate in cores with upward moving water or no movement cannot be attributed solely to differences in water depth or in amount of terrigenous dilution. If the sediment column acts as a passive boundary layer, then the water velocities necessary to affect chemical gradients of silica are in the range 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -10/ cm s/sup -1/. However, if dissolution of silica occurs within the sediment column, then the advection velocities needed to affect chemical gradients are at least 3 x 10/sup -8/ cm s/sup -1/ and may be as high as 3 x 10/sup -6/ cm s/sup -1/. This order of magnitude increase in advection velocities when chemical reactions occur within the sediments is probably applicable to other cations in addition to silica. If so, then the advection velocities needed to affect heat flow (>10/sup -8/ cm s/sup -1/) and pore water chemical gradients are much nearer in magnitude than previously assumed.

  18. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  19. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  20. Spiral Light Beams and Contour Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishkin, Sergey A.; Kotova, Svetlana P.; Volostnikov, Vladimir G.

    Spiral beams of light are characterized by their ability to remain structurally unchanged at propagation. They may have the shape of any closed curve. In the present paper a new approach is proposed within the framework of the contour analysis based on a close cooperation of modern coherent optics, theory of functions and numerical methods. An algorithm for comparing contours is presented and theoretically justified, which allows convincing of whether two contours are similar or not to within the scale factor and/or rotation. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are considered; the results of numerical modeling are presented.

  1. Particulate export vs lateral advection in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Capotondi, L.; Giglio, F.

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of our study was to describe and quantify the influence of lateral advection relative to the vertical export in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean). In areas where lateral advection of particulate material is significant, budgets of bioactive elements can be inaccurate if fluxes through the water column and to the seabed are exclusively interpreted as passive sinking of particles. However, detailed information on the influence of lateral advection in the water column in the southern ocean is lacking. With this in mind, our study focused between the twilight zone (i.e. mesopelagic) and the benthic nepheloid layer to understand the relative importance of lateral flux with increasing water depth. Measurements were performed south of the Antarctic Polar Front for 1 year (January 10th 1999-January 3rd 2000) at 900, 1300, 2400, and 3700 m from the sea surface. The study was carried out using a 3.5 km long mooring line instrumented with sediment traps, current meters and sensors of temperature and conductivity. Sediment trap samples were characterized via several parameters including total mass flux, elemental composition (organic carbon, total nitrogen, biogenic silica, and calcium carbonate), concentration of metals (aluminum, iron, barium, and manganese), 210Pb activity, and foraminifera taxonomy. High fluxes of biogenic particles were observed in both summer 1999 and 2000 as a result of seasonal algal blooms associated with sea ice retreat and water column stratification. During no-productive periods, several high energy events occurred and resulted in advecting resuspended biogenic particles from flat-topped summits of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. Whereas the distance between seabed and uppermost sediment traps was sufficient to avoid lateral advection processes, resuspension was significant in the lowermost sediment traps accounting for ~60 and ~90% of the material caught at 2400 and 3700 m, respectively. Samples collected during

  2. Analysis of Breast Contour using Rotated Catenary.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Beahm, Elisabeth K; Crosby, Melissa A; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K

    2010-11-13

    Surgical reconstruction of natural-appearing breasts is a challenging task. Currently, surgical planning is limited to the surgeon's subjective assessment of breast morphology. Therefore, it is useful to develop objective measurements of breast contour. In this paper, a novel quantitative measure of the breast contour based on catenary theory is introduced. A catenary curve is fitted on the breast contour (lateral and inferior) and the key parameter determining the shape of the curve is extracted. The new catenary analysis was applied to pre- and post-operative clinical photographs of women who underwent tissue expander/implant (TE/Implant) reconstruction. A logistic regression model was developed to predict the probability that the observed contour is that of a TE/Implant reconstruction from the catenary parameter, patient age, and patient body mass index. It was demonstrated that the parameters contain useful information for distinguishing TE/Implant reconstructed breasts from pre-operative breasts.

  3. Holding fixture for variable-contour parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, C. C.; Packer, P. N.; Zebus, P. P.

    1979-01-01

    Array of vacuum cups on spindles holds parts for safe machining and other processings. Variable-contour part resting on fixture is held firmly enough for machining, coating, or other mechanical treatment.

  4. Extreme_SeaState_Contour_v1

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-19

    This software generates environmental contours of extreme sea states using buoy observations of significant wave height and energy period or peak period. The code transforms these observations using principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data. The subsequent components are modeled using probability distributions and parameter fitting functions. The inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) is then applied to these models in order to generate an extreme event contour based on a given return period (i.e., 100 years).The subsequent contour is then transformed back into the original input space defined by the variables of interest in order to create an environmental contour of extreme sea states.

  5. Contour based object detection using part bundles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, ChengEn; Adluru, Nagesh; Ling, Haibin; Zhu, Guangxi; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel framework for contour based object detection from cluttered environments. Given a contour model for a class of objects, it is first decomposed into fragments hierarchically. Then, we group these fragments into part bundles, where a part bundle can contain overlapping fragments. Given a new image with set of edge fragments we develop an efficient voting method using local shape similarity between part bundles and edge fragments that generates high quality candidate part configurations. We then use global shape similarity between the part configurations and the model contour to find optimal configuration. Furthermore, we show that appearance information can be used for improving detection for objects with distinctive texture when model contour does not sufficiently capture deformation of the objects.

  6. Interval and contour processing in autism.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Pamela

    2005-12-01

    High functioning children with autism and age and intelligence matched controls participated in experiments testing perception of pitch intervals and musical contours. The finding from the interval study showed superior detection of pitch direction over small pitch distances in the autism group. On the test of contour discrimination no group differences emerged. These findings confirm earlier studies showing facilitated pitch processing and a preserved ability to represent small-scale musical structures in autism.

  7. Contour detection based on wavelet differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglov, D.; Kuzin, A.; Voronin, V.

    2016-05-01

    This work proposes a novel algorithm for contour detection based on high-performance algorithm of wavelet analysis for multimedia applications. To solve the noise effect on the result of peaking in this paper we consider the direct and inverse wavelet differentiation. Extensive experimental evaluation on noisy images demonstrates that our contour detection method significantly outperform competing algorithms. The proposed algorithm provides a means of coupling our system to recognition application such as detection and identification of vehicle number plate.

  8. Parallel algorithms for contour extraction and coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinstein, Its'hak; Landau, Gad M.

    1990-07-01

    A parallel approach to contour extraction and coding on an Exclusive Read Exclusive Write (EREW) Parallel Random Access Machine (PRAM) is presented and analyzed. The algorithm is intended for binary images. The labeled contours can be represented by lists of coordinates, and/or chain codes, and/or any other user designed codes. Using O(n2/log n) processors, the algorithm runs in O(logn) time, where n by n is the size of the processed binary image.

  9. Decoupled active contour (DAC) for boundary detection.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akshaya Kumar; Fieguth, Paul W; Clausi, David A

    2011-02-01

    The accurate detection of object boundaries via active contours is an ongoing research topic in computer vision. Most active contours converge toward some desired contour by minimizing a sum of internal (prior) and external (image measurement) energy terms. Such an approach is elegant, but suffers from a slow convergence rate and frequently misconverges in the presence of noise or complex contours. To address these limitations, a decoupled active contour (DAC) is developed which applies the two energy terms separately. Essentially, the DAC consists of a measurement update step, employing a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and Viterbi search, and then a separate prior step, which modifies the updated curve based on the relative strengths of the measurement uncertainty and the nonstationary prior. By separating the measurement and prior steps, the algorithm is less likely to misconverge; furthermore, the use of a Viterbi optimizer allows the method to converge far more rapidly than energy-based iterative solvers. The results clearly demonstrate that the proposed approach is robust to noise, can capture regions of very high curvature, and exhibits limited dependence on contour initialization or parameter settings. Compared to five other published methods and across many image sets, the DAC is found to be faster with better or comparable segmentation accuracy.

  10. Right-hemisphere specialization for contour grouping.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies often revealed a right-hemisphere specialization for processing the global level of compound visual stimuli. Here we explore whether a similar specialization exists for the detection of intersected contours defined by a chain of local elements. Subjects were presented with arrays of randomly oriented Gabor patches that could contain a global path of collinearly arranged elements in the left or in the right visual hemifield. As expected, the detection accuracy was higher for contours presented to the left visual field/right hemisphere. This difference was absent in two control conditions where the smoothness of the contour was decreased. The results demonstrate that the contour detection, often considered to be driven by lateral coactivation in primary visual cortex, relies on higher-level visual representations that differ between the hemispheres. Furthermore, because contour and non-contour stimuli had the same spatial frequency spectra, the results challenge the view that the right-hemisphere advantage in global processing depends on a specialization for processing low spatial frequencies.

  11. Isolating contour information from arbitrary images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    Aspects of natural vision (physiological and perceptual) serve as a basis for attempting the development of a general processing scheme for contour extraction. Contour information is assumed to be central to visual recognition skills. While the scheme must be regarded as highly preliminary, initial results do compare favorably with the visual perception of structure. The scheme pays special attention to the construction of a smallest scale circular difference-of-Gaussian (DOG) convolution, calibration of multiscale edge detection thresholds with the visual perception of grayscale boundaries, and contour/texture discrimination methods derived from fundamental assumptions of connectivity and the characteristics of printed text. Contour information is required to fall between a minimum connectivity limit and maximum regional spatial density limit at each scale. Results support the idea that contour information, in images possessing good image quality, is (centered at about 10 cyc/deg and 30 cyc/deg). Further, lower spatial frequency channels appear to play a major role only in contour extraction from images with serious global image defects.

  12. Isolating contour information from arbitrary images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1989-11-01

    Aspects of natural vision (physiological and perceptual) serve as a basis for attempting the development of a general processing scheme for contour extraction. Contour information is assumed to be central to visual recognition skills. While the scheme must be regarded as highly preliminary, initial results do compare favorably with the visual perception of structure. The scheme pays special attention to the construction of a smallest scale circular difference-of-Gaussian (DOG) convolution, calibration of multiscale edge detection thresholds with the visual perception of grayscale boundaries, and contour/texture discrimination methods derived from fundamental assumptions of connectivity and the characteristics of printed text. Contour information is required to fall between a minimum connectivity limit and maximum regional spatial density limit at each scale. Results support the idea that contour information, in images possessing good image quality, is (centered at about 10 cyc/deg and 30 cyc/deg). Further, lower spatial frequency channels appear to play a major role only in contour extraction from images with serious global image defects.

  13. Technical report on the surface reconstruction of stacked contours by using the commercial software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Sun; Chung, Min Suk; Hwang, Sung Bae; Park, Jin Seo

    2007-03-01

    After drawing and stacking contours of a structure, which is identified in the serially sectioned images, three-dimensional (3D) image can be made by surface reconstruction. Usually, software is composed for the surface reconstruction. In order to compose the software, medical doctors have to acquire the help of computer engineers. So in this research, surface reconstruction of stacked contours was tried by using commercial software. The purpose of this research is to enable medical doctors to perform surface reconstruction to make 3D images by themselves. The materials of this research were 996 anatomic images (1 mm intervals) of left lower limb, which were made by serial sectioning of a cadaver. On the Adobe Photoshop, contours of 114 anatomic structures were drawn, which were exported to Adobe Illustrator files. On the Maya, contours of each anatomic structure were stacked. On the Rhino, superoinferior lines were drawn along all stacked contours to fill quadrangular surfaces between contours. On the Maya, the contours were deleted. 3D images of 114 anatomic structures were assembled with their original locations preserved. With the surface reconstruction technique, developed in this research, medical doctors themselves could make 3D images of the serially sectioned images such as CTs and MRIs.

  14. Statistical Modeling Approach to Quantitative Analysis of Interobserver Variability in Breast Contouring

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinzhong; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reed, Valerie K.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Zhang, Lifei; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence E.; Li, X. Allen; Dong, Lei

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To develop a new approach for interobserver variability analysis. Methods and Materials: Eight radiation oncologists specializing in breast cancer radiation therapy delineated a patient's left breast “from scratch” and from a template that was generated using deformable image registration. Three of the radiation oncologists had previously received training in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group consensus contouring for breast cancer atlas. The simultaneous truth and performance level estimation algorithm was applied to the 8 contours delineated “from scratch” to produce a group consensus contour. Individual Jaccard scores were fitted to a beta distribution model. We also applied this analysis to 2 or more patients, which were contoured by 9 breast radiation oncologists from 8 institutions. Results: The beta distribution model had a mean of 86.2%, standard deviation (SD) of ±5.9%, a skewness of −0.7, and excess kurtosis of 0.55, exemplifying broad interobserver variability. The 3 RTOG-trained physicians had higher agreement scores than average, indicating that their contours were close to the group consensus contour. One physician had high sensitivity but lower specificity than the others, which implies that this physician tended to contour a structure larger than those of the others. Two other physicians had low sensitivity but specificity similar to the others, which implies that they tended to contour a structure smaller than the others. With this information, they could adjust their contouring practice to be more consistent with others if desired. When contouring from the template, the beta distribution model had a mean of 92.3%, SD ± 3.4%, skewness of −0.79, and excess kurtosis of 0.83, which indicated a much better consistency among individual contours. Similar results were obtained for the analysis of 2 additional patients. Conclusions: The proposed statistical approach was able to measure interobserver variability quantitatively and to

  15. Contouring variations and the role of atlas in non-small-cell lung cancer radiotherapy: analysis of a multi-institutional pre-clinical trial planning study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yunfeng; Chen, Wenzhou; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring); Olsen, Lindsey A.; Beatty, Ronald E.; Maxim, Peter G.; Ritter, Timothy; Sohn, Jason W.; Higgins, Jane; Galvin, James M.; Xiao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To quantify variations in target and normal structure contouring and evaluate dosimetric impact of these variations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. To study whether providing an atlas can reduce potential variation. Methods and Materials Three NSCLC cases were distributed sequentially to multiple institutions for contouring and radiotherapy planning. No segmentation atlas was provided for the first two cases (Case1 and Case2). Contours were collected from submitted plans and consensus contour sets were generated. The volume variation among institution contours and the deviation of them from consensus contours were analyzed. The dose-volume histograms (DVH) for individual institution plans were re-calculated using consensus contours to quantify the dosimetric changes. An atlas containing targets and critical structures was constructed and was made available when the third case (Case3) was distributed for planning. The contouring variability in the submitted plans of Case3 was compared with that in first two cases. Results Planning Target Volume (PTV) showed large variation among institutions. The PTV coverage in institutions’ plans decreased dramatically when re-evaluated using the consensus PTV contour. The PTV contouring consistency did not show improvement with atlas use in Case3. For normal structures, lung contours presented very good agreement, while the brachial plexus showed the largest variation. The consistency of esophagus and heart contouring improved significantly (t-test, p<0.05) in Case3. Major factors contributing to the contouring variation were identified through a survey questionnaire. Conclusions The amount of contouring variations in NSCLC cases was presented. Its impact on dosimetric parameters can be significant. The segmentation atlas improved the contour agreement for esophagus and heart, but not for the PTV in this study. Quality assurance of contouring is essential for a successful multi-institutional clinical trial

  16. Variations in the Contouring of Organs at Risk: Test Case From a Patient With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Robinson, Greg; Wheeler, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomy contouring is critical in radiation therapy. Inaccuracy and variation in defining critical volumes will affect everything downstream: treatment planning, dose-volume histogram analysis, and contour-based visual guidance used in image-guided radiation therapy. This study quantified: (1) variation in the contouring of organs at risk (OAR) in a clinical test case and (2) corresponding effects on dosimetric metrics of highly conformal plans. Methods and Materials: A common CT data set with predefined targets from a patient with oropharyngeal cancer was provided to a population of clinics, which were asked to (1) contour OARs and (2) design an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Thirty-two acceptable plans were submitted as DICOM RT data sets, each generated by a different clinical team. Using those data sets, we quantified: (1) the OAR contouring variation and (2) the impact this variation has on dosimetric metrics. New technologies were employed, including a software tool to quantify three-dimensional structure comparisons. Results: There was significant interclinician variation in OAR contouring. The degree of variation is organ-dependent. We found substantial dose differences resulting strictly from contouring variation (differences ranging from -289% to 56% for mean OAR dose; -22% to 35% for maximum dose). However, there appears to be a threshold in the OAR comparison metric beyond which the dose differences stabilize. Conclusions: The effects of interclinician variation in contouring organs-at-risk in the head and neck can be large and are organ-specific. Physicians need to be aware of the effect that variation in OAR contouring can play on the final treatment plan and not restrict their focus only to the target volumes.

  17. Expansion/De-expansion Tool to Quantify the Accuracy of Prostate Contours

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Evans, Cheryl; Narayana, Vrinda; McLaughlin, Patrick W.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of the prostate gland on computed tomography (CT) remains a persistent challenge and continues to introduce geometric uncertainty into the planning and delivery of external beam radiotherapy. We, therefore, developed an expansion/de-expansion tool to quantify the contour errors and determine the location of the deviations. Methods and Materials: A planning CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging scan were prospectively acquired for 10 patients with prostate cancer. The prostate glands were contoured by 3 independent observers using the CT data sets with instructions to contour the prostate without underestimation but to minimize overestimation. The standard prostate for each patient was defined using magnetic resonance imaging and CT on multiple planes. After registration of the CT and magnetic resonance imaging data sets, the CT-defined prostates were scored for accuracy. The contours were defined as ideal if they were within a 2.5-mm expansion of the standard without underestimation, acceptable if they were within a 5.0-mm expansion and a 2.5-mm de-expansion, and unacceptable if they extended >5.0 mm or underestimated the prostate by >2.5 mm. Results: A total of 636 CT slices were individually analyzed, with the vast majority scored as ideal or acceptable. However, none of the 30 prostate contour sets had all the contours scored as ideal or acceptable. For all 3 observers, the unacceptable contours were more likely from underestimation than overestimation of the prostate. The errors were more common at the base and apex than the mid-gland. Conclusions: The expansion/de-expansion tool allows for directed feedback on the location of contour deviations, as well as the determination of over- or underestimation of the prostate. This metric might help improve the accuracy of prostate contours.

  18. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Barthold, H. Joseph; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Bosch, Walter R.; El Naqa, Issam; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, W. Robert; Sandler, Howard; Zietman, Anthony; Myerson, Robert; Dawson, Laura A.; Willett, Christopher; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Ryu, Janice; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  19. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  20. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction.

  1. Patient Expectations of Bariatric and Body Contouring Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Anne; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Pusic, Andrea; Roessler, Kirsten K.; Rose, Michael; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient expectations are important in bariatric and body contouring surgery because the goals include improvements in health-related quality of life, appearance, and body image. The aim of this study was to identify patient expectations along the weight loss journey and/or body contouring surgery. Methods: This qualitative study took an interpretive description approach. Between September 2009 and February 2012, 49 patients were interviewed postbody contouring surgery. Data were analyzed using a line-by-line approach whereby expectations were identified and labeled as expected, unexpected, or neutral. Constant comparison was used to ensure coding was done consistently. Interviews continued until no new themes emerged. Results: Participants described expectations according to appearance, health-related quality of life, and patient experience of care. Two areas stood out in terms of unmet expectations and included appearance and physical health, ie, recovery from body contouring surgery. Most participants, who underwent bariatric surgery, expected neither the extent of excess skin after weight loss nor how the excess skin would make them look and feel. For recovery, participants did not expect that it would be as long or as hard as it was in reality. Conclusions: A full understanding of outcomes and expectations for this patient population is needed to enhance patient education and improve shared medical decision making. Education materials should be informed by the collection of evidence-based patient-reported outcome information using measures such as the BODY-Q. A patient-reported outcome scale measuring patient expectations is needed for obese and bariatric patients. PMID:27200256

  2. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas D.; Kelley, Douglas H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  3. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Thomas D; Kelley, Douglas H

    2016-10-14

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  4. Jet Magnetically Accelerated from Advection Dominated Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Zhi-Xiong

    2014-08-01

    A jet model for the jet power arising from a steady, optically thin, advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) around a Kerr black hole (BH) is proposed. We investigate the typical numerical solutions of ADAF, and calculate the jet power from an ADAF using a general relativistic version of electronic circuit theory. It is shown that the jet power concentrates in the inner region of the accretion flow, and the higher the degree to which the flow advection-dominated is, the lower the jet power from the ADAF is.

  5. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  6. A shape constrained parametric active contour model for breast contour detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Muralidhar, Gautam S; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative measures of breast morphology can help a breast cancer survivor to understand outcomes of reconstructive surgeries. One bottleneck of quantifying breast morphology is that there are only a few reliable automation algorithms for detecting the breast contour. This study proposes a novel approach for detecting the breast contour, which is based on a parametric active contour model. In addition to employing the traditional parametric active contour model, the proposed approach enforces a mathematical shape constraint based on the catenary curve, which has been previously shown to capture the overall shape of the breast contour reliably. The mathematical shape constraint regulates the evolution of the active contour and helps the contour evolve towards the breast, while minimizing the undesired effects of other structures such as, the nipple/areola and scars. The efficacy of the proposed approach was evaluated on anterior posterior photographs of women who underwent or were scheduled for breast reconstruction surgery including autologous tissue reconstruction. The proposed algorithm shows promising results for detecting the breast contour.

  7. Portable FORTRAN contour-plotting subprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, K.H.

    1983-07-01

    In this report we discuss a contour plotting Fortran subprogram. While contour plotting subroutines are available in many commercial plotting packages, this routine has the following advantages: (1) since it uses the Weasel and VDI plot routines developed at Sandia, it occupies little storage and can be used on most of the Sandia time-sharing systems as part of a larger program. In the past, the size of plotting packages often forced a user to perform plotting operations in a completely separate program; (2) the contour computation algorithm is efficient and robust, and computes accurate contours for sets of data with low resolution; and (3) the subprogram is easy to use. A simple contour plot can be produced with a minimum of information provided by a user in one Fortran subroutine call. Through the use of a wide variety of subroutine options, many additional features can be used. These include such items as plot titles, grid lines, placement of text on the page, etc. The subroutine is written in portable Fortran 77, and is designed to run on any system which supports the Weasel and VDI plot packages. It also uses routines from the SLATEC mathematical subroutine library.

  8. Curved contours and the associative response.

    PubMed

    Zusne, L

    1975-02-01

    72 random polygons and their curvilinear transformations were exposed for 3 sec. to 40 subjects who produced written associations during a 10-sec. interval. The number of associations varied, in general, directly with the amount of curved contour as well as with the degree of contour dispersion. The amount of variance accounted for by these two variables was small, however. Differences in curvature produced much greater differences in the content of the associations, greater degrees of curvature evoking more associations that were curved, man-made objects or living things and fewer associations that were straight-edged, man-made objects. A significant and inverse relationship was also established between contour dispersion and associations that were non-living, natural objects. It is concluded that physical form dimensions, especially curvature, affect less the association value (connotative meaning) of visual forms and much more their denotative meaning.

  9. Surface reconstruction from sparse fringe contours

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, G.; Parvin, B.

    1998-08-10

    A new approach for reconstruction of 3D surfaces from 2D cross-sectional contours is presented. By using the so-called ''Equal Importance Criterion,'' we reconstruct the surface based on the assumption that every point in the region contributes equally to the surface reconstruction process. In this context, the problem is formulated in terms of a partial differential equation (PDE), and we show that the solution for dense contours can be efficiently derived from distance transform. In the case of sparse contours, we add a regularization term to insure smoothness in surface recovery. The proposed technique allows for surface recovery at any desired resolution. The main advantage of the proposed method is that inherent problems due to correspondence, tiling, and branching are avoided. Furthermore, the computed high resolution surface is better represented for subsequent geometric analysis. We present results on both synthetic and real data.

  10. Modified contour-improved perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Loewe, Marcelo; Martinez, Cristian; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2010-11-01

    The semihadronic tau decay width allows a clean extraction of the strong coupling constant at low energies. We present a modification of the standard ''contour-improved'' method based on a derivative expansion of the Adler function. The new approach has some advantages compared to contour-improved perturbation theory. The renormalization scale dependence is weaker by more than a factor of 2 and the last term of the expansion is reduced by about 10%, while the renormalization scheme dependence remains approximately equal. The extracted QCD coupling at the tau mass scale is by 2% lower than the contour-improved value. We find {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1211{+-}0.0010.

  11. Perceptual Grouping of Object Contours Survives Saccades

    PubMed Central

    Demeyer, Maarten; De Graef, Peter; Verfaillie, Karl; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Human observers explore scenes by shifting their gaze from object to object. Before each eye movement, a peripheral glimpse of the next object to be fixated has however already been caught. Here we investigate whether the perceptual organization extracted from such a preview could guide the perceptual analysis of the same object during the next fixation. We observed that participants were indeed significantly faster at grouping together spatially separate elements into an object contour, when the same contour elements had also been grouped together in the peripheral preview display. Importantly, this facilitation occurred despite a change in the grouping cue defining the object contour (similarity versus collinearity). We conclude that an intermediate-level description of object shape persists in the visual system across gaze shifts, providing it with a robust basis for balancing efficiency and continuity during scene exploration. PMID:21713007

  12. Diffusion or advection? Mass transfer and complex boundary layer landscapes of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Nørregaard, Rasmus Dyrmose; Kühl, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The role of hyaline hairs on the thallus of brown algae in the genus Fucus is long debated and several functions have been proposed. We used a novel motorized set-up for two-dimensional and three-dimensional mapping with O2 microsensors to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) and O2 flux around single and multiple tufts of hyaline hairs on the thallus of Fucus vesiculosus. Flow was a major determinant of DBL thickness, where higher flow decreased DBL thickness and increased O2 flux between the algal thallus and the surrounding seawater. However, the topography of the DBL varied and did not directly follow the contour of the underlying thallus. Areas around single tufts of hyaline hairs exhibited a more complex mass-transfer boundary layer, showing both increased and decreased thickness when compared with areas over smooth thallus surfaces. Over thallus areas with several hyaline hair tufts, the overall effect was an apparent increase in the boundary layer thickness. We also found indications for advective O2 transport driven by pressure gradients or vortex shedding downstream from dense tufts of hyaline hairs that could alleviate local mass-transfer resistances. Mass-transfer dynamics around hyaline hair tufts are thus more complex than hitherto assumed and may have important implications for algal physiology and plant-microbe interactions.

  13. Invasions in heterogeneous habitats in the presence of advection.

    PubMed

    Vergni, Davide; Iannaccone, Sandro; Berti, Stefano; Cencini, Massimo

    2012-05-21

    We investigate invasions from a biological reservoir to an initially empty, heterogeneous habitat in the presence of advection. The habitat consists of a periodic alternation of favorable and unfavorable patches. In the latter the population dies at fixed rate. In the former it grows either with the logistic or with an Allee effect type dynamics, where the population has to overcome a threshold to grow. We study the conditions for successful invasions and the speed of the invasion process, which is numerically and analytically investigated in several limits. Generically advection enhances the downstream invasion speed but decreases the population size of the invading species, and can even inhibit the invasion process. Remarkably, however, the rate of population increase, which quantifies the invasion efficiency, is maximized by an optimal advection velocity. In models with Allee effect, differently from the logistic case, above a critical unfavorable patch size the population localizes in a favorable patch, being unable to invade the habitat. However, we show that advection, when intense enough, may activate the invasion process.

  14. Theory of advection-driven long range biotic transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple mechanistic model to examine the effects of advective flow on the spread of fungal diseases spread by wind-blown spores. The model is defined by a set of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for spore densities. One equation describes the long-distance advectiv...

  15. Black Hole Advective Accretion Disks with Optical Depth Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Artemove, Y.V.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Novikov, I.D.

    2006-02-01

    We have constructed numerically global solutions of advective accretion disks around black holes that describe a continuous transition between the effectively optically thick outer and optically thin inner disk regions. We have concentrated on models of accretion flows with large mass accretion rates, and we have employed a bridging formula for radiative losses at high and low effective optical depths.

  16. Robot Hand Would Adapt To Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual device uses hydraulic pressure to activate fingers. Projections on opposing fingers of proposed robot hand automatically conform to contours of object on contact. Pistons connected to common reservoir provide gentle, firm grip. Fingers communicate with each other via hydraulic pressure, without elaborate control system. Pistons move in and out, and tips slope to match contour of object. Their action tends to center object on finger. Hand used to grasp objects of various shapes and sizes. Conforming process passive; pressure of object on one or several pad elements forces other pad elements to touch it. Would not use elaborate mechanisms involving motors, cams, and cables.

  17. Advective velocity and energy dissipation rate in an oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ziaul; Hondzo, Miki; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    Characterizing the transport processes at the sediment-water interface along sloping boundaries in lakes and reservoirs is of fundamental interest in lake and reservoir water quality management. The turbulent bottom boundary layer (TBBL) along a slope, induced by the breaking of internal waves in a linearly stratified fluid, was investigated through laboratory measurements. Fast response micro-scale conductivity and temperature probes in conjunction with laser-Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the time series of salinity, temperature, and velocity along a sloping boundary. Turbulent energy spectra were computed from the velocity data using a time-dependent advective velocity and Taylor's hypothesis. The energy spectra were used to estimate the energy dissipation rate at different positions in the TBBL. The advective velocity in this near-zero mean shear flow is based on an integral time scale (T(int)). The integral time scale is related to the average frequency of the spectral energy density of the flow velocity. The energy dissipation rate estimated from the variable advective velocity with an averaging time window equal to the integral time scale (T=T(int)) was 43% higher than the energy dissipation rate estimated from a constant advective velocity. The estimated dissipation rates with T=T(int) were comparable to values obtained by curve-fitting a theoretical Batchelor spectrum for the temperature gradient spectra. This study proposes the integral time scale to be used for the oscillatory flows as (a) a time-averaging window to estimate the advective velocity and associated energy dissipation level, and (b) a normalizing parameter in the energy spectrum.

  18. Persistence of cluster synchronization under the influence of advection.

    PubMed

    Guirey, Emma; Bees, Martin; Martin, Adrian; Srokosz, Meric

    2010-05-01

    We present a study on the emergence of spatial structure in plankton dynamics under the influence of stirring and mixing. A distribution of plankton is represented as a lattice of nonidentical, interacting, oscillatory plankton populations. Each population evolves according to (i) the internal biological dynamics represented by an NPZ model with population-specific phytoplankton growth rate, (ii) sub-grid-cell stirring and mixing parameterized by a nearest-neighbor coupling, and (iii) explicit advection resulting from a constant horizontal shear. Using the methods of synchronization theory, the emergent spatial structure of the simulation is investigated as a function of the coupling strength and rate of advection. Previous work using similar methods has neglected the effects of explicit stirring (i.e., at scales larger than the grid cell), leaving as an open question the relevance of the work to real marine systems. Here, we show that persistent spatial structure emerges for a range of coupling strengths for all realistic levels of surface ocean shear. Spatially, this corresponds to the formation of temporally evolving clusters of local synchronization. Increasing shear alters the spatial characteristics of this clustering by stretching and narrowing patches of synchronized dynamics. These patches are not stretched into stripes of synchronized abundance aligned with the flow, as may be expected, but instead lie at an angle to the flow. This study shows that advection does not diminish the relevance of conclusions from previous studies of spatial structure in plankton simulations. In fact, the inclusion of advection adds characteristic filamental structure, as observed in real-world plankton distributions. The results also show that the ability of coupled oscillators to synchronize depends strongly on the spatial arrangement of oscillator natural frequencies; under the influence of advection, therefore, the impact of the coupling strength on the emergent spatial

  19. Comparison of hinged and contoured rods for occipitocervical arthrodesis in adults: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Dlouhy, Brian J; Lopez, Alejandro J; Menezes, Arnold H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A rigid construct that employs an occipital plate and upper cervical screws and rods is the current standard treatment for craniovertebral junction (CVJ) instability. A rod is contoured to accommodate the occipitocervical angle. Fatigue failure has been associated these acute bends. Hinged rod systems have been developed to obviate intraoperative rod contouring. Object: The aim of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of the hinged rod system in occipitocervical fusion. Materials and Methods: This study retrospectively evaluated 39 patients who underwent occipitocervical arthrodesis. Twenty patients were treated with hinged rods versus 19 with contoured rods. Clinical and radiographic data were compared and analyzed. Results: Preoperative and postoperative Nurick and Frankel scores were similar between both groups. The use of allograft, autograft or bone morphogenetic protein was similar in both groups. The average number of levels fused was 4.1 (±2.4) and 3.4 (±2) for hinged and contoured rods, respectively. The operative time, estimated blood loss, and length of stay were similar between both groups. The occiput to C2 angle was similarly maintained in both groups and all patients demonstrated no movement across the CVJ on flexion-extension X-rays during their last follow-up. The average follow-up for the hinged and contoured rod groups was 12.2 months and 15.9 months, respectively. Conclusion: Hinged rods provide a safe and effective alternative to contoured rods during occipitocervical arthrodesis. PMID:27630479

  20. Hygroscopic chemicals and the formation of advection warm fog: A numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of advection fog is closely associated with the characteristics of the aerosol particles, including the chemical composition, mass of the nuclei, particle size, and concentration. Both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution.

  1. Camera Would Monitor Weld-Pool Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.; Gutow, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Weld pool illuminated and viewed coaxially along welding torch. Proposed monitoring subsystem for arc welder provides image in which horizontal portions of surface of weld pool highlighted. Monitoring and analyzing subsystems integrated into overall control system of robotic welder. Control system sets welding parameters to adapt to changing conditions, maintaining surface contour giving desired pattern of reflections.

  2. Automatic Contour Tracking in Ultrasound Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Min; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new automatic contour tracking system, EdgeTrak, for the ultrasound image sequences of human tongue is presented. The images are produced by a head and transducer support system (HATS). The noise and unrelated high-contrast edges in ultrasound images make it very difficult to automatically detect the correct tongue surfaces. In…

  3. Contour-measuring tool for composite layups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontes, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Simple handtool helps form contours and complex shapes from laminae of resin-impregnated fabric. Tool, which consists of yoke having ballpoint pen and spindle and gage, is placed so that it straddles model. As toll is moved, pen draws constant thickness focus that is used as template.

  4. Aircraft noise source and contour estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D. G.; Peart, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    Calculation procedures are presented for predicting the noise-time histories and noise contours (footprints) of five basic types of aircraft; turbojet, turofan, turboprop, V/STOL, and helicopter. The procedures have been computerized to facilitate prediction of the noise characteristics during takeoffs, flyovers, and/or landing operations.

  5. Contour completion through depth interferes with stereoacuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreven, Dawn; McKee, Suzanne P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2002-01-01

    Local disparity signals must interact in visual cortex to represent boundaries and surfaces of three-dimensional (3D) objects. We investigated how disparity signals interact in 3D contours and in 3D surfaces generated from the contours. We compared flat (single disparity) stimuli with curved (multi-disparity) stimuli. We found no consistent differences in sensitivity to contours vs. surfaces; for equivalent amounts of disparity, however, observers were more sensitive to flat stimuli than curved stimuli. Poor depth sensitivity for curved stimuli cannot be explained by the larger range of disparities present in the curved surface, nor by disparity averaging, nor by poor sensitivity to the largest disparity in the stimulus. Surprisingly, sensitivity to surfaces curved in depth was improved by removing portions of the surface and thus removing disparity information. Stimulus configuration had a profound effect on stereo thresholds that cannot be accounted for by disparity-energy models of V1 processing. We suggest that higher-level 3D contour or 3D shape mechanisms are involved.

  6. Vascular active contour for vessel tree segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yanfeng; Deklerck, Rudi; Nyssen, Edgard; Markova, Aneta; de Mey, Johan; Yang, Xin; Sun, Kun

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a novel active contour model is proposed for vessel tree segmentation. First, we introduce a region competition-based active contour model exploiting the gaussian mixture model, which mainly segments thick vessels. Second, we define a vascular vector field to evolve the active contour along its center line into the thin and weak vessels. The vector field is derived from the eigenanalysis of the Hessian matrix of the image intensity in a multiscale framework. Finally, a dual curvature strategy, which uses a vesselness measure-dependent function selecting between a minimal principal curvature and a mean curvature criterion, is added to smoothen the surface of the vessel without changing its shape. The developed model is used to extract the liver and lung vessel tree as well as the coronary artery from high-resolution volumetric computed tomography images. Comparisons are made with several classical active contour models and manual extraction. The experiments show that our model is more accurate and robust than these classical models and is, therefore, more suited for automatic vessel tree extraction.

  7. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object.

  8. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  9. Chaotic Advection in a Bounded 3-Dimensional Potential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Smith, Lachlan; Lester, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    3-dimensional potential, or Darcy flows, are central to understanding and designing laminar transport in porous media; however, chaotic advection in 3-dimensional, volume-preserving flows is still not well understood. We show results of advecting passive scalars in a transient 3-dimensional potential flow that consists of a steady dipole flow and periodic reorientation. Even for the most symmetric reorientation protocol, neither of the two invarients of the motion are conserved; however, one invarient is closely shadowed by a surface of revolution constructed from particle paths of the steady flow, creating in practice an adiabatic surface. A consequence is that chaotic regions cover 3-dimensional space, though tubular regular regions are still transport barriers. This appears to be a new mechanism generating 3-dimensional chaotic orbits. These results contast with the experimental and theoretical results for chaotic scalar transport in 2-dimensional Darcy flows. Wiggins, J. Fluid Mech. 654 (2010).

  10. Spectral Theory of Advective Diffusion in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-19

    to study this enhancement of sea ice thermal conductivity and better understand temperature data collected during a 2007 Antarctic expedition. 15...conductivity and better understand temperature data collected during a 2007 Antarctic expedition. Activities and Findings: 1. Advection-enhanced...critically on the properties of this Hilbert space. More specifically, it is only on a special subset of this space that the random operator is Hermitian

  11. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  12. The LEM exponential integrator for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliari, Marco; Vianello, Marco; Bergamaschi, Luca

    2007-12-01

    We implement a second-order exponential integrator for semidiscretized advection-diffusion-reaction equations, obtained by coupling exponential-like Euler and Midpoint integrators, and computing the relevant matrix exponentials by polynomial interpolation at Leja points. Numerical tests on 2D models discretized in space by finite differences or finite elements, show that the Leja-Euler-Midpoint (LEM) exponential integrator can be up to 5 times faster than a classical second-order implicit solver.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  14. Stability of explicit advection schemes. The balance point location rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    2002-02-01

    This paper introduces the balance point location rule, providing specific necessary and sufficient conditions for constructing unconditionally stable explicit advection schemes, in both semi-Lagrangian and flux-form Eulerian formulations. The rule determines how the spatial stencil is placed on the computational grid. It requires the balance point (the center of the stencil in index space) to be located in the same patch as the departure point for semi-Lagrangian schemes or the same cell as the sweep point for Eulerian schemes. Centering the stencil in this way guarantees stability, regardless of the size of the time step. In contrast, the original Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition requiring the stencil merely to include the departure (sweep) point, although necessary, is not sufficient for guaranteeing stability. The CFL condition is of limited practical value, whereas the balance point location rule always gives precise and easily implemented prescriptions for constructing stable algorithms. The rule is also helpful in correcting a number of misconceptions that have arisen concerning explicit advection schemes. In particular, explicit Eulerian schemes are widely believed to be inefficient because of stability constraints on the time step, dictated by a narrow interpretation of the CFL condition requiring the Courant number to be less than or equal to one. However, such constraints apply only to a particular class of advection schemes resulting for centering the stencil on the arrival point, when in fact the sole function of the stencil is to estimate the departure (sweep) point value - the arrival point has no relevance in determining the placement of the stencil. Unconditionally stable explicit Eulerian advection schemes are efficient and accurate, comparable in operation count to semi-Lagrangian schemes of the same order, but because of their flux-based formulation, they have the added advantage of being inherently conservative. Copyright

  15. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Kapp, Daniel S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-09-01

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours. The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  16. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei

    2015-10-07

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems.The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours.The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  17. A Streamline-Upwind Model for Filling Front Advection in Powder Injection Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Guillaume; Cheng, Zhi Qiang; Barriere, Thierry; Liu, Bao Sheng; Gelin, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    The filling process of powder injection molding is modeled by the flows of two variably adjacent domains in the mold cavity. The feedstock is filled into the cavity while the air is expelled out by the injected feedstock [1]. Eulerian description is adopted. The filling patterns are determined by the solution of an advection equation, governed by the velocity field in both the feedstock flow and air flow [2]. In the real physics, the advance of filling front depends mainly on the flow of feedstock that locates behind the front. The flow of air in front of the injected material plays in fact no meaningful effect. However, the actual algorithm for solution of the advection equation takes equally the importance for both the flow of viscous feedstock and that of the slight air. Under such a condition, the injection flow of feedstock in simulation may be misdirected unrealistically by the velocity field in the air portion of the mold cavity. To correct this defect, an upwind scheme is proposed to reinforce the effect of upwind flow and reduce the effect of downstream flow. The present paper involves the investigation of an upwind algorithm for simulation of the filling state during powder injection molding. A Petrov-Galerkin upwind based method (SUPG) is adopted for numerical simulation of the transport equation instead of the Taylor-Galerkin method in previous work. In the proposed implementation of the Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) approach. A stabilization method is used to prevent oscillations in the convection-dominated problems. It consists in the introduction of an artificial diffusion in streamline direction. Suitable modification of the test function is the important issue. It ensures the stable simulation of filling process and results in the more realistic prediction of filling patterns. The implementation of upwind scheme in mould filling state simulation, based on an advection equation and the whole velocity field of feedstock and air flow, makes

  18. Modulating Phonation Through Alteration of Vocal Fold Medial Surface Contour

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Ted; Muhlestein, Joseph; Callahan, Sean; Chan, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 1. To test whether alteration of the vocal fold medial surface contour can improve phonation. 2. To demonstrate that implant material properties affect vibration even when implant is deep to the vocal fold lamina propria. Study Design Induced phonation of excised human larynges. Methods Thirteen larynges were harvested within 24 hours post-mortem. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and flow (PTF) were measured before and after vocal fold injections using either calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) or hyaluronic acid (HA). Small-volume injections (median 0.0625 mL) were targeted to the infero-medial aspect of the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. Implant locations were assessed histologically. Results The effect of implantation on PTP was material-dependent. CaHA tended to increase PTP, whereas HA tended to decrease PTP (Wilcoxon test P = 0.00013 for onset). In contrast, the effect of implantation on PTF was similar, with both materials tending to decrease PTF (P = 0.16 for onset). Histology confirmed implant presence in the inferior half of the vocal fold vertical thickness. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggested the implants may have altered the vocal fold medial surface contour, potentially resulting in a less convergent or more rectangular glottal geometry as a means to improve phonation. An implant with a closer viscoelastic match to vocal fold cover is desirable for this purpose, as material properties can affect vibration even when the implant is not placed within the lamina propria. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions and implies greater need for surgical precision in implant placement and care in material selection. PMID:22865592

  19. 32 CFR 707.5 - Underway replenishment contour lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underway replenishment contour lights. 707.5... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.5 Underway replenishment contour lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of outlining the contour of the delivery ship during...

  20. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  1. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  2. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  3. Contour Instabilities in Early Tumor Growth Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, M.; Chatelain, C.; Ciarletta, P.

    2011-04-01

    Recent tumor growth models are often based on the multiphase mixture framework. Using bifurcation theory techniques, we show that such models can give contour instabilities. Restricting to a simplified but realistic version of such models, with an elastic cell-to-cell interaction and a growth rate dependent on diffusing nutrients, we prove that the tumor cell concentration at the border acts as a control parameter inducing a bifurcation with loss of the circular symmetry. We show that the finite wavelength at threshold has the size of the proliferating peritumoral zone. We apply our predictions to melanoma growth since contour instabilities are crucial for early diagnosis. Given the generality of the equations, other relevant applications can be envisaged for solving problems of tissue growth and remodeling.

  4. Contour detection combined with depth information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Cai, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Many challenging computer vision problems have been proven to benefit from the incorporation of depth information, to name a few, semantic labellings, pose estimations and even contour detection. Different objects have different depths from a single monocular image. The depth information of one object is coherent and the depth information of different objects may vary discontinuously. Meanwhile, there exists a broad non-classical receptive field (NCRF) outside the classical receptive field (CRF). The response of the central neuron is affected not only by the stimulus inside the CRF, but also modulated by the stimulus surrounding it. The contextual modulation is mediated by horizontal connections across the visual cortex. Based on the findings and researches, a biological-inspired contour detection model which combined with depth information is proposed in this paper.

  5. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  6. Thermal contouring of forestry data: Wallops Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    The contouring of 8-13.5 micrometer thermal data collected over a forestry site in Virginia is described. The data were collected at an altitude of 1000 ft above terrain on November 4, 1970. The site was covered on three approximately parallel lines. The purpose of the contouring was to attempt to delineate pine trees attacked by southern pine bark beetle, and to map other important terrain categories. Special processing steps were required to achieve the correct aspect ratio of the thermal data. The reference for the correction procedure was color infrared photography. Data form and quality are given, processing steps are outlined, a brief interpretation of results is given, and conclusion are presented.

  7. Image Segmentation With Cage Active Contours.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Lluís; Guerrieri, Marité; Igual, Laura

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for image segmentation based on parametrized active contours. The evolving contour is parametrized according to a reduced set of control points that form a closed polygon and have a clear visual interpretation. The parametrization, called mean value coordinates, stems from the techniques used in computer graphics to animate virtual models. Our framework allows to easily formulate region-based energies to segment an image. In particular, we present three different local region-based energy terms: 1) the mean model; 2) the Gaussian model; 3) and the histogram model. We show the behavior of our method on synthetic and real images and compare the performance with state-of-the-art level set methods.

  8. Macromolecular extraction based on contour evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaobin; Guo, Miao; Zhu, Ying; Yang, Lizhen; Ma, Yi-de

    2013-03-01

    Detecting the region of interest plays an important role in the field of image processing and analysis. For the microscopic image of plant embryo slice, region of interest usually indicates various cells or macromolecules. Combining contour evolution theory and pulse coupled neural network, we propose a new method of macromolecular detection and extraction for biological microscopic image. Some existing methods are compared with the proposed method. Experimental results show the proposed method has the better performance than existing methods.

  9. Contour-Driven Atlas-Based Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Wachinger, Christian; Fritscher, Karl; Sharp, Greg; Golland, Polina

    2016-01-01

    We propose new methods for automatic segmentation of images based on an atlas of manually labeled scans and contours in the image. First, we introduce a Bayesian framework for creating initial label maps from manually annotated training images. Within this framework, we model various registration- and patch-based segmentation techniques by changing the deformation field prior. Second, we perform contour-driven regression on the created label maps to refine the segmentation. Image contours and image parcellations give rise to non-stationary kernel functions that model the relationship between image locations. Setting the kernel to the covariance function in a Gaussian process establishes a distribution over label maps supported by image structures. Maximum a posteriori estimation of the distribution over label maps conditioned on the outcome of the atlas-based segmentation yields the refined segmentation. We evaluate the segmentation in two clinical applications: the segmentation of parotid glands in head and neck CT scans and the segmentation of the left atrium in cardiac MR angiography images. PMID:26068202

  10. Semi-automated contour recognition using DICOMautomaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, H.; Wu, J.; Moiseenko, V.; Lee, R.; Gill, B.; Duzenli, C.; Thomas, S.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: A system has been developed which recognizes and classifies Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine contour data with minimal human intervention. It allows researchers to overcome obstacles which tax analysis and mining systems, including inconsistent naming conventions and differences in data age or resolution. Methods: Lexicographic and geometric analysis is used for recognition. Well-known lexicographic methods implemented include Levenshtein-Damerau, bag-of-characters, Double Metaphone, Soundex, and (word and character)-N-grams. Geometrical implementations include 3D Fourier Descriptors, probability spheres, boolean overlap, simple feature comparison (e.g. eccentricity, volume) and rule-based techniques. Both analyses implement custom, domain-specific modules (e.g. emphasis differentiating left/right organ variants). Contour labels from 60 head and neck patients are used for cross-validation. Results: Mixed-lexicographical methods show an effective improvement in more than 10% of recognition attempts compared with a pure Levenshtein-Damerau approach when withholding 70% of the lexicon. Domain-specific and geometrical techniques further boost performance. Conclusions: DICOMautomaton allows users to recognize contours semi-automatically. As usage increases and the lexicon is filled with additional structures, performance improves, increasing the overall utility of the system.

  11. Body Image and Body Contouring Procedures.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Polonsky, Heather M

    2016-10-01

    Dissatisfaction with physical appearance and body image is a common psychological phenomena in Western society. Body image dissatisfaction is frequently reported by those who have excess body weight, but also is seen in those of normal body weight. For both groups of individuals, this dissatisfaction impacts self-esteem and quality of life. Furthermore, it is believed to be the motivational catalyst to a range of appearance-enhancing behaviors, including weight loss efforts and physical activity. Body image dissatisfaction is also believed to play a role in the decision to seek the wide range of body contouring procedures offered by aesthetic physicians. Individuals who seek these procedures typically report increased body image dissatisfaction, focus on the feature they wish to alter with treatment, and often experience improvement in body image following treatment. At the same time, extreme body image dissatisfaction is a symptom of a number of recognized psychiatric disorders. These include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), all of which can contraindicate aesthetic treatment. This special topic review paper provides an overview of the relationship between body image dissatisfaction and aesthetic procedures designed to improve body contouring. The review specifically focuses on the relationship of body image and body weight, as well as the presentation of body image psychopathology that would contraindicate aesthetic surgery. The overall goal of the paper is to highlight the clinical implications of the existing research and provide suggestions for future research on the psychological aspects of body contouring procedures.

  12. Inlet contour and flow effects on radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ville, J. M.; Silcox, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sound radiation from inlets with different contours with and without flow is being conducted to study the possibility of reducing noise radiated by aircraft engines. For each inlet configuration, complex directivity patterns and complex pressure reflection coefficients are measured as a function of a single space-time structure of the wave (up to a frequency of 4000Hz and an azimuthal wave number 6) and of flow velocity (up to Mach number 0.4) in a cylindrical duct located downstream the inlet. Experimental results of radiation from an unflanged duct are compared with theory. Effect of inlet contour and flow are deduced by comparing respectively unflanged duct and bellmouth measurements and, no flow and flow measurements with the bellmouth. Results are presented which indicate that the contour effect is significant near the cut-on frequency of a mode and emphasize the necessity for taking into account the inlet geometry in a radiation prediction. These results show also that internal flow has a weak effect on the amplitude of the directivity pattern

  13. Selected configuration tradeoffs of contour optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Strohbehn, K.; Murchie, S.; Fort, D.; Reynolds, E.; Heyler, G.; Peacock, K.; Boldt, J.; Darlington, E.; Hayes, J.; Henshaw, R.; Izenberg, N.; Kardian, C.; Lees, J.; Lohr, D.; Mehoke, D.; Schaefer, E.; Sholar, T.; Spisz, T.; Willey, C.; Veverka, J.; Bell, J.; Cochran, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) is a low-cost NASA Discovery mission designed to conduct three close flybys of comet nuclei. Selected configuration tradeoffs conducted to balance science requirements with low mission cost are reviewed. The tradeoffs discussed focus on the optical instruments and related spacecraft considerations. Two instruments are under development. The CONTOUR Forward Imager (CFI) is designed to perform optical navigation, moderate resolution nucleus/jet imaging, and imaging of faint molecular emission bands in the coma. The CONTOUR Remote Imager and Spectrometer (CRISP) is designed to obtain high-resolution multispectral images of the nucleus, conduct spectral mapping of the nucleus surface, and provide a backup optical navigation capability. Tradeoffs discussed are: (1) the impact on the optical instruments of not using reaction wheels on the spacecraft, (2) the improved performance and simplification gained by implementing a dedicated star tracker instead of including this function in CFI, (3) the improved flexibility and robustness of switching to a low frame rate tracker for CRISP, (4) the improved performance and simplification of replacing a visible imaging spectrometer by enhanced multispectral imaging in CRISP, and (5) the impact on spacecraft resources of these and other tradeoffs.

  14. Surgical excision and contoured custom made splint to treat helical keloid

    PubMed Central

    Chamaria, Ankita; De Sousa, Reuben Fernando; Aras, Meena Ajay; Mascarenhas, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Helical keloids are difficult to treat as surgical excision requires effective compression of the operative scar to prevent recurrence while retaining the contour and elasticity of the helix. The authors fabricated a conforming custom made post-operative splint from a commonly used dental material. Splints could be fabricated in both pre-operative and post-operative stage. PMID:28216825

  15. Outer contour extraction of skull from CT scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulinuha, M. A.; Yuniarno, E. M.; Nugroho, S. M. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of the outer contour of the skull is an important step in craniofacial reconstruction. The outer contour is required for surface reconstruction of the skull. In this paper, we propose a method to extract the outer contour of the skull. The extraction process consists of four stages: defining the region of interest, segmentation of the bone, noise removal and extraction of the outer contour based on scanning from the four sides of the image. The proposed method successfully extracts the outermost contour of the skull and avoids redundant data.

  16. A component-labeling algorithm based on contour tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liudong; Li, Zushu

    2007-12-01

    A new method for finding connected components from binary images is presented in this paper. The main step of this method is to use a contour tracing technique to detect component contours, and use the information of contour to fill in interior areas. All the component points are traced by this algorithm in a single pass and are assigned either a new label or the same label of the contour pixels. Comparative experiment results show that Our algorithm, moreover, is a fast method that not only labels components but also extracts component contours at the same time, which proves to be more useful than those algorithms that only label components.

  17. The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Kastengren, Alan L

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

  18. Decoding figure-ground occlusions from contours and shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juno; Anstis, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Visual experience of surface properties relies on accurately attributing encoded luminance variations (e.g., edges and contours) to any one of several potential environmental causes. We examined the role of differences in the local shading directions across sharp contours in (i) identifying occlusion boundaries and (ii) perceiving the depth layout of adjacent surfaces. We used graphical rendering to control the orientation of a simulated light source, and hence the shading direction between adjacent surface regions that met at a common edge. We call the difference in shading direction across the edge the delta shading angle. We found that delta-shaded edges looked like occluding boundaries. We also found that the perceived figure-ground organisation of the adjacent surface regions depended on an assumed lighting from above prior. Shaded regions experienced as convex surfaces illuminated from above were perceived as occluding surfaces in the foreground. We computed an image-based measure of delta shading using the difference in local shading direction (the orientation field) and found this model could reliably account for observer judgments of surface occlusion, better than local (in-)coherence in the orientation of isophotes across the edge alone. However, additional information from co-alignment of isophotes relative to the edge is necessary to explain figure-ground distinctions across a broad class of occlusion events. We conclude that both local and global measures of shading direction are needed to explain perceived scene organisation, and material appearance more generally.

  19. Radial-searching contour extraction method based on a modified active contour model for mammographic masses.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Horita, Katsuhei; Iwase, Takuji; Endo, Tokiko

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic extraction scheme for the precise recognition of the contours of masses on digital mammograms in order to improve a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. We propose a radial-searching contour extraction method based on a modified active contour model (ACM). In this technique, after determining the central point of a mass by searching for the direction of the density gradient, we arranged an initial contour at the central point, and the movement of a control point was limited to directions radiating from the central point. Moreover, it became possible to increase the extraction accuracy by sorting out the pixel used for processing and using two images-an edge-intensity image and a degree-of-separation image defined based on the pixel-value histogram-for calculation of the image forces used for constraints on deformation of the ACM. We investigated the accuracy of the automated extraction method by using 53 masses with several "difficult contours" on 53 digitized mammograms. The extraction results were compared quantitatively with the "correct segmentation" represented by an experienced physician's sketches. The numbers of cases in which the extracted region corresponded to the correct region with overlap ratios of more than 81 and 61% were 30 and 45, respectively. The initial results obtained with this technique show that it will be useful for the segmentation of masses in CAD schemes.

  20. The effect of contour closure on shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Garrigan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Recent research on the Gestalt principle of closure has focused on how the presence of closure affects the ability to detect contours hidden in cluttered visual arrays. Some of the earliest research on closure, however, dealt with encoding and recognizing closed and open shapes, rather than detection. This research re-addresses the relation between closure and shape memory, focusing on how contour closure affects the ability to learn to recognize novel contour shapes. Of particular interest is whether closed contour shapes are easier to learn to recognize and, if so, whether this benefit is due to better encoding of closed contour shapes or easier comparison of closed contour shapes to already learned shapes. The results show that closed contours are indeed easier to recognize and, further, that this advantage appears to be related to better encoding.

  1. Analyzing critical propagation in a reaction-diffusion-advection model using unstable slow waves.

    PubMed

    Kneer, Frederike; Obermayer, Klaus; Dahlem, Markus A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of advection on the propagation and in particular on the critical minimal speed of traveling waves in a reaction-diffusion model is studied. Previous theoretical studies estimated this effect on the velocity of stable fast waves and predicted the existence of a critical advection strength below which propagating waves are not supported anymore. In this paper, an analytical expression for the advection-velocity relation of the unstable slow wave is derived. In addition, the critical advection strength is calculated taking into account the unstable slow wave solution. We also analyze a two-variable reaction-diffusion-advection model numerically in a wide parameter range. Due to the new control parameter (advection) we can find stable wave propagation in the otherwise non-excitable parameter regime, if the advection strength exceeds a critical value. Comparing theoretical predictions to numerical results, we find that they are in good agreement. Theory provides an explanation for the observed behaviour.

  2. Reconstruction of a 3D stereotactic brain atlas and its contour-to-contour elastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masahiko; Otsuki, Taisuke

    1993-06-01

    We describe a refined method for estimating the 3-D geometry of cerebral structures of a patient's brain from magnetic resonance (MR) images by adapting a 3-D atlas to the images. The 3-D atlas represents the figures of anatomical subdivisions of deep cerebral structures as series of contours reconstructed from a stereotactic printed atlas. The method correlates corresponding points and curve segments that are recognizable in both the atlas and the image, by elastically deforming the atlas two-dimensionally, while maintaining the point-to-point and contour-to-contour correspondence, until equilibrium is reached. We have used the method experimentally for a patient with Parkinson's disease, and successfully estimated the substructures of the thalamus to be treated.

  3. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  4. Is Chaotic Advection Inherent to Porous Media Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Daniel; Metcalfe, Guy; Trefry, Mike

    2013-11-01

    All porous media, including granular and packed media, fractured and open networks, are typified by the inherent topological complexity of the pore-space. This topological complexity admits a large number density of stagnation points under steady Stokes flow, which in turn generates a 3D fluid mechanical analouge of the Bakers map, termed the Baker's flow. We demonstrate that via this mechanism, chaotic advection at the pore-scale is inherent to almost all porous media under reasonable conditions, and such dynamics have significant implications for a range of fluid-borne processes including transport and mixing, chemical reactions and biological activity.

  5. Vortex emission accompanies the advection of optical localized structures.

    PubMed

    Haudin, F; Rojas, R G; Bortolozzo, U; Clerc, M G; Residori, S

    2011-02-11

    We show that the advection of optical localized structures is accompanied by the emission of vortices, with phase singularities appearing in the wake of the drifting structure. Localized structures are obtained in a light-valve experiment and made to drift by a mirror tilt in the feedback loop. Pairs of oppositely charged vortices are detected for small drifts, whereas for large drifts a vortex array develops. Observations are supported by numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of the system equations and are expected to be generic for a large class of translated optical patterns.

  6. A convexity preserving scheme for conservative advection transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng; Peng, Xindong

    2004-08-01

    A simple and practical scheme for advection transport equation is presented. The scheme, namely piecewise rational method (PRM), is a variant of the existing piecewise parabolic method (PPM) of Colella and Woodward (1984). Instead of the parabolic function, a rational function is used for the reconstruction. Making use of the convexity preserving nature of the rational function enables us to obtain oscillation-less numerical solutions, but avoids the adjustments of the cell-interface values to enforce the monotonicity in PPM. The PRM is very simple and computationally efficient. Our numerical results show that PRM is competitive to the PPM in many aspects, such as numerical accuracy and shape-preserving property.

  7. Contour dynamics model for electric discharges.

    PubMed

    Arrayás, M; Fontelos, M A; Jiménez, C

    2010-03-01

    We present an effective contour model for electrical discharges deduced as the asymptotic limit of the minimal streamer model for the propagation of electric discharges, in the limit of small electron diffusion. The incorporation of curvature effects to the velocity propagation and not to the boundary conditions is a feature and makes it different from the classical Laplacian growth models. The dispersion relation for a nonplanar two-dimensional discharge is calculated. The development and propagation of fingerlike patterns are studied and their main features quantified.

  8. Shear-strain contours from moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Joh, D.

    1985-01-01

    The development of whole-field contour maps of shear strains gamma (xy), derived from displacement fields obtained by moire interferometry with 2400 lines/mm, is described. The use of mechanical differentiation to obtain cross-derivatives of displacements and the use of graphical additive moire to sum the cross-derivatives are explained. Quantitative analysis in the small-strain domain is possible because of the high sensitivity of moire interferometry. The applicability of this technique is shown by the testing of a short epoxy beam under three-point bending.

  9. High effectiveness contour matching contact heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, Robert L. (Inventor); Roebelen, George J., Jr. (Inventor); Davenport, Arthur K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    There is a need in the art for a heat exchanger design having a flexible core providing contour matching capabilities, which compensates for manufacturing tolerance and distortion buildups, and which accordingly furnishes a relatively uniform thermal contact conductance between the core and external heat sources under essentially all operating conditions. The core of the heat exchanger comprises a top plate and a bottom plate, each having alternate rows of pins attached. Each of the pins fits into corresponding tight-fitting recesses in the opposite plate.

  10. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean {+-} standard deviation of 32 {+-} 9 vs. 23 {+-} 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 {+-} 3 vs. 21 {+-} 5 min (p = .003), 39 {+-} 12 vs. 30 {+-} 5 min (p = .055), and 29 {+-} 5 vs. 20 {+-} 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target

  11. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  12. Advection-Based Sparse Data Management for Visualizing Unsteady Flow.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Zhang, Jiang; Liu, Richen; Liu, Lu; Yuan, Xiaoru; Huang, Jian; Meng, Xiangfei; Pan, Jingshan

    2014-12-01

    When computing integral curves and integral surfaces for large-scale unsteady flow fields, a major bottleneck is the widening gap between data access demands and the available bandwidth (both I/O and in-memory). In this work, we explore a novel advection-based scheme to manage flow field data for both efficiency and scalability. The key is to first partition flow field into blocklets (e.g. cells or very fine-grained blocks of cells), and then (pre)fetch and manage blocklets on-demand using a parallel key-value store. The benefits are (1) greatly increasing the scale of local-range analysis (e.g. source-destination queries, streak surface generation) that can fit within any given limit of hardware resources; (2) improving memory and I/O bandwidth-efficiencies as well as the scalability of naive task-parallel particle advection. We demonstrate our method using a prototype system that works on workstation and also in supercomputing environments. Results show significantly reduced I/O overhead compared to accessing raw flow data, and also high scalability on a supercomputer for a variety of applications.

  13. Local and nonlocal advection of a passive scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. K.

    2006-11-01

    Passive and active scalar mixing is examined in a simple one-parameter family of two-dimensional flows based on quasi-geostrophic dynamics, in which the active scalar, the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity, is confined to a single horizontal surface (so-called surface quasi-geostrophic dynamics) and in which a passive scalar field is also advected by the (horizontal, two-dimensional) velocity field at a finite distance from the surface. At large distances from the surface the flow is determined by the largest horizontal scales, the flow is spectrally nonlocal, and a chaotic advection-type regime dominates. At small distances, z, scaling arguments suggest a transition wavenumber kc˜1/2z, where the slope of the passive scalar spectrum changes from k-5/3, determined by local dynamics, to k-1, determined by nonlocal dynamics, analogous to the transition to a k-1 slope in the Batchelor regime in three-dimensional turbulence. Direct numerical simulations reproduce the qualitative aspects of this transition. Other characteristics of the simulated scalar fields, such as the relative dominance of coherent or filamentary structures, are also shown to depend strongly on the degree of locality.

  14. THE ADVECTION OF SUPERGRANULES BY THE SUN'S AXISYMMETRIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, David H.; Williams, Peter E.; Rosa, Kevin Dela; Cuntz, Manfred E-mail: peter.williams@nasa.go

    2010-12-10

    We show that the motions of supergranules are consistent with a model in which they are simply advected by the axisymmetric flows in the Sun's surface shear layer. We produce a 10 day series of simulated Doppler images at a 15 minute cadence that reproduces most spatial and temporal characteristics seen in the SOHO/MDI Doppler data. Our simulated data have a spectrum of cellular flows with just two components-a granule component that peaks at spherical wavenumbers of about 4000 and a supergranule component that peaks at wavenumbers of about 110. We include the advection of these cellular components by the axisymmetric flows-differential rotation and meridional flow-whose variations with latitude and depth (wavenumber) are consistent with observations. We mimic the evolution of the cellular pattern by introducing random variations to the phases of the spectral components at rates that reproduce the levels of cross-correlation as functions of time and latitude. Our simulated data do not include any wave-like characteristics for the supergranules yet can reproduce the rotation characteristics previously attributed to wave-like behavior. We find rotation rates which appear faster than the actual rotation rates and attribute this to projection effects. We find that the measured meridional flow does accurately represent the actual flow and that the observations indicate poleward flow to 65{sup 0}-70{sup 0} latitude with equatorward countercells in the polar regions.

  15. Space-fractional advection-diffusion and reflective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Krepysheva, Natalia; Di Pietro, Liliana; Néel, Marie-Christine

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous diffusive transport arises in a large diversity of disordered media. Stochastic formulations in terms of continuous time random walks (CTRWs) with transition probability densities showing space- and/or time-diverging moments were developed to account for anomalous behaviors. A broad class of CTRWs was shown to correspond, on the macroscopic scale, to advection-diffusion equations involving derivatives of noninteger order. In particular, CTRWs with Lévy distribution of jumps and finite mean waiting time lead to a space-fractional equation that accounts for superdiffusion and involves a nonlocal integral-differential operator. Within this framework, we analyze the evolution of particles performing symmetric Lévy flights with respect to a fluid moving at uniform speed . The particles are restricted to a semi-infinite domain limited by a reflective barrier. We show that the introduction of the boundary condition induces a modification in the kernel of the nonlocal operator. Thus, the macroscopic space-fractional advection-diffusion equation obtained is different from that in an infinite medium.

  16. Effects of demographic stochasticity on population persistence in advective media.

    PubMed

    Kolpas, Allison; Nisbet, Roger M

    2010-07-01

    Many populations live and disperse in advective media. A fundamental question, known as the "drift paradox" in stream ecology, is how a closed population can survive when it is constantly being transported downstream by the flow. Recent population-level models have focused on the role of diffusive movement in balancing the effects of advection, predicting critical conditions for persistence. Here, we formulate an individual-based stochastic analog of the model described in (Lutscher et al., SIAM Rev. 47(4):749-772, 2005) to quantify the effects of demographic stochasticity on persistence. Population dynamics are modeled as a logistic growth process and dispersal as a position-jump process on a finite domain divided into patches. When there is no correlation in the interpatch movement of residents, stochasticity simply smooths the persistence-extinction boundary. However, when individuals disperse in "packets" from one patch to another and the flow field is memoryless on the timescale of packet transport, the probability of persistence is greatly enhanced. The latter transport mechanism may be characteristic of larval dispersal in the coastal ocean or wind-dispersed seed pods.

  17. Transient responses to spatial perturbations in advective systems.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kurt E; Nisbet, Roger M; McCauley, Edward

    2008-07-01

    We study the transient dynamics, following a spatially-extended perturbation of models describing populations residing in advective media such as streams and rivers. Our analyses emphasize metrics that are independent of initial perturbations-resilience, reactivity, and the amplification envelope-and relate them to component spatial wavelengths of the perturbation using spatial Fourier transforms of the state variables. This approach offers a powerful way of understanding the influence of spatial scale on the initial dynamics of a population following a spatially variable environmental perturbation, an important property in determining the ecological implications of transient dynamics in advective systems. We find that asymptotically stable systems may exhibit transient amplification of perturbations (i.e., have positive reactivity) for some spatial wavelengths and not others. Furthermore, the degree and duration of amplification varies strongly with spatial wavelength. For two single-population models, there is a relationship between transient dynamics and the response length that characterizes the steady state response to spatial perturbations: a long response length implies that peak amplification of perturbations is small and occurs fast. This relationship holds less generally in a specialist consumer-resource model, likely due to the model's tendency for flow-induced instabilities at an alternative characteristic spatial scale.

  18. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  19. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Lawler, J E

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3). A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  20. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Granular Scale Advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhichen; Cao, W.; Ji, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report the first evidence of magnetic reconnection driven by advection in a rapidly developing large granule, using high spatial resolution observations of a small surge event (base size 4‧‧ by 4‧‧) with the 1.6 meter aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The observations were carried out in narrow-band (0.5 Å) Helium I 10830 Å and broad-band (10 Å) TiO 7057 Å. Since He I 10830 Å triplet has very high excitation level and is optically thin, its filtergrams enable us to investigate the surge from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the lower corona. Simultaneous space data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used in the analysis. It is shown that the surge is spatio-temporally associated with magnetic flux emergence in the rapidly developing large granule. During the development of the granule, its advecting flow ( 2 km/ s) squeezed the magnetic flux into an intergranular lane area, where a magnetic flux concentration was formed and the neighboring flux with opposite magnetic polarity was cancelled. During the cancellation, the surge was produced as absorption in He I 10830 Å filtergrams while simultaneous EUV brightening occurred at its base. The observations clearly indicate evidence of finest-scale reconnection process driven by the granule’s motion.

  1. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Granular Scale Advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2013-06-01

    We report the first evidence of magnetic reconnection driven by advection in a rapidly developing large granule using high spatial resolution observations of a small surge event (base size ~ 4'' × 4'') with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The observations were carried out in narrowband (0.5 Å) He I 10830 Å and broadband (10 Å) TiO 7057 Å. Since He I 10830 Å triplet has a very high excitation level and is optically thin, its filtergrams enable us to investigate the surge from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the lower corona. Simultaneous space data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory were used in the analysis. It is shown that the surge is spatio-temporally associated with magnetic flux emergence in the rapidly developing large granule. During the development of the granule, its advecting flow (~2 km s-1) squeezed the magnetic flux into an intergranular lane area, where a magnetic flux concentration was formed and the neighboring flux with opposite magnetic polarity was canceled. During the cancellation, the surge was produced as absorption in He I 10830 Å filtergrams while simultaneous EUV brightening occurred at its base. The observations clearly indicate evidence of a finest-scale reconnection process driven by the granule's motion.

  2. Positivity-preserving numerical schemes for multidimensional advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Macvean, M. K.; Lock, A. P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the construction of an explicit, single time-step, conservative, finite-volume method for multidimensional advective flow, based on a uniformly third-order polynomial interpolation algorithm (UTOPIA). Particular attention is paid to the problem of flow-to-grid angle-dependent, anisotropic distortion typical of one-dimensional schemes used component-wise. The third-order multidimensional scheme automatically includes certain cross-difference terms that guarantee good isotropy (and stability). However, above first-order, polynomial-based advection schemes do not preserve positivity (the multidimensional analogue of monotonicity). For this reason, a multidimensional generalization of the first author's universal flux-limiter is sought. This is a very challenging problem. A simple flux-limiter can be found; but this introduces strong anisotropic distortion. A more sophisticated technique, limiting part of the flux and then restoring the isotropy-maintaining cross-terms afterwards, gives more satisfactory results. Test cases are confined to two dimensions; three-dimensional extensions are briefly discussed.

  3. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-15

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  4. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  5. CONTOUR; a modification of G.I. Evenden's general purpose contouring program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godson, R.H.; Webring, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    A contouring program written for the DEC-10 computer (Evenden, 1975) has been modified and enhanced to operate on a Honeywell Multics 68/80 computer. The program uses a device independent plotting system (Wahl, 1977) so that output can be directed to any of several plotting devices by simply specifying one input variable.

  6. Brain extraction using geodesic active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Albert; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Tam, Roger; Traboulsee, Anthony

    2006-03-01

    Extracting the brain cortex from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) head scans is an essential preprocessing step of which the accuracy greatly affects subsequent image analysis. The currently popular Brain Extraction Tool (BET) produces a brain mask which may be too smooth for practical use. This paper presents a novel brain extraction tool based on three-dimensional geodesic active contours, connected component analysis and mathematical morphology. Based on user-specified intensity and contrast levels, the proposed algorithm allows an active contour to evolve naturally and extract the brain cortex. Experiments on synthetic MRI data and scanned coronal and axial MRI image volumes indicate successful extraction of tight perimeters surrounding the brain cortex. Quantitative evaluations on both synthetic phantoms and manually labeled data resulted in better accuracy than BET in terms of true and false voxel assignment. Based on these results, we illustrate that our brain extraction tool is a robust and accurate approach for the challenging task of automatically extracting the brain cortex in MRI data.

  7. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate.

  8. Thermo-chemical convection in planetary mantles: advection methods and magma ocean overturn simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, A.-C.; Tosi, N.; Hüttig, C.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal and chemical convection in planetary mantles are the most dominant dynamical processes influencing the thermal and geological evolution of a planet. After the planetary formation, convection in the interior is one of the most prominent processes being responsible for the heat transport efficiency, the interior structure, the magnetic field generation and the geological structures at the surface of a planet such as volcanoes, rifts and others. The slow creep of the silicate materials that make up the mantle of terrestrial planets (i.e. Mercury, Venus, the Earth and Mars) is driven by a combination of thermal and compositional buoyancy. On the one hand, the primordial heat accumulated after accretion and core formation and the heat released by the decay of radiogenic isotopes are transported from the interior to the surface by thermal convection. This process involves the transfer of heat both via diffusion, which occurs mainly across thermal boundary layers, and advection due to fluid motion in the bulk of the mantle. On the other hand, density anomalies of non-thermal origin associated with chemical (i.e. compositional) heterogeneities provide an additional source of buoyancy that actively contributes to the transport of energy and mass. In the present work we discuss the modeling of active compositional fields in the framework of solid-state mantle convection using the 3D spherical/2D cylindrical code Gaia [1, 2]. Numerical methods for the advection of active compositional fields fall in two main categories [3, 4]. They are based either on a fixed computational grid (Eulerian methods) or on evolving grids or moving particles (Lagrangian methods). We compare an Eulerian method based on double-diffusive convection against a Lagrangian, particle-based method. Though straightforward, the first method generally suffers from non-negligible numerical diffusion and demands then the use of grids with a high resolution. Moreover, its accuracy can substantially

  9. Modeling breakup and relaxation of Newtonian droplets using the advected phase-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucourt, J.; Biben, T.; Leyrat, A.; Verdier, C.

    2007-02-01

    The relaxation and breakup of Newtonian droplets is considered using the advected field approach. This method allows one to follow the deformation of interfaces using an order parameter field [Biben , Europhys. Lett. 63, 623 (2003)] based on a Ginzburg-Landau equation. Using this method, it is possible to follow the breakup of droplets and stability curves can be obtained in both two- and three-dimensional shear and elongational flows. Finally, relaxation of a droplet is considered, following the application of an elongational flow. The results are compared with previous experimental data [Ha and Leal, Phys. Fluids 13, 1568 (2001)], and are found to be in satisfactory agreement. The method is general enough to be applied to other non-Newtonian fluids, such as Oldroyd-B fluids or viscoplastic materials.

  10. Thermally driven advection for radioxenon transport from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-05-01

    Barometric pumping is a ubiquitous process resulting in migration of gases in the subsurface that has been studied as the primary mechanism for noble gas transport from an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). However, at early times following a UNE, advection driven by explosion residual heat is relevant to noble gas transport. A rigorous measure is needed for demonstrating how, when, and where advection is important. In this paper three physical processes of uncertain magnitude (oscillatory advection, matrix diffusion, and thermally driven advection) are parameterized by using boundary conditions, system properties, and source term strength. Sobol' sensitivity analysis is conducted to evaluate the importance of all physical processes influencing the xenon signals. This study indicates that thermally driven advection plays a more important role in producing xenon signals than oscillatory advection and matrix diffusion at early times following a UNE, and xenon isotopic ratios are observed to have both time and spatial dependence.

  11. Effects of Spatial Frequency Similarity and Dissimilarity on Contour Integration

    PubMed Central

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of spatial frequency similarity and dissimilarity on human contour integration under various conditions of uncertainty. Participants performed a temporal 2AFC contour detection task. Spatial frequency jitter up to 3.0 octaves was applied either to background elements, or to contour and background elements, or to none of both. Results converge on four major findings. (1) Contours defined by spatial frequency similarity alone are only scarcely visible, suggesting the absence of specialized cortical routines for shape detection based on spatial frequency similarity. (2) When orientation collinearity and spatial frequency similarity are combined along a contour, performance amplifies far beyond probability summation when compared to the fully heterogenous condition but only to a margin compatible with probability summation when compared to the fully homogenous case. (3) Psychometric functions are steeper but not shifted for homogenous contours in heterogenous backgrounds indicating an advantageous signal-to-noise ratio. The additional similarity cue therefore not so much improves contour detection performance but primarily reduces observer uncertainty about whether a potential candidate is a contour or just a false positive. (4) Contour integration is a broadband mechanism which is only moderately impaired by spatial frequency dissimilarity. PMID:26057620

  12. Challenges of OPC model calibration from SEM contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granik, Yuri; Kusnadi, Ir

    2008-03-01

    Traditionally OPC models are calibrated to match CD measurements from selected test pattern locations. This demand for massive CD data drives advances in metrology. Considerable progress has recently been achieved in complimenting this CD data with SEM contours. Here we propose solutions to some challenges that emerge in calibrating OPC models from the experimental contours. We discuss and state the minimization objective as a measure of the distance between simulation and experimental contours. The main challenge is to correctly process inevitable gaps, discontinuities and roughness of the SEM contours. We discuss standardizing the data interchange formats and procedures between OPC and metrology vendors.

  13. Robustness of shape descriptors to incomplete contour representations.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anarta; Petkov, Nicolai

    2005-11-01

    With inspiration from psychophysical researches of the human visual system, we propose a novel aspect and a method for performance evaluation of contour-based shape recognition algorithms regarding their robustness to incompleteness of contours. We use complete contour representations of objects as a reference (training) set. Incomplete contour representations of the same objects are used as a test set. The performance of an algorithm is reported using the recognition rate as a function of the percentage of contour retained. We call this evaluation procedure the ICR test. We consider three types of contour incompleteness, viz. segment-wise contour deletion, occlusion, and random pixel depletion. As an illustration, the robustness of two shape recognition algorithms to contour incompleteness is evaluated. These algorithms use a shape context and a distance multiset as local shape descriptors. Qualitatively, both algorithms mimic human visual perception in the sense that recognition performance monotonously increases with the degree of completeness and that they perform best in the case of random depletion and worst in the case of occluded contours. The distance multiset method performs better than the shape context method in this test framework.

  14. One "shape" fits all: the orientation bandwidth of contour integration.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bruce C; May, Keith A; Hess, Robert F

    2014-11-18

    The ability of human participants to integrate fragmented stimulus elements into perceived coherent contours (amidst a field of distracter elements) has been intensively studied across a large number of contour element parameters, ranging from luminance contrast and chromaticity to motion and stereo. The evidence suggests that contour integration performance depends on the low-level Fourier properties of the stimuli. Thus, to understand contour integration, it would be advantageous to understand the properties of the low-level filters that the visual system uses to process contour stimuli. We addressed this issue by examining the role of stimulus element orientation bandwidth in contour integration, a previously unexplored area. We carried out three psychophysical experiments, and then simulated all of the experiments using a recently developed two-stage filter-overlap model whereby the contour grouping occurs by virtue of the overlap between the filter responses to different elements. The first stage of the model responds to the elements, while the second stage integrates the responses along the contour. We found that the first stage had to be fairly broadly tuned for orientation to account for our results. The model showed a very good fit to a large data set with relatively few free parameters, suggesting that this class of model may have an important role to play in helping us to better understand the mechanisms of contour integration.

  15. Effects of Spatial Frequency Similarity and Dissimilarity on Contour Integration.

    PubMed

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of spatial frequency similarity and dissimilarity on human contour integration under various conditions of uncertainty. Participants performed a temporal 2AFC contour detection task. Spatial frequency jitter up to 3.0 octaves was applied either to background elements, or to contour and background elements, or to none of both. Results converge on four major findings. (1) Contours defined by spatial frequency similarity alone are only scarcely visible, suggesting the absence of specialized cortical routines for shape detection based on spatial frequency similarity. (2) When orientation collinearity and spatial frequency similarity are combined along a contour, performance amplifies far beyond probability summation when compared to the fully heterogenous condition but only to a margin compatible with probability summation when compared to the fully homogenous case. (3) Psychometric functions are steeper but not shifted for homogenous contours in heterogenous backgrounds indicating an advantageous signal-to-noise ratio. The additional similarity cue therefore not so much improves contour detection performance but primarily reduces observer uncertainty about whether a potential candidate is a contour or just a false positive. (4) Contour integration is a broadband mechanism which is only moderately impaired by spatial frequency dissimilarity.

  16. The role of eye movements in a contour detection task.

    PubMed

    Van Humbeeck, Nathalie; Schmitt, Nadine; Hermens, Frouke; Wagemans, Johan; Ernst, Udo A

    2013-12-04

    Vision combines local feature integration with active viewing processes, such as eye movements, to perceive complex visual scenes. However, it is still unclear how these processes interact and support each other. Here, we investigated how the dynamics of saccadic eye movements interact with contour integration, focusing on situations in which contours are difficult to find or even absent. We recorded observers' eye movements while they searched for a contour embedded in a background of randomly oriented elements. Task difficulty was manipulated by varying the contour's path angle. An association field model of contour integration was employed to predict potential saccade targets by identifying stimulus locations with high contour salience. We found that the number and duration of fixations increased with the increasing path angle of the contour. In addition, fixation duration increased over the course of a trial, and the time course of saccade amplitude depended on the percept of observers. Model fitting revealed that saccades fully compensate for the reduced saliency of peripheral contour targets. Importantly, our model predicted fixation locations to a considerable degree, indicating that observers fixated collinear elements. These results show that contour integration actively guides eye movements and determines their spatial and temporal parameters.

  17. Unification of some advection schemes in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, D.; Roe, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between two approaches towards construction of genuinely two-dimensional upwind advection schemes is established. One of these approaches is of the control volume type applicable on structured cartesian meshes. It resulted in the compact high resolution schemes capable of maintaining second order accuracy in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous cases. Another one is the fluctuation splitting approach, which is well suited for triangular (and possibly) unstructured meshes. Understanding the relationship between these two approaches allows us to formulate here a new fluctuation splitting high resolution (i.e. possible use of artificial compression, while maintaining positivity property) scheme. This scheme is shown to be linearity preserving in inhomogeneous as well as homogeneous cases.

  18. Mobile scintillometry to study heat advection over heterogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J.

    2007-12-01

    Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) receivers measure the structure parameter of the refractive index from intensity fluctuations of the transmitter beam. Due to the spatial averaging over 1-4 km employed by this emerging technique the constraints for long temporal averaging (15-30 min) and associated uncertainties that have to be met by other flux measurement techniques do not apply for LASs. In this paper the constraints for temporal averaging of LASs will be examined as a function of environmental conditions and transect geometry. Moreover, analysis of data from a mobile LAS measurement across a surface gradient from rough and dry to smoother and wet will be presented. In this experiment the LAS was mounted on a pickup truck, allowing for quick redeployment of the transect after meaurement. The potential for the use of LAS to study local advection of heat in riparian or irrigated areas in the semi-arid southwest will be evaluated.

  19. Microscale chaotic advection enables robust convective DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Priye, Aashish; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2013-11-05

    The ability of chaotic advection under microscale confinement to direct chemical processes along accelerated kinetic pathways has been recognized for some time. However, practical applications have been slow to emerge because optimal results are often counterintuitively achieved in flows that appear to possess undesirably high disorder. Here we present a 3D time-resolved analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated DNA replication across a broad ensemble of geometric states. The resulting parametric map reveals an unexpectedly wide operating regime where reaction rates remain constant over 2 orders of magnitude of the Rayleigh number, encompassing virtually any realistic PCR condition (temperature, volume, gravitational alignment), a level of robustness previously thought unattainable in the convective format.

  20. Dependence of advection-diffusion-reaction on flow coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Luna, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    A study on an advection-diffusion-reaction system is presented. Variability of the reaction process in such a system triggered by a highly localized source is quantified. It is found, for geophysically motivated parameter regimes, that the difference in bulk concentration subject to realizations of different source locations is highly correlated with the local flow topology of the source. Such flow topologies can be highlighted by Lagrangian coherent structures. Reaction is relatively enhanced in regions of strong stretching, and relatively suppressed in regions where vortices are present. In any case, the presence of a divergence-free background flow helps speed up the reaction process, especially when the flow is time-dependent. Probability density of various quantities characterizing the reaction processes is also obtained. This reveals the inherent complexity of the reaction-diffusion process subject to nonlinear background stirring.

  1. Examination of the evolution of radiation and advection fogs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A literature study was done on radiation and advection fog evolution. For radiation fog, six stages of fog evolution have been identified -- (1) precursor, (2) sunset, (3) conditioning, (4) mature, (5) sunrise, and (6) dissipation. The evolution of advection fog models has been in parallel with radiation fog models, but no identified stages in the evolution of advection fog have been proposed: (1) precursor, (2) initiation, (3) mature, and (4) dissipation. Radiation and advection fog models will require greater sophistication in order to study fog spatial and temporal variability. Physical aspects that require further study are discussed.

  2. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waitz, I.A.; Marble, F.E.; Zukoski, E.E. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1992-07-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface. 19 refs.

  3. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.; Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface.

  4. Combining prior day contours to improve automated prostate segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Godley, Andrew; Sheplan Olsen, Lawrence J.; Stephans, Kevin; Zhao Anzi

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of automatically segmented prostate, rectum, and bladder contours required for online adaptive therapy. The contouring accuracy on the current image guidance [image guided radiation therapy (IGRT)] scan is improved by combining contours from earlier IGRT scans via the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Methods: Six IGRT prostate patients treated with daily kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) had their original plan CT and nine CBCTs contoured by the same physician. Three types of automated contours were produced for analysis. (1) Plan: By deformably registering the plan CT to each CBCT and then using the resulting deformation field to morph the plan contours to match the CBCT anatomy. (2) Previous: The contour set drawn by the physician on the previous day CBCT is similarly deformed to match the current CBCT anatomy. (3) STAPLE: The contours drawn by the physician, on each prior CBCT and the plan CT, are deformed to match the CBCT anatomy to produce multiple contour sets. These sets are combined using the STAPLE algorithm into one optimal set. Results: Compared to plan and previous, STAPLE improved the average Dice's coefficient (DC) with the original physician drawn CBCT contours to a DC as follows: Bladder: 0.81 {+-} 0.13, 0.91 {+-} 0.06, and 0.92 {+-} 0.06; Prostate: 0.75 {+-} 0.08, 0.82 {+-} 0.05, and 0.84 {+-} 0.05; and Rectum: 0.79 {+-} 0.06, 0.81 {+-} 0.06, and 0.85 {+-} 0.04, respectively. The STAPLE results are within intraobserver consistency, determined by the physician blindly recontouring a subset of CBCTs. Comparing plans recalculated using the physician and STAPLE contours showed an average disagreement less than 1% for prostate D98 and mean dose, and 5% and 3% for bladder and rectum mean dose, respectively. One scan takes an average of 19 s to contour. Using five scans plus STAPLE takes less than 110 s on a 288 core graphics processor unit. Conclusions: Combining the plan and

  5. Patterns in biofilms: From contour undulations to fold focussing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, Martine; Wu, Min

    2014-11-01

    Morphologies of soft materials in growth, swelling or drying have been extensively studied recently. Shape modifications occur as the size varies transforming ordinary spheres, cylinders and thin plates into more or less complex objects. Here we consider the genesis of biofilm patterns when a simple disc containing initially bacteria with moderate adhesion to a rigid substrate grows according to very simple rules. The initial circular geometry is lost during the growth expansion, contour undulations and buckling appear, ultimately a rather regular periodic focussing of folds repartition emerges. We theoretically predict these morphological instabilities as bifurcations of solutions in elasticity, characterized by typical driving parameters established here. The substrate plays a critical role limiting the geometry of the possible modes of instabilities and anisotropic growth, adhesion and toughness compete to eventually give rise to wrinkling, buckling or both. Additionally, due to the substrate, we show that the ordinary buckling modes, vertical deviation of thin films, are not observed in practice and a competitive pattern with self-focussing of folds can be found analytically. These patterns are reminiscent of the blisters of delamination in material sciences and explain recent observations of bacteria biofilms. The model presented here is purely analytical, is based on a neo-Hookean elastic energy, and can be extended without difficulties and applied to polymer materials.

  6. Holographic contouring and its limitations in nearly specularly reflecting surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lédl, Vít.; Psota, Pavel; Vojtíšek, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Mokrý, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the digital holography to grinded surfaces shape measurements is experimentally examined with regard to the surface micro-roughness of brittle materials (optical glass). Multi-wavelength phase shifted digital holographic interferometry (holographic contouring) is used and its performance is analyzed. Holographic contouring is a great candidate for the precise shape measurement technique, which can be applied to the iterative manufacture process of optical elements. Optical surface artifacts with different radii of the spherical (convex and concave) shapes were prepared with different micro-roughness. Their optical surfaces were then holographically recorded using a designed setup. Two different measures were selected to estimate the quality of the holographic recording: first, the intensity profile of the reconstructed surface deviation as a consequence of the micro-roughness decrease, where the shape of the intensity profile develops as the surface is altering from strongly diffusive to almost specular; second, the correlation of the phase fields (surfaces shapes), which were holographically recorded using two light beams of different wavelengths. In this situation, the correlation function decreases with an increase in the noise amount in data. The presented preliminary results indicate that the multi- wavelength holographic contouring can be used for surface measurements of high-quality polished and nearly specular surfaces. On the other hand, the application of holographic contouring to polished surface measurement still represents a challenging task and remains unresolved even with the multidirection illumination.

  7. Computer program utilizes FORTRAN 4 subroutines for contour plotting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, N.; Garret, R.; Lawson, C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program constructs lists of xy-coordinate pairs that define contour curves for an arbitrary given function of two variables and transmits these lists to plotting equipment to produce contour plots. The principal subroutine, CONTUR, is independent of any specific system of plotting subroutines and equipment.

  8. Solid Rocket Motor Backflow Analysis For CONTOUR Mishap Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    to thank the members of the CONTOUR MIB, especially Mr. Craig Tooley , NASA/GSFC, for their support. He also appreciates the efforts of Messrs. Lou... Tooley , CONTOUR Mishap Investigation Board, SAI-12-627/MSW-2, 20 May 2003, pp. 1-13. 6. M. Woronowicz, “Development of a Novel Free Molecule Rocket Plume

  9. 32 CFR 707.5 - Underway replenishment contour lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underway replenishment contour lights. 707.5... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.5 Underway replenishment contour lights... underway replenishment operations, either red or blue lights at delivery-ship-deck-edge extremities....

  10. 32 CFR 707.5 - Underway replenishment contour lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underway replenishment contour lights. 707.5... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.5 Underway replenishment contour lights... underway replenishment operations, either red or blue lights at delivery-ship-deck-edge extremities....

  11. 32 CFR 707.5 - Underway replenishment contour lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underway replenishment contour lights. 707.5... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.5 Underway replenishment contour lights... underway replenishment operations, either red or blue lights at delivery-ship-deck-edge extremities....

  12. Estimation of Weapon Yield From Inversion of Dose Rate Contours

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Zucchini .................................................................................... 76 Operation PLUMBBOB—Priscilla...Appendix E: ESS FOM ....................................................................................................112 Appendix F: Zucchini FOM...Relationship of Dose Rate Contour Area, Weather Grid, and AOI ............... 57 23. Zucchini FDC, DNA-EX, and HPAC Dose Rate Contours at 28KT

  13. Contour Integration over Time: Psychophysical and fMRI Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Shu-Guang; Li, Wu; Yu, Cong; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2016-05-30

    The brain integrates discrete but collinear stimuli to perceive global contours. Previous contour integration (CI) studies mainly focus on integration over space, and CI is attributed to either V1 long-range connections or contour processing in high-visual areas that top-down modulate V1 responses. Here, we show that CI also occurs over time in a design that minimizes the roles of V1 long-range interactions. We use tilted contours embedded in random orientation noise and moving horizontally behind a fixed vertical slit. Individual contour elements traveling up/down within the slit would be encoded over time by parallel, rather than aligned, V1 neurons. However, we find robust contour detection even when the slit permits only one viewable contour element. Similar to CI over space, CI over time also obeys the rule of collinearity. fMRI evidence shows that while CI over space engages visual areas as early as V1, CI over time mainly engages higher dorsal and ventral visual areas involved in shape processing, as well as posterior parietal regions involved in visual memory that can represent the orientation of temporally integrated contours. These results suggest at least partially dissociable mechanisms for implementing the Gestalt rule of continuity in CI over space and time.

  14. Brain networks supporting perceptual grouping and contour selection.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The human visual system groups local elements into global objects seemingly without effort. Using a contour integration task and EEG source level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that perceptual grouping requires a top-down selection, rather than a passive pooling, of neural information that codes local elements in the visual image. The participants were presented visual displays with or without a hidden contour. Two tasks were performed: a central luminance-change detection task and a peripheral contour detection task. Only in the contour-detection task could we find differential brain activity between contour and non-contour conditions, within a distributed brain network including parietal, lateral occipital and primary visual areas. Contour processing was associated with an inflow of information from lateral occipital into primary visual regions, as revealed from the slope of phase differences between source level oscillations within these areas. The findings suggest that contour integration results from a selection of neural information from lower visual areas, and that this selection is driven by the lateral occipital cortex.

  15. 32 CFR 707.5 - Underway replenishment contour lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underway replenishment contour lights. 707.5... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.5 Underway replenishment contour lights... underway replenishment operations, either red or blue lights at delivery-ship-deck-edge extremities....

  16. Variable length open contour tracking using a deformable trellis.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Mehmet Emre; Altinok, Alphan; Manjunath, Bangalore S; Rose, Kenneth

    2011-04-01

    This paper focuses on contour tracking, an important problem in computer vision, and specifically on open contours that often directly represent a curvilinear object. Compelling applications are found in the field of bioimage analysis where blood vessels, dendrites, and various other biological structures are tracked over time. General open contour tracking, and biological images in particular, pose major challenges including scene clutter with similar structures (e.g., in the cell), and time varying contour length due to natural growth and shortening phenomena, which have not been adequately answered by earlier approaches based on closed and fixed end-point contours. We propose a model-based estimation algorithm to track open contours of time-varying length, which is robust to neighborhood clutter with similar structures. The method employs a deformable trellis in conjunction with a probabilistic (hidden Markov) model to estimate contour position, deformation, growth and shortening. It generates a maximum a posteriori estimate given observations in the current frame and prior contour information from previous frames. Experimental results on synthetic and real-world data demonstrate the effectiveness and performance gains of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Passive advection-dispersion in networks of pipes: Effect of connectivity and relationship to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabé, Y.; Wang, Y.; Qi, T.; Li, M.

    2016-02-01

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the relationship between passive advection-dispersion and permeability in porous materials presumed to be statistically homogeneous at scales larger than the pore scale but smaller than the reservoir scale. We simulated fluid flow through pipe network realizations with different pipe radius distributions and different levels of connectivity. The flow simulations used periodic boundary conditions, allowing monitoring of the advective motion of solute particles in a large periodic array of identical network realizations. In order to simulate dispersion, we assumed that the solute particles obeyed Taylor dispersion in individual pipes. When a particle entered a pipe, a residence time consistent with local Taylor dispersion was randomly assigned to it. When exiting the pipe, the particle randomly proceeded into one of the pipes connected to the original one according to probabilities proportional to the outgoing volumetric flow in each pipe. For each simulation we tracked the motion of at least 6000 solute particles. The mean fluid velocity was 10-3 ms-1, and the distance traveled was on the order of 10 m. Macroscopic dispersion was quantified using the method of moments. Despite differences arising from using different types of lattices (simple cubic, body-centered cubic, and face-centered cubic), a number of general observations were made. Longitudinal dispersion was at least 1 order of magnitude greater than transverse dispersion, and both strongly increased with decreasing pore connectivity and/or pore size variability. In conditions of variable hydraulic radius and fixed pore connectivity and pore size variability, the simulated dispersivities increased as power laws of the hydraulic radius and, consequently, of permeability, in agreement with previously published experimental results. Based on these observations, we were able to resolve some of the complexity of the relationship between dispersivity and permeability.

  18. Robust contour tracking in ultrasound tongue image sequences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kele; Yang, Yin; Stone, Maureen; Jaumard-Hakoun, Aurore; Leboullenger, Clémence; Dreyfus, Gérard; Roussel, Pierre; Denby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A new contour-tracking algorithm is presented for ultrasound tongue image sequences, which can follow the motion of tongue contours over long durations with good robustness. To cope with missing segments caused by noise, or by the tongue midsagittal surface being parallel to the direction of ultrasound wave propagation, active contours with a contour-similarity constraint are introduced, which can be used to provide 'prior' shape information. Also, in order to address accumulation of tracking errors over long sequences, we present an automatic re-initialization technique, based on the complex wavelet image similarity index. Experiments on synthetic data and on real 60 frame per second (fps) data from different subjects demonstrate that the proposed method gives good contour tracking for ultrasound image sequences even over durations of minutes, which can be useful in applications such as speech recognition where very long sequences must be analyzed in their entirety.

  19. Some distinguishing characteristics of contour and texture phenomena in images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of generalized contour/texture discrimination techniques is a central element necessary for machine vision recognition and interpretation of arbitrary images. Here, the visual perception of texture, selected studies of texture analysis in machine vision, and diverse small samples of contour and texture are all used to provide insights into the fundamental characteristics of contour and texture. From these, an experimental discrimination scheme is developed and tested on a battery of natural images. The visual perception of texture defined fine texture as a subclass which is interpreted as shading and is distinct from coarse figural similarity textures. Also, perception defined the smallest scale for contour/texture discrimination as eight to nine visual acuity units. Three contour/texture discrimination parameters were found to be moderately successful for this scale discrimination: (1) lightness change in a blurred version of the image, (2) change in lightness change in the original image, and (3) percent change in edge counts relative to local maximum.

  20. Contour-Based Surface Reconstruction using MPU Implicit Models.

    PubMed

    Braude, Ilya; Marker, Jeffrey; Museth, Ken; Nissanov, Jonathan; Breen, David

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a technique for creating a smooth, closed surface from a set of 2D contours, which have been extracted from a 3D scan. The technique interprets the pixels that make up the contours as points in ℝ(3) and employs Multi-level Partition of Unity (MPU) implicit models to create a surface that approximately fits to the 3D points. Since MPU implicit models additionally require surface normal information at each point, an algorithm that estimates normals from the contour data is also described. Contour data frequently contains noise from the scanning and delineation process. MPU implicit models provide a superior approach to the problem of contour-based surface reconstruction, especially in the presence of noise, because they are based on adaptive implicit functions that locally approximate the points within a controllable error bound. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique with a number of example datasets, providing images and error statistics generated from our results.

  1. Framework of a Contour Based Depth Map Coding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghui; He, Xun; Jin, Xin; Goto, Satoshi

    Stereo-view and multi-view video formats are heavily investigated topics given their vast application potential. Depth Image Based Rendering (DIBR) system has been developed to improve Multiview Video Coding (MVC). Depth image is introduced to synthesize virtual views on the decoder side in this system. Depth image is a piecewise image, which is filled with sharp contours and smooth interior. Contours in a depth image show more importance than interior in view synthesis process. In order to improve the quality of the synthesized views and reduce the bitrate of depth image, a contour based coding strategy is proposed. First, depth image is divided into layers by different depth value intervals. Then regions, which are defined as the basic coding unit in this work, are segmented from each layer. The region is further divided into the contour and the interior. Two different procedures are employed to code contours and interiors respectively. A vector-based strategy is applied to code the contour lines. Straight lines in contours cost few of bits since they are regarded as vectors. Pixels, which are out of straight lines, are coded one by one. Depth values in the interior of a region are modeled by a linear or nonlinear formula. Coefficients in the formula are retrieved by regression. This process is called interior painting. Unlike conventional block based coding method, the residue between original frame and reconstructed frame (by contour rebuilt and interior painting) is not sent to decoder. In this proposal, contour is coded in a lossless way whereas interior is coded in a lossy way. Experimental results show that the proposed Contour Based Depth map Coding (CBDC) achieves a better performance than JMVC (reference software of MVC) in the high quality scenarios.

  2. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  3. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  4. Modeling velocity in gradient flows with coupled-map lattices with advection.

    PubMed

    Lind, Pedro G; Corte-Real, João; Gallas, Jason A C

    2002-07-01

    We introduce a simple model to investigate large scale behavior of gradient flows based on a lattice of coupled maps which, in addition to the usual diffusive term, incorporates advection, as an asymmetry in the coupling between nearest neighbors. This diffusive-advective model predicts traveling patterns to have velocities obeying the same scaling as wind velocities in the atmosphere, regarding the advective parameter as a sort of geostrophic wind. In addition, the velocity and wavelength of traveling wave solutions are studied. In general, due to the presence of advection, two regimes are identified: for strong diffusion the velocity varies linearly with advection, while for weak diffusion a power law is found with a characteristic exponent proportional to the diffusion.

  5. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  6. Refined contour analysis of giant unilamellar vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécréaux, J.; Döbereiner, H.-G.; Prost, J.; Joanny, J.-F.; Bassereau, P.

    2004-03-01

    The fluctuation spectrum of giant unilamellar vesicles is measured using a high-resolution contour detection technique. An analysis at higher q vectors than previously achievable is now possible due to technical improvements of the experimental setup and of the detection algorithm. The global fluctuation spectrum is directly fitted to deduce the membrane tension and the bending modulus of lipid membranes. Moreover, we show that the planar analysis of fluctuations is valid for spherical objects, even at low wave vectors. Corrections due to the integration time of the video camera and to the section of a 3D object by the observation plane are introduced. A precise calculation of the error bars has been done in order to provide reliable error estimate. Eventually, using this technique, we have measured bending moduli for EPC, SOPC and \\chem{SOPC:CHOL} membranes confirming previously published values. An interesting application of this technique can be the measurement of the fluctuation spectra for non-equilibrium membranes, such as “active membranes”.

  7. Discourse-level contours in Nehiyawewin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlbauer, Jeff; Cook, Clare

    2005-04-01

    This study describes declination and discourse-sized intonation contours in Nehiyawewin, an Algonquian language whose pitch and intonation systems have not been previously studied. The study draws on 270 min of recordings of two female Nehiyaw elders telling their life stories to another Nehiyawewin native speaker. Data is analyzed by using Praat's default algorithm to generate f0 curves for each breath group. Preliminary results indicate: (1) When breath-group internal pitch peaks are considered, an obvious downward trend of f0 occurred in fewer than half the breath groups analyzed (about 40% or 37/90). This raises questions about the role of classical declination in natural discourse [Umeda, Journal of Phonetics 10 (1982)]. (2) When we abstract away from declination within a breath group by computing mean f0 and mean pitch peak for each breath group and tracking trends for these means, larger patterns seem to emerge; breath groups can be grouped into larger units based on raising and lowering trends. These units have a mean peak range of 150 Hz with a 30 Hz change from one breath group to the next and correspond to a domain of around five clauses (about 3-4 breath groups, about 45 syllables).

  8. ANOPP/VMS HSCT ground contour system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawls, John, Jr.; Glaab, Lou

    1992-01-01

    This viewgraph shows the integration of the Visual Motion Simulator with ANOPP. ANOPP is an acronym for the Aircraft NOise Prediction Program. It is a computer code consisting of dedicated noise prediction modules for jet, propeller, and rotor powered aircraft along with flight support and noise propagation modules, all executed under the control of an executive system. The Visual Motion Simulator (VMS) is a ground based motion simulator with six degrees of freedom. The transport-type cockpit is equipped with conventional flight and engine-thrust controls and with flight instrument displays. Control forces on the wheel, column, and rudder pedals are provided by a hydraulic system coupled with an analog computer. The simulator provides variable-feel characteristics of stiffness, damping, coulomb friction, breakout forces, and inertia. The VMS provides a wide range of realistic flight trajectories necessary for computing accurate ground contours. The NASA VMS will be discussed in detail later in this presentation. An equally important part of the system for both ANOPP and VMS is the engine performance. This will also be discussed in the presentation.

  9. Directed random polymers via nested contour integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Alexei; Bufetov, Alexey; Corwin, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    We study the partition function of two versions of the continuum directed polymer in 1 + 1 dimension. In the full-space version, the polymer starts at the origin and is free to move transversally in R, and in the half-space version, the polymer starts at the origin but is reflected at the origin and stays in R-. The partition functions solve the stochastic heat equation in full-space or half-space with mixed boundary condition at the origin; or equivalently the free energy satisfies the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. We derive exact formulas for the Laplace transforms of the partition functions. In the full-space this is expressed as a Fredholm determinant while in the half-space this is expressed as a Fredholm Pfaffian. Taking long-time asymptotics we show that the limiting free energy fluctuations scale with exponent 1 / 3 and are given by the GUE and GSE Tracy-Widom distributions. These formulas come from summing divergent moment generating functions, hence are not mathematically justified. The primary purpose of this work is to present a mathematical perspective on the polymer replica method which is used to derive these results. In contrast to other replica method work, we do not appeal directly to the Bethe ansatz for the Lieb-Liniger model but rather utilize nested contour integral formulas for moments as well as their residue expansions.

  10. Advective hydrogel membrane chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Brower, Mark; Pollard, David; Kanani, Dharmesh; Jacquemart, Renaud; Kachuik, Bradley; Stout, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is widely employed for the capture and purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because of the high cost of protein A resins, there is a significant economic driving force to seek new downstream processing strategies. Membrane chromatography has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional resin based column chromatography. However, to date, the application has been limited to mostly ion exchange flow through (FT) mode. Recently, significant advances in Natrix hydrogel membrane has resulted in increased dynamic binding capacities for proteins, which makes membrane chromatography much more attractive for bind/elute operations. The dominantly advective mass transport property of the hydrogel membrane has also enabled Natrix membrane to be run at faster volumetric flow rates with high dynamic binding capacities. In this work, the potential of using Natrix weak cation exchange membrane as a mAb capture step is assessed. A series of cycle studies was also performed in the pilot scale device (> 30 cycles) with good reproducibility in terms of yield and product purities, suggesting potential for improved manufacturing flexibility and productivity. In addition, anion exchange (AEX) hydrogel membranes were also evaluated with multiple mAb programs in FT mode. Significantly higher binding capacity for impurities (support mAb loads up to 10Kg/L) and 40X faster processing speed were observed compared with traditional AEX column chromatography. A proposed protein A free mAb purification process platform could meet the demand of a downstream purification process with high purity, yield, and throughput.

  11. Population persistence under advection-diffusion in river networks.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jorge M

    2012-11-01

    An integro-differential equation on a tree graph is used to model the time evolution and spatial distribution of a population of organisms in a river network. Individual organisms become mobile at a constant rate, and disperse according to an advection-diffusion process with coefficients that are constant on the edges of the graph. Appropriate boundary conditions are imposed at the outlet and upstream nodes of the river network. The local rates of population growth/decay and that by which the organisms become mobile, are assumed constant in time and space. Imminent extinction of the population is understood as the situation whereby the zero solution to the integro-differential equation is stable. Lower and upper bounds for the eigenvalues of the dispersion operator, and related Sturm-Liouville problems are found. The analysis yields sufficient conditions for imminent extinction and/or persistence in terms of the values of water velocity, channel length, cross-sectional area and diffusivity throughout the river network.

  12. MAST solution of advection problems in irrotational flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2007-03-01

    A new numerical-analytical Eulerian procedure is proposed for the solution of convection-dominated problems in the case of existing scalar potential of the flow field. The methodology is based on the conservation inside each computational elements of the 0th and 1st order effective spatial moments of the advected variable. This leads to a set of small ODE systems solved sequentially, one element after the other over all the computational domain, according to a MArching in Space and Time technique. The proposed procedure shows the following advantages: (1) it guarantees the local and global mass balance; (2) it is unconditionally stable with respect to the Courant number, (3) the solution in each cell needs information only from the upstream cells and does not require wider and wider stencils as in most of the recently proposed higher-order methods; (4) it provides a monotone solution. Several 1D and 2D numerical test have been performed and results have been compared with analytical solutions, as well as with results provided by other recent numerical methods.

  13. Jet-dominated advective systems of all mass scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körding, Elmar; Fender, R.

    We show that the radio emission of black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) X-ray binaries (XRBs) follows the analytical prediction of a jet model where the jet carries a constant fraction of the accretion power. The radio emission can therefore be used as a tracer of the accretion rate. This measure is normalised with efficiently radiating objects. As it is independent of the X-ray fluxes, the measure allows us to compare the accretion rate dependency of the bolometric X-ray lumi- nosity of BHs and NSs. For NSs, it scales linearly with accretion rate while the scaling for BHs is quadratic - as expected for inefficient accretion flows. We find the same behaviour in AGN. This new approach uses the jet power to obtain the accretion rate. Thus, we know both the jet power and the radiated power of an accreting BH. This allows us to show that some accretion power is likely to be advected into the black hole, while the jet power dominates over the bolometric luminosity of a hard state BH.

  14. Sea breezes and advective effects in southwest James Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckendry, Ian; Roulet, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Observations from a transect extending 100 km inland during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) in 1990 show that the sea breeze develops on approximately 25% of days during summer and may penetrate up to 100 km inland on occasions. The sea breeze exhibits a marked diurnal clockwise rotation as a result of the Coriolis effect along the unobstructed coastline. The marine advective effect is shown to depend on gradient wind direction. With northwesterly upper level flow the sea breeze tends to be northeasterly in direction and is associated with decreased temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD). With southwesterly upper level flow the sea breeze tends to have a southeasterly direction and less effect on temperatures and VPD. This is attributed to shorter residence times of air parcels over water. For two cases, Colorado State University mesoscale model simulations show good agreement with surface wind observations and suggest that under northwesterly gradient flow, Bowen ratios are increased in the onshore flow along western James Bay, while during southwesterly gradient flow these effects are negligible. These results have implications for the interpretation of local climate, ecology, and hydrology as well as land-based and airborne turbulent flux measurements made during NOWES.

  15. Time Acceleration Methods for Advection on the Cubed Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, Richard K; Evans, Katherine J; White III, James B; Drake, John B

    2009-01-01

    Climate simulation will not grow to the ultrascale without new algorithms to overcome the scalability barriers blocking existing implementations. Until recently, climate simulations concentrated on the question of whether the climate is changing. The emphasis is now shifting to impact assessments, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and regional details. Such studies will require significant increases in spatial resolution and model complexity while maintaining adequate throughput. The barrier to progress is the resulting decrease in time step without increasing single-thread performance. In this paper we demonstrate how to overcome this time barrier for the first standard test defined for the shallow-water equations on a sphere. This paper explains how combining a multiwavelet discontinuous Galerkin method with exact linear part time-evolution schemes can overcome the time barrier for advection equations on a sphere. The discontinuous Galerkin method is a high-order method that is conservative, flexible, and scalable. The addition of multiwavelets to discontinuous Galerkin provides a hierarchical scale structure that can be exploited to improve computational efficiency in both the spatial and temporal dimensions. Exact linear part time-evolution schemes are explicit schemes that remain stable for implicit-size time steps.

  16. Authalic parameterization of general surfaces using Lie advection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guangyu; Hu, Jiaxi; Gu, Xianfeng; Hua, Jing

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of complex surfaces constitutes a major means of visualizing highly convoluted geometric structures as well as other properties associated with the surface. It also enables users with the ability to navigate, orient, and focus on regions of interest within a global view and overcome the occlusions to inner concavities. In this paper, we propose a novel area-preserving surface parameterization method which is rigorous in theory, moderate in computation, yet easily extendable to surfaces of non-disc and closed-boundary topologies. Starting from the distortion induced by an initial parameterization, an area restoring diffeomorphic flow is constructed as a Lie advection of differential 2-forms along the manifold, which yields equality of the area elements between the domain and the original surface at its final state. Existence and uniqueness of result are assured through an analytical derivation. Based upon a triangulated surface representation, we also present an efficient algorithm in line with discrete differential modeling. As an exemplar application, the utilization of this method for the effective visualization of brain cortical imaging modalities is presented. Compared with conformal methods, our method can reveal more subtle surface patterns in a quantitative manner. It, therefore, provides a competitive alternative to the existing parameterization techniques for better surface-based analysis in various scenarios.

  17. Spatial profile of contours inducing long-range color assimilation

    PubMed Central

    DEVINCK, FRÉDÉRIC; SPILLMANN, LOTHAR; WERNER, JOHN S.

    2008-01-01

    Color induction was measured using a matching method for two spatial patterns, each composed of double contours. In one pattern (the standard), the contours had sharp edges to induce the Watercolor Effect (WCE); in the other, the two contours had a spatial taper so that the overall profile produced a sawtooth edge, or ramped stimulus. These patterns were chosen based on our previous study demonstrating that the strength of the chromatic WCE depends on a luminance difference between the two contours. Low-pass chromatic mechanisms, unlike bandpass luminance mechanisms, may be expected to be insensitive to the difference between the two spatial profiles. The strength of the watercolor spreading was similar for the two patterns at narrow widths of the contour possibly because of chromatic aberration, but with wider contours, the standard stimulus produced stronger assimilation than the ramped stimulus. This research suggests that luminance-dependent chromatic mechanisms mediate the WCE and that these mechanisms are sensitive to differences in the two spatial profiles of the pattern contours only when they are wide. PMID:16961998

  18. Adaptive pseudo dilation for gestalt edge grouping and contour detection.

    PubMed

    Papari, Giuseppe; Petkov, Nicolai

    2008-10-01

    We consider the problem of detecting object contours in natural images. In many cases, local luminance changes turn out to be stronger in textured areas than on object contours. Therefore, local edge features, which only look at a small neighborhood of each pixel, cannot be reliable indicators of the presence of a contour, and some global analysis is needed. We introduce a new morphological operator, called adaptive pseudo-dilation (APD), which uses context dependent structuring elements in order to identify long curvilinear structure in the edge map. We show that grouping edge pixels as the connected components of the output of APD results in a good agreement with the gestalt law of good continuation. The novelty of this operator is that dilation is limited to the Voronoi cell of each edge pixel. An efficient implementation of APD is presented. The grouping algorithm is then embedded in a multithreshold contour detector. At each threshold level, small groups of edges are removed, and contours are completed by means of a generalized reconstruction from markers. The use of different thresholds makes the algorithm much less sensitive to the values of the input parameters. Both qualitative and quantitative comparison with existing approaches prove the superiority of the proposed contour detector in terms of larger amount of suppressed texture and more effective detection of low-contrast contours.

  19. Low level constraints on dynamic contour path integration.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sophie; Bourke, Patrick; Guo, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Contour integration is a fundamental visual process. The constraints on integrating discrete contour elements and the associated neural mechanisms have typically been investigated using static contour paths. However, in our dynamic natural environment objects and scenes vary over space and time. With the aim of investigating the parameters affecting spatiotemporal contour path integration, we measured human contrast detection performance of a briefly presented foveal target embedded in dynamic collinear stimulus sequences (comprising five short 'predictor' bars appearing consecutively towards the fovea, followed by the 'target' bar) in four experiments. The data showed that participants' target detection performance was relatively unchanged when individual contour elements were separated by up to 2° spatial gap or 200 ms temporal gap. Randomising the luminance contrast or colour of the predictors, on the other hand, had similar detrimental effect on grouping dynamic contour path and subsequent target detection performance. Randomising the orientation of the predictors reduced target detection performance greater than introducing misalignment relative to the contour path. The results suggest that the visual system integrates dynamic path elements to bias target detection even when the continuity of path is disrupted in terms of spatial (2°), temporal (200 ms), colour (over 10 colours) and luminance (-25% to 25%) information. We discuss how the findings can be largely reconciled within the functioning of V1 horizontal connections.

  20. Infants' perception of curved illusory contour with motion.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Masuda, Tomohiro; Wada, Yuji; Shirai, Nobu; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Masuda et al. (submitted for publication) showed that adults perceive moving rigid or nonrigid motion from illusory contour with neon color spreading in which the inducer has pendular motion with or without phase difference. In Experiment 1, we used the preferential looking method to investigate whether 3-8-month-old infants can discriminate illusory and non-illusory contour figures, and found that the 7-8-month-old, but not the 3-6-month-old, infants showed significant preference for illusory contour with phase difference. In Experiment 2, we tested the validity of the visual stimuli in the present study, and whether infants could detect illusory contour from the current neon color spreading figures. The results showed that all infants might detect illusory contour figure with neon color spreading figures. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that 7-8-month-old infants potentially perceive illusory contour from the visual stimulus with phase-different movement of inducers, which elicits the perception of nonrigid dynamic subjective contour in adults.

  1. Evaluation of mandibular contour in patients with significant facial asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Fang, J-J; Tu, Y-H; Wong, T-Y; Liu, J-K; Zhang, Y-X; Leong, I-F; Chen, K-C

    2016-07-01

    Most previous studies on facial asymmetry have not specifically differentiated mandible deviation from structural asymmetry of the mandible. The purpose of this study was to assess the symmetry of the mandible by examining its contour in a cohort of patients with significant facial asymmetry. Eleven cases of facial asymmetry with chin deviation ≥10mm were enrolled. A voxel-paired median plane (optimal symmetry plane, OSP) and two landmark-based median planes were generated. The OSP was created by computing the best pairing of the bony voxels on the two sides. One side of the mandibular contour was mirrored onto the other side using the test plane. The contour differences were measured by distance and by area ratio. They were examined both in frontal and frontal downward inclined view. The contour symmetry of the mandible was that revealed by the plane that presented the best symmetry. The results showed that the OSP worked best in bisecting the contour into two symmetrical halves. Contour analysis showed relatively small discrepancies between the two sides. In conclusion, the mandibles retained an acceptable contour symmetry despite the presence of significant mandibular deviations. It is suggested that proper mandibular alignment be the primary objective in the correction of facial asymmetry.

  2. The contour method: a new approach in experimental mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure complex residual-stress maps in situations where other measurement methods cannot. This talk first describes the principle of the contour method. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contour of the resulting new surface, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, is then measured. Finally, a conceptually simple finite element analysis determines the original residual stresses from the measured contour. Next, this talk gives several examples of applications. The method is validated by comparing with neutron diffraction measurements in an indented steel disk and in a friction stir weld between dissimilar aluminum alloys. Several applications are shown that demonstrate the power of the contour method: large aluminum forgings, railroad rails, and welds. Finally, this talk discusses why the contour method is significant departure from conventional experimental mechanics. Other relaxation method, for example hole-drilling, can only measure a 1-D profile of residual stresses, and yet they require a complicated inverse calculation to determine the stresses from the strain data. The contour method gives a 2-D stress map over a full cross-section, yet a direct calculation is all that is needed to reduce the data. The reason for these advantages lies in a subtle but fundamental departure from conventional experimental mechanics. Applying new technology to old methods like will not give similar advances, but the new approach also introduces new errors.

  3. The Influence of Contour on Similarity Perception of Star Glyphs.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Johannes; Isenberg, Petra; Bezerianos, Anastasia; Fischer, Fabian; Bertini, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    We conducted three experiments to investigate the effects of contours on the detection of data similarity with star glyph variations. A star glyph is a small, compact, data graphic that represents a multi-dimensional data point. Star glyphs are often used in small-multiple settings, to represent data points in tables, on maps, or as overlays on other types of data graphics. In these settings, an important task is the visual comparison of the data points encoded in the star glyph, for example to find other similar data points or outliers. We hypothesized that for data comparisons, the overall shape of a star glyph--enhanced through contour lines--would aid the viewer in making accurate similarity judgments. To test this hypothesis, we conducted three experiments. In our first experiment, we explored how the use of contours influenced how visualization experts and trained novices chose glyphs with similar data values. Our results showed that glyphs without contours make the detection of data similarity easier. Given these results, we conducted a second study to understand intuitive notions of similarity. Star glyphs without contours most intuitively supported the detection of data similarity. In a third experiment, we tested the effect of star glyph reference structures (i.e., tickmarks and gridlines) on the detection of similarity. Surprisingly, our results show that adding reference structures does improve the correctness of similarity judgments for star glyphs with contours, but not for the standard star glyph. As a result of these experiments, we conclude that the simple star glyph without contours performs best under several criteria, reinforcing its practice and popularity in the literature. Contours seem to enhance the detection of other types of similarity, e. g., shape similarity and are distracting when data similarity has to be judged. Based on these findings we provide design considerations regarding the use of contours and reference structures on star

  4. A closed-form solution for noise contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Carson, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical approach for generating noise contours that overcome the difficulties of existing programs is described. This approach is valid for arbitrarily complex paths and reveals the importance of various factors that influence contour shape and size. The calculations are simple enough to be implemented on a small, hand-held programmable calculator, and a program for the HP-67 calculator is illustrated. The method is fast, simple, and gives the area, the contour, and its extremities for arbitrary flight paths for both takeoffs and landings.

  5. Contour shape analysis of hollow ion x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmej, F. B.; Angelo, P.; Aouad, Y.

    2008-10-22

    Hollow ion x-ray transitions originating from the configurations K{sup 0}L{sup N} have been studied via relativistic atomic structure and Stark broadening calculations. The broadening of the total contour is largely influenced by the oscillator strengths distribution over wavelengths rather than by Stark broadening alone. Interference effects between the upper and lower levels are shown to result in a considerable contour narrowing as well as in a shift of the total contour which could be either red or blue.

  6. Contour erasure and filling-in: New observations

    PubMed Central

    Anstis, Stuart; Greenlee, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Contour erasure is a newly established form of flicker adaptation that diminishes the saliency of object edges leading to their complete disappearance (Anstis, S. 2013. Journal of Vision, 13(2):25, 1–14). If these “disappeared” objects are then viewed on textured backgrounds, the observers experience filling-in, the illusory sense of background completion in the absence of physical input. In a series of observations, we demonstrate that contour erasure can greatly speed up the filling-in (or fading) of brightness. Based on these observations, we suggest that contour adaptation happens early in the magnocellular pathways. PMID:25469212

  7. Drell-Yan hadron tensor: Contour gauge and gluon propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Cherednikov, I. O.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the gauge invariant Drell-Yan hadron tensor which includes the standard and nonstandard diagram contributions. The nonstandard diagram contribution appeared owing to the complexity of the twist three BV(x1,x2)-function where the gluon pole manifests. We use the contour gauge conception which allows us to fix easily the spurious uncertainties in the gluon propagator. The contour gauge condition is generated by the corresponding Wilson lines in both the standard and nonstandard diagrams. We demonstrate the substantial role of the nonstandard diagram for forming of the relevant contour in the Wilson path-ordered exponential that leads to the spurious singularity fixing.

  8. Image Segmentation Using Parametric Contours With Free Endpoints.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Heike; Garcke, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for active contours with free endpoints. A scheme for image segmentation is presented based on a discrete version of the Mumford-Shah functional where the contours can be both closed and open curves. Additional to a flow of the curves in normal direction, evolution laws for the tangential flow of the endpoints are derived. Using a parametric approach to describe the evolving contours together with an edge-preserving denoising, we obtain a fast method for image segmentation and restoration. The analytical and numerical schemes are presented followed by numerical experiments with artificial test images and with a real medical image.

  9. Image Segmentation Using Parametric Contours With Free Endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninghoff, Heike; Garcke, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for active contours with free endpoints. A scheme is presented for image segmentation and restoration based on a discrete version of the Mumford-Shah functional where the contours can be both closed and open curves. Additional to a flow of the curves in normal direction, evolution laws for the tangential flow of the endpoints are derived. Using a parametric approach to describe the evolving contours together with an edge-preserving denoising, we obtain a fast method for image segmentation and restoration. The analytical and numerical schemes are presented followed by numerical experiments with artificial test images and with a real medical image.

  10. Fractal Iso-Contours of Passive Scalar in Two-Dimensional Smooth Random Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucelja, Marija; Falkovich, Gregory; Turitsyn, Konstantin S.

    2012-04-01

    A passive scalar field was studied under the action of pumping, diffusion and advection by a 2D smooth flow with Lagrangian chaos. We present theoretical arguments showing that the scalar statistics are not conformally invariant and formulate a new effective semi-analytic algorithm to model scalar turbulence. We then carry out massive numerics of scalar turbulence, focusing on nodal lines. The distribution of contours over sizes and perimeters is shown to depend neither on the flow realization nor on the resolution (diffusion) scale r d for scales exceeding r d . The scalar isolines are found to be fractal/smooth at scales larger/smaller than the pumping scale. We characterize the statistics of isoline bending by the driving function of the Löwner map. That function is found to behave like diffusion with diffusivity independent of the resolution yet, most surprisingly, dependent on the velocity realization and time (beyond the time on which the statistics of the scalar is stabilized).

  11. Details of Side Load Test Data and Analysis for a Truncated Ideal Contour Nozzle and a Parabolic Contour Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Two cold flow subscale nozzles were tested for side load characteristics during simulated nozzle start transients. The two test article contours were a truncated ideal and a parabolic. The current paper is an extension of a 2009 AIAA JPC paper on the test results for the same two nozzle test articles. The side load moments were measured with the strain tube approach in MSFC s Nozzle Test Facility. The processing techniques implemented to convert the strain gage signals into side load moment data are explained. Nozzle wall pressure profiles for separated nozzle flow at many NPRs are presented and discussed in detail. The effect of the test cell diffuser inlet on the parabolic nozzle s wall pressure profiles for separated flow is shown. The maximum measured side load moments for the two contours are compared. The truncated ideal contour s peak side load moment was 45% of that of the parabolic contour. The calculated side load moments, via mean-plus-three-standard-deviations at each nozzle pressure ratio, reproduced the characteristics and absolute values of measured maximums for both contours. The effect of facility vibration on the measured side load moments is quantified and the effect on uncertainty is calculated. The nozzle contour designs are discussed and the impact of a minor fabrication flaw in the nozzle contours is explained.

  12. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  13. An operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Liaqat Ali; Liu, Philip L.-F.

    1998-09-01

    Operator splitting algorithms are frequently used for solving the advection-diffusion equation, especially to deal with advection dominated transport problems. In this paper an operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation is presented. The algorithm represents a second-order-accurate adaptation of the Holly and Preissmann scheme for three-dimensional problems. The governing equation is split into an advection equation and a diffusion equation, and they are solved by a backward method of characteristics and a finite element method, respectively. The Hermite interpolation function is used for interpolation of concentration in the advection step. The spatial gradients of concentration in the Hermite interpolation are obtained by solving equations for concentration gradients in the advection step. To make the composite algorithm efficient, only three equations for first-order concentration derivatives are solved in the diffusion step of computation. The higher-order spatial concentration gradients, necessary to advance the solution in a computational cycle, are obtained by numerical differentiations based on the available information. The simulation characteristics and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several advection dominated transport problems.

  14. STANDING SHOCK INSTABILITY IN ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Truong; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, Peter A.; Putney, Joy

    2016-03-10

    Depending on the values of the energy and angular momentum per unit mass in the gas supplied at large radii, inviscid advection-dominated accretion flows can display velocity profiles with either preshock deceleration or preshock acceleration. Nakayama has shown that these two types of flow configurations are expected to have different stability properties. By employing the Chevalier and Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we discover that there are regions of parameter space where disks/shocks with outflows can be stable or unstable. In regions of instability, we find that preshock deceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation, but is always stable to the fundamental mode and overtones. Furthermore, we also find that preshock acceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode and that the fundamental mode and overtones become increasingly less stable as the shock location moves away from the horizon when the disk half-height expands above ∼12 gravitational radii at the shock radius. In regions of stability, we demonstrate the zeroth mode to be stable for the velocity profiles that exhibit preshock acceleration and deceleration. Moreover, for models that are linearly unstable, our model suggests the possible existence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with ratios 2:3 and 3:5. These ratios are believed to occur in stellar and supermassive black hole candidates, for example, in GRS 1915+105 and Sgr A*, respectively. We expect that similar QPO ratios also exist in regions of stable shocks.

  15. Critical time scales for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of local accumulation time (LAT) was introduced by Berezhkovskii and co-workers to give a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to approach the steady-state solution [A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Such a measure is referred to as a critical time. Here, we show that LAT is, in fact, identical to the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was first introduced by McNabb [A. McNabb and G. C. Wake, IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Although McNabb's initial argument was motivated by considering the mean particle lifetime (MPLT) for a linear death process, he applied the ideas to study diffusion. We extend the work of these authors by deriving expressions for the MAT for a general one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction problem. Using a combination of continuum and discrete approaches, we show that MAT and MPLT are equivalent for certain uniform-to-uniform transitions; these results provide a practical interpretation for MAT by directly linking the stochastic microscopic processes to a meaningful macroscopic time scale. We find that for more general transitions, the equivalence between MAT and MPLT does not hold. Unlike other critical time definitions, we show that it is possible to evaluate the MAT without solving the underlying partial differential equation (pde). This makes MAT a simple and attractive quantity for practical situations. Finally, our work explores the accuracy of certain approximations derived using MAT, showing that useful approximations for nonlinear kinetic processes can be obtained, again without treating the governing pde directly.

  16. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  17. Investigation of structure and properties of novel multi-layer clay nanocomposite films produced controllably by continuous chaotic advection blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesha, Chaitra

    A unique processing technique based on chaotic advection developed at Clemson University and shown to controllably produce structured materials in the past was employed to produce structured nanocomposites with a high degree of clay orientation as well as localization of platelets within layers of nanoscale thicknesses. Continuous lengths of nanocomposites with different clay contents were extruded in the form of films by feeding separately melts of virgin polyamide-6 polymer and polyamide 6-clay masterbatch into a continuous chaotic advection blender. A variety of composite structures were producible at fixed clay compositions. The internal structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Nanocomposites with novel in-situ multi-layered structures and a high degree of platelet orientation were formed by the recursive stretching and folding of the melt domains due to chaotic advection. Clay platelets were localized within discrete regions to form alternating virgin and platelet-rich layers leading to a hierarchical structure with multiple nano-scales. The thicknesses of the layers reduced with prolonged chaotic advection, eventually leading to nanocomposites in which the multi-layering was no longer discernible. The oriented platelets appeared to be homogenously dispersed through the bulk of the nanocomposite. Investigation of the morphology of the matrix by XRD showed that the homogeneity of the crystalline phase and the orientation of polymer chains parallel to the film surface increased with increased chaotic advection. Also, as the layer thickness reduced, the number of polymer chains restricted by clay platelets increased causing the gamma-crystalline fraction to increase. While XRD results suggested a change in total crystallinity with chaotic advection and clay content but without a specific trend, no change in crystallinity was measured by DSC. Such contradictions are

  18. Energy dissipation and contour integral characterizing fracture behavior of incremental plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi-Lin; Wu, Lin-Zhi; Li, Ming; Chen, Hong-Bo

    2011-04-01

    J ep-integral is derived for characterizing the fracture behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The J ep-integral differs from Rice's J-integral in that the free energy density rather than the stress working density is employed to define energy-momentum tensor. The J ep-integral is proved to be path-dependent regardless of incremental plasticity and deformation plasticity. The J ep-integral possesses clearly clear physical meaning: (1) the value J {tip/ep} evaluated on the infinitely small contour surrounding the crack tip represents the crack tip energy dissipation; (2) when the global steadystate crack growth condition is approached, the value of J {far-ss/ep} calculated along the boundary contour equals to the sum of crack tip dissipation and bulk dissipation of plastic zone. The theoretical results are verified by simulating mode I crack problems.

  19. Direct imaging of isofrequency contours in photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Emma C.; Igarashi, Yuichi; Zhen, Bo; Kaminer, Ido; Hsu, Chia Wei; Shen, Yichen; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The isofrequency contours of a photonic crystal are important for predicting and understanding exotic optical phenomena that are not apparent from high-symmetry band structure visualizations. We demonstrate a method to directly visualize the isofrequency contours of high-quality photonic crystal slabs that show quantitatively good agreement with numerical results throughout the visible spectrum. Our technique relies on resonance-enhanced photon scattering from generic fabrication disorder and surface roughness, so it can be applied to general photonic and plasmonic crystals or even quasi-crystals. We also present an analytical model of the scattering process, which explains the observation of isofrequency contours in our technique. Furthermore, the isofrequency contours provide information about the characteristics of the disorder and therefore serve as a feedback tool to improve fabrication processes. PMID:28138536

  20. A MultiScale Particle Filter Framework for Contour Detection.

    PubMed

    Widynski, Nicolas; Mignotte, Max

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the contour detection task in complex natural images. We propose a novel contour detection algorithm which jointly tracks at two scales small pieces of edges called edgelets. This multiscale edgelet structure naturally embeds semi-local information and is the basic element of the proposed recursive Bayesian modeling. Prior and transition distributions are learned offline using a shape database. Likelihood functions are learned online, thus are adaptive to an image, and integrate color and gradient information via local, textural, oriented, and profile gradient-based features. The underlying model is estimated using a sequential Monte Carlo approach, and the final soft contour detection map is retrieved from the approximated trajectory distribution. We also propose to extend the model to the interactive cut-out task. Experiments conducted on the Berkeley Segmentation data sets show that the proposed MultiScale Particle Filter Contour Detector method performs well compared to competing state-of-the-art methods.

  1. Robust contour decomposition using a constant curvature criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuescher, Daniel M.; Boyer, Kim L.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of decomposing an extended boundary or contour into simple primitives is addressed with particular emphasis on Laplacian-of-Gaussian (LoG) zero-crossing contours. A technique is introduced for partitioning such contours into constant curvature segments. A nonlinear `blip' filter matched to the impairment signature of the curvature computation process, an overlapped voting scheme, and a sequential contiguous segment extraction mechanism are used. This technique is insensitive to reasonable changes in algorithm parameters and robust to noise and minor viewpoint-induced distortions in the contour shape, such as those encountered between stereo image pairs. The results vary smoothly with the data, and local perturbations induce only local changes in the result. Robustness and insensitivity are experimentally verified.

  2. Simple method for prediction of aircraft noise contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Carson, T. M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for generating noise contours more rapidly and more simply than previously used programs is discussed. The method gives the area, the noise contour, and its extremities for an arbitrarily complex flight path for both takeoffs and landings with relative ease. The analysis reveals the fundamental nature of the contours and how the various factors that influence its size and shape enter into the analysis. It is noted that the effects of ground attenuation and shielding are omitted as they are important only on the initial portion of flight and are highly dependent upon aircraft configuration. However, the analysis shows that these effects could be included. It is emphasized the the single-event contour is an obvious choice for purposes of minimizing noise impact.

  3. Shaping of the continental rise by deep geostrophic contour currents.

    PubMed

    Heezen, B C; Hollister, C D; Ruddiman, W F

    1966-04-22

    Geostrophic contour-following bottom currents involved in the deep thermohaline circulation of the world ocean appear to be the principal agents which control the shape of the continental rise and other sediment bodies.

  4. A New Methodology For Estimating CO2 Advective Fluxes In Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Canepa, E.; Georgieva, E.; Kerschbaumer, G.; Minerbi, S.; Seufert, G.

    2007-12-01

    A key problem in using the eddy correlation (EC) technique for estimating the carbon dioxide Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of terrestrial ecosystems is the potential bias caused by advective fluxes of CO2. Advective fluxes are often not considered since they are difficult to identify and to quantify, especially in complex mountainous terrain with highly variable wind patterns and drainage flows. We propose a methodology to estimate these fluxes based on a full 3-Dimensional (3D) approach applied to the topographically complex alpine forest site of Renon (1736 m a.s.l.). This is an aerodynamic method based on the computation of advective fluxes across the aerial faces of a control volume including the plant ecosystem. Data used for the computation of CO2 advective fluxes were collected during an extensive field campaign performed in 2005 in the framework of CarboEurope-IP research project. Vertical profiles of wind, air temperature and CO2 concentration have been measured at five towers and a spatial interpolation was performed in order to get 3D fields of such variables. The frame of reference used was orthogonal and the vertical direction was parallel to the gravity. Each anemometer was aligned in this frame of reference and no rotations were applied to the wind velocity components. The analysis of the 3D fields of wind velocity, CO2 mixing ratio and air density highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of CO2 source/sink strength and the strong de-coupling between air flow below and above the canopy during stable nights. The total CO2 advection calculated using the proposed methodology exhibited prevailing positive values during the night-time period. Advective fluxes estimated during windy nights were of the same magnitude and sign of vertical turbulent flux measured above canopy by the EC technique. This observation suggests that the friction velocity correction routinely applied to night-time periods may not be efficient at the Renon site. During light windy nights

  5. SEBAL-A: A remote sensing ET algorithm that accounts for advection with limited data. Part II: Test for transferability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) tends to underestimate ET under conditions of advection, the model was modified by incorporating an advection component as part of the energy usable for crop evapotranspiration (ET). The modification involved the estimation of advected en...

  6. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ming; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future.

  7. A historical note on illusory contours in shadow writing.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Stefano; Marino, Barbara F M

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that illusory contours have been first displayed and discussed by Schumann (1900, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane 23 1-32). Here we show that, before him, Jastrow (1899, Popular Science Monthly 54 299-312) produced illusory contours consisting of a shadow word. A brief history of shadow writing in psychological literature from Jastrow to Brunswik is presented, in which the contributions of Pillsbury, Warren, Koffka, and Benussi are examined.

  8. Projection lithography with distortion compensation using reticle chuck contouring

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    A chuck for holding a reflective reticle where the chuck has an insulator block with a non-planer surface contoured to cause distortion correction of EUV radiation is provided. Upon being placed on the chuck, a thin, pliable reflective reticle will conform to the contour of the chuck's non-planer surface. When employed in a scanning photolithography system, distortion in the scanned direction is corrected.

  9. Contour-map encoding of shape for early vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1990-01-01

    Contour maps provide a general method for recognizing 2-D shapes. All but blank images give rise to such maps, and people are good at recognizing objects and shapes from them. The maps are encoded easily in long feature vectors that are suitable for recognition by an associative memory. These properties of contour maps suggest a role for them in early visual perception. The prevalence of direction sensitive neurons in the visual cortex of mammals supports this view.

  10. An Unusual Application of NASTRAN Contour Plotting Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittal, S.; Gallo, M.; Wang, T.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is presented for obtaining contour plots of any physical quantity defined on a number of points of the surface of a structure. Rigid Format 1 of HEAT approach in Cosmic NASTRAN is ALTERED to enable use of contour plotting capability for scalar quantities. The ALTERED DMAP sequence is given. Examples include temperature distribution on the face of a cooled laser mirror and the angle of incidence or a radome surface.

  11. phase_space_cosmo_fisher: Fisher matrix 2D contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alejo

    2016-11-01

    phase_space_cosmo_fisher produces Fisher matrix 2D contours from which the constraints on cosmological parameters can be derived. Given a specified redshift array and cosmological case, 2D marginalized contours of cosmological parameters are generated; the code can also plot the derivatives used in the Fisher matrix. In addition, this package can generate 3D plots of qH^2 and other cosmological quantities as a function of redshift and cosmology.

  12. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2008-09-07

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future.

  13. Evidence Relating Subjective Contours and Interpretations Involving Occlusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    This article describes a patient with visual agnosia who is both unable to make the usual occlusion interpretations and is unable to see subjective... article describes a patient with visual agnosia who is both unable to make the usual occlusion interpretions and is unable to see subjective contours...Subjective contours This article examines a prediction that follows from the following two postulates of the above theory: (i) that subjective

  14. Fully automatic contour detection in intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, Elisabeth F.; de Korte, Chris L.; Mastik, Fritz; Schaar, Johannes; van der Steen, Anton F.

    2004-04-01

    Segmentation of deformable structures remains a challenging task in ultrasound imaging especially in low signal-to-noise ratio applications. In this paper a fully automatic method, dedicated to the luminal contour segmentation in intracoronary ultrasound imaging is introduced. The method is based on an active contour with a priori properties that evolves according to the statistics of the ultrasound texture brightness, determined as being mainly Rayleigh distributed. However, contrary to classical snake-based algorithms, the presented technique neither requires from the user the pre-selection of a region of interest tight around the boundary, nor parameter tuning. This fully automatic character is achieved by an initial contour that is not set, but estimated and thus adapted to each image. Its estimation combines two statistical criteria extracted from the a posteriori probability, function of the contour position. These criteria are the location of the function maximum (or maximum a posteriori estimator) and the first zero-crossing of the function derivative. Then starting form the initial contour, a region of interest is automatically selected and the process iterated until the contour evolution can be ignored. In vivo coronary images from 15 patients, acquired with a 20 MHz central frequency Jomed Invision ultrasound scanner were segmented with the developed method. Automatic contours were compared to those manually drawn by two physician in terms of mean absolute difference. Results demonstrate that the error between automatic contours and the average of manual ones (0.099+/-0.032mm) and the inter-expert error (0.097+/-0.027mm) are similar and of small amplitude.

  15. A GENERAL ALGORITHM FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF CONTOUR PLOTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1994-01-01

    The graphical presentation of experimentally or theoretically generated data sets frequently involves the construction of contour plots. A general computer algorithm has been developed for the construction of contour plots. The algorithm provides for efficient and accurate contouring with a modular approach which allows flexibility in modifying the algorithm for special applications. The algorithm accepts as input data values at a set of points irregularly distributed over a plane. The algorithm is based on an interpolation scheme in which the points in the plane are connected by straight line segments to form a set of triangles. In general, the data is smoothed using a least-squares-error fit of the data to a bivariate polynomial. To construct the contours, interpolation along the edges of the triangles is performed, using the bivariable polynomial if data smoothing was performed. Once the contour points have been located, the contour may be drawn. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 100K of 8-bit bytes. This computer algorithm was developed in 1981.

  16. Do we need another neural correlate of contour integration?

    PubMed

    de-Wit, Lee; Schwarzkopf, Dietrich Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Gilad and colleagues use an elegant combination of voltage-sensitive dyes and high temporal and spatial resolution optical imaging to visualize a differential response to collinear contour elements in monkey V1. This result adds to the literature on the neural correlates of contour integration, but does not yet tackle (or seek to tackle) the question as to whether contour integration is mediated by lateral connections within an area (e.g., V1), through pooling of feedfoward connections, or feedback mechanisms. Moreover, while Gilad et al. find that their differential response is correlated with the behavioral performance of each monkey, there are reasons to suspect that the correlation they observe is a consequence of processing in higher regions, and that the differential V1 response may not play a critical role in integrating contour elements, or in generating the monkey's response. Moreover, this differential V1 response was not observed in a monkey who was not trained on the task, a result that can only be reconciled, if one assumes that the monkey could not see the contour prior to training. If valid, this could raise doubts as to whether the study of contour integration really provides insights into the processes by which normal visual perception is achieved.

  17. The development of contour processing: evidence from physiology and psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gemma; Hipp, Daniel; Moser, Alecia; Dickerson, Kelly; Gerhardstein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Object perception and pattern vision depend fundamentally upon the extraction of contours from the visual environment. In adulthood, contour or edge-level processing is supported by the Gestalt heuristics of proximity, collinearity, and closure. Less is known, however, about the developmental trajectory of contour detection and contour integration. Within the physiology of the visual system, long-range horizontal connections in V1 and V2 are the likely candidates for implementing these heuristics. While post-mortem anatomical studies of human infants suggest that horizontal interconnections reach maturity by the second year of life, psychophysical research with infants and children suggests a considerably more protracted development. In the present review, data from infancy to adulthood will be discussed in order to track the development of contour detection and integration. The goal of this review is thus to integrate the development of contour detection and integration with research regarding the development of underlying neural circuitry. We conclude that the ontogeny of this system is best characterized as a developmentally extended period of associative acquisition whereby horizontal connectivity becomes functional over longer and longer distances, thus becoming able to effectively integrate over greater spans of visual space.

  18. Anomalous contours and illusion of angularity: phenomenal and theoretical comparisons.

    PubMed

    Pinna, B

    1991-01-01

    Many experimental comparisons between real and anomalous contours have proven the functional equivalence of the two conditions; however, there are some contradictory findings. One of these is obtained by analyzing the anomalous contours in the light of a new illusion, called the 'illusion of angularity'. A circle becomes a polygon when it covers the centre of a radial arrangement of black stripes, and a polygon changes its perceptual shape depending on its orientation with respect to the same radial arrangement. Phenomenally, it appears like a very pointed polygon, in which every side is concave or, alternatively, a shape that looks like a circle with angles added in the spaces between the radial stripes, or a polygonal shape in which every side is convex. The reciprocal anomalous counterparts of these conditions, obtained by removing the geometrical/polygonal contours, reveal different results. In the first case, one sees a perfect circle; in the second case, a polygon with blunted vertices, or a circular shape with angular protrusions; in the third case, a deformed circle. These results are inconsistent with some theoretical models proposed to explain the emergence of anomalous contours, namely, all the top-down models expressed in terms of cognitive constructions and perceptual hypotheses, or in terms of global figural organizations. Rather, these comparisons suggest a different interpretation for the two phenomena (the illusion of angularity and anomalous contours). This interpretation is based on dynamic interactions or on network computations that synthesize both real and anomalous contours.

  19. A fast contour descriptor algorithm for supernova imageclassification

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Aragon, David Bradburn

    2006-07-16

    We describe a fast contour descriptor algorithm and its application to a distributed supernova detection system (the Nearby Supernova Factory) that processes 600,000 candidate objects in 80 GB of image data per night. Our shape-detection algorithm reduced the number of false positives generated by the supernova search pipeline by 41% while producing no measurable impact on running time. Fourier descriptors are an established method of numerically describing the shapes of object contours, but transform-based techniques are ordinarily avoided in this type of application due to their computational cost. We devised a fast contour descriptor implementation for supernova candidates that meets the tight processing budget of the application. Using the lowest-order descriptors (F{sub 1} and F{sub -1}) and the total variance in the contour, we obtain one feature representing the eccentricity of the object and another denoting its irregularity. Because the number of Fourier terms to be calculated is fixed and small, the algorithm runs in linear time, rather than the O(n log n) time of an FFT. Constraints on object size allow further optimizations so that the total cost of producing the required contour descriptors is about 4n addition/subtraction operations, where n is the length of the contour.

  20. A possible analogy between contours in mathematics--as exemplified by Cauchy's integral formula--and contours in the arts.

    PubMed

    Gerr, S

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to draw an analogy between contour drawing and a particular mathematical theorem. The analogy is seen to depend on the fact that both methods use definite values along a contour to imply a totality of values within the contour; thus, the use of a part to suggest the whole, by way of a hypothetical 'gestalt-like integration' in the case of the art contour, and the usual process of mathematical integration in the case of Cauchy's formula. Examples illustrating the analogy are drawn from a wide range of artistic work: a modern American drawing, a Cro-Magnon cave painting, and two Chinese works. The traditional Chinese philosophy of painting is invoked in support of the analogy because of its explicit emphasis on the primacy of outline drawing in Chinese painting. Some speculations are offered on further development and application of the analogy.

  1. Black Hole Event Horizons and Advection-Dominated Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The XMM data on black-hole X-ray novae are only now becoming available and they have so far not been included in any publications. This work is part of a larger project that makes use of both XMM and Chandra data. Our first publication on the Chandra results is the following: "New Evidence for Black Hole Event Horizons from Chandra" by M.R. Garcia, J.E. McClintock, R. Narayan, P. Callanan, D. Barret and S. Murray (2001, ApJ, 553, L47). Therein we present the luminosities of the two black-hole X-ray novae, GRO J0422+22 and 4U1 543-47, which were observed by Chandra. These results are combined with the luminosities of four additional black-hole X-ray novae, which were observed as part of a Chandra GTO program (PI: S. Murray). The very low, but nonzero, quiescent X-ray luminosities of these black hole binaries is very difficult to understand in the context of standard viscous accretion disk theory. The principal result of this work is that X-ray novae that contain black hole primaries are about 100 times fainter that X-ray novae that contain neutron star primaries. This result had been suggested in earlier work, but the present work very firmly establishes this large luminosity difference. The result is remarkable because the black-hole and the neutron-star systems are believed to be similar in many respects. Most importantly, the mass transfer rate from the secondary star is believed to be very comparable for the two kinds of systems for similar orbital periods. The advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model provides a natural framework for understanding the extraordinarily low luminosities of the black hole systems and the hundred-fold greater luminosities of the neutron star systems. The chief feature of an ADAF is that the heat energy in the accreting gas is trapped in the gas and travels with it, rather than being radiated promptly. Thus the accreting gas reaches the central object with a huge amount of thermal energy. If the accretor is a black hole, the

  2. Fractures as Advective Conduits at the Earth Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragila, M. I.; Weisbrod, N.; Nachshon, U.; Kamai, T.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding gas exchange between the Earth's upper crust and the atmosphere is vital and necessary because this phenomenon controls to a large extent many important processes including, the water cycle, agricultural activities, greenhouse gas emissions and more. From a hydrological aspect, water vapor transport is an extremely important process related to Earth-atmosphere gas exchange because it affects above ground water vapor concentration, soil water content and soil salinity. Traditionally, diffusion was considered the main mechanism of gas exchange between the atmosphere and vadose zone, driven by gas concentration gradients. While this assumption may be correct for many porous media, our laboratory and field-scale studies have shown that advective gas transport mechanisms are governing these fluxes in fractured rocks and cracked soils. Convection driven by thermal gradients (free convection) and wind induced (forced convection) were explored and both were found to play a major role in Earth-atmosphere gas exchange. Long-term laboratory experiments using fracture simulators in a customized climate controlled laboratory have shown that thermal convection occurs when nighttime thermal conditions prevail. This convective venting significantly enhances evaporation and subsequently salt precipitation on the fracture walls. Experiment results were used to develop an empirical relationship between temperature gradients, fracture aperture and convective gas flux through the fracture. Theoretical calculations show that thermal convection is indeed likely to play a major role in evaporation from fractures and can explain enhanced salt accumulation observed in surface-exposed fractures. Long-term field measurements, carried out continuously for 5+ years in a single fracture in the Israeli Negev Desert, verified the development of air convection cycles of 10-18 hours duration on a daily basis, with a peak in both convective flux and duration during the winter. During

  3. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    , indicating deep soil evaporation. Daily fluctuation of the air temperature in the desiccation cracks supported thermally induced air convection within the cracks void and could explain the deep soil salinization process. Combination of all the abovementioned observations demonstrated that the formation of desiccation cracks network in dispersive clay sediments generates a bulk advection dominated environment for both air and water flow, and that the reference to clay sediments as "hydrologically safe" should to be reconsidered.

  4. Rigorous upper bounds for fluid and plasma transport due to passive advection

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.; Kim, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    The formulation of variational principles for transport due to passive advection is described. A detailed account of the work has been published elsewhere. In the present paper, the motivations, philosophy, and implications of the method are briefly discussed. 15 refs.

  5. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  6. Simulation of Helical Flow Hydrodynamics in Meanders and Advection-Turbulent Diffusion Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusti, T. P.; Hertanti, D. R.; Bahsan, E.; Soeryantono, H.

    2013-12-01

    Particle-based numerical methods, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), may be able to simulate some hydrodynamic and morphodynamic behaviors better than grid-based numerical methods. This study simulates hydrodynamics in meanders and advection and turbulent diffusion in straight river channels using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. The simulators generate three-dimensional data for hydrodynamics and one-dimensional data for advection-turbulent diffusion. Fluid at rest, sloshing, and helical flow are simulated in the river meanders. Spill loading and step loading are done to simulate concentration patterns associated with advection-turbulent diffusion. Results indicate that helical flow is formed due to disturbance in morphology and particle velocity in the stream and the number of particles does not have a significant effect on the pattern of advection-turbulent diffusion concentration.

  7. A Quasi-Conservative Adaptive Semi-Lagrangian Advection-Diffusion Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Many processes in atmospheric or oceanic tracer transport are conveniently represented by advection-diffusion type equations. Depending on the magnitudes of both components, the mathematical representation and consequently the discretization is a non-trivial problem. We will focus on advection-dominated situations and will introduce a semi-Lagrangian scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for high local resolution. This scheme is well suited for pollutant transport from point sources, or transport processes featuring fine filamentation with corresponding local concentration maxima. In order to achieve stability, accuracy and conservation, we combine an adaptive mesh refinement quasi-conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme, based on an integral formulation of the underlying advective conservation law (Behrens, 2006), with an advection diffusion scheme as described by Spiegelman and Katz (2006). The resulting scheme proves to be conservative and stable, while maintaining high computational efficiency and accuracy.

  8. AN EXACT PEAK CAPTURING AND OSCILLATION-FREE SCHEME TO SOLVE ADVECTION-DISPERSION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exact peak capturing and essentially oscillation-free (EPCOF) algorithm, consisting of advection-dispersion decoupling, backward method of characteristics, forward node tracking, and adaptive local grid refinement, is developed to solve transport equations. This algorithm repr...

  9. The impact of advection on stratification and chlorophyll variability in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Apurva C.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2015-06-01

    Previously reported global-scale correlations between interannual variability in upper ocean stratification and chlorophyll a (a proxy for phytoplankton biomass) have been shown to be driven by strong associations between the two properties in the central and western equatorial Pacific. Herein, we present evidence that these correlations are not causal but instead result from the advection of heat, salt, and nutrients in the region. Specifically, we demonstrate that stratification and chlorophyll are simultaneously influenced by shifts in the horizontal advective inputs of cold/saline/nutrient-rich waters from upwelling regions to the east and warm/fresh/nutrient-poor waters to the west. We find that horizontal advection contributes substantially to the annual surface layer nutrient budget and, together with vertical advection, significantly impacts interannual variability in chlorophyll. These results highlight the importance of a three-dimensional framework for examining nutrient supply in the upper ocean—a crucial requirement for assessing future marine ecosystem responses to a changing climate.

  10. Advection-Induced Spectrotemporal Defects in a Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bielawski, S.; Szwaj, C.; Bruni, C.; Garzella, D.; Orlandi, G.L.; Couprie, M.E.

    2005-07-15

    We evidence numerically and experimentally that advection can induce spectrotemporal defects in a system presenting a localized structure. Those defects in the spectrum are associated with the breakings induced by the drift of the localized solution. The results are based on simulations and experiments performed on the super-ACO free-electron laser. However, we show that this instability can be generalized using a real Ginzburg-Landau equation with (i) advection and (ii) a finite-size supercritical region.

  11. Exploration of POD-Galerkin Techniques for Developing Reduced Order Models of Reaction-Advection Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    downstream boundary (when needed) is obtained by extrapolation, taking into account the hyperbolic character of the equation . By separating the...for Developing Reduced Order Models of Reaction-Advection Equations 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...advection scalar equation is used as a representative equation to investigate the overall approach. Both linear and nonlinear model equations are

  12. Groundwater flux characterization using distributed temperature sensing: Separating advection from thermal conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Knobbe, S.; Butler, J. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Direct measurement of groundwater flux is difficult to obtain in the field so hydrogeologists often use easily-detectable environmental tracers, such as heat or chemicals, as an indirect way to characterize flux. Previously, we developed a groundwater flux characterization (GFC) probe by using distributed temperature sensing (DTS) to monitor the temperature responses to active heating in a well. The temperature responses were consistent with the hydraulic conductivity profiles determined at the same location, and provided high-resolution information (approx. 1.5 cm) about vertical variations in horizontal flux through the screen. One of the key assumptions in the previous GFC approach was that the vertical variations in the thermal conductivity of the aquifer materials near the well are negligible, so that the temperature differences with depth are primarily a result of groundwater flux instead of thermal conduction. Although this assumption is likely valid for wells constructed with an artificial filter pack, it might become questionable for wells with natural filter packs (such as the wells constructed by direct push where the sediments are allowed to directly collapse onto the well screen). In this work, we develop a new procedure for separating advection from thermal conduction during GFC measurement. In addition to the normal open-screen GFC profiling, an impermeable sleeve was used so that heating tests could be performed without advective flow entering the well. The heating tests under sleeved conditions were primarily controlled by the thermal conduction around the well, and therefore could be used to remove the impact of thermal conduction from the normal GFC results obtained under open-screen conditions. This new procedure was tested in a laboratory sandbox, where a series of open-screen and sleeved GFC tests were performed under different flow rates. Results indicated that for the tested range of rates (Darcy velocity 0 - 0.78 m/d), the relation between

  13. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  14. Sensitivity of solute advective travel time to porosities of hydrogeologic units.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianting; Pohlmann, Karl F; Chapman, Jenny B; Russell, Charles E; Carroll, Rosemary W H; Shafer, David S

    2010-01-01

    An integral approach is proposed to quantify uncertainty and sensitivity of advective travel time to the effective porosities of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) along groundwater flow paths. The approach is applicable in situations where a groundwater flow model exists, but a full solute transport model is not available. The approach can be used to: (1) determine HGUs whose porosities are influential to the solute advective travel time; and (2) apportion uncertainties of solute advective travel times to the uncertainty contributions from individual HGU porosities. A simple one-dimensional steady-state flow example is used to illustrate the approach. Advective travel times of solutes are obtained based on the one-dimensional steady-state flow results in conjunction with the HGU porosities. The approach can be easily applicable to more complex multi-dimensional cases where advective solute travel time can be calculated based on simulated flow results from groundwater flow models. This approach is particularly valuable for optimizing limited resources when designing field characterization programs for uncertainty reduction by identifying HGUs that contribute most to the estimation uncertainty of advective travel times of solutes.

  15. Role of synchrony in contour binding: some transient doubts sustained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2002-04-01

    The temporal correlation hypothesis proposes that neurons signal mutual inclusion in complex features, such as extended contours, by phase-locking their firing [C. M. Gray and W. Singer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 1698 (1989)]. Although this hypothesis remains controversial, a number of recent psychophysical studies have suggested that temporal correlation among features can indeed promote perceptual grouping. In particular, subjects are better at detecting extended visual contours embedded within a field of distractor elements when a small delay is present between a cycling presentation of the contour and the background [Nature 394, 179 (1988)]. We have replicated this finding and examined three potentially confounding factors. First, we controlled local density and used more curved contours composed of bandpass elements to confirm that the effect was associated with contour integration and not with the operation of coarse-scale spatial filters. Second, we minimized the effects of saccadic eye movements (which could combine with the flicker of the asynchronous display to introduce motion cues at the contour location) both by using a fixation marker that was visible only when observers made a saccade (allowing them to reject these trials) and by retinally stabilizing the stimulus. We report that eye movements contribute to the effect. Third, we asked if either visible persistence or transients at the onset and the offset of the asynchronous stimuli might contribute to the effect. We report that the effect is largely abolished by the inclusion of prestimulus and poststimulus masks and is entirely abolished by ramping the contrast of the stimulus on and off. Neither ramping, masking, nor stabilization should specifically disrupt a contour-binding scheme based on temporal synchrony, and we conclude that it is the transient component at the onset and the offset of these stimuli that is responsible for the reported advantage for asynchronous presentation.

  16. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour

    PubMed Central

    Roncato, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges. The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP). Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP). The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different gray shades. These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in is blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this “solution” by the visual system. PMID:25368570

  17. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour.

    PubMed

    Roncato, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges. The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP). Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP). The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different gray shades. These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in is blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this "solution" by the visual system.

  18. Contour interaction for foveal acuity targets at different luminances.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Harold E; Siderov, John; Waugh, Sarah J; Zemanová, Romana; Pluháček, František; Musilová, Lenka

    2013-08-30

    Single-letter visual acuity is impaired by nearby flanking stimuli, a phenomenon known as contour interaction. We showed previously that when foveal acuity is degraded by a reduction of letter contrast, both the magnitude and angular spatial extent of foveal contour interaction remain unchanged. In this study, we asked whether contour interaction also remains unchanged when foveal visual acuity is degraded by a reduction of the target's background luminance. Percent correct letter identification was measured for isolated, near-threshold black Sloan letters and for letters surrounded by 4 flanking bars in 10 normal observers, 5 at Anglia Ruskin University, UK (ARU) and 5 at Palacky University, Czech Republic (PU). A stepwise reduction in the background luminance over 3 log units resulted in an approximately threefold increase in the near-threshold letter size. At each background luminance, black flanking bars with a width equal to 1 letter stroke were presented at separations between approximately 0.45 and 4.5 min arc (ARU) or 0.32 and 3.2 min arc (PU). The results indicate that the angular extent of contour interaction remains unchanged at approximately 4 min arc at all background luminances. On the other hand, the magnitude of contour interaction decreases systematically as luminance is reduced, from approximately a 50% reduction to a 30% reduction in percent correct. The constant angular extent and decreasing magnitude of contour interaction with a reduction of background luminance suggest foveal contour interaction is mediated by luminance-dependent lateral inhibition within a fixed angular region.

  19. Horizontal Advection and Mixing of Pollutants in the Urban Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, S. P.; Entekhabi, D.; Britter, R.; Norford, L.; Fernando, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    Although urban air quality and its impacts on the public health have long been studied, the increasing urbanization is raising concerns on how to better control and mitigate these health impacts. A necessary element in predicting exposure levels is fundamental understanding of flow and dispersion in urban canyons. The complex topology of building structures and roads requires the resolution of turbulence phenomena within urban canyons. The use of dense and low porosity construction material can lead to rapid heating in response to direct solar exposure due to large thermal mass. Hence thermal and buoyancy effects may be as important as mechanically-forced or shear-induced flows. In this study, the transport of pollutants within the urban environment, as well as the thermal and advection effects, are investigated. The focus is on the horizontal transport or the advection effects within the urban environment. With increased urbanization and larger and more spread cities, concern about how the upstream air quality situation can affect downstream areas. The study also examines the release and the dispersion of hazardous material. Due to the variety and complexity of urban areas around the world, the urban environment is simplified into adjacent two-dimensional urban street canyons. Pollutants are released inside each canyon. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are applied to evaluate and quantify the flow rate out of each canyon and also the exchange of pollutants between the canyons. Imagine a row of ten adjacent urban street canyons of aspect ratio 1 with horizontal flow perpendicular to it as shown in the attached figure. C is the concentration of pollutants. The first digit indicates in what canyon the pollutant is released and the second digit indicates the location of that pollutant. For example, C3,4 is the concentration of pollutant released inside canyon 3 measured in canyon 4. The same amount of pollution is released inside the ten street canyons

  20. Normal Tissue Anatomy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Contouring Variability and Its Impact on Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Demiroz, Candan; Vineberg, Karen A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Balter, James M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the variability of organ at risk (OAR) delineation and the resulting impact on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 3 radiation oncologists jointly delineated OARs, including the parotid and submandibular glands (SM), pharyngeal constrictors (PC), larynx, and glottis (GL), in 10 patients with advanced oropharynx cancer in 3 contouring sessions, spaced at least 1 week apart. Contour variability and uncertainty, as well as their dosimetric impact on IMRT planning for each case, were assessed. Results: The mean difference in total volume for each OAR was 1 cm{sup 3} ({sigma} 0.5 cm{sup 3}). Mean fractional overlap was 0.7 ({sigma} 0.1) and was highest (0.8) for the larynx and bilateral SMs and parotids and lowest (0.5) for PC. There were considerable spatial differences in contours, with the ipsilateral parotid and PC displaying the most variability (0.9 cm), which was most prominent in cases in which tumors obliterated fat planes. Both SMs and GL had the smallest differences (0.5 cm). The mean difference in OAR dose was 0.9 Gy (range 0.6-1.1 Gy, {sigma} 0.1 Gy), with the smallest difference for GL and largest for both SMs and the larynx. Conclusions: Despite substantial difference in OAR contours, optimization was barely affected, with a 0.9-Gy mean difference between optimizations, suggesting relative insensitivity of dose distributions for IMRT of oropharynx cancer to the extent of OARs.

  1. A new template matching method based on contour information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huiying; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Qingxiao; Li, Sicong

    2014-11-01

    Template matching is a significant approach in machine vision due to its effectiveness and robustness. However, most of the template matching methods are so time consuming that they can't be used to many real time applications. The closed contour matching method is a popular kind of template matching methods. This paper presents a new closed contour template matching method which is suitable for two dimensional objects. Coarse-to-fine searching strategy is used to improve the matching efficiency and a partial computation elimination scheme is proposed to further speed up the searching process. The method consists of offline model construction and online matching. In the process of model construction, triples and distance image are obtained from the template image. A certain number of triples which are composed by three points are created from the contour information that is extracted from the template image. The rule to select the three points is that the template contour is divided equally into three parts by these points. The distance image is obtained here by distance transform. Each point on the distance image represents the nearest distance between current point and the points on the template contour. During the process of matching, triples of the searching image are created with the same rule as the triples of the model. Through the similarity that is invariant to rotation, translation and scaling between triangles, the triples corresponding to the triples of the model are found. Then we can obtain the initial RST (rotation, translation and scaling) parameters mapping the searching contour to the template contour. In order to speed up the searching process, the points on the searching contour are sampled to reduce the number of the triples. To verify the RST parameters, the searching contour is projected into the distance image, and the mean distance can be computed rapidly by simple operations of addition and multiplication. In the fine searching process

  2. Advection and evolution of river basins in mountain ranges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelltort, S.; Simpson, G.; Willett, S.

    2009-04-01

    Simpson (2006) have proposed a mechanism which involves (1) the idea that river networks in the lowland plains are incorporated in the orogen as it widens, and (2) that they do not change after their incorporation, thus "importing" a geometry acquired outside of the range independently of the tectonic and climatic influences acting inside the uplifting zone. This mechanisms implies rather a "static" view of river networks which serves as an alternative to models in which river networks continuously reorganize inside uplifting topography in such a way as to maintain a statistical geometry dictated solely by geomorphic processes. In the present work our approach to this problem is to measure and compare the form of river basins in the lowlands and in the uplands of the Himalayas, New-Zealand, Taiwan, the European Alps, the Pyrenees and the Apennines. We first present the method we employ to measure the shape of river basins and the data used. Second, we analyse and discuss our results which show a correlation between the shape of networks developed in the pro-lowlands of active orogens and their upland counterparts whereas such a correlation does not exist on the retro-side of the considered orogens. Our results thus support (1) the horizontal advection of river basins from the pro-lowlands to the pro-uplands, (2) a certain amount of reorganization by widening of basin boundaries, and (3) the existence of a different mechanism of drainage network evolution in the retro-side of the orogens. Castelltort, S., and Simpson, G., 2006, Basin Research, 18: 267-276. Hallet, B. and Molnar, P., 2001. J. Geophys. Res, 106: 13697-13709. Hovius, N., 1996, Basin Research, 8: 29-44.

  3. Integration of contour and surface information in shape detection.

    PubMed

    Machilsen, Bart; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    In studies of shape perception, the detection of contours and the segregation of regions enclosed by these contours have mostly been treated in isolation. However, contours and surfaces somehow need to be combined to create a stable perception of shape. In this study, we used a 2AFC task with arrays of oriented Gabor elements to determine whether and to what extent human observers integrate information from the contour and from the interior surface of a shape embedded in this array. The saliency of the shapes depended on the alignment of Gabors along the shape outline and on the isolinearity of Gabors inside the shape. In two experiments we measured detectability of shapes defined by the contour cue, by the surface cue, and by the combination of both cues. As a first step, we matched performance in the two single-cue conditions. We then compared shape detectability in the double-cue condition with the two equally detectable single-cue conditions. Our results show a clear double-cue benefit: Participants used both cues to detect the shapes. Next, we compared performance in the double-cue condition with the performance predicted by two models of sensory cue combination: a minimum rule (probability summation) and an integration rule (information summation). Results from Experiment 2 indicate that participants applied a combination rule that was better than mere probability summation. We found no evidence against the integration rule.

  4. Image analysis techniques for automated IVUS contour detection.

    PubMed

    Papadogiorgaki, Maria; Mezaris, Vasileios; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Giannoglou, George D; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis

    2008-09-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) constitutes a valuable technique for the diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis. The detection of lumen and media-adventitia borders in IVUS images represents a necessary step towards the reliable quantitative assessment of atherosclerosis. In this work, a fully automated technique for the detection of lumen and media-adventitia borders in IVUS images is presented. This comprises two different steps for contour initialization: one for each corresponding contour of interest and a procedure for the refinement of the detected contours. Intensity information, as well as the result of texture analysis, generated by means of a multilevel discrete wavelet frames decomposition, are used in two different techniques for contour initialization. For subsequently producing smooth contours, three techniques based on low-pass filtering and radial basis functions are introduced. The different combinations of the proposed methods are experimentally evaluated in large datasets of IVUS images derived from human coronary arteries. It is demonstrated that our proposed segmentation approaches can quickly and reliably perform automated segmentation of IVUS images.

  5. Contour Tracking with a Spatio-Temporal Intensity Moment.

    PubMed

    Demi, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    Standard edge detection operators such as the Laplacian of Gaussian and the gradient of Gaussian can be used to track contours in image sequences. When using edge operators, a contour, which is determined on a frame of the sequence, is simply used as a starting contour to locate the nearest contour on the subsequent frame. However, the strategy used to look for the nearest edge points may not work when tracking contours of non isolated gray level discontinuities. In these cases, strategies derived from the optical flow equation, which look for similar gray level distributions, appear to be more appropriate since these can work with a lower frame rate than that needed for strategies based on pure edge detection operators. However, an optical flow strategy tends to propagate the localization errors through the sequence and an additional edge detection procedure is essential to compensate for such a drawback. In this paper a spatio-temporal intensity moment is proposed which integrates the two basic functions of edge detection and tracking.

  6. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  7. Reading acquisition enhances an early visual process of contour integration.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Marcin; Ventura, Paulo; Querido, Luis; Cohen, Laurent; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of reading has an extensive impact on the developing brain and leads to enhanced abilities in phonological processing and visual letter perception. Could this expertise also extend to early visual abilities outside the reading domain? Here we studied the performance of illiterate, ex-illiterate and literate adults closely matched in age, socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, on a contour integration task known to depend on early visual processing. Stimuli consisted of a closed egg-shaped contour made of disconnected Gabor patches, within a background of randomly oriented Gabor stimuli. Subjects had to decide whether the egg was pointing left or right. Difficulty was varied by jittering the orientation of the Gabor patches forming the contour. Contour integration performance was lower in illiterates than in both ex-illiterate and literate controls. We argue that this difference in contour perception must reflect a genuine difference in visual function. According to this view, the intensive perceptual training that accompanies reading acquisition also improves early visual abilities, suggesting that the impact of literacy on the visual system is more widespread than originally proposed.

  8. A Vessel Active Contour Model for Vascular Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingli; Wang, Wei; Peng, Yu; Wang, Qingjun; Wu, Zhongke; Zhou, Mingquan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a vessel active contour model based on local intensity weighting and a vessel vector field. Firstly, the energy function we define is evaluated along the evolving curve instead of all image points, and the function value at each point on the curve is based on the interior and exterior weighted means in a local neighborhood of the point, which is good for dealing with the intensity inhomogeneity. Secondly, a vascular vector field derived from a vesselness measure is employed to guide the contour to evolve along the vessel central skeleton into thin and weak vessels. Thirdly, an automatic initialization method that makes the model converge rapidly is developed, and it avoids repeated trails in conventional local region active contour models. Finally, a speed-up strategy is implemented by labeling the steadily evolved points, and it avoids the repeated computation of these points in the subsequent iterations. Experiments using synthetic and real vessel images validate the proposed model. Comparisons with the localized active contour model, local binary fitting model, and vascular active contour model show that the proposed model is more accurate, efficient, and suitable for extraction of the vessel tree from different medical images. PMID:25101262

  9. Maps Using Hachure and Contour Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Two maps of Salem Neck, Massachusetts, are primary source materials from the National Archives which K-12 teachers can duplicate and use to teach map skills. Students learn how to read maps and how to use them as historical documents. (Author/RM)

  10. Laser contouring of Space Shuttle tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, P. J.; Minardi, A.; He, Mingli; Shelton, Bret

    Straight through and partial cuts were made in fibrous silicon-based ceramic insulation materials (used on the Space Shuttle) to determine the feasibility of laser machining. Experimental results were accumulated from over 800 exposures to determine the belt conditions for cutting. Laser intensity, feedrate, and other parameters were varied to determine conditions for cutting and are discussed in the paper.

  11. Constant contour integration in peripheral vision for stimuli with good Gestalt properties.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Shu-Guang; Yu, Cong

    2006-12-15

    The visual system integrates discrete but aligned local stimuli to form percept of global contours. Previous experiments using "snake" contours showed that contour integration was mainly present in foveal vision but absent or greatly weakened in peripheral vision. In this study, we demonstrated that, for contour stimuli such as circles and ellipses, which bore good Gestalt properties, contour integration for shape detection and discrimination was nearly constant from the fovea to up to 35 degrees visual periphery! Contour integration was impaired by local orientation and position jitters of contour elements, indicating that the same local contour linking mechanisms revealed with snake contour stimuli also played critical roles in integration of our good Gestalt stimuli. Contour integration was also unaffected by global position jittering up to 20% of the contour size and by dramatic shape jittering, which excluded non-contour integration processes such as detection of various local cues and template matching as alternative mechanisms for uncompromised peripheral perception of good Gestalt stimuli. Peripheral contour integration also presented an interesting upper-lower visual field symmetry after asymmetries of contrast sensitivity and shape discrimination were discounted. The constant peripheral performance might benefit from easy detection of good Gestalt stimuli, which popped out from background noise, from a boost of local contour linking by top-down influences and/or from multielement contour linking by long-range interactions.

  12. Aerial targets detection using improved ULPCNN combined with contour tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhenming; Jiang, Biao; Wang, Hongbing

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method for automatically segmenting and detecting targets in complex environment using the improved unit linking pulse coupled neural networks (ULPCNN) combining with contour tracking. On the one hand, the typical ULPCNN model is improved including linear modulate, linear attenuation of dynamic threshold and the attenuation parameter matrix Δ , which is more suitable for segmenting and detecting the target under complex environment. On the other hand, we determine the iteration times and obtain the optimal segmentation result using contour tracking based on maximum line contour point. In order to verify the efficiency, various simulations were conducted for different images acquired from real scenes. Experimental results show, as compared to the conventional approaches, the proposed method can overcome the drawbacks of PCNN and obtain the good results for segmenting and detecting targets against complex background.

  13. Method for measuring the contour of a machined part

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1995-05-30

    A method for measuring the contour of a machined part with a contour gage apparatus, having a probe assembly including a probe tip for providing a measure of linear displacement of the tip on the surface of the part. The contour gage apparatus may be moved into and out of position for measuring the part while the part is still carried on the machining apparatus. Relative positions between the part and the probe tip may be changed, and a scanning operation is performed on the machined part by sweeping the part with the probe tip, whereby data points representing linear positions of the probe tip at prescribed rotation intervals in the position changes between the part and the probe tip are recorded. The method further allows real-time adjustment of the apparatus machining the part, including real-time adjustment of the machining apparatus in response to wear of the tool that occurs during machining.

  14. Method for measuring the contour of a machined part

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1995-05-30

    A method is disclosed for measuring the contour of a machined part with a contour gage apparatus, having a probe assembly including a probe tip for providing a measure of linear displacement of the tip on the surface of the part. The contour gage apparatus may be moved into and out of position for measuring the part while the part is still carried on the machining apparatus. Relative positions between the part and the probe tip may be changed, and a scanning operation is performed on the machined part by sweeping the part with the probe tip, whereby data points representing linear positions of the probe tip at prescribed rotation intervals in the position changes between the part and the probe tip are recorded. The method further allows real-time adjustment of the apparatus machining the part, including real-time adjustment of the machining apparatus in response to wear of the tool that occurs during machining. 5 figs.

  15. The TICTOP nozzle: a new nozzle contouring concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Manuel; Makowka, Konrad; Aichner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Currently, mainly two types of nozzle contouring methods are applied in space propulsion: the truncated ideal contour (TIC) and the thrust-optimized parabola (TOP). This article presents a new nozzle contouring method called TICTOP, combining elements of TIC and TOP design. The resulting nozzle is shock-free as the TIC and therefore does not induce restricted shock separation leading to excessive side-loads. Simultaneously, the TICTOP nozzle will allow higher nozzle wall exit pressures and hence give a better separation margin than is the case for a TIC. Hence, this new nozzle type combines the good properties of TIC and TOP nozzles and eliminates their drawbacks. It is especially suited for first stage application in launchers where flow separation and side-loads are design drivers.

  16. An Investigation of Implicit Active Contours for Scientific Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K; Kamath, C

    2003-10-29

    The use of partial differential equations in image processing has become an active area of research in the last few years. In particular, active contours are being used for image segmentation, either explicitly as snakes, or implicitly through the level set approach. In this paper, we consider the use of the implicit active contour approach for segmenting scientific images of pollen grains obtained using a scanning electron microscope. Our goal is to better understand the pros and cons of these techniques and to compare them with the traditional approaches such as the Canny and SUSAN edge detectors. The preliminary results of our study show that the level set method is computationally expensive and requires the setting of several different parameters. However, it results in closed contours, which may be useful in separating objects from the background in an image.

  17. Automatic segmentation of leg bones by using active contours.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhee; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung; Lee, Deukhee

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new active contours model to segment human leg bones in computed tomography images that is based on a variable-weighted combination of local and global intensity. This model can split an object surrounded by both weak and strong boundaries, and also distinguish very adjacent objects with those boundaries. The ability of this model is required for segmentation in medical images, e.g., human leg bones, which are usually composed of highly inhomogeneous objects and where the distances among organs are very close. We developed an evolution equation of a level set function whose zero level set represents a contour. An initial contour is automatically obtained by applying a histogram based multiphase segmentation method. We experimented with computed tomography images from three patients, and demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in experimental results.

  18. Localized Patch-Based Fuzzy Active Contours for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huaxiang; Zhang, Liting; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel fuzzy region-based active contour model for image segmentation. By incorporating local patch-energy functional along each pixel of the evolving curve into the fuzziness of the energy, we construct a patch-based energy function without the regurgitation term. Its purpose is not only to make the active contour evolve very stably without the periodical initialization during the evolution but also to reduce the effect of noise. In particular, in order to reject local minimal of the energy functional, we utilize a direct method to calculate the energy alterations instead of solving the Euler-Lagrange equation of the underlying problem. Compared with other fuzzy active contour models, experimental results on synthetic and real images show the advantages of the proposed method in terms of computational efficiency and accuracy. PMID:28070210

  19. Neuronal oscillations form parietal/frontal networks during contour integration.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Marta; Plöchl, Michael; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The ability to integrate visual features into a global coherent percept that can be further categorized and manipulated are fundamental abilities of the neural system. While the processing of visual information involves activation of early visual cortices, the recruitment of parietal and frontal cortices has been shown to be crucial for perceptual processes. Yet is it not clear how both cortical and long-range oscillatory activity leads to the integration of visual features into a coherent percept. Here, we will investigate perceptual grouping through the analysis of a contour categorization task, where the local elements that form contour must be linked into a coherent structure, which is then further processed and manipulated to perform the categorization task. The contour formation in our visual stimulus is a dynamic process where, for the first time, visual perception of contours is disentangled from the onset of visual stimulation or from motor preparation, cognitive processes that until now have been behaviorally attached to perceptual processes. Our main finding is that, while local and long-range synchronization at several frequencies seem to be an ongoing phenomena, categorization of a contour could only be predicted through local oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal sources, which in turn, would synchronize at gamma (>30 Hz) frequency. Simultaneously, fronto-parietal beta (13-30 Hz) phase locking forms a network spanning across neural sources that are not category specific. Both long range networks, i.e., the gamma network that is category specific, and the beta network that is not category specific, are functionally distinct but spatially overlapping. Altogether, we show that a critical mechanism underlying contour categorization involves oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal cortices, as well as its synchronization across distal cortical sites.

  20. Determination of plate contours with a servo-scanning interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1981-05-01

    The history of Badoz's principle of linear detection of fringes having a potential precision of 5 x 10/sup -6/ orders and its applications to the measurement of birefringence, to ellipsometry, and to interferometry are given. The application of the principle to a servo-scanning interferometer (Twyman-Green configuration) for the calibration of the instrument, the analysis of the data, and the determination of the absolute contour of small plates is described. The problems of the interferometry and the determination of absolute contours, and the prospects for improving the precision from that attained, 1/70 fringe, to the very much greater potential of Badoz's principle are discussed.

  1. Luminance contours can gate afterimage colors and "real" colors.

    PubMed

    Anstis, Stuart; Vergeer, Mark; Van Lier, Rob

    2012-09-06

    It has long been known that colored images may elicit afterimages in complementary colors. We have already shown (Van Lier, Vergeer, & Anstis, 2009) that one and the same adapting image may result in different afterimage colors, depending on the test contours presented after the colored image. The color of the afterimage depends on two adapting colors, those both inside and outside the test. Here, we further explore this phenomenon and show that the color-contour interactions shown for afterimage colors also occur for "real" colors. We argue that similar mechanisms apply for both types of stimulation.

  2. Ideality contours and thermodynamic regularities in supercritical molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Margo, Abigail; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    Using Expanded Wang-Landau simulations, we calculate the ideality contours for 3 molecular fluids (SF6, CO2 and H2O). We analyze how the increase in polarity, and thus, in the strength of the intermolecular interactions, impacts the contours and thermodynamic regularities. This effect results in the increase in the Boyle and H parameters, that underlie the Zeno line and the curve of ideal enthalpy. Furthermore, a detailed analysis reveals that dipole-dipole interactions lead to much larger enthalpic contributions to the Gibbs free energy. This accounts for the much higher temperatures and pressures that are necessary for supercritical H2O to achieve ideal-like thermodynamic properties.

  3. SEM image contouring for OPC model calibration and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabery, Cyrus; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Page, Lorena; Bailey, George E.; Kusnadi, Ir; Do, Thuy

    2007-03-01

    Lithography models for leading-edge OPC and design verification must be calibrated with empirical data, and this data is traditionally collected as a one-dimensional quantification of the features acquired by a CD-SEM. Two-dimensional proximity features such as line-end, bar-to-bar, or bar-to-line are only partially characterized because of the difficulty in transferring the complete information of a SEM image into the OPC model building process. A new method of two-dimensional measurement uses the contouring of large numbers of SEM images acquired within the context of a design based metrology system to drive improvement in the quality of the final calibrated model. Hitachi High-Technologies has continued to develop "full automated EPE measurement and contouring function" based on design layout and detected edges of SEM image. This function can measure edge placement error everywhere in a SEM image and pass the result as a design layout (GDSII) into Mentor Graphics model calibration flow. Classification of the critical design elements using tagging scripts is used to weight the critical contours in the evaluation of model fitness. During process of placement of the detected SEM edges of into the coordinate system of the design, coordinate errors inevitably are introduced because of pattern matching errors. Also, line edge roughness in 2D features introduces noise that is large compared to the model building accuracy requirements of advanced technology nodes. This required the development of contour averaging algorithms. Contours from multiple SEM images are acquired of a feature and averaged before passing into the model calibration. This function has been incorporated into the prototype Calibre Workbench model calibration flow. Based on these methods, experimental data is presented detailing the model accuracy of a 45nm immersion lithography process using traditional 1D calibration only, and a hybrid model calibration using SEM image contours and 1D measurement

  4. Conservative restorations combined with gingival zenith contour technique.

    PubMed

    Rigolin Ferreira, Fernando José; Vasconcellos, Andréa Araújo; Miranda, Milton Edson; Santini, Eduardo; Bocabella, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The symmetry, shape, contour, and size of teeth play an important role in the esthetics of the anterior maxillary region of the mouth. However, abnormalities in symmetry and contour can considerably influence the esthetic parameters. Consequently, rehabilitation performed in this region can be challenging and, frequently, multidisciplinary treatment planning that includes esthetics, function, structure, and biologic aspects is paramount. The high demand for esthetic rehabilitations has, therefore, allowed the effective use of minimally invasive techniques to obtain results that mimic natural teeth. This article presents a case report in which both esthetic and functional rehabilitation were obtained by recontouring the gingival zenith followed by placing ultraconservative porcelain veneers.

  5. Contour detect in the medical image by shearlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadena, Luis; Espinosa, Nikolai; Cadena, Franklin; Rios, Ramiro; Simonov, Konstantin; Romanenko, Alexey

    2015-07-01

    Contour detect in the urology medical image. The investigation algorithm FFST revealed that the contours of objects can be obtained as the sum of the coefficients shearlet transform a fixed value for the last scale and the of all possible values of the shift parameter. The results of this task using a modified algorithm FFST for data processing urology image is show. In the results of the corresponding calculations for some images and a comparison with filters Sobel and Prewitt. Shows the relevant calculations for some images and a comparison with Sobel and Prewitt filters respectively.

  6. Computed Tomography Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Contouring in Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Trial and Preliminary Guidelines for Standardized Contours

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Dimopoulos, Johannes . E-mail: Johannes.dimopoulos@akhwien.at; Kirisits, Christian; Berger, Daniel; Poetter, Richard

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the contours and dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the tumor and organs at risk (OAR) with computed tomography (CT) vs. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cervical cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients underwent both MRI and CT after applicator insertion. The dose received by at least 90% of the volume (D{sub 90}), the minimal target dose (D{sub 100}), the volume treated to the prescription dose or greater for tumor for the high-risk (HR) and intermediate-risk (IR) clinical target volume (CTV) and the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for the OARs were evaluated. A standardized approach to contouring on CT (CT{sub Std}) was developed, implemented (HR- and IR-CTV{sub CTStd}), and compared with the MRI contours. Results: Tumor height, thickness, and total volume measurements, as determined by either CT or CT{sub Std} were not significantly different compared with the MRI volumes. In contrast, the width measurements differed in HR-CTV{sub CTStd} (p = 0.05) and IR-CTV{sub CTStd} (p = 0.01). For the HR-CTV{sub CTStd}, this resulted in statistically significant differences in the volume treated to the prescription dose or greater (MRI, 96% vs. CT{sub Std}, 86%, p = 0.01), D{sub 100} (MRI, 5.4 vs. CT{sub Std}, 3.4, p <0.01), and D{sub 90} (MRI, 8.7 vs. CT{sub Std}, 6.7, p <0.01). Correspondingly, the IR-CTV DVH values on MRI vs. CT{sub Std}, differed in the D{sub 100} (MRI, 3.0 vs. CT{sub Std}, 2.2, p = 0.01) and D{sub 90} (MRI, 5.6 vs. CT{sub Std}, 4.6, p = 0.02). The MRI and CT DVH values of the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for the OARs were similar. Conclusion: Computed tomography-based or MRI-based scans at brachytherapy are adequate for OAR DVH analysis. However, CT tumor contours can significantly overestimate the tumor width, resulting in significant differences in the D{sub 90}, D{sub 100}, and volume treated to the prescription dose or greater for the HR-CTV compared with that using

  7. Estimation of the advection effects induced by surface heterogeneities in the surface energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuxart, Joan; Wrenger, Burkhard; Martínez-Villagrasa, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius O.; Jiménez, Maria A.; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Hartogensis, Oscar; Dünnermann, Jens; Conangla, Laura; Garai, Anirban

    2016-07-01

    The effect of terrain heterogeneities in one-point measurements is a continuous subject of discussion. Here we focus on the order of magnitude of the advection term in the equation of the evolution of temperature as generated by documented terrain heterogeneities and we estimate its importance as a term in the surface energy budget (SEB), for which the turbulent fluxes are computed using the eddy-correlation method. The heterogeneities are estimated from satellite and model fields for scales near 1 km or broader, while the smaller scales are estimated through direct measurements with remotely piloted aircraft and thermal cameras and also by high-resolution modelling. The variability of the surface temperature fields is not found to decrease clearly with increasing resolution, and consequently the advection term becomes more important as the scales become finer. The advection term provides non-significant values to the SEB at scales larger than a few kilometres. In contrast, surface heterogeneities at the metre scale yield large values of the advection, which are probably only significant in the first centimetres above the ground. The motions that seem to contribute significantly to the advection term in the SEB equation in our case are roughly those around the hectometre scales.

  8. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics I: Lie dragging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper advected invariants and conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics are obtained using Lie dragging techniques. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. The gauge condition for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow is determined. Different variants of the helicity in ideal fluid dynamics and MHD including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity are investigated. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross-helicity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in the constant entropy surface, then the gas pressure can depend on both the entropy and the density. In these cases the conservation laws are local conservation laws. For non-barotropic gases, we obtain nonlocal conservation laws for fluid helicity and cross helicity by using Clebsch variables. These nonlocal conservation laws are the main new results of the paper. Ertel's theorem and potential vorticity, the Hollman invariant, and the Godbillon-Vey invariant for special flows for which the magnetic helicity is zero are also discussed.

  9. Solving the advection-diffusion equations in biological contexts using the cellular Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Mueller, Chris; Chen, Kun; Glazier, James A.

    2005-10-01

    The cellular Potts model (CPM) is a robust, cell-level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Both tissue physiology and morphogenesis depend on diffusion of chemical morphogens in the extra-cellular fluid or matrix (ECM). Standard diffusion solvers applied to the cellular potts model use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. However, these methods produce a diffusing field tied to the underlying lattice, which is inaccurate in many biological situations in which cell or ECM movement causes advection rapid compared to diffusion. Finite difference schemes suffer numerical instabilities solving the resulting advection-diffusion equations. To circumvent these problems we simulate advection diffusion within the framework of the CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalized fluid particles which detach advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid particles by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. Directed spin flips in the CPM handle the advective movement of the fluid particles. A constraint on relative velocities in the fluid explicitly accounts for fluid viscosity. We use the CPM to solve various diffusion examples including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources, and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation against analytical and established numerical solutions. We also verify the CPM results for Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Aris dispersion.

  10. Distinct effects of contour smoothness and observer bias on visual persistence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Strother, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Stable object perception relies on persistent yet temporary neural representations under constantly fluctuating stimulus conditions. The mechanisms by which such representations are formed and maintained are not fully understood but presumably involve interplay between early and higher tier visual cortical mechanisms. Some neurophysiological models of feature binding in early visual cortex predict persistent contour perception under certain stimulus conditions. Here we show that the duration of contour persistence reflects the persistent operation of visual mechanisms sensitive to contour smoothness, which also influences contour visibility more generally under highly camouflaging stimulus conditions. We distinguish the effect of contour smoothness on contour persistence from observer bias, which also contributes to the surprisingly long duration of contour persistence. We conclude that the strong modulatory effects of contour smoothness on persistence are due to the sustained reverberation of local and global contour-binding mechanisms in visual cortex, which form an important basis of perceptual continuity and stable object perception.

  11. Population responses to contour integration: early encoding of discrete elements and late perceptual grouping.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ariel; Meirovithz, Elhanan; Slovin, Hamutal

    2013-04-24

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying perceptual grouping of discrete, similarly oriented elements are not well understood. To investigate this, we measured neural population responses using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in V1 of monkeys trained on a contour-detection task. By mapping the contour and background elements onto V1, we could study their neural processing. Population response early in time showed activation patches corresponding to the contour/background individual elements. However, late increased activity in the contour elements, along with suppressed activity in the background elements, enabled us to visualize in single trials a salient continuous contour "popping out" from a suppressed background. This modulated activity in the contour and in background extended beyond the cortical representation of individual contour or background elements. Finally, the late modulation was correlated with behavioral performance of contour saliency and the monkeys' perceptual report. Thus, opposing responses in the contour and background may underlie perceptual grouping in V1.

  12. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. First-Order Hyperbolic System Method for Time-Dependent Advection-Diffusion Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    A time-dependent extension of the first-order hyperbolic system method for advection-diffusion problems is introduced. Diffusive/viscous terms are written and discretized as a hyperbolic system, which recovers the original equation in the steady state. The resulting scheme offers advantages over traditional schemes: a dramatic simplification in the discretization, high-order accuracy in the solution gradients, and orders-of-magnitude convergence acceleration. The hyperbolic advection-diffusion system is discretized by the second-order upwind residual-distribution scheme in a unified manner, and the system of implicit-residual-equations is solved by Newton's method over every physical time step. The numerical results are presented for linear and nonlinear advection-diffusion problems, demonstrating solutions and gradients produced to the same order of accuracy, with rapid convergence over each physical time step, typically less than five Newton iterations.

  14. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. The effect of diffusion and advection across the snow pores on the snow microstructure were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments and possible effects on natural snowpacks discussed. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective permeability. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Isothermal snow metamorphism is driven by sublimation deposition caused by the Kelvin effect and is the limiting factor independently of the transport regime in the pores.

  15. Variational optimization analysis of temperature and moisture advection in a severe storm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Horizontal wind components, potential temperature, and mixing ratio fields associated with a severe storm environment in the south central U.S. were analyzed from synoptic upper air observations with a nonhomogeneous, anisotropic weighting function. Each data field was filtered with variational optimization analysis techniques. Variational optimization analysis was also performed on the vertical motion field and was used to produce advective forecasts of the potential temperature and mixing ratio fields. Results show that the dry intrusion is characterized by warm air, the advection of which produces a well-defined upward motion pattern. A corresponding downward motion pattern comprising a deep vertical circulation in the warm air sector of the low pressure system was detected. The axes alignment of maximum dry and warm advection with the axis of the tornado-producing squall line also resulted.

  16. Small-scale particle advection, manipulation and mixing: beyond the hydrodynamic scale.

    PubMed

    Straube, Arthur V

    2011-05-11

    In this paper we discuss the problems of particle advection, manipulation and mixing at small scales. We start by considering reaction-advection-diffusion systems with the focus on mixing. We show how mixing advection affects the processes of reaction-diffusion and discuss mixing-induced instabilities. Further, we consider the problem of particle manipulation and discuss collective effects in systems comprising solid and compressible particles. We particularly discuss mechanisms of particle entrapment, the role of compressibility in the dynamics of bubbly liquids and nonequilibrium colloidal explosion. Finally, we address two issues related to the problem of wetting. First, we study the role of contact line motion for a sessile droplet (or a bubble) on an oscillating substrate. Second, we discuss an instability of a thin film leading to the formation of a fractal structure of droplets.

  17. Rapid Activation of Motor Responses by Illusory Contours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Schmidt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Whereas physiological studies indicate that illusory contours (ICs) are signaled in early visual areas at short latencies, behavioral studies are divided as to whether IC processing can proceed in a fast, automatic, bottom-up manner or whether it requires extensive top-down intracortical feedback or even awareness and cognition. Here, we employ a…

  18. Effects of Lexical Tone Contour on Mandarin Sentence Intelligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fei; Wong, Lena L. N.; Hu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of lexical tone contour on the intelligibility of Mandarin sentences in quiet and in noise. Method: A text-to-speech synthesis engine was used to synthesize Mandarin sentences with each word carrying the original lexical tone, flat tone, or a tone randomly selected from the 4 Mandarin lexical tones. The…

  19. Pulse-coupled neural networks for contour and motion matchings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Zhang, Liming

    2004-09-01

    Two neural networks based on temporal coding are proposed in this paper to perform contour and motion matchings. Both of the proposed networks are three-dimensional (3-D) pulse-coupled neural networks (PCNNs). They are composed of simplified Eckhorn neurons and mimic the structure of the primary visual cortex. The PCNN for contour matching can segment from the background the object with a particular contour, which has been stored as prior knowledge and controls the network activity in the form of spike series; The PCNN for motion matching not only detects the motion in the visual field, but also extracts the object moving in an arbitrarily specified direction. The basic idea of these two models is to encode information into the timing of spikes and later to decode this information through coincidence detectors and synapse delays to realize the knowledge-controlled object matchings. The simulation results demonstrate that the temporal coding and the decoding mechanisms are powerful enough to perform the contour and motion matchings.

  20. A general algorithm for the construction of contour plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Silva, F.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm is described that performs the task of drawing equal level contours on a plane, which requires interpolation in two dimensions based on data prescribed at points distributed irregularly over the plane. The approach is described in detail. The computer program that implements the algorithm is documented and listed.

  1. Applying manifold learning to plotting approximate contour trees.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigeo; Fujishiro, Issei; Okada, Masato

    2009-01-01

    A contour tree is a powerful tool for delineating the topological evolution of isosurfaces of a single-valued function, and thus has been frequently used as a means of extracting features from volumes and their time-varying behaviors. Several sophisticated algorithms have been proposed for constructing contour trees while they often complicate the software implementation especially for higher-dimensional cases such as time-varying volumes. This paper presents a simple yet effective approach to plotting in 3D space, approximate contour trees from a set of scattered samples embedded in the high-dimensional space. Our main idea is to take advantage of manifold learning so that we can elongate the distribution of high-dimensional data samples to embed it into a low-dimensional space while respecting its local proximity of sample points. The contribution of this paper lies in the introduction of new distance metrics to manifold learning, which allows us to reformulate existing algorithms as a variant of currently available dimensionality reduction scheme. Efficient reduction of data sizes together with segmentation capability is also developed to equip our approach with a coarse-to-fine analysis even for large-scale datasets. Examples are provided to demonstrate that our proposed scheme can successfully traverse the features of volumes and their temporal behaviors through the constructed contour trees.

  2. Principles of Contour Information: Reply to Lim and Leek (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Manish; Feldman, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Lim and Leek (2012) presented a formalization of information along object contours, which they argued was an alternative to the approach taken in our article (Feldman & Singh, 2005). Here, we summarize the 2 approaches, showing that--notwithstanding Lim and Leek's (2012) critical rhetoric--their approach is substantially identical to ours,…

  3. 22. NORTH BRANCH, PRAIRIE CITY DITCH, CONTOURING AROUND SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. NORTH BRANCH, PRAIRIE CITY DITCH, CONTOURING AROUND SIDE OF KNOLL. DITCH LIES BETWEEN OAK TREE AND POINTED ROCKS, AND EXITS PHOTOGRAPH AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  4. 8. RHODES DITCH: VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SHARP 'U' CONTOURED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. RHODES DITCH: VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SHARP 'U' CONTOURED ABOVE SWALE. DITCH IS ALSO VISIBLE IN DISTANCE, RUNNING HORIZONTALLY ACROSS PHOTO, ON FAR HILLSIDE. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  5. Two-dimensional flow patterns near contour grass hedges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grass hedges are narrow strips of stiff-stemmed vegetation used to control erosion and sediment delivery. When planted on the contour, the hydraulic resistance of the vegetation slows runoff, creates ponding, and promotes sediment deposition. In addition, when tillage is performed between grass he...

  6. Runoff through and upslope of contour switchgrass hedges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grass hedges are specialized vegetative buffers effective in trapping sediment but less is known about their ability to reduce and/or redirect runoff. Runoff and sediment yield from natural rainfall were measured during eight years from 0.1-ha contour-planted plots with and without 1-m wide switchgr...

  7. Are Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders Susceptible to Contour Illusions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Elizabeth; Scope, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism have been shown to be less susceptible to Kanisza type contour illusions than children without autism (Happe, 1996). Other authors have suggested that this finding could be explained by the fact that participants with autism were required to make a potentially ambiguous verbal response which may have masked whether or not they…

  8. Allograft selection for distal femur through cutting contour registration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Lihui; Niu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Allograft reconstruction is an acceptable procedure for the recovery of normal anatomy after the bone tumor resection. During the past few years, several automated methods have been proposed to select the best anatomically matching allograft from the virtual donor bone bank. The surface-based automated method uses the contralateral healthy bone to obtain the normal surface shape of the diseased bone, which could achieve good matching of the defect and the selected allograft. However, the surface-based method focuses on the matching of the whole bone so that the matching of the contact surface between the allograft and the recipient bone may not be optimal. To deal with the above problem, we propose a cutting contour based method for the allograft selection. Cutting contour from the recipient bone could reflect the structural information of the defect and is seldom influenced by tumor. Thus the cutting contour can be used as the matching template to find the optimal alignment of the recipient bone and the allograft. The proposed method is validated using the data of distal femurs where bone transplantation is commonly performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method generally outperforms the surface-based method within modest extra time. Overall, our contour-based method is an effective complementary technique for allograft selection in the virtual bone bank.

  9. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must... applicant for an FM broadcast station. (2) In connection with problems of coverage arising out...

  10. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must... applicant for an FM broadcast station. (2) In connection with problems of coverage arising out...

  11. Experimental Investigation of Convoluted Contouring for Aircraft Afterbody Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Hunter, Craig A.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic effects of external convolutions, placed on the boattail of a nonaxisymmetric nozzle for drag reduction. Boattail angles of 15 and 22 were tested with convolutions placed at a forward location upstream of the boattail curvature, at a mid location along the curvature and at a full location that spanned the entire boattail flap. Each of the baseline nozzle afterbodies (no convolutions) had a parabolic, converging contour with a parabolically decreasing corner radius. Data were obtained at several Mach numbers from static conditions to 1.2 for a range of nozzle pressure ratios and angles of attack. An oil paint flow visualization technique was used to qualitatively assess the effect of the convolutions. Results indicate that afterbody drag reduction by convoluted contouring is convolution location, Mach number, boattail angle, and NPR dependent. The forward convolution location was the most effective contouring geometry for drag reduction on the 22 afterbody, but was only effective for M < 0.95. At M = 0.8, drag was reduced 20 and 36 percent at NPRs of 5.4 and 7, respectively, but drag was increased 10 percent for M = 0.95 at NPR = 7. Convoluted contouring along the 15 boattail angle afterbody was not effective at reducing drag because the flow was minimally separated from the baseline afterbody, unlike the massive separation along the 22 boattail angle baseline afterbody.

  12. Simple computer method provides contours for radiological images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. D.; Keller, R. A.; Baily, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    Computer is provided with information concerning boundaries in total image. Gradient of each point in digitized image is calculated with aid of threshold technique; then there is invoked set of algorithms designed to reduce number of gradient elements and to retain only major ones for definition of contour.

  13. An Algorithm for Converting Contours to Elevation Grids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid-Green, Keith S.

    Some of the test questions for the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards deal with the site, including drainage, regrading, and the like. Some questions are most easily scored by examining contours, but others, such as water flow questions, are best scored from a grid in which each element is assigned its average elevation. This…

  14. Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rietzel, Eike Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

  15. Contour Enhancement Benefits Older Adults with Simulated Central Field Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Ramachandra, Chaithanya; Satgunam, PremNandhini; Mel, Bartlett W.; Peli, Eli; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among Americans over the age of 65. Currently, no effective treatment can reverse the central vision loss associated with most AMD. Digital image-processing techniques have been developed to improve image visibility for peripheral vision; however, both the selection and efficacy of such methods are limited. Progress has been difficult for two reasons: the exact nature of image enhancement that might benefit peripheral vision is not well understood, and efficient methods for testing such techniques have been elusive. The current study aims to develop both an effective image-enhancement technique for peripheral vision and an efficient means for validating the technique. Methods We used a novel contour detection algorithm to locate shape-defining edges in images based on natural-image statistics. We then enhanced the scene by locally boosting the luminance contrast along such contours. Using a gaze-contingent display, we simulated central visual field loss in normally-sighted young (ages 18–30) and older adults (ages 58–88). Visual search performance was measured as a function of contour enhancement strength ("Original" (unenhanced), "Medium", and "High"). For preference task, a separate group of subjects judged which image in a pair "would lead to better search performance". Results We found that while contour enhancement had no significant effect on search time and accuracy in young adults, Medium enhancement resulted in significantly shorter search time in older adults (~13% reduction relative to Original). Both age groups preferred images with Medium enhancement over Original (2 to 7 times). Furthermore, across age groups, image content types and enhancement strengths, there was a robust correlation between preference and performance. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a beneficial role of contour enhancement in peripheral vision for older adults. Our findings further suggest

  16. Large-eddy Advection in Evapotranspiration Estimates from an Array of Eddy Covariance Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Evett, S. R.; Gowda, P. H.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Aiken, R.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration was continuously measured by an array of eddy covariance systems and large weighting lysimeter in a sorghum in Bushland, Texas in 2014. The advective divergence from both horizontal and vertical directions were measured through profile measurements above canopy. All storage terms were integrated from the depth of soil heat flux plate to the height of eddy covariance measurement. Therefore, a comparison between the eddy covariance system and large weighing lysimeter was conducted on hourly and daily basis. The results for the discrepancy between eddy covariance towers and the lysimeter will be discussed in terms of advection and storage contributions in time domain and frequency domain.

  17. An extension of Prandtl-Batchelor theory and consequences for chaotic advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezic, Igor

    2002-09-01

    We extend the Prandtl-Batchelor theory of steady laminar motion at large Reynolds number to derive conditions that steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows have to satisfy. We combine these results with ergodic theory to show that flows with strong Beltrami property (e.g., ABC flows) cannot be a paradigm for chaotic advection in inertia-dominated boundary-driven three-dimensional flows. Our results indicate that viscous forces are responsible for chaotic advection in steady, three-dimensional boundary-driven Navier-Stokes flows at large Reynolds numbers.

  18. The impact of air mass advection on aerosol optical properties over Gotland (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdun, Agnieszka; Rozwadowska, Anna; Kratzer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, measurements of aerosol optical properties from the Gotland station of the AERONET network, combined with a two-stage cluster analysis of back trajectories of air masses moving over Gotland, were used to identify the main paths of air mass advection to the Baltic Sea and to relate them to aerosol optical properties, i.e. the aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength λ = 500 nm, AOT (500) and the Ångström exponent for the spectral range from 440 to 870 nm, α(440,870). One- to six-day long back trajectories ending at 300, 500 and 3000 m above the station were computed using the HYSPLIT model. The study shows that in the Gotland region, variability in aerosol optical thickness AOT(500) is more strongly related to advections in the boundary layer than to those in the free troposphere. The observed variability in AOT(500) was best explained by the advection speeds and directions given by clustering of 4-day backward trajectories of air arriving in the boundary layer at 500 m above the station. 17 clusters of 4-day trajectories arriving at altitude 500 m above the Gotland station (sea level) derived using two-stage cluster analysis differ from each other with respect to trajectory length, the speed of air mass movement and the direction of advection. They also show different cluster means of AOT(500) and α(440,870). The cluster mean AOT(500) ranges from 0.342 ± 0.012 for the continental clusters M2 (east-southeast advection with moderate speed) and 0.294 ± 0.025 for S5 (slow south-southeast advection) to 0.064 ± 0.002 and 0.069 ± 0.002 for the respective marine clusters L3 (fast west-northwest advection) and M3 (north-northwest advection with moderate speed). The cluster mean α(440,870) varies from 1.65-1.70 for the short-trajectory clusters to 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.06 ± 0.03 for the Arctic marine cluster L4 (fast inflow from the north) and marine cluster L5 (fast inflow from the west) respectively.

  19. SU-E-J-129: Atlas Development for Cardiac Automatic Contouring Using Multi-Atlas Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, R; Yang, J; Pan, T; Milgrom, S; Pinnix, C; Shi, A; Yang, J; Liu, Y; Nguyen, Q; Gomez, D; Dabaja, B; Balter, P; Court, L; Liao, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a set of atlases for automatic contouring of cardiac structures to determine heart radiation dose and the associated toxicity. Methods: Six thoracic cancer patients with both contrast and non-contrast CT images were acquired for this study. Eight radiation oncologists manually and independently delineated cardiac contours on the non-contrast CT by referring to the fused contrast CT and following the RTOG 1106 atlas contouring guideline. Fifteen regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated, including heart, four chambers, four coronary arteries, pulmonary artery and vein, inferior and superior vena cava, and ascending and descending aorta. Individual expert contours were fused using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm for each ROI and each patient. The fused contours became atlases for an in-house multi-atlas segmentation. Using leave-one-out test, we generated auto-segmented contours for each ROI and each patient. The auto-segmented contours were compared with the fused contours using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean surface distance (MSD). Results: Inter-observer variability was not obvious for heart, chambers, and aorta but was large for other structures that were not clearly distinguishable on CT image. The average DSC between individual expert contours and the fused contours were less than 50% for coronary arteries and pulmonary vein, and the average MSD were greater than 4.0 mm. The largest MSD of expert contours deviating from the fused contours was 2.5 cm. The mean DSC and MSD of auto-segmented contours were within one standard deviation of expert contouring variability except the right coronary artery. The coronary arteries, vena cava, and pulmonary vein had DSC<70% and MSD>3.0 mm. Conclusion: A set of cardiac atlases was created for cardiac automatic contouring, the accuracy of which was comparable to the variability in expert contouring. However, substantial modification may need

  20. Local and global components of texture-surround suppression of contour-shape coding.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Elena; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2012-06-15

    Evidence that contour-shapes and texture-shapes are processed by different mechanisms included the finding that contour-shape aftereffects are reduced when the adaptation stimulus is a texture made of contours rather than a single contour. This phenomenon has been termed texture-surround suppression of contour-shape, or TSSCS. How does TSSCS operate and over what spatial extent? We measured the postadaptation shift in the apparent shape frequency of a single sinusoidal-shaped contour as a function of the number of contours in the adaptor stimulus. Contours were Gabor strings in which the Gabor orientations were either tangential (snakes) or orthogonal (ladders) to the path of the contour. We found that for extended surrounds, the aftereffect was strongly reduced when the surround contours were the same as the central adaptor contour, but not when the Gabors making up the surround contours were opposite-in-orientation to those of the central adaptor. For near surrounds, the aftereffect in a snake contour was unaffected by same-orientation but strongly suppressed by opposite-orientation surrounds, whereas the aftereffect for a ladder-contour was suppressed equally by both same- and opposite-orientation near surrounds. Finally, the strength of surround suppression decreased gradually with increasing spatial separation between center and surround. These results indicate that there are two components to texture-surround suppression in our shape aftereffect: one that is sensitive to opposite-orientation texture surrounds, operates locally, and disrupts contour-processing; the other that is sensitive to same-orientation texture surrounds, is spatially extended, and prevents the shape of the contour from being processed as a contour. We also demonstrate that the observed shape aftereffects are not due to changes in the apparent shape-frequency of the adaptors or the precision with which their shape-frequency is encoded, indicating that TSSCS is not an instance of crowding.

  1. Recognizing the authenticity of emotional expressions: F0 contour matters when you need to know

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Matthis; Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Fischer, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Authenticity of vocal emotion expression affects emotion recognition and brain activity in the so-called Theory of Mind (ToM) network, which is implied in the ability to explain and predict behavior by attributing mental states to other individuals. Exploiting the variability of the fundamental frequency (F0 contour), which varies more (higher contour) in play-acted expressions than authentic ones, we examined whether contour biases explicit categorization toward a particular authenticity or emotion category. Moreover, we tested whether contour modulates blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response in the ToM network and explored the role of task as a top-down modulator. The effects of contour on BOLD signal were analyzed by contrasting high and low contour stimuli within two previous fMRI studies that implemented emotion and authenticity rating tasks. Participants preferentially categorized higher contour stimuli as play-acted and lower contour stimuli as sad. Higher contour was found to up-regulate activation task-independently in the primary auditory cortex. Stimulus contour and task were found to interact in a network including medial prefrontal cortex, with an increase in BOLD signal for low-contour stimuli during explicit perception of authenticity and an increase for high-contour stimuli during explicit perception of emotion. Contour-induced BOLD effects appear to be purely stimulus-driven in early auditory and intonation perception, while being strongly task-dependent in regions involved in higher cognition. PMID:24701202

  2. Recognizing the authenticity of emotional expressions: F0 contour matters when you need to know.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Matthis; Schubotz, Ricarda I; Fischer, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Authenticity of vocal emotion expression affects emotion recognition and brain activity in the so-called Theory of Mind (ToM) network, which is implied in the ability to explain and predict behavior by attributing mental states to other individuals. Exploiting the variability of the fundamental frequency (F0 contour), which varies more (higher contour) in play-acted expressions than authentic ones, we examined whether contour biases explicit categorization toward a particular authenticity or emotion category. Moreover, we tested whether contour modulates blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response in the ToM network and explored the role of task as a top-down modulator. The effects of contour on BOLD signal were analyzed by contrasting high and low contour stimuli within two previous fMRI studies that implemented emotion and authenticity rating tasks. Participants preferentially categorized higher contour stimuli as play-acted and lower contour stimuli as sad. Higher contour was found to up-regulate activation task-independently in the primary auditory cortex. Stimulus contour and task were found to interact in a network including medial prefrontal cortex, with an increase in BOLD signal for low-contour stimuli during explicit perception of authenticity and an increase for high-contour stimuli during explicit perception of emotion. Contour-induced BOLD effects appear to be purely stimulus-driven in early auditory and intonation perception, while being strongly task-dependent in regions involved in higher cognition.

  3. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame.

  4. Fast Contour-Tracing Algorithm Based on a Pixel-Following Method for Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jonghoon; Chae, Seungho; Shim, Jinwook; Kim, Dongchul; Cheong, Cheolho; Han, Tack-Don

    2016-03-09

    Contour pixels distinguish objects from the background. Tracing and extracting contour pixels are widely used for smart/wearable image sensor devices, because these are simple and useful for detecting objects. In this paper, we present a novel contour-tracing algorithm for fast and accurate contour following. The proposed algorithm classifies the type of contour pixel, based on its local pattern. Then, it traces the next contour using the previous pixel's type. Therefore, it can classify the type of contour pixels as a straight line, inner corner, outer corner and inner-outer corner, and it can extract pixels of a specific contour type. Moreover, it can trace contour pixels rapidly because it can determine the local minimal path using the contour case. In addition, the proposed algorithm is capable of the compressing data of contour pixels using the representative points and inner-outer corner points, and it can accurately restore the contour image from the data. To compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to that of conventional techniques, we measure their processing time and accuracy. In the experimental results, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared to the others. Furthermore, it can provide the compressed data of contour pixels and restore them accurately, including the inner-outer corner, which cannot be restored using conventional algorithms.

  5. An investigation into positron emission tomography contouring methods across two treatment planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Tony; Som, Seu; Sathiakumar, Chithradevi; Holloway, Lois

    2013-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to provide additional information regarding patient tumor location, size, and staging for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes. This additional information reduces interobserver variability and produces more consistent contouring. It is well recognized that different contouring methodology for PET data results in different contoured volumes. The goal of this study was to compare the difference in PET contouring methods for 2 different treatment planning systems using a phantom dataset and a series of patient datasets. Contouring methodology was compared on the ADAC Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and the CMS XiO Treatment Planning System. Contours were completed on the phantom and patient datasets using a number of PET contouring methods—the standardized uptake value 2.5 method, 30%, 40%, and 50% of the maximum uptake method and the signal to background ratio method. Differences of >15% were observed for PET-contoured volumes between the different treatment planning systems for the same data and the same PET contouring methodology. Contoured volume differences between treatment planning systems were caused by differences in data formatting and display and the different contouring tools available. Differences in treatment planning system as well as contouring methodology should be considered carefully in dose-volume contouring and reporting, especially between centers that may use different treatment planning systems or those that have several different treatment planning systems.

  6. Characterization of microstructures using contour tree connectivity for fluid flow analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan, Dogu Baran; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the connectivity of material microstructures is important for a wide range of applications from filters to biomaterials. Currently, the most used measure of connectivity is the Euler number, which is a topological invariant. Topology alone, however, is not sufficient for most practical purposes. In this study, we use our recently introduced connectivity measure, called the contour tree connectivity (CTC), to study microstructures for flow analysis. CTC is a new structural connectivity measure that is based on contour trees and algebraic graph theory. To test CTC, we generated a dataset composed of 120 samples and six different types of artificial microstructures. We compared CTC against the Euler parameter (EP), the parameter for connected pairs, the nominal opening dimension (dnom) and the permeabilities estimated using direct pore scale modelling. The results show that dnom is highly correlated with permeability (R2 = 0.91), but cannot separate the structural differences. The groups are best classified with feature combinations that include CTC. CTC provides new information with a different connectivity interpretation that can be used to analyse and design materials with complex microstructures. PMID:24671931

  7. Evaluation of a simulation procedure designed to recognize shape and contour of suspicious masses in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Siqueira, Paula N.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    A large number of breast phantoms have been developed for conducting quality tests, characterization of imaging systems and computer aided diagnosis schemes, dosimetry and image perception. The realism of these phantoms is important for ensuring the accuracy of results and a greater range of applications. In this work, a developed phantom is considered proposing the use of PVC films for simulation of nodules inserted in the breast parenchyma designed for classification between malignant and benign signals according to the BI-RADS® standard. The investigation includes analysis of radiographic density, mass shape and its corresponding contour outlined by experienced radiologists. The material was cut based on lesions margins found in 44 clinical cases, which were divided between circumscribed and spiculated structures. Tests were performed to check the ability of the specialists in distinguishing the contour compared to actual cases while the shapes accuracy was determined quantitatively by evaluation metrics. Results showed the applicability of the chosen material creating image radiological patterns very similar to the actual ones.

  8. WCPP-THE WOLF PLOTTING AND CONTOURING PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masaki, G. T.

    1994-01-01

    The WOLF Contouring and Plotting Package provides the user with a complete general purpose plotting and contouring capability. This package is a complete system for producing line printer, SC4020, Gerber, Calcomp, and SD4060 plots. The package has been designed to be highly flexible and easy to use. Any plot from a quick simple plot (which requires only one call to the package) to highly sophisticated plots (including motion picture plots) can be easily generated with only a basic knowledge of FORTRAN and the plot commands. Anyone designing a software system that requires plotted output will find that this package offers many advantages over the standard hardware support packages available. The WCPP package is divided into a plot segment and a contour segment. The plot segment can produce output for any combination of line printer, SC4020, Gerber, Calcomp, and SD4060 plots. The line printer plots allow the user to have plots available immediately after a job is run at a low cost. Although the resolution of line printer plots is low, the quick results allows the user to judge if a high resolution plot of a particular run is desirable. The SC4020 and SD4060 provide high speed high resolution cathode ray plots with film and hard copy output available. The Gerber and Calcomp plotters provide very high quality (of publishable quality) plots of good resolution. Being bed or drum type plotters, the Gerber and Calcomp plotters are usually slow and not suited for large volume plotting. All output for any or all of the plotters can be produced simultaneously. The types of plots supported are: linear, semi-log, log-log, polar, tabular data using the FORTRAN WRITE statement, 3-D perspective linear, and affine transformations. The labeling facility provides for horizontal labels, vertical labels, diagonal labels, vector characters of a requested size (special character fonts are easily implemented), and rotated letters. The gridding routines label the grid lines according to

  9. Perceptual representation and effectiveness of local figure–ground cues in natural contours

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Ko; Matsuoka, Shouhei; Kurematsu, Ken; Hatori, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A contour shape strongly influences the perceptual segregation of a figure from the ground. We investigated the contribution of local contour shape to figure–ground segregation. Although previous studies have reported local contour features that evoke figure–ground perception, they were often image features and not necessarily perceptual features. First, we examined whether contour features, specifically, convexity, closure, and symmetry, underlie the perceptual representation of natural contour shapes. We performed similarity tests between local contours, and examined the contribution of the contour features to the perceptual similarities between the contours. The local contours were sampled from natural contours so that their distribution was uniform in the space composed of the three contour features. This sampling ensured the equal appearance frequency of the factors and a wide variety of contour shapes including those comprised of contradictory factors that induce figure in the opposite directions. This sampling from natural contours is advantageous in order to randomly pickup a variety of contours that satisfy a wide range of cue combinations. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that the combinations of convexity, closure, and symmetry contribute to perceptual similarity, thus they are perceptual quantities. Second, we examined whether the three features contribute to local figure–ground perception. We performed psychophysical experiments to judge the direction of the figure along the local contours, and examined the contribution of the features to the figure–ground judgment. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that closure was a significant factor, but that convexity and symmetry were not. These results indicate that closure is dominant in the local figure–ground perception with natural contours when the other cues coexist with equal probability including contradictory cases. PMID:26579057

  10. Contour integration and aging: the effects of element spacing, orientation alignment and stimulus duration.

    PubMed

    Roudaia, Eugenie; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2013-01-01

    The ability to extract contours in cluttered visual scenes, which is a crucial step in visual processing, declines with healthy aging, but the reasons for this decline are not well understood. In three experiments, we examined how the effect of aging on contour discrimination varies as a function of contour and distracter inter-element spacing, collinearity, and stimulus duration. Spiral-shaped contours composed of Gabors were embedded within a field of distracter Gabors of uniform density. In a four alternative forced-choice task, younger and older subjects were required to report the global orientation of the contour. In Experiment 1, the absolute contour element spacing varied from two to eight times the Gabor wavelength and contour element collinearity was disrupted with five levels of orientation jitter. Contour discrimination accuracy was lower in older subjects, but the effect of aging did not vary with contour spacing or orientation jitter. Experiment 2 found that decreasing stimulus durations from 0.8 to 0.04 s had a greater effect on older subjects' performance, but only for less salient contours. Experiment 3 examined the effect of the background on contour discrimination by varying the spacing and orientation of the distracter elements for contours with small and large absolute spacing. As in Experiment, the effect of aging did not vary with absolute contour spacing. Decreasing the distracter spacing, however, had a greater detrimental effect on accuracy in older subjects compared to younger subjects. Finally, both groups showed equally high accuracy when all distracters were iso-oriented. In sum, these findings suggest that aging does not affect the sensitivity of contour integration to proximity or collinearity. However, contour integration in older adults is slower and is especially vulnerable when distracters are denser than contour elements.

  11. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  12. Alteration of chaotic advection in blood flow around partial blockage zone: Role of hematocrit concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Soumyabrata; Chaudhury, Kaustav; DasGupta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Spatial distributions of particles carried by blood exhibit complex filamentary pattern under the combined effects of geometrical irregularities of the blood vessels and pulsating pumping by the heart. This signifies the existence of so called chaotic advection. In the present article, we argue that the understanding of such pathologically triggered chaotic advection is incomplete without giving due consideration to a major constituent of blood: abundant presence of red blood cells quantified by the hematocrit (HCT) concentration. We show that the hematocrit concentration in blood cells can alter the filamentary structures of the spatial distribution of advected particles in an intriguing manner. Our results reveal that there primarily are two major impacts of HCT concentrations towards dictating the chaotic dynamics of blood flow: changing the zone of influence of chaotic mixing and determining the enhancement of residence time of the advected particles away from the wall. This, in turn, may alter the extent of activation of platelets or other reactive biological entities, bearing immense consequence towards dictating the biophysical mechanisms behind possible life-threatening diseases originating in the circulatory system.

  13. Wind tunnel measurement of turbulent and advective scalar fluxes: a case study on intersection ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux.

  14. MECHANISM OF OUTFLOWS IN ACCRETION SYSTEM: ADVECTIVE COOLING CANNOT BALANCE VISCOUS HEATING?

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-20

    Based on the no-outflow assumption, we investigate steady-state, axisymmetric, optically thin accretion flows in spherical coordinates. By comparing the vertically integrated advective cooling rate with the viscous heating rate, we find that the former is generally less than 30% of the latter, which indicates that the advective cooling itself cannot balance the viscous heating. As a consequence, for radiatively inefficient flows with low accretion rates such as M-dot ≲10{sup −3} M-dot {sub Edd}, where M-dot {sub Edd} is the Eddington accretion rate, the viscous heating rate will be larger than the sum of the advective cooling rate and the radiative cooling one. Thus, no thermal equilibrium can be established under the no-outflow assumption. We therefore argue that in such cases outflows ought to occur and take away more than 70% of the thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation. Similarly, for optically thick flows with extremely large accretion rates such as M-dot ≳10 M-dot {sub Edd}, outflows should also occur owing to the limited advection and the low efficiency of radiative cooling. Our results may help to understand the mechanism of outflows found in observations and numerical simulations.

  15. Satellite-advection based solar forecasting: lessons learned and progress towards probabalistic solar forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using satellite observations from GOES-E and GOES-W platforms in concert with GFS-derived cloud-level winds and a standalone radiative transfer model, an advection-derived forecast for surface GHI over the continental United States, with intercomparison between forecasts for four zones over the CONUS and Central Pacific with SURFRAD results. Primary sources for error in advection-based forecasts, primarily driven by false- or mistimed ramp events are discussed, with identification of error sources quantified along with techniques used to improve advection-based forecasts to approximately 10% MAE for designated surface locations. Development of a blended steering wind product utilizing NWP output combined with satellite-derived winds from AMV techniques to improve 0-1 hour advection forecasts will be discussed. Additionally, the use of two years' of solar forecast observations in the development of a prototype probablistic forecast for ramp events will be shown, with the intent of increasing the use of satellite-derived forecasts for grid operators and optimizing integration of renewable resources into the power grid. Elements of the work were developed under the 'Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting' project spearheaded by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  16. An enriched finite element method to fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shengzhi; Lian, Yanping; Ying, Yuping; Tang, Shaoqiang; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an enriched finite element method with fractional basis [ 1,x^{α }] for spatial fractional partial differential equations is proposed to obtain more stable and accurate numerical solutions. For pure fractional diffusion equation without advection, the enriched Galerkin finite element method formulation is demonstrated to simulate the exact solution successfully without any numerical oscillation, which is advantageous compared to the traditional Galerkin finite element method with integer basis [ 1,x] . For fractional advection-diffusion equation, the oscillatory behavior becomes complex due to the introduction of the advection term which can be characterized by a fractional element Peclet number. For the purpose of addressing the more complex numerical oscillation, an enriched Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is developed by using a dimensionless fractional stabilization parameter, which is formulated through a minimization of the residual of the nodal solution. The effectiveness and accuracy of the enriched finite element method are demonstrated by a series of numerical examples of fractional diffusion equation and fractional advection-diffusion equation, including both one-dimensional and two-dimensional, steady-state and time-dependent cases.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  18. A global spectral element model for poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Huan; Wang, Faming; Zeng, Zhong; Qiu, Zhouhua; Yin, Linmao; Li, Liang

    2016-03-01

    A global spherical Fourier-Legendre spectral element method is proposed to solve Poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere. In the meridional direction, Legendre polynomials are used and the region is divided into several elements. In order to avoid coordinate singularities at the north and south poles in the meridional direction, Legendre-Gauss-Radau points are chosen at the elements involving the two poles. Fourier polynomials are applied in the zonal direction for its periodicity, with only one element. Then, the partial differential equations are solved on the longitude-latitude meshes without coordinate transformation between spherical and Cartesian coordinates. For verification of the proposed method, a few Poisson equations and advective flows are tested. Firstly, the method is found to be valid for test cases with smooth solution. The results of the Poisson equations demonstrate that the present method exhibits high accuracy and exponential convergence. Highprecision solutions are also obtained with near negligible numerical diffusion during the time evolution for advective flow with smooth shape. Secondly, the results of advective flow with non-smooth shape and deformational flow are also shown to be reasonable and effective. As a result, the present method is proved to be capable of solving flow through different types of elements, and thereby a desirable method with reliability and high accuracy for solving partial differential equations over a sphere.

  19. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux. PMID:22649290

  20. A Study of the Physical Processes of an Advection Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duan Yang; Yan, Wen Lian; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei Juan; Niu, Sheng Jie; Li, Zi Hua

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of advection fog appeared in the Yangtze River delta region between 1 and 2 December 2009. Here, we detail the fog formation and dissipation processes and the background weather conditions. The fog boundary layer and its formation and dissipation mechanisms have also been analyzed using field data recorded in a northern suburb of Nanjing. The results showed the following: (1) This advection fog was generated by interaction between advection of a north-east cold ground layer and a south-east warm upper layer. The double-inversion structure generated by this interaction between the cold and warm advections and steady south-east vapour transport was the main cause of this long-lasting fog. The double-inversion structure provided good thermal conditions for the thick fog, and the south-east vapour transport was not only conducive to maintaining the thickness of the fog but also sustained its long duration. (2) The fog-top altitude was over 600 m for most of the time, and the fog reduced visibility to less than 100 m for approximately 12 h. (3) The low-level jet near the lower inversion layer also played a role in maintaining the thick fog system by promoting heat, momentum and south-east vapour transport.

  1. The connection of standard thin disk with advection-dominated accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-qing; Lu, Ju-fu; G. U., Wei-min

    2005-04-01

    Using the standard Runge-Kutta method, a global solution of the basic equations describing black hole accretion flows is derived. It is proved that transition from a standard thin disk to an advection-dominated accretion flow is realizable in case of high viscosity, without introducing any additional mechanism of energy transfer or specifying any ad hoc outer boundary condition.

  2. 47 CFR 73.6010 - Class A TV station protected contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV station protected contour. 73.6010... contour. (a) A Class A TV station will be protected from interference within the following predicted signal contours: (1) 62 dBu for stations on Channels 2 through 6; (2) 68 dBu for stations on Channels...

  3. 47 CFR 73.6010 - Class A TV station protected contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class A TV station protected contour. 73.6010... contour. (a) A Class A TV station will be protected from interference within the following predicted signal contours: (1) 62 dBu for stations on Channels 2 through 6; (2) 68 dBu for stations on Channels...

  4. 47 CFR 73.6010 - Class A TV station protected contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class A TV station protected contour. 73.6010... contour. (a) A Class A TV station will be protected from interference within the following predicted signal contours: (1) 62 dBu for stations on Channels 2 through 6; (2) 68 dBu for stations on Channels...

  5. Inter-element orientation and distance influence the duration of persistent contour integration.

    PubMed

    Strother, Lars; Alferov, Danila

    2014-01-01

    Contour integration is a fundamental form of perceptual organization. We introduce a new method of studying the mechanisms responsible for contour integration. This method capitalizes on the perceptual persistence of contours under conditions of impending camouflage. Observers viewed arrays of randomly arranged line segments upon which circular contours comprised of similar line segments were superimposed via abrupt onset. Crucially, these contours remained visible for up to a few seconds following onset, but eventually disappeared due to the camouflaging effects of surrounding background line segments. Our main finding was that the duration of contour visibility depended on the distance and degree of co-alignment between adjacent contour segments such that relatively dense smooth contours persisted longest. The stimulus-related effects reported here parallel similar results from contour detection studies, and complement previous reported top-down influences on contour persistence (Strother et al., 2011). We propose that persistent contour visibility reflects the sustained activity of recurrent processing loops within and between visual cortical areas involved in contour integration and other important stages of visual object recognition.

  6. 47 CFR 73.215 - Contour protection for short-spaced assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contour protection for short-spaced assignments... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.215 Contour protection for short-spaced... of § 73.207); Provided That, such applications propose contour protection, as defined in paragraph...

  7. 47 CFR 73.6010 - Class A TV station protected contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class A TV station protected contour. 73.6010... contour. (a) A Class A TV station will be protected from interference within the following predicted signal contours: (1) 62 dBu for stations on Channels 2 through 6; (2) 68 dBu for stations on Channels...

  8. 47 CFR 73.6010 - Class A TV station protected contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class A TV station protected contour. 73.6010... contour. (a) A Class A TV station will be protected from interference within the following predicted signal contours: (1) 62 dBu for stations on Channels 2 through 6; (2) 68 dBu for stations on Channels...

  9. 47 CFR 73.215 - Contour protection for short-spaced assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contour protection for short-spaced assignments... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.215 Contour protection for short-spaced... of § 73.207); Provided That, such applications propose contour protection, as defined in paragraph...

  10. Enhancing OPC model stability and predictability using SEM image contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Mohamed Serag El-Din

    2008-10-01

    The process model is a major factor affecting the quality of the Model Based Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). Better process model directly leads to better OPC, hence better yield and more profit. While the traditional way in calibrating these process models is using CD measurements at sample locations in the test chip, however, the use of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image contours for process model calibration and optimization has been recently introduced in trial to build more predictable models. In this study, we characterize the traditional flow models versus the contour calibrated models and study the effect of using different combinations and weighting schemes on the quality of the resulting process models, its stability and its ability to correctly predict the process.

  11. BABEL - A method for digitization and restoration of contour maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Gernot

    1995-03-01

    We have developed BABEL as a method for digitization and restoration of contour maps. The results of the comparison between restoration and template are encouraging and first applications are proving very useful. The restoration method is now quite flexible and fast. The result is available as a standard fits file, so that the restored map can be transferred into various coordinate systems and projections and can be used for further digital processing, e.g. for comparison of older radio data with new infrared or X-ray data. So far we have digitized various HI line and 11.1 cm continuum contour maps, for which we know that the original digital data were lost or did never exist in a machine readable format.

  12. Generation algorithm of craniofacial structure contour in cephalometric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Jain, Ashish; Sardana, H. K.

    2010-02-01

    Anatomical structure tracing on cephalograms is a significant way to obtain cephalometric analysis. Computerized cephalometric analysis involves both manual and automatic approaches. The manual approach is limited in accuracy and repeatability. In this paper we have attempted to develop and test a novel method for automatic localization of craniofacial structure based on the detected edges on the region of interest. According to the grey scale feature at the different region of the cephalometric images, an algorithm for obtaining tissue contour is put forward. Using edge detection with specific threshold an improved bidirectional contour tracing approach is proposed by an interactive selection of the starting edge pixels, the tracking process searches repetitively for an edge pixel at the neighborhood of previously searched edge pixel to segment images, and then craniofacial structures are obtained. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated by the preliminary experimental results obtained with the proposed method.

  13. Skeleton pruning by contour partitioning with discrete curve evolution.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan; Liu, Wen-Yu

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new skeleton pruning method based on contour partitioning. Any contour partition can be used, but the partitions obtained by Discrete Curve Evolution (DCE) yield excellent results. The theoretical properties and the experiments presented demonstrate that obtained skeletons are in accord with human visual perception and stable, even in the presence of significant noise and shape variations, and have the same topology as the original skeletons. In particular, we have proven that the proposed approach never produces spurious branches, which are common when using the known skeleton pruning methods. Moreover, the proposed pruning method does not displace the skeleton points. Consequently, all skeleton points are centers of maximal disks. Again, many existing methods displace skeleton points in order to produces pruned skeletons.

  14. Automatic exudate detection using active contour model and regionwise classification.

    PubMed

    Harangi, B; Lazar, I; Hajdu, A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one the most common cause of blindness in the world. Exudates are among the early signs of this disease, so its proper detection is a very important task to prevent consequent effects. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for exudate detection. First, we identify possible regions containing exudates using grayscale morphology. Then, we apply an active contour based method to minimize the Chan-Vese energy to extract accurate borders of the candidates. To remove those false candidates that have sufficient strong borders to pass the active contour method we use a regionwise classifier. Hence, we extract several shape features for each candidate and let a boosted Naïve Bayes classifier eliminate the false candidates. We considered the publicly available DiaretDB1 color fundus image set for testing, where the proposed method outperformed several state-of-the-art exudate detectors.

  15. Diffusion tensor driven contour closing for cell microinjection targeting.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a novel approach to robust automatic detection of unstained living cells in bright-field (BF) microscope images with the goal of producing a target list for an automated microinjection system. The overall image analysis process is described and includes: preprocessing, ridge enhancement, image segmentation, shape analysis and injection point definition. The developed algorithm implements a new version of anisotropic contour completion (ACC) based on the partial differential equation (PDE) for heat diffusion which improves the cell segmentation process by elongating the edges only along their tangent direction. The developed ACC algorithm is equivalent to a dilation of the binary edge image with a continuous elliptic structural element that takes into account local orientation of the contours preventing extension towards normal direction. Experiments carried out on real images of 10 to 50 microm CHO-K1 adherent cells show a remarkable reliability in the algorithm along with up to 85% success for cell detection and injection point definition.

  16. Modeling the advection of discontinuous quantities in Geophysical flows using Particle Level Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V.; Samuel, H.; Evonuk, M.

    2010-12-01

    Advection is one of the major processes that commonly acts on various scales in nature (core formation, mantle convective stirring, multi-phase flows in magma chambers, salt diapirism ...). While this process can be modeled numerically by solving conservation equations, various geodynamic scenarios involve advection of quantities with sharp discontinuities. Unfortunately, in these cases modeling numerically pure advection becomes very challenging, in particular because sharp discontinuities lead to numerical instabilities, which prevent the local use of high order numerical schemes. Several approaches have been used in computational geodynamics in order to overcome this difficulty, with variable amounts of success. Despite the use of correcting filters or non-oscillatory, shock-preserving schemes, Eulerian (fixed grid) techniques generally suffer from artificial numerical diffusion. Lagrangian approaches (dynamic grids or particles) tend to be more popular in computational geodynamics because they are not prone to excessive numerical diffusion. However, these approaches are generally computationally expensive, especially in 3D, and can suffer from spurious statistical noise. As an alternative to these aforementioned approaches, we have applied a relatively recent Particle Level set method [Enright et al., 2002] for modeling advection of quantities with the presence of sharp discontinuities. We have tested this improved method, which combines the best of Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, against well known benchmarks and classical Geodynamic flows. In each case the Particle Level Set method accuracy equals or is better than other Eulerian and Lagrangian methods, and leads to significantly smaller computational cost, in particular in three-dimensional flows, where the reduction of computational time for modeling advection processes is most needed.

  17. Fast and accurate advection of sharp discontinuities in Geophysical flows using hybrid implicit surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Henri

    2010-05-01

    Advection is one of the major processes that commonly acts on various scales in nature (core formation, mantle convective stirring, multi-phase flows in magma chambers, salt diapirism ...). While this process can be modeled numerically by solving conservation equations, various geodynamic scenarios involve advection of quantities with sharp discontinuities. Unfortunately, in these cases modeling numerically pure advection becomes very challenging, in particular because sharp discontinuities lead to numerical instabilities, which prevent the local use of high order numerical schemes. Several approaches have been used in computational geodynamics in order to overcome this difficulty, with variable amounts of success. Despite the use of correcting filters or non-oscillatory, shock-preserving schemes, Eulerian (fixed grid) techniques generally suffer from artificial numerical diffusion. Lagrangian approaches (dynamic grids or particles) tend to be more popular in computational geodynamics because they are not prone to excessive numerical diffusion. However, these approaches are generally computationally expensive, especially in 3D, and can suffer from spurious statistical noise. As an alternative to these aforementioned approaches, I have applied a relatively recent Particle Level set method [Enright et al., 2002] for modeling advection of quantities with the presence of sharp discontinuities. I have adapted this improved method, which combines the best of Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, and I have tested it against well known benchmarks and classical Geodynamic flows. In each case the Particle Level Set method accuracy equals or is better than other Eulerian and Lagrangian methods, and leads to significantly smaller computational cost, in particular in three-dimensional flows, where the reduction of computational time for modeling advection processes is most needed.

  18. High-resolution stochastic downscaling of climate models: simulating wind advection, cloud cover and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    A new stochastic approach to generate wind advection, cloud cover and precipitation fields is presented with the aim of formulating a space-time weather generator characterized by fields with high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g., 1 km x 1 km and 5 min). Its use is suitable for stochastic downscaling of climate scenarios in the context of hydrological, ecological and geomorphological applications. The approach is based on concepts from the Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.), the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation model (STREAP) introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), and the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator (HiReS-WG) presented by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.). Advection fields are generated on the basis of the 500 hPa u and v wind direction variables derived from global or regional climate models. The advection velocity and direction are parameterized using Kappa and von Mises distributions respectively. A random Gaussian fields is generated using a fast Fourier transform to preserve the spatial correlation of advection. The cloud cover area, total precipitation area and mean advection of the field are coupled using a multi-autoregressive model. The approach is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and, in the context of climate change, allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climate in a fast and efficient way. A preliminary test of the approach is presented with reference to a case study in a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  19. Advective removal of intraparticle uranium from contaminated vadose zone sediments, Hanford, U.S.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, Dean A; Zachara, John M

    2008-03-01

    A column study on U(VI)-contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford Site, WA, was performed to investigate U(VI) release kinetics with water advection and variable geochemical conditions. The sediments were collected from an area adjacent to and below tank BX-102 that was contaminated as a result of a radioactive tank waste overfill event. The primary reservoir for U(VI) in the sediments are micrometer-size precipitates composed of nanocrystallite aggregates of a Na-U-Silicate phase, most likely Na-boltwoodite, that nucleated and grew within microfractures of the plagioclase component of sand-sized granitic clasts. Two sediment samples, with different U(VI) concentrations and intraparticle mass transfer properties, were leached with advective flows of three different solutions. The influent solutions were all calcite-saturated and in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. One solution was prepared from DI water, the second was a synthetic groundwater (SGW) with elevated Na that mimicked groundwater at the Hanford site, and the third was the same SGW but with both elevated Na and Si. The latter two solutions were employed, in part, to test the effect of saturation state on U(VI) release. For both sediments, and all three electrolytes, there was an initial rapid release of U(VI) to the advecting solution followed by slower near steady-state release. U(VI)aq concentrations increased during subsequent stop-flow events. The electrolytes with elevated Na and Si depressed U(VL)aq concentrations in effluent solutions. Effluent U(VI)aq concentrations for both sediments and all three electrolytes were simulated reasonably well by a three domain model (the advecting fluid, fractures, and matrix) that coupled U(VI) dissolution, intraparticle U(VI)aq diffusion, and interparticle advection, where diffusion and dissolution properties were parameterized in a previous batch study.

  20. Quantification of numerical diffusivity due to TVD schemes in the advection equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidadi, Shreyas; Rani, Sarma L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the numerical diffusivity νnum inherent to the Roe-MUSCL scheme has been quantified for the scalar advection equation. The Roe-MUSCL scheme employed is a combination of: (1) the standard extension of the original Roe's formulation to the advection equation, and (2) van Leer's Monotone Upwind Scheme for Conservation Laws (MUSCL) technique that applies a linear variable reconstruction in a cell along with a scaled limiter function. An explicit expression is derived for the numerical diffusivity in terms of the limiter function, the distance between the cell centers on either side of a face, and the face-normal velocity. The numerical diffusivity formulation shows that a scaled limiter function is more appropriate for MUSCL in order to consistently recover the central-differenced flux at the maximum value of the limiter. The significance of the scaling factor is revealed when the Roe-MUSCL scheme, originally developed for 1-D scenarios, is applied to 2-D scalar advection problems. It is seen that without the scaling factor, the MUSCL scheme may not necessarily be monotonic in multi-dimensional scenarios. Numerical diffusivities of the minmod, superbee, van Leer and Barth-Jesperson TVD limiters were quantified for four problems: 1-D advection of a step function profile, and 2-D advection of step, sinusoidal, and double-step profiles. For all the cases, it is shown that the superbee scheme provides the lowest numerical diffusivity that is also most confined to the vicinity of the discontinuity. The minmod scheme is the most diffusive, as well as active in regions away from high gradients. As expected, the grid resolution study demonstrates that the magnitude and the spatial extent of the numerical diffusivity decrease with increasing resolution.

  1. A novel method for analytically solving a radial advection-dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Keng-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Sie, Bing-Ruei

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution for solute transport in a radial flow field has a variety of practical applications in the study of the transport in push-pull/divergent/convergent flow tracer tests, aquifer remediation by pumping and aquifer storage and recovery. However, an analytical solution for radial advective-dispersive transport has been proven very difficult to develop and relatively few in subsurface hydrology have made efforts to do so, because variable coefficients in the governing partial differential equations. Most of the solutions for radial advective-dispersive transport presented in the literature have generally been solved semi-analytically with the final concentration values being obtained with the help of a numerical Laplace inversion. This study presents a novel solution strategy for analytically solving the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. A Laplace transform with respect to the time variable and a generalized integral transform technique with respect to the spatial variable are first performed to convert the transient governing partial differential equations into an algebraic equation. Subsequently, the algebraic equation is solved using simple algebraic manipulations, easily yielding the solution in the transformed domain. The solution in the original domain is ultimately obtained by successive applications of the Laplace and corresponding generalized integral transform inversions. A convergent flow tracer test is used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method for deriving an exact analytical solution to the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. The developed analytical solution is verified against a semi-analytical solution taken from the literature. The results show perfect agreement between our exact analytical solution and the semi-analytical solution. The solution method presented in this study can be applied to create more comprehensive analytical models for a great variety of radial advective

  2. Improving estimates of ecosystem metabolism by reducing effects of tidal advection on dissolved oxygen time series-Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) have been used to compute estimates of metabolism in aquatic ecosystems. Central to this open water or "Odum" method is the assumption that the DO time is not strongly affected by advection and that effects due to advection or mixin...

  3. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  4. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  5. Yet another method for triangulation and contouring for automated cartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Floriani, L.; Falcidieno, B.; Nasy, G.; Pienovi, C.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for hierarchical subdivision of a set of three-dimensional surface observations. The data structure used for obtaining the desired triangulation is also singularly appropriate for extracting contours. Some examples are presented, and the results obtained are compared with those given by Delaunay triangulation. The data points selected by the algorithm provide a better approximation to the desired surface than do randomly selected points.

  6. Contour classification in thermographic images for detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuniewski, Rafał; Nowak, Robert M.; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Oleszkiewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Thermographic images of breast taken by the Braster device are uploaded into web application which uses different classification algorithms to automatically decide whether a patient should be more thoroughly examined. This article presents the approach to the task of classifying contours visible on thermographic images of breast taken by the Braster device in order to make the decision about the existence of cancerous tumors in breast. It presents the results of the researches conducted on the different classification algorithms.

  7. Effects of Contoured Pallets on AMC Mission Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    empty space that could otherwise be filled and thus leaves cargo space unutilized when moved on a non -contoured carrier. AMC faces the problem of how...specifically at airlift ops, researchers have examined a heuristic approach to scheduling (Kopp, 2004) as well as complex, non -linear modeling of...be entirely on internal military airlift capability (called “ organic ”), but rather on the combined capability of organic and contracted lift. The

  8. Evidence of singularities for a family of contour dynamics equations

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Diego; Fontelos, Marco A.; Mancho, Ana M.; Rodrigo, Jose L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we show evidence of the existence of singularities developing in finite time for a class of contour dynamics equations depending on a parameter 0 < α ≤ 1. The limiting case α → 0 corresponds to 2D Euler equations, and α = 1 corresponds to the surface quasi-geostrophic equation. The singularity is point-like, and it is approached in a self-similar manner. PMID:15837929

  9. Computational Contour of Mixed Mode Crack-Tip Plastic Zone for Aluminum Alloy 2024T351

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tien Dung; Leroy, Rene; Joly, Damien

    2013-07-01

    The studies on mixed mode crack-tip plastic zones are one of the fundamental importance in describing the process of failure and in evaluation of the material life. The approach is also applied to predict crack initiation under mixed mode loading. The objective of this work is to study the contour of mixed mode crack-tip plastic zones, the minimum plastic zone radius (MPZR) and the direction of initial crack for aluminum alloy 2024T351 in Compact tension specimen by using Matlab software. This paper computed the shape, size of plastic zone at crack-tip and the minimum plastic zone radius with reference to the loading angle and stress intensity factor in linear elastic fracture mechanics regime for plane strain condition according to Von Mises yield criteria, the study is conducted for various loading angle. We found that the mixed mode loading (β = 60°) can lead to material fracture earlier than any mode loading.

  10. Contour tracking and probabilistic segmentation of tissue phase mapping MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitiboi, Teodora; Hennemuth, Anja; Schnell, Susanne; Chowdhary, Varun; Honarmand, Amir; Markl, Michael; Linsen, Lars; Hahn, Horst

    2016-03-01

    Many cardiovascular diseases manifest as an abnormal motion pattern of the heart muscle (myocardium). Local cardiac motion can be non-invasively quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using methods such as tissue phase mapping (TPM), which directly measures the local myocardial velocities over time with high temporal and spatial resolution. The challenges for routine clinical use of TPM for the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiac function lie in providing a fast and accurate myocardium segmentation and a robust quantitative analysis of the velocity field. Both of these tasks are difficult to automate on routine clinical data because of the reduced contrast in the presence of noise. In this work, we propose to address these challenges with a segmentation approach that combines smooth, iterative contour displacement and probabilistic segmentation using particle tracing, based on the underlying velocity field. The proposed solution enabled the efficient and reproducible segmentation of TPM datasets from 27 patients and 14 volunteers, showing good potential for routine use in clinical studies. Our method allows for a more reliable quantitative analysis of local myocardial velocities, by giving a higher weight to velocity vectors corresponding to pixels more likely to belong to the myocardium. The accuracy of the contour propagation was evaluated on nine subjects, showing an average error smaller than the spatial resolution of the image data. Statistical analysis concluded that the difference between the segmented contours and the ground truths was not significantly higher than the variability between the manual ground truth segmentations.

  11. Active contour segmentation for hyperspectral oil spill remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-ping; Chang, Ming; An, Ju-bai; Huang, Jian; Lin, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Oil spills could occur in many conditions, which results in pollution of the natural resources, marine environment and economic health of the area. Whenever we need to identify oil spill, confirm the location or get the shape and acreage of oil spill, we have to get the edge information of oil slick images firstly. Hyperspectral remote sensing imaging is now widely used to detect oil spill. Active Contour Models (ACMs) is a widely used image segmentation method that utilizes the geometric information of objects within images. Region based models are less sensitive to noise and give good performance for images with weak edges or without edges. One of the popular Region based ACMs, active contours without edges Models, is implemented by Chan-Vese. The model has the property of global segmentation to segment all the objects within an image irrespective of the initial contour. In this paper, we propose an improved CV model, which can perform well in the oil spill hyper-spectral image segmentation. The energy function embeds spectral and spatial information, introduces the vector edge stopping function, and constructs a novel length term. Results of the improved model on airborne hyperspectral oil spill images show that it improves the ability of distinguishing between oil spills and sea water, as well as the capability of noise reduction.

  12. Affect From Mere Perception: Illusory Contour Perception Feels Good.

    PubMed

    Erle, Thorsten M; Reber, Rolf; Topolinski, Sascha

    2017-02-16

    Can affect be evoked by mere perception? Earlier work on processing fluency, which manipulated the dynamics of a running perceptual process, has shown that efficient processing can indeed trigger positive affect. The present work introduces a novel route by not manipulating the dynamics of an ongoing perceptual process, but by blocking or allowing the whole process in the first place. We used illusory contour perception as one very basic such process. In 5 experiments (total N = 422), participants briefly (≤100 ms) viewed stimuli that either allowed illusory contour perception, so-called Kanizsa shapes, or proximally identical control shapes that did not allow for this process to occur. Self-reported preference ratings (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and facial muscle activity (Experiment 3) showed that participants consistently preferred Kanizsa over these control shapes. Moreover, even within Kanizsa shapes, those that most likely instigated illusory contour perception (i.e., those with the highest support ratio) were liked the most (Experiment 5). At the same time, Kanizsa stimuli with high support ratios were objectively and subjectively the most complex, rendering a processing fluency explanation of this preference unlikely. These findings inform theorizing in perception about affective properties of early perceptual processes that are independent from perceptual fluency and research on affect about the importance of basic perception as a source of affectivity. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; ...

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulnessmore » of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (σ/E = 7 · 10⁻⁵) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (σ/E = 14 · 10⁻⁵).« less

  14. Discrimination contours for the perception of head-centered velocity.

    PubMed

    Champion, Rebecca A; Freeman, Tom C A

    2010-06-01

    There is little direct psychophysical evidence that the visual system contains mechanisms tuned to head-centered velocity when observers make a smooth pursuit eye movement. Much of the evidence is implicit, relying on measurements of bias (e.g., matching and nulling). We therefore measured discrimination contours in a space dimensioned by pursuit target motion and relative motion between target and background. Within this space, lines of constant head-centered motion are parallel to the main negative diagonal, so judgments dominated by mechanisms that combine individual components should produce contours with a similar orientation. Conversely, contours oriented parallel to the cardinal axes of the space indicate judgments based on individual components. The results provided evidence for mechanisms tuned to head-centered velocity-discrimination ellipses were significantly oriented away from the cardinal axes, toward the main negative diagonal. However, ellipse orientation was considerably less steep than predicted by a pure combination of components. This suggests that observers used a mixture of two strategies across trials, one based on individual components and another based on their sum. We provide a model that simulates this type of behavior and is able to reproduce the ellipse orientations we found.

  15. Neutral Gas and Ion Measurements by the CONTOUR Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Niemann, Hasso B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) on the Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) Mission will measure the chemical and isotopic composition of neutral and ion species in the coma of comet Encke and the subsequent targets of this mission. Currently the second target of this mission is comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3. This neutral gas and ion data together with complementary data from the dust analyzer and the imaging spectrometer is designed to allow a broad characterization of the molecular and elemental composition of each cometary nucleus. These experiments enable the study of the of the likely variations in chemical conditions present in different regions of the early solar nebula where the comets formed. With these experiments we will also test ideas about cometary contributions of organics, water, and other volatiles to the inner planets. The CONTOUR NGIMS data set from multiple comets is expected to provide an important extension of to the only other detailed in situ data set from a close flyby of a nucleus, that from Halley. CONTOUR will extend this measurement of an Oort cloud comet to the class of short period comets thought to originate in the Kuiper belt. This data will complement the detailed measurements to be carried out at a single nucleus by the Rosetta Mission.

  16. Automatic extraction and tracking of the tongue contours.

    PubMed

    Akgul, Y S; Kambhamettu, C; Stone, M

    1999-10-01

    Computerized analysis of the tongue surface movement can provide valuable information to speech and swallowing research. Ultrasound technology is currently the most attractive modality for the tongue imaging mainly because of its high video frame rate. However, problems with ultrasound imaging, such as noise and echo artifacts, refractions, and unrelated reflections pose significant challenges for computer analysis of the tongue images and hence specific methods must be developed. This paper presents a system that is developed for automatic extraction and tracking of the tongue surface movements from ultrasound image sequences. The ultrasound images are supplied by the head and transducer support system (HATS), which was developed in order to fix the head and support the transducer under the chin in a known position without disturbing speech. In this work, we propose a novel scheme for the analysis of the tongue images using deformable contours. We incorporate novel mechanisms to 1) impose speech related constraints on the deformations; 2) perform spatiotemporal smoothing using a contour postprocessing stage; 3) utilize optical flow techniques to speed up the search process; and 4) propagate user supplied information to the analysis of all image frames. We tested the system's performance qualitatively and quantitatively in consultation with speech scientists. Our system produced contours that are within the range of manual measurement variations. The results of our system are extremely encouraging and the system can be used in practical speech and swallowing research in the field of otolaryngology.

  17. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (σ/E = 7 · 10⁻⁵) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (σ/E = 14 · 10⁻⁵).

  18. Microvascular quantification based on contour-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chenghung; Soetikno, Brian; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Accurate quantification of microvasculature remains of interest in fundamental pathophysiological studies and clinical trials. Current photoacoustic microscopy can noninvasively quantify properties of the microvasculature, including vessel density and diameter, with a high spatial resolution. However, the depth range of focus (i.e., focal zone) of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is often insufficient to encompass the depth variations of features of interest—such as blood vessels—due to uneven tissue surfaces. Thus, time-consuming image acquisitions at multiple different focal planes are required to maintain the region of interest in the focal zone. We have developed continuous three-dimensional motorized contour-scanning OR-PAM, which enables real-time adjustment of the focal plane to track the vessels’ profile. We have experimentally demonstrated that contour scanning improves the signal-to-noise ratio of conventional OR-PAM by as much as 41% and shortens the image acquisition time by 3.2 times. Moreover, contour-scanning OR-PAM more accurately quantifies vessel density and diameter, and has been applied to studying tumors with uneven surfaces. PMID:25223708

  19. The Surface Fatigue Life of Contour Induction Hardened AISI 1552 Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Turza, Alan; Chaplin, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Two groups of spur gears manufactured from two different materials and heat treatments were endurance tested for surface fatigue life. One group was manufactured from AISI 1552 and was finished ground to a 0.4 micron (16 micro-in.) rms surface finish and then dual frequency contour induction hardened. The second group was manufactured from CEVM AISI 9310 and was carburized, hardened, and ground to a 0.4 micron (16 micro-in.) rms surface finish. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm (3.5 in.). Test conditions were a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi), a bulk gear temperature of approximately 350 K (170 F) and a speed of 10,000 rpm. The lubricant used for the tests was a synthetic paraffinic oil with an additive package. The test results showed that the 10 percent surface fatigue (pitting) life of the contour hardened AISI 1552 test gears was 1.7 times that of the carburized and hardened AISI 9310 test gears. Also there were two early failures of the AISI 1552 gears by bending fatigue.

  20. Contour of lingual surface in lower complete denture formed by polished surface impression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to analyze the shapes of lingual polished surfaces in lower complete dentures formed by polished surface impressions and to provide reference data for use when manufacturing edentulous trays and lower complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-six patients with mandibular edentulism were studied. After lower wax dentures were fabricated, wax was removed from the lingual side of the wax denture and a lingual polished surface impression was obtained with tissue conditioner. The definitive denture was scanned with a three-dimensional scanner, and scanned images were obtained. At the cross-sections of the lingual frenum, lateral incisors, first premolars, first molars, and anterior border of the retromolar pads, three points were marked and eight measurements were taken. The Kruskal-Wallis test and a post hoc analysis with the Mann-Whitney test were performed. RESULTS Each patient showed similar values for the same areas on the left and right sides without a statistically significant difference. The height of the contour of the lingual polished surface at the lingual frenum was halfway between the occlusal plane and lingual border, it moved gradually in a downward direction. The angle from the occlusal plane to the height of the contour of the lingual polished surface was increased as it progressed from the lingual frenum towards the retromolar pads. CONCLUSION The shape of the mandibular lingual polished surface was convex at the lingual frenum, lateral incisors and gradually flattened towards the first molars and retromolar pads. PMID:28018565

  1. Characterization and optimization of illumination vector for contouring surface form and feature using DSPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chaolong; Prasad A. S., Guru; Chan, Kelvin H. K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-06-01

    Surface defect or damage is one of the critical factors leading to the failure of engineering materials and structures. The methodologies for the measurement of surface shape and feature or defect have been extensively explored and developed over the past few decades, including both contact and non-contact methods. Speckle pattern interferometry, as a non-contact optical method, has been demonstrated to effectively contour the surface shape through adjusting the illumination vector. However, few studies have been made to investigate the effect of the initial position of the illumination source as well as the source translation direction. In this paper, we report to carry out a study of measuring the surface form and feature using digital speckle pattern interferometry system via a slight translation of illumination source. Through theoretically analyzing the sensitivity factor along with the experimental validation, it is shown that the contouring fringe is more sensitive to the surface height with an off-axis illumination than the paraxial illumination. It is also found that translating the source along axial and lateral direction can be both used for the surface shape re-construction.

  2. An instrument for the heat flux measurement from a contour of a surface with uniform temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughn, J. W.; Hoffman, M. A.; Lee, Daehee

    1994-03-01

    An instrument for the measurement of the heat flux distribution along an internal or external contour of a surface with a uniform temperature is described. The main element in this instrument is an electrically heated narrow nickel/chromium ribbon which is mounted flush with, but thermally and electrically insulated from, walls on all sides. The walls are separately heated and are made of a highly conducting material (e.g., aluminum) to ensure a uniform temperature. Differential thermocouples are used to measure the temperature difference between the walls and Ni/Cr ribbon at various positions along the ribbon. The ribbon power is adjusted until the differential temperature is nulled at a particular position on the ribbon. Since conduction along the ribbon is small, the electrical power divided by the sensor area is a direct measure of the surface heat flux at the nulled position. This makes it possible to measure the local time-average heat flux at various positions along a contour of a surface inside a circular duct. The time constant in this application was 13 s. An uncertainty analysis shows that this instrument has an uncertainty of ±3.84% for a convective heat flux on the order of 900 W/m2.

  3. Abnormal contextual modulation of visual contour detection in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Sponheim, Scott R; Olman, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients demonstrate perceptual deficits consistent with broad dysfunction in visual context processing. These include poor integration of segments forming visual contours, and reduced visual contrast effects (e.g. weaker orientation-dependent surround suppression, ODSS). Background image context can influence contour perception, as stimuli near the contour affect detection accuracy. Because of ODSS, this contextual modulation depends on the relative orientation between the contour and flanking elements, with parallel flankers impairing contour perception. However in schizophrenia, the impact of abnormal ODSS during contour perception is not clear. It is also unknown whether deficient contour perception marks genetic liability for schizophrenia, or is strictly associated with clinical expression of this disorder. We examined contour detection in 25 adults with schizophrenia, 13 unaffected first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients, and 28 healthy controls. Subjects performed a psychophysics experiment designed to quantify the effect of flanker orientation during contour detection. Overall, patients with schizophrenia showed poorer contour detection performance than relatives or controls. Parallel flankers suppressed and orthogonal flankers enhanced contour detection performance for all groups, but parallel suppression was relatively weaker for schizophrenia patients than healthy controls. Relatives of patients showed equivalent performance with controls. Computational modeling suggested that abnormal contextual modulation in schizophrenia may be explained by suppression that is more broadly tuned for orientation. Abnormal flanker suppression in schizophrenia is consistent with weaker ODSS and/or broader orientation tuning. This work provides the first evidence that such perceptual abnormalities may not be associated with a genetic liability for schizophrenia.

  4. Single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme for advection-diffusion problems with large diffusion-coefficient heterogeneities and high-advection transport.

    PubMed

    Perko, Janez; Patel, Ravi A

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an approach that extends the flexibility of the standard lattice Boltzmann single relaxation time scheme in terms of spatial variation of dissipative terms (e.g., diffusion coefficient) and stability for high Péclet mass transfer problems. Spatial variability of diffusion coefficient in SRT is typically accommodated through the variation of relaxation time during the collision step. This method is effective but cannot deal with large diffusion coefficient variations, which can span over several orders of magnitude in some natural systems. The approach explores an alternative way of dealing with large diffusion coefficient variations in advection-diffusion transport systems by introducing so-called diffusion velocity. The diffusion velocity is essentially an additional convective term that replaces variations in diffusion coefficients vis-à-vis a chosen reference diffusion coefficient which defines the simulation time step. Special attention is paid to the main idea behind the diffusion velocity formulation and its implementation into the lattice Boltzmann framework. Finally, the performance, stability, and accuracy of the diffusion velocity formulation are discussed via several advection-diffusion transport benchmark examples. These examples demonstrate improved stability and flexibility of the proposed scheme with marginal consequences on the numerical performance.

  5. A Genetic-Algorithm-Based Explicit Description of Object Contour and its Ability to Facilitate Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui; Tang, Xue-Song

    2015-11-01

    Shape representation is an extremely important and longstanding problem in the field of pattern recognition. Closed contour, which refers to shape contour, plays a crucial role in the comparison of shapes. Because shape contour is the most stable, distinguishable, and invariable feature of an object, it is useful to incorporate it into the recognition process. This paper proposes a method based on genetic algorithms. The proposed method can be used to identify the most common contour fragments, which can be used to represent the contours of a shape category. The common fragments clarify the particular logics included in the contours. This paper shows that the explicit representation of the shape contour contributes significantly to shape representation and object recognition.

  6. Estimation and correction of advection effects with single and multiple, conventional and Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Chen, T.

    1981-01-01

    The laws of fluid motion are invariant under a Gallilean transformation. For a perfect observing system, the data analysis should, therefore, also be invariant under a Gallilean transformation. This invariance is often not preserved in practical observing systems. In this connection, it is often advisable to perform mesoscale analysis in a frame moving with respect to the earth's surface. In the present investigation the velocity of such a frame is referred to as an advection velocity. The investigation is concerned with remaining problems regarding the Gallilean transformation. The establishment of a frame of reference for the achievement of maximum coherence is considered, taking into account the case of given nonsimultaneous observations of scalars or Cartesian vectors. It is found that advection speed can be estimated objectively if a scalar or Cartesian vector can be observed directly and if, in addition, the time and position of each observation is approximately known.

  7. The effect of advection on the nutrient reservoir in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Palter, Jaime B; Lozier, M Susan; Barber, Richard T

    2005-09-29

    Though critically important in sustaining the ocean's biological pump, the cycling of nutrients in the subtropical gyres is poorly understood. The supply of nutrients to the sunlit surface layer of the ocean has traditionally been attributed solely to vertical processes. However, horizontal advection may also be important in establishing the availability of nutrients. Here we show that the production and advection of North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water introduces spatial and temporal variability in the subsurface nutrient reservoir beneath the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. As the mode water is formed, its nutrients are depleted by biological utilization. When the depleted water mass is exported to the gyre, it injects a wedge of low-nutrient water into the upper layers of the ocean. Contrary to intuition, cold winters that promote deep convective mixing and vigorous mode water formation may diminish downstream primary productivity by altering the subsurface delivery of nutrients.

  8. Scalar variance decay in chaotic advection and Batchelor-regime turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereday, D. R.; Haynes, P. H.; Wonhas, A.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2002-03-01

    The decay of the variance of a diffusive scalar in chaotic advection flow (or equivalently Batchelor-regime turbulence) is analyzed using a model in which the advection is represented by an inhomogeneous baker's map on the unit square. The variance decays exponentially at large times, with a rate that has a finite limit as the diffusivity κ tends to zero and is determined by the action of the inhomogeneous map on the gravest Fourier modes in the scalar field. The decay rate predicted by recent theoretical work that follows scalar evolution in linear flow and then averages over all stretching histories is shown to be incorrect. The exponentially decaying scalar field is shown to have a spatial power spectrum of the form P(k)~k-σ at wave numbers small enough for diffusion to be neglected, with σ<1.

  9. Analytic radiative-advective equilibrium as a model for high-latitude climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Timothy W.; Jansen, Malte F.

    2016-01-01

    We propose radiative-advective equilibrium as a basic-state model for the high-latitude atmosphere. Temperature profiles are determined by a competition between stabilization by atmospheric shortwave absorption and advective heat flux convergence, and destabilization by surface shortwave absorption. We derive analytic expressions for temperature profiles, assuming power law atmospheric heating profiles as a function of pressure and two-stream windowed-gray longwave radiative transfer. We discuss example profiles with and without an atmospheric window and show that the sensitivity of surface temperature to forcing depends on the nature of the forcing, with greatest sensitivity to radiative forcing by increased optical thickness and least sensitivity to increased atmospheric heat transport. These differences in sensitivity of surface temperature to forcing can be explained in terms of a forcing-dependent lapse-rate feedback.

  10. Advective-diffusive motion on large scales from small-scale dynamics with an internal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Aurell, Erik

    2016-06-01

    We consider coupled diffusions in n -dimensional space and on a compact manifold and the resulting effective advective-diffusive motion on large scales in space. The effective drift (advection) and effective diffusion are determined as a solvability conditions in a multiscale analysis. As an example, we consider coupled diffusions in three-dimensional space and on the group manifold SO(3) of proper rotations, generalizing results obtained by H. Brenner [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 80, 548 (1981), 10.1016/0021-9797(81)90214-9]. We show in detail how the analysis can be conveniently carried out using local charts and invariance arguments. As a further example, we consider coupled diffusions in two-dimensional complex space and on the group manifold SU(2). We show that although the local operators may be the same as for SO(3), due to the global nature of the solvability conditions the resulting diffusion will differ and generally be more isotropic.

  11. Comparison of Nonlinear and Linear Stabilization Schemes for Advection-Diffusion Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, R. R.; Heister, T.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately solving advection-diffusion equations that appear in the finite element discretization of a mantle convection simulation is an important computational issue to the computational geoscience community. This is because it allows for users studying mantle convection to create reliable simulations for something as small and simple as a 2D simulation on their personal laptop to something as complex as a massively parallel 3D simulation on their university supercomputer. Standard finite element discretizations of advection-diffusion equations introduce unphysical oscillations around steep gradients. Therefore, stabilization must be added to the discrete formulation to obtain correct solutions. Using the open source scientific library ASPECT, the SUPG and Entropy Viscosity schemes are compared using stationary and non-stationary test equations. Differences in maximum overshoot and undershoot, smear, and convergence orders are compared to see if improvements can be made to the existing numerical method existing in ASPECT.

  12. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  13. Oxygen Advection and Diffusion in a Three Dimensional Vascular Anatomical Network

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qianqian; Sakadžić, Sava; Ruvinskaya, Lana; Devor, Anna; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for quantitative and computationally affordable models for analyzing tissue metabolism and hemodynamics in microvascular networks. In this work, we develop a hybrid model to solve for the time-varying oxygen advection-diffusion equation in the vessels and tissue. To obtain a three-dimensional temporal evolution of tissue oxygen concentration for realistic complex vessel networks, we used a graph-based advection model combined with a finite-element based diffusion model and an implicit time-advancing scheme. We validated this algorithm for both static and dynamic conditions. We also applied it to a complex vascular network obtained from a rodent somatosensory cortex. Qualitative agreement was found with in-vivo experiments. PMID:18958033

  14. Advection and the Efficiency of Spectral Energy Transfer in Two-Dimensional Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-09-02

    We report measurements of the geometric alignment of the small-scale turbulent stress and the large-scale rate of strain that together lead to the net flux of energy from small scales to large scales in two-dimensional turbulence. We find that the instantaneous alignment between these two tensors is weak and, thus, that the spectral transport of energy is inefficient. We show, however, that the strain rate is much better aligned with the stress at times in the past, suggesting that the differential advection of the two is responsible for the inefficient spectral transfer. We provide evidence for this conjecture by measuring the alignment statistics conditioned on weakly changing stress history. Our results give new insight into the relationship between scale-to-scale energy transfer, geometric alignment, and advection in turbulent flows.

  15. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  16. Use of CD-ROM-based tool for analyzing contouring variations in involved-field radiotherapy for Stage III NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Soernsen De Koste, John R. van . E-mail: j.vansornsendekoste@vumc.nl; Senan, Suresh; Underberg, Rene W.M.; Oei, Swie Swat; Elshove, Dionne; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2005-10-01

    Background: Interclinician variability in defining target volumes is a problem in conformal radiotherapy. A CD-ROM-based contouring tool was used to conduct a dummy run in an international trial of involved-field chemoradiotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The CT scan of an eligible patient was installed on an 'auto-run' CD-ROM incorporating a contouring program based on ImageJ for Windows, which runs on any personal computer equipped with a CD-ROM drive. This tool was initially piloted at four academic centers and was subsequently mailed, together with all relevant clinical, radiologic, and positron emission tomography findings, to all participating centers in the international trial. Clinicians were instructed to contour separate gross tumor volumes (GTVs) for the tumor and two enlarged nodes and a clinical target volume for the hilus. A reference 'consensus' target volume for each target was jointly generated by three other clinicians. Results: The data received from the four academic centers and 16 study participants were suitable for analysis. Data from one center was unsuitable for detailed analysis because the target volumes were contoured at 1.2-cm intervals. GTVs were available for a total of 21 tumors and 19 nodes, and 15 hilar clinical target volumes were available. The mean GTV of the primary tumor was 13.6 cm{sup 3} (SD, 5.2; median, 12.3; range, 8.3-26.9). The variation in the center of the mass relative to the mean center of the mass in the left-right, ventrodorsal, and craniocaudal axes was 1.5, 0.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest volume variation was observed for the right hilar clinical target volume (mean, 33.7 cm{sup 3}; SD, 31.2; median, 20.3; range, 4.8-109.9). Smaller variations were observed for the subcarinal node (mean, GTV, 1.9 cm{sup 3}; SD, 1.2; median, 1.7; range, 0.5-5.3), except caudally where the node was difficult to distinguish from the pericardium. The 'consensus' volumes for all

  17. Estimating Advective Near-surface Currents from Ocean Color Satellite Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 01/23/2015 Journal Article Estimating advective near-surface currents from ocean color ...currents from the sequential ocean color imagery provided by multiple newer generations of satellite sensors on hourly scales in the Yellow Sea and the...optical properties are discussed regarding the performances of various color products on the retrieval of currents. Similarities of velocity

  18. A family of compact high order coupled time-space unconditionally stable vertical advection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarié, Florian; Debreu, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Recent papers by Shchepetkin (2015) and Lemarié et al. (2015) have emphasized that the time-step of an oceanic model with an Eulerian vertical coordinate and an explicit time-stepping scheme is very often restricted by vertical advection in a few hot spots (i.e. most of the grid points are integrated with small Courant numbers, compared to the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, except just few spots where numerical instability of the explicit scheme occurs first). The consequence is that the numerics for vertical advection must have good stability properties while being robust to changes in Courant number in terms of accuracy. An other constraint for oceanic models is the strict control of numerical mixing imposed by the highly adiabatic nature of the oceanic interior (i.e. mixing must be very small in the vertical direction below the boundary layer). We examine in this talk the possibility of mitigating vertical Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction, while avoiding numerical inaccuracies associated with standard implicit advection schemes (i.e. large sensitivity of the solution on Courant number, large phase delay, and possibly excess of numerical damping with unphysical orientation). Most regional oceanic models have been successfully using fourth order compact schemes for vertical advection. In this talk we present a new general framework to derive generic expressions for (one-step) coupled time and space high order compact schemes (see Daru & Tenaud (2004) for a thorough description of coupled time and space schemes). Among other properties, we show that those schemes are unconditionally stable and have very good accuracy properties even for large Courant numbers while having a very reasonable computational cost.

  19. Statistical evaluation of thermal advection and stratification effects in scatterometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, F. S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of thermal advection and atmospheric stratification are statistically evaluated using Seasat scatterometer observations as a data base. The results indicate that, whenever the surface winds or wind stress are related to the atmospheric pressure field, the appropriate stratification and baroclinic corrections should be applied. Without such corrections, errors of 15-25 percent are likely to arise in the surface fluxes computed from model low-level winds or pressure measurements.

  20. An advection-based model to increase the temporal resolution of PIV time series.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Fulvio; Moore, Peter

    A numerical implementation of the advection equation is proposed to increase the temporal resolution of PIV time series. The method is based on the principle that velocity fluctuations are transported passively, similar to Taylor's hypothesis of frozen turbulence. In the present work, the advection model is extended to unsteady three-dimensional flows. The main objective of the method is that of lowering the requirement on the PIV repetition rate from the Eulerian frequency toward the Lagrangian one. The local trajectory of the fluid parcel is obtained by forward projection of the instantaneous velocity at the preceding time instant and backward projection from the subsequent time step. The trajectories are approximated by the instantaneous streamlines, which yields accurate results when the amplitude of velocity fluctuations is small with respect to the convective motion. The verification is performed with two experiments conducted at temporal resolutions significantly higher than that dictated by Nyquist criterion. The flow past the trailing edge of a NACA0012 airfoil closely approximates frozen turbulence, where the largest ratio between the Lagrangian and Eulerian temporal scales is expected. An order of magnitude reduction of the needed acquisition frequency is demonstrated by the velocity spectra of super-sampled series. The application to three-dimensional data is made with time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of a transitional jet. Here, the 3D advection equation is implemented to estimate the fluid trajectories. The reduction in the minimum sampling rate by the use of super-sampling in this case is less, due to the fact that vortices occurring in the jet shear layer are not well approximated by sole advection at large time separation. Both cases reveal that the current requirements for time-resolved PIV experiments can be revised when information is poured from space to time. An additional favorable effect is observed by the analysis in the frequency

  1. Approximate Solution of Time-Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation via Fractional Variational Iteration Method

    PubMed Central

    İbiş, Birol

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to obtain the approximate solution of time-fractional advection-dispersion equation (FADE) involving Jumarie's modification of Riemann-Liouville derivative by the fractional variational iteration method (FVIM). FVIM provides an analytical approximate solution in the form of a convergent series. Some examples are given and the results indicate that the FVIM is of high accuracy, more efficient, and more convenient for solving time FADEs. PMID:24578662

  2. Noise Prevents Infinite Stretching of the Passive Field in a Stochastic Vector Advection Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandoli, Franco; Maurelli, Mario; Neklyudov, Mikhail

    2014-09-01

    A linear stochastic vector advection equation is considered; the equation may model a passive magnetic field in a random fluid. When the driving velocity field is rough but deterministic, in particular just Hölder continuous and bounded, one can construct examples of infinite stretching of the passive field, arising from smooth initial conditions. The purpose of the paper is to prove that infinite stretching is prevented if the driving velocity field contains in addition a white noise component.

  3. New Solution of Diffusion-Advection Equation for Cosmic-Ray Transport Using Ultradistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we exactly solve the diffusion-advection equation (DAE) for cosmic-ray transport. For such a purpose we use the Theory of Ultradistributions of J. Sebastiao e Silva, to give a general solution for the DAE. From the ensuing solution, we obtain several approximations as limiting cases of various situations of physical and astrophysical interest. One of them involves Solar cosmic-rays' diffusion.

  4. Assessment of advective porewater movement affecting mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants in marine intertidal sediment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Moffett, Kevan B; Luthy, Richard G

    2010-08-01

    Advective porewater movement and molecular diffusion are important factors affecting the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in marsh and mudflat sediments. This study assessed porewater movement in an intertidal mudflat in South Basin adjacent to Hunters Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA, where a pilot-scale test of sorbent amendment assessed the in situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To quantify advective porewater movement within the top 0-60 cm sediment layer, we used temperature as a tracer and conducted heat transport analysis using 14-day data from multidepth sediment temperature logging stations and one-dimensional heat transport simulations. The best-fit conditions gave an average Darcy velocity of 3.8cm/d in the downward vertical direction for sorbent-amended sediment with a plausible range of 0 cm/d to 8 cm/d. In a limiting case with no net advection, the best-fit depth-averaged mechanical dispersion coefficient was 2.2x10(-7) m2/s with a range of 0.9x10(-7) m2/s to 5.6x10(-7) m2/s. The Peclet number for PCB mobilization showed that molecular diffusion would control PCB mass transfer from sediment to sorbent particles for the case of uniform distribution of sorbent. However, the advective flow and mechanical dispersion in the test site would significantly benefit the stabilization effect of heterogeneously distributed sorbent by acting to smooth out the heterogeneities and homogenizing pollutant concentrations across the entire bioactive zone. These measurements and modeling techniques on intertidal sediment porewater transport could be useful for the development of more reliable mass transfer models for the prediction of contaminant release within the sediment bed, the movement of HOCs in the intertidal aquatic environment, and in situ sequestration by sorbent addition.

  5. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  6. Melodic Contour Identification Reflects the Cognitive Threshold of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eunju; Ryu, Hokyoung

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a natural phenomenon of aging. Although there exists a consensus that sensitivity to acoustic features of music is associated with such decline, no solid evidence has yet shown that structural elements and contexts of music explain this loss of cognitive performance. This study examined the extent and the type of cognitive decline that is related to the contour identification task (CIT) using tones with different pitches (i.e., melodic contours). Both younger and older adult groups participated in the CIT given in three listening conditions (i.e., focused, selective, and alternating). Behavioral data (accuracy and response times) and hemodynamic reactions were measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Our findings showed cognitive declines in the older adult group but with a subtle difference from the younger adult group. The accuracy of the melodic CITs given in the target-like distraction task (CIT2) was significantly lower than that in the environmental noise (CIT1) condition in the older adult group, indicating that CIT2 may be a benchmark test for age-specific cognitive decline. The fNIRS findings also agreed with this interpretation, revealing significant increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) concentration in the younger (p < 0.05 for Δpre - on task; p < 0.01 for Δon – post task) rather than the older adult group (n.s for Δpre - on task; n.s for Δon – post task). We further concluded that the oxyHb difference was present in the brain regions near the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these findings suggest that CIT2 (i.e., the melodic contour task in the target-like distraction) is an optimized task that could indicate the degree and type of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:27378907

  7. Interpreting layer thickness advection in terms of eddy-topography interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanyu; Köhl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef

    2014-09-01

    A parameterization for the spatial pattern of the eddy induced thickness advection parameter estimated from a dynamically consistent data assimilation procedure is presented. Values of the thickness advection parameter are predominantly negative (positive) over seamounts, and positive (negative) over the deep ocean in the southern (northern) hemisphere along strong currents; its magnitude is large at high latitudes but low in the tropical regions. Those characteristics motivate a parameterization based on the Coriolis parameter, the bottom depth and an eddy length scale. As a parameterization for an eddy streamfunction, the associated bolus velocities advect density anti-cyclonically (cyclonically) around seamounts (troughs). Although the parameterization has the same form as Holloway’s streamfunction for the Neptune effect, and is also related to eddy-topography interactions, Holloway’s streamfunction is in contrast applied to the momentum equation. The parameterization is independently confirmed by the flux-mean gradient relation from the output of a high resolution model. The effect of the proposed scheme is investigated using a channel model with idealized bottom topographies and a global ocean circulation model with realistic bottom topography. In agreement with the high resolution model, our scheme generates cold (warm) domes and cyclonic circulations over seamounts (troughs), which is consistent with the eddy movement in presence of the topographic β effect. This provides a different mechanism for eddy-topography interaction than the Neptune effect, which generates circulations of opposing sign.

  8. A computational Lagrangian-Eulerian advection remap for free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashgriz, Nasser; Barbat, Tiberiu; Wang, Gang

    2004-01-01

    A VOF-based algorithm for advecting free surfaces and interfaces across a 2-D unstructured grid is presented. This algorithm is based on a combination of a Computational Lagrangian-Eulerian Advection Remap and the Volume of the Fluid method (CLEAR-VOF). A set of geometric tools are used to remap the advected shape of the volume fraction from one cell onto the Eulerian fixed unstructured grid. The geometric remapping is used to compute the fluxes onto a group of neighbouring cells of the mesh. These fluxes are then redistributed and corrected to satisfy the conservation of mass. Here, we present methods for developing identification algorithms for surface cells and incorporating them with CLEAR-VOF. The CLEAR-VOF algorithm is then tested for translation of several geometries. It is also incorporated in a finite element based flow solver and tested in a laminar flow over a broad-crested weir and a turbulent flow over a semi-circular obstacle.

  9. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  10. Reactive-Diffusive-Advective Traveling Waves in a Family of Degenerate Nonlinear Equations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Garduño, Faustino; Pérez-Velázquez, Judith

    This paper deals with the analysis of existence of traveling wave solutions (TWS) for a diffusion-degenerate (at D(0) = 0) and advection-degenerate (at h'(0) = 0) reaction-diffusion-advection (RDA) equation. Diffusion is a strictly increasing function and the reaction term generalizes the kinetic part of the Fisher-KPP equation. We consider different forms of the convection term h(u): (1)  h'(u) is constant k, (2)  h'(u) = ku with k > 0, and (3) it is a quite general form which guarantees the degeneracy in the advective term. In Case 1, we prove that the task can be reduced to that for the corresponding equation, where k = 0, and then previous results reported from the authors can be extended. For the other two cases, we use both analytical and numerical tools. The analysis we carried out is based on the restatement of searching TWS for the full RDA equation into a two-dimensional dynamical problem. This consists of searching for the conditions on the parameter values for which there exist heteroclinic trajectories of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) system in the traveling wave coordinates. Throughout the paper we obtain the dynamics by using tools coming from qualitative theory of ODE.

  11. Reactive-Diffusive-Advective Traveling Waves in a Family of Degenerate Nonlinear Equations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Garduño, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of existence of traveling wave solutions (TWS) for a diffusion-degenerate (at D(0) = 0) and advection-degenerate (at h′(0) = 0) reaction-diffusion-advection (RDA) equation. Diffusion is a strictly increasing function and the reaction term generalizes the kinetic part of the Fisher-KPP equation. We consider different forms of the convection term h(u): (1)  h′(u) is constant k, (2)  h′(u) = ku with k > 0, and (3) it is a quite general form which guarantees the degeneracy in the advective term. In Case 1, we prove that the task can be reduced to that for the corresponding equation, where k = 0, and then previous results reported from the authors can be extended. For the other two cases, we use both analytical and numerical tools. The analysis we carried out is based on the restatement of searching TWS for the full RDA equation into a two-dimensional dynamical problem. This consists of searching for the conditions on the parameter values for which there exist heteroclinic trajectories of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) system in the traveling wave coordinates. Throughout the paper we obtain the dynamics by using tools coming from qualitative theory of ODE. PMID:27689131

  12. Thermal advection and stratification effects on surface winds and the low level meridional mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, Felice S.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical tests are performed on the Seasat scatterometer observations to examine if and to what degree thermal advection and stratification effects manifest themselves in these remotely sensed measurements of mean wind and wind stress over the ocean. On the basis of a two layer baroclinic boundary layer model which is presented, it is shown that the thermal advection and stratification of the entire boundary layer as well as the geostrophic forcing influence the modeled near surface wind and wind stress profiles. Evidence of diurnal variation in the stratification under barotropic conditions is found in the data, with the daytime marine boundary layer being more convective than its nighttime counterpart. The temporal and spacial sampling pattern of the satellite makes it impossible to recover the full diurnal cycle, however. The observed effects of the thermal advection are shown to be statistically significant during the day (and presumed more convective) hours, causing a systematic increase in the poleward transport of mass and heat. The statistical results are in a qualitative agreement with the model simulations and cannot be reproduced in randomized control tests.

  13. An improved lattice Boltzmann method for simulating advective-diffusive processes in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aursjø, Olav; Jettestuen, Espen; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel

    2017-03-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are widely used to simulate advective-diffusive processes in fluids. Lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook methods presented in the literature mostly just exhibit first order spatial accuracy and introduce errors proportional to the velocity squared. Formulations proposed to alleviate this have only been partly successful and are valid only in certain specific situations. We present and demonstrate here a formulation that produces no such second order errors. This formulation suggests that a subtle, but important, adjustment is all it takes to improve the accuracy of the method. The key to the improved accuracy of this new model is the non-standard definition of the concentration that relates to the distribution function describing the advection-diffusion in lattice Boltzmann. The main advantage of the algorithm comes to view when simulating situations where fluid density variations appear. The present formulation of the advection-diffusion algorithm will, by taking into account these fluid density variations, drastically reduce the errors produced compared to the standard formulations. We also show how a source term is included in this new formulation without it losing its second order spatial accuracy.

  14. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-06

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration.

  15. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Weimin

    2012-07-10

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above {approx}0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Hoiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  16. Pointwise interactions of finite element modeling of advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1984-07-01

    Pointwise iteration techniques including successive under-relaxation (SUR), Gauss-Seidel (G-S), and successive over-relaxation (SOR) schemes, are applied to advection-diffusion equations to derive the matrix equation with finite element methods. These schemes are tested using two simple examples for which analytical solutions are available so that numerical results can be checked to ensure code consistency. Numerical experiments indicate that the iteration schemes, if convergent, produce almost identical solutions as those obtained by the direct elimination scheme. For diffusion dominant transport, all three iteration schemes generate convergent computations. However, for advection-diffusion equally dominant or advection dominant transport, only SUR and G-S schemes yield convergent calculations, the SOR scheme leads to divergent computations. Pointwise iteration schemes offer substantial savings in central process unit (CPU) memory over the direct elimination scheme, even for the small, two-dimensional verification example, without complicating the programming efforts and, in the meantime, keeps the CPU time comparable. A realistic, hypothetical problem is used to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of pointwise iterations and direct elimination schemes. The saving in CPU memory using the pointwise iterations is more than tenfold that using the direct elimination solution for this hypothetical problem. The saving in CPU time is even better, more than 40 fold.

  17. A particle-mesh algorithm for advection-reaction-diffusion equations with applications to plankton modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparella, F.; Oliveri, F.

    2009-04-01

    The interplay of advection, reaction and diffusion terms in ADR equations is a rather difficult one to be modeled numerically. The kind of spurious oscillations that is usually harmless for non-reacting scalars is often amplified without bounds by reaction terms. Furthermore, in most biogeochimical applications, such as mesoscale or global-scale plankton modeling, the diffusive fluxes may be smaller than the numerical ones. Inspired by the particle-mesh methods used by cosmologists, we propose to discretize on a grid only the diffusive term of the equation, and solve the advection-reaction terms as ordinary differential equations along the characteristic lines. Diffusion happens by letting the concentration field carried by each particle to relax towards the diffusive field known on the grid, without redistributing the particles. This method, in the limit of vanishing diffusivity and for a fixed mesh size, recovers the advection-reaction solution with no numerical diffusion. We show some example numerical solutions of the ADR equations stemming from a simple predator-prey model.

  18. An advection scheme based on the combination of particle mesh method and pure Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenic, Ilija; Mihailovic, Dragutin T.; Kapor, Darko

    2011-11-01

    Possibility of using pure Lagrangian approach in modeling transport phenomena is described in this paper. The application of pure Lagrangian approach in real atmospheric field induces highly irregular spatial distribution of grid points, after only a few time steps. In order to avoid problems caused by that irregularity, a quasi interpolation procedure is proposed. Proposed interpolation procedure is similar to the radial basis functions interpolation and does not impose any demands about spatial distribution of the grid points or about continuity and differentiability of the field that needs to be interpolated. Besides that, proposed procedure is explicitly mass conserving. Combination of particle mesh method and pure Lagrangian approach creates efficient transport scheme that does not produce any new local maxima and minima in advected field. In proposed advection scheme motion of points are performed in Lagrangian manner while spatial derivatives are evaluated on the basis of values interpolated onto regular grid. Applicability of proposed advection scheme in an unambiguous way is proved by performing "standard" numerical tests with (i) the slotted cylinder under solid body rotation, (ii) the test with Doswell's idealized cyclogenesis as well as (iii) integration of shallow water equations.

  19. Anisotropic Turbulent Advection of a Passive Vector Field: Effects of the Finite Correlation Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    The turbulent passive advection under the environment (velocity) field with finite correlation time is studied. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is investigated by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and prescribed pair correlation function. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations and depend on the relation between the exponents in the energy energy spectrum ɛ ∝ k⊥1-ξ and the dispersion law ω ∝ k⊥2-η . The corresponding anomalous exponents are associated with the critical dimensions of tensor composite operators built solely of the passive vector field itself. In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale L has a logarithmic behavior: instead of power-like corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of L. Due to the presence of the anisotropy in the model, all multiloop diagrams are equal to zero, thus this result is exact.

  20. Advection-Dominant MHD Computation for External Kinks and Edge-Localized Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Separation of temporal and spatial scales is the primary consideration for computation of macroscopic dynamics in magnetically confined plasma. Dynamic shock capturing is not needed, but nonlinear external kinks and ELMs advect large gradients near the plasma surface. Using an implicit time-advance with Galerkin projection can be problematic in these applications when advection is stronger than dissipation on the spatial scale of the mesh. The applied math community has investigated many approaches to stabilizing numerical advection. One approach is the least-squares finite element method, which has previously been applied to MHD and plasma-fluid models. Here, we adapt this technique for MHD computation with the NIMROD code, starting with the scalar dependent fields that need to have definite sign: density and temperature. Time-splitting physical diffusion maintains the original size of the algebraic systems that are solved at each time-step. Upwinding explicit terms where derivatives are discontinuous avoids overshoot error while minimizing numerical dissipation. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  1. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  2. Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Performance for Contoured Endwall Stators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Haas, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Comparisons between predicted and experimental stator losses showed that the analysis was able to predict the change in stator loss when contoured endwalls with highly three dimensional passage geometry were used. The level of loss was predicted to within 75 percent of that measured. The predicted loss was due only to profile loss and boundary layer growth on the endwalls. The 25 percent difference was approximately 0.015 at design pressure ratio. The analysis was shown to predict the trend in stator flow angle, even for small stator geometries.

  3. Evaluation of body contouring surgery today: a 30-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Pitanguy, I

    2000-04-01

    Concepts of beauty have been continuously evolving throughout the history of mankind. The voluptuous figures that were idealized by artists in the past have been substituted by slimmer forms. Medical advances in this century have permitted safe and efficient surgical correction of contour deformities. Until recently, these alterations were mostly hidden under heavy clothing or were accepted reluctantly. Current fashion trends generally promote body-revealing attire. The media frequently encourage the importance of fitness and good health, linking these qualities with youthfulness and beauty. The subliminal and the overt message is that these are necessary and desirable requirements for social acceptance and professional success.

  4. Laser Welding Of Contoured Thin-Wall Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Lyle B.; Oleksiak, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    Superalloy parts joined with less distortion. Carbon dioxide laser beam directed by optics in numerically controlled robot arm welds shell-type turbopump housings having complicated shapes. 5-kW laser, following single programmed three-dimensional pass, produces high-quality, full-penetration weld pass in age-hardenable nickel superalloy. Operator easily programs robot by using teaching pendant to track weld joint and keeps laser focused on workpiece while following contour of shell. Shells welded in rapid succession, with minimal change in setup for each.

  5. The Effect of Local Orientation Change on the Detection of Contours Defined by Constant Curvature: Psychophysics and Image Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Khuu, Sieu K.; Cham, Joey; Hayes, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the detection of contours defined by constant curvature and the statistics of curved contours in natural scenes. In Experiment 1, we examined the degree to which human sensitivity to contours is affected by changing the curvature angle and disrupting contour curvature continuity by varying the orientation of end elements. We find that (1) changing the angle of contour curvature decreased detection performance, while (2) end elements oriented in the direction (i.e., clockwise) of curvature facilitated contour detection regardless of the curvature angle of the contour. In Experiment 2 we further established that the relative effect of end—element orientation on contour detection was not only dependent on their orientation (collinear or cocircular), but also their spatial separation from the contour, and whether the contour shape was curved or not (i.e., C-shaped or S-shaped). Increasing the spatial separation of end-elements reduced contour detection performance regardless of their orientation or the contour shape. However, at small separations, cocircular end-elements facilitated the detection of C-shaped contours, but not S-shaped contours. The opposite result was observed for collinear end-elements, which improved the detection of S- shaped, but not C-shaped contours. These dissociative results confirmed that the visual system specifically codes contour curvature, but the association of contour elements occurs locally. Finally, we undertook an analysis of natural images that mapped contours with a constant angular change and determined the frequency of occurrence of end elements with different orientations. Analogous to our behavioral data, this image analysis revealed that the mapped end elements of constantly curved contours are likely to be oriented clockwise to the angle of curvature. Our findings indicate that the visual system is selectively sensitive to contours defined by constant curvature and that this might

  6. The Effect of Local Orientation Change on the Detection of Contours Defined by Constant Curvature: Psychophysics and Image Statistics.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Sieu K; Cham, Joey; Hayes, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the detection of contours defined by constant curvature and the statistics of curved contours in natural scenes. In Experiment 1, we examined the degree to which human sensitivity to contours is affected by changing the curvature angle and disrupting contour curvature continuity by varying the orientation of end elements. We find that (1) changing the angle of contour curvature decreased detection performance, while (2) end elements oriented in the direction (i.e., clockwise) of curvature facilitated contour detection regardless of the curvature angle of the contour. In Experiment 2 we further established that the relative effect of end-element orientation on contour detection was not only dependent on their orientation (collinear or cocircular), but also their spatial separation from the contour, and whether the contour shape was curved or not (i.e., C-shaped or S-shaped). Increasing the spatial separation of end-elements reduced contour detection performance regardless of their orientation or the contour shape. However, at small separations, cocircular end-elements facilitated the detection of C-shaped contours, but not S-shaped contours. The opposite result was observed for collinear end-elements, which improved the detection of S- shaped, but not C-shaped contours. These dissociative results confirmed that the visual system specifically codes contour curvature, but the association of contour elements occurs locally. Finally, we undertook an analysis of natural images that mapped contours with a constant angular change and determined the frequency of occurrence of end elements with different orientations. Analogous to our behavioral data, this image analysis revealed that the mapped end elements of constantly curved contours are likely to be oriented clockwise to the angle of curvature. Our findings indicate that the visual system is selectively sensitive to contours defined by constant curvature and that this might reflect

  7. The role of shape complexity in the detection of closed contours.

    PubMed

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The detection of contours in noise has been extensively studied, but the detection of closed contours, such as the boundaries of whole objects, has received relatively little attention. Closed contours pose substantial challenges not present in the simple (open) case, because they form the outlines of whole shapes and thus take on a range of potentially important configural properties. In this paper we consider the detection of closed contours in noise as a probabilistic decision problem. Previous work on open contours suggests that contour complexity, quantified as the negative log probability (Description Length, DL) of the contour under a suitably chosen statistical model, impairs contour detectability; more complex (statistically surprising) contours are harder to detect. In this study we extended this result to closed contours, developing a suitable probabilistic model of whole shapes that gives rise to several distinct though interrelated measures of shape complexity. We asked subjects to detect either natural shapes (Exp. 1) or experimentally manipulated shapes (Exp. 2) embedded in noise fields. We found systematic effects of global shape complexity on detection performance, demonstrating how aspects of global shape and form influence the basic process of object detection.

  8. The Poggendorff illusion driven by real and illusory contour: Behavioral and neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The Poggendorff illusion refers to the phenomenon that the human brain misperceives a diagonal line as being apparently misaligned once the diagonal line is interrupted by two parallel edges, and the size of illusion is negatively correlated with the angle of interception of the oblique, i.e. the sharper the oblique angle, the larger the illusion. This optical illusion can be produced by both real and illusory contour. In this fMRI study, by parametrically varying the oblique angle, we investigated the shared and specific neural mechanisms underlying the Poggendorff illusion induced by real and illusory contour. At the behavioral level, not only the real but also the illusory contours were capable of inducing significant Poggendorff illusion. The size of illusion induced by the real contour, however, was larger than that induced by the illusory contour. At the neural level, real and illusory contours commonly activated more dorsal visual areas, and the real contours specifically activated more ventral visual areas. More importantly, examinations on the parametric modulation effects of the size of illusion revealed the specific neural mechanisms underlying the Poggendorff illusion induced by the real and the illusory contours, respectively. Left precentral gyrus and right middle occipital cortex were specifically involved in the Poggendorff illusion induced by the real contour. On the other hand, bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and right lateral occipital complex (LOC) were specifically involved in the Poggendorff illusion induced by the illusory contour. Functional implications of the above findings were further discussed.

  9. Independence of the completion effect from the noncompletion effect in illusory contour perception.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junkai; Yue, Zhenzhu; Wu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Spatially separated object information can be effortlessly completed in the visual system, as demonstrated by the well-known Kanizsa-type illusory contours. The perception of illusory contours is closely associated with the spatial configuration of contour fragments, leading to the long-lasting difficulty in distinguishing the effect of the completion process that interpolates the contour fragments from the effect of the noncompletion process that analyzes the contour fragments. However, a close relationship does not necessarily imply nonindependence, e.g., two people may show similar behaviors in one situation but may not in another situation. Inspired by this simple common sense, we conducted a contour discrimination task (i.e., discriminating between the interpolated contours) and a fragment discrimination task (i.e., discriminating between the physically-specified contour fragments) for Kanizsa squares and Kanizsa circles. The performance difference between the contour and fragment discrimination tasks was much larger for Kanizsa circles than for Kanizsa squares. This independence of the completion effect--as indicated by the performance in the contour task--from the noncompletion effect--as indicated by the performance in the fragment task--provides new insights into the understanding of the mechanism of visual completion.

  10. An automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation.

    PubMed

    Beasley, William J; McWilliam, Alan; Slevin, Nicholas J; Mackay, Ranald I; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-12-21

    Contour propagation is an essential component of adaptive radiotherapy, but current contour propagation algorithms are not yet sufficiently accurate to be used without manual supervision. Manual review of propagated contours is time-consuming, making routine implementation of real-time adaptive radiotherapy unrealistic. Automated methods of monitoring the performance of contour propagation algorithms are therefore required. We have developed an automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation and validated it on a cohort of head and neck patients, on which parotids were outlined by two observers. Two types of error were simulated-mislabelling of contours and introducing noise in the scans before propagation. The ability of the workflow to correctly predict the occurrence of errors was tested, taking both sets of observer contours as ground truth, using receiver operator characteristic analysis. The area under the curve was 0.90 and 0.85 for the observers, indicating good ability to predict the occurrence of errors. This tool could potentially be used to identify propagated contours that are likely to be incorrect, acting as a flag for manual review of these contours. This would make contour propagation more efficient, facilitating the routine implementation of adaptive radiotherapy.

  11. An automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, William J.; McWilliam, Alan; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Mackay, Ranald I.; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Contour propagation is an essential component of adaptive radiotherapy, but current contour propagation algorithms are not yet sufficiently accurate to be used without manual supervision. Manual review of propagated contours is time-consuming, making routine implementation of real-time adaptive radiotherapy unrealistic. Automated methods of monitoring the performance of contour propagation algorithms are therefore required. We have developed an automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation and validated it on a cohort of head and neck patients, on which parotids were outlined by two observers. Two types of error were simulated—mislabelling of contours and introducing noise in the scans before propagation. The ability of the workflow to correctly predict the occurrence of errors was tested, taking both sets of observer contours as ground truth, using receiver operator characteristic analysis. The area under the curve was 0.90 and 0.85 for the observers, indicating good ability to predict the occurrence of errors. This tool could potentially be used to identify propagated contours that are likely to be incorrect, acting as a flag for manual review of these contours. This would make contour propagation more efficient, facilitating the routine implementation of adaptive radiotherapy.

  12. Surface contouring by controlled application of processing fluid using Marangoni effect

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.; Britten, Jerald A.

    2003-04-29

    An apparatus and method for modifying the surface of an object by contacting said surface with a liquid processing solution using the liquid applicator geometry and Marangoni effect (surface tension gradient-driven flow) to define and confine the dimensions of the wetted zone on said object surface. In particular, the method and apparatus involve contouring or figuring the surface of an object using an etchant solution as the wetting fluid and using realtime metrology (e.g. interferometry) to control the placement and dwell time of this wetted zone locally on the surface of said object, thereby removing material from the surface of the object in a controlled manner. One demonstrated manifestation is in the deterministic optical figuring of thin glasses by wet chemical etching using a buffered hydrofluoric acid solution and Marangoni effect.

  13. Flextensional ultrasonic motor using the contour mode of a square piezoelectric plate.

    PubMed

    Leinvuo, Joni T; Wilson, Stephen A; Whatmore, Roger W

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new type of standing wave piezoelectric ultrasonic motor. The motor uses a metallic flextensional amplifier, or cymbal, to convert the contour mode vibrations of a square piezoelectric ceramic plate into flexural oscillations, which are further converted to produce rotary actuation by means of an elastic-fin friction drive. The motor operates on a single-phase electrical supply. A beryllium copper rotor design with three-fin configuration was adopted, and the geometry was varied to include different material thicknesses, fin lengths, and inclinations. The best stall torque and no load speed for a 25-mm square motor were 0.72 Nmm and 895 r/minute, respectively. The behavior of the stator structure was analyzed by ANSYS finite element software using harmonic and modal analyses. The vibration mode estimated by finite element modeling (FEM) was confirmed by laser Doppler vibration measurements.

  14. MEMS switching of contour-mode aluminum nitride resonators for switchable and reconfigurable radio frequency filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordquist, Christopher D.; Branch, Darren W.; Pluym, Tammy; Choi, Sukwon; Nguyen, Janet H.; Grine, Alejandro; Dyck, Christopher W.; Scott, Sean M.; Sing, Molly N.; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2016-10-01

    Switching of transducer coupling in aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators provides an enabling technology for future tunable and reconfigurable filters for multi-function RF systems. By using microelectromechanical capacitive switches to realize the transducer electrode fingers, coupling between the metal electrode finger and the piezoelectric material is modulated to change the response of the device. On/off switched width extensional resonators with an area of  <0.2 mm2 demonstrate a Q of 2000, K 2 of 0.72, and  >24 dB switching ratio at a resonator center frequency of 635 MHz. Other device examples include a 63 MHz resonator with switchable impedance and a 470 MHz resonator with 127 kHz of fine center frequency tuning accomplished by mass loading of the resonator with the MEMS switches.

  15. Reconstruction of bony facial contour deficiencies with polymethylmethacrylate implants: case report

    PubMed Central

    ABDO FILHO, Ruy C. C.; OLIVEIRA, Thais M.; LOURENÇO, Natalino; GURGEL, Carla; ABDO, Ruy C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Facial trauma can be considered one of the most serious aggressions found in the medical centers due to the emotional consequences and the possibility of deformity. In craniofacial surgery, the use of autologous bone is still the first choice for reconstructing bony defects or irregularities. When there is a shortage of donor bone or a patient refuses an intracranial operation, alloplastic materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) can be used. The PMMA prosthesis can be pre-fabricated, bringing advantages such as reduction of surgical time, easy technical handling and good esthetic results. This paper describes the procedures for rehabilitating a patient with PMMA implants in the region of the face, recovering the facial contours and esthetics of the patient. PMID:21952926

  16. Design optimization studies for large-scale contoured beam deployable satellite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    Satellite communications systems over the past two decades have become more sophisticated and evolved new applications that require much higher flux densities. These new requirements to provide high data rate services to very small user terminals have in turn led to the need for large aperture space antenna systems with higher gain. Conventional parabolic reflectors constructed of metal have become, over time, too massive to support these new missions in a cost effective manner and also have posed problems of fitting within the constrained volume of launch vehicles. Designers of new space antenna systems have thus begun to explore new design options. These design options for advanced space communications networks include such alternatives as inflatable antennas using polyimide materials, antennas constructed of piezo-electric materials, phased array antenna systems (especially in the EHF bands) and deployable antenna systems constructed of wire mesh or cabling systems. This article updates studies being conducted in Japan of such deployable space antenna systems [H. Tanaka, M.C. Natori, Shape control of space antennas consisting of cable networks, Acta Astronautica 55 (2004) 519-527]. In particular, this study shows how the design of such large-scale deployable antenna systems can be optimized based on various factors including the frequency bands to be employed with such innovative reflector design. In particular, this study investigates how contoured beam space antennas can be effective by constructed out of so-called cable networks or mesh-like reflectors. This design can be accomplished via "plane wave synthesis" and by the "force density method" and then to iterate the design to achieve the optimum solution. We have concluded that the best design is achieved by plane wave synthesis. Further, we demonstrate that the nodes on the reflector are best determined by a pseudo-inverse calculation of the matrix that can be interpolated so as to achieve the minimum

  17. A new Remesh-Lagrange technique for advecting temperature that minimizes numerical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, J.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Shi, C.

    2007-12-01

    The proper treatment of heat-advection is a generally underappreciated problem within CFD, yet particularly critical for calculating physically sound erosion in plume-lithosphere interactions and temperature sensitive melting processes. Typically, Eulerian (fixed-mesh) codes have been preferred to solve for fluid flow and they are almost essential for finite-difference-based algorithms. Unfortunately, the Eulerian approach introduces numerical artifacts into the solution of the advection-diffusion heat transport problem that can only be suppressed by adding 'too-diffusive' artificial diffusion to the equations, as for example in the Smolarkiewicz formulation for heat advection. We have developed a 'Remesh-Lagrange' method using a partly deforming finite element mesh and find it to be significantly more accurate than our previous methods. In several test scenarios we show the large improvement in accuracy that can be obtained by using a Lagrangian approach for 10-30 time steps (depending upon the distortion of the finite elements in the deformed Lagrangian mesh) and then regridding to the initial mesh. When an element becomes too distorted the nodes connected to it become fixed and we switch from Lagrange to a Semi-Lagrange formulation for these nodes. Instead of the standard 'linear backward' Semi-Lagrange we are also experimenting with a more accurate interpolation scheme for an unstructured mesh that additionally includes the nodal derivatives of the temperature field when calculating the value at the Semi-Lagrange traceback point. The same bicubic interpolation method for an unstructured grid is used to remesh the 'too-distorted' Lagrange grid back to the initial undistorted mesh. We compare the Remesh-Lagrange technique against the following Eulerian methods in a series of 2-D numerical experiments advecting stripes and Gaussian peaks in steady circulating flow: linear back-interpolation Semi-Lagrange method; bicubic back-interpolation Semi-Lagrange method

  18. Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) Contouring Atlas and Planning Guidelines for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Michael; Leong, Trevor; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Wiltshire, Kirsty; Ngan, Samuel; Kachnic, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a high-resolution target volume atlas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning guidelines for the conformal treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A draft contouring atlas and planning guidelines for anal cancer IMRT were prepared at the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) annual meeting in September 2010. An expert panel of radiation oncologists contoured an anal cancer case to generate discussion on recommendations regarding target definition for gross disease, elective nodal volumes, and organs at risk (OARs). Clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins, dose fractionation, and other IMRT-specific issues were also addressed. A steering committee produced the final consensus guidelines. Results: Detailed contouring and planning guidelines and a high-resolution atlas are provided. Gross tumor and elective target volumes are described and pictorially depicted. All elective regions should be routinely contoured for all disease stages, with the possible exception of the inguinal and high pelvic nodes for select, early-stage T1N0. A 20-mm CTV margin for the primary, 10- to 20-mm CTV margin for involved nodes and a 7-mm CTV margin for the elective pelvic nodal groups are recommended, while respecting anatomical boundaries. A 5- to 10-mm PTV margin is suggested. When using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions to gross disease and 45 Gy to elective nodes with chemotherapy is appropriate. Guidelines are provided for OAR delineation. Conclusion: These consensus planning guidelines and high-resolution atlas complement the existing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) elective nodal ano-rectal atlas and provide additional anatomic, clinical, and technical instructions to guide radiation oncologists in the planning and delivery of IMRT for anal cancer.

  19. Segmentation of volumetric tissue images using constrained active contour models.

    PubMed

    Adiga, P S Umesh

    2003-06-01

    In this article we describe an application of active contour model for the segmentation of 3D histo-pathological images. The 3D images of a thick tissue specimen are obtained as a stack of optical sections using confocal laser beam scanning microscope (CLSM). We have applied noise reduction and feature enhancement methods so that a smooth and slowly varying potential surface is obtained for proper convergence. To increase the capture range of the potential surface, we use a combination of distance potential and the diffused gradient potential as external forces. It has been shown that the region-based information obtained from low-level segmentation can be applied to reduce the adverse influence of the neighbouring nucleus having a strong boundary feature. We have also shown that, by increasing the axial resolution of the image stack, we can automatically propagate the optimum active contour of one image slice to its neighbouring image slices as an appropriate initial model. Results on images of prostate tissue section are presented.

  20. Fast Virtual Stenting with Active Contour Models in Intracranical Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jingru; Long, Yunling; Yan, Huagang; Meng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial stents are becoming increasingly a useful option in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Image simulation of the releasing stent configuration together with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation prior to intervention will help surgeons optimize intervention scheme. This paper proposed a fast virtual stenting of IAs based on active contour model (ACM) which was able to virtually release stents within any patient-specific shaped vessel and aneurysm models built on real medical image data. In this method, an initial stent mesh was generated along the centerline of the parent artery without the need for registration between the stent contour and the vessel. Additionally, the diameter of the initial stent volumetric mesh was set to the maximum inscribed sphere diameter of the parent artery to improve the stenting accuracy and save computational cost. At last, a novel criterion for terminating virtual stent expanding that was based on the collision detection of the axis aligned bounding boxes was applied, making the stent expansion free of edge effect. The experiment results of the virtual stenting and the corresponding CFD simulations exhibited the efficacy and accuracy of the ACM based method, which are valuable to intervention scheme selection and therapy plan confirmation. PMID:26876026