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Sample records for advection transport algorithm

  1. Pathways for Advective Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-19

    the approach is given and an application to the Gulf of Mexico is described where the analysis precisely identifies the boundaries of coherent vortical structures as well as pathways for advective transport.

  2. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  3. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  4. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  5. Parallel algorithms for semi-lagrangian advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevsky, A. V.; Thomas, S. J.

    1997-08-01

    Numerical time step limitations associated with the explicit treatment of advection-dominated problems in computational fluid dynamics are often relaxed by employing Eulerian-Lagrangian methods. These are also known as semi-Lagrangian methods in the atmospheric sciences. Such methods involve backward time integration of a characteristic equation to find the departure point of a fluid particle arriving at a Eulerian grid point. The value of the advected field at the departure point is obtained by interpolation. Both the trajectory integration and repeated interpolation influence accuracy. We compare the accuracy and performance of interpolation schemes based on piecewise cubic polynomials and cubic B-splines in the context of a distributed memory, parallel computing environment. The computational cost and interprocessor communication requirements for both methods are reported. Spline interpolation has better conservation properties but requires the solution of a global linear system, initially appearing to hinder a distributed memory implementation. The proposed parallel algorithm for multidimensional spline interpolation has almost the same communication overhead as local piecewise polynomial interpolation. We also compare various techniques for tracking trajectories given different values for the Courant number. Large Courant numbers require a high-order ODE solver involving multiple interpolations of the velocity field.

  6. AN EXACT PEAK CAPTURING AND OSCILLATION-FREE SCHEME TO SOLVE ADVECTION-DISPERSION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exact peak capturing and essentially oscillation-free (EPCOF) algorithm, consisting of advection-dispersion decoupling, backward method of characteristics, forward node tracking, and adaptive local grid refinement, is developed to solve transport equations. This algorithm repr...

  7. An operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Liaqat Ali; Liu, Philip L.-F.

    1998-09-01

    Operator splitting algorithms are frequently used for solving the advection-diffusion equation, especially to deal with advection dominated transport problems. In this paper an operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation is presented. The algorithm represents a second-order-accurate adaptation of the Holly and Preissmann scheme for three-dimensional problems. The governing equation is split into an advection equation and a diffusion equation, and they are solved by a backward method of characteristics and a finite element method, respectively. The Hermite interpolation function is used for interpolation of concentration in the advection step. The spatial gradients of concentration in the Hermite interpolation are obtained by solving equations for concentration gradients in the advection step. To make the composite algorithm efficient, only three equations for first-order concentration derivatives are solved in the diffusion step of computation. The higher-order spatial concentration gradients, necessary to advance the solution in a computational cycle, are obtained by numerical differentiations based on the available information. The simulation characteristics and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several advection dominated transport problems.

  8. A convexity preserving scheme for conservative advection transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng; Peng, Xindong

    2004-08-01

    A simple and practical scheme for advection transport equation is presented. The scheme, namely piecewise rational method (PRM), is a variant of the existing piecewise parabolic method (PPM) of Colella and Woodward (1984). Instead of the parabolic function, a rational function is used for the reconstruction. Making use of the convexity preserving nature of the rational function enables us to obtain oscillation-less numerical solutions, but avoids the adjustments of the cell-interface values to enforce the monotonicity in PPM. The PRM is very simple and computationally efficient. Our numerical results show that PRM is competitive to the PPM in many aspects, such as numerical accuracy and shape-preserving property.

  9. Thermally driven advection for radioxenon transport from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-05-01

    Barometric pumping is a ubiquitous process resulting in migration of gases in the subsurface that has been studied as the primary mechanism for noble gas transport from an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). However, at early times following a UNE, advection driven by explosion residual heat is relevant to noble gas transport. A rigorous measure is needed for demonstrating how, when, and where advection is important. In this paper three physical processes of uncertain magnitude (oscillatory advection, matrix diffusion, and thermally driven advection) are parameterized by using boundary conditions, system properties, and source term strength. Sobol' sensitivity analysis is conducted to evaluate the importance of all physical processes influencing the xenon signals. This study indicates that thermally driven advection plays a more important role in producing xenon signals than oscillatory advection and matrix diffusion at early times following a UNE, and xenon isotopic ratios are observed to have both time and spatial dependence.

  10. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  11. SEBAL-A: A remote sensing ET algorithm that accounts for advection with limited data. Part II: Test for transferability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) tends to underestimate ET under conditions of advection, the model was modified by incorporating an advection component as part of the energy usable for crop evapotranspiration (ET). The modification involved the estimation of advected en...

  12. Theory of advection-driven long range biotic transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple mechanistic model to examine the effects of advective flow on the spread of fungal diseases spread by wind-blown spores. The model is defined by a set of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for spore densities. One equation describes the long-distance advectiv...

  13. Rigorous upper bounds for fluid and plasma transport due to passive advection

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.; Kim, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    The formulation of variational principles for transport due to passive advection is described. A detailed account of the work has been published elsewhere. In the present paper, the motivations, philosophy, and implications of the method are briefly discussed. 15 refs.

  14. Contour advection with surgery: A technique for investigating finescale structure in tracer transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Plumb, R. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We present a trajectory technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), for tracing the evolution of material contours in a specified (including observed) evolving flow. CAS uses the algorithms developed by Dritschel for contour dynamics/surgery to trace the evolution of specified contours. The contours are represented by a series of particles, which are advected by a specified, gridded, wind distribution. The resolution of the contours is preserved by continually adjusting the number of particles, and finescale features are produced that are not present in the input data (and cannot easily be generated using standard trajectory techniques). The reliability, and dependence on the spatial and temporal resolution of the wind field, of the CAS procedure is examined by comparisons with high-resolution numerical data (from contour dynamics calculations and from a general circulation model), and with routine stratospheric analyses. These comparisons show that the large-scale motions dominate the deformation field and that CAS can accurately reproduce small scales from low-resolution wind fields. The CAS technique therefore enables examination of atmospheric tracer transport at previously unattainable resolution.

  15. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  16. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  17. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  18. THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN GEOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AND ADVECTION-DISPERSION IN CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AT A URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface are controlled by complex processes including advection, dispersion-diffusion, and chemical reactions. However, the interplay between the physical transport processes and chemical reactions, and their...

  19. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  20. New Solution of Diffusion-Advection Equation for Cosmic-Ray Transport Using Ultradistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we exactly solve the diffusion-advection equation (DAE) for cosmic-ray transport. For such a purpose we use the Theory of Ultradistributions of J. Sebastiao e Silva, to give a general solution for the DAE. From the ensuing solution, we obtain several approximations as limiting cases of various situations of physical and astrophysical interest. One of them involves Solar cosmic-rays' diffusion.

  1. Analytical solution for one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Guerrero, J. S.; Skaggs, T. H.

    2010-08-01

    SummaryMathematical models describing contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media are often formulated as an advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent transport coefficients. In this work, a general analytical solution is presented for the linear, one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation with distance-dependent coefficients. An integrating factor is employed to obtain a transport equation that has a self-adjoint differential operator, and a solution is found using the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). It is demonstrated that an analytical expression for the integrating factor exists for several transport equation formulations of practical importance in groundwater transport modeling. Unlike nearly all solutions available in the literature, the current solution is developed for a finite spatial domain. As an illustration, solutions for the particular case of a linearly increasing dispersivity are developed in detail and results are compared with solutions from the literature. Among other applications, the current analytical solution will be particularly useful for testing or benchmarking numerical transport codes because of the incorporation of a finite spatial domain.

  2. Developing a modified SEBAL algorithm that is responsive to advection by using limited weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhwanazi, Mcebisi

    The use of Remote Sensing ET algorithms in water management, especially for agricultural purposes is increasing, and there are more models being introduced. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) and its variant, Mapping Evapotranspiration with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) are some of the models that are being widely used. While SEBAL has several advantages over other RS models, including that it does not require prior knowledge of soil, crop and other ground details, it has the downside of underestimating evapotranspiration (ET) on days when there is advection, which may be in most cases in arid and semi-arid areas. METRIC, however has been modified to be able to account for advection, but in doing so it requires hourly weather data. In most developing countries, while accurate estimates of ET are required, the weather data necessary to use METRIC may not be available. This research therefore was meant to develop a modified version of SEBAL that would require minimal weather data that may be available in these areas, and still estimate ET accurately. The data that were used to develop this model were minimum and maximum temperatures, wind data, preferably the run of wind in the afternoon, and wet bulb temperature. These were used to quantify the advected energy that would increase ET in the field. This was a two-step process; the first was developing the model for standard conditions, which was described as a healthy cover of alfalfa, 40-60 cm tall and not short of water. Under standard conditions, when estimated ET using modified SEBAL was compared with lysimeter-measured ET, the modified SEBAL model had a Mean Bias Error (MBE) of 2.2 % compared to -17.1 % from the original SEBAL. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was lower for the modified SEBAL model at 10.9 % compared to 25.1 % for the original SEBAL. The modified SEBAL model, developed on an alfalfa field in Rocky Ford, was then tested on other crops; beans and wheat. It was also tested on

  3. Thermal advection and stratification effects on surface winds and the low level meridional mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, Felice S.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical tests are performed on the Seasat scatterometer observations to examine if and to what degree thermal advection and stratification effects manifest themselves in these remotely sensed measurements of mean wind and wind stress over the ocean. On the basis of a two layer baroclinic boundary layer model which is presented, it is shown that the thermal advection and stratification of the entire boundary layer as well as the geostrophic forcing influence the modeled near surface wind and wind stress profiles. Evidence of diurnal variation in the stratification under barotropic conditions is found in the data, with the daytime marine boundary layer being more convective than its nighttime counterpart. The temporal and spacial sampling pattern of the satellite makes it impossible to recover the full diurnal cycle, however. The observed effects of the thermal advection are shown to be statistically significant during the day (and presumed more convective) hours, causing a systematic increase in the poleward transport of mass and heat. The statistical results are in a qualitative agreement with the model simulations and cannot be reproduced in randomized control tests.

  4. Advective-diffusive/dispersive transport of chemically reacting species in hydrothermal systems. Final report, FY83-85

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1986-06-20

    A general formulation of multi-phase fluid flow coupled to chemical reactions was developed based on a continuum description of porous media. A preliminary version of the computer code MCCTM was constructed which implemented the general equations for a single phase fluid. The computer code MCCTM incorporates mass transport by advection-diffusion/dispersion in a one-dimensional porous medium coupled to reversible and irreversible, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions. These reactions include aqueous complexing, oxidation/reduction reactions, ion exchange, and hydrolysis reactions of stoichiometric minerals. The code MCCTM uses a fully implicit finite difference algorithm. The code was tested against analytical calculations. Applications of the code included investigation of the propagation of sharp chemical reaction fronts, metasomatic alteration of microcline at elevated temperatures and pressures, and ion-exchange in a porous column. Finally numerical calculations describing fluid flow in crystalline rock in the presence of a temperature gradient were compared with experimental results for quartzite.

  5. An advection-diffusion model for cross-field runaway electron transport in perturbed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Särkimäki, Konsta; Hirvijoki, Eero; Decker, Joan; Varje, Jari; Kurki-Suonio, Taina

    2016-12-01

    Disruption-generated runaway electrons (RE) present an outstanding issue for ITER. The predictive computational studies of RE generation rely on orbit-averaged computations and, as such, they lack the effects from the magnetic field stochasticity. Since stochasticity is naturally present in post-disruption plasma, and externally induced stochastization offers a prominent mechanism to mitigate RE avalanche, we present an advection-diffusion model that can be used to couple an orbit-following code to an orbit-averaged tool in order to capture the cross-field transport and to overcome the latter’s limitation. The transport coefficients are evaluated via a Monte Carlo method. We show that the diffusion coefficient differs significantly from the well-known Rechester-Rosenbluth result. We also demonstrate the importance of including the advection: it has a two-fold role both in modelling transport barriers created by magnetic islands and in amplifying losses in regions where the islands are not present.

  6. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  7. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  8. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  9. Simulation of the advective methane transport and AOM in Shenhu area, the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wu, N.

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) occurs in the transition zone between the presence of sulfate and methane. This reaction is an important process for methane and the global carbon cycle. Methane gas hydrates bearing sediments were recovered in Shenhu Area, the Northern South China Sea, and methane advective transport was detected in this area as well. A one dimension numerical simulation tool was implemented to study the AOM process combined with the advective methane transport in Shenhu Area according to the local drilling data and geochemical information. The modeled results suggest that local methane flux will be consumed in the sediment column via dissolution, sorption and AOM reaction. A portion of methane will enter water column and possibly atmosphere if the methane flux was one order of magnitude higher than current level. Furthermore, the calculated rates of AOM in Shenhu area range similar to that of gas hydrate mounds in Mexico Golf. However, AOM is ability to consume more methane than that in Golf of Mexico due to the lower permeable sediment associated with a deeper sulfate methane transition layer.

  10. Renormalization group estimates of transport coefficients in the advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George

    1993-01-01

    The advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence is considered using recursive renormalization group procedures in the differential sub grid shell thickness limit. It is shown explicitly that the higher order nonlinearities induced by the recursive renormalization group procedure preserve Galilean invariance. Differential equations, valid for the entire resolvable wave number k range, are determined for the eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity coefficients, and it is shown that higher order nonlinearities do not contribute as k goes to 0, but have an essential role as k goes to k(sub c) the cutoff wave number separating the resolvable scales from the sub grid scales. The recursive renormalization transport coefficients and the associated eddy Prandtl number are in good agreement with the k-dependent transport coefficients derived from closure theories and experiments.

  11. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August

  12. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bruce S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Passeport, Elodie; Sleep, Brent E

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining "observable" DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C0), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (Dmech/Deff). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C0/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C0/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (<100years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with "typical" well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where Dmech/Deff is larger than 10, DRIF effects will likely not be

  13. Single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme for advection-diffusion problems with large diffusion-coefficient heterogeneities and high-advection transport.

    PubMed

    Perko, Janez; Patel, Ravi A

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an approach that extends the flexibility of the standard lattice Boltzmann single relaxation time scheme in terms of spatial variation of dissipative terms (e.g., diffusion coefficient) and stability for high Péclet mass transfer problems. Spatial variability of diffusion coefficient in SRT is typically accommodated through the variation of relaxation time during the collision step. This method is effective but cannot deal with large diffusion coefficient variations, which can span over several orders of magnitude in some natural systems. The approach explores an alternative way of dealing with large diffusion coefficient variations in advection-diffusion transport systems by introducing so-called diffusion velocity. The diffusion velocity is essentially an additional convective term that replaces variations in diffusion coefficients vis-à-vis a chosen reference diffusion coefficient which defines the simulation time step. Special attention is paid to the main idea behind the diffusion velocity formulation and its implementation into the lattice Boltzmann framework. Finally, the performance, stability, and accuracy of the diffusion velocity formulation are discussed via several advection-diffusion transport benchmark examples. These examples demonstrate improved stability and flexibility of the proposed scheme with marginal consequences on the numerical performance.

  14. In situ measurements of advective solute transport in permeable shelf sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Stecher, Hilmar A.; Taghon, Gary L.; Fuller, Charlotte M.; Huettel, Markus; Rusch, Antje; Ryckelynck, Natacha; Wild, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Solute transport rates within the uppermost 2 cm of a rippled continental shelf sand deposit, with a mean grain size of 400-500 μm and permeabilities of 2.0-2.4×10 -11 m 2, have been measured in situ by detecting the breakthrough of a pulse of iodide after its injection into the bottom water. These tracer experiments were conducted on the USA Middle Atlantic Bight shelf at a water depth of ˜13 m using a small tethered tripod that carried a close-up video camera, acoustic current meter, motorized 1.5 liter "syringe", and a microprofiling system for positioning and operating a solid-state voltammetric microelectrode. When triggered on shipboard, the syringe delivered a 0.21 M solution of potassium iodide and red dye through five nozzles positioned around and above the buried tip of the voltammetric sensor for 0.65-5 min. Bottom turbulence rapidly mixed and dispersed the tracer, which then was carried into the bed by interfacial water flows associated with ripple topography. The advective downward transport to the sensor tip was timed by a sequence of repetitive voltammetric scans. The distance-averaged vertical velocity, expressed as the depth of the sensor tip in the sand divided by the time to iodide breakthrough, was found to vary from 6 to 53 cm h -1 and generally to decrease with sediment depth. Because of episodic pumping and dispersion associated with the greatest 5% of wave heights and current speeds recorded, some concentration vs. time responses showed evidence of uneven solute migration. For reasons of mass balance, the advective flow field in the surface layers of permeable beds includes regions of water intrusion, horizontal pore-water flow and upwelling which also may explain some of the observed uneven migration. Pore-water advection was also evident in oxygen profiles measured before and after tracer injection with the voltammetric sensor. These profiles showed irregular distributions and oxygen penetration depths of 4-4.5 cm. Sand cores from the

  15. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  16. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  17. A subordinated advection model for uniform bed load transport from local to regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Martin, Raleigh L.; Chen, Dong; Baeumer, Boris; Sun, Hongguang; Chen, Li

    2014-12-01

    Sediment tracers moving as bed load can exhibit anomalous dispersion behavior deviating from Fickian diffusion. The presence of heavy-tailed resting time distributions and thin-tailed step length distributions motivate adoption of fractional-derivative models (FDMs) to describe sediment dispersion, but these models require many parameters that are difficult to quantify. Here we propose a considerably simplified FDM for anomalous transport of uniformly sized grains along straight channels, the subordinated advection equation (SAE), which is based on the concept of time subordination. Unlike previous FDM models with time index γ between 0 and 1, our SAE model adopts a value of γ between 1 and 2. This γ describes random velocities deviating significantly from the mean velocity and models both long resting periods and relatively fast displacements. We show that the model quantifies the dynamics of four bed load transport experiments recorded in the literature. In addition to γ, SAE model parameters—velocity and capacity coefficient—are related to the mean and variance of particle velocities, respectively. Successful application of the SAE model also implies a universal probability density for the heavy-tailed waiting time distribution (with finite mean) and a relatively lighter tailed step length distribution for uniform bed load transport from local to regional scales.

  18. Transport and Recruitment of Blue Crab Larvae:a Model with Advection and Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Epifanio, C. E.; Epifanio, C. C.; Wong, K.-C.

    1997-07-01

    The present paper develops a mathematical model for the transport and recruitment of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae, and applies it to the inner continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight near Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Blue crab larvae develop through seven or eight planktonic zoeal stages to a megalopa stage suitable for recruitment to adult populations of east coast estuaries. The larvae are concentrated near the surface, and the currents are primarily forced by alongshelf winds and river discharge through major estuaries. Model currents are prescribed based on a realistic synthesis of their observed relationship to wind and river discharge. Besides the resulting advection, particle diffusion and biological mortality are added to determine the fate of larvae released from their parent estuary. Groups of particles were released across the source region of the outflowing buoyancy-driven current in the model estuary mouth. Most larvae were swept alongshelf to the south with the buoyancy-driven coastal current, and thus were lost as recruits to the population of their parent estuary. However, some larvae released close to the seaward edge of the emerging coastal current were able to cross the coastal current front and move seaward into inner shelf water during upwelling-favorable (northward) wind events. Some of these, in turn, were suitably placed near the parent estuary mouth so that they could be advected landward as megalopae into the estuary during a subsequent downwelling-favorable (southward) wind event and thus join the adult population. The model results for megalopae returns were computed from consecutive daily release of 1000 particles, and were compared with 4 years of blue crab megalopa settlement data for Delaware Bay. The model results for 1989 and 1990 matched the observed data remarkably well, with both years showing dominance by a single return event of a few days duration. For 1991 and 1992, the observed results showed multiple return events

  19. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  20. Removing volatile contaminants from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Hoag, G.E.; Marley, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Organic liquids inadvertently spilled and then distributed in the unsaturated zone can pose a long-term threat to ground water. Many of these substances have significant volatility, and thereby establish a premise for contaminant removal from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport with wells screened in the unsaturated zone. In order to focus attention on the rates of mass transfer from liquid to vapour phases, sand columns were partially saturated with gasoline and vented under steady air-flow conditions. The ability of an equilibrium-based transport model to predict the hydrocarbon vapor flux from the columns implies an efficient rate of local phase transfer for reasonably high air-phase velocities. Thus the success of venting remediations will depend primarily on the ability to induce an air-flow field in a heterogeneous unsaturated zone that will intersect the distributed contaminant. To analyze this aspect of the technique, a mathematical model was developed to predict radially symmetric air flow induced by venting from a single well. This model allows for in-situ determinations of air-phase permeability, which is the fundamental design parameter, and for the analysis of the limitations of a single well design. A successful application of the technique at a site once contaminated by gasoline supports the optimism derived from the experimental and modeliing phases of this study, and illustrates the well construction and field methods used to document the volatile contaminant recovery. ?? 1989.

  1. The predictability of advection-dominated flux-transport solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Sabrina; Fournier, Alexandre; Aubert, Julien

    2014-01-20

    Space weather is a matter of practical importance in our modern society. Predictions of forecoming solar cycles mean amplitude and duration are currently being made based on flux-transport numerical models of the solar dynamo. Interested in the forecast horizon of such studies, we quantify the predictability window of a representative, advection-dominated, flux-transport dynamo model by investigating its sensitivity to initial conditions and control parameters through a perturbation analysis. We measure the rate associated with the exponential growth of an initial perturbation of the model trajectory, which yields a characteristic timescale known as the e-folding time τ {sub e}. The e-folding time is shown to decrease with the strength of the α-effect, and to increase with the magnitude of the imposed meridional circulation. Comparing the e-folding time with the solar cycle periodicity, we obtain an average estimate for τ {sub e} equal to 2.76 solar cycle durations. From a practical point of view, the perturbations analyzed in this work can be interpreted as uncertainties affecting either the observations or the physical model itself. After reviewing these, we discuss their implications for solar cycle prediction.

  2. Numerical simulation of advective-dispersive multisolute transport with sorption, ion exchange and equilibrium chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed that can simulate the effect of certain chemical and sorption reactions simultaneously among solutes involved in advective-dispersive transport through porous media. The model is based on a methodology that utilizes physical-chemical relationships in the development of the basic solute mass-balance equations; however, the form of these equations allows their solution to be obtained by methods that do not depend on the chemical processes. The chemical environment is governed by the condition of local chemical equilibrium, and may be defined either by the linear sorption of a single species and two soluble complexation reactions which also involve that species, or binary ion exchange and one complexation reaction involving a common ion. Partial differential equations that describe solute mass balance entirely in the liquid phase are developed for each tenad (a chemical entity whose total mass is independent of the reaction process) in terms of their total dissolved concentration. These equations are solved numerically in two dimensions through the modification of an existing groundwater flow/transport computer code. (Author 's abstract)

  3. In situ experiment to determine advective-diffusive controls on solute transport in a clay-rich aquitard.

    PubMed

    Barbour, S Lee; Hendry, M Jim; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2012-04-01

    Solute transport in clay-rich aquitards is characterized as molecular diffusion- or advection-dominated based on the Péclet number (P(e)). However, few field-based measurements of the coefficient of molecular diffusion (D(e)) exist, and none with a range of advection- or diffusion-dominated conditions in the same aquitard. In this long-term field experiment, standing water in a recovering well was spiked with deuterium ((2)H), then water-level recovery and δ(2)H values were monitored as the well returned to static conditions over 1054 days. After a second (2)H spike, water levels and δ(2)H values were monitored to day 1644 while under near static conditions. Modeling of the second spike was used to define the D(e) of (2)H as (3-4)× 10(-10)m(2)s(-1) for an accessible porosity of 0.31. Reservoir concentrations from the initial spike were modeled to define the transition from advection- to diffusion-dominated transport. This occurred after 200 days, consistent with a transition in P(e) from <1 to >1 when the length term is taken as the radial extent of the tracer plume (normalized concentration <0.05). This study verifies plume extent as the characteristic length term in the calculation of P(e) and demonstrates the transition from advection- to diffusion-dominated transport as the value of P(e) decreases below unity.

  4. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-07

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  5. Assessment of nitrate transport parameters using the advection-diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Aljazzar, Taiseer; Al-Qinna, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to better understand nitrate transport in the soil system in a part of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, in Germany, and to aid in the development of groundwater protection plans. An advection-diffusion (AD) cell was used in a miscible displacement experiment setup to characterize nitrate transport in 12 different soil samples from the study area. The three nitrate sorption isotherms were tested to define the exact nitrate interaction with the soil matrix. Soils varied in their properties which in its turn explain the variations in nitrate transport rates. Soil texture and organic matter content showed to have the most important effect on nitrate recovery and retardation. The miscible displacement experiment indicated a decrease in retardation by increasing sand fraction, and an increase in retardation by increasing soil organic matter content. Soil samples with high sand fractions (up to 94 %) exhibited low nitrate sorption capacity of less than 10 %, while soils with high organic matter content showed higher sorption of about 30 %. Based on parameterization for nitrate transport equation, the pore water velocity for both sandy and loamy soils were significantly different (P < 0.001). Pore water velocity in sandy soil (about 4 × 10(-3) m/s) was about 100 to 1000 larger than in loamy soils (8.7 × 10(-5) m/s). On the other hand, the reduction in nitrate transport in soils associated with high organic matter was due to fine pore pathways clogged by fine organic colloids. It is expected that the existing micro-phobicity increased the nitrate recovery from 9 to 32 % resulting in maximum diffusion rates of about 3.5 × 10(-5) m/s(2) in sandy soils (sample number CS-04) and about 1.4 × 10(-7) m/s(2) in silt loam soils (sample number FS-02).

  6. A particle-mesh algorithm for advection-reaction-diffusion equations with applications to plankton modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparella, F.; Oliveri, F.

    2009-04-01

    The interplay of advection, reaction and diffusion terms in ADR equations is a rather difficult one to be modeled numerically. The kind of spurious oscillations that is usually harmless for non-reacting scalars is often amplified without bounds by reaction terms. Furthermore, in most biogeochimical applications, such as mesoscale or global-scale plankton modeling, the diffusive fluxes may be smaller than the numerical ones. Inspired by the particle-mesh methods used by cosmologists, we propose to discretize on a grid only the diffusive term of the equation, and solve the advection-reaction terms as ordinary differential equations along the characteristic lines. Diffusion happens by letting the concentration field carried by each particle to relax towards the diffusive field known on the grid, without redistributing the particles. This method, in the limit of vanishing diffusivity and for a fixed mesh size, recovers the advection-reaction solution with no numerical diffusion. We show some example numerical solutions of the ADR equations stemming from a simple predator-prey model.

  7. Advective transport observations with MODPATH-OBS--documentation of the MODPATH observation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Kauffman, L.K.; Hill, M.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.

    2013-01-01

    The MODPATH-OBS computer program described in this report is designed to calculate simulated equivalents for observations related to advective groundwater transport that can be represented in a quantitative way by using simulated particle-tracking data. The simulated equivalents supported by MODPATH-OBS are (1) distance from a source location at a defined time, or proximity to an observed location; (2) time of travel from an initial location to defined locations, areas, or volumes of the simulated system; (3) concentrations used to simulate groundwater age; and (4) percentages of water derived from contributing source areas. Although particle tracking only simulates the advective component of conservative transport, effects of non-conservative processes such as retardation can be approximated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity based on the properties of selected conservative tracers. This program can also account for simple decay or production, but it cannot account for diffusion. Dispersion can be represented through direct simulation of subsurface heterogeneity and the use of many particles. MODPATH-OBS acts as a postprocessor to MODPATH, so that the sequence of model runs generally required is MODFLOW, MODPATH, and MODPATH-OBS. The version of MODFLOW and MODPATH that support the version of MODPATH-OBS presented in this report are MODFLOW-2005 or MODFLOW-LGR, and MODPATH-LGR. MODFLOW-LGR is derived from MODFLOW-2005, MODPATH 5, and MODPATH 6 and supports local grid refinement. MODPATH-LGR is derived from MODPATH 5. It supports the forward and backward tracking of particles through locally refined grids and provides the output needed for MODPATH_OBS. For a single grid and no observations, MODPATH-LGR results are equivalent to MODPATH 5. MODPATH-LGR and MODPATH-OBS simulations can use nearly all of the capabilities of MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-LGR; for example, simulations may be steady-state, transient, or a combination

  8. An approximate calculation of advective gas-phase transport of 14C at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    A quasilinear partial differential equation, which describes gas-phase transport of a 14C kinematic wave through a porous medium, is derived, its sensitivity to system variables is analyzed and it is applied to one possible release scenarion at the porposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada high-level radioactive waste repository. Advection, isotope exchange between CO 2 in a flowing gas phase and HCO 3- in a static aqueous phase, and radioactive decay are incorporated. The governing equation is solved analytically by the method of characteristics. The mass fraction of 14C in the gas phase,X 14g, is controlled by radioactive decay. The relatively long half-line of 14C, about 5720 years, and the relatively shallow proposed burial depth of the radioactive waste, about 350m, requires significant retardation of the 14C wave velocity for significant reduction in X 14g. 14C wave velocity is most sensitive to temperature and pH which control the distribution of total carbon between gas and liquid phase; the greater the partitioning of carbon into the liquid phase, the greater the retardation of the 14C wave velocity and the greater the ultimate reduction in X 14g from initial conditions. Partitioning of total carbon into the liquid phase is greatest at low temperatures, < 100° C, and high pH values, > 8. Increasing water saturation also tends to retard 14C wave velocity but to a lesser extent. The governing equation has been applied using conditions that may possibly occur at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Calculations indicate that the 14C wave takes about 5900 years to reach the surface with a X 14g equal to 25 ppm. Diffusion and dispersion are not of major importance for these conditions. These calculations are approximate due to the number of assumptions involved. Discharge of 14C into the gas before the selected time would accelerate wave arrival and increase the amount of 14C reaching the surface.

  9. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  10. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  11. Comparison of estimated surface energy fluxes using METRIC and two-source algorithms for Advective Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface energy fluxes have long been recognized as playing an important role in determining exchanges of energy and mass between the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. In this study, we applied the METRIC (Mapping ET at high Resolutions with Internal Calibration) algorithm to derive daily surfa...

  12. Temporal signatures of advective versus diffusive radon transport at a geothermal zone in Central Nepal.

    PubMed

    Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Girault, Frédéric; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2011-02-01

    Temporal variation of radon-222 concentration was studied at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located on the Main Central Thrust zone in Central Nepal. This site is characterized by several carbon dioxide discharges having maximum fluxes larger than 10 kg m(-2) d(-1). Radon concentration was monitored with autonomous Barasol™ probes between January 2008 and November 2009 in two small natural cavities with high CO(2) concentration and at six locations in the soil: four points having a high flux, and two background reference points. At the reference points, dominated by radon diffusion, radon concentration was stable from January to May, with mean values of 22 ± 6.9 and 37 ± 5.5 kBq m(-3), but was affected by a large increase, of about a factor of 2 and 1.6, respectively, during the monsoon season from June to September. At the points dominated by CO(2) advection, by contrast, radon concentration showed higher mean values 39.0 ± 2.6 to 78 ± 1.4 kBq m(-3), remarkably stable throughout the year with small long-term variation, including a possible modulation of period around 6 months. A significant difference between the diffusion dominated reference points and the advection-dominated points also emerged when studying the diurnal S(1) and semi-diurnal S(2) periodic components. At the advection-dominated points, radon concentration did not exhibit S(1) or S(2) components. At the reference points, however, the S(2) component, associated with barometric tide, could be identified during the dry season, but only when the probe was installed at shallow depth. The S(1) component, associated with thermal and possibly barometric diurnal forcing, was systematically observed, especially during monsoon season. The remarkable short-term and long-term temporal stability of the radon concentration at the advection-dominated points, which suggests a strong pressure source at depth, may be an important asset to detect possible temporal variations associated with the

  13. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  14. Demonstration of microbial transport into the capillary fringe via advection from below the water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Andrea M.; Silliman, Stephen E.; Dhamwichukorn, Srisuda; Kulpa, Charles F.

    2005-05-01

    A laboratory experiment is used to provide preliminary evidence that microbes can be advected into the capillary fringe from the region below the water table under steady flow conditions. A flow cell was packed so as to contain both a region for which pore-water pressure was greater than atmospheric pressure (termed 'below the water table') and a region, where the pore-water pressure was less than atmospheric with the pores essentially saturated with water (termed the 'capillary fringe'). Steady flow was then established through maintaining a hydraulic gradient across the medium. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) transformed bacteria ( E. coli JM109) were used to visualize migration of bacteria from below the water table into the capillary fringe. These transformed bacteria fluoresce brightly and readily when excited by standard UV light (395 nm) in 100 mL LB medium with 100 μg/mL ampicillin. The concentrations of bacterial inoculum and oxygen were adjusted to ensure GFPuv expression at a large scale. Results demonstrated that microbes can move into the capillary fringe from below the water table under horizontal hydraulic gradients. Motion from the capillary fringe into the region below the water table was also observed as was the absence of advection through regions of entrapped air below the water table.

  15. The role of advection and dispersion in the rock matrix on the transport of leaking CO2-saturated brine along a fractured zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nawaz; Wörman, Anders; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    CO2 that is injected into a geological storage reservoir can leak in dissolved form because of brine displacement from the reservoir, which is caused by large-scale groundwater motion. Simulations of the reactive transport of leaking CO2aq along a conducting fracture in a clay-rich caprock are conducted to analyze the effect of various physical and geochemical processes. Whilst several modeling transport studies along rock fractures have considered diffusion as the only transport process in the surrounding rock matrix (diffusive transport), this study analyzes the combined role of advection and dispersion in the rock matrix in addition to diffusion (advection-dominated transport) on the migration of CO2aq along a leakage pathway and its conversion in geochemical reactions. A sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the effect of fluid velocity and dispersivity. Variations in the porosity and permeability of the medium are found in response to calcite dissolution and precipitation along the leakage pathway. We observe that advection and dispersion in the rock matrix play a significant role in the overall transport process. For the parameters that were used in this study, advection-dominated transport increased the leakage of CO2aq from the reservoir by nearly 305%, caused faster transport and increased the mass conversion of CO2aq in geochemical reactions along the transport pathway by approximately 12.20% compared to diffusive transport.

  16. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  17. LAYER DEPENDENT ADVECTION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advection methods used in CMAQ require that the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition be satisfied for numerical stability and accuracy. In CMAQ prior to version 4.3, the ADVSTEP algorithm established CFL-safe synchronization and advection timesteps that were uniform throu...

  18. User's guide to PHREEQC, a computer program for speciation, reaction-path, advective-transport, and inverse geochemical calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is a computer program written in the C pwgranuning language that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC is based on an ion-association aqueous model and has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations, (2) reaction-path and advective-transport calculations involving specified irreversible reactions, mixing of solutions, mineral and gas equilibria surface-complex-ation reactions, and ion-exchange reactions, and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for composition differences between waters, within specified compositional uncertainties. PHREEQC is derived from the Fortran program PHREEQE, but it has been completely rewritten in C with the addition many new capabilities. New features include the capabilities to use redox couples to distribute redox elements among their valence states in speciation calculations; to model ion-exchange and surface-compiexation reactions; to model reactions with a fixed-pressure, multicomponent gas phase (that is, a gas bubble); to calculate the mass of water in the aqueous phase during reaction and transport calculations; to keep track of the moles of minerals present in the solid phases and determine antomaticaHy the thermodynamically stable phase assemblage; to simulate advective transport in combination with PHREEQC's reaction-modeling capability; and to make inverse modeling calculations that allow for uncertainties in the analytical data. The user interface is improved through the use of a simplified approach to redox reactions, which includes explicit mole-balance equations for hydrogen and oxygen; the use of a revised input that is modular and completely free format; and the use of mineral names and standard chemical symbolism rather than index numbers. The use of (2 eliminates nearly all limitations on army sizes, including numbers of elements, aqueous species, solutions, phases, and lengths of character

  19. From analytical solutions of solute transport equations to multidimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    In this study, new multi-dimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms are derived from approximate one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and from exact 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D analytical solutions of the pure-diffusion equation. These algorithms enable the calculation of both the time required for a particle to travel a specified distance in a homogeneous medium and the mass recovery at the observation point, which may be incomplete due to 2-D or 3-D transverse dispersion or diffusion. The method is extended to heterogeneous media, represented as a piecewise collection of homogeneous media. The particle motion is then decomposed along a series of intermediate checkpoints located on the medium interface boundaries. The accuracy of the multi-dimensional TDRW method is verified against (i) exact analytical solutions of solute transport in homogeneous media and (ii) finite-difference simulations in a synthetic 2-D heterogeneous medium of simple geometry. The results demonstrate that the method is ideally suited to purely diffusive transport and to advection-dispersion transport problems dominated by advection. Conversely, the method is not recommended for highly dispersive transport problems because the accuracy of the advection-dispersion TDRW algorithms degrades rapidly for a low Péclet number, consistent with the accuracy limit of the approximate analytical solutions. The proposed approach provides a unified methodology for deriving multi-dimensional time-domain particle equations and may be applicable to other mathematical transport models, provided that appropriate analytical solutions are available.

  20. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  1. Investigating the impact of advective and diffusive controls in solute transport on geoelectrical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Daniel D.; Singha, Kamini

    2010-09-01

    Multiple types of physical heterogeneity have been suggested to explain anomalous solute transport behavior, yet determining exactly what controls transport at a given site is difficult from concentration histories alone. Differences in timing between co-located fluid and bulk apparent electrical conductivity data have previously been used to estimate solute mass transfer rates between mobile and less-mobile domains; here, we consider if this behavior can arise from other types of heterogeneity. Numerical models are used to investigate the electrical signatures associated with large-scale hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity and small-scale dual-domain mass transfer, and address issues regarding the scale of the geophysical measurement. We examine the transport behavior of solutes with and without dual-domain mass transfer, in: 1) a homogeneous medium, 2) a discretely fractured medium, and 3) a hydraulic conductivity field generated with sequential Gaussian simulation. We use the finite-element code COMSOL Multiphysics to construct two-dimensional cross-sectional models and solve the coupled flow, transport, and electrical conduction equations. Our results show that both large-scale heterogeneity and subscale heterogeneity described by dual-domain mass transfer produce a measurable hysteresis between fluid and bulk apparent electrical conductivity, indicating a lag between electrical conductivity changes in the mobile and less-mobile domains of an aquifer, or mass transfer processes, at some scale. The shape and magnitude of the observed hysteresis is controlled by the spatial distribution of hydraulic heterogeneity, mass transfer rate between domains, and the ratio of mobile to immobile porosity. Because the rate of mass transfer is related to the inverse square of a diffusion length scale, our results suggest that the shape of the hysteresis curve is indicative of the length scale over which mass transfer is occurring. We also demonstrate that the difference in

  2. A massively parallel semi-Lagrangian algorithm for solving the transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, Russell; Wang, Dali

    2010-01-01

    The scalar transport equation underpins many models employed in science, engineering, technology and business. Application areas include, but are not restricted to, pollution transport, weather forecasting, video analysis and encoding (the optical flow equation), options and stock pricing (the Black-Scholes equation) and spatially explicit ecological models. Unfortunately finding numerical solutions to this equation which are fast and accurate is not trivial. Moreover, finding such numerical algorithms that can be implemented on high performance computer architectures efficiently is challenging. In this paper the authors describe a massively parallel algorithm for solving the advection portion of the transport equation. We present an approach here which is different to that used in most transport models and which we have tried and tested for various scenarios. The approach employs an intelligent domain decomposition based on the vector field of the system equations and thus automatically partitions the computational domain into algorithmically autonomous regions. The solution of a classic pure advection transport problem is shown to be conservative, monotonic and highly accurate at large time steps. Additionally we demonstrate that the algorithm is highly efficient for high performance computer architectures and thus offers a route towards massively parallel application.

  3. The effects of temperature and motility on the advective transport of a deep subsurface bacteria through saturated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, Douglas Ray

    1993-01-01

    Replicate column experiments were done to quantify the effects of temperature and bacterial motility on advective transport through repacked, but otherwise unaltered, natural aquifer sediment. The bacteria used in this study, A0500, was a flagellated, spore-forming rod isolated from the deep subsurface at DOE`s Savannah River Laboratory. Motility was controlled by turning on flagellar metabolism at 18°C but off at 40°α), estimated using a steady-state filtration model. The observed greater microsphere removal at the higher temperature agreed with the physical-chemical model, but bacteria removal at 18{degrees}C was only half that at 4°C. The sticking efficiency for non-motile A0500 (4°C) was over three times that of the motile A0500 (18°C), 0.073 versus 0.022 respectively. Analysis of complete breakthrough curves using a non-steady, kinetically limited, transport model to estimate the time scales of attachment and detachment suggested that motile A 0500 bacteria traveled twice as far as non-motile A 0500 bacteria before becoming attached. Once attached, non-motile colloids detached on the time scale of 9 to 17 days. The time scale for detachment of motile A0500 bacteria was shorter, 4 to 5 days. Results indicate that bacterial attachment was reversible and detachment was enhanced by bacterial motifity. The kinetic energy of bacterial motility changed the attachment-detachment kinetics in favor of the detached state. The chemical factors responsible for the enhanced transport are not known. However, motility may have caused weakly held bacteria to detach from the secondary minimum, and possibly from the primary minimum, as described by DLVO theory.

  4. Advective heat transport associated with regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Frondini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we show that the main springs of the central Apennine transport a total amount of heat of ˜2.2×109 J s-1. Most of this heat (57%) is the result of geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. This result indicates that a large area of the central Apennines is very hot with heat flux values >300 mW m-2. These values are higher than those measured in the magmatic and famously geothermal provinces of Tuscany and Latium and about 1/3 of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone. This finding is surprising because the central Apennines have been thought to be a relatively cold area. Translated by CO2 rich fluids, this heat anomaly suggests the existence of a thermal source such as a large magmatic intrusion at depth. Recent tomographic images of the area support the presence of such an intrusion visible as a broad negative velocity anomaly in seismic waves. Our results indicate that the thermal regime of tectonically active areas of the Earth, where meteoric waters infiltrate and deeply circulate, should be revised on the basis of mass and energy balances of the groundwater systems.

  5. Global mass fixer algorithms for conservative tracer transport in the ECMWF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantakis, M.; Flemming, J.

    2014-01-01

    Various mass fixer algorithms (MFA) have been implemented in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of ECMWF to ensure mass conservation of atmospheric tracers within the Semi-Lagrangian (SL) advection scheme. Emphasis has been placed in implementing schemes that despite being primarily global in nature adjust the solution mostly in regions where the advected field has large gradients and therefore interpolation (transport) error is assumed larger. The MFA have been tested in weather forecast, idealised and atmospheric dispersion cases. Applying these fixers to specific humidity and cloud fields did not change the accuracy of 10 day forecasts. In other words, global mass tracer conservation is achieved without deteriorating the solution accuracy. However, for longer forecast timescales or for forecasts in which correlated species are transported, experiments suggest that MFA may improve IFS forecasts.

  6. Global mass fixer algorithms for conservative tracer transport in the ECMWF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantakis, M.; Flemming, J.

    2014-05-01

    Various mass fixer algorithms (MFAs) have been implemented in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to ensure mass conservation of atmospheric tracers within the semi-Lagrangian (SL) advection scheme. Emphasis has been placed in implementing schemes that despite being primarily global in nature adjust the solution mostly in regions where the advected field has large gradients and therefore interpolation (transport) error is assumed larger. The MFAs have been tested in weather forecast, idealised and atmospheric dispersion cases. Applying these fixers to specific humidity and cloud fields did not change the accuracy of 10-day forecasts. In other words, global mass tracer conservation is achieved without deteriorating the solution accuracy. However, for longer forecast timescales or for forecasts in which correlated species are transported, experiments suggest that MFAs may improve IFS forecasts.

  7. Analysis of steady-state flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of ground-water flow directions and traveltimes for advective flow were developed for the regional aquifer system of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The work included: (1) descriptions of compartments in the aquifer that function as intermediate and regional flow systems, (2) descriptions of pathlines for flow originating at or near the water table, and (3) quantitative estimates of traveltimes for advective transport originating at or near the water table. A particle-tracking postprocessing program was used to compute pathlines on the basis of output from an existing three-dimensional steady-state flow model. The flow model uses 1980 conditions to approximate average annual conditions for 1950-80. The advective transport model required additional information about the nature of flow across model boundaries, aquifer thickness, and porosity. Porosity of two types of basalt strata has been reported for more than 1,500 individual cores from test holes, wells, and outcrops near the south side of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The central 80 percent of samples had porosities of 0.08 to 0.25, the central 50 percent of samples, O. 11 to 0.21. Calibration of the model involved choosing a value for porosity that yielded the best solution. Two radiologic contaminants, iodine-129 and tritium, both introduced to the flow system about 40 years ago, are relatively conservative tracers. Iodine- 129 was considered to be more useful because of a lower analytical detection limit, longer half-life, and longer flow path. The calibration value for porosity was 0.21. Most flow in the aquifer is contained within a regional-scale compartment and follows paths that discharge to the Snake River downstream from Milner Dam. Two intermediate-scale compartments exist along the southeast side of the aquifer and near Mud Lake.One intermediate-scale compartment along the southeast side of the aquifer discharges to the Snake River near American Fails

  8. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  9. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  10. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated.

  11. MODFLOW-2000 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--documentation of the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the advective component of contaminant transport in steady-state flow fields can provide important information for the calibration of ground-water flow models. This report documents the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package, version 2, which allows advective-transport observations to be used in the three-dimensional ground-water flow parameter-estimation model MODFLOW-2000. The ADV2 Package is compatible with some of the features in the Layer-Property Flow and Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow Packages, but is not compatible with the Block-Centered Flow or Generalized Finite-Difference Packages. The particle-tracking routine used in the ADV2 Package duplicates the semi-analytical method of MODPATH, as shown in a sample problem. Particles can be tracked in a forward or backward direction, and effects such as retardation can be simulated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity. Particles can be discharged at cells that are considered to be weak sinks, in which the sink applied does not capture all the water flowing into the cell, using one of two criteria: (1) if there is any outflow to a boundary condition such as a well or surface-water feature, or (2) if the outflow exceeds a user specified fraction of the cell budget. Although effective porosity could be included as a parameter in the regression, this capability is not included in this package. The weighted sum-of-squares objective function, which is minimized in the Parameter-Estimation Process, was augmented to include the square of the weighted x-, y-, and z-components of the differences between the simulated and observed advective-front locations at defined times, thereby including the direction of travel as well as the overall travel distance in the calibration process. The sensitivities of the particle movement to the parameters needed to minimize the objective function are calculated for any particle location using the exact sensitivity

  12. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  13. Wind tunnel measurements of scale-by-scale energy transfer, dissipation, advection and production/transport in equilibrium and nonequilibrium decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro; Vassilicos, Christos

    2012-11-01

    The cornerstone assumption that Cɛ ≡ ɛL /u3 ~ constant was found to breakdown in certain nonequilibrium regions of decaying grid-generated turbulence with wide power-law near -5/3 spectra where the behaviour of Cɛ is, instead, very close to Cɛ ~ ReL- 1 (Valente & Vassilicos, 2012 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 214503]). We investigate nonequilibrium turbulence by measuring with two cross wire anemometers the downstream evolution of the scale-by-scale energy transfer, dissipation, advection, production and transport in the lee of a square-mesh grid and compare with a region of equilibrium turbulence. For the nonequilibrium case it is shown that the production and transport terms are negligible for scales smaller than about a third of L. For both cases it is shown that the peak of the scale-by-scale energy transfer scales as u3 / L which is the expected behaviour for equilibrium turbulence. However, for the nonequilibrium case this implies an imbalance between the energy transfer to the small scales and the dissipation. This imbalance is reflected on the small-scale advection which becomes larger in proportion to the maximum energy transfer as the turbulence decays whereas it stays proportionally constant in the equilibrium case. P. V. acknowledges the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (SFRH/BD/61223/2009, cofinanced by POPH/FSE).

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Ely, D.M.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G.M.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2001-08-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS). The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 underground Test Area (UGTA) sites. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work.

  15. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  16. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Monger, Gregg R; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L

    2014-12-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation.

  17. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2010-01-01

    Long term human presence in space requires the inclusion of radiation constraints in mission planning and the design of shielding materials, structures, and vehicles. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN is addressed. An inadequate numerical integration scheme in the transport algorithm is shown to produce large errors in the low energy portion of the neutron and light ion fluence spectra. It is further shown that the errors result from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic cross section spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required to resolve the problem under the current formulation. Two numerical methods are developed to provide adequate resolution in the energy domain and more accurately resolve the neutron elastic interactions. Convergence testing is completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with various energy grids to ensure stability of the newly implemented method.

  18. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    PubMed Central

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  19. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Mary C.; Ely, D. Matthew; Tiedeman, Claire R.; O'Brien, Grady M.; D'Agnese, Frank A.; Faunt, Claudia C.

    2001-01-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system. The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 Underground Test Areas. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work. The methods presented in this report are used in three ways. (1) The ratings for individual observations are obtained by manipulating the measures of prediction uncertainty, and do not involve recalibrating the model. In this analysis, observation locations are each omitted individually and the resulting increase in uncertainty in the predictions is calculated. The uncertainty is quantified as standard deviations on the simulated advective transport. The increase in uncertainty is quantified as the percent increase in the standard deviations caused by omitting the one observation location from the calculation of standard deviations. In general, observation locations associated with larger increases are rated as more important. (2) Ratings for largely geographically based groups are obtained using a straightforward extension of the method used for

  20. STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING TRANSPORT PARAMETERS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS TO ONE-DOMENSIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Brian J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation nonlinear multiple-regression methodology for estimating parameters that characterize the transport of contaminants is developed and demonstrated. Finite difference containment transport simulation is combined with a nonlinear weighted least squares multiple-regression procedure. The technique provides optimal parameter estimates and gives statistics for assessing the reliability of these estimates under certain general assumptions about the distributions of the random measurement errors. Monte Carlo analysis is used to estimate parameter reliability for a hypothetical homogeneous soil column for which concentration data contain large random measurement errors. The value of data collected spatially versus data collected temporally was investigated for estimation of velocity, dispersion coefficient, effective porosity, first-order decay rate, and zero-order production. The use of spatial data gave estimates that were 2-3 times more reliable than estimates based on temporal data for all parameters except velocity. (Estimated author abstract) Refs.

  1. A comparison of Eulerian and Lagrangian transport and non-linear reaction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David A.; Aquino, Tomás; Bolster, Diogo; Engdahl, Nicholas; Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    When laboratory-measured chemical reaction rates are used in simulations at the field-scale, the models typically overpredict the apparent reaction rates. The discrepancy is primarily due to poorer mixing of chemically distinct waters at the larger scale. As a result, realistic field-scale predictions require accurate simulation of the degree of mixing between fluids. The Lagrangian particle-tracking (PT) method is a now-standard way to simulate the transport of conservative or sorbing solutes. The method's main advantage is the absence of numerical dispersion (and its artificial mixing) when simulating advection. New algorithms allow particles of different species to interact in nonlinear (e.g., bimolecular) reactions. Therefore, the PT methods hold a promise of more accurate field-scale simulation of reactive transport because they eliminate the masking effects of spurious mixing due to advection errors inherent in grid-based methods. A hypothetical field-scale reaction scenario is constructed and run in PT and Eulerian (finite-volume/finite-difference) simulators. Grid-based advection schemes considered here include 1st- to 3rd-order spatially accurate total-variation-diminishing flux-limiting schemes, both of which are widely used in current transport/reaction codes. A homogeneous velocity field in which the Courant number is everywhere unity, so that the chosen Eulerian methods incur no error when simulating advection, shows that both the Eulerian and PT methods can achieve convergence in the L1 (integrated concentration) norm, but neither shows stricter pointwise convergence. In this specific case with a constant dispersion coefficient and bimolecular reaction A + B → P , the correct total amount of product is 0.221MA0, where MA0 is the original mass of reactant A. When the Courant number drops, the grid-based simulations can show remarkable errors due to spurious over- and under-mixing. In a heterogeneous velocity field (keeping the same constant and

  2. Modelling coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Croisé, J.; Altmann, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemico-osmosis is a recognized phenomenon taking place in clay mineral-rich sedimentary formations and a number of questions have been raised concerning its potential effects on pressure fields in and around underground radioactive waste repositories installed in such formations. Certain radioactive waste packages contain large quantities of nitrate salts whose release might result in the presence of highly concentrated salt solutions in the disposal cells, during their resaturation after closure of the facility. This would lead to large solute concentration gradients within the formation's porewater which could then potentially induce significant chemico-osmotic fluxes. In this paper, we assess the impact of chemico-osmotic fluxes on the water pressure during the post-closure period of a typical disposal cell for intermediate-level, long-lived bituminised radioactive waste in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay formation. A numerical model of chemico-osmotic water flow and solute transport has been developed based on the work of Bader and Kooi (2005) [5], and including Bresler's dependence of osmotic efficiency on concentration and compaction state [9]. Model validity has been extended to highly concentrated solutions by incorporating a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, based on the Pitzer's equations. Results show that due to the strong dependence of the osmotic coefficient on concentration, the impact of chemico-osmosis on water flow and on the pressure field around the disposal cell is relatively low. A maximum overpressure of the order of 1 MPa was obtained. No difference in the simulation results were noticed for disposal cell solutions having concentrations higher than 1 M NaNO3. Differences between simulations were found to be almost entirely due to Bresler's relationship i.e., the model of the dependence between osmotic efficiency and concentration, and only slightly on the activity coefficient correction. Questions remain regarding the appropriate

  3. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  4. A computational study of routing algorithms for realistic transportation networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.V.; Nagel, K.

    1998-12-01

    The authors carry out an experimental analysis of a number of shortest path (routing) algorithms investigated in the context of the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and Simulation System) project. The main focus of the paper is to study how various heuristic and exact solutions, associated data structures affected the computational performance of the software developed especially for realistic transportation networks. For this purpose the authors have used Dallas Fort-Worth road network with very high degree of resolution. The following general results are obtained: (1) they discuss and experimentally analyze various one-one shortest path algorithms, which include classical exact algorithms studied in the literature as well as heuristic solutions that are designed to take into account the geometric structure of the input instances; (2) they describe a number of extensions to the basic shortest path algorithm. These extensions were primarily motivated by practical problems arising in TRANSIMS and ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) related technologies. Extensions discussed include--(i) time dependent networks, (ii) multi-modal networks, (iii) networks with public transportation and associated schedules. Computational results are provided to empirically compare the efficiency of various algorithms. The studies indicate that a modified Dijkstra`s algorithm is computationally fast and an excellent candidate for use in various transportation planning applications as well as ITS related technologies.

  5. A Cultural Algorithm for the Urban Public Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Laura Cruz; Zezzatti, Carlos Alberto Ochoa Ortíz; Santillán, Claudia Gómez; Hernández, Paula Hernández; Fuerte, Mercedes Villa

    In the last years the population of Leon City, located in the state of Guanajuato in Mexico, has been considerably increasing, causing the inhabitants to waste most of their time with public transportation. As a consequence of the demographic growth and traffic bottleneck, users deal with the daily problem of optimizing their travel so that to get to their destination on time. To give a solution to this problem of obtaining an optimized route between two points in a public transportation, a method based on the cultural algorithms technique is proposed. Cultural algorithms are used in the generated knowledge in a set of time periods for a same population, using a belief space. These types of algorithms are a recent creation. The proposed method seeks a path that minimizes the time of traveling and the number of transfers. The results of the experiment show that the technique of the cultural algorithms is applicable to these kinds of multi-objective problems.

  6. HEMP advection model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R.W. Jr.; Barton, R.T.

    1981-01-21

    A continuous rezoning procedure has been implemented in the computational cycle of a version of the HEMP two-dimensional, Lagrange, fluid dynamics code. The rezoning problem is divided into two steps. The first step requires the solving of ordinary Lagrange equations of motion; the second step consists of adding equipotential grid relaxation along with an advective remapping scheme.

  7. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  8. Monte Carlo Particle Transport: Algorithm and Performance Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N; Procassini, R; Scott, H

    2005-06-02

    Monte Carlo methods are frequently used for neutron and radiation transport. These methods have several advantages, such as relative ease of programming and dealing with complex meshes. Disadvantages include long run times and statistical noise. Monte Carlo photon transport calculations also often suffer from inaccuracies in matter temperature due to the lack of implicitness. In this paper we discuss the Monte Carlo algorithm as it is applied to neutron and photon transport, detail the differences between neutron and photon Monte Carlo, and give an overview of the ways the numerical method has been modified to deal with issues that arise in photon Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  10. Steady-State and Transient Groundwater Flow and Advective Transport, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and Vicinity, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. C.; Ackerman, D. J.; Rousseau, J. P.; Rattray, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport through the fractured basalts and interbedded sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The model domain covers an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the aquifer. Numerical models simulated 1980 steady-state conditions and transient flow for 1980-95. In the transient model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress. The models were calibrated using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. The steady-state model reasonably simulated the observed water-table altitude and gradients. Simulation of transient conditions reproduced changes in the flow system resulting from episodic infiltration from the Big Lost River. Analysis of simulations shows that flow is (1) dominantly horizontal through interflow zones in basalt, vertical anisotropy resulting from contrasts in hydraulic conductivity of different types of basalt and the interbedded sediments, (2) temporally variable due to streamflow infiltration from the Big Lost River, and (3) moving downward downgradient of the INL. Particle-tracking simulations were used to evaluate how simulated groundwater flow paths and travel times differ between the steady-state and transient flow models, and how well model-derived groundwater flow directions and velocities compare to independently-derived estimates. Particle tracking also was used to simulate the growth of tritium plumes originating at two INL facilities over a 16 year period under steady-state and transient flow conditions (1953-68). The shape, dimensions, and areal extent of these plumes were compared to a map of the plumes for 1968 from tritium releases beginning in 1952

  11. Steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport, Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Daniel J.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Rattray, Gordon W.; Fisher, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The steady-state and transient flow models cover an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the 890 square miles of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Model results can be used in numerical simulations to evaluate the movement of contaminants in the aquifer. Saturated flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer was simulated using the MODFLOW-2000 groundwater flow model. Steady-state flow was simulated to represent conditions in 1980 with average streamflow infiltration from 1966-80 for the Big Lost River, the major variable inflow to the system. The transient flow model simulates groundwater flow between 1980 and 1995, a period that included a 5-year wet cycle (1982-86) followed by an 8-year dry cycle (1987-94). Specified flows into or out of the active model grid define the conditions on all boundaries except the southwest (outflow) boundary, which is simulated with head-dependent flow. In the transient flow model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress, and was variable in time and location. The models were calibrated by adjusting aquifer hydraulic properties to match simulated and observed heads or head differences using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. Various summary, regression, and inferential statistics, in addition to comparisons of model properties and simulated head to measured properties and head, were used to evaluate the model calibration. Model parameters estimated for the steady-state calibration included hydraulic conductivity for seven of nine hydrogeologic zones and a global value of vertical anisotropy. Parameters

  12. How to Find a Bug in Ten Thousand Lines Transport Solver? Outline of Experiences from AN Advection-Diffusion Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, K.; Bombardelli, F.

    2011-12-01

    Almost all natural phenomena on Earth are highly nonlinear. Even simplifications to the equations describing nature usually end up being nonlinear partial differential equations. Transport (ADR) equation is a pivotal equation in atmospheric sciences and water quality. This nonlinear equation needs to be solved numerically for practical purposes so academicians and engineers thoroughly rely on the assistance of numerical codes. Thus, numerical codes require verification before they are utilized for multiple applications in science and engineering. Model verification is a mathematical procedure whereby a numerical code is checked to assure the governing equation is properly solved as it is described in the design document. CFD verification is not a straightforward and well-defined course. Only a complete test suite can uncover all the limitations and bugs. Results are needed to be assessed to make a distinction between bug-induced-defect and innate limitation of a numerical scheme. As Roache (2009) said, numerical verification is a state-of-the-art procedure. Sometimes novel tricks work out. This study conveys the synopsis of the experiences we gained during a comprehensive verification process which was done for a transport solver. A test suite was designed including unit tests and algorithmic tests. Tests were layered in complexity in several dimensions from simple to complex. Acceptance criteria defined for the desirable capabilities of the transport code such as order of accuracy, mass conservation, handling stiff source term, spurious oscillation, and initial shape preservation. At the begining, mesh convergence study which is the main craft of the verification is performed. To that end, analytical solution of ADR equation gathered. Also a new solution was derived. In the more general cases, lack of analytical solution could be overcome through Richardson Extrapolation and Manufactured Solution. Then, two bugs which were concealed during the mesh convergence

  13. Inverse transport calculations in optical imaging with subspace optimization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Tian; Ren, Kui

    2014-09-01

    Inverse boundary value problems for the radiative transport equation play an important role in optics-based medical imaging techniques such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and fluorescence optical tomography (FOT). Despite the rapid progress in the mathematical theory and numerical computation of these inverse problems in recent years, developing robust and efficient reconstruction algorithms remains a challenging task and an active research topic. We propose here a robust reconstruction method that is based on subspace minimization techniques. The method splits the unknown transport solution (or a functional of it) into low-frequency and high-frequency components, and uses singular value decomposition to analytically recover part of low-frequency information. Minimization is then applied to recover part of the high-frequency components of the unknowns. We present some numerical simulations with synthetic data to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  14. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    A low-energy neutron transport algorithm for use in space radiation protection is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multigroup analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. This analysis is accomplished by solving a realistic but simplified neutron transport test problem. The test problem is analyzed by using numerical and analytical procedures to obtain an accurate solution within specified error bounds. Results from the test problem are then used for determining mean values associated with rescattering terms that are associated with a multigroup solution of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through the evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for a water and an aluminum-water shield-target configuration is then compared with LAHET and MCNPX Monte Carlo code calculations for the same shield-target configuration. The algorithm developed showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a two-directional solution of the evaporation source showed even further improvement of the fluence near the front of the water target where diffusion from the front surface is important.

  15. Overcoming diffusion-limited processes using enhanced advective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Many subsurface cleanup activities focus on the remediation of organic contaminants using induced advective fields. Subsurface heterogeneities cause most advective transport to occur in more permeable zones, with transport from the lower permeability units being limited by diffusion to the higher permeable units. While diffusion rates can be enhanced using thermal sources, many of the treatment strategies, including pump and treat, vapor extraction and bioremediation, are limited by mass exchange rates between the higher and lower permeability sand and clay mixtures. Instead of relying on the enhancement of diffusion rates, it is proposed that remediation strategies should focus on the enhancement of induced advective transport rates through the lower permeability units. Injection-extraction strategies using crosshole and huff-and-puff methods are presented for maximizing advective transport through lower permeability units. Optimization of the design can incorporate diffusion-enhancement technologies, bionourishment, capillary confinement in the unsaturated zone, and DNAPL slurping.

  16. ecode - Electron Transport Algorithm Testing v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian C.; Olson, Aaron J.; Bruss, Donald Eugene; Laub, Thomas W.; Crawford, Martin J; Kenseck, Ronald P.; Prinja, Anil

    2016-10-05

    ecode is a Monte Carlo code used for testing algorithms related to electron transport. The code can read basic physics parameters, such as energy-dependent stopping powers and screening parameters. The code permits simple planar geometries of slabs or cubes. Parallelization consists of domain replication, with work distributed at the start of the calculation and statistical results gathered at the end of the calculation. Some basic routines (such as input parsing, random number generation, and statistics processing) are shared with the Integrated Tiger Series codes. A variety of algorithms for uncertainty propagation are incorporated based on the stochastic collocation and stochastic Galerkin methods. These permit uncertainty only in the total and angular scattering cross sections. The code contains algorithms for simulating stochastic mixtures of two materials. The physics is approximate, ranging from mono-energetic and isotropic scattering to screened Rutherford angular scattering and Rutherford energy-loss scattering (simple electron transport models). No production of secondary particles is implemented, and no photon physics is implemented.

  17. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D advection model towards large-scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2015-02-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric advection model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach for advection was chosen to ensure mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to reduce the memory footprint and enable effective parallel performances. In addition, a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the advection scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on algebraic test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred cores.

  18. Comparison of genetic algorithm and imperialist competitive algorithms in predicting bed load transport in clean pipe.

    PubMed

    Ebtehaj, Isa; Bonakdari, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    The existence of sediments in wastewater greatly affects the performance of the sewer and wastewater transmission systems. Increased sedimentation in wastewater collection systems causes problems such as reduced transmission capacity and early combined sewer overflow. The article reviews the performance of the genetic algorithm (GA) and imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) in minimizing the target function (mean square error of observed and predicted Froude number). To study the impact of bed load transport parameters, using four non-dimensional groups, six different models have been presented. Moreover, the roulette wheel selection method is used to select the parents. The ICA with root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.007, mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) = 3.5% show better results than GA (RMSE = 0.007, MAPE = 5.6%) for the selected model. All six models return better results than the GA. Also, the results of these two algorithms were compared with multi-layer perceptron and existing equations.

  19. An Algorithm for the Mixed Transportation Network Design Problem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimization algorithm, the dimension-down iterative algorithm (DDIA), for solving a mixed transportation network design problem (MNDP), which is generally expressed as a mathematical programming with equilibrium constraint (MPEC). The upper level of the MNDP aims to optimize the network performance via both the expansion of the existing links and the addition of new candidate links, whereas the lower level is a traditional Wardrop user equilibrium (UE) problem. The idea of the proposed solution algorithm (DDIA) is to reduce the dimensions of the problem. A group of variables (discrete/continuous) is fixed to optimize another group of variables (continuous/discrete) alternately; then, the problem is transformed into solving a series of CNDPs (continuous network design problems) and DNDPs (discrete network design problems) repeatedly until the problem converges to the optimal solution. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is that its solution process is very simple and easy to apply. Numerical examples show that for the MNDP without budget constraint, the optimal solution can be found within a few iterations with DDIA. For the MNDP with budget constraint, however, the result depends on the selection of initial values, which leads to different optimal solutions (i.e., different local optimal solutions). Some thoughts are given on how to derive meaningful initial values, such as by considering the budgets of new and reconstruction projects separately.

  20. An Algorithm for the Mixed Transportation Network Design Problem

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimization algorithm, the dimension-down iterative algorithm (DDIA), for solving a mixed transportation network design problem (MNDP), which is generally expressed as a mathematical programming with equilibrium constraint (MPEC). The upper level of the MNDP aims to optimize the network performance via both the expansion of the existing links and the addition of new candidate links, whereas the lower level is a traditional Wardrop user equilibrium (UE) problem. The idea of the proposed solution algorithm (DDIA) is to reduce the dimensions of the problem. A group of variables (discrete/continuous) is fixed to optimize another group of variables (continuous/discrete) alternately; then, the problem is transformed into solving a series of CNDPs (continuous network design problems) and DNDPs (discrete network design problems) repeatedly until the problem converges to the optimal solution. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is that its solution process is very simple and easy to apply. Numerical examples show that for the MNDP without budget constraint, the optimal solution can be found within a few iterations with DDIA. For the MNDP with budget constraint, however, the result depends on the selection of initial values, which leads to different optimal solutions (i.e., different local optimal solutions). Some thoughts are given on how to derive meaningful initial values, such as by considering the budgets of new and reconstruction projects separately. PMID:27626803

  1. Algorithm for efficient elastic transport calculations for arbitrary device geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Douglas J.; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Heller, Eric J.

    2011-10-01

    With the growth in interest in graphene, controlled nanoscale device geometries with complex form factors are now being studied and characterized. There is a growing need to understand new techniques to handle efficient electronic transport calculations for these systems. We present an algorithm that dramatically reduces the computational time required to find the local density of states and transmission matrix for open systems regardless of their topology or boundary conditions. We argue that the algorithm, which generalizes the recursive Green's function method by incorporating the reverse Cuthill-McKee algorithm for connected graphs, is ideal for calculating transmission through devices with multiple leads of unknown orientation and becomes a computational necessity when the input and output leads overlap in real space. This last scenario takes the Landauer-Buttiker formalism to general scattering theory in a computational framework that makes it tractable to perform full-spectrum calculations of the quantum scattering matrix in mesoscopic systems. We demonstrate the efficacy of these approaches on graphene stadiums, a system of recent scientific interest, and contribute to a physical understanding of Fano resonances which appear in these systems.

  2. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  3. Capillary deposition of advected floating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Debaisieux, Aymeric; Gregori, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The deposition and aggregation of particles flowing through a confined environment can dramatically hinder the transport of suspensions. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of particles in shear flow are not fully understood. Here, we use an experimental model system in which floating particles are advected on the surface of a water channel and deposited on fixed obstacles through attractive capillary effects. By varying the flow rate of the liquid, the wetting properties and size of the particles and obstacles, we can tune the magnitude of the capillary and hydrodynamic forces that determine the probability of deposition and the equilibrium position on the substrate. We show that arrays of obstacles can be designed to efficiently capture the floating particles advected by the flow.

  4. Impacts of the Convective Transport Algorithm on Atmospheric Composition and Ozone-Climate Feedbacks in GEOS-CCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, S.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Oman, L.; Douglass, A. R.; Duncan, B. N.; Zhu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Convective transport is one of the dominant factors in determining the composition of the troposphere. It is the main mechanism for lofting constituents from near-surface source regions to the middle and upper troposphere, where they can subsequently be advected over large distances. Gases reaching the upper troposphere can also be injected through the tropopause and play a subsequent role in the lower stratospheric ozone balance. Convection codes in climate models remain a great source of uncertainty for both the energy balance of the general circulation and the transport of constituents. This study uses the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to perform a controlled experiment that isolates the impact of convective transport of constituents from the direct changes on the atmospheric energy balance. Two multi-year simulations are conducted. In the first, the thermodynamic variable, moisture, and all trace gases are transported using the multi-plume Relaxed-Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) convective parameterization. In the second simulation, RAS impacts the thermodynamic energy and moisture in this standard manner, but all other constituents are transported differently. The accumulated convective mass fluxes (including entrainment and detrainment) computed at each time step of the GCM are used with a diffusive (bulk) algorithm for the vertical transport, which above all is less efficient at transporting constituents from the lower to the upper troposphere. Initial results show the expected differences in vertical structure of trace gases such as carbon monoxide, but also show differences in lower stratospheric ozone, in a region where it can potentially impact the climate state of the model. This work will investigate in more detail the impact of convective transport changes by comparing the two simulations over many years (1996-2010), focusing on comparisons with observed constituent distributions and similarities and differences of patterns

  5. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  6. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE{sub 0} and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E{sub 0} and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE{sub 0})/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm{sup 3} size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy

  7. Dynamic airspace configuration algorithms for next generation air transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jian

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is under great pressure to safely and efficiently handle the record-high air traffic volume nowadays, and will face even greater challenge to keep pace with the steady increase of future air travel demand, since the air travel demand is projected to increase to two to three times the current level by 2025. The inefficiency of traffic flow management initiatives causes severe airspace congestion and frequent flight delays, which cost billions of economic losses every year. To address the increasingly severe airspace congestion and delays, the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is proposed to transform the current static and rigid radar based system to a dynamic and flexible satellite based system. New operational concepts such as Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) have been under development to allow more flexibility required to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalances in order to increase the throughput of the entire NAS. In this dissertation, we address the DAC problem in the en route and terminal airspace under the framework of NextGen. We develop a series of algorithms to facilitate the implementation of innovative concepts relevant with DAC in both the en route and terminal airspace. We also develop a performance evaluation framework for comprehensive benefit analyses on different aspects of future sector design algorithms. First, we complete a graph based sectorization algorithm for DAC in the en route airspace, which models the underlying air route network with a weighted graph, converts the sectorization problem into the graph partition problem, partitions the weighted graph with an iterative spectral bipartition method, and constructs the sectors from the partitioned graph. The algorithm uses a graph model to accurately capture the complex traffic patterns of the real flights, and generates sectors with high efficiency while evenly distributing the workload among the generated sectors. We further improve

  8. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  9. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  10. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction.

  11. BUOYANT ADVECTION OF GASES IN UNSATURATED SOIL

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Gregory E.; Falta, Ronald W.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    In unsaturated soil, methane and volatile organic compounds can significantly alter the density of soil gas and induce buoyant gas flow. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a two-dimensional, homogeneous sand pack with gas permeabilities ranging from 110 to 3,000 darcy. Pure methane gas was injected horizontally into the sand and steady-state methane profiles were measured. Experimental results are in close agreement with a numerical model that represents the advective and diffusive components of methane transport. Comparison of simulations with and without gravitational acceleration permits identification of conditions where buoyancy dominates methane transport. Significant buoyant flow requires a Rayleigh number greater than 10 and an injected gas velocity sufficient to overcome dilution by molecular diffusion near the source. These criteria allow the extension of laboratory results to idealized field conditions for methane as well as denser-than-air vapors produced by volatilizing nonaqueous phase liquids trapped in unsaturated soil. PMID:20396624

  12. Fractional-step method for two-dimensional estuarine transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Holley, Edward R.

    1988-01-01

    The fractional-step method was used in this study to split the longitudinal advective transport term from the other terms in the two-dimensional, laterally-averaged equation for estuarine mass transport. The method of characteristics with spline interpolations was used to approximate the longitudinal advective transport. A general discussion of the fractional-step method, the specific algorithm developed in this investigation, and results of numerical tests are presented. Application of the fractional-step method in conjunction with the characteristic-spline scheme offers the potential for improved simulations of transport for situations in which concentration gradients are steep.

  13. Algorithm research and realization of the turning control system for heavy transportation vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Hanguang; Yuan, Haiwen; Wang, Qiusheng; Zhao, Jingpo

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics of turning system which is a nonlinear system normally has great impact on the transportation speed of the vehicle having heavy load and large size. The dynamics of turning system depends on control algorithm and its implementation, but the existing control algorithms which having high dynamics in the application of heavy transportation vehicle are complex for realization and high hardware requirement. So, the nonlinear turning system is analyzed for improving its dynamics by researching new efficient control algorithm. The models of electromagnetic valve, hydraulic cylinder and turning mechanical part are built individually to get the open-loop model of the turning system following characteristics analyzed. According to the model, a new control algorithm for heavy transportation vehicle which combined PID with Bang-Bang control is presented. Then the close-loop model of turning system is obtained under Matlab/Simulink environment. By comparing the step response of different control algorithms in the same conditions, the new algorithm's validity is verified. On the basis of the analysis results, the algorithm is adopted to implement the turning control system by using CAN field bus and PLC controllers. Furthermore, the turning control system has been applied in one type of heavy transportation vehicle. It reduces the response time of turning system from seconds level to 250 ms, and the speed of heavy transportation vehicle increases from 5 km/h to 30 km/h. The application result shows that the algorithm and turning control system have met all the turning requirements. This new type of turning control algorithm proposed is simple in implementation for fast response of nonlinear and large-scale turning system of heavy transportation vehicle.

  14. Parallel algorithms for semi-Lagrangian transport in global atmospheric circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.; Worley, P.H.; Michalakes, J.; Foster, I.T.

    1995-02-01

    Global atmospheric circulation models (GCM) typically have three primary algorithmic components: columnar physics, spectral transform, and semi-Lagrangian transport. In developing parallel implementations, these three components are equally important and can be examined somewhat independently. A two-dimensional horizontal data decomposition of the three-dimensional computational grid leaves all physics computations on processor, and the only efficiency issues arise in load balancing. A recently completed study by the authors of different approaches to parallelizing the spectral transform showed several viable algorithms. Preliminary results of an analogous study of algorithmic alternatives for parallel semi-Lagrangian transport are described here.

  15. Advection, diffusion, and delivery over a network.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Luke L M; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K; Fricker, Mark D; Jones, Nick S

    2012-08-01

    Many biological, geophysical, and technological systems involve the transport of a resource over a network. In this paper, we present an efficient method for calculating the exact quantity of the resource in each part of an arbitrary network, where the resource is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. The key conceptual step is to partition the resource into material that does or does not reach a node over a given time step. As an example application, we consider resource allocation within fungal networks, and analyze the spatial distribution of the resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, and such growth necessarily involves the movement of fluid. We develop a model of delivery in growing fungal networks, and find good empirical agreement between our model and experimental data gathered using radio-labeled tracers. Our results lead us to suggest that in foraging fungi, growth-induced mass flow is sufficient to account for long-distance transport, if the system is well insulated. We conclude that active transport mechanisms may only be required at the very end of the transport pathway, near the growing tips.

  16. A New Algorithm for Supernova Neutrino Transport and Some Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Young, Timothy; Pinto, Philip; Eastman, Ron; Thompson, Todd A.

    2000-08-01

    We have developed an implicit, multigroup, time-dependent, spherical neutrino transport code based on the Feautrier variables, the tangent-ray method, and accelerated Λ iteration. The code achieves high angular resolution, is good to O(v/c), is equivalent to a Boltzmann solver (without gravitational redshifts), and solves the transport equation at all optical depths with precision. In this paper, we present our formulation of the relevant numerics and microphysics and explore protoneutron star atmospheres for snapshot postbounce models. Our major focus is on spectra, neutrino-matter heating rates, Eddington factors, angular distributions, and phase-space occupancies. In addition, we investigate the influence on neutrino spectra and heating of final-state electron blocking, stimulated absorption, velocity terms in the transport equation, neutrino-nucleon scattering asymmetry, and weak magnetism and recoil effects. Furthermore, we compare the emergent spectra and heating rates obtained using full transport with those obtained using representative flux-limited transport formulations to gauge their accuracy and viability. Finally, we derive useful formulae for the neutrino source strength due to nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and determine bremsstrahlung's influence on the emergent νμ and ντ neutrino spectra. These studies are in preparation for new calculations of spherically symmetric core-collapse supernovae, proto-neutron star winds, and neutrino signals.

  17. Chaotic Advection in a Bounded 3-Dimensional Potential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Smith, Lachlan; Lester, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    3-dimensional potential, or Darcy flows, are central to understanding and designing laminar transport in porous media; however, chaotic advection in 3-dimensional, volume-preserving flows is still not well understood. We show results of advecting passive scalars in a transient 3-dimensional potential flow that consists of a steady dipole flow and periodic reorientation. Even for the most symmetric reorientation protocol, neither of the two invarients of the motion are conserved; however, one invarient is closely shadowed by a surface of revolution constructed from particle paths of the steady flow, creating in practice an adiabatic surface. A consequence is that chaotic regions cover 3-dimensional space, though tubular regular regions are still transport barriers. This appears to be a new mechanism generating 3-dimensional chaotic orbits. These results contast with the experimental and theoretical results for chaotic scalar transport in 2-dimensional Darcy flows. Wiggins, J. Fluid Mech. 654 (2010).

  18. Development and Implementation of a Transport Method for the Transport and Reaction Simulation Engine (TaRSE) based on the Godunov-Mixed Finite Element Method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Andrew I.; Jawitz, James W.; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    A model to simulate transport of materials in surface water and ground water has been developed to numerically approximate solutions to the advection-dispersion equation. This model, known as the Transport and Reaction Simulation Engine (TaRSE), uses an algorithm that incorporates a time-splitting technique where the advective part of the equation is solved separately from the dispersive part. An explicit finite-volume Godunov method is used to approximate the advective part, while a mixed-finite element technique is used to approximate the dispersive part. The dispersive part uses an implicit discretization, which allows it to run stably with a larger time step than the explicit advective step. The potential exists to develop algorithms that run several advective steps, and then one dispersive step that encompasses the time interval of the advective steps. Because the dispersive step is computationally most expensive, schemes can be implemented that are more computationally efficient than non-time-split algorithms. This technique enables scientists to solve problems with high grid Peclet numbers, such as transport problems with sharp solute fronts, without spurious oscillations in the numerical approximation to the solution and with virtually no artificial diffusion.

  19. A new Remesh-Lagrange technique for advecting temperature that minimizes numerical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, J.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Shi, C.

    2007-12-01

    The proper treatment of heat-advection is a generally underappreciated problem within CFD, yet particularly critical for calculating physically sound erosion in plume-lithosphere interactions and temperature sensitive melting processes. Typically, Eulerian (fixed-mesh) codes have been preferred to solve for fluid flow and they are almost essential for finite-difference-based algorithms. Unfortunately, the Eulerian approach introduces numerical artifacts into the solution of the advection-diffusion heat transport problem that can only be suppressed by adding 'too-diffusive' artificial diffusion to the equations, as for example in the Smolarkiewicz formulation for heat advection. We have developed a 'Remesh-Lagrange' method using a partly deforming finite element mesh and find it to be significantly more accurate than our previous methods. In several test scenarios we show the large improvement in accuracy that can be obtained by using a Lagrangian approach for 10-30 time steps (depending upon the distortion of the finite elements in the deformed Lagrangian mesh) and then regridding to the initial mesh. When an element becomes too distorted the nodes connected to it become fixed and we switch from Lagrange to a Semi-Lagrange formulation for these nodes. Instead of the standard 'linear backward' Semi-Lagrange we are also experimenting with a more accurate interpolation scheme for an unstructured mesh that additionally includes the nodal derivatives of the temperature field when calculating the value at the Semi-Lagrange traceback point. The same bicubic interpolation method for an unstructured grid is used to remesh the 'too-distorted' Lagrange grid back to the initial undistorted mesh. We compare the Remesh-Lagrange technique against the following Eulerian methods in a series of 2-D numerical experiments advecting stripes and Gaussian peaks in steady circulating flow: linear back-interpolation Semi-Lagrange method; bicubic back-interpolation Semi-Lagrange method

  20. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  1. Transport path optimization algorithm based on fuzzy integrated weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yuan-Da; Xu, Xiao-Hao

    2014-11-01

    Natural disasters cause significant damage to roads, making route selection a complicated logistical problem. To overcome this complexity, we present a method of using a trapezoidal fuzzy number to select the optimal transport path. Using the given trapezoidal fuzzy edge coefficients, we calculate a fuzzy integrated matrix, and incorporate the fuzzy multi-weights into fuzzy integrated weights. The optimal path is determined by taking two sets of vertices and transforming undiscovered vertices into discoverable ones. Our experimental results show that the model is highly accurate, and requires only a few measurement data to confirm the optimal path. The model provides an effective, feasible, and convenient method to obtain weights for different road sections, and can be applied to road planning in intelligent transportation systems.

  2. A Streamline-Upwind Model for Filling Front Advection in Powder Injection Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Guillaume; Cheng, Zhi Qiang; Barriere, Thierry; Liu, Bao Sheng; Gelin, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    The filling process of powder injection molding is modeled by the flows of two variably adjacent domains in the mold cavity. The feedstock is filled into the cavity while the air is expelled out by the injected feedstock [1]. Eulerian description is adopted. The filling patterns are determined by the solution of an advection equation, governed by the velocity field in both the feedstock flow and air flow [2]. In the real physics, the advance of filling front depends mainly on the flow of feedstock that locates behind the front. The flow of air in front of the injected material plays in fact no meaningful effect. However, the actual algorithm for solution of the advection equation takes equally the importance for both the flow of viscous feedstock and that of the slight air. Under such a condition, the injection flow of feedstock in simulation may be misdirected unrealistically by the velocity field in the air portion of the mold cavity. To correct this defect, an upwind scheme is proposed to reinforce the effect of upwind flow and reduce the effect of downstream flow. The present paper involves the investigation of an upwind algorithm for simulation of the filling state during powder injection molding. A Petrov-Galerkin upwind based method (SUPG) is adopted for numerical simulation of the transport equation instead of the Taylor-Galerkin method in previous work. In the proposed implementation of the Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) approach. A stabilization method is used to prevent oscillations in the convection-dominated problems. It consists in the introduction of an artificial diffusion in streamline direction. Suitable modification of the test function is the important issue. It ensures the stable simulation of filling process and results in the more realistic prediction of filling patterns. The implementation of upwind scheme in mould filling state simulation, based on an advection equation and the whole velocity field of feedstock and air flow, makes

  3. Analysis of Massively Parallel Discrete-Ordinates Transport Sweep Algorithms with Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Falgout, R D

    2008-10-14

    We present theoretical scaling models for a variety of discrete-ordinates sweep algorithms. In these models, we pay particular attention to the way each algorithm handles collisions. A collision is defined as a processor having multiple angles with ready to be swept during one stage of the sweep. The models also take into account how subdomains are assigned to processors and how angles are grouped during the sweep. We describe a data driven algorithm that resolves collisions efficiently during the sweep as well as other algorithms that have been designed to avoid collisions completely. Our models are validated using the ARGES and AMTRAN transport codes. We then use the models to study and predict scaling trends in all of the sweep algorithms.

  4. Advective-diffusive contaminant migration in unsaturated sand and gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, R.K.; Badv, K.

    1996-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating the diffusion coefficients for chloride and sodium in unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel based on parameters obtained from saturated diffusion tests conducted for similar material. The method is tested by comparing the observed and predicted diffusion profiles through unsaturated soil. The method is shown to work well for predicting the advective-diffusive migration of chloride and sodium through a two-layer soil system consisting of a compacted clayey silt underlain by an unsaturated fine gravel. Over the range of conditions examined, it is concluded that existing solute transport theory along with the proposed procedure for estimating the unsaturated diffusion coefficients can adequately predict chloride and sodium diffusion through both unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel as well as predict advective-diffusive transport through a compacted clayey layer and underlying unsaturated fine gravel.

  5. An Algorithm for the Transport of Anisotropic Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.

    2005-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effect of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar particle events (SPE) were of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated GCR exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Therefore, a critical issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space enterprise is cost effective mitigation of risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure. In order to estimate astronaut risk to GCR exposure and associated cancer risks and health hazards, it is necessary to do shield material studies. To determine an optimum radiation shield material it is necessary to understand nuclear interaction processes such as fragmentation and secondary particle production which is a function of energy dependent cross sections. This requires knowledge of material transmission characteristics either through laboratory testing or improved theoretical modeling. Here ion beam transport theory is of importance in that testing of materials in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are a major emphasis of the present work.

  6. Algorithm and data support of traffic congestion forecasting in the controlled transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    The topicality of problem of the traffic congestion forecasting in the logistic systems of product movement highways is considered. The concepts: the controlled territory, the highway occupancy by vehicles, the parking and the controlled territory are introduced. Technical realizabilityof organizing the necessary flow of information on the state of the transport system for its regulation has been marked. Sequence of practical implementation of the solution is given. An algorithm for predicting traffic congestion in the controlled transport system is suggested.

  7. A Quasi-Conservative Adaptive Semi-Lagrangian Advection-Diffusion Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Many processes in atmospheric or oceanic tracer transport are conveniently represented by advection-diffusion type equations. Depending on the magnitudes of both components, the mathematical representation and consequently the discretization is a non-trivial problem. We will focus on advection-dominated situations and will introduce a semi-Lagrangian scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for high local resolution. This scheme is well suited for pollutant transport from point sources, or transport processes featuring fine filamentation with corresponding local concentration maxima. In order to achieve stability, accuracy and conservation, we combine an adaptive mesh refinement quasi-conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme, based on an integral formulation of the underlying advective conservation law (Behrens, 2006), with an advection diffusion scheme as described by Spiegelman and Katz (2006). The resulting scheme proves to be conservative and stable, while maintaining high computational efficiency and accuracy.

  8. Visualizing Vector Fields Using Line Integral Convolution and Dye Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1996-01-01

    We present local and global techniques to visualize three-dimensional vector field data. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method to image the global vector field, our new algorithm allows the user to introduce colored 'dye' into the vector field to highlight local flow features. A fast algorithm is proposed that quickly recomputes the dyed LIC images. In addition, we introduce volume rendering methods that can map the LIC texture on any contour surface and/or translucent region defined by additional scalar quantities, and can follow the advection of colored dye throughout the volume.

  9. Evolution and advection of solar mesogranulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard; Auffret, Herve; Roudier, Thierry; Vigneau, Jean; Simon, George W.; Frank, Zoe; Shine, Richard A.; Title, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    A three-hour sequence of observations at the Pic du Midi observatory has been obtained which shows the evolution of solar mesogranules from appearance to disappearance with unprecedented clarity. It is seen that the supergranules, which are known to advect the granules with their convective motion, also advect the mesogranules to their boundaries. This process controls the evolution and disappearance of mesogranules.

  10. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties and simulated advective transport of contaminated ground water in a fractured rock aquifer at the Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Brown, Jean C.; Carleton, Glen B.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, predominantly trichloroethylene and its degradation products, have been detected in ground water at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. An air-stripping pump-and-treat system has been in operation at the NAWC since 1998. An existing ground-water-flow model was used to evaluate the effect of a change in the configuration of the network of recovery wells in the pump-and-treat system on flow paths of contaminated ground water. The NAWC is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer composed of dipping layers of sedimentary rocks of the Lockatong and Stockton Formations. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties of the part of the aquifer composed of the Lockatong Formation were measured using aquifer tests and tracer tests. The heterogeneity of the rocks causes a wide range of values of each parameter measured. Transmissivity ranges from 95 to 1,300 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient ranges from 9 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3; and the effective porosity ranges from 0.0003 to 0.002. The average linear velocity of contaminated ground water was determined for ambient conditions (when no wells at the site are pumped) using an existing ground-water-flow model, particle-tracking techniques, and the porosity values determined in this study. The average linear velocity of flow paths beginning at each contaminated well and ending at the streams where the flow paths terminate ranges from 0.08 to 130 feet per day. As a result of a change in the pump-and-treat system (adding a 165-foot-deep well pumped at 5 gallons per minute and reducing the pumping rate at a nearby 41-foot-deep well by the same amount), water in the vicinity of three 100- to 165-foot-deep wells flows to the deep well rather than the shallower well.

  11. An asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian algorithm for the time-dependent anisotropic heat transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory D.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a Lagrangian numerical algorithm for a time-dependent, anisotropic temperature transport equation in magnetized plasmas in the large guide field regime. The approach is based on an analytical integral formal solution of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) transport equation with sources, and it is able to accommodate both local and non-local parallel heat flux closures. The numerical implementation is based on an operator-split formulation, with two straightforward steps: a perpendicular transport step (including sources), and a Lagrangian (field-line integral) parallel transport step. Algorithmically, the first step is amenable to the use of modern iterative methods, while the second step has a fixed cost per degree of freedom (and is therefore scalable). Accuracy-wise, the approach is free from the numerical pollution introduced by the discrete parallel transport term when the perpendicular to parallel transport coefficient ratio X /X becomes arbitrarily small, and is shown to capture the correct limiting solution when ε = X⊥L2/X1L2 → 0 (with L∥∙ L⊥ , the parallel and perpendicular diffusion length scales, respectively). Therefore, the approach is asymptotic-preserving. We demonstrate the capabilities of the scheme with several numerical experiments with varying magnetic field complexity in two dimensions, including the case of transport across a magnetic island.

  12. Kull ALE: I. Unstructured Mesh Advection, Interface Capturing, and Multiphase 2T RHD with Material Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-02-11

    Several advection algorithms are presented within the remap framework for unstructured mesh ALE codes. The methods discussed include a generic advection scheme based on a finite volume approach, and three groups of algorithms for the treatment of material boundary interfaces. The interface capturing algorithms belong to the Volume of Fluid (VoF) class of methods to approximate material interfaces from the local fractional volume of fluid distribution in arbitrary unstructured polyhedral meshes appropriate for the Kull code. Also presented are several schemes for extending single material radiation diffusion solvers to account for multi-material interfaces.

  13. Sensitivity of CO2 Simulation in a GCM to the Convective Transport Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Z.; Pawson, S.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D.; Ott, L.

    2014-01-01

    Convection plays an important role in the transport of heat, moisture and trace gases. In this study, we simulated CO2 concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). Three different convective transport algorithms were used. One is a modified Arakawa-Shubert scheme that was native to the GCM; two others used in two off-line chemical transport models (CTMs) were added to the GCM here for comparison purposes. Advanced CO2 surfaced fluxes were used for the simulations. The results were compared to a large quantity of CO2 observation data. We find that the simulation results are sensitive to the convective transport algorithms. Overall, the three simulations are quite realistic and similar to each other in the remote marine regions, but are significantly different in some land regions with strong fluxes such as Amazon and Siberia during the convection seasons. Large biases against CO2 measurements are found in these regions in the control run, which uses the original GCM. The simulation with the simple diffusive algorithm is better. The difference of the two simulations is related to the very different convective transport speed.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  16. Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Method for Advection-Diffusion Equations Subject to Heterogeneous Reactive Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-10-13

    We present a hybrid scheme for the coupling of macro and microscale continuum models for reactive contaminant transport in fractured and porous media. The transport model considered is the advection-dispersion equation, subject to linear heterogeneous reactive boundary conditions. The Multiscale Finite Volume method (MsFV) is employed to define an approximation to the microscale concentration field defined in terms of macroscopic or \\emph{global} degrees of freedom, together with local interpolator and corrector functions capturing microscopic spatial variability. The macroscopic mass balance relations for the MsFV global degrees of freedom are coupled with the macroscopic model, resulting in a global problem for the simultaneous time-stepping of all macroscopic degrees of freedom throughout the domain. In order to perform the hybrid coupling, the micro and macroscale models are applied over overlapping subdomains of the simulation domain, with the overlap denoted as the handshake subdomain $\\Omega^{hs}$, over which continuity of concentration and transport fluxes between models is enforced. Continuity of concentration is enforced by posing a restriction relation between models over $\\Omega^{hs}$. Continuity of fluxes is enforced by prolongating the macroscopic model fluxes across the boundary of $\\Omega^{hs}$ to microscopic resolution. The microscopic interpolator and corrector functions are solutions to local microscopic advection-diffusion problems decoupled from the global degrees of freedom and from each other by virtue of the MsFV decoupling ansatz. The error introduced by the decoupling ansatz is reduced iteratively by the preconditioned GMRES algorithm, with the hybrid MsFV operator serving as the preconditioner.

  17. Advective velocity and energy dissipation rate in an oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ziaul; Hondzo, Miki; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    Characterizing the transport processes at the sediment-water interface along sloping boundaries in lakes and reservoirs is of fundamental interest in lake and reservoir water quality management. The turbulent bottom boundary layer (TBBL) along a slope, induced by the breaking of internal waves in a linearly stratified fluid, was investigated through laboratory measurements. Fast response micro-scale conductivity and temperature probes in conjunction with laser-Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the time series of salinity, temperature, and velocity along a sloping boundary. Turbulent energy spectra were computed from the velocity data using a time-dependent advective velocity and Taylor's hypothesis. The energy spectra were used to estimate the energy dissipation rate at different positions in the TBBL. The advective velocity in this near-zero mean shear flow is based on an integral time scale (T(int)). The integral time scale is related to the average frequency of the spectral energy density of the flow velocity. The energy dissipation rate estimated from the variable advective velocity with an averaging time window equal to the integral time scale (T=T(int)) was 43% higher than the energy dissipation rate estimated from a constant advective velocity. The estimated dissipation rates with T=T(int) were comparable to values obtained by curve-fitting a theoretical Batchelor spectrum for the temperature gradient spectra. This study proposes the integral time scale to be used for the oscillatory flows as (a) a time-averaging window to estimate the advective velocity and associated energy dissipation level, and (b) a normalizing parameter in the energy spectrum.

  18. Transport implementation of the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm with ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallek, S. D.; Herold, C. D.; McMahon, B. J.; Maller, K. M.; Brown, K. R.; Amini, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    Using trapped ion quantum bits in a scalable microfabricated surface trap, we perform the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm. Our architecture takes advantage of the ion transport capabilities of such a trap. The algorithm is demonstrated using two- and three-ion chains. For three ions, an improvement is achieved compared to a classical system using the same number of oracle queries. For two ions and one query, we correctly determine an unknown bit string with probability 97.6(8)%. For three ions, we succeed with probability 80.9(3)%.

  19. The Design of Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) Algorithms for Structured Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesak, Steven T.

    A given flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm consists of three components: (1) a high order algorithm to which it reduces in smooth parts of the flow; (2) a low order algorithm to which it reduces in parts of the flow devoid of smoothness; and (3) a flux limiter which calculates the weights assigned to the high and low order fluxes in various regions of the flow field. One way of optimizing an FCT algorithm is to optimize each of these three components individually. We present some of the ideas that have been developed over the past 30 years toward this end. These include the use of very high order spatial operators in the design of the high order fluxes, non-clipping flux limiters, the appropriate choice of constraint variables in the critical flux-limiting step, and the implementation of a "failsafe" flux-limiting strategy. This chapter confines itself to the design of FCT algorithms for structured grids, using a finite volume formalism, for this is the area with which the present author is most familiar. The reader will find excellent material on the design of FCT algorithms for unstructured grids, using both finite volume and finite element formalisms, in the chapters by Professors Löhner, Baum, Kuzmin, Turek, and Möller in the present volume.

  20. Harmony search optimization algorithm for a novel transportation problem in a consolidation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davod Hosseini, Seyed; Akbarpour Shirazi, Mohsen; Taghi Fatemi Ghomi, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    This article presents a new harmony search optimization algorithm to solve a novel integer programming model developed for a consolidation network. In this network, a set of vehicles is used to transport goods from suppliers to their corresponding customers via two transportation systems: direct shipment and milk run logistics. The objective of this problem is to minimize the total shipping cost in the network, so it tries to reduce the number of required vehicles using an efficient vehicle routing strategy in the solution approach. Solving several numerical examples confirms that the proposed solution approach based on the harmony search algorithm performs much better than CPLEX in reducing both the shipping cost in the network and computational time requirement, especially for realistic size problem instances.

  1. Evolution and Advection of Solar Mesogranulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    unprecedented clarity. We see that the supergranules, which are known to carry along (advect) the granules with their convective motion, also advect...I Solar mesogranulation, Solar observations, Solar super- 2 granulation 16. PRICE COCE 1i7. SECJ-3T LSiIATO 8 EUITY CLASSIFICA ION 19. SECURITY CLAS...mo~iesý sho~ed that granules are adl~ectedl b• Richard Muller*, Hers& Auffret*, Thierry Roudiert, the larger-scale consectie flowss. and thu, could

  2. Parallel Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport Simulation on Exascale Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Paul Kollath

    Monte Carlo particle transport methods are being considered as a viable option for high-fidelity simulation of nuclear reactors. While Monte Carlo methods offer several potential advantages over deterministic methods, there are a number of algorithmic shortcomings that would prevent their immediate adoption for full-core analyses. In this thesis, algorithms are proposed both to ameliorate the degradation in parallel efficiency typically observed for large numbers of processors and to offer a means of decomposing large tally data that will be needed for reactor analysis. A nearest-neighbor fission bank algorithm was proposed and subsequently implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo code. A theoretical analysis of the communication pattern shows that the expected cost is O( N ) whereas traditional fission bank algorithms are O(N) at best. The algorithm was tested on two supercomputers, the Intrepid Blue Gene/P and the Titan Cray XK7, and demonstrated nearly linear parallel scaling up to 163,840 processor cores on a full-core benchmark problem. An algorithm for reducing network communication arising from tally reduction was analyzed and implemented in OpenMC. The proposed algorithm groups only particle histories on a single processor into batches for tally purposes---in doing so it prevents all network communication for tallies until the very end of the simulation. The algorithm was tested, again on a full-core benchmark, and shown to reduce network communication substantially. A model was developed to predict the impact of load imbalances on the performance of domain decomposed simulations. The analysis demonstrated that load imbalances in domain decomposed simulations arise from two distinct phenomena: non-uniform particle densities and non-uniform spatial leakage. The dominant performance penalty for domain decomposition was shown to come from these physical effects rather than insufficient network bandwidth or high latency. The model predictions were verified with

  3. Transportation Network with Fluctuating Input/Output Designed by the Bio-Inspired Physarum Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter. PMID:24586616

  4. One effective algorithm for finding a minimum cut of any transport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, S. V.; Snezhin, A. N.; Prostokishin, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Finding the minimal cut on the directed graph is an important task that has not yet been solved in a general form. The solution of this problem allows one to find “the pipeline bottleneck” of the transport network and manage changing flows efficiently. In this article, authors discussed a new algorithm for solving this problem, built on the basis of consideration of the corresponding dual problem.

  5. Transportation network with fluctuating input/output designed by the bio-inspired Physarum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose designing transportation network topology and traffic distribution under fluctuating conditions using a bio-inspired algorithm. The algorithm is inspired by the adaptive behavior observed in an amoeba-like organism, plasmodial slime mold, more formally known as plasmodium of Physarum plycephalum. This organism forms a transportation network to distribute its protoplasm, the fluidic contents of its cell, throughout its large cell body. In this process, the diameter of the transportation tubes adapts to the flux of the protoplasm. The Physarum algorithm, which mimics this adaptive behavior, has been widely applied to complex problems, such as maze solving and designing the topology of railroad grids, under static conditions. However, in most situations, environmental conditions fluctuate; for example, in power grids, the consumption of electric power shows daily, weekly, and annual periodicity depending on the lifestyles or the business needs of the individual consumers. This paper studies the design of network topology and traffic distribution with oscillatory input and output traffic flows. The network topology proposed by the Physarum algorithm is controlled by a parameter of the adaptation process of the tubes. We observe various rich topologies such as complete mesh, partial mesh, Y-shaped, and V-shaped networks depending on this adaptation parameter and evaluate them on the basis of three performance functions: loss, cost, and vulnerability. Our results indicate that consideration of the oscillatory conditions and the phase-lags in the multiple outputs of the network is important: The building and/or maintenance cost of the network can be reduced by introducing the oscillating condition, and when the phase-lag among the outputs is large, the transportation loss can also be reduced. We use stability analysis to reveal how the system exhibits various topologies depending on the parameter.

  6. Radiation transport calculations on unstructured grids using a spatially decomposed and threaded algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Nemanic, M K; Nowak, P

    1999-04-12

    We consider the solution of time-dependent, energy-dependent, discrete ordinates, and nonlinear radiative transfer problems on three-dimensional unstructured spatial grids. We discuss the solution of this class of transport problems, using the code TETON, on large distributed-memory multinode computers having multiple processors per ''node'' (e.g. the IBM-SP). We discuss the use of both spatial decomposition using message passing between ''nodes'' and a threading algorithm in angle on each ''node''. We present timing studies to show how this algorithm scales to hundreds and thousands of processors. We also present an energy group ''batching'' algorithm that greatly enhances cache performance. Our conclusion, after considering cache performance, storage limitations and dependencies inherent in the physics, is that a model that uses a combination of message-passing and threading is superior to one that uses message-passing alone. We present numerical evidence to support our conclusion.

  7. Understanding Air Transportation Market Dynamics Using a Search Algorithm for Calibrating Travel Demand and Price

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Horio, Brant M.; DeCicco, Anthony H.; Hasan, Shahab; Stouffer, Virginia L.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a search algorithm based framework to calibrate origin-destination (O-D) market specific airline ticket demands and prices for the Air Transportation System (ATS). This framework is used for calibrating an agent based model of the air ticket buy-sell process - Airline Evolutionary Simulation (Airline EVOS) -that has fidelity of detail that accounts for airline and consumer behaviors and the interdependencies they share between themselves and the NAS. More specificially, this algorithm simultaneous calibrates demand and airfares for each O-D market, to within specified threshold of a pre-specified target value. The proposed algorithm is illustrated with market data targets provided by the Transportation System Analysis Model (TSAM) and Airline Origin and Destination Survey (DB1B). Although we specify these models and datasources for this calibration exercise, the methods described in this paper are applicable to calibrating any low-level model of the ATS to some other demand forecast model-based data. We argue that using a calibration algorithm such as the one we present here to synchronize ATS models with specialized forecast demand models, is a powerful tool for establishing credible baseline conditions in experiments analyzing the effects of proposed policy changes to the ATS.

  8. Stability of explicit advection schemes. The balance point location rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    2002-02-01

    This paper introduces the balance point location rule, providing specific necessary and sufficient conditions for constructing unconditionally stable explicit advection schemes, in both semi-Lagrangian and flux-form Eulerian formulations. The rule determines how the spatial stencil is placed on the computational grid. It requires the balance point (the center of the stencil in index space) to be located in the same patch as the departure point for semi-Lagrangian schemes or the same cell as the sweep point for Eulerian schemes. Centering the stencil in this way guarantees stability, regardless of the size of the time step. In contrast, the original Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition requiring the stencil merely to include the departure (sweep) point, although necessary, is not sufficient for guaranteeing stability. The CFL condition is of limited practical value, whereas the balance point location rule always gives precise and easily implemented prescriptions for constructing stable algorithms. The rule is also helpful in correcting a number of misconceptions that have arisen concerning explicit advection schemes. In particular, explicit Eulerian schemes are widely believed to be inefficient because of stability constraints on the time step, dictated by a narrow interpretation of the CFL condition requiring the Courant number to be less than or equal to one. However, such constraints apply only to a particular class of advection schemes resulting for centering the stencil on the arrival point, when in fact the sole function of the stencil is to estimate the departure (sweep) point value - the arrival point has no relevance in determining the placement of the stencil. Unconditionally stable explicit Eulerian advection schemes are efficient and accurate, comparable in operation count to semi-Lagrangian schemes of the same order, but because of their flux-based formulation, they have the added advantage of being inherently conservative. Copyright

  9. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  10. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  11. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  12. Is Chaotic Advection Inherent to Porous Media Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Daniel; Metcalfe, Guy; Trefry, Mike

    2013-11-01

    All porous media, including granular and packed media, fractured and open networks, are typified by the inherent topological complexity of the pore-space. This topological complexity admits a large number density of stagnation points under steady Stokes flow, which in turn generates a 3D fluid mechanical analouge of the Bakers map, termed the Baker's flow. We demonstrate that via this mechanism, chaotic advection at the pore-scale is inherent to almost all porous media under reasonable conditions, and such dynamics have significant implications for a range of fluid-borne processes including transport and mixing, chemical reactions and biological activity.

  13. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  14. Effects of demographic stochasticity on population persistence in advective media.

    PubMed

    Kolpas, Allison; Nisbet, Roger M

    2010-07-01

    Many populations live and disperse in advective media. A fundamental question, known as the "drift paradox" in stream ecology, is how a closed population can survive when it is constantly being transported downstream by the flow. Recent population-level models have focused on the role of diffusive movement in balancing the effects of advection, predicting critical conditions for persistence. Here, we formulate an individual-based stochastic analog of the model described in (Lutscher et al., SIAM Rev. 47(4):749-772, 2005) to quantify the effects of demographic stochasticity on persistence. Population dynamics are modeled as a logistic growth process and dispersal as a position-jump process on a finite domain divided into patches. When there is no correlation in the interpatch movement of residents, stochasticity simply smooths the persistence-extinction boundary. However, when individuals disperse in "packets" from one patch to another and the flow field is memoryless on the timescale of packet transport, the probability of persistence is greatly enhanced. The latter transport mechanism may be characteristic of larval dispersal in the coastal ocean or wind-dispersed seed pods.

  15. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  16. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  17. Effect of dissolved organic carbon on the transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and carboxylate-modified microspheres advected through temperate humic and tropical volcanic agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Metge, David W; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-02-21

    Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and microspheres in two disparate (a clay- and Fe-rich, volcanic and a temperate, humic) agricultural soils were studied in the presence and absence of 100 mg L(-1) of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 5.0-6.0. Transport of carboxylate-modified, 1.8 μm microspheres in soil columns was highly sensitive to the nature of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas oocysts transport was more affected by soil mineralogy. SDBS increased transport of microspheres from 48% to 87% through the tropical soil and from 43% to 93% in temperate soil. In contrast, SRHA reduced transport of microspheres from 48% to 28% in tropical soil and from 43% to 16% in temperate soil. SDBS also increased oocysts transport through the temperate soil 5-fold, whereas no oocyst transport was detected in tropical soil. SRHA had only a nominal effect in increasing oocysts transport in tropical soil, but caused a 6-fold increase in transport through the temperate soil. Amendments of only 4 mg L(-1) SRHA and SDBS decreased oocyst hydrophobicity from 66% to 20% and from 66% to 5%, respectively. However, SDBS increased microsphere hydrophobicity from 16% to 33%. Soil fines, which includes clays, and SRHA, both caused the oocysts zeta potential (ζ) to become more negative, but caused the highly hydrophilic microspheres to become less negatively charged. The disparate behaviors of the two colloids in the presence of an ionic surfactant and natural organic matter suggest that microspheres may not be suitable surrogates for oocysts in certain types of soils. These results indicate that whether or not DOC inhibits or promotes transport of oocysts and microspheres in agricultural soils and by how much, depends not only on the surface characteristics of the colloid, but the nature of the DOC and the soil mineralogy.

  18. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  19. The radial basis function finite collocation approach for capturing sharp fronts in time dependent advection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, D.; Power, H.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a node-based local meshless method for advective transport problems that is capable of operating on centrally defined stencils and is suitable for shock-capturing purposes. High spatial convergence rates can be achieved; in excess of eighth-order in some cases. Strongly-varying smooth profiles may be captured at infinite Péclet number without instability, and for discontinuous profiles the solution exhibits neutrally stable oscillations that can be damped by introducing a small artificial diffusion parameter, allowing a good approximation to the shock-front to be maintained for long travel times without introducing spurious oscillations. The proposed method is based on local collocation with radial basis functions (RBFs) in a "finite collocation" configuration. In this approach the PDE governing and boundary equations are enforced directly within the local RBF collocation systems, rather than being reconstructed from fixed interpolating functions as is typical of finite difference, finite volume or finite element methods. In this way the interpolating basis functions naturally incorporate information from the governing PDE, including the strength and direction of the convective velocity field. By using these PDE-enhanced interpolating functions an "implicit upwinding" effect is achieved, whereby the flow of information naturally respects the specifics of the local convective field. This implicit upwinding effect allows high-convergence solutions to be obtained on centred stencils for advection problems. The method is formulated using a high-convergence implicit timestepping algorithm based on Richardson extrapolation. The spatial and temporal convergence of the proposed approach is demonstrated using smooth functions with large gradients. The capture of discontinuities is then investigated, showing how the addition of a dynamic stabilisation parameter can damp the neutrally stable oscillations with limited smearing of the shock front.

  20. Vertical transportation systems embedded on shuffled frog leaping algorithm for manufacturing optimisation problems in industries.

    PubMed

    Aungkulanon, Pasura; Luangpaiboon, Pongchanun

    2016-01-01

    Response surface methods via the first or second order models are important in manufacturing processes. This study, however, proposes different structured mechanisms of the vertical transportation systems or VTS embedded on a shuffled frog leaping-based approach. There are three VTS scenarios, a motion reaching a normal operating velocity, and both reaching and not reaching transitional motion. These variants were performed to simultaneously inspect multiple responses affected by machining parameters in multi-pass turning processes. The numerical results of two machining optimisation problems demonstrated the high performance measures of the proposed methods, when compared to other optimisation algorithms for an actual deep cut design.

  1. Simulation of Long Lived Tracers Using an Improved Empirically Based Two-Dimensional Model Transport Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Considine, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a new empirically-based transport algorithm for use in our GSFC two-dimensional transport and chemistry model. The new algorithm contains planetary wave statistics, and parameterizations to account for the effects due to gravity waves and equatorial Kelvin waves. As such, this scheme utilizes significantly more information compared to our previous algorithm which was based only on zonal mean temperatures and heating rates. The new model transport captures much of the qualitative structure and seasonal variability observed in long lived tracers, such as: isolation of the tropics and the southern hemisphere winter polar vortex; the well mixed surf-zone region of the winter sub-tropics and mid-latitudes; the latitudinal and seasonal variations of total ozone; and the seasonal variations of mesospheric H2O. The model also indicates a double peaked structure in methane associated with the semiannual oscillation in the tropical upper stratosphere. This feature is similar in phase but is significantly weaker in amplitude compared to the observations. The model simulations of carbon-14 and strontium-90 are in good agreement with observations, both in simulating the peak in mixing ratio at 20-25 km, and the decrease with altitude in mixing ratio above 25 km. We also find mostly good agreement between modeled and observed age of air determined from SF6 outside of the northern hemisphere polar vortex. However, observations inside the vortex reveal significantly older air compared to the model. This is consistent with the model deficiencies in simulating CH4 in the northern hemisphere winter high latitudes and illustrates the limitations of the current climatological zonal mean model formulation. The propagation of seasonal signals in water vapor and CO2 in the lower stratosphere showed general agreement in phase, and the model qualitatively captured the observed amplitude decrease in CO2 from the tropics to midlatitudes. However, the simulated seasonal

  2. Sensitivity of solute advective travel time to porosities of hydrogeologic units.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianting; Pohlmann, Karl F; Chapman, Jenny B; Russell, Charles E; Carroll, Rosemary W H; Shafer, David S

    2010-01-01

    An integral approach is proposed to quantify uncertainty and sensitivity of advective travel time to the effective porosities of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) along groundwater flow paths. The approach is applicable in situations where a groundwater flow model exists, but a full solute transport model is not available. The approach can be used to: (1) determine HGUs whose porosities are influential to the solute advective travel time; and (2) apportion uncertainties of solute advective travel times to the uncertainty contributions from individual HGU porosities. A simple one-dimensional steady-state flow example is used to illustrate the approach. Advective travel times of solutes are obtained based on the one-dimensional steady-state flow results in conjunction with the HGU porosities. The approach can be easily applicable to more complex multi-dimensional cases where advective solute travel time can be calculated based on simulated flow results from groundwater flow models. This approach is particularly valuable for optimizing limited resources when designing field characterization programs for uncertainty reduction by identifying HGUs that contribute most to the estimation uncertainty of advective travel times of solutes.

  3. Effects of Temperature Control Algorithms on Transport Properties and Kinetics in Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Basconi, Joseph E; Shirts, Michael R

    2013-07-09

    Temperature control algorithms in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are necessary to study isothermal systems. However, these thermostatting algorithms alter the velocities of the particles and thus modify the dynamics of the system with respect to the microcanonical ensemble, which could potentially lead to thermostat-dependent dynamical artifacts. In this study, we investigate how six well-established thermostat algorithms applied with different coupling strengths and to different degrees of freedom affect the dynamics of various molecular systems. We consider dynamic processes occurring on different times scales by measuring translational and rotational self-diffusion as well as the shear viscosity of water, diffusion of a small molecule solvated in water, and diffusion and the dynamic structure factor of a polymer chain in water. All of these properties are significantly dampened by thermostat algorithms which randomize particle velocities, such as the Andersen thermostat and Langevin dynamics, when strong coupling is used. For the solvated small molecule and polymer, these dampening effects are reduced somewhat if the thermostats are applied to the solvent alone, such that the solute's temperature is maintained only through thermal contact with solvent particles. Algorithms which operate by scaling the velocities, such as the Berendsen thermostat, the stochastic velocity rescaling approach of Bussi and co-workers, and the Nosé-Hoover thermostat, yield transport properties that are statistically indistinguishable from those of the microcanonical ensemble, provided they are applied globally, i.e. coupled to the system's kinetic energy. When coupled to local kinetic energies, a velocity scaling thermostat can have dampening effects comparable to a velocity randomizing method, as we observe when a massive Nose-Hoover coupling scheme is used to simulate water. Correct dynamical properties, at least those studied in this paper, are obtained with the Berendsen

  4. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  5. Diffusion and Advection using Cellular Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Glazier, James

    2005-03-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a robust cell level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Standard diffusion solvers in the CPM use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. These methods have difficulty in simulating local advection in the ECM due to physiology and morphogenesis. To circumvent the problem of instabilities we simulate advection-diffusion within the framework of CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalised fluid "cells" or particles which separate advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid cells by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. CPM movement of the cells by spin flips handles the advection. The extension allows the CPM to model viscosity explicitly by including a relative velocity constraint on the fluid. The extended CPM correctly reproduces flow profiles of viscous fluids in cylindrical tube, during Stokes flow across a sphere and in flow in concentric cylindrical shells. We illustrate various conditions for diffusion including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation by comparing with analytical and established numerical solutions.

  6. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  7. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  8. Optimizations of the energy grid search algorithm in continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Romano, Paul K.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we propose, implement, and test various optimizations of the typical energy grid-cross section pair lookup algorithm in Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The key feature common to all of the optimizations is a reduction in the length of the vector of energies that must be searched when locating the index of a particle's current energy. Other factors held constant, a reduction in energy vector length yields a reduction in CPU time. The computational methods we present here are physics-informed. That is, they are designed to utilize the physical information embedded in a simulation in order to reduce the length of the vector to be searched. More specifically, the optimizations take advantage of information about scattering kinematics, neutron cross section structure and data representation, and also the expected characteristics of a system's spatial flux distribution and energy spectrum. The methods that we present are implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code as part of this work. The gains in computational efficiency, as measured by overall code speedup, associated with each of the optimizations are demonstrated in both serial and multithreaded simulations of realistic systems. Depending on the system, simulation parameters, and optimization method employed, overall code speedup factors of 1.2-1.5, relative to the typical single-nuclide binary search algorithm, are routinely observed.

  9. A novel method for analytically solving a radial advection-dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Keng-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Sie, Bing-Ruei

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution for solute transport in a radial flow field has a variety of practical applications in the study of the transport in push-pull/divergent/convergent flow tracer tests, aquifer remediation by pumping and aquifer storage and recovery. However, an analytical solution for radial advective-dispersive transport has been proven very difficult to develop and relatively few in subsurface hydrology have made efforts to do so, because variable coefficients in the governing partial differential equations. Most of the solutions for radial advective-dispersive transport presented in the literature have generally been solved semi-analytically with the final concentration values being obtained with the help of a numerical Laplace inversion. This study presents a novel solution strategy for analytically solving the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. A Laplace transform with respect to the time variable and a generalized integral transform technique with respect to the spatial variable are first performed to convert the transient governing partial differential equations into an algebraic equation. Subsequently, the algebraic equation is solved using simple algebraic manipulations, easily yielding the solution in the transformed domain. The solution in the original domain is ultimately obtained by successive applications of the Laplace and corresponding generalized integral transform inversions. A convergent flow tracer test is used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method for deriving an exact analytical solution to the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. The developed analytical solution is verified against a semi-analytical solution taken from the literature. The results show perfect agreement between our exact analytical solution and the semi-analytical solution. The solution method presented in this study can be applied to create more comprehensive analytical models for a great variety of radial advective

  10. Improved algorithms and coupled neutron-photon transport for auto-importance sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Jun-Li; Wu, Zhen; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Man-Chun; Zhang, Hui; Gang, Zhi; Xu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The Auto-Importance Sampling (AIS) method is a Monte Carlo variance reduction technique proposed for deep penetration problems, which can significantly improve computational efficiency without pre-calculations for importance distribution. However, the AIS method is only validated with several simple examples, and cannot be used for coupled neutron-photon transport. This paper presents improved algorithms for the AIS method, including particle transport, fictitious particle creation and adjustment, fictitious surface geometry, random number allocation and calculation of the estimated relative error. These improvements allow the AIS method to be applied to complicated deep penetration problems with complex geometry and multiple materials. A Completely coupled Neutron-Photon Auto-Importance Sampling (CNP-AIS) method is proposed to solve the deep penetration problems of coupled neutron-photon transport using the improved algorithms. The NUREG/CR-6115 PWR benchmark was calculated by using the methods of CNP-AIS, geometry splitting with Russian roulette and analog Monte Carlo, respectively. The calculation results of CNP-AIS are in good agreement with those of geometry splitting with Russian roulette and the benchmark solutions. The computational efficiency of CNP-AIS for both neutron and photon is much better than that of geometry splitting with Russian roulette in most cases, and increased by several orders of magnitude compared with that of the analog Monte Carlo. Supported by the subject of National Science and Technology Major Project of China (2013ZX06002001-007, 2011ZX06004-007) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275110, 11375103)

  11. Positivity-preserving numerical schemes for multidimensional advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Macvean, M. K.; Lock, A. P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the construction of an explicit, single time-step, conservative, finite-volume method for multidimensional advective flow, based on a uniformly third-order polynomial interpolation algorithm (UTOPIA). Particular attention is paid to the problem of flow-to-grid angle-dependent, anisotropic distortion typical of one-dimensional schemes used component-wise. The third-order multidimensional scheme automatically includes certain cross-difference terms that guarantee good isotropy (and stability). However, above first-order, polynomial-based advection schemes do not preserve positivity (the multidimensional analogue of monotonicity). For this reason, a multidimensional generalization of the first author's universal flux-limiter is sought. This is a very challenging problem. A simple flux-limiter can be found; but this introduces strong anisotropic distortion. A more sophisticated technique, limiting part of the flux and then restoring the isotropy-maintaining cross-terms afterwards, gives more satisfactory results. Test cases are confined to two dimensions; three-dimensional extensions are briefly discussed.

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  13. Space-fractional advection-diffusion and reflective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Krepysheva, Natalia; Di Pietro, Liliana; Néel, Marie-Christine

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous diffusive transport arises in a large diversity of disordered media. Stochastic formulations in terms of continuous time random walks (CTRWs) with transition probability densities showing space- and/or time-diverging moments were developed to account for anomalous behaviors. A broad class of CTRWs was shown to correspond, on the macroscopic scale, to advection-diffusion equations involving derivatives of noninteger order. In particular, CTRWs with Lévy distribution of jumps and finite mean waiting time lead to a space-fractional equation that accounts for superdiffusion and involves a nonlocal integral-differential operator. Within this framework, we analyze the evolution of particles performing symmetric Lévy flights with respect to a fluid moving at uniform speed . The particles are restricted to a semi-infinite domain limited by a reflective barrier. We show that the introduction of the boundary condition induces a modification in the kernel of the nonlocal operator. Thus, the macroscopic space-fractional advection-diffusion equation obtained is different from that in an infinite medium.

  14. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  15. F--Ray: A new algorithm for efficient transport of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Zhang, J.; Wandelt, B. D.; Shapiro, P. R.; Iliev, I. T.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new algorithm for the 3D transport of ionizing radiation, called F2-Ray (Fast Fourier Ray-tracing method). The transfer of ionizing radiation with long mean free path in diffuse intergalactic gas poses a special challenge to standard numerical methods which transport the radiation in position space. Standard methods usually trace each individual ray until it is fully absorbed by the intervening gas. If the mean free path is long, the computational cost and memory load are likely to be prohibitive. We have developed an algorithm that overcomes these limitations and is, therefore, significantly more efficient. The method calculates the transfer of radiation collectively, using the Fast Fourier Transform to convert radiation between position and Fourier spaces, so the computational cost will not increase with the number of ionizing sources. The method also automatically combines parallel rays with the same frequency at the same grid cell, thereby minimizing the memory requirement. The method is explicitly photon-conserving, i.e. the depletion of ionizing photons is guaranteed to equal the photoionizations they caused, and explicitly obeys the periodic boundary condition, i.e. the escape of ionizing photons from one side of a simulation volume is guaranteed to be compensated by emitting the same amount of photons into the volume through the opposite side. Together, these features make it possible to numerically simulate the transfer of ionizing photons more efficiently than previous methods. Since ionizing radiation such as the X-ray is responsible for heating the intergalactic gas when first stars and quasars form at high redshifts, our method can be applied to simulate thermal distribution, in addition to cosmic reionization, in three-dimensional inhomogeneous cosmological density field.

  16. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. The effect of diffusion and advection across the snow pores on the snow microstructure were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments and possible effects on natural snowpacks discussed. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective permeability. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Isothermal snow metamorphism is driven by sublimation deposition caused by the Kelvin effect and is the limiting factor independently of the transport regime in the pores.

  17. A Study of the Physical Processes of an Advection Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duan Yang; Yan, Wen Lian; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei Juan; Niu, Sheng Jie; Li, Zi Hua

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of advection fog appeared in the Yangtze River delta region between 1 and 2 December 2009. Here, we detail the fog formation and dissipation processes and the background weather conditions. The fog boundary layer and its formation and dissipation mechanisms have also been analyzed using field data recorded in a northern suburb of Nanjing. The results showed the following: (1) This advection fog was generated by interaction between advection of a north-east cold ground layer and a south-east warm upper layer. The double-inversion structure generated by this interaction between the cold and warm advections and steady south-east vapour transport was the main cause of this long-lasting fog. The double-inversion structure provided good thermal conditions for the thick fog, and the south-east vapour transport was not only conducive to maintaining the thickness of the fog but also sustained its long duration. (2) The fog-top altitude was over 600 m for most of the time, and the fog reduced visibility to less than 100 m for approximately 12 h. (3) The low-level jet near the lower inversion layer also played a role in maintaining the thick fog system by promoting heat, momentum and south-east vapour transport.

  18. A Novel Algorithm for Solving the Multidimensional Neutron Transport Equation on Massively Parallel Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Yousry

    2014-06-10

    We employ the Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells' fluxes and between the cells' and boundary surfaces' fluxes. The main goals of this work are to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and parallel performance of the developed methods with increasing number of processes, P. The fastest observed parallel solution method, Parallel Gauss-Seidel (PGS), was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN transport code, which uses the source iteration (SI) scheme parallelized with the Koch-baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method- even without acceleration/preconditioning-is completitive for optically thick problems as P is increased to the tens of thousands range. For the most optically thick cells tested, PGS reduced execution time by an approximate factor of three for problems with more than 130 million computational cells on P = 32,768. Moreover, the SI-DSA execution times's trend rises generally more steeply with increasing P than the PGS trend. Furthermore, the PGS method outperforms SI for the periodic heterogeneous layers (PHL) configuration problems. The PGS method outperforms SI and SI-DSA on as few as P = 16 for PHL problems and reduces execution time by a factor of ten or more for all problems considered with more than 2 million computational cells on P = 4.096.

  19. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  20. A computational Lagrangian-Eulerian advection remap for free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashgriz, Nasser; Barbat, Tiberiu; Wang, Gang

    2004-01-01

    A VOF-based algorithm for advecting free surfaces and interfaces across a 2-D unstructured grid is presented. This algorithm is based on a combination of a Computational Lagrangian-Eulerian Advection Remap and the Volume of the Fluid method (CLEAR-VOF). A set of geometric tools are used to remap the advected shape of the volume fraction from one cell onto the Eulerian fixed unstructured grid. The geometric remapping is used to compute the fluxes onto a group of neighbouring cells of the mesh. These fluxes are then redistributed and corrected to satisfy the conservation of mass. Here, we present methods for developing identification algorithms for surface cells and incorporating them with CLEAR-VOF. The CLEAR-VOF algorithm is then tested for translation of several geometries. It is also incorporated in a finite element based flow solver and tested in a laminar flow over a broad-crested weir and a turbulent flow over a semi-circular obstacle.

  1. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water.

  2. Aplication of LIRIC algorithm to study aerosol transport over Belsk, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruczuk, Aleksander; Posyniak, Michał

    2015-04-01

    In this work synergy of measurements done by of a LIDAR and a sun-sky scanning photometer is presented. The LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) was applied to study periodic events of increased values of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed at Belsk (Poland). Belsk is a background site located in a rural area around 50 km south from Warsaw. Events of increased AOD occur mainly during spring and they coincide with events of elevated concentrations of particulate matter (PM10). This phenomenon is observed in all eastern Europe, e.g. in Minsk, and is caused by long range aerosol transport. Our previous work showed aerosol transport from the border between Belarus, Ukraine and Russia in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), and from north Africa in the free troposphere. The LIRIC algorithm, which uses optical and microphysical properties of the aerosol derived from photometric measurements and LIDAR profiles, was applied to study vertical distribution of fine and coarse modes of aerosol. The analysis of the airmass backward trajectories and models results (DREAM and NAAPS)was also used to determine a possible aerosol type and its source region. This study proved our previous findings. Most of events with increased AODs are observed during spring. In this season the fine mode aerosol is mainly present in the PBL. On the basis of the trajectory analysis and the NAAPS results we presume that it is the absorbing aerosol originating from the regions of seasonal biomass burning in eastern Europe, i.e. the area mentioned above. The events with increased AODs were also found during summer. In this case the fine mode aerosol is transported in the PBL a like to spring season. However, our analysis of trajectories and model results indicated western Europe as a source region. It is probably urban/industrial aerosol. The coarse mode aerosol is transported mainly in the free troposphere as separate layers. The analysis of backward trajectories indicates northern Africa as a

  3. Striated populations in disordered environments with advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.; Succi, Sauro

    2017-01-01

    Growth in static and controlled environments such as a Petri dish can be used to study the spatial population dynamics of microorganisms. However, natural populations such as marine microbes experience fluid advection and often grow up in heterogeneous environments. We investigate a generalized Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov (FKPP) equation describing single species population subject to a constant flow field and quenched random spatially inhomogeneous growth rates with a fertile overall growth condition. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that the non-equilibrium steady-state population density develops a flow-driven striation pattern. The striations are highly asymmetric with a longitudinal correlation length that diverges linearly with the flow speed and a transverse correlation length that approaches a finite velocity-independent value. Linear response theory is developed to study the statistics of the steady states. Theoretical predictions show excellent agreement with the numerical steady states of the generalized FKPP equation obtained from Lattice Boltzmann simulations. These findings suggest that, although the growth disorder can be spatially uncorrelated, correlated population structures with striations emerge naturally at sufficiently strong advection.

  4. Waves, advection, and cloud patterns on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Smith, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The stable layers adjacent to the nearly neutral layer within the Venus clouds are found to be capable of supporting vertically trapped, horizontally propagating waves with horizontal wavelengths of about 10 km and speeds of a few meters per second relative to the mean wind in the neutral layer. These waves may possibly be excited by turbulence within the neutral layer. Here, the properties of the waves, and the patterns which they might produce within the visible clouds if excited near the subsolar point are examined. The patterns can be in agreement with many features in images. The waves are capable of transferring momentum latitudinally to help maintain the general atmospheric spin, but at present we are not able to evaluate wave amplitudes. We also examine an alternative possibility that the cloud patterns are produced by advection and shearing by the mean zonal and meridional flow of blobs formed near the equator. It is concluded that advection and shearing by the mean flow is the most likely explanation for the general pattern of small scale striations.

  5. Configuration of the electron transport algorithm of PENELOPE to simulate ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Sempau, J; Andreo, P

    2006-07-21

    The stability of the electron transport algorithm implemented in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with respect to variations of its step length is analysed in the context of the simulation of ion chambers used in photon and electron dosimetry. More precisely, the degree of violation of the Fano theorem is quantified (to the 0.1% level) as a function of the simulation parameters that determine the step size. To meet the premises of the theorem, we define an infinite graphite phantom with a cavity delimited by two parallel planes (i.e., a slab) and filled with a 'gas' that has the same composition as graphite but a mass density a thousand-fold smaller. The cavity walls and the gas have identical cross sections, including the density effect associated with inelastic collisions. Electrons with initial kinetic energies equal to 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 or 20 MeV are generated in the wall and in the gas with a uniform intensity per unit mass. Two configurations, motivated by the design of pancake- and thimble-type chambers, are considered, namely, with the initial direction of emission perpendicular or parallel to the gas-wall interface. This version of the Fano test avoids the need of photon regeneration and the calculation of photon energy absorption coefficients, two ingredients that are common to some alternative definitions of equivalent tests. In order to reduce the number of variables in the analysis, a global new simulation parameter, called the speedup parameter (a), is introduced. It is shown that setting a = 0.2, corresponding to values of the usual PENELOPE parameters of C1 = C2 = 0.02 and values of WCC and WCR that depend on the initial and absorption energies, is appropriate for maximum tolerances of the order of 0.2% with respect to an analogue, i.e., interaction-by-interaction, simulation of the same problem. The precise values of WCC and WCR do not seem to be critical to achieve this level of accuracy. The step-size dependence of the absorbed dose is explained in

  6. Diffusion algorithms and data reduction routine for onsite launch predictions for the transport of Titan 3 C exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Hamilton, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion algorithms have been specialized for the prediction of the surface impact for the dispersive transport of the exhaust effluents from the launch of a Titan 3 vehicle. This specialization permits these transport predictions to be made at the launch range in real time so that the effluent monitoring teams can optimize their monitoring grids. Basically, the data reduction routine requires just the meteorology profiles for the thermodynamics and kinematics of the atmosphere as an input. These profiles are graphed along with the resulting exhaust cloud rise history, the center line concentrations and dosages, and the hydrogen chloride isopleths.

  7. Numerical advection by conservation of second-order moments. [for trace element spatial distribution and chemical interaction in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new, accurate, and nondiffusive method for three-dimensional advection of trace species is presented. The method preserves tracer structures by conserving the second-order moments of the spatial distribution of tracer during advection. Upstream transport and second-order tracer distribution are described, and the moments of the tracer distribution about the center of a grid box are formally defined and related to the polynomial distribution. Formulas are presented which describe how the moments of a grid box are decomposed into a unique set of moments centered about each subbox and how they are reassembled into new grid boxes. A one-dimensional example if tracer transport is given, and limits necessary to maintain positive tracer concentrations are derived. The accuracy and stability of this method are analytically examined, and numerical experiments testing the effective resolution are presented. The method is compared with other methods for numerical advection of tracers.

  8. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  9. An improved lattice Boltzmann method for simulating advective-diffusive processes in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aursjø, Olav; Jettestuen, Espen; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel

    2017-03-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are widely used to simulate advective-diffusive processes in fluids. Lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook methods presented in the literature mostly just exhibit first order spatial accuracy and introduce errors proportional to the velocity squared. Formulations proposed to alleviate this have only been partly successful and are valid only in certain specific situations. We present and demonstrate here a formulation that produces no such second order errors. This formulation suggests that a subtle, but important, adjustment is all it takes to improve the accuracy of the method. The key to the improved accuracy of this new model is the non-standard definition of the concentration that relates to the distribution function describing the advection-diffusion in lattice Boltzmann. The main advantage of the algorithm comes to view when simulating situations where fluid density variations appear. The present formulation of the advection-diffusion algorithm will, by taking into account these fluid density variations, drastically reduce the errors produced compared to the standard formulations. We also show how a source term is included in this new formulation without it losing its second order spatial accuracy.

  10. A tracer-based inversion method for diagnosing eddy-induced diffusivity and advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bryan, F. O.

    2015-02-01

    A diagnosis method is presented which inverts a set of tracer flux statistics into an eddy-induced transport intended to apply for all tracers. The underlying assumption is that a linear flux-gradient relationship describes eddy-induced tracer transport, but a full tensor coefficient is assumed rather than a scalar coefficient which allows for down-gradient and skew transports. Thus, Lagrangian advection and anisotropic diffusion not necessarily aligned with the tracer gradient can be diagnosed. In this method, multiple passive tracers are initialized in an eddy-resolving flow simulation. Their spatially-averaged gradients form a matrix, where the gradient of each tracer is assumed to satisfy an identical flux-gradient relationship. The resulting linear system, which is overdetermined when using more than three tracers, is then solved to obtain an eddy transport tensor R which describes the eddy advection (antisymmetric part of R) and potentially anisotropic diffusion (symmetric part of R) in terms of coarse-grained variables. The mathematical basis for this inversion method is presented here, along with practical guidelines for its implementation. We present recommendations for initialization of the passive tracers, maintaining the required misalignment of the tracer gradients, correcting for nonconservative effects, and quantifying the error in the diagnosed transport tensor. A method is proposed to find unique, tracer-independent, distinct rotational and divergent Lagrangian transport operators, but the results indicate that these operators are not meaningfully relatable to tracer-independent eddy advection or diffusion. With the optimal method of diagnosis, the diagnosed transport tensor is capable of predicting the fluxes of other tracers that are withheld from the diagnosis, including even active tracers such as buoyancy, such that relative errors of 14% or less are found.

  11. Time Acceleration Methods for Advection on the Cubed Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, Richard K; Evans, Katherine J; White III, James B; Drake, John B

    2009-01-01

    Climate simulation will not grow to the ultrascale without new algorithms to overcome the scalability barriers blocking existing implementations. Until recently, climate simulations concentrated on the question of whether the climate is changing. The emphasis is now shifting to impact assessments, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and regional details. Such studies will require significant increases in spatial resolution and model complexity while maintaining adequate throughput. The barrier to progress is the resulting decrease in time step without increasing single-thread performance. In this paper we demonstrate how to overcome this time barrier for the first standard test defined for the shallow-water equations on a sphere. This paper explains how combining a multiwavelet discontinuous Galerkin method with exact linear part time-evolution schemes can overcome the time barrier for advection equations on a sphere. The discontinuous Galerkin method is a high-order method that is conservative, flexible, and scalable. The addition of multiwavelets to discontinuous Galerkin provides a hierarchical scale structure that can be exploited to improve computational efficiency in both the spatial and temporal dimensions. Exact linear part time-evolution schemes are explicit schemes that remain stable for implicit-size time steps.

  12. Authalic parameterization of general surfaces using Lie advection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guangyu; Hu, Jiaxi; Gu, Xianfeng; Hua, Jing

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of complex surfaces constitutes a major means of visualizing highly convoluted geometric structures as well as other properties associated with the surface. It also enables users with the ability to navigate, orient, and focus on regions of interest within a global view and overcome the occlusions to inner concavities. In this paper, we propose a novel area-preserving surface parameterization method which is rigorous in theory, moderate in computation, yet easily extendable to surfaces of non-disc and closed-boundary topologies. Starting from the distortion induced by an initial parameterization, an area restoring diffeomorphic flow is constructed as a Lie advection of differential 2-forms along the manifold, which yields equality of the area elements between the domain and the original surface at its final state. Existence and uniqueness of result are assured through an analytical derivation. Based upon a triangulated surface representation, we also present an efficient algorithm in line with discrete differential modeling. As an exemplar application, the utilization of this method for the effective visualization of brain cortical imaging modalities is presented. Compared with conformal methods, our method can reveal more subtle surface patterns in a quantitative manner. It, therefore, provides a competitive alternative to the existing parameterization techniques for better surface-based analysis in various scenarios.

  13. Comparison of an algebraic multigrid algorithm to two iterative solvers used for modeling ground water flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detwiler, R.L.; Mehl, S.; Rajaram, H.; Cheung, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical solution of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems is often constrained by the convergence behavior of the iterative solvers used to solve the resulting systems of equations. We demonstrate the ability of an algebraic multigrid algorithm (AMG) to efficiently solve the large, sparse systems of equations that result from computational models of ground water flow and transport in large and complex domains. Unlike geometric multigrid methods, this algorithm is applicable to problems in complex flow geometries, such as those encountered in pore-scale modeling of two-phase flow and transport. We integrated AMG into MODFLOW 2000 to compare two- and three-dimensional flow simulations using AMG to simulations using PCG2, a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that uses the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioner and is included with MODFLOW 2000. CPU times required for convergence with AMG were up to 140 times faster than those for PCG2. The cost of this increased speed was up to a nine-fold increase in required random access memory (RAM) for the three-dimensional problems and up to a four-fold increase in required RAM for the two-dimensional problems. We also compared two-dimensional numerical simulations of steady-state transport using AMG and the generalized minimum residual method with an incomplete LU-decomposition preconditioner. For these transport simulations, AMG yielded increased speeds of up to 17 times with only a 20% increase in required RAM. The ability of AMG to solve flow and transport problems in large, complex flow systems and its ready availability make it an ideal solver for use in both field-scale and pore-scale modeling.

  14. Oxygen Advection and Diffusion in a Three Dimensional Vascular Anatomical Network

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qianqian; Sakadžić, Sava; Ruvinskaya, Lana; Devor, Anna; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for quantitative and computationally affordable models for analyzing tissue metabolism and hemodynamics in microvascular networks. In this work, we develop a hybrid model to solve for the time-varying oxygen advection-diffusion equation in the vessels and tissue. To obtain a three-dimensional temporal evolution of tissue oxygen concentration for realistic complex vessel networks, we used a graph-based advection model combined with a finite-element based diffusion model and an implicit time-advancing scheme. We validated this algorithm for both static and dynamic conditions. We also applied it to a complex vascular network obtained from a rodent somatosensory cortex. Qualitative agreement was found with in-vivo experiments. PMID:18958033

  15. Assessment of advective porewater movement affecting mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants in marine intertidal sediment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Moffett, Kevan B; Luthy, Richard G

    2010-08-01

    Advective porewater movement and molecular diffusion are important factors affecting the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in marsh and mudflat sediments. This study assessed porewater movement in an intertidal mudflat in South Basin adjacent to Hunters Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA, where a pilot-scale test of sorbent amendment assessed the in situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To quantify advective porewater movement within the top 0-60 cm sediment layer, we used temperature as a tracer and conducted heat transport analysis using 14-day data from multidepth sediment temperature logging stations and one-dimensional heat transport simulations. The best-fit conditions gave an average Darcy velocity of 3.8cm/d in the downward vertical direction for sorbent-amended sediment with a plausible range of 0 cm/d to 8 cm/d. In a limiting case with no net advection, the best-fit depth-averaged mechanical dispersion coefficient was 2.2x10(-7) m2/s with a range of 0.9x10(-7) m2/s to 5.6x10(-7) m2/s. The Peclet number for PCB mobilization showed that molecular diffusion would control PCB mass transfer from sediment to sorbent particles for the case of uniform distribution of sorbent. However, the advective flow and mechanical dispersion in the test site would significantly benefit the stabilization effect of heterogeneously distributed sorbent by acting to smooth out the heterogeneities and homogenizing pollutant concentrations across the entire bioactive zone. These measurements and modeling techniques on intertidal sediment porewater transport could be useful for the development of more reliable mass transfer models for the prediction of contaminant release within the sediment bed, the movement of HOCs in the intertidal aquatic environment, and in situ sequestration by sorbent addition.

  16. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  17. An Algorithm for Interactive Modeling of Space-Transportation Engine Simulations: A Constraint Satisfaction Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Debasis; Thomas, Ajai; Hemminger, Joseph; Sakowski, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In this research we have developed an algorithm for the purpose of constraint processing by utilizing relational algebraic operators. Van Beek and others have investigated in the past this type of constraint processing from within a relational algebraic framework, producing some unique results. Apart from providing new theoretical angles, this approach also gives the opportunity to use the existing efficient implementations of relational database management systems as the underlying data structures for any relevant algorithm. Our algorithm here enhances that framework. The algorithm is quite general in its current form. Weak heuristics (like forward checking) developed within the Constraint-satisfaction problem (CSP) area could be also plugged easily within this algorithm for further enhancements of efficiency. The algorithm as developed here is targeted toward a component-oriented modeling problem that we are currently working on, namely, the problem of interactive modeling for batch-simulation of engineering systems (IMBSES). However, it could be adopted for many other CSP problems as well. The research addresses the algorithm and many aspects of the problem IMBSES that we are currently handling.

  18. Advective hydrogel membrane chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Brower, Mark; Pollard, David; Kanani, Dharmesh; Jacquemart, Renaud; Kachuik, Bradley; Stout, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is widely employed for the capture and purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because of the high cost of protein A resins, there is a significant economic driving force to seek new downstream processing strategies. Membrane chromatography has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional resin based column chromatography. However, to date, the application has been limited to mostly ion exchange flow through (FT) mode. Recently, significant advances in Natrix hydrogel membrane has resulted in increased dynamic binding capacities for proteins, which makes membrane chromatography much more attractive for bind/elute operations. The dominantly advective mass transport property of the hydrogel membrane has also enabled Natrix membrane to be run at faster volumetric flow rates with high dynamic binding capacities. In this work, the potential of using Natrix weak cation exchange membrane as a mAb capture step is assessed. A series of cycle studies was also performed in the pilot scale device (> 30 cycles) with good reproducibility in terms of yield and product purities, suggesting potential for improved manufacturing flexibility and productivity. In addition, anion exchange (AEX) hydrogel membranes were also evaluated with multiple mAb programs in FT mode. Significantly higher binding capacity for impurities (support mAb loads up to 10Kg/L) and 40X faster processing speed were observed compared with traditional AEX column chromatography. A proposed protein A free mAb purification process platform could meet the demand of a downstream purification process with high purity, yield, and throughput.

  19. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-06

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration.

  20. Pointwise interactions of finite element modeling of advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1984-07-01

    Pointwise iteration techniques including successive under-relaxation (SUR), Gauss-Seidel (G-S), and successive over-relaxation (SOR) schemes, are applied to advection-diffusion equations to derive the matrix equation with finite element methods. These schemes are tested using two simple examples for which analytical solutions are available so that numerical results can be checked to ensure code consistency. Numerical experiments indicate that the iteration schemes, if convergent, produce almost identical solutions as those obtained by the direct elimination scheme. For diffusion dominant transport, all three iteration schemes generate convergent computations. However, for advection-diffusion equally dominant or advection dominant transport, only SUR and G-S schemes yield convergent calculations, the SOR scheme leads to divergent computations. Pointwise iteration schemes offer substantial savings in central process unit (CPU) memory over the direct elimination scheme, even for the small, two-dimensional verification example, without complicating the programming efforts and, in the meantime, keeps the CPU time comparable. A realistic, hypothetical problem is used to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of pointwise iterations and direct elimination schemes. The saving in CPU memory using the pointwise iterations is more than tenfold that using the direct elimination solution for this hypothetical problem. The saving in CPU time is even better, more than 40 fold.

  1. An advection scheme based on the combination of particle mesh method and pure Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenic, Ilija; Mihailovic, Dragutin T.; Kapor, Darko

    2011-11-01

    Possibility of using pure Lagrangian approach in modeling transport phenomena is described in this paper. The application of pure Lagrangian approach in real atmospheric field induces highly irregular spatial distribution of grid points, after only a few time steps. In order to avoid problems caused by that irregularity, a quasi interpolation procedure is proposed. Proposed interpolation procedure is similar to the radial basis functions interpolation and does not impose any demands about spatial distribution of the grid points or about continuity and differentiability of the field that needs to be interpolated. Besides that, proposed procedure is explicitly mass conserving. Combination of particle mesh method and pure Lagrangian approach creates efficient transport scheme that does not produce any new local maxima and minima in advected field. In proposed advection scheme motion of points are performed in Lagrangian manner while spatial derivatives are evaluated on the basis of values interpolated onto regular grid. Applicability of proposed advection scheme in an unambiguous way is proved by performing "standard" numerical tests with (i) the slotted cylinder under solid body rotation, (ii) the test with Doswell's idealized cyclogenesis as well as (iii) integration of shallow water equations.

  2. The Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System. Part I; Overview and Description of the Instrument and Retrival Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorks, John E.; Mcgill, Matthew J.; Scott, V. Stanley; Kupchock, Andrew; Wake, Shane; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Selmer, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (ACATS) is a multi-channel Doppler lidar system recently developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). A unique aspect of the multi-channel Doppler lidar concept such as ACATS is that it is also, by its very nature, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL). Both the particulate and molecular scattered signal can be directly and unambiguously measured, allowing for direct retrievals of particulate extinction. ACATS is therefore capable of simultaneously resolving the backscatterextinction properties and motion of a particle from a high altitude aircraft. ACATS has flown on the NASA ER-2 during test flights over California in June 2012 and science flights during the Wallops Airborne Vegetation Experiment (WAVE) in September 2012. This paper provides an overview of the ACATS method and instrument design, describes the ACATS retrieval algorithms for cloud and aerosol properties, and demonstrates the data products that will be derived from the ACATS data using initial results from the WAVE project. The HSRL retrieval algorithms developed for ACATS have direct application to future spaceborne missions such as the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS). Furthermore, the direct extinction and particle wind velocity retrieved from the ACATS data can be used for science applications such 27 as dust or smoke transport and convective outflow in anvil cirrus clouds.

  3. Analytic radiative-advective equilibrium as a model for high-latitude climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Timothy W.; Jansen, Malte F.

    2016-01-01

    We propose radiative-advective equilibrium as a basic-state model for the high-latitude atmosphere. Temperature profiles are determined by a competition between stabilization by atmospheric shortwave absorption and advective heat flux convergence, and destabilization by surface shortwave absorption. We derive analytic expressions for temperature profiles, assuming power law atmospheric heating profiles as a function of pressure and two-stream windowed-gray longwave radiative transfer. We discuss example profiles with and without an atmospheric window and show that the sensitivity of surface temperature to forcing depends on the nature of the forcing, with greatest sensitivity to radiative forcing by increased optical thickness and least sensitivity to increased atmospheric heat transport. These differences in sensitivity of surface temperature to forcing can be explained in terms of a forcing-dependent lapse-rate feedback.

  4. Advection and the Efficiency of Spectral Energy Transfer in Two-Dimensional Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-09-02

    We report measurements of the geometric alignment of the small-scale turbulent stress and the large-scale rate of strain that together lead to the net flux of energy from small scales to large scales in two-dimensional turbulence. We find that the instantaneous alignment between these two tensors is weak and, thus, that the spectral transport of energy is inefficient. We show, however, that the strain rate is much better aligned with the stress at times in the past, suggesting that the differential advection of the two is responsible for the inefficient spectral transfer. We provide evidence for this conjecture by measuring the alignment statistics conditioned on weakly changing stress history. Our results give new insight into the relationship between scale-to-scale energy transfer, geometric alignment, and advection in turbulent flows.

  5. Relative importance of gas-phase diffusive and advective tichloroethene (TCE) fluxes in the unsaturated zone under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee-Won; Tillman, Fred D; Smith, James A

    2002-07-15

    It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure changes can induce gas flow in the unsaturated zone to such an extent that the advective flux of organic vapors in unsaturated-zone soil gas can be significant relative to the gas-phase diffusion flux of these organic vapors. To test this hypothesis, a series of field measurements and computer simulations were conducted to simulate and compare diffusion and advection fluxes at a trichloroethene-contaminated field site at Picatinny Arsenal in north-central New Jersey. Moisture content temperature, and soil-gas pressure were measured at multiple depths (including at land surface) and times for three distinct sampling events in August 1996, October 1996, and August 1998. Gas pressures in the unsaturated zone changed significantly over time and followed changes measured in the atmosphere. Gas permeability of the unsaturated zone was estimated using data from a variety of sources, including laboratory gas permeability measurements made on intact soil cores from the site, a field air pump test, and calibration of a gas-flow model to the transient, one-dimensional gas pressure data. The final gas-flow model reproduced small pressure gradients as observed in the field during the three distinct sampling events. The velocities calculated from the gas-flow model were used in transient, one-dimensional transport simulations to quantify advective and diffusive fluxes of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere as a function of time for each sampling event. Effective diffusion coefficients used for these simulations were determined from independent laboratory measurements made on intact soil cores collected from the field site. For two of the three sampling events (August 1996 and August 1998), the TCE gas-phase diffusion flux at land surface was significantly greater than the advection flux over the entire sampling period. For the second sampling event (October 1996), the advection flux was frequently larger than the

  6. Designing for chaos: applications of chaotic advection at the microscale.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, F R; Aref, Hassan

    2004-05-15

    Chaotic advection can play an important role in efficient microfluidic mixers. We discuss a design paradigm that exploits chaotic advection and illustrate by two recent examples, namely enhancing gene expression profiling and constructing an in-line microfluidic mixing channel, how application of this paradigm has led to successful micromixers. We suggest that 'designing for chaos', that is, basing practical mixer design on chaotic advection analysis, is a promising approach to adopt in this developing field which otherwise has little to guide it and is constrained by issues of scale and manufacturability.

  7. Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; Zhan, Hongbin

    2013-02-01

    Diffusive flux is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditions, and advective flux is usually neglected. However, some researchers have found that pressure-driven and density-driven advective flux may also be significant under certain conditions. This article compares the diffusive, pressure-driven and density-driven advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compound (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under various natural conditions. The presence of a less or more permeable layer at ground surface in a layered unsaturated zone is investigated for its impact on the net contribution of advective and diffusive fluxes. Results show although the transient advective flux can be greater than the diffusive flux, under most of the field conditions the net contribution of the advective flux is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux, and the influence of the density-driven flux is undetectable. The advective flux contributes comparably with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is less than 0.05. The presence of a less permeable layer at ground surface slightly increases the total flux in the underlying layer, while the presence of a more permeable layer at ground surface significantly increases the total flux in it. When the magnitude of water table fluctuation is less than 1 cm, and the period is greater than 0.5 day, the fluctuation of the water table can be simulated by fixing the water table position and setting a fluctuating moving velocity at the water table.

  8. Comparative Study of Multicast Protection Algorithms Using Shared Links in 100GET Transport Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Samer; Haidine, Abdelfattah; Lehnert, Ralf; Tuerk, Stefan

    In recent years new challenges have emerged in the telecommunications market resulting from the increase of network traffic and strong competition. Because of that, service providers feel constrained to replace expensive and complex IP-routers with a cheap and simple solution which guarantees the requested quality of services (QoS) with low cost. One of these solutions is to use the Ethernet technology as a switching layer, which results in using the cheap Ethernet services (E-Line, E-LAN and E-Tree) and to replace the expensive IP-routers. To achieve this migration step, new algorithms that support the available as well as the future services have to be developed. In this paper, we investigate the multicast protection issue. Three multicast protection algorithms based on the shared capacity between primary and backup solutions are proposed and evaluated. The blocking probability is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms. The sub-path algorithm resulted in a low blocking probability compared with the other algorithms.

  9. A comparison of transport algorithms for premixed, laminar steady state flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffee, T. P.; Heimerl, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of different methods of approximating multispecies transport phenomena in models of premixed, laminar, steady state flames were studied. Five approximation methods that span a wide range of computational complexity were developed. Identical data for individual species properties were used for each method. Each approximation method is employed in the numerical solution of a set of five H2-02-N2 flames. For each flame the computed species and temperature profiles, as well as the computed flame speeds, are found to be very nearly independent of the approximation method used. This does not indicate that transport phenomena are unimportant, but rather that the selection of the input values for the individual species transport properties is more important than the selection of the method used to approximate the multispecies transport. Based on these results, a sixth approximation method was developed that is computationally efficient and provides results extremely close to the most sophisticated and precise method used.

  10. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  11. A numerical treatment of geodynamic viscous flow problems involving the advection of material interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenardic, A.; Kaula, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Effective numerical treatment of multicomponent viscous flow problems involving the advection of sharp interfaces between materials of differing physical properties requires correction techniques to prevent spurious diffusion and dispersion. We develop a particular algorithm, based on modern shock-capture techniques, employing a two-step nonlinear method. The first step involves the global application of a high-order upwind scheme to a hyperbolic advection equation used to model the distribution of distinct material components in a flow field. The second step is corrective and involves the application of a global filter designed to remove dispersion errors that result from the advection of discontinuities (e.g., material interfaces) by high-order, minimally dissipative schemes. The filter introduces no additional diffusion error. Nonuniform viscosity across a material interface is allowed for by the implementation of a compositionally weighted-inverse interface viscosity scheme. The combined method approaches the optimal accuracy of modern shock-capture techniques with a minimal increase in computational time and memory. A key advantage of this method is its simplicity to incorporate into preexisting codes be they finite difference, element, or volume of two or three dimensions.

  12. Constraints upon water advection in sediments of the Mariana Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.H.; Menke, W.; Morin, R.

    1983-02-10

    Thermal gradient measurements, consolidation tests, and pore water compositions from the Mariana Trough imply that water is moving through the sediments in areas with less than about 100 m of sediment cover. The maximum advection rates implied by the thermal measurements and consolidation tests may be as high as 10/sup -5/ cm s/sup -1/ but are most commonly in the range of 1 to 5 x 10/sup -6/ cm s/sup -1/. Theoretical calculations of the effect of the highest advection rates upon carbonate dissolution indicate that dissolution may be impeded or enhanced (depending upon the direction of flow) by a factor of 2 to 5 times the rate for diffusion alone. The average percentage of carbonate is consistently higher in two cores from the area with no advection or upward advection than the average percentage of carbonate in three cores from the area with downward advection. This increase in average amount of carbonate in cores with upward moving water or no movement cannot be attributed solely to differences in water depth or in amount of terrigenous dilution. If the sediment column acts as a passive boundary layer, then the water velocities necessary to affect chemical gradients of silica are in the range 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -10/ cm s/sup -1/. However, if dissolution of silica occurs within the sediment column, then the advection velocities needed to affect chemical gradients are at least 3 x 10/sup -8/ cm s/sup -1/ and may be as high as 3 x 10/sup -6/ cm s/sup -1/. This order of magnitude increase in advection velocities when chemical reactions occur within the sediments is probably applicable to other cations in addition to silica. If so, then the advection velocities needed to affect heat flow (>10/sup -8/ cm s/sup -1/) and pore water chemical gradients are much nearer in magnitude than previously assumed.

  13. Algorithm design for automated transportation photo enforcement camera image and video quality diagnostic check modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Ajay; Saha, Bhaskar

    2013-03-01

    Photo enforcement devices for traffic rules such as red lights, toll, stops, and speed limits are increasingly being deployed in cities and counties around the world to ensure smooth traffic flow and public safety. These are typically unattended fielded systems, and so it is important to periodically check them for potential image/video quality problems that might interfere with their intended functionality. There is interest in automating such checks to reduce the operational overhead and human error involved in manually checking large camera device fleets. Examples of problems affecting such camera devices include exposure issues, focus drifts, obstructions, misalignment, download errors, and motion blur. Furthermore, in some cases, in addition to the sub-algorithms for individual problems, one also has to carefully design the overall algorithm and logic to check for and accurately classifying these individual problems. Some of these issues can occur in tandem or have the potential to be confused for each other by automated algorithms. Examples include camera misalignment that can cause some scene elements to go out of focus for wide-area scenes or download errors that can be misinterpreted as an obstruction. Therefore, the sequence in which the sub-algorithms are utilized is also important. This paper presents an overview of these problems along with no-reference and reduced reference image and video quality solutions to detect and classify such faults.

  14. Computer Modeling of Sand Transport on Mars Using a Compart-Mentalized Fluids Algorithm (CFA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Stratton, D.

    1999-01-01

    It has been postulated that aeolian transport on Mars may be significantly different from that on Earth. From laboratory experiments simulating martian grain transport [2], it has been observed that (saltating) grains striking the bed can cause hundreds of secondary reptation trajectories when impact occurs at speeds postulated for Mars. Some of the ballistically induced trajectories "die ouf' and effectively join the ranks on the creep population that is merely nudged along by impact. Many of the induced reptation trajectories, however, are sufficiently high for the grains to become part of the saltation load (it is irrelevant to the boundary layer how a grain attained its initial lift force). When these grains, in turn, strike the surface, they too are capable of inducing more reptating grains. This cascading effect has been discussed in connection with terrestrial aeolian transport in an attempt to dispel the notion that sand motion is divisible only into creep and saltation loads. On Earth, only a few grains are splashed by impact. On Mars, it may be hundreds. We developed a computer model to address this phenomenon because there are some important ramifications: First, this ratio may mean that martian aeolian transport is dominated by reptation flux rather than saltation. On Earth, the flux would be a roughly balanced mixture between reptation/creep and saltation. On Venus, there would be no transport other than by saltation. In other words, an understanding of planetary aeolian processes may not be necessarily understood by extrapolating from the "Earth case", with only gravity and atmospheric density/viscosity being considered as variables. Second, the reptation flux on Mars may be self sustaining, so that little input is required by the wind once transport has been initiated. The number of grains saturating the boundary layer near the bed may mean that average grain speed on Mars might conceivably be less than that on Earth. This would say much for models

  15. Fractures as Advective Conduits at the Earth Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragila, M. I.; Weisbrod, N.; Nachshon, U.; Kamai, T.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding gas exchange between the Earth's upper crust and the atmosphere is vital and necessary because this phenomenon controls to a large extent many important processes including, the water cycle, agricultural activities, greenhouse gas emissions and more. From a hydrological aspect, water vapor transport is an extremely important process related to Earth-atmosphere gas exchange because it affects above ground water vapor concentration, soil water content and soil salinity. Traditionally, diffusion was considered the main mechanism of gas exchange between the atmosphere and vadose zone, driven by gas concentration gradients. While this assumption may be correct for many porous media, our laboratory and field-scale studies have shown that advective gas transport mechanisms are governing these fluxes in fractured rocks and cracked soils. Convection driven by thermal gradients (free convection) and wind induced (forced convection) were explored and both were found to play a major role in Earth-atmosphere gas exchange. Long-term laboratory experiments using fracture simulators in a customized climate controlled laboratory have shown that thermal convection occurs when nighttime thermal conditions prevail. This convective venting significantly enhances evaporation and subsequently salt precipitation on the fracture walls. Experiment results were used to develop an empirical relationship between temperature gradients, fracture aperture and convective gas flux through the fracture. Theoretical calculations show that thermal convection is indeed likely to play a major role in evaporation from fractures and can explain enhanced salt accumulation observed in surface-exposed fractures. Long-term field measurements, carried out continuously for 5+ years in a single fracture in the Israeli Negev Desert, verified the development of air convection cycles of 10-18 hours duration on a daily basis, with a peak in both convective flux and duration during the winter. During

  16. Comparative Investigation of Source Term Estimation Algorithms for Hazardous Material Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion Prediction Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    model was a simple, normally distributed measurement error model . DSTL’s Urban Dispersion Model ...field trial data or code-on-code comparisons. V&V of Urban Dispersion Modeling . Complex Urban dispersion modeling is an active area where T&D...Validation Analysis of Hazardous Material Assessment Model , Support for DTRA in the Validation Analysis of Hazardous Material Transport and Dispersion

  17. An advection-based model to increase the temporal resolution of PIV time series.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Fulvio; Moore, Peter

    A numerical implementation of the advection equation is proposed to increase the temporal resolution of PIV time series. The method is based on the principle that velocity fluctuations are transported passively, similar to Taylor's hypothesis of frozen turbulence. In the present work, the advection model is extended to unsteady three-dimensional flows. The main objective of the method is that of lowering the requirement on the PIV repetition rate from the Eulerian frequency toward the Lagrangian one. The local trajectory of the fluid parcel is obtained by forward projection of the instantaneous velocity at the preceding time instant and backward projection from the subsequent time step. The trajectories are approximated by the instantaneous streamlines, which yields accurate results when the amplitude of velocity fluctuations is small with respect to the convective motion. The verification is performed with two experiments conducted at temporal resolutions significantly higher than that dictated by Nyquist criterion. The flow past the trailing edge of a NACA0012 airfoil closely approximates frozen turbulence, where the largest ratio between the Lagrangian and Eulerian temporal scales is expected. An order of magnitude reduction of the needed acquisition frequency is demonstrated by the velocity spectra of super-sampled series. The application to three-dimensional data is made with time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of a transitional jet. Here, the 3D advection equation is implemented to estimate the fluid trajectories. The reduction in the minimum sampling rate by the use of super-sampling in this case is less, due to the fact that vortices occurring in the jet shear layer are not well approximated by sole advection at large time separation. Both cases reveal that the current requirements for time-resolved PIV experiments can be revised when information is poured from space to time. An additional favorable effect is observed by the analysis in the frequency

  18. A DOUBLE-RING ALGORITHM FOR MODELING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: UNIFYING KINEMATIC DYNAMO MODELS AND SURFACE FLUX-TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Yeates, Anthony R. E-mail: dnandi@iiserkol.ac.i E-mail: anthony@maths.dundee.ac.u

    2010-09-01

    The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions (ARs) and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation, and meridional circulation, is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed {alpha}-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on AR eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. Using surface flux-transport simulations, we first show that an axisymmetric formulation-which is usually invoked in kinematic dynamo models-can reasonably approximate the surface flux dynamics. Finally, we demonstrate that our treatment of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism through double-ring eruption leads to an inverse relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed as expected, reconciling the discrepancy between surface flux-transport simulations and kinematic dynamo models.

  19. Transport coefficients of multi-particle collision algorithms with velocity-dependent collision rules.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Thomas

    2008-06-11

    Detailed calculations of the transport coefficients of a recently introduced particle-based model for fluid dynamics with a non-ideal equation of state are presented. Excluded volume interactions are modeled by means of biased stochastic multi-particle collisions which depend on the local velocities and densities. Momentum and energy are exactly conserved locally. A general scheme to derive transport coefficients for such biased, velocity-dependent collision rules is developed. Analytic expressions for the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity are obtained, and very good agreement is found with numerical results at small and large mean free paths. The viscosity turns out to be proportional to the square root of temperature, as in a real gas. In addition, the theoretical framework is applied to a two-component version of the model, and expressions for the viscosity and the difference in diffusion of the two species are given.

  20. The role of advection and diffusion in waste disposal by sea urchin embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Aaron; Licata, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    We determine the first passage probability for the absorption of waste molecules released from the microvilli of sea urchin embryos. We calculate a perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation for a linear shear profile similar to the fluid environment which the embryos inhabit. Rapid rotation of the embryo results in a concentration boundary layer of comparable thickness to the length of the microvilli. A comparison of the results to the regime of diffusion limited transport indicates that fluid flow is advantageous for efficient waste disposal.

  1. Least-Squares Spectral Method for the solution of a fractional advection-dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carella, Alfredo Raúl; Dorao, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Fractional derivatives provide a general approach for modeling transport phenomena occurring in diverse fields. This article describes a Least Squares Spectral Method for solving advection-dispersion equations using Caputo or Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. A Gauss-Lobatto-Jacobi quadrature is implemented to approximate the singularities in the integrands arising from the fractional derivative definition. Exponential convergence rate of the operator is verified when increasing the order of the approximation. Solutions are calculated for fractional-time and fractional-space differential equations. Comparisons with finite difference schemes are included. A significant reduction in storage space is achieved by lowering the resolution requirements in the time coordinate.

  2. Parallelization of the Red-Black Algorithm on Solving the Second-Order PN Transport Equation with the Hybrid Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Cristian Rabiti; Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2011-06-01

    The Red-Black algorithm has been successfully applied on solving the second-order parity transport equation with the PN approximation in angle and the Hybrid Finite Element Method (HFEM) in space, i.e., the Variational Nodal Method (VNM) [1,2,3,4,5]. Any transport solving techniques, including the Red-Black algorithm, need to be parallelized in order to take the advantage of the development of supercomputers with multiple processors for the advanced modeling and simulation. To our knowledge, an attempt [6] was done to parallelize it, but it was devoted only to the z axis plans in three-dimensional calculations. General parallelization of the Red-Black algorithm with the spatial domain decomposition has not been reported in the literature. In this summary, we present our implementation of the parallelization of the Red-Black algorithm and its efficiency results.

  3. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  4. The Sensitivity of Model Ozone to Advective and Photochemical Processes in the High Latitude Winter Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.; Kawa, S. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three dimensional chemistry and transport models (CTMs) contain a set of coupled continuity equations which describe the evolution of constituents such as ozone and other minor species which affect ozone. Both advection and photochemical processes contribute to constituent evolution, and a CTM provides a means to evaluate these contributions separately. Such evaluation is particularly useful when both terms are important to the modeled tendency. An example is the ozone tendency in the high latitude winter lower stratosphere, where advection tends to increase ozone, and catalytic processes involving chlorine radicals tend to decrease ozone. The Goddard three dimensional chemistry and transport model uses meteorological fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, thus the modeled ozone evolution may reproduce the observed evolution and provide a test of the model representation of photochemical processes if the transport is shown to be modeled appropriately. We have investigated the model advection further using diabatic trajectory calculations. For long lived constituents such as N2O, the model field for a particular time on a potential temperature surface is compared with a field produced by calculating 15 day back trajectories for a fixed latitude longitude grid, and mapping model N2O at the terminus of the back trajectories onto the initial grid. This provides a quantitative means to evaluate two aspects of the CTM transport: one, the model horizontal gradient between middle latitudes and the polar vortex is compared with the gradient produced using the non-diffusive trajectory calculation; two, the model vertical advection, which is produced by the divergence of the horizontal winds, is compared with the vertical transport expected from diabatic cooling.

  5. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  6. Advanced Transport Delay Compensation Algorithms: Results of Delay Measurement and Piloted Performance Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of delay measurement and piloted performance tests that were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the adaptive compensator and the state space compensator for alleviating the phase distortion of transport delay in the visual system in the VMS at the NASA Langley Research Center. Piloted simulation tests were conducted to assess the effectiveness of two novel compensators in comparison to the McFarland predictor and the baseline system with no compensation. Thirteen pilots with heterogeneous flight experience executed straight-in and offset approaches, at various delay configurations, on a flight simulator where different predictors were applied to compensate for transport delay. The glideslope and touchdown errors, power spectral density of the pilot control inputs, NASA Task Load Index, and Cooper-Harper rating of the handling qualities were employed for the analyses. The overall analyses show that the adaptive predictor results in slightly poorer compensation for short added delay (up to 48 ms) and better compensation for long added delay (up to 192 ms) than the McFarland compensator. The analyses also show that the state space predictor is fairly superior for short delay and significantly superior for long delay than the McFarland compensator.

  7. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas D.; Kelley, Douglas H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  8. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Thomas D; Kelley, Douglas H

    2016-10-14

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  9. Jet Magnetically Accelerated from Advection Dominated Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Zhi-Xiong

    2014-08-01

    A jet model for the jet power arising from a steady, optically thin, advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) around a Kerr black hole (BH) is proposed. We investigate the typical numerical solutions of ADAF, and calculate the jet power from an ADAF using a general relativistic version of electronic circuit theory. It is shown that the jet power concentrates in the inner region of the accretion flow, and the higher the degree to which the flow advection-dominated is, the lower the jet power from the ADAF is.

  10. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  11. An evaluation and intercomparison of four new advection schemes for use in global chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Arthur C.; Spee, Edwin J.; van Dop, Han; Hundsdorfer, Willem

    1998-08-01

    The need to use a higher spatial resolution and to include more chemical species in global atmospheric chemistry models has led to a demand for efficient advection schemes with high accuracy. We test four newly developed three-dimensional advection schemes named Mol-rg, Split-u, Split-us, and Split-rg. We compare the new schemes with the existing schemes Slopes and Second Moments, both implemented on a uniform grid. Mol-rg and Split-rg make use of a reduced grid. Split-us is an unconditionally stable scheme on a uniform grid. Two tests are performed with all schemes: a solid-body rotation test and a radon transport test. The radon transport test is performed with the off-line global tracer model TM2. The solid-body rotation test shows that none of the new schemes generates undershoot and overshoot and that all of them are mass conservative. Slopes and Second Moments both generate small undershoot and overshoot at all resolutions. The accuracy of the new and old schemes for rotation of a smooth profile is similar for the horizontal resolutions studied. Since the new schemes are slightly more diffusive than the old schemes, they perform worse for rotation of a cone. The radon test shows that the errors related to the numerical schemes are much smaller than other model errors. The main advantage of the new schemes is that they use 75% and 90% less memory than Slopes and Second Moments, respectively. At horizontal resolutions higher than 5° × 5° Split-us and Split-rg are the most efficient of the schemes in terms of cpu time. The new advection schemes are available through Internet.

  12. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  13. Dynamic typology of hydrothermal systems: competing effects of advection, dispersion and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejs, David

    2016-04-01

    Genetic interpretation hydrothermal systems relies on recognition of (i) hydrothermal fluid source, (ii) fluid migration pathways, and (iii) deposition site identified by hydrothermal alteration and/or mineralization. Frequently, only the last object is of interest or accessible to direct observation, but constraints on the fluid source (volume) and pathways can be obtained from evaluation of the time-integrated fluid flux during hydrothermal event. Successful interpretation of the petrological record, that is, progress of alteration reactions, relies on identification of individual contributions arising from solute advection (to the deposition site), its lateral dispersion, and reaction efficiency. Although these terms are all applicable in a mass-conservation relationship within the framework of the transport theory, they are rarely considered simultaneously and their relative magnitudes evaluated. These phenomena operate on variable length and time scales, and may in turn provide insight into the system dynamics such as flow, diffusion and reaction rates, or continuous vs. episodic behavior of hydrothermal events. In addition, here we demonstrate that they also affect estimate of the net fluid flux, frequently by several orders of magnitude. The extent of alteration and mineralization reactions between the hydrothermal fluid and the host environment is determined by: (i) temperature, pressure or any other gradients across the mineralization site, (ii) magnitude of disequilibrium at inflow to the mineralization site, which is related to physico-chemical gradient between the fluid source and the mineralization site, and (iii) chemical redistribution (dispersion) within the mineralization site. We introduce quantitative mass-transport descriptors - Péclet and Damköhler II numbers - to introduce division into dispersion-dominated, advection-dominated and reaction-constrained systems. Dispersive systems are characterized by lateral solute redistribution, driven by

  14. A forward-in-time advection scheme and adaptive multilevel flow solver for nearly incompressible atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.E.; Bretherton, S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a new forward-in-time advection method for nearly incompressible flow, MU, and its application to an adaptive multilevel flow solver for atmospheric flows. MU is a modification of Leonard et al.`s UTOPIA scheme. MU, like UTOPIA, is based on third-order accurate semi-Lagrangian multidimensional upwinding for constant velocity flows. for varying velocity fields, MU is a second-order conservative method. MU has greater stability and accuracy than UTOPIA and naturally decomposes into a monotone low-order method and a higher-order accurate correction for use with flux limiting. Its stability and accuracy make it a computationally efficient alternative to current finite-difference advection methods. We present a fully second-order accurate flow solver for the anelastic equations, a prototypical low Mach number flow. The flow solver is based on MU which is used for both momentum and scalar transport equations. This flow solver can also be implemented with any forward-in-time advection scheme. The multilevel flow solver conserves discrete global integrals of advected quantities and includes adaptive mesh refinements. Its second-order accuracy is verified using a nonlinear energy conservation integral for the anelastic equations. For a typical geophysical problem in which the flow is most rapidly varying in a small part of the domain, the multilevel flow solver achieves global accuracy comparable to uniform-resolution simulation for 10% of the computational cost. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.H.; Saiers, J.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Noe, G.B.; Mylon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of particulate matter within wetland surface waters affects nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility, and the evolution of the wetland landscape. Despite the importance of particle transport in influencing wetland form and function, there are few data sets that illuminate, in a quantitative way, the transport behavior of particulate matter within surface waters containing emergent vegetation. We report observations from experiments on the transport of 1 ??m latex microspheres at a wetland field site located in Water Conservation Area 3A of the Florida Everglades. The experiments involved line source injections of particles inside two 4.8-m-long surface water flumes constructed within a transition zone between an Eleocharis slough and Cladium jamaicense ridge and within a Cladium jamaicense ridge. We compared the measurements of particle transport to calculations of two-dimensional advection-dispersion model that accounted for a linear increase in water velocities with elevation above the ground surface. The results of this analysis revealed that particle spreading by longitudinal and vertical dispersion was substantially greater in the ridge than within the transition zone and that particle capture by aquatic vegetation lowered surface water particle concentrations and, at least for the timescale of our experiments, could be represented as an irreversible, first-order kinetics process. We found generally good agreement between our field-based estimates of particle dispersion and water velocity and estimates determined from published theory, suggesting that the advective-dispersive transport of particulate matter within complex wetland environments can be approximated on the basis of measurable properties of the flow and aquatic vegetation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Toxic Alexandrium blooms in the western Gulf of Maine: The plume advection hypothesis revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.M.; Keafer, B.A.; Geyer, W.R.; Signell, R.P.; Loder, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    The plume advection hypothesis links blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense in the western Gulf of Maine (GOM) to a buoyant plume derived from river outflows. This hypothesis was examined with cruise and moored-instrument observations in 1993 when levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins were high, and in 1994 when toxicity was low. A coupled physical-biological model simulated hydrography and A. fundyense distributions. Initial A. fundyense populations were restricted to low-salinity nearshore waters near Casco Bay, but also occurred in higher salinity waters along the plume boundary. This suggests two sources of cells - those from shallow-water cyst populations and those transported to shore from offshore blooms in the eastern segment of the Maine coastal current (EMCC). Observations confirm the role of the plume in A. fundyense transport and growth. Downwelling-favorable winds in 1993 transported the plume and its cells rapidly alongshore, enhancing toxicity and propagating PSP to the south. In 1994, sustained upwelling moved the plume offshore, resulting in low toxicity in intertidal shellfish. A. fundyense blooms were likely nutrient limited, leading to low growth rates and moderate cell abundances. These observations and mechanisms were reproduced by coupled physical-biological model simulations. The plume advection hypothesis provides a viable explanation for outbreaks of PSP in the western GOM, but should be refined to include two sources for cells that populate the plume and two major pathways for transport: one within the low-salinity plume and another where A. fundyense cells originating in the EMCC are transported along the outer boundary of the plume front with the western segment of the Maine coastal current.

  17. Pollutant advective spreading in beach sand exposed to high-energy tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itugha, Okuroghoboye D.; Chen, Daoyi; Guo, Yakun

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents field measurements in which dye solute was injected into coastal sand to investigate contaminant advection in intertidal beach sand. The measurements show the pathways of a contaminated plume in the unsaturated zone during both the flood and ebb tides. A prescribed amount of dye tracer solution was directly injected through the topsoil, with average porosity 0.3521 ± 0.01, at predetermined locations of the River Mersey's outer estuarial beach during ebb-tide. The injected dye was monitored, sampled and photographed over several tidal cycles. The distinctive features of the plume (full two dimensional cross-sections), sediments and water-table depth were sampled in-situ, close to the injection point (differing from previous contaminant monitoring tests in aquifers). The advective movement is attributed to tidal impact which is different from contaminant transport in aquifers. The experimental results show that plumes have significantly large spatial variability, diverging upwards and converging downwards, with a conical geometric shape which is different from the usual spherical/elliptical shape reported in literature. The mean vertical motion of the plume reaches three times the top-width within ten tidal cycles, exceeding the narrow bottom-width by a factor of order 2. The observed transport features of the plume within the beach sand have significant relevance to saltwater intrusion, surface water and groundwater quality. The field observations are unique and can serve as a valuable benchmark database for relevant numerical studies.

  18. Advection of surface-derived organic carbon fuels microbial reduction in Bangladesh groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailloux, Brian J.; Trembath-Reichert, Elizabeth; Cheung, Jennifer; Watson, Marlena; Stute, Martin; Freyer, Greg A.; Ferguson, Andrew S.; Matin Ahmed, Kazi; Jahangir Alam, Md.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Thomas, James; Layton, Alice C.; Zheng, Yan; Bostick, Benjamin C.; van Geen, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) by drinking shallow groundwater causes widespread disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries. The release of As naturally present in sediment to groundwater has been linked to the reductive dissolution of iron oxides coupled to the microbial respiration of organic carbon (OC). The source of OC driving this microbial reduction-carbon deposited with the sediments or exogenous carbon transported by groundwater-is still debated despite its importance in regulating aquifer redox status and groundwater As levels. Here, we used the radiocarbon (14C) signature of microbial DNA isolated from groundwater samples to determine the relative importance of surface and sediment-derived OC. Three DNA samples collected from the shallow, high-As aquifer and one sample from the underlying, low-As aquifer were consistently younger than the total sediment carbon, by as much as several thousand years. This difference and the dominance of heterotrophic microorganisms implies that younger, surface-derived OC is advected within the aquifer, albeit more slowly than groundwater, and represents a critical pool of OC for aquifer microbial communities. The vertical profile shows that downward transport of dissolved OC is occurring on anthropogenic timescales, but bomb 14C-labeled dissolved OC has not yet accumulated in DNA and is not fueling reduction. These results indicate that advected OC controls aquifer redox status and confirm that As release is a natural process that predates human perturbations to groundwater flow. Anthropogenic perturbations, however, could affect groundwater redox conditions and As levels in the future.

  19. Invasions in heterogeneous habitats in the presence of advection.

    PubMed

    Vergni, Davide; Iannaccone, Sandro; Berti, Stefano; Cencini, Massimo

    2012-05-21

    We investigate invasions from a biological reservoir to an initially empty, heterogeneous habitat in the presence of advection. The habitat consists of a periodic alternation of favorable and unfavorable patches. In the latter the population dies at fixed rate. In the former it grows either with the logistic or with an Allee effect type dynamics, where the population has to overcome a threshold to grow. We study the conditions for successful invasions and the speed of the invasion process, which is numerically and analytically investigated in several limits. Generically advection enhances the downstream invasion speed but decreases the population size of the invading species, and can even inhibit the invasion process. Remarkably, however, the rate of population increase, which quantifies the invasion efficiency, is maximized by an optimal advection velocity. In models with Allee effect, differently from the logistic case, above a critical unfavorable patch size the population localizes in a favorable patch, being unable to invade the habitat. However, we show that advection, when intense enough, may activate the invasion process.

  20. Black Hole Advective Accretion Disks with Optical Depth Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Artemove, Y.V.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Novikov, I.D.

    2006-02-01

    We have constructed numerically global solutions of advective accretion disks around black holes that describe a continuous transition between the effectively optically thick outer and optically thin inner disk regions. We have concentrated on models of accretion flows with large mass accretion rates, and we have employed a bridging formula for radiative losses at high and low effective optical depths.

  1. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L. Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  2. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  3. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  4. Persistence of cluster synchronization under the influence of advection.

    PubMed

    Guirey, Emma; Bees, Martin; Martin, Adrian; Srokosz, Meric

    2010-05-01

    We present a study on the emergence of spatial structure in plankton dynamics under the influence of stirring and mixing. A distribution of plankton is represented as a lattice of nonidentical, interacting, oscillatory plankton populations. Each population evolves according to (i) the internal biological dynamics represented by an NPZ model with population-specific phytoplankton growth rate, (ii) sub-grid-cell stirring and mixing parameterized by a nearest-neighbor coupling, and (iii) explicit advection resulting from a constant horizontal shear. Using the methods of synchronization theory, the emergent spatial structure of the simulation is investigated as a function of the coupling strength and rate of advection. Previous work using similar methods has neglected the effects of explicit stirring (i.e., at scales larger than the grid cell), leaving as an open question the relevance of the work to real marine systems. Here, we show that persistent spatial structure emerges for a range of coupling strengths for all realistic levels of surface ocean shear. Spatially, this corresponds to the formation of temporally evolving clusters of local synchronization. Increasing shear alters the spatial characteristics of this clustering by stretching and narrowing patches of synchronized dynamics. These patches are not stretched into stripes of synchronized abundance aligned with the flow, as may be expected, but instead lie at an angle to the flow. This study shows that advection does not diminish the relevance of conclusions from previous studies of spatial structure in plankton simulations. In fact, the inclusion of advection adds characteristic filamental structure, as observed in real-world plankton distributions. The results also show that the ability of coupled oscillators to synchronize depends strongly on the spatial arrangement of oscillator natural frequencies; under the influence of advection, therefore, the impact of the coupling strength on the emergent spatial

  5. Analyzing the evolutionary mechanisms of the Air Transportation System-of-Systems using network theory and machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotegawa, Tatsuya

    Complexity in the Air Transportation System (ATS) arises from the intermingling of many independent physical resources, operational paradigms, and stakeholder interests, as well as the dynamic variation of these interactions over time. Currently, trade-offs and cost benefit analyses of new ATS concepts are carried out on system-wide evaluation simulations driven by air traffic forecasts that assume fixed airline routes. However, this does not well reflect reality as airlines regularly add and remove routes. A airline service route network evolution model that projects route addition and removal was created and combined with state-of-the-art air traffic forecast methods to better reflect the dynamic properties of the ATS in system-wide simulations. Guided by a system-of-systems framework, network theory metrics and machine learning algorithms were applied to develop the route network evolution models based on patterns extracted from historical data. Constructing the route addition section of the model posed the greatest challenge due to the large pool of new link candidates compared to the actual number of routes historically added to the network. Of the models explored, algorithms based on logistic regression, random forests, and support vector machines showed best route addition and removal forecast accuracies at approximately 20% and 40%, respectively, when validated with historical data. The combination of network evolution models and a system-wide evaluation tool quantified the impact of airline route network evolution on air traffic delay. The expected delay minutes when considering network evolution increased approximately 5% for a forecasted schedule on 3/19/2020. Performance trade-off studies between several airline route network topologies from the perspectives of passenger travel efficiency, fuel burn, and robustness were also conducted to provide bounds that could serve as targets for ATS transformation efforts. The series of analysis revealed that high

  6. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation: Continuous load of finite duration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Field studies of solute fate and transport in streams and rivers often involve an. experimental release of solutes at an upstream boundary for a finite period of time. A review of several standard references on surface-water-quality modeling indicates that the analytical solution to the constant-parameter advection-dispersion equation for this type of boundary condition has been generally overlooked. Here an exact analytical solution that considers a continuous load of unite duration is compared to an approximate analytical solution presented elsewhere. Results indicate that the exact analytical solution should be used for verification of numerical solutions and other solute-transport problems wherein a high level of accuracy is required. ?? ASCE.

  7. Advanced Control Algorithms for Compensating the Phase Distortion Due to Transport Delay in Human-Machine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2007-01-01

    The desire to create more complex visual scenes in modern flight simulators outpaces recent increases in processor speed. As a result, simulation transport delay remains a problem. New approaches for compensating the transport delay in a flight simulator have been developed and are presented in this report. The lead/lag filter, the McFarland compensator and the Sobiski/Cardullo state space filter are three prominent compensators. The lead/lag filter provides some phase lead, while introducing significant gain distortion in the same frequency interval. The McFarland predictor can compensate for much longer delay and cause smaller gain error in low frequencies than the lead/lag filter, but the gain distortion beyond the design frequency interval is still significant, and it also causes large spikes in prediction. Though, theoretically, the Sobiski/Cardullo predictor, a state space filter, can compensate the longest delay with the least gain distortion among the three, it has remained in laboratory use due to several limitations. The first novel compensator is an adaptive predictor that makes use of the Kalman filter algorithm in a unique manner. In this manner the predictor can accurately provide the desired amount of prediction, while significantly reducing the large spikes caused by the McFarland predictor. Among several simplified online adaptive predictors, this report illustrates mathematically why the stochastic approximation algorithm achieves the best compensation results. A second novel approach employed a reference aircraft dynamics model to implement a state space predictor on a flight simulator. The practical implementation formed the filter state vector from the operator s control input and the aircraft states. The relationship between the reference model and the compensator performance was investigated in great detail, and the best performing reference model was selected for implementation in the final tests. Theoretical analyses of data from offline

  8. Improving Electron Transport Simulation in Mesoscopic Systems by Coupling a Classical Monte Carlo Algorithm to a Wigner Function Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Oriols, X.; Suñé, J.

    Because of its high switching speed, low power consumption and reduced complexity to implement a given function, resonant tunneling diodes (RTD's) have been recently recognized as excellent candidates for digital circuit applications [1]. Device modeling and simulation is thus important, not only to understand mesoscopic transport properties, but also to provide guidance in optimal device design and fabrication. Several approaches have been used to this end. Among kinetic models, those based on the non-equilibrium Green function formalism [2] have gained increasing interest due to their ability to incorporate coherent and incoherent interactions in a unified formulation. The Wigner distribution function approach has been also extensively used to study quantum transport in RTD's [3-6]. The main limitations of this formulation are the semiclassical treatment of carrier-phonon interactions by means of the relaxation time approximation and the huge computational burden associated to the self-consistent solution of Liouville and Poisson equations. This has imposed severe limitations on spatial domains, these being too small to succeed in the development of reliable simulation tools. Based on the Wigner function approach, we have developed a simulation tool that allows to extend the simulation domains up to hundreds of nanometers without a significant increase in computer time [7]. This tool is based on the coupling between the Wigner distribution function (quantum Liouville equation) and the Boltzmann transport equation. The former is applied to the active region of the device including the double barrier, where quantum effects are present (quantum window, QW). The latter is solved by means of a Monte Carlo algorithm and applied to the outer regions of the device, where quantum effects are not expected to occur. Since the classical Monte Carlo algorithm is much less time consuming than the discretized version of the Wigner transport equation, we can considerably

  9. An adaptive, Courant-number-dependent implicit scheme for vertical advection in oceanic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetkin, Alexander F.

    2015-07-01

    An oceanic model with an Eulerian vertical coordinate and an explicit vertical advection scheme is subject to the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) limitation. Depending on the horizontal grid spacing, the horizontal-to-vertical grid resolution ratio and the flow pattern this limitation may easily become the most restrictive factor in choosing model time step, with the general tendency to become more severe as horizontal resolution becomes finer. Using terrain-following coordinate makes local vertical grid spacing depend on topography, ultimately resulting in very fine resolution in shallow areas in comparison with other models, z-coordinate, and isopycnic, which adds another factor in restricting time step. At the same time, terrain-following models are models of choice for the fine-resolution coastal modeling, often including tides interacting with topography resulting in large amplitude baroclinic vertical motions. In this article we examine the possibility of mitigating vertical CFL restriction, while at the same time avoiding numerical inaccuracies associated with standard implicit advection schemes. In doing so we design a combined algorithm which acts like a high-order explicit scheme when Courant numbers are small enough to allow explicit method (which is usually the case throughout the entire modeling domain except just few "hot spots"), while at the same time has the ability to adjust itself toward implicit scheme should it became necessary to avoid stability limitations. This is done in a seamless manner by continuously adjusting weighting between explicit and implicit components.

  10. Cumulative distribution function solutions of advection-reaction equations with uncertain parameters.

    PubMed

    Boso, F; Broyda, S V; Tartakovsky, D M

    2014-06-08

    We derive deterministic cumulative distribution function (CDF) equations that govern the evolution of CDFs of state variables whose dynamics are described by the first-order hyperbolic conservation laws with uncertain coefficients that parametrize the advective flux and reactive terms. The CDF equations are subjected to uniquely specified boundary conditions in the phase space, thus obviating one of the major challenges encountered by more commonly used probability density function equations. The computational burden of solving CDF equations is insensitive to the magnitude of the correlation lengths of random input parameters. This is in contrast to both Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) and direct numerical algorithms, whose computational cost increases as correlation lengths of the input parameters decrease. The CDF equations are, however, not exact because they require a closure approximation. To verify the accuracy and robustness of the large-eddy-diffusivity closure, we conduct a set of numerical experiments which compare the CDFs computed with the CDF equations with those obtained via MCSs. This comparison demonstrates that the CDF equations remain accurate over a wide range of statistical properties of the two input parameters, such as their correlation lengths and variance of the coefficient that parametrizes the advective flux.

  11. On the error propagation of semi-Lagrange and Fourier methods for advection problems.

    PubMed

    Einkemmer, Lukas; Ostermann, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we study the error propagation of numerical schemes for the advection equation in the case where high precision is desired. The numerical methods considered are based on the fast Fourier transform, polynomial interpolation (semi-Lagrangian methods using a Lagrange or spline interpolation), and a discontinuous Galerkin semi-Lagrangian approach (which is conservative and has to store more than a single value per cell). We demonstrate, by carrying out numerical experiments, that the worst case error estimates given in the literature provide a good explanation for the error propagation of the interpolation-based semi-Lagrangian methods. For the discontinuous Galerkin semi-Lagrangian method, however, we find that the characteristic property of semi-Lagrangian error estimates (namely the fact that the error increases proportionally to the number of time steps) is not observed. We provide an explanation for this behavior and conduct numerical simulations that corroborate the different qualitative features of the error in the two respective types of semi-Lagrangian methods. The method based on the fast Fourier transform is exact but, due to round-off errors, susceptible to a linear increase of the error in the number of time steps. We show how to modify the Cooley-Tukey algorithm in order to obtain an error growth that is proportional to the square root of the number of time steps. Finally, we show, for a simple model, that our conclusions hold true if the advection solver is used as part of a splitting scheme.

  12. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  13. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  14. Spectral Theory of Advective Diffusion in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-19

    to study this enhancement of sea ice thermal conductivity and better understand temperature data collected during a 2007 Antarctic expedition. 15...conductivity and better understand temperature data collected during a 2007 Antarctic expedition. Activities and Findings: 1. Advection-enhanced...critically on the properties of this Hilbert space. More specifically, it is only on a special subset of this space that the random operator is Hermitian

  15. The LEM exponential integrator for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliari, Marco; Vianello, Marco; Bergamaschi, Luca

    2007-12-01

    We implement a second-order exponential integrator for semidiscretized advection-diffusion-reaction equations, obtained by coupling exponential-like Euler and Midpoint integrators, and computing the relevant matrix exponentials by polynomial interpolation at Leja points. Numerical tests on 2D models discretized in space by finite differences or finite elements, show that the Leja-Euler-Midpoint (LEM) exponential integrator can be up to 5 times faster than a classical second-order implicit solver.

  16. Enhancement of microbial motility due to advection-dependent nutrient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos A.; di Salvo, Mario E.

    2014-03-01

    In their classical work, Berg and Purcell [Biophys. J. 20, 193 (1977)] concluded that the motion of a small microorganism would not significantly increase its nutrient uptake rate, if the nutrient consisted of high diffusivity particles. As a result, it has been generally assumed that nutrient transport to small microorganisms such as bacteria is dominated by molecular diffusion and that swimming and feeding currents play a negligible role. On the other hand, recent studies have found that flagellar motion may increase advection-mediated uptake. We formulate a model to investigate the hypothesis that fast-moving microbes may enhance their swimming speed by taking advantage of advection to increase nutrient absorption. Surprisingly, using realistic parameter values for bacteria and algae, we find that even modest increases in nutrient absorption may lead to a significant increase of the microbial speed. We also show that, optimally, the rate of effective energy transfer to the microbial propulsion system should be proportional to the speed for slow motion, while it should be proportional to a power of the speed close to two for fast motion. We are grateful to SECyT-UNC and CONICET, Argentina, for financial support.

  17. A high order characteristic discontinuous Galerkin scheme for advection on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Lowrie, R.; Petersen, M.; Ringler, T.; Hecht, M.

    2016-11-01

    A new characteristic discontinuous Galerkin (CDG) advection scheme is presented. In contrast to standard discontinuous Galerkin schemes, the test functions themselves follow characteristics in order to ensure conservation and the edges of each element are also traced backwards along characteristics in order to create a swept region, which is integrated in order to determine the mass flux across the edge. Both the accuracy and performance of the scheme are greatly improved by the use of large Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers for a shear flow test case and the scheme is shown to scale sublinearly with the number of tracers being advected, outperforming a standard flux corrected transport scheme for 10 or more tracers with a linear basis. Moreover the CDG scheme may be run to arbitrarily high order spatial accuracy and on unstructured grids, and is shown to give the correct order of error convergence for piecewise linear and quadratic bases on regular quadrilateral and hexahedral planar grids. Using a modal Taylor series basis, the scheme may be made monotone while preserving conservation with the use of a standard slope limiter, although this reduces the formal accuracy of the scheme to first order. The second order scheme is roughly as accurate as the incremental remap scheme with nonlocal gradient reconstruction at half the horizontal resolution. The scheme is being developed for implementation within the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) Ocean model, an unstructured grid finite volume ocean model.

  18. Advective and Conductive Heat Flow Budget Across the Wagner Basin, Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, F.; Negrete-Aranda, R.; Contreras, J.; Müller, C.; Hutnak, M.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Harris, R. N.; Sclater, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015, we conducted a cruise across the northern Gulf of California, an area of continental rift basin formation and rapid deposition of sediments. The cruise was undertaken aboard the R/V Alpha Helix; our goal was to study variation in superficial conductive heat flow, lateral changes in the shallow thermal conductivity structure, and advective transport of heat across the Wagner basin. We used a Fielax heat flow probe with 22 thermistors that can penetrate up to 6 m into the sediment cover. The resulting data set includes 53 new heat flow measurements collected along three profiles. The longest profile (42 km) contains 30 measurements spaced 1-2 km apart. The western part of the Wagner basin (hanging wall block) exhibit low to normal conductive heat flow whereas the eastern part of the basin (foot wall block) heat flow is high to very high (up to 2500 mWm-2). Two other short profiles (12 km long each) focused on resolving an extremely high heat flow anomaly up to 15 Wm-2 located near the intersection between the Wagner bounding fault system and the Cerro Prieto fault. We hypothesize that the contrasting heat flow values observed across the Wagner basin are due to horizontal water circulation through sand layers and fault pathways of high permeability. Circulation appears to be from west (recharge zone) to east (discharge zone). Additionally, our results reveal strong vertical advection of heat due to dehydration reactions and compaction of fine grained sediments.

  19. Space-fractional advection-dispersion equations by the Kansa method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Guofei; Chen, Wen; Fu, Zhuojia

    2015-07-01

    The paper makes the first attempt at applying the Kansa method, a radial basis function meshless collocation method, to the space-fractional advection-dispersion equations, which have recently been observed to accurately describe solute transport in a variety of field and lab experiments characterized by occasional large jumps with fewer parameters than the classical models of integer-order derivative. However, because of non-local property of integro-differential operator of space-fractional derivative, numerical solution of these novel models is very challenging and little has been reported in literature. It is stressed that local approximation techniques such as the finite element and finite difference methods lose their sparse discretization matrix due to this non-local property. Thus, the global methods appear to have certain advantages in numerical simulation of these non-local models because of their high accuracy and smaller size resultant matrix equation. Compared with the finite difference method, popular in the solution of fractional equations, the Kansa method is a recent meshless global technique and is promising for high-dimensional irregular domain problems. In this study, the resultant matrix of the Kansa method is accurately calculated by the Gauss-Jacobi quadrature rule. Numerical results show that the Kansa method is highly accurate and computationally efficient for space-fractional advection-dispersion problems.

  20. An adaptive multiresolution gradient-augmented level set method for advection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kai; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Nave, Jean-Chtristophe

    2014-11-01

    Advection problems are encountered in many applications, such as transport of passive scalars modeling pollution or mixing in chemical engineering. In some problems, the solution develops small-scale features localized in a part of the computational domain. If the location of these features changes in time, the efficiency of the numerical method can be significantly improved by adapting the partition dynamically to the solution. We present a space-time adaptive scheme for solving advection equations in two space dimensions. The third order accurate gradient-augmented level set method using a semi-Lagrangian formulation with backward time integration is coupled with a point value multiresolution analysis using Hermite interpolation. Thus locally refined dyadic spatial grids are introduced which are efficiently implemented with dynamic quad-tree data structures. For adaptive time integration, an embedded Runge-Kutta method is employed. The precision of the new fully adaptive method is analysed and speed up of CPU time and memory compression with respect to the uniform grid discretization are reported.

  1. Experimental tsunami deposits: Linking hydrodynamics to sediment entrainment, advection lengths and downstream fining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joel P. L.; Delbecq, Katie; Kim, Wonsuck; Mohrig, David

    2016-01-01

    A goal of paleotsunami research is to quantitatively reconstruct wave hydraulics from sediment deposits in order to better understand coastal hazards. Simple models have been proposed to predict wave heights and velocities, based largely on deposit grain size distributions (GSDs). Although seemingly consistent with some recent tsunamis, little independent data exist to test these equations. We conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate inversion assumptions and uncertainties. A computer-controlled lift gate instantaneously released 6.5 m3 of water into a 32 m flume with shallow ponded water, creating a hydraulic bore that transported sand from an upstream source dune. Differences in initial GSDs and ponded water depths influenced entrainment, transport, and deposition. While the source dune sand was fully suspendable based on size alone, experimental tsunamis produced deposits dominated by bed load sand transport in the upstream 1/3 of the flume and suspension-dominated transport downstream. The suspension deposits exhibited downstream fining and thinning. At 95% confidence, a published advection-settling model predicts time-averaged flow depths to approximately a factor of two, and time-averaged downstream flow velocities to within a factor of 1.5. Finally, reasonable scaling is found between flume and field cases by comparing flow depths, inundation distances, Froude numbers, Rouse numbers and grain size trends in suspension-dominated tsunami deposits, justifying laboratory study of sediment transport and deposition by tsunamis.

  2. Clustering of randomly advected low-inertia particles using an economical simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaekyoon; Krueger, Steven; Kerstein, Alan

    2007-11-01

    In the EMPM (Explicit Mixing Parcel Model), turbulent advection of fluid is implemented by rearranging the fluid cells. Each permutation represents an individual turbulent eddy, and is called a ``triplet map.'' This implementation of the triplet map captures flow processes as small as the smallest turbulent eddy (Kolmogorov microscale), but the response of small droplets to turbulence has important features at scales as small as the droplet radius. Namely, droplet motion relative to the fluid at scales less than the Kolmogorov microscale induces droplet clustering that is estimated to increase droplet collision rates significantly. We have developed (Kerstein and Krueger 2006), implemented, and tested a 3D triplet map for droplets that captures this clustering effect. There is excellent agreement between our results and DNS (direct numerical simulation) results obtained by Reade and Collins (2000). We are now implementing a collision detection algorithm into the model so that we can simulate collisions and coalescence between finite-inertia particles.

  3. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  4. Thermo-chemical convection in planetary mantles: advection methods and magma ocean overturn simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, A.-C.; Tosi, N.; Hüttig, C.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal and chemical convection in planetary mantles are the most dominant dynamical processes influencing the thermal and geological evolution of a planet. After the planetary formation, convection in the interior is one of the most prominent processes being responsible for the heat transport efficiency, the interior structure, the magnetic field generation and the geological structures at the surface of a planet such as volcanoes, rifts and others. The slow creep of the silicate materials that make up the mantle of terrestrial planets (i.e. Mercury, Venus, the Earth and Mars) is driven by a combination of thermal and compositional buoyancy. On the one hand, the primordial heat accumulated after accretion and core formation and the heat released by the decay of radiogenic isotopes are transported from the interior to the surface by thermal convection. This process involves the transfer of heat both via diffusion, which occurs mainly across thermal boundary layers, and advection due to fluid motion in the bulk of the mantle. On the other hand, density anomalies of non-thermal origin associated with chemical (i.e. compositional) heterogeneities provide an additional source of buoyancy that actively contributes to the transport of energy and mass. In the present work we discuss the modeling of active compositional fields in the framework of solid-state mantle convection using the 3D spherical/2D cylindrical code Gaia [1, 2]. Numerical methods for the advection of active compositional fields fall in two main categories [3, 4]. They are based either on a fixed computational grid (Eulerian methods) or on evolving grids or moving particles (Lagrangian methods). We compare an Eulerian method based on double-diffusive convection against a Lagrangian, particle-based method. Though straightforward, the first method generally suffers from non-negligible numerical diffusion and demands then the use of grids with a high resolution. Moreover, its accuracy can substantially

  5. Diffusion algorithms and data reduction routine for onsite real-time launch predictions for the transport of Delta-Thor exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Marshall Space Flight Center multilayer diffusion algorithms have been specialized for the prediction of the surface impact for the dispersive transport of the exhaust effluents from the launch of a Delta-Thor vehicle. This specialization permits these transport predictions to be made at the launch range in real time so that the effluent monitoring teams can optimize their monitoring grids. Basically, the data reduction routine requires only the meteorology profiles for the thermodynamics and kinematics of the atmosphere as an input. These profiles are graphed along with the resulting exhaust cloud rise history, the centerline concentrations and dosages, and the hydrogen chloride isopleths.

  6. Sensitivity of Age-of-Air Calculations to the Choice of Advection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hemler, Richard S.; Mahlman, Jerry D.; Bruhwiler, Lori; Takacs, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    The age of air has recently emerged as a diagnostic of atmospheric transport unaffected by chemical parameterizations, and the features in the age distributions computed in models have been interpreted in terms of the models' large-scale circulation field. This study shows, however, that in addition to the simulated large-scale circulation, three-dimensional age calculations can also be affected by the choice of advection scheme employed in solving the tracer continuity equation, Specifically, using the 3.0deg latitude X 3.6deg longitude and 40 vertical level version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory SKYHI GCM and six online transport schemes ranging from Eulerian through semi-Lagrangian to fully Lagrangian, it will be demonstrated that the oldest ages are obtained using the nondiffusive centered-difference schemes while the youngest ages are computed with a semi-Lagrangian transport (SLT) scheme. The centered- difference schemes are capable of producing ages older than 10 years in the mesosphere, thus eliminating the "young bias" found in previous age-of-air calculations. At this stage, only limited intuitive explanations can be advanced for this sensitivity of age-of-air calculations to the choice of advection scheme, In particular, age distributions computed online with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (MACCM3) using different varieties of the SLT scheme are substantially older than the SKYHI SLT distribution. The different varieties, including a noninterpolating-in-the-vertical version (which is essentially centered-difference in the vertical), also produce a narrower range of age distributions than the suite of advection schemes employed in the SKYHI model. While additional MACCM3 experiments with a wider range of schemes would be necessary to provide more definitive insights, the older and less variable MACCM3 age distributions can plausibly be interpreted as being due to the semi-implicit semi

  7. Bioturbation, advection, and diffusion of a conserved tracer in a laboratory flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Work, P. A.; Moore, P. R.; Reible, D. D.

    2002-06-01

    Laboratory experiments indicating the relative influences of advection, diffusion, and bioturbation on transport of NaCl tracer between a stream and streambed are described. Data were collected in a recirculating flume housing a box filled with test sediments. Peclet numbers ranged from 0 to 1.5. Sediment components included a medium sand (d50 = 0.31 mm), kaolinite, and topsoil. Lumbriculus variegatus were introduced as bioturbators. Conductivity probes were employed to document the flux of the tracer solution out of the bed. Measurements are compared to one-dimensional effective diffusion models assuming one or two horizontal sediment layers. These simple models provide a good indication of tracer half-life in the bed if a suitable effective diffusion coefficient is chosen but underpredict initial flux and overpredict flux at long times. Organism activity was limited to the upper reaches of the sediment test box but eventually exerts a secondary influence on flux from deeper regions.

  8. Thermal Instability of Advection-Dominated Disks against Revised Local Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shoji; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Abramowicz, Marek A.; Chen, Xingming

    1997-04-01

    The thermal stability of advection-dominated accretion disks against local perturbations is re-examined in order to correct some errors in our previous paper. Thermal perturbations which are local in the radial direction are found to also be local in the vertical direction. Because of this, the using of vertically integrated quantities was irrelevant in analyzing the stability of local thermal perturbations when the disks are geometrically thick. Our new results, obtained by correcting the error, show that if the turbulence acts as a diffusion process in thermal energy transport, it strongly dampens the thermal perturbations. In these cases when the diffusion process is weak, however, perturbations grow due to a variation of the viscous heating associated with the perturbations. One such example of growth is in the case where radiation pressure greatly dominates the gas pressure.

  9. An advective volume-balance model for flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2016-11-01

    Volume-balance models are used by petroleum engineers to simulate multiphase and multicomponent flow phenomena in porous media and the extraction process in oil reservoirs. In these models, mass conservation equations and Darcy's law are supplemented by a balance condition for the pore and fluid volumes. This provides a pressure equation suitable for simulating a compressible flow within a compressible solid matrix. Here we present an alternative interpretation of the volume-balance condition that includes the advective transport within a consolidated porous media. We obtain a modified equation for the time evolution of the pressure field. Preliminary numerical tests of phase separation due to gravity suggest the model reproduces qualitatively the physical phenomena. Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  10. Developing a 3D constrained variational analysis method to obtain accurate gridded atmospheric vertical velocity and horizontal advections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the constrained variational analysis (CVA) algorithm developed by Zhang and Lin (1997), a 3-dimensional (3D) version of CVA is developed. The new algorithm used gridded surface and TOA observations as constraints to adjust atmospheric state variables in each grid point to satisfy column-integrated mass, moisture and static energy conservation. From the process of adjustment a set of high-quality 3D large-scale forcing data (vertical velocity and horizontal advections) can be derived to drive Single-Column models (SCM), Cloud-Resolving Models (CRM) and Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to evaluate and improve parameterizations. Since the 3D CVA can adjust gridded state variables from any data source with observed precipitation, radiation and surface fluxes, it also gives a potential possibility to use this algorithm in data assimilation system to assimilate precipitation and radiation data.

  11. Analyzing critical propagation in a reaction-diffusion-advection model using unstable slow waves.

    PubMed

    Kneer, Frederike; Obermayer, Klaus; Dahlem, Markus A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of advection on the propagation and in particular on the critical minimal speed of traveling waves in a reaction-diffusion model is studied. Previous theoretical studies estimated this effect on the velocity of stable fast waves and predicted the existence of a critical advection strength below which propagating waves are not supported anymore. In this paper, an analytical expression for the advection-velocity relation of the unstable slow wave is derived. In addition, the critical advection strength is calculated taking into account the unstable slow wave solution. We also analyze a two-variable reaction-diffusion-advection model numerically in a wide parameter range. Due to the new control parameter (advection) we can find stable wave propagation in the otherwise non-excitable parameter regime, if the advection strength exceeds a critical value. Comparing theoretical predictions to numerical results, we find that they are in good agreement. Theory provides an explanation for the observed behaviour.

  12. Differential patterns of divergence in ocean drifters: Implications for larval flatfish advection and recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderbuer, Thomas; Duffy-Anderson, Janet T.; Stabeno, Phyllis; Hermann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    effect on horizontal eddy diffusion, increasing its value by a factor of five in the case of fixed-depth floats, as compared with a factor of two in the case of neutrally buoyant floats. Further, the incorporation of diurnal vertical behavior in phase with favorable (on shelf) tides transported the "larvae" ~ 400 km within 40 days of their release date. Empirical drifter data coupled with model evidence suggest that semi-diurnal tidal forcing is the primary mechanism of eastward advection over the Bering Sea shelf, and larval observational data suggest that northern rock sole larvae can maximize their eastward transport to nursery grounds by synchronizing their vertical movements to tidal periodicity during the postflexion stage.

  13. Advection of surface-derived organic carbon fuels microbial reduction in Bangladesh groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Brian J.; Trembath-Reichert, Elizabeth; Cheung, Jennifer; Watson, Marlena; Stute, Martin; Freyer, Greg A.; Ferguson, Andrew S.; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Thomas, James; Layton, Alice C.; Zheng, Yan; Bostick, Benjamin C.; van Geen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) by drinking shallow groundwater causes widespread disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries. The release of As naturally present in sediment to groundwater has been linked to the reductive dissolution of iron oxides coupled to the microbial respiration of organic carbon (OC). The source of OC driving this microbial reduction—carbon deposited with the sediments or exogenous carbon transported by groundwater—is still debated despite its importance in regulating aquifer redox status and groundwater As levels. Here, we used the radiocarbon (14C) signature of microbial DNA isolated from groundwater samples to determine the relative importance of surface and sediment-derived OC. Three DNA samples collected from the shallow, high-As aquifer and one sample from the underlying, low-As aquifer were consistently younger than the total sediment carbon, by as much as several thousand years. This difference and the dominance of heterotrophic microorganisms implies that younger, surface-derived OC is advected within the aquifer, albeit more slowly than groundwater, and represents a critical pool of OC for aquifer microbial communities. The vertical profile shows that downward transport of dissolved OC is occurring on anthropogenic timescales, but bomb 14C-labeled dissolved OC has not yet accumulated in DNA and is not fueling reduction. These results indicate that advected OC controls aquifer redox status and confirm that As release is a natural process that predates human perturbations to groundwater flow. Anthropogenic perturbations, however, could affect groundwater redox conditions and As levels in the future. PMID:23487743

  14. Vortex emission accompanies the advection of optical localized structures.

    PubMed

    Haudin, F; Rojas, R G; Bortolozzo, U; Clerc, M G; Residori, S

    2011-02-11

    We show that the advection of optical localized structures is accompanied by the emission of vortices, with phase singularities appearing in the wake of the drifting structure. Localized structures are obtained in a light-valve experiment and made to drift by a mirror tilt in the feedback loop. Pairs of oppositely charged vortices are detected for small drifts, whereas for large drifts a vortex array develops. Observations are supported by numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of the system equations and are expected to be generic for a large class of translated optical patterns.

  15. Magnetic method for stimulating transport in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle J.

    2016-10-18

    A method for producing mass and heat transport in fluids, wherein the method does not rely on conventional convection, that is, it does not require gravity, a thermal gradient, or a magnetic field gradient. This method gives rise to a unique class of vigorous, field-controllable flow patterns termed advection lattices. The advection lattices can be used to transport heat and/or mass in any desired direction using only magnetic fields.

  16. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  17. Advection-Based Sparse Data Management for Visualizing Unsteady Flow.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Zhang, Jiang; Liu, Richen; Liu, Lu; Yuan, Xiaoru; Huang, Jian; Meng, Xiangfei; Pan, Jingshan

    2014-12-01

    When computing integral curves and integral surfaces for large-scale unsteady flow fields, a major bottleneck is the widening gap between data access demands and the available bandwidth (both I/O and in-memory). In this work, we explore a novel advection-based scheme to manage flow field data for both efficiency and scalability. The key is to first partition flow field into blocklets (e.g. cells or very fine-grained blocks of cells), and then (pre)fetch and manage blocklets on-demand using a parallel key-value store. The benefits are (1) greatly increasing the scale of local-range analysis (e.g. source-destination queries, streak surface generation) that can fit within any given limit of hardware resources; (2) improving memory and I/O bandwidth-efficiencies as well as the scalability of naive task-parallel particle advection. We demonstrate our method using a prototype system that works on workstation and also in supercomputing environments. Results show significantly reduced I/O overhead compared to accessing raw flow data, and also high scalability on a supercomputer for a variety of applications.

  18. Local and nonlocal advection of a passive scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. K.

    2006-11-01

    Passive and active scalar mixing is examined in a simple one-parameter family of two-dimensional flows based on quasi-geostrophic dynamics, in which the active scalar, the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity, is confined to a single horizontal surface (so-called surface quasi-geostrophic dynamics) and in which a passive scalar field is also advected by the (horizontal, two-dimensional) velocity field at a finite distance from the surface. At large distances from the surface the flow is determined by the largest horizontal scales, the flow is spectrally nonlocal, and a chaotic advection-type regime dominates. At small distances, z, scaling arguments suggest a transition wavenumber kc˜1/2z, where the slope of the passive scalar spectrum changes from k-5/3, determined by local dynamics, to k-1, determined by nonlocal dynamics, analogous to the transition to a k-1 slope in the Batchelor regime in three-dimensional turbulence. Direct numerical simulations reproduce the qualitative aspects of this transition. Other characteristics of the simulated scalar fields, such as the relative dominance of coherent or filamentary structures, are also shown to depend strongly on the degree of locality.

  19. THE ADVECTION OF SUPERGRANULES BY THE SUN'S AXISYMMETRIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, David H.; Williams, Peter E.; Rosa, Kevin Dela; Cuntz, Manfred E-mail: peter.williams@nasa.go

    2010-12-10

    We show that the motions of supergranules are consistent with a model in which they are simply advected by the axisymmetric flows in the Sun's surface shear layer. We produce a 10 day series of simulated Doppler images at a 15 minute cadence that reproduces most spatial and temporal characteristics seen in the SOHO/MDI Doppler data. Our simulated data have a spectrum of cellular flows with just two components-a granule component that peaks at spherical wavenumbers of about 4000 and a supergranule component that peaks at wavenumbers of about 110. We include the advection of these cellular components by the axisymmetric flows-differential rotation and meridional flow-whose variations with latitude and depth (wavenumber) are consistent with observations. We mimic the evolution of the cellular pattern by introducing random variations to the phases of the spectral components at rates that reproduce the levels of cross-correlation as functions of time and latitude. Our simulated data do not include any wave-like characteristics for the supergranules yet can reproduce the rotation characteristics previously attributed to wave-like behavior. We find rotation rates which appear faster than the actual rotation rates and attribute this to projection effects. We find that the measured meridional flow does accurately represent the actual flow and that the observations indicate poleward flow to 65{sup 0}-70{sup 0} latitude with equatorward countercells in the polar regions.

  20. Transient responses to spatial perturbations in advective systems.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kurt E; Nisbet, Roger M; McCauley, Edward

    2008-07-01

    We study the transient dynamics, following a spatially-extended perturbation of models describing populations residing in advective media such as streams and rivers. Our analyses emphasize metrics that are independent of initial perturbations-resilience, reactivity, and the amplification envelope-and relate them to component spatial wavelengths of the perturbation using spatial Fourier transforms of the state variables. This approach offers a powerful way of understanding the influence of spatial scale on the initial dynamics of a population following a spatially variable environmental perturbation, an important property in determining the ecological implications of transient dynamics in advective systems. We find that asymptotically stable systems may exhibit transient amplification of perturbations (i.e., have positive reactivity) for some spatial wavelengths and not others. Furthermore, the degree and duration of amplification varies strongly with spatial wavelength. For two single-population models, there is a relationship between transient dynamics and the response length that characterizes the steady state response to spatial perturbations: a long response length implies that peak amplification of perturbations is small and occurs fast. This relationship holds less generally in a specialist consumer-resource model, likely due to the model's tendency for flow-induced instabilities at an alternative characteristic spatial scale.

  1. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  2. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Lawler, J E

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3). A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  3. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Granular Scale Advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhichen; Cao, W.; Ji, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report the first evidence of magnetic reconnection driven by advection in a rapidly developing large granule, using high spatial resolution observations of a small surge event (base size 4‧‧ by 4‧‧) with the 1.6 meter aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The observations were carried out in narrow-band (0.5 Å) Helium I 10830 Å and broad-band (10 Å) TiO 7057 Å. Since He I 10830 Å triplet has very high excitation level and is optically thin, its filtergrams enable us to investigate the surge from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the lower corona. Simultaneous space data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used in the analysis. It is shown that the surge is spatio-temporally associated with magnetic flux emergence in the rapidly developing large granule. During the development of the granule, its advecting flow ( 2 km/ s) squeezed the magnetic flux into an intergranular lane area, where a magnetic flux concentration was formed and the neighboring flux with opposite magnetic polarity was cancelled. During the cancellation, the surge was produced as absorption in He I 10830 Å filtergrams while simultaneous EUV brightening occurred at its base. The observations clearly indicate evidence of finest-scale reconnection process driven by the granule’s motion.

  4. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Granular Scale Advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2013-06-01

    We report the first evidence of magnetic reconnection driven by advection in a rapidly developing large granule using high spatial resolution observations of a small surge event (base size ~ 4'' × 4'') with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The observations were carried out in narrowband (0.5 Å) He I 10830 Å and broadband (10 Å) TiO 7057 Å. Since He I 10830 Å triplet has a very high excitation level and is optically thin, its filtergrams enable us to investigate the surge from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the lower corona. Simultaneous space data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory were used in the analysis. It is shown that the surge is spatio-temporally associated with magnetic flux emergence in the rapidly developing large granule. During the development of the granule, its advecting flow (~2 km s-1) squeezed the magnetic flux into an intergranular lane area, where a magnetic flux concentration was formed and the neighboring flux with opposite magnetic polarity was canceled. During the cancellation, the surge was produced as absorption in He I 10830 Å filtergrams while simultaneous EUV brightening occurred at its base. The observations clearly indicate evidence of a finest-scale reconnection process driven by the granule's motion.

  5. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-15

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  6. On the error propagation of semi-Lagrange and Fourier methods for advection problems☆

    PubMed Central

    Einkemmer, Lukas; Ostermann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the error propagation of numerical schemes for the advection equation in the case where high precision is desired. The numerical methods considered are based on the fast Fourier transform, polynomial interpolation (semi-Lagrangian methods using a Lagrange or spline interpolation), and a discontinuous Galerkin semi-Lagrangian approach (which is conservative and has to store more than a single value per cell). We demonstrate, by carrying out numerical experiments, that the worst case error estimates given in the literature provide a good explanation for the error propagation of the interpolation-based semi-Lagrangian methods. For the discontinuous Galerkin semi-Lagrangian method, however, we find that the characteristic property of semi-Lagrangian error estimates (namely the fact that the error increases proportionally to the number of time steps) is not observed. We provide an explanation for this behavior and conduct numerical simulations that corroborate the different qualitative features of the error in the two respective types of semi-Lagrangian methods. The method based on the fast Fourier transform is exact but, due to round-off errors, susceptible to a linear increase of the error in the number of time steps. We show how to modify the Cooley–Tukey algorithm in order to obtain an error growth that is proportional to the square root of the number of time steps. Finally, we show, for a simple model, that our conclusions hold true if the advection solver is used as part of a splitting scheme. PMID:25844018

  7. Simulation of advective flow under steady-state and transient recharge conditions, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.; Masterson, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed several ground-water models in support of an investigation of ground-water contamination being conducted by the Army National Guard Bureau at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation on western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Regional and subregional steady-state models and regional transient models were used to (1) improve understanding of the hydrologic system, (2) simulate advective transport of contaminants, (3) delineate recharge areas to municipal wells, and (4) evaluate how model discretization and time-varying recharge affect simulation results. A water-table mound dominates ground-water-flow patterns. Near the top of the mound, which is within Camp Edwards, hydraulic gradients are nearly vertically downward and horizontal gradients are small. In downgradient areas that are further from the top of the water-table mound, the ratio of horizontal to vertical gradients is larger and horizontal flow predominates. The steady-state regional model adequately simulates advective transport in some areas of the aquifer; however, simulation of ground-water flow in areas with local hydrologic boundaries, such as ponds, requires more finely discretized subregional models. Subregional models also are needed to delineate recharge areas to municipal wells that are inadequately represented in the regional model or are near other pumped wells. Long-term changes in recharge rates affect hydraulic heads in the aquifer and shift the position of the top of the water-table mound. Hydraulic-gradient directions do not change over time in downgradient areas, whereas they do change substantially with temporal changes in recharge near the top of the water-table mound. The assumption of steady-state hydraulic conditions is valid in downgradient area, where advective transport paths change little over time. In areas closer to the top of the water-table mound, advective transport paths change as a function of time, transient and steady-state paths

  8. Orbital Advection by Interpolation: A Fast and Accurate Numerical Scheme for Super-Fast MHD Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M; Guan, X; Gammie, F

    2008-04-11

    In numerical models of thin astrophysical disks that use an Eulerian scheme, gas orbits supersonically through a fixed grid. As a result the timestep is sharply limited by the Courant condition. Also, because the mean flow speed with respect to the grid varies with position, the truncation error varies systematically with position. For hydrodynamic (unmagnetized) disks an algorithm called FARGO has been developed that advects the gas along its mean orbit using a separate interpolation substep. This relaxes the constraint imposed by the Courant condition, which now depends only on the peculiar velocity of the gas, and results in a truncation error that is more nearly independent of position. This paper describes a FARGO-like algorithm suitable for evolving magnetized disks. Our method is second order accurate on a smooth flow and preserves {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to machine precision. The main restriction is that B must be discretized on a staggered mesh. We give a detailed description of an implementation of the code and demonstrate that it produces the expected results on linear and nonlinear problems. We also point out how the scheme might be generalized to make the integration of other supersonic/super-fast flows more efficient. Although our scheme reduces the variation of truncation error with position, it does not eliminate it. We show that the residual position dependence leads to characteristic radial variations in the density over long integrations.

  9. Implementation of a conservative two-step shape-preserving advection scheme on a spherical icosahedral hexagonal geodesic grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Yu, Rucong; Li, Jian

    2017-03-01

    An Eulerian flux-form advection scheme, called the Two-step Shape-Preserving Advection Scheme (TSPAS), was generalized and implemented on a spherical icosahedral hexagonal grid (also referred to as a geodesic grid) to solve the transport equation. The C grid discretization was used for the spatial discretization. To implement TSPAS on an unstructured grid, the original finite-difference scheme was further generalized. The two-step integration utilizes a combination of two separate schemes (a low-order monotone scheme and a high-order scheme that typically cannot ensure monotonicity) to calculate the fluxes at the cell walls (one scheme corresponds to one cell wall). The choice between these two schemes for each edge depends on a pre-updated scalar value using slightly increased fluxes. After the determination of an appropriate scheme, the final integration at a target cell is achieved by summing the fluxes that are computed by the different schemes. The conservative and shape-preserving properties of the generalized scheme are demonstrated. Numerical experiments are conducted at several horizontal resolutions. TSPAS is compared with the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) approach to demonstrate the differences between the two methods, and several transport tests are performed to examine the accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the two schemes.

  10. Enhanced transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection in a humid temperate agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Santana, V.; Asbjornsen, H.; Sauer, T.; Isenhart, T.; Schilling, K.; Schultz, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Riparian buffers are designed as management practices to increase infiltration and reduce surface runoff and transport of sediment and nonpoint source pollutants from crop fields to adjacent streams. Achieving these ecosystem service goals depends, in part, on their ability to remove water from the soil via transpiration. In these systems, edges between crop fields and trees of the buffer systems can create advection processes, which could influence water use by trees. We conducted a field study in a riparian buffer system established in 1994 under a humid temperate climate, located in the Corn Belt region of the Midwestern U.S. (Iowa). The goals were to estimate stand level transpiration by the riparian buffer, quantify the controls on water use by the buffer system, and determine to what extent advective energy and tree position within the buffer system influence individual tree transpiration rates. We primarily focused on the water use response (determined with the Heat Ratio Method) of one of the dominant species (Acer saccharinum) and a subdominant (Juglans nigra). A few individuals of three additional species (Quercus bicolor, Betula nigra, Platanus occidentalis) were monitored over a shorter time period to assess the generality of responses. Meteorological stations were installed along a transect across the riparian buffer to determine the microclimate conditions. The differences found among individuals were attributed to differences in species sap velocities and sapwood depths, location relative to the forest edge and prevailing winds and canopy exposure and dominance. Sapflow rates for A. saccharinum trees growing at the SE edge (prevailing winds) were 39% greater than SE interior trees and 30% and 69% greater than NW interior and edge trees, respectively. No transpiration enhancement due to edge effect was detected in the subdominant J. nigra. The results were interpreted as indicative of advection effects from the surrounding crops. Further, significant

  11. Chaotic advection in the restricted four-vortex problem on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Paul K.; Ross, Shane D.

    2006-11-01

    The chaotic advection of tracer particles in the field of a perturbed latitudinal ring of point vortices on a sphere is considered. We consider a restricted four-vortex problem where three vortices have equal strength, while the fourth has strength zero. The equal-strength vortices are initially spaced evenly on a ring of fixed latitude in the northern hemisphere. The equilateral triangle formed by the vortices is known to be a nonlinearly stable relative equilibrium configuration. When perturbed, the vortex motion induces chaotic particle advection analyzed by means of stroboscopic Poincaré maps as a function of the dimensionless energy of the system, which can be related to the size of the perturbation from equilibrium. A critical energy is identified which separates the vortex motion into two distinct dynamical regimes. For energies below critical, the vortices undergo periodic partner exchange while retaining their relative orientation. For values above critical, the relative orientation of the vortices changes throughout the periodic cycle. We consider how the streamline topologies bifurcate both as a function of the energy and during the course of their evolution, as well as the role that the evolution of instantaneous streamline structures plays in the mixing and transport of particles. The geometric extent of the mixing region on the full sphere is considered (measured as a percentage of the surface area of the sphere) and dynamical properties in the region, such as mixing and stretching rates as well as computational evidence of ergodicity, are obtained. Global mixing on the sphere does not seem to increase monotonically with energy, but appears to be maximized for values near critical.

  12. Scheduling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, William J.; Wood, David; Sorensen, Stephen E.

    1996-12-01

    This paper discusses automated scheduling as it applies to complex domains such as factories, transportation, and communications systems. The window-constrained-packing problem is introduced as an ideal model of the scheduling trade offs. Specific algorithms are compared in terms of simplicity, speed, and accuracy. In particular, dispatch, look-ahead, and genetic algorithms are statistically compared on randomly generated job sets. The conclusion is that dispatch methods are fast and fairly accurate; while modern algorithms, such as genetic and simulate annealing, have excessive run times, and are too complex to be practical.

  13. On enforcing maximum principles and achieving element-wise species balance for advection-diffusion-reaction equations under the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudunuru, M. K.; Nakshatrala, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    We present a robust computational framework for advective-diffusive-reactive systems that satisfies maximum principles, the non-negative constraint, and element-wise species balance property. The proposed methodology is valid on general computational grids, can handle heterogeneous anisotropic media, and provides accurate numerical solutions even for very high Péclet numbers. The significant contribution of this paper is to incorporate advection (which makes the spatial part of the differential operator non-self-adjoint) into the non-negative computational framework, and overcome numerical challenges associated with advection. We employ low-order mixed finite element formulations based on least-squares formalism, and enforce explicit constraints on the discrete problem to meet the desired properties. The resulting constrained discrete problem belongs to convex quadratic programming for which a unique solution exists. Maximum principles and the non-negative constraint give rise to bound constraints while element-wise species balance gives rise to equality constraints. The resulting convex quadratic programming problems are solved using an interior-point algorithm. Several numerical results pertaining to advection-dominated problems are presented to illustrate the robustness, convergence, and the overall performance of the proposed computational framework.

  14. Unification of some advection schemes in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, D.; Roe, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between two approaches towards construction of genuinely two-dimensional upwind advection schemes is established. One of these approaches is of the control volume type applicable on structured cartesian meshes. It resulted in the compact high resolution schemes capable of maintaining second order accuracy in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous cases. Another one is the fluctuation splitting approach, which is well suited for triangular (and possibly) unstructured meshes. Understanding the relationship between these two approaches allows us to formulate here a new fluctuation splitting high resolution (i.e. possible use of artificial compression, while maintaining positivity property) scheme. This scheme is shown to be linearity preserving in inhomogeneous as well as homogeneous cases.

  15. Mobile scintillometry to study heat advection over heterogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J.

    2007-12-01

    Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) receivers measure the structure parameter of the refractive index from intensity fluctuations of the transmitter beam. Due to the spatial averaging over 1-4 km employed by this emerging technique the constraints for long temporal averaging (15-30 min) and associated uncertainties that have to be met by other flux measurement techniques do not apply for LASs. In this paper the constraints for temporal averaging of LASs will be examined as a function of environmental conditions and transect geometry. Moreover, analysis of data from a mobile LAS measurement across a surface gradient from rough and dry to smoother and wet will be presented. In this experiment the LAS was mounted on a pickup truck, allowing for quick redeployment of the transect after meaurement. The potential for the use of LAS to study local advection of heat in riparian or irrigated areas in the semi-arid southwest will be evaluated.

  16. Microscale chaotic advection enables robust convective DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Priye, Aashish; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2013-11-05

    The ability of chaotic advection under microscale confinement to direct chemical processes along accelerated kinetic pathways has been recognized for some time. However, practical applications have been slow to emerge because optimal results are often counterintuitively achieved in flows that appear to possess undesirably high disorder. Here we present a 3D time-resolved analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated DNA replication across a broad ensemble of geometric states. The resulting parametric map reveals an unexpectedly wide operating regime where reaction rates remain constant over 2 orders of magnitude of the Rayleigh number, encompassing virtually any realistic PCR condition (temperature, volume, gravitational alignment), a level of robustness previously thought unattainable in the convective format.

  17. Dependence of advection-diffusion-reaction on flow coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Luna, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    A study on an advection-diffusion-reaction system is presented. Variability of the reaction process in such a system triggered by a highly localized source is quantified. It is found, for geophysically motivated parameter regimes, that the difference in bulk concentration subject to realizations of different source locations is highly correlated with the local flow topology of the source. Such flow topologies can be highlighted by Lagrangian coherent structures. Reaction is relatively enhanced in regions of strong stretching, and relatively suppressed in regions where vortices are present. In any case, the presence of a divergence-free background flow helps speed up the reaction process, especially when the flow is time-dependent. Probability density of various quantities characterizing the reaction processes is also obtained. This reveals the inherent complexity of the reaction-diffusion process subject to nonlinear background stirring.

  18. Examination of the evolution of radiation and advection fogs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A literature study was done on radiation and advection fog evolution. For radiation fog, six stages of fog evolution have been identified -- (1) precursor, (2) sunset, (3) conditioning, (4) mature, (5) sunrise, and (6) dissipation. The evolution of advection fog models has been in parallel with radiation fog models, but no identified stages in the evolution of advection fog have been proposed: (1) precursor, (2) initiation, (3) mature, and (4) dissipation. Radiation and advection fog models will require greater sophistication in order to study fog spatial and temporal variability. Physical aspects that require further study are discussed.

  19. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachand, P.A.M.; S. Bachand,; Fleck, Jacob A.; Anderson, Frank E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2014-01-01

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flowrates and tracer concentrations atwetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactormodel solutions, a continuous flowstirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these nonideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a fluxmodel, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment–water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemicalmechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition,our understanding of internal

  20. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone.

    PubMed

    Bachand, P A M; Bachand, S; Fleck, J; Anderson, F; Windham-Myers, L

    2014-06-15

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flow rates and tracer concentrations at wetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactor model solutions, a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these non-ideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a flux model, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment-water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemical mechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition, our understanding of

  1. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  2. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  3. The Van Leer Advection Algorithm in the MACH2 Computer Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    derivative of other volume-integrals. Marsden and Tromba (Ref. 8) state the scalar and vector forms of the theorem. Their definitions may be expanded in two...Marsden, J. E. and Tromba , A. J., Vector Calculus, 2nd ed., W. H. Freeman and Co., New York, NY, p. 450, 1981. 9. Margolin, L. G. and Beason, C. W

  4. Modeling velocity in gradient flows with coupled-map lattices with advection.

    PubMed

    Lind, Pedro G; Corte-Real, João; Gallas, Jason A C

    2002-07-01

    We introduce a simple model to investigate large scale behavior of gradient flows based on a lattice of coupled maps which, in addition to the usual diffusive term, incorporates advection, as an asymmetry in the coupling between nearest neighbors. This diffusive-advective model predicts traveling patterns to have velocities obeying the same scaling as wind velocities in the atmosphere, regarding the advective parameter as a sort of geostrophic wind. In addition, the velocity and wavelength of traveling wave solutions are studied. In general, due to the presence of advection, two regimes are identified: for strong diffusion the velocity varies linearly with advection, while for weak diffusion a power law is found with a characteristic exponent proportional to the diffusion.

  5. Population persistence under advection-diffusion in river networks.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jorge M

    2012-11-01

    An integro-differential equation on a tree graph is used to model the time evolution and spatial distribution of a population of organisms in a river network. Individual organisms become mobile at a constant rate, and disperse according to an advection-diffusion process with coefficients that are constant on the edges of the graph. Appropriate boundary conditions are imposed at the outlet and upstream nodes of the river network. The local rates of population growth/decay and that by which the organisms become mobile, are assumed constant in time and space. Imminent extinction of the population is understood as the situation whereby the zero solution to the integro-differential equation is stable. Lower and upper bounds for the eigenvalues of the dispersion operator, and related Sturm-Liouville problems are found. The analysis yields sufficient conditions for imminent extinction and/or persistence in terms of the values of water velocity, channel length, cross-sectional area and diffusivity throughout the river network.

  6. MAST solution of advection problems in irrotational flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2007-03-01

    A new numerical-analytical Eulerian procedure is proposed for the solution of convection-dominated problems in the case of existing scalar potential of the flow field. The methodology is based on the conservation inside each computational elements of the 0th and 1st order effective spatial moments of the advected variable. This leads to a set of small ODE systems solved sequentially, one element after the other over all the computational domain, according to a MArching in Space and Time technique. The proposed procedure shows the following advantages: (1) it guarantees the local and global mass balance; (2) it is unconditionally stable with respect to the Courant number, (3) the solution in each cell needs information only from the upstream cells and does not require wider and wider stencils as in most of the recently proposed higher-order methods; (4) it provides a monotone solution. Several 1D and 2D numerical test have been performed and results have been compared with analytical solutions, as well as with results provided by other recent numerical methods.

  7. Jet-dominated advective systems of all mass scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körding, Elmar; Fender, R.

    We show that the radio emission of black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) X-ray binaries (XRBs) follows the analytical prediction of a jet model where the jet carries a constant fraction of the accretion power. The radio emission can therefore be used as a tracer of the accretion rate. This measure is normalised with efficiently radiating objects. As it is independent of the X-ray fluxes, the measure allows us to compare the accretion rate dependency of the bolometric X-ray lumi- nosity of BHs and NSs. For NSs, it scales linearly with accretion rate while the scaling for BHs is quadratic - as expected for inefficient accretion flows. We find the same behaviour in AGN. This new approach uses the jet power to obtain the accretion rate. Thus, we know both the jet power and the radiated power of an accreting BH. This allows us to show that some accretion power is likely to be advected into the black hole, while the jet power dominates over the bolometric luminosity of a hard state BH.

  8. Sea breezes and advective effects in southwest James Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckendry, Ian; Roulet, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Observations from a transect extending 100 km inland during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) in 1990 show that the sea breeze develops on approximately 25% of days during summer and may penetrate up to 100 km inland on occasions. The sea breeze exhibits a marked diurnal clockwise rotation as a result of the Coriolis effect along the unobstructed coastline. The marine advective effect is shown to depend on gradient wind direction. With northwesterly upper level flow the sea breeze tends to be northeasterly in direction and is associated with decreased temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD). With southwesterly upper level flow the sea breeze tends to have a southeasterly direction and less effect on temperatures and VPD. This is attributed to shorter residence times of air parcels over water. For two cases, Colorado State University mesoscale model simulations show good agreement with surface wind observations and suggest that under northwesterly gradient flow, Bowen ratios are increased in the onshore flow along western James Bay, while during southwesterly gradient flow these effects are negligible. These results have implications for the interpretation of local climate, ecology, and hydrology as well as land-based and airborne turbulent flux measurements made during NOWES.

  9. Advection in polar and sub-polar environments: Impacts on high latitude marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, George L.; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.; Arrigo, Kevin; Berge, Jørgen; Daly, Kendra L.; Danielson, Seth; Daase, Malin; Hop, Haakon; Isla, Enrique; Karnovsky, Nina; Laidre, Kristin; Mueter, Franz J.; Murphy, Eugene J.; Renaud, Paul E.; Smith, Walker O.; Trathan, Philip; Turner, John; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    We compare and contrast the ecological impacts of atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns on polar and sub-polar marine ecosystems. Circulation patterns differ strikingly between the north and south. Meridional circulation in the north provides connections between the sub-Arctic and Arctic despite the presence of encircling continental landmasses, whereas annular circulation patterns in the south tend to isolate Antarctic surface waters from those in the north. These differences influence fundamental aspects of the polar ecosystems from the amount, thickness and duration of sea ice, to the types of organisms, and the ecology of zooplankton, fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Meridional flows in both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic oceans transport heat, nutrients, and plankton northward into the Chukchi Sea, the Barents Sea, and the seas off the west coast of Greenland. In the North Atlantic, the advected heat warms the waters of the southern Barents Sea and, with advected nutrients and plankton, supports immense biomasses of fish, seabirds and marine mammals. On the Pacific side of the Arctic, cold waters flowing northward across the northern Bering and Chukchi seas during winter and spring limit the ability of boreal fish species to take advantage of high seasonal production there. Southward flow of cold Arctic waters into sub-Arctic regions of the North Atlantic occurs mainly through Fram Strait with less through the Barents Sea and the Canadian Archipelago. In the Pacific, the transport of Arctic waters and plankton southward through Bering Strait is minimal. In the Southern Ocean, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and its associated fronts are barriers to the southward dispersal of plankton and pelagic fishes from sub-Antarctic waters, with the consequent evolution of Antarctic zooplankton and fish species largely occurring in isolation from those to the north. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current also disperses biota throughout the Southern Ocean

  10. Tomography-based characterization of ice-air interface dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Andreoli, Christian; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. A functional understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on regional and global climate to assessing avalanche formation. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Experiments specifically analyzed sublimation and deposition of water vapor on the ice structure. In addition, an analysis of the ice-air interface dynamics was carried out using a macroscopic equivalent model of heat and water vapor transport through a snow layer. The results indicate that sublimation of the ice matrix dominated for flow rates < 10-6 m3 s-1 while during increased mass flow rates the water vapor deposition supplied by the advective flow counteracted sublimation. A flow rate dependence of water vapor deposition at the ice interface was observed, asymptotically approaching an average estimated maximum deposition rate on the whole sample of 1.05 · 10-4 kg m-3 s-1. The growth of microsized whisker-like crystals on larger ice crystals was detected on microscope photographs, leading to an increase of the specific surface area and thus suggest a change of the physical and optical properties of the snow. The estimated values of the curvature effect of the ice crystals and the interface kinetic coefficient are in good agreement with previously published values.

  11. Heat advection processes leading to El Niño events as depicted by an ensemble of ocean assimilation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Joan; Bordoni, Simona; Petrova, Desislava; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    The oscillatory nature of El Niño-Southern Oscillation results from an intricate superposition of near-equilibrium balances and out-of-phase disequilibrium processes between the ocean and the atmosphere. The main objective of the present work is to perform an exhaustive spatiotemporal analysis of the upper ocean heat budget in an ensemble of state-of-the-art ocean assimilation products. We put specific emphasis on the ocean heat advection mechanisms, and their representation in individual ensemble members and in the different stages of the ENSO oscillation leading to EN events. Our analyses consistently show that the initial subsurface warming in the western equatorial Pacific is advected to the central Pacific by the equatorial undercurrent, which, together with the equatorward advection associated with anomalies in both the meridional temperature gradient and circulation at the level of the thermocline, explains the heat buildup in the central Pacific during the recharge phase. We also find that the recharge phase is characterized by an increase of meridional tilting of the thermocline, as well as a southward upper-ocean cross-equatorial mass transport resulting from Ekman-induced anomalous vertical motion in the off-equatorial regions. Although differences between data sets are generally small, and anomalies tend to have the same sign, the differences in the magnitude of the meridional term are seen to be key for explaining the different propagation speed of the subsurface warming tendency along the thermocline. The only exception is GECCO, which does not produce the patterns of meridional surface Ekman divergence (subsurface Sverdrup convergence) in the western and central equatorial Pacific.

  12. Algorithms and Algorithmic Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veselov, V. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    This paper is intended as an introduction to a number of problems connected with the description of algorithms and algorithmic languages, particularly the syntaxes and semantics of algorithmic languages. The terms "letter, word, alphabet" are defined and described. The concept of the algorithm is defined and the relation between the algorithm and…

  13. Estimation of sediment transport with an in-situ acoustic retrieval algorithm in the high-turbidity Changjiang Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian-zhong; Ding, Ping-xing; Li, Cheng; Fan, Zhong-ya; Shen, Fang; Kong, Ya-zhen

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive acoustic retrieval algorithm to investigate suspended sediment is presented with the combined validations of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Optical Backscattering Sensor (OBS) monitoring along seven cross-channel sections in the high-turbidity North Passage of the Changjiang Estuary, China. The realistic water conditions, horizontal and vertical salinities, and grain size of the suspended sediment are considered in the retrieval algorithm. Relations between net volume scattering of sound attenuation ( S v ) due to sediments and ADCP echo intensity ( E) were obtained with reasonable accuracy after applying the linear regression method. In the river mouth, an intensive vertical stratification and horizontal inhomogeneity were found, with a higher concentration of sediment in the North Passage and a lower concentration in the North Channel and South Passage. Additionally, The North Passage is characterized by higher sediment concentration in the middle region and lower concentration in the entrance and outlet areas. The maximum sediment flux rate, occurred in the middle region, could reach 6.3×105 and 1.5×105 t/h during the spring and neap tide, respectively. Retrieved sediment fluxes in the middle region are significantly larger than that in the upstream and downstream region. This strong sediment imbalance along the main channel indicates potential secondary sediment supply from southern Jiuduansha Shoals.

  14. Diffusion or advection? Mass transfer and complex boundary layer landscapes of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Nørregaard, Rasmus Dyrmose; Kühl, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The role of hyaline hairs on the thallus of brown algae in the genus Fucus is long debated and several functions have been proposed. We used a novel motorized set-up for two-dimensional and three-dimensional mapping with O2 microsensors to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) and O2 flux around single and multiple tufts of hyaline hairs on the thallus of Fucus vesiculosus. Flow was a major determinant of DBL thickness, where higher flow decreased DBL thickness and increased O2 flux between the algal thallus and the surrounding seawater. However, the topography of the DBL varied and did not directly follow the contour of the underlying thallus. Areas around single tufts of hyaline hairs exhibited a more complex mass-transfer boundary layer, showing both increased and decreased thickness when compared with areas over smooth thallus surfaces. Over thallus areas with several hyaline hair tufts, the overall effect was an apparent increase in the boundary layer thickness. We also found indications for advective O2 transport driven by pressure gradients or vortex shedding downstream from dense tufts of hyaline hairs that could alleviate local mass-transfer resistances. Mass-transfer dynamics around hyaline hair tufts are thus more complex than hitherto assumed and may have important implications for algal physiology and plant-microbe interactions.

  15. Analytical solution of advection-diffusion equation in heterogeneous infinite medium using Green's function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanskrityayn, Abhishek; Kumar, Naveen

    2016-12-01

    Some analytical solutions of one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation (ADE) with variable dispersion coefficient and velocity are obtained using Green's function method (GFM). The variability attributes to the heterogeneity of hydro-geological media like river bed or aquifer in more general ways than that in the previous works. Dispersion coefficient is considered temporally dependent, while velocity is considered spatially and temporally dependent. The spatial dependence is considered to be linear and temporal dependence is considered to be of linear, exponential and asymptotic. The spatio-temporal dependence of velocity is considered in three ways. Results of previous works are also derived validating the results of the present work. To use GFM, a moving coordinate transformation is developed through which this ADE is reduced into a form, whose analytical solution is already known. Analytical solutions are obtained for the pollutant's mass dispersion from an instantaneous point source as well as from a continuous point source in a heterogeneous medium. The effect of such dependence on the mass transport is explained through the illustrations of the analytical solutions.

  16. Bound-preserving discontinuous Galerkin methods for conservative phase space advection in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endeve, Eirik; Hauck, Cory D.; Xing, Yulong; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    We extend the positivity-preserving method of Zhang and Shu [49] to simulate the advection of neutral particles in phase space using curvilinear coordinates. The ability to utilize these coordinates is important for non-equilibrium transport problems in general relativity and also in science and engineering applications with specific geometries. The method achieves high-order accuracy using Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization of phase space and strong stability-preserving, Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time integration. Special care is taken to ensure that the method preserves strict bounds for the phase space distribution function f; i.e., f ∈ [ 0 , 1 ]. The combination of suitable CFL conditions and the use of the high-order limiter proposed in [49] is sufficient to ensure positivity of the distribution function. However, to ensure that the distribution function satisfies the upper bound, the discretization must, in addition, preserve the divergence-free property of the phase space flow. Proofs that highlight the necessary conditions are presented for general curvilinear coordinates, and the details of these conditions are worked out for some commonly used coordinate systems (i.e., spherical polar spatial coordinates in spherical symmetry and cylindrical spatial coordinates in axial symmetry, both with spherical momentum coordinates). Results from numerical experiments - including one example in spherical symmetry adopting the Schwarzschild metric - demonstrate that the method achieves high-order accuracy and that the distribution function satisfies the maximum principle.

  17. The 8th-10 th January 2009 snowfalls: a case of Mediterranean warm advection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, F.; Ayensa, E.; Barriga, M.; Del Hoyo, J.; Fernández, A.; Garrido, N.; Martín, A.; Martín, F.; Roa, I. Martínez, A.; Pascual, R.

    2009-09-01

    From 8 th to 10 th of January 2009, significant snowfalls were reported in many areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands. This relevant event was very important from the meteorological and social impact point of views. The snow affected many zones, especially the regions of Madrid, Castilla & León and Castilla-La Mancha (Spanish central plateau) with the persistence and thickness of solid precipitation. Up to twenty-five centimetres of snow were reported in some places. On 9th of January the snowfalls caused great social and media impact due to the fact that they took place in the early hours in the Madrid metropolitan areas, affecting both air traffic and land transport. The "Madrid-Barajas" airport was closed and the city was collapsed during several hours. A study of this situation appears in the poster. The snowstorm was characterized by the previous irruption of an European continental polar air mass, that subsequently interacted with a wet and warm air mass of Mediterranean origin, all preceded by low level easterly flows. This type of snowfall is called "warm advection". These winter situations are very efficient from precipitation point of view, generating significant snowfalls and affecting a lot of areas.

  18. Advective loss of overwintering Calanus finmarchicus from the Faroe-Shetland Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullyanto, Arief; Jónasdóttir, Sigrún H.; Visser, André W.

    2015-04-01

    The flow of deep water from the Norwegian Sea to the North Atlantic via the Faroe-Shetland Channel is one of the critical bottlenecks in the meridional overturn circulation. It is also a flow that potentially carries with it a large number of the overwintering copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, a regionally important secondary producer. Using a high resolution hydrodynamic model, MIKE 3 FM, we simulate the overflow of deep water and estimate the associated loss rate of C. finmarchicus as a function of the water depth strata within which they reside. We estimate a net advective loss from the Norwegian Sea population of 80±10 kt carbon bound in lipids of C. finmarchicus biomass per year, a number that constitutes about 50% of the total overwintering population. Estimates of water mass characteristics and particle tracking suggest that the fate of individuals transported in the overflowing water is to be entrained into warmer waters of the North Atlantic Basin, a habitat that appears to be unsuitable for successful overwintering.

  19. Typhoon induced summer cold shock advected by Kuroshio off eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Chun; Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Zheng, Quanan; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Lee, Chia-Ying; Chern, Shi-We; Chao, Yan-Hao

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we used satellite observations, in-situ measurements, and numerical modelling to investigate an extreme temperature change triggered by a typhoon in the ocean near the Kuroshio region off eastern Taiwan. With the westward passage of Typhoon Morakot in 2009 through Taiwan, a distinct cool wake was generated at the southeastern corner of Taiwan (CWSET) and moved towards the downstream Kuroshio region; it involved a precipitous cooling of at least 4 °C within 10-20 km of the coast. Rapid and drastic temperature drops triggered by the CWSET and advected by the strong conveyor belt effect of the Kuroshio Current are highly probable sources of cold shocks in summer. We clarified the mechanism that generated the CWSET through a series of sensitivity experiments using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System. The cold shock was mainly triggered by local wind stress associated with the typhoon. In addition, the Kuroshio Current was demonstrated to have played a crucial role in both the generation of upwelling off the southeastern coast of Taiwan during the passage of the typhoon and the transporting of this impact downstream. This process was verified through a systematic analysis of all typhoons moving westward through Taiwan from 2005 to 2013. Cold-shock stress is thought to be linked with naturally occurring 'fish kills', and obtaining a more thorough understanding of the CWSET will be helpful for protecting aquaculture off the eastern coast of Taiwan from the impacts of cold shocks triggered by typhoons moving westward through Taiwan in summer.

  20. An advective mechanism for deep chlorophyll maxima formation in southern Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Zachary K.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Cassar, Nicolas; Sprintall, Janet; Mazloff, Matthew R.

    2016-10-01

    We observe surface and subsurface fluorescence-derived chlorophyll maxima in southern Drake Passage during austral summer. Backscatter measurements indicate that the deep chlorophyll maxima (DCMs) are also deep biomass maxima, and euphotic depth estimates show that they lie below the euphotic layer. Subsurface, offshore and near-surface, onshore features lie along the same isopycnal, suggesting advective generation of DCMs. Temperature measurements indicate a warming of surface waters throughout austral summer, capping the winter water (WW) layer and increasing off-shelf stratification in this isopycnal layer. The outcrop position of the WW isopycnal layer shifts onshore, into a surface phytoplankton bloom. A lateral potential vorticity (PV) gradient develops, such that a down-gradient PV flux is consistent with offshore, along-isopycnal tracer transport. Model results are consistent with this mechanism. Subduction of chlorophyll and biomass along isopycnals represents a biological term not observed by surface satellite measurements which may contribute significantly to the strength of the biological pump in this region.

  1. Disparities in glacial advection of Southern Ocean Intermediate Water to the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R.; Nürnberg, D.; Ronge, T.; Tiedemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Intermediate Waters formed in the Southern Ocean are critical for ventilating the thermocline in the Southern Hemisphere Gyres and transporting climatic signals from high to low latitudes on glacial-interglacial time-scales. Despite the importance of the Southern Ocean Intermediate Waters (SOIWs), information on past changes in SOIWs formation is fragmentary, and its impact on the South Pacific Gyre (SPG)'s thermocline largely unknown. Here, we present a 200 kyr record of paired Mg/Ca ratios and stable oxygen isotope from surface and deep dwelling planktonic foraminifera, from the SPG. On average, the Globigerina bulloides Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures show similar conditions during the LGM and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 (9.4 °C versus 9.8 °C). In contrast, the subsurface temperatures derived from the Mg/Ca values of Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides suggest that LGM is ∼3 to ∼2 °C colder than MIS 6. Furthermore, at subsurface depths the reconstructed δ18Osw-ivc record (proxy for relative local salinity changes) suggests opposite glacial conditions, with slightly saltier-than-Holocene waters during MIS 6, and fresher-than-Holocene waters during LGM. Contrasting glacial scenarios, plausibly due to changes in the presence of SOIWs at the study site, suggest variable formation and/or advection of SOIWs to the SPG during different glacial stages. The variability in SOIWs is probably driven by the changes in the intensity of the Southern Westerly Winds.

  2. On the potential importance of transient air flow in advective radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Holman, H.Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have investigated, using a mathematical model, the temporal variations of air flux within the soil mass surrounding a basement in the presence of time dependent periodic variations of barometric pressure and a persistent under-pressure at the basement. The results of transient air flow show that for a homogeneous soil medium, the effects of barometric fluctuations are most significant in the cases where soil permeability to air is low and the fluctuation frequency is high. In these cases, the barometric fluctuation can greatly enhance the magnitude of fluxes as well as introduce flow direction reversals from surrounding soil into the basement. These large fluxes with direction reversals have strong implications in regard to advective transport of radon. The results suggest that the transient oscillations have to be accounted for in quantifying radon entry into buildings. In the actual field set up, the transient behavior will be further influenced by soil permeability heterogeneity, by soil moisture variations, and by the effects of multiple periodic components in the barometric pressure fluctuations.

  3. Central Arctic Ocean freshwater during a period of anomalous melt and advection in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Benjamin; Korhonen, Meri; Hoppmann, Mario; Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Krumpen, Thomas; Beckers, Justin; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    During the recent decade the Arctic Ocean has shown several years of very low sea-ice extent and an increase in liquid freshwater. Yet, the processes underlying the interannual variability are still not fully understood. Hydrographic observations by ship campaigns and autonomous platforms reveal that summer 2015 showed above average liquid freshwater in the upper ocean of the central Arctic. Surface temperatures and sea level pressure were also higher than the average of the preceeding two decades. From hydrographic observations and atmospheric reanalysis data we show that this liquid freshwater anomaly is associated with above average sea-ice melt and intensified northward Ekman transport. We, further, found significant amounts of Pacific Water in the upper water column, from the mixed-layer to the upper halocline. Our results suggest that the freshening was due to both advection of low-salinity water from the direction of the Siberian shelves, the Beaufort Gyre and the Bering Strait, and enhance sea-ice melt.

  4. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  5. STANDING SHOCK INSTABILITY IN ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Truong; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, Peter A.; Putney, Joy

    2016-03-10

    Depending on the values of the energy and angular momentum per unit mass in the gas supplied at large radii, inviscid advection-dominated accretion flows can display velocity profiles with either preshock deceleration or preshock acceleration. Nakayama has shown that these two types of flow configurations are expected to have different stability properties. By employing the Chevalier and Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we discover that there are regions of parameter space where disks/shocks with outflows can be stable or unstable. In regions of instability, we find that preshock deceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation, but is always stable to the fundamental mode and overtones. Furthermore, we also find that preshock acceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode and that the fundamental mode and overtones become increasingly less stable as the shock location moves away from the horizon when the disk half-height expands above ∼12 gravitational radii at the shock radius. In regions of stability, we demonstrate the zeroth mode to be stable for the velocity profiles that exhibit preshock acceleration and deceleration. Moreover, for models that are linearly unstable, our model suggests the possible existence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with ratios 2:3 and 3:5. These ratios are believed to occur in stellar and supermassive black hole candidates, for example, in GRS 1915+105 and Sgr A*, respectively. We expect that similar QPO ratios also exist in regions of stable shocks.

  6. The distortion of the level set gradient under advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Mario F.; Anumolu, Lakshman; Ryddner, Doug

    2017-04-01

    The practice of periodically reinitializing the level set function is well established in two-phase flow applications as a way of controlling the growth of anomalies and/or numerical errors. In the present work, the underlying roots of this anomalous growth are studied, where it is established that the augmentation of the magnitude of the level set gradient (| ∇ϕ |) is directly connected to the nature of the flow field; hence, it is not necessarily the result of some type of numerical error. More specifically, for a general flow field advecting the level set function, it is shown that the eigenpairs of the strain rate tensor are responsible for the rate of change of | ∇ϕ | along a fluid particle trajectory. This straining action not only affects the magnitude of | ∇ϕ |, but the general character of ϕ, and consequently contributes to the growth in numerical error. These numerical consequences are examined by adopting the Gradient Augmented Level Set method. Specifically, it is shown that the local error for ϕ is directly connected to the size of | ∇ϕ | and to the magnitude of the second and fourth order derivatives of ϕ. These analytical findings are subsequently supported by various examples. The role of reinitialization is discussed, where it is shown that in cases where the zero level set contour has a local radius of curvature that is below the local grid resolution, reinitialization exacerbates rather than diminishes the degree of error. For other cases, where the interface is well resolved, reinitialization helps stabilize the error as intended.

  7. Critical time scales for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of local accumulation time (LAT) was introduced by Berezhkovskii and co-workers to give a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to approach the steady-state solution [A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Such a measure is referred to as a critical time. Here, we show that LAT is, in fact, identical to the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was first introduced by McNabb [A. McNabb and G. C. Wake, IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Although McNabb's initial argument was motivated by considering the mean particle lifetime (MPLT) for a linear death process, he applied the ideas to study diffusion. We extend the work of these authors by deriving expressions for the MAT for a general one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction problem. Using a combination of continuum and discrete approaches, we show that MAT and MPLT are equivalent for certain uniform-to-uniform transitions; these results provide a practical interpretation for MAT by directly linking the stochastic microscopic processes to a meaningful macroscopic time scale. We find that for more general transitions, the equivalence between MAT and MPLT does not hold. Unlike other critical time definitions, we show that it is possible to evaluate the MAT without solving the underlying partial differential equation (pde). This makes MAT a simple and attractive quantity for practical situations. Finally, our work explores the accuracy of certain approximations derived using MAT, showing that useful approximations for nonlinear kinetic processes can be obtained, again without treating the governing pde directly.

  8. Horizontal Advection and Mixing of Pollutants in the Urban Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, S. P.; Entekhabi, D.; Britter, R.; Norford, L.; Fernando, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    Although urban air quality and its impacts on the public health have long been studied, the increasing urbanization is raising concerns on how to better control and mitigate these health impacts. A necessary element in predicting exposure levels is fundamental understanding of flow and dispersion in urban canyons. The complex topology of building structures and roads requires the resolution of turbulence phenomena within urban canyons. The use of dense and low porosity construction material can lead to rapid heating in response to direct solar exposure due to large thermal mass. Hence thermal and buoyancy effects may be as important as mechanically-forced or shear-induced flows. In this study, the transport of pollutants within the urban environment, as well as the thermal and advection effects, are investigated. The focus is on the horizontal transport or the advection effects within the urban environment. With increased urbanization and larger and more spread cities, concern about how the upstream air quality situation can affect downstream areas. The study also examines the release and the dispersion of hazardous material. Due to the variety and complexity of urban areas around the world, the urban environment is simplified into adjacent two-dimensional urban street canyons. Pollutants are released inside each canyon. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are applied to evaluate and quantify the flow rate out of each canyon and also the exchange of pollutants between the canyons. Imagine a row of ten adjacent urban street canyons of aspect ratio 1 with horizontal flow perpendicular to it as shown in the attached figure. C is the concentration of pollutants. The first digit indicates in what canyon the pollutant is released and the second digit indicates the location of that pollutant. For example, C3,4 is the concentration of pollutant released inside canyon 3 measured in canyon 4. The same amount of pollution is released inside the ten street canyons

  9. A New Methodology For Estimating CO2 Advective Fluxes In Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Canepa, E.; Georgieva, E.; Kerschbaumer, G.; Minerbi, S.; Seufert, G.

    2007-12-01

    A key problem in using the eddy correlation (EC) technique for estimating the carbon dioxide Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of terrestrial ecosystems is the potential bias caused by advective fluxes of CO2. Advective fluxes are often not considered since they are difficult to identify and to quantify, especially in complex mountainous terrain with highly variable wind patterns and drainage flows. We propose a methodology to estimate these fluxes based on a full 3-Dimensional (3D) approach applied to the topographically complex alpine forest site of Renon (1736 m a.s.l.). This is an aerodynamic method based on the computation of advective fluxes across the aerial faces of a control volume including the plant ecosystem. Data used for the computation of CO2 advective fluxes were collected during an extensive field campaign performed in 2005 in the framework of CarboEurope-IP research project. Vertical profiles of wind, air temperature and CO2 concentration have been measured at five towers and a spatial interpolation was performed in order to get 3D fields of such variables. The frame of reference used was orthogonal and the vertical direction was parallel to the gravity. Each anemometer was aligned in this frame of reference and no rotations were applied to the wind velocity components. The analysis of the 3D fields of wind velocity, CO2 mixing ratio and air density highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of CO2 source/sink strength and the strong de-coupling between air flow below and above the canopy during stable nights. The total CO2 advection calculated using the proposed methodology exhibited prevailing positive values during the night-time period. Advective fluxes estimated during windy nights were of the same magnitude and sign of vertical turbulent flux measured above canopy by the EC technique. This observation suggests that the friction velocity correction routinely applied to night-time periods may not be efficient at the Renon site. During light windy nights

  10. Development of algorithms for using satellite meteorological data sets to study global transport of stratospheric aerosols and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Want, P. H.; Deepak, A.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of stratospheric aerosol and ozone measurements obtained from the NASA developed SAM II and SAGE satellite instruments were investigated for their global scale transports. The stratospheric aerosols showed that during the stratospheric warming of the winter 1978 to 1979, the distribution of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio in the northern high latitude exhibited distinct changes. Dynamic processes might have played an important role in maintenance role in maintenance of this zonal mean distribution. As to the stratospheric ozone, large poleward ozone transports are shown to occur in the altitude region from 24 km to 38 km near 55N during this warming. This altitude region is shown to be a transition region of the phase relationship between ozone and temperature waves from an in-phase one above 38 km. It is shown that the ozone solar heating in the upper stratosphere might lead to enhancement of the damping rate of the planetary waves due to infrared radiation alone in agreement with theoretical analyses and an earlier observational study.

  11. Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bales, R.C.; Arnold, R.G.; Gerba, C.P.

    1995-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop tools with which to measure the advective transport of microorganisms through porous media. These tools were then applied to investigate the sorptive properties of representative microorganisms that were selected at random from the DOE`s deep subsurface collection of bacterial, maintained at Florida State University. The transport screening procedure that arose from this study was also used to investigate biological factors that affect the transport/sorption of biocolloids during their movement through porous media with the bulk advective flow.

  12. Investigating redox processes under diffusive and advective flow conditions using a coupled omics and synchrotron approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Kelly, S.; Skinner, K.; Mishra, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Wu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    FeIII- and SO42--reducing microorganisms and the mineral phases they produce have profound implications for many processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems. In addition, many of these microbially-catalysed geochemical transformations are highly dependent upon introduction of reactants via advective and diffusive hydrological transport. We have characterized microbial communities from a set of static microcosms to test the effect of ethanol diffusion and sulfate concentration on UVI-contaminated sediment. The spatial distribution, valence states, and speciation of both U and Fe were monitored in situ throughout the experiment by synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in parallel with solution measurements of pH and the concentrations of sulfate, ethanol, and organic acids. After reaction initiation, a ~1-cm thick layer of sediment near the sediment-water (S-W) interface became visibly dark. Fe XANES spectra of the layer were consistent with the formation of FeS. Over the 4 year duration of the experiment, U LIII-edge XANES indicated reduction of U, first in the dark layer and then throughout the sediment. Next, the microcosms were disassembled and samples were taken from the overlying water and different sediment regions. We extracted DNA and characterized the microbial community by sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the Illumina MiSeq platform and found that the community evolved from its originally homogeneous composition, becoming significantly spatially heterogeneous. We have also developed an x-ray accessible column to probe elemental transformations as they occur along the flow path in a porous medium with the purpose of refining reactive transport models (RTMs) that describe coupled physical and biogeochemical processes in environmental systems. The elemental distribution dynamics and the RTMs of the redox driven processes within them will be presented.

  13. A locally conservative non-negative finite element formulation for anisotropic advective-diffusive-reactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudunuru, M. K.; Shabouei, M.; Nakshatrala, K.

    2015-12-01

    Advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) equations appear in various areas of life sciences, hydrogeological systems, and contaminant transport. Obtaining stable and accurate numerical solutions can be challenging as the underlying equations are coupled, nonlinear, and non-self-adjoint. Currently, there is neither a robust computational framework available nor a reliable commercial package known that can handle various complex situations. Herein, the objective of this poster presentation is to present a novel locally conservative non-negative finite element formulation that preserves the underlying physical and mathematical properties of a general linear transient anisotropic ADR equation. In continuous setting, governing equations for ADR systems possess various important properties. In general, all these properties are not inherited during finite difference, finite volume, and finite element discretizations. The objective of this poster presentation is two fold: First, we analyze whether the existing numerical formulations (such as SUPG and GLS) and commercial packages provide physically meaningful values for the concentration of the chemical species for various realistic benchmark problems. Furthermore, we also quantify the errors incurred in satisfying the local and global species balance for two popular chemical kinetics schemes: CDIMA (chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid) and BZ (Belousov--Zhabotinsky). Based on these numerical simulations, we show that SUPG and GLS produce unphysical values for concentration of chemical species due to the violation of the non-negative constraint, contain spurious node-to-node oscillations, and have large errors in local and global species balance. Second, we proposed a novel finite element formulation to overcome the above difficulties. The proposed locally conservative non-negative computational framework based on low-order least-squares finite elements is able to preserve these underlying physical and mathematical properties

  14. Improvement of transport-corrected scattering stability and performance using a Jacobi inscatter algorithm for 2D-MOC

    DOE PAGES

    Stimpson, Shane; Collins, Benjamin; Kochunas, Brendan

    2017-03-10

    The MPACT code, being developed collaboratively by the University of Michigan and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is the primary deterministic neutron transport solver being deployed within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) as part of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). In many applications of the MPACT code, transport-corrected scattering has proven to be an obstacle in terms of stability, and considerable effort has been made to try to resolve the convergence issues that arise from it. Most of the convergence problems seem related to the transport-corrected cross sections, particularly when used in the 2Dmore » method of characteristics (MOC) solver, which is the focus of this work. Here in this paper, the stability and performance of the 2-D MOC solver in MPACT is evaluated for two iteration schemes: Gauss-Seidel and Jacobi. With the Gauss-Seidel approach, as the MOC solver loops over groups, it uses the flux solution from the previous group to construct the inscatter source for the next group. Alternatively, the Jacobi approach uses only the fluxes from the previous outer iteration to determine the inscatter source for each group. Consequently for the Jacobi iteration, the loop over groups can be moved from the outermost loop$-$as is the case with the Gauss-Seidel sweeper$-$to the innermost loop, allowing for a substantial increase in efficiency by minimizing the overhead of retrieving segment, region, and surface index information from the ray tracing data. Several test problems are assessed: (1) Babcock & Wilcox 1810 Core I, (2) Dimple S01A-Sq, (3) VERA Progression Problem 5a, and (4) VERA Problem 2a. The Jacobi iteration exhibits better stability than Gauss-Seidel, allowing for converged solutions to be obtained over a much wider range of iteration control parameters. Additionally, the MOC solve time with the Jacobi approach is roughly 2.0-2.5× faster per sweep. While the performance and stability of

  15. Black Hole Event Horizons and Advection-Dominated Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The XMM data on black-hole X-ray novae are only now becoming available and they have so far not been included in any publications. This work is part of a larger project that makes use of both XMM and Chandra data. Our first publication on the Chandra results is the following: "New Evidence for Black Hole Event Horizons from Chandra" by M.R. Garcia, J.E. McClintock, R. Narayan, P. Callanan, D. Barret and S. Murray (2001, ApJ, 553, L47). Therein we present the luminosities of the two black-hole X-ray novae, GRO J0422+22 and 4U1 543-47, which were observed by Chandra. These results are combined with the luminosities of four additional black-hole X-ray novae, which were observed as part of a Chandra GTO program (PI: S. Murray). The very low, but nonzero, quiescent X-ray luminosities of these black hole binaries is very difficult to understand in the context of standard viscous accretion disk theory. The principal result of this work is that X-ray novae that contain black hole primaries are about 100 times fainter that X-ray novae that contain neutron star primaries. This result had been suggested in earlier work, but the present work very firmly establishes this large luminosity difference. The result is remarkable because the black-hole and the neutron-star systems are believed to be similar in many respects. Most importantly, the mass transfer rate from the secondary star is believed to be very comparable for the two kinds of systems for similar orbital periods. The advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model provides a natural framework for understanding the extraordinarily low luminosities of the black hole systems and the hundred-fold greater luminosities of the neutron star systems. The chief feature of an ADAF is that the heat energy in the accreting gas is trapped in the gas and travels with it, rather than being radiated promptly. Thus the accreting gas reaches the central object with a huge amount of thermal energy. If the accretor is a black hole, the

  16. Simulation of Helical Flow Hydrodynamics in Meanders and Advection-Turbulent Diffusion Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusti, T. P.; Hertanti, D. R.; Bahsan, E.; Soeryantono, H.

    2013-12-01

    Particle-based numerical methods, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), may be able to simulate some hydrodynamic and morphodynamic behaviors better than grid-based numerical methods. This study simulates hydrodynamics in meanders and advection and turbulent diffusion in straight river channels using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. The simulators generate three-dimensional data for hydrodynamics and one-dimensional data for advection-turbulent diffusion. Fluid at rest, sloshing, and helical flow are simulated in the river meanders. Spill loading and step loading are done to simulate concentration patterns associated with advection-turbulent diffusion. Results indicate that helical flow is formed due to disturbance in morphology and particle velocity in the stream and the number of particles does not have a significant effect on the pattern of advection-turbulent diffusion concentration.

  17. The impact of advection on stratification and chlorophyll variability in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Apurva C.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2015-06-01

    Previously reported global-scale correlations between interannual variability in upper ocean stratification and chlorophyll a (a proxy for phytoplankton biomass) have been shown to be driven by strong associations between the two properties in the central and western equatorial Pacific. Herein, we present evidence that these correlations are not causal but instead result from the advection of heat, salt, and nutrients in the region. Specifically, we demonstrate that stratification and chlorophyll are simultaneously influenced by shifts in the horizontal advective inputs of cold/saline/nutrient-rich waters from upwelling regions to the east and warm/fresh/nutrient-poor waters to the west. We find that horizontal advection contributes substantially to the annual surface layer nutrient budget and, together with vertical advection, significantly impacts interannual variability in chlorophyll. These results highlight the importance of a three-dimensional framework for examining nutrient supply in the upper ocean—a crucial requirement for assessing future marine ecosystem responses to a changing climate.

  18. Advection-Induced Spectrotemporal Defects in a Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bielawski, S.; Szwaj, C.; Bruni, C.; Garzella, D.; Orlandi, G.L.; Couprie, M.E.

    2005-07-15

    We evidence numerically and experimentally that advection can induce spectrotemporal defects in a system presenting a localized structure. Those defects in the spectrum are associated with the breakings induced by the drift of the localized solution. The results are based on simulations and experiments performed on the super-ACO free-electron laser. However, we show that this instability can be generalized using a real Ginzburg-Landau equation with (i) advection and (ii) a finite-size supercritical region.

  19. Exploration of POD-Galerkin Techniques for Developing Reduced Order Models of Reaction-Advection Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    downstream boundary (when needed) is obtained by extrapolation, taking into account the hyperbolic character of the equation . By separating the...for Developing Reduced Order Models of Reaction-Advection Equations 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...advection scalar equation is used as a representative equation to investigate the overall approach. Both linear and nonlinear model equations are

  20. A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Test results demonstrate that the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) outperforms standard finite-difference methods for solute transport problems that are dominated by advection. FVELLAM systematically conserves mass globally with all types of boundary conditions. Integrated finite differences, instead of finite elements, are used to approximate the governing equation. This approach, in conjunction with a forward tracking scheme, greatly facilitates mass conservation. The mass storage integral is numerically evaluated at the current time level, and quadrature points are then tracked forward in time to the next level. Forward tracking permits straightforward treatment of inflow boundaries, thus avoiding the inherent problem in backtracking of characteristic lines intersecting inflow boundaries. FVELLAM extends previous results by obtaining mass conservation locally on Lagrangian space-time elements. -from Authors

  1. ACCURATE TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATION OF ADVECTIVE-DIFFUSIVE-REACTIVE TRANSPORT. (R824801)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Stochastic Analysis of Advection-diffusion-Reactive Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Daniel

    2013-08-30

    We developed new CDF and PDF methods for solving non-linear stochastic hyperbolic equations that does not rely on linearization approximations and allows for rigorous formulation of the boundary conditions.

  3. Melt production by viscous dissipation: Role of heat advection by Magma transport

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenson, M.D.; Spera, F.J.

    1980-02-01

    An energy conservation equation is formulated that balances the heat generated by viscous dissipation in a peridotite simultaneously undergoing partial fusion and penetrative constant shear stress deformation with the heat removed by mobilization and ascent of basaltic magma from the region undergoing deformation. The solution of this parameterized energy equation gives the volume fraction of melt (theta) as a function of time (t) after the initiation of deformation. A stability analysis of the conservation equation shows that stable (theta<100%) or unstable (theta..-->..infinity) solutions exist depending on the magnitude of two dimensionless parameters K/sub 1//K/sub 2/ and K/sub 3/. For geologically reasonable values of K/sub 2//K/sub 2/ and K/sub 3/, the analysis indicates that peridotitic thermo-mechanical systems undergoing penetrative deformation at constant shear stress show a two-stage history. An early stage of growth where theta increases monotonically on a 2 to 3 m.y. time scale eventually is replaced by a steady s ate regime (constant theta). Typical values of theta lie in the range 3 to 5 volume percent; melting of peridotite to the extent of 20--30% appears to be precluded by this model.

  4. An ELLAM Approximation for Advective-Dispersive Transport with Nonlinear Sorption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-28

    1, Cass T. Miller a aCenter for the Integrated Study of the Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering , University of North...Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7431, USA bU.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, 3909 Halls...Center for Integrated Study of the Environment,Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering ,Chapel Hill,NC,27599-7431 8. PERFORMING

  5. Numerical Computation of Mass Transport in Low Reynolds Number Flows and the Concentration Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which an individual cell interacts with its environment often requires detailed information about the fluid in which the cell is immersed. Mass transport between the interior of the cell and the external environment is influenced by the flow of the extracellular fluid and the molecular diffusivity. Analytical calculations of the flow field are challenging in simple geometries, and not generally available in more realistic cases with irregular domain boundaries. Motivated by these problems, we discuss the numerical solution of Stokes equation by implementing a Gauss-Seidel algorithm on a staggered computational grid. The computed velocity profile is used as input to numerically solve the advection-diffusion equation for mass transport. Special attention is paid to the case of two-dimensional flows at large Péclet number. The numerical results are compared with a perturbative analytical treatment of the concentration boundary layer.

  6. NONUNIFORM AND UNSTEADY SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN FURROW IRRRIGATION: I. MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for solving a cross-section-averaged Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) was developed to simulate the transport of fertilizer in furrow irrigation. The advection and dispersion processes were solved separately at each time step by implementing a method of characteristics with cubic spline i...

  7. Advection and evolution of river basins in mountain ranges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelltort, S.; Simpson, G.; Willett, S.

    2009-04-01

    Simpson (2006) have proposed a mechanism which involves (1) the idea that river networks in the lowland plains are incorporated in the orogen as it widens, and (2) that they do not change after their incorporation, thus "importing" a geometry acquired outside of the range independently of the tectonic and climatic influences acting inside the uplifting zone. This mechanisms implies rather a "static" view of river networks which serves as an alternative to models in which river networks continuously reorganize inside uplifting topography in such a way as to maintain a statistical geometry dictated solely by geomorphic processes. In the present work our approach to this problem is to measure and compare the form of river basins in the lowlands and in the uplands of the Himalayas, New-Zealand, Taiwan, the European Alps, the Pyrenees and the Apennines. We first present the method we employ to measure the shape of river basins and the data used. Second, we analyse and discuss our results which show a correlation between the shape of networks developed in the pro-lowlands of active orogens and their upland counterparts whereas such a correlation does not exist on the retro-side of the considered orogens. Our results thus support (1) the horizontal advection of river basins from the pro-lowlands to the pro-uplands, (2) a certain amount of reorganization by widening of basin boundaries, and (3) the existence of a different mechanism of drainage network evolution in the retro-side of the orogens. Castelltort, S., and Simpson, G., 2006, Basin Research, 18: 267-276. Hallet, B. and Molnar, P., 2001. J. Geophys. Res, 106: 13697-13709. Hovius, N., 1996, Basin Research, 8: 29-44.

  8. Moisture Advection and Fresh Water Flux over Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Moisture transport in the atmosphere is one of the most significant components in the hydrological cycle. Under stationary condition, ocean surface fresh water flux, which is the difference between precipitation (P) and evaporation (E), is balanced by the divergence of column-integrated moisture transport (IMT) in the atmosphere. Characterizing accurately a global picture of IMT from observation is a difficult task. It requires measurements of vertical profiles for wind vector and humidity. More specifically, IMT can be defined as the integration in pressure coordinates the product of specific humidity q and wind vector u, where g is the gravitational acceleration, and p, is the atmospheric pressure at ocean surface.In this study, a statistical relationship is derived between u, and u(sub)s using data from numerical weather prediction model. The relationship is then validated using surface and vertical profile from radiosonde data, before applied to spacebased measurements.

  9. On the influence of advection on the "Guardia dei Lombardi" geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebigbo, Anozie; Niederau, Jan; Marquart, Gabriele; Gola, Gianluca; Inversi, Barbara; Scrocca, Davide; Manzella, Adele; Montegrossi, Giordano

    2014-05-01

    Due to local specific-heat-flow maxima of up to 90 mW/m2 and temperatures of about 100 °C at less than 1.7 km depth, a southern Italian (Province of Avelino) carbonate reservoir is being explored as a medium-enthalpy geothermal resource. Hydrocarbon exploration wells and several seismic profiles within the chosen area (with dimensions of 43 x 28 km) provide the basis for a complex, three-dimensional geological model. The reservoir is faulted, anticlinal in structure, and overlain by dense, partly clay-rich sedimentary layers. A hydraulic and thermal characterisation of the geological units is possible through a combination of laboratory measurements, literature sources, and well log data. Under the assumption of purely conductive heat transport, the specific heat flow at the bottom of the reservoir (at 6 km depth) can be estimated using temperature data from several boreholes in the region to 67 mW/m2 . The goal of this study is the investigation of advective flow and the evaluation of its influence on the temperature distribution in the reservoir. First hydrothermal simulation models show a complicated flow structure in the anticlinal reservoir. But an inversion for constant reservoir permeability based on the borehole-temperature observations results in a relatively low value of 0.5 to 1 mD. However, pointwise comparisons between modelled and measured temperatures show large differences. Thus, for an accurate inclusion of regional flow processes and thermal convection, a proper representation of the geometry of the anticlinal Apulian platform and a karstified, highly permeable layer at the interface between the reservoir and its sedimentary cover is necessary. Such a refined model will also lead to a recalibration of the specific basal heat flow.

  10. CLUMPY ACCRETION ONTO BLACK HOLES. I. CLUMPY-ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOW STRUCTURE AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianmin; Cheng Cheng; Li Yanrong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  11. Advection of Microphysical Scalars in Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2011-01-01

    The Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) is a large eddy scale atmospheric flow model with extensive turbulence and microphysics packages. It has been applied successfully in the past to a diverse set of problems ranging from prediction of severe convective events (Proctor et al. 2002), tracking storms and for simulating weapons effects such as the dispersion and fallout of fission debris (Bacon and Sarma 1991), etc. More recently, TASS has been used for predicting the transport and decay of wake vortices behind aircraft (Proctor 2009). An essential part of the TASS model is its comprehensive microphysics package, which relies on the accurate computation of microphysical scalar transport. This paper describes an evaluation of the Leonard scheme implemented in the TASS model for transporting microphysical scalars. The scheme is validated against benchmark cases with exact solutions and compared with two other schemes - a Monotone Upstream-centered Scheme for Conservation Laws (MUSCL)-type scheme after van Leer and LeVeque's high-resolution wave propagation method. Finally, a comparison between the schemes is made against an incident of severe tornadic super-cell convection near Del City, Oklahoma.

  12. Modeling of Convective-Stratiform Precipitation Processes: Sensitivity to Partitioning Methods and Numerical Advection Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Steve; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Ferrier, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Six different convective-stratiform separation techniques, including a new technique that utilizes the ratio of vertical and terminal velocities, are compared and evaluated using two-dimensional numerical simulations of a tropical [Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE)] and midlatitude continental [Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRESTORM)] squall line. The simulations are made using two different numerical advection schemes: 4th order and positive definite advection. Comparisons are made in terms of rainfall, cloud coverage, mass fluxes, apparent heating and moistening, mean hydrometeor profiles, CFADs (Contoured Frequency with Altitude Diagrams), microphysics, and latent heating retrieval. Overall, it was found that the different separation techniques produced results that qualitatively agreed. However, the quantitative differences were significant. Observational comparisons were unable to conclusively evaluate the performance of the techniques. Latent heating retrieval was shown to be sensitive to the use of separation technique mainly due to the stratiform region for methods that found very little stratiform rain. The midlatitude PRESTORM simulation was found to be nearly invariant with respect to advection type for most quantities while for TOGA COARE fourth order advection produced numerous shallow convective cores and positive definite advection fewer cells that were both broader and deeper penetrating above the freezing level.

  13. Estimation of the advection effects induced by surface heterogeneities in the surface energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuxart, Joan; Wrenger, Burkhard; Martínez-Villagrasa, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius O.; Jiménez, Maria A.; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Hartogensis, Oscar; Dünnermann, Jens; Conangla, Laura; Garai, Anirban

    2016-07-01

    The effect of terrain heterogeneities in one-point measurements is a continuous subject of discussion. Here we focus on the order of magnitude of the advection term in the equation of the evolution of temperature as generated by documented terrain heterogeneities and we estimate its importance as a term in the surface energy budget (SEB), for which the turbulent fluxes are computed using the eddy-correlation method. The heterogeneities are estimated from satellite and model fields for scales near 1 km or broader, while the smaller scales are estimated through direct measurements with remotely piloted aircraft and thermal cameras and also by high-resolution modelling. The variability of the surface temperature fields is not found to decrease clearly with increasing resolution, and consequently the advection term becomes more important as the scales become finer. The advection term provides non-significant values to the SEB at scales larger than a few kilometres. In contrast, surface heterogeneities at the metre scale yield large values of the advection, which are probably only significant in the first centimetres above the ground. The motions that seem to contribute significantly to the advection term in the SEB equation in our case are roughly those around the hectometre scales.

  14. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics I: Lie dragging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper advected invariants and conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics are obtained using Lie dragging techniques. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. The gauge condition for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow is determined. Different variants of the helicity in ideal fluid dynamics and MHD including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity are investigated. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross-helicity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in the constant entropy surface, then the gas pressure can depend on both the entropy and the density. In these cases the conservation laws are local conservation laws. For non-barotropic gases, we obtain nonlocal conservation laws for fluid helicity and cross helicity by using Clebsch variables. These nonlocal conservation laws are the main new results of the paper. Ertel's theorem and potential vorticity, the Hollman invariant, and the Godbillon-Vey invariant for special flows for which the magnetic helicity is zero are also discussed.

  15. Solving the advection-diffusion equations in biological contexts using the cellular Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Mueller, Chris; Chen, Kun; Glazier, James A.

    2005-10-01

    The cellular Potts model (CPM) is a robust, cell-level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Both tissue physiology and morphogenesis depend on diffusion of chemical morphogens in the extra-cellular fluid or matrix (ECM). Standard diffusion solvers applied to the cellular potts model use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. However, these methods produce a diffusing field tied to the underlying lattice, which is inaccurate in many biological situations in which cell or ECM movement causes advection rapid compared to diffusion. Finite difference schemes suffer numerical instabilities solving the resulting advection-diffusion equations. To circumvent these problems we simulate advection diffusion within the framework of the CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalized fluid particles which detach advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid particles by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. Directed spin flips in the CPM handle the advective movement of the fluid particles. A constraint on relative velocities in the fluid explicitly accounts for fluid viscosity. We use the CPM to solve various diffusion examples including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources, and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation against analytical and established numerical solutions. We also verify the CPM results for Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Aris dispersion.

  16. Improvements in Satellite-Derived Short-Term Insolation Forecasting: Statistical Comparisons, Challenges for Advection-Based Forecasts, and New Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M. A.; Miller, S. D.; Haynes, J. M.; Heidinger, A. K.; Haupt, S. E.; Sengupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Using satellite observations from GOES-E and GOES-W platforms in concert with GFS-derived cloud-level winds and a standalone radiative transfer model, an advection-derived forecast for surface GHI over the continental United States is described. In particular, comparisons from the satellite-derived forecast are shown against several SURFRAD sites, with particular attention to developing meaningful error metrics to better demonstrate forecast skill and identify sources of error. Challenges in advection-based forecast techniques, such as forecasting near regions of non-wind-driven cloud systems such as coastal marine stratocumulus, are described, as are methods integrated into the forecast algorithm to identify and address these challenges. Improvements in the particular algorithm with respect to comparison against surface observations, integration of the forecast technique into blended forecast products such as those described by the 'Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting' project spearheaded by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other observations germane to satellite-derived solar forecasting are covered using nearly two years of operational forecasts as background.

  17. First-Order Hyperbolic System Method for Time-Dependent Advection-Diffusion Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    A time-dependent extension of the first-order hyperbolic system method for advection-diffusion problems is introduced. Diffusive/viscous terms are written and discretized as a hyperbolic system, which recovers the original equation in the steady state. The resulting scheme offers advantages over traditional schemes: a dramatic simplification in the discretization, high-order accuracy in the solution gradients, and orders-of-magnitude convergence acceleration. The hyperbolic advection-diffusion system is discretized by the second-order upwind residual-distribution scheme in a unified manner, and the system of implicit-residual-equations is solved by Newton's method over every physical time step. The numerical results are presented for linear and nonlinear advection-diffusion problems, demonstrating solutions and gradients produced to the same order of accuracy, with rapid convergence over each physical time step, typically less than five Newton iterations.

  18. Variational optimization analysis of temperature and moisture advection in a severe storm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Horizontal wind components, potential temperature, and mixing ratio fields associated with a severe storm environment in the south central U.S. were analyzed from synoptic upper air observations with a nonhomogeneous, anisotropic weighting function. Each data field was filtered with variational optimization analysis techniques. Variational optimization analysis was also performed on the vertical motion field and was used to produce advective forecasts of the potential temperature and mixing ratio fields. Results show that the dry intrusion is characterized by warm air, the advection of which produces a well-defined upward motion pattern. A corresponding downward motion pattern comprising a deep vertical circulation in the warm air sector of the low pressure system was detected. The axes alignment of maximum dry and warm advection with the axis of the tornado-producing squall line also resulted.

  19. Small-scale particle advection, manipulation and mixing: beyond the hydrodynamic scale.

    PubMed

    Straube, Arthur V

    2011-05-11

    In this paper we discuss the problems of particle advection, manipulation and mixing at small scales. We start by considering reaction-advection-diffusion systems with the focus on mixing. We show how mixing advection affects the processes of reaction-diffusion and discuss mixing-induced instabilities. Further, we consider the problem of particle manipulation and discuss collective effects in systems comprising solid and compressible particles. We particularly discuss mechanisms of particle entrapment, the role of compressibility in the dynamics of bubbly liquids and nonequilibrium colloidal explosion. Finally, we address two issues related to the problem of wetting. First, we study the role of contact line motion for a sessile droplet (or a bubble) on an oscillating substrate. Second, we discuss an instability of a thin film leading to the formation of a fractal structure of droplets.

  20. Lagrangian advection scheme with shape matrix (LASM) v0.2: interparcel mixing, physics-dynamics coupling and 3-D extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, L.; Wang, B.; Liu, L.; Huang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The interparcel mixing algorithm in the Lagrangian advection scheme with shape matrix (LASM) is updated to make the scheme more robust. The linear degeneration criterion is replaced by the maximum deviation of the skeleton points so that the new algorithm is more effective in controlling the shape of parcels, which is vital for long time simulation. LASM is inherently shape-preserving without any complicated filter or limiter, and it is linear. This fact contributes to the ability to preserve the sum of multiple tracers exactly on the parcels in LASM. A newly proposed terminator "toy"-chemistry test is used to test LASM, which shows that LASM can preserve the weighted sum of two reactive species precisely. The physics-dynamics coupling (i.e., tendency evaluation type) is also discussed. A flow generated by a WRF large-eddy simulation is also used to test the 3-D extension of LASM.

  1. Large-eddy Advection in Evapotranspiration Estimates from an Array of Eddy Covariance Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Evett, S. R.; Gowda, P. H.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Aiken, R.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration was continuously measured by an array of eddy covariance systems and large weighting lysimeter in a sorghum in Bushland, Texas in 2014. The advective divergence from both horizontal and vertical directions were measured through profile measurements above canopy. All storage terms were integrated from the depth of soil heat flux plate to the height of eddy covariance measurement. Therefore, a comparison between the eddy covariance system and large weighing lysimeter was conducted on hourly and daily basis. The results for the discrepancy between eddy covariance towers and the lysimeter will be discussed in terms of advection and storage contributions in time domain and frequency domain.

  2. An extension of Prandtl-Batchelor theory and consequences for chaotic advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezic, Igor

    2002-09-01

    We extend the Prandtl-Batchelor theory of steady laminar motion at large Reynolds number to derive conditions that steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows have to satisfy. We combine these results with ergodic theory to show that flows with strong Beltrami property (e.g., ABC flows) cannot be a paradigm for chaotic advection in inertia-dominated boundary-driven three-dimensional flows. Our results indicate that viscous forces are responsible for chaotic advection in steady, three-dimensional boundary-driven Navier-Stokes flows at large Reynolds numbers.

  3. The impact of air mass advection on aerosol optical properties over Gotland (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdun, Agnieszka; Rozwadowska, Anna; Kratzer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, measurements of aerosol optical properties from the Gotland station of the AERONET network, combined with a two-stage cluster analysis of back trajectories of air masses moving over Gotland, were used to identify the main paths of air mass advection to the Baltic Sea and to relate them to aerosol optical properties, i.e. the aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength λ = 500 nm, AOT (500) and the Ångström exponent for the spectral range from 440 to 870 nm, α(440,870). One- to six-day long back trajectories ending at 300, 500 and 3000 m above the station were computed using the HYSPLIT model. The study shows that in the Gotland region, variability in aerosol optical thickness AOT(500) is more strongly related to advections in the boundary layer than to those in the free troposphere. The observed variability in AOT(500) was best explained by the advection speeds and directions given by clustering of 4-day backward trajectories of air arriving in the boundary layer at 500 m above the station. 17 clusters of 4-day trajectories arriving at altitude 500 m above the Gotland station (sea level) derived using two-stage cluster analysis differ from each other with respect to trajectory length, the speed of air mass movement and the direction of advection. They also show different cluster means of AOT(500) and α(440,870). The cluster mean AOT(500) ranges from 0.342 ± 0.012 for the continental clusters M2 (east-southeast advection with moderate speed) and 0.294 ± 0.025 for S5 (slow south-southeast advection) to 0.064 ± 0.002 and 0.069 ± 0.002 for the respective marine clusters L3 (fast west-northwest advection) and M3 (north-northwest advection with moderate speed). The cluster mean α(440,870) varies from 1.65-1.70 for the short-trajectory clusters to 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.06 ± 0.03 for the Arctic marine cluster L4 (fast inflow from the north) and marine cluster L5 (fast inflow from the west) respectively.

  4. Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chong H.

    2016-08-05

    We present an interface area transport model required in tracking of mass, momentum, and energy exchange between dispersed and background materials. The basic transport equation has been rigorously derived from the volume fraction evolution equation. Interface area changes due to mass transport and local compression/expansion are included. The model is then simplified for the case in which the dispersed phase is composed of spheres of locally uniform size. A procedure for calculating advective flux with interface reconstruction has been suggested.

  5. BEHAVIOR OF SENSITIVITIES IN THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL ADVECTION-DISPERSION EQUATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND SAMPLING DESIGN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of sensitivities has a significant impact on parameter estimation and sampling design for studies of solute transport in porous media. Physical insight into the behavior of sensitivities is offered through an analysis of analytically derived sensitivities for the one-dimensional form of the advection-dispersion equation. When parameters are estimated in regression models of one-dimensional transport, the spatial and temporal variability in sensitivities influences variance and covariance of parameter estimates. Several principles account for the observed influence of sensitivities on parameter uncertainty. (1) Information about a physical parameter may be most accurately gained at points in space and time. (2) As the distance of observation points from the upstream boundary increases, maximum sensitivity to velocity during passage of the solute front increases. (3) The frequency of sampling must be 'in phase' with the S shape of the dispersion sensitivity curve to yield the most information on dispersion. (4) The sensitivity to the dispersion coefficient is usually at least an order of magnitude less than the sensitivity to velocity. (5) The assumed probability distribution of random error in observations of solute concentration determines the form of the sensitivities. (6) If variance in random error in observations is large, trends in sensitivities of observation points may be obscured by noise. (7) Designs that minimize the variance of one parameter may not necessarily minimize the variance of other parameters.

  6. The Global Modeling Initiative Assessment Model: Model Description, Integration and Testing of the Transport Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Tannahill, J.R.; Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.; Bergmann, D.; Proctor, D.; Rodriquez, J.M.; Lin, S.J.; Rood, R.B.; Prather, M.J.; Rasch, P.J.; Considine, D.B.; Ramaroson, R.; Kawa, S.R.

    2000-04-25

    We describe the three dimensional global stratospheric chemistry model developed under the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) to assess the possible environmental consequences from the emissions of a fleet of proposed high speed civil transport aircraft. This model was developed through a unique collaboration of the members of the GMI team. Team members provided computational modules representing various physical and chemical processes, and analysis of simulation results through extensive comparison to observation. The team members' modules were integrated within a computational framework that allowed transportability and simulations on massively parallel computers. A unique aspect of this model framework is the ability to interchange and intercompare different submodules to assess the sensitivity of numerical algorithms and model assumptions to simulation results. In this paper, we discuss the important attributes of the GMI effort, describe the GMI model computational framework and the numerical modules representing physical and chemical processes. As an application of the concept, we illustrate an analysis of the impact of advection algorithms on the dispersion of a NO{sub y}-like source in the stratosphere which mimics that of a fleet of commercial supersonic transports (High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)) flying between 17 and 20 kilometers.

  7. Development of a three-dimensional, regional, coupled wave, current, and sediment-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Signell, R.P.; Harris, C.K.; Arango, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional numerical model that implements algorithms for sediment transport and evolution of bottom morphology in the coastal-circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v3.0), and provides a two-way link between ROMS and the wave model Simulating Waves in the Nearshore (SWAN) via the Model-Coupling Toolkit. The coupled model is applicable for fluvial, estuarine, shelf, and nearshore (surfzone) environments. Three-dimensional radiation-stress terms have been included in the momentum equations, along with effects of a surface wave roller model. The sediment-transport algorithms are implemented for an unlimited number of user-defined non-cohesive sediment classes. Each class has attributes of grain diameter, density, settling velocity, critical stress threshold for erosion, and erodibility constant. Suspended-sediment transport in the water column is computed with the same advection-diffusion algorithm used for all passive tracers and an additional algorithm for vertical settling that is not limited by the CFL criterion. Erosion and deposition are based on flux formulations. A multi-level bed framework tracks the distribution of every size class in each layer and stores bulk properties including layer thickness, porosity, and mass, allowing computation of bed morphology and stratigraphy. Also tracked are bed-surface properties including active-layer thickness, ripple geometry, and bed roughness. Bedload transport is calculated for mobile sediment classes in the top layer. Bottom-boundary layer submodels parameterize wave-current interactions that enhance bottom stresses and thereby facilitate sediment transport and increase bottom drag, creating a feedback to the circulation. The model is demonstrated in a series of simple test cases and a realistic application in Massachusetts Bay. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrogen Sorption and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen is unique among aqueous ions, both in its importance for geochemical reactions, and in its complex transport behavior through reactive media. The structure of hydrogen reaction fronts can be analyzed in the advective limit of the transport equation. At local chemical equilibrium, sorption of hydrogen onto the media surface (sorption isotherm) controls reaction front morphology. Transport modeling thus necessitates accurate knowledge of surface chemistry. Though motivated by transport, sorption models are often parameterized against batch titration experiments. The validity of these parameterizations, in a transport setting, are seldom tested. The analytic solution to the transport equation gives an algebraic relationship between concentration velocity and equilibrium sorption behavior. In this study, we conduct a suite of column flow experiments through quartz sand. Hydrogen concentration breakthrough curves at the column outlet are used to infer the "transport sorption isotherm." These results are compared to the batch titration derived sorption isotherm. We find excellent agreement between the datasets. Our findings suggest that, for aqueous hydrogen, local chemical equilibrium is a valid assumption. With the goal of a predictive transport model, we parameterize various sorption models against this dataset. Models which incorporate electrostatic effects at the surface predict transport well. Nonelectrostatic models such as the Kd, Langmuir, and Freundlich models fail. These results are particularly compelling as nonelectrostatic models are often employed to predict hydrogen transport in many reactive transport code.

  9. SIMULATION OF DISPERSION OF A POWER PLANT PLUME USING AN ADAPTIVE GRID ALGORITHM. (R827028)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new dynamic adaptive grid algorithm has been developed for use in air quality modeling. This algorithm uses a higher order numerical scheme––the piecewise parabolic method (PPM)––for computing advective solution fields; a weight function capable o...

  10. SIMULATION OF DISPERSION OF A POWER PLANT PLUME USING AN ADAPTIVE GRID ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new dynamic adaptive grid algorithm has been developed for use in air quality modeling. This algorithm uses a higher order numerical scheme?the piecewise parabolic method (PPM)?for computing advective solution fields; a weight function capable of promoting grid node clustering ...

  11. Alteration of chaotic advection in blood flow around partial blockage zone: Role of hematocrit concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Soumyabrata; Chaudhury, Kaustav; DasGupta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Spatial distributions of particles carried by blood exhibit complex filamentary pattern under the combined effects of geometrical irregularities of the blood vessels and pulsating pumping by the heart. This signifies the existence of so called chaotic advection. In the present article, we argue that the understanding of such pathologically triggered chaotic advection is incomplete without giving due consideration to a major constituent of blood: abundant presence of red blood cells quantified by the hematocrit (HCT) concentration. We show that the hematocrit concentration in blood cells can alter the filamentary structures of the spatial distribution of advected particles in an intriguing manner. Our results reveal that there primarily are two major impacts of HCT concentrations towards dictating the chaotic dynamics of blood flow: changing the zone of influence of chaotic mixing and determining the enhancement of residence time of the advected particles away from the wall. This, in turn, may alter the extent of activation of platelets or other reactive biological entities, bearing immense consequence towards dictating the biophysical mechanisms behind possible life-threatening diseases originating in the circulatory system.

  12. Wind tunnel measurement of turbulent and advective scalar fluxes: a case study on intersection ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux.

  13. MECHANISM OF OUTFLOWS IN ACCRETION SYSTEM: ADVECTIVE COOLING CANNOT BALANCE VISCOUS HEATING?

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-20

    Based on the no-outflow assumption, we investigate steady-state, axisymmetric, optically thin accretion flows in spherical coordinates. By comparing the vertically integrated advective cooling rate with the viscous heating rate, we find that the former is generally less than 30% of the latter, which indicates that the advective cooling itself cannot balance the viscous heating. As a consequence, for radiatively inefficient flows with low accretion rates such as M-dot ≲10{sup −3} M-dot {sub Edd}, where M-dot {sub Edd} is the Eddington accretion rate, the viscous heating rate will be larger than the sum of the advective cooling rate and the radiative cooling one. Thus, no thermal equilibrium can be established under the no-outflow assumption. We therefore argue that in such cases outflows ought to occur and take away more than 70% of the thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation. Similarly, for optically thick flows with extremely large accretion rates such as M-dot ≳10 M-dot {sub Edd}, outflows should also occur owing to the limited advection and the low efficiency of radiative cooling. Our results may help to understand the mechanism of outflows found in observations and numerical simulations.

  14. Satellite-advection based solar forecasting: lessons learned and progress towards probabalistic solar forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using satellite observations from GOES-E and GOES-W platforms in concert with GFS-derived cloud-level winds and a standalone radiative transfer model, an advection-derived forecast for surface GHI over the continental United States, with intercomparison between forecasts for four zones over the CONUS and Central Pacific with SURFRAD results. Primary sources for error in advection-based forecasts, primarily driven by false- or mistimed ramp events are discussed, with identification of error sources quantified along with techniques used to improve advection-based forecasts to approximately 10% MAE for designated surface locations. Development of a blended steering wind product utilizing NWP output combined with satellite-derived winds from AMV techniques to improve 0-1 hour advection forecasts will be discussed. Additionally, the use of two years' of solar forecast observations in the development of a prototype probablistic forecast for ramp events will be shown, with the intent of increasing the use of satellite-derived forecasts for grid operators and optimizing integration of renewable resources into the power grid. Elements of the work were developed under the 'Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting' project spearheaded by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  15. An enriched finite element method to fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shengzhi; Lian, Yanping; Ying, Yuping; Tang, Shaoqiang; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an enriched finite element method with fractional basis [ 1,x^{α }] for spatial fractional partial differential equations is proposed to obtain more stable and accurate numerical solutions. For pure fractional diffusion equation without advection, the enriched Galerkin finite element method formulation is demonstrated to simulate the exact solution successfully without any numerical oscillation, which is advantageous compared to the traditional Galerkin finite element method with integer basis [ 1,x] . For fractional advection-diffusion equation, the oscillatory behavior becomes complex due to the introduction of the advection term which can be characterized by a fractional element Peclet number. For the purpose of addressing the more complex numerical oscillation, an enriched Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is developed by using a dimensionless fractional stabilization parameter, which is formulated through a minimization of the residual of the nodal solution. The effectiveness and accuracy of the enriched finite element method are demonstrated by a series of numerical examples of fractional diffusion equation and fractional advection-diffusion equation, including both one-dimensional and two-dimensional, steady-state and time-dependent cases.

  16. A global spectral element model for poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Huan; Wang, Faming; Zeng, Zhong; Qiu, Zhouhua; Yin, Linmao; Li, Liang

    2016-03-01

    A global spherical Fourier-Legendre spectral element method is proposed to solve Poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere. In the meridional direction, Legendre polynomials are used and the region is divided into several elements. In order to avoid coordinate singularities at the north and south poles in the meridional direction, Legendre-Gauss-Radau points are chosen at the elements involving the two poles. Fourier polynomials are applied in the zonal direction for its periodicity, with only one element. Then, the partial differential equations are solved on the longitude-latitude meshes without coordinate transformation between spherical and Cartesian coordinates. For verification of the proposed method, a few Poisson equations and advective flows are tested. Firstly, the method is found to be valid for test cases with smooth solution. The results of the Poisson equations demonstrate that the present method exhibits high accuracy and exponential convergence. Highprecision solutions are also obtained with near negligible numerical diffusion during the time evolution for advective flow with smooth shape. Secondly, the results of advective flow with non-smooth shape and deformational flow are also shown to be reasonable and effective. As a result, the present method is proved to be capable of solving flow through different types of elements, and thereby a desirable method with reliability and high accuracy for solving partial differential equations over a sphere.

  17. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux. PMID:22649290

  18. The connection of standard thin disk with advection-dominated accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-qing; Lu, Ju-fu; G. U., Wei-min

    2005-04-01

    Using the standard Runge-Kutta method, a global solution of the basic equations describing black hole accretion flows is derived. It is proved that transition from a standard thin disk to an advection-dominated accretion flow is realizable in case of high viscosity, without introducing any additional mechanism of energy transfer or specifying any ad hoc outer boundary condition.

  19. Modeling the advection of discontinuous quantities in Geophysical flows using Particle Level Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V.; Samuel, H.; Evonuk, M.

    2010-12-01

    Advection is one of the major processes that commonly acts on various scales in nature (core formation, mantle convective stirring, multi-phase flows in magma chambers, salt diapirism ...). While this process can be modeled numerically by solving conservation equations, various geodynamic scenarios involve advection of quantities with sharp discontinuities. Unfortunately, in these cases modeling numerically pure advection becomes very challenging, in particular because sharp discontinuities lead to numerical instabilities, which prevent the local use of high order numerical schemes. Several approaches have been used in computational geodynamics in order to overcome this difficulty, with variable amounts of success. Despite the use of correcting filters or non-oscillatory, shock-preserving schemes, Eulerian (fixed grid) techniques generally suffer from artificial numerical diffusion. Lagrangian approaches (dynamic grids or particles) tend to be more popular in computational geodynamics because they are not prone to excessive numerical diffusion. However, these approaches are generally computationally expensive, especially in 3D, and can suffer from spurious statistical noise. As an alternative to these aforementioned approaches, we have applied a relatively recent Particle Level set method [Enright et al., 2002] for modeling advection of quantities with the presence of sharp discontinuities. We have tested this improved method, which combines the best of Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, against well known benchmarks and classical Geodynamic flows. In each case the Particle Level Set method accuracy equals or is better than other Eulerian and Lagrangian methods, and leads to significantly smaller computational cost, in particular in three-dimensional flows, where the reduction of computational time for modeling advection processes is most needed.

  20. Fast and accurate advection of sharp discontinuities in Geophysical flows using hybrid implicit surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Henri

    2010-05-01

    Advection is one of the major processes that commonly acts on various scales in nature (core formation, mantle convective stirring, multi-phase flows in magma chambers, salt diapirism ...). While this process can be modeled numerically by solving conservation equations, various geodynamic scenarios involve advection of quantities with sharp discontinuities. Unfortunately, in these cases modeling numerically pure advection becomes very challenging, in particular because sharp discontinuities lead to numerical instabilities, which prevent the local use of high order numerical schemes. Several approaches have been used in computational geodynamics in order to overcome this difficulty, with variable amounts of success. Despite the use of correcting filters or non-oscillatory, shock-preserving schemes, Eulerian (fixed grid) techniques generally suffer from artificial numerical diffusion. Lagrangian approaches (dynamic grids or particles) tend to be more popular in computational geodynamics because they are not prone to excessive numerical diffusion. However, these approaches are generally computationally expensive, especially in 3D, and can suffer from spurious statistical noise. As an alternative to these aforementioned approaches, I have applied a relatively recent Particle Level set method [Enright et al., 2002] for modeling advection of quantities with the presence of sharp discontinuities. I have adapted this improved method, which combines the best of Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, and I have tested it against well known benchmarks and classical Geodynamic flows. In each case the Particle Level Set method accuracy equals or is better than other Eulerian and Lagrangian methods, and leads to significantly smaller computational cost, in particular in three-dimensional flows, where the reduction of computational time for modeling advection processes is most needed.

  1. High-resolution stochastic downscaling of climate models: simulating wind advection, cloud cover and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    A new stochastic approach to generate wind advection, cloud cover and precipitation fields is presented with the aim of formulating a space-time weather generator characterized by fields with high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g., 1 km x 1 km and 5 min). Its use is suitable for stochastic downscaling of climate scenarios in the context of hydrological, ecological and geomorphological applications. The approach is based on concepts from the Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.), the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation model (STREAP) introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), and the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator (HiReS-WG) presented by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.). Advection fields are generated on the basis of the 500 hPa u and v wind direction variables derived from global or regional climate models. The advection velocity and direction are parameterized using Kappa and von Mises distributions respectively. A random Gaussian fields is generated using a fast Fourier transform to preserve the spatial correlation of advection. The cloud cover area, total precipitation area and mean advection of the field are coupled using a multi-autoregressive model. The approach is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and, in the context of climate change, allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climate in a fast and efficient way. A preliminary test of the approach is presented with reference to a case study in a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  2. Advective removal of intraparticle uranium from contaminated vadose zone sediments, Hanford, U.S.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, Dean A; Zachara, John M

    2008-03-01

    A column study on U(VI)-contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford Site, WA, was performed to investigate U(VI) release kinetics with water advection and variable geochemical conditions. The sediments were collected from an area adjacent to and below tank BX-102 that was contaminated as a result of a radioactive tank waste overfill event. The primary reservoir for U(VI) in the sediments are micrometer-size precipitates composed of nanocrystallite aggregates of a Na-U-Silicate phase, most likely Na-boltwoodite, that nucleated and grew within microfractures of the plagioclase component of sand-sized granitic clasts. Two sediment samples, with different U(VI) concentrations and intraparticle mass transfer properties, were leached with advective flows of three different solutions. The influent solutions were all calcite-saturated and in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. One solution was prepared from DI water, the second was a synthetic groundwater (SGW) with elevated Na that mimicked groundwater at the Hanford site, and the third was the same SGW but with both elevated Na and Si. The latter two solutions were employed, in part, to test the effect of saturation state on U(VI) release. For both sediments, and all three electrolytes, there was an initial rapid release of U(VI) to the advecting solution followed by slower near steady-state release. U(VI)aq concentrations increased during subsequent stop-flow events. The electrolytes with elevated Na and Si depressed U(VL)aq concentrations in effluent solutions. Effluent U(VI)aq concentrations for both sediments and all three electrolytes were simulated reasonably well by a three domain model (the advecting fluid, fractures, and matrix) that coupled U(VI) dissolution, intraparticle U(VI)aq diffusion, and interparticle advection, where diffusion and dissolution properties were parameterized in a previous batch study.

  3. Quantification of numerical diffusivity due to TVD schemes in the advection equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidadi, Shreyas; Rani, Sarma L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the numerical diffusivity νnum inherent to the Roe-MUSCL scheme has been quantified for the scalar advection equation. The Roe-MUSCL scheme employed is a combination of: (1) the standard extension of the original Roe's formulation to the advection equation, and (2) van Leer's Monotone Upwind Scheme for Conservation Laws (MUSCL) technique that applies a linear variable reconstruction in a cell along with a scaled limiter function. An explicit expression is derived for the numerical diffusivity in terms of the limiter function, the distance between the cell centers on either side of a face, and the face-normal velocity. The numerical diffusivity formulation shows that a scaled limiter function is more appropriate for MUSCL in order to consistently recover the central-differenced flux at the maximum value of the limiter. The significance of the scaling factor is revealed when the Roe-MUSCL scheme, originally developed for 1-D scenarios, is applied to 2-D scalar advection problems. It is seen that without the scaling factor, the MUSCL scheme may not necessarily be monotonic in multi-dimensional scenarios. Numerical diffusivities of the minmod, superbee, van Leer and Barth-Jesperson TVD limiters were quantified for four problems: 1-D advection of a step function profile, and 2-D advection of step, sinusoidal, and double-step profiles. For all the cases, it is shown that the superbee scheme provides the lowest numerical diffusivity that is also most confined to the vicinity of the discontinuity. The minmod scheme is the most diffusive, as well as active in regions away from high gradients. As expected, the grid resolution study demonstrates that the magnitude and the spatial extent of the numerical diffusivity decrease with increasing resolution.

  4. Improving estimates of ecosystem metabolism by reducing effects of tidal advection on dissolved oxygen time series-Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) have been used to compute estimates of metabolism in aquatic ecosystems. Central to this open water or "Odum" method is the assumption that the DO time is not strongly affected by advection and that effects due to advection or mixin...

  5. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly

  6. An innovative lattice Boltzmann model for simulating Michaelis-Menten-based diffusion-advection kinetics and its application within a cartilage cell bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Moaty Sayed, A A; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2010-04-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) are rapidly showing their ability to simulate a lot of fluid dynamics problems that previously required very complex approaches. This study presents a LBM for simulating diffusion-advection transport of substrate in a 2-D laminar flow. The model considers the substrate influx into a set of active cells placed inside the flow field. A new innovative method was used to simulate the cells activity using the LBM by means of Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The model is validated with some numerical benchmark problems and proved highly accurate results. After validation the model was used to simulate the transport of oxygen substrates that diffuse in water to feed a set of active cartilage cells inside a new designed bioreactor.

  7. Subsurface Xenon Migration by Atmospheric Pumping Using an Implicit Non-Iterative Algorithm for a Locally 1D Dual-Porosity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.; Kalinowksi, M. B.

    2009-04-01

    An underground nuclear explosion injects radionuclids in the surrounding host rock creating an initial radionuclid distribution. In the case of fractured permeable media, cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can draw gaseous species upwards to the surface, establishing a ratcheting pump effect. The resulting advective transport is orders of magnitude more significant than transport by molecular diffusion. In the 1990s the US Department of Energy funded the socalled Non-Proliferation Experiment conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate this barometric pumping effect for verifying compliance with respect to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. A chemical explosive of approximately 1 kt TNT-equivalent has been detonated in a cavity located 390 m deep in the Rainier Mesa (Nevada Test Site) in which two tracer gases were emplaced. Within this experiment SF6 was first detected in soil gas samples taken near fault zones after 50 days and 3He after 325 days. For this paper a locally one-dimensional dual-porosity model for flow along the fracture and within the permeable matrix was used after Nilson and Lie (1990). Seepage of gases and diffusion of tracers between fracture and matrix are accounted. The advective flow along the fracture and within the matrix block is based on the FRAM filtering remedy and methodology of Chapman. The resulting system of equations is solved by an implicit non-iterative algorithm. Results on time of arrival and subsurface concentration levels for the CTBT-relevant xenons will be presented.

  8. Modeling transportation of efavirenz: inference on possibility of mixed modes of transportation and kinetic solubility.

    PubMed

    Nemaura, Tafireyi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding drug transportation mechanisms in the human body is of paramount importance in modeling Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic relationships. This work gives a novel general model of efavirenz transportation projections based on concentrations simulated from patients on a dose of 600 mg. The work puts forward a proposition that transportation can wholly be modeled by concentration and time in a uniform volumetric space. Furthermore, movement entities are used to inform the state of "kinetic solubility" of a solution. There is use of Ricker's model, and forms of the Hill's equation in modeling transportation. Characterization on the movement rates of solution particle are suggested in relation to advection rate of solution particle. At turning points on the transportation rate of solution particle vs. concentration curve, a suggestion of possibly change of dominance in the mode of transportation and saturation is made. There are four movement rates postulated at primary micro-level transportation, that are attributed to convection, diffusion [passive transportation (EI )] and energy dependent system transportation (ED ) in relation to advection. Furthermore, a new parameter is introduced which is defined as an advection rate constant of solution particle. It is postulated to be dependent on two rate constants of solution particle, that is a convection rate constant of solution particle and a saturable transportation rate constant of solution particle. At secondary micro-level transportation, the results show convection as sum of advection and saturable transportation. The kinetics of dissolution of efavirenz in the solution space is postulated. Relatively, a good level of kinetics of dissolution is projected in the concentration region 0 - 32.82 μg/ml.

  9. Evaluation of a mechanistic algorithm to calculate the influence of a shallow water table on hydrology sediment and pesticide transport through vegetative filter strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvernet, C.; Munoz-Carpena, R.; Carluer, N.

    2012-04-01

    Natural or introduced areas of vegetation, also known as vegetative filter strips (VFS), are a common environmental control practice to protect surface water bodies from human influence. In Europe, VFS are placed along the water network to protect from agrochemical drift during applications, in addition to runoff control. Their bottomland placement next to the streams often implies the presence of a seasonal shallow water table which can have a profound impact on the efficiency of the buffer zone (Lacas et al. 2005). A physically-based algorithm describing ponded infiltration into soils bounded by a water table, proposed by Salvucci and Enthekabi (1995), was further developed to simulate VFS dynamics by making it explicit in time, account for unsteady rainfall conditions, and by coupling to a numerical overland flow and transport model (VFSMOD) (Munoz-Carpena et al., submitted). In this study, we evaluate the importance of the presence of a shallow water table on filter efficiency (reductions in runoff, sediment and pesticide mass), in the context of all other input factors used to describe the system. Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) was used to rank the important input factors and the presence of interactions, as well as the contribution of the important factors to the output variance. GSA of VSFMOD modified for shallow water table was implemented on 2 sites selected in France because they represent different agro-pedo-climatic conditions for which we can compare the role of the factors influencing the performance of grassed buffer strips for surface runoff, sediment and pesticide removal. The first site at Morcille watershed in the Beaujolais wineyard (Rhône-Alpes) contains a very permeable sandy-clay with water table depth varying with the season (very deep in summer and shallow in winter), with a high slope (20 to 30%), and subject to strong seasonal storms (semi-continental, Mediterranean climate). The second site at La Jailliere (Loire-Atlantique, ARVALIS

  10. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  11. Coupling between geochemical reactions and multicomponent gas and solute transport in unsaturated media: A reactive transport modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K. U.

    2007-05-01

    The two-way coupling that exists between biogeochemical reactions and vadose zone transport processes, in particular gas phase transport, determines the composition of soil gas. To explore these feedback processes quantitatively, multicomponent gas diffusion and advection are implemented into an existing reactive transport model that includes a full suite of geochemical reactions. Multicomponent gas diffusion is described on the basis of the dusty gas model, which accounts for all relevant gas diffusion mechanisms. The simulation of gas attenuation in partially saturated landfill soil covers, methane production, and oxidation in aquifers contaminated by organic compounds (e.g., an oil spill site) and pyrite oxidation in mine tailings demonstrate that both diffusive and advective gas transport can be affected by geochemical reactions. Methane oxidation in landfill covers reduces the existing upward pressure gradient, thereby decreasing the contribution of advective methane emissions to the atmosphere and enhancing the net flux of atmospheric oxygen into the soil column. At an oil spill site, methane oxidation causes a reversal in the direction of gas advection, which results in advective transport toward the zone of oxidation both from the ground surface and the deeper zone of methane production. Both diffusion and advection contribute to supply atmospheric oxygen into the subsurface, and methane emissions to the atmosphere are averted. During pyrite oxidation in mine tailings, pressure reduction in the reaction zone drives advective gas flow into the sediment column, enhancing the oxidation process. In carbonate-rich mine tailings, calcite dissolution releases carbon dioxide, which partly offsets the pressure reduction caused by O2 consumption.

  12. Coupling between geochemical reactions and multicomponent gas and solute transport in unsaturated media: A reactive transport modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.

    2007-01-01

    The two-way coupling that exists between biogeochemical reactions and vadose zone transport processes, in particular gas phase transport, determines the composition of soil gas. To explore these feedback processes quantitatively, multicomponent gas diffusion and advection are implemented into an existing reactive transport model that includes a full suite of geochemical reactions. Multicomponent gas diffusion is described on the basis of the dusty gas model, which accounts for all relevant gas diffusion mechanisms. The simulation of gas attenuation in partially saturated landfill soil covers, methane production, and oxidation in aquifers contaminated by organic compounds (e.g., an oil spill site) and pyrite oxidation in mine tailings demonstrate that both diffusive and advective gas transport can be affected by geochemical reactions. Methane oxidation in landfill covers reduces the existing upward pressure gradient, thereby decreasing the contribution of advective methane emissions to the atmosphere and enhancing the net flux of atmospheric oxygen into the soil column. At an oil spill site, methane oxidation causes a reversal in the direction of gas advection, which results in advective transport toward the zone of oxidation both from the ground surface and the deeper zone of methane production. Both diffusion and advection contribute to supply atmospheric oxygen into the subsurface, and methane emissions to the atmosphere are averted. During pyrite oxidation in mine tailings, pressure reduction in the reaction zone drives advective gas flow into the sediment column, enhancing the oxidation process. In carbonate-rich mine tailings, calcite dissolution releases carbon dioxide, which partly offsets the pressure reduction caused by O2 consumption.

  13. Estimates of carbon sources and sinks using new NIES transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Belikov, D.; Inoue, G.; Maksyutov, S.

    2008-12-01

    The NIES08, new version of the NIES transport model, has improved by increasing spatial resolution (1.25 deg × 1.25 deg) and more accurate advection (Van Leer, 1977) from former version (NIES99) with the spatial resolution of 2.5 deg × 2.5 deg and semi-Lagrangian advection. In this study, we estimate CO2 sources and sinks using NIES08, and study the influence of transport algorithms on inverse modeling by comparing NIES08 and other transport models. The NIES08 predicting stronger vertical mixing produces seasonal amplitudes which are closer to the observed seasonality. The interhemispheric difference (IHD) of surface mean CO2 concentration which is overestimated by NIES99 decreases in NIES08, and the IHD of NIES08 is lower as compared to average of transport models used in TransCom 3. The NIES08 estimates weaker northern land uptake (-1.3 Gt C year-1), which falls within standard deviation of the averaged flux of three models which estimate closest to the annual-mean vertical gradients of the atmospheric CO2 in results of Stephens et al. (2007). The northern land flux by NIES08 is estimated reasonably reflecting a seasonality and vertical gradient of CO2. In tropics, the NIES08 estimates strong land emission when compared with the difference between the northern land uptake and the tropical land emission in NIES99. There are still uncertainties because the tropical fluxes are less constrained by atmospheric CO2 measurements and because compensating variations in the tropical land fluxes are estimated in inversion.

  14. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  15. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, and minerals. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain large-scale, long-distance solids advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a generalized mechanism for advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, enabling a simulated continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  16. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  17. Improved numerical modeling of groundwater flow and transport at the MADE-2 site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.D.; Rucker, D.F.

    1995-02-01

    Public domain computer programs were used to attempt an improved model of the tritium plume observed during Macrodispersion Experiment 2 (MADE-2), a field scale natural gradient experiment conducted at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. The finite difference program MODFLOW was used to simulate the flow of groundwater through a 330 m x 105 m computational domain. Solutions for the 468 day experiment were obtained using a Sun Sparcstation 2 for several choices of convergence and storage parameters. The simulations had small mass balance errors and were consistent with continuous head observations. Tritium plume simulations used the mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian finite difference program MT3D to solve the contaminant transport equation using the MODFLOW-predicted flow field. Thirteen runs were made using various advection algorithms and dispersivities, but none was successful.

  18. Particulate export vs lateral advection in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Capotondi, L.; Giglio, F.

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of our study was to describe and quantify the influence of lateral advection relative to the vertical export in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean). In areas where lateral advection of particulate material is significant, budgets of bioactive elements can be inaccurate if fluxes through the water column and to the seabed are exclusively interpreted as passive sinking of particles. However, detailed information on the influence of lateral advection in the water column in the southern ocean is lacking. With this in mind, our study focused between the twilight zone (i.e. mesopelagic) and the benthic nepheloid layer to understand the relative importance of lateral flux with increasing water depth. Measurements were performed south of the Antarctic Polar Front for 1 year (January 10th 1999-January 3rd 2000) at 900, 1300, 2400, and 3700 m from the sea surface. The study was carried out using a 3.5 km long mooring line instrumented with sediment traps, current meters and sensors of temperature and conductivity. Sediment trap samples were characterized via several parameters including total mass flux, elemental composition (organic carbon, total nitrogen, biogenic silica, and calcium carbonate), concentration of metals (aluminum, iron, barium, and manganese), 210Pb activity, and foraminifera taxonomy. High fluxes of biogenic particles were observed in both summer 1999 and 2000 as a result of seasonal algal blooms associated with sea ice retreat and water column stratification. During no-productive periods, several high energy events occurred and resulted in advecting resuspended biogenic particles from flat-topped summits of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. Whereas the distance between seabed and uppermost sediment traps was sufficient to avoid lateral advection processes, resuspension was significant in the lowermost sediment traps accounting for ~60 and ~90% of the material caught at 2400 and 3700 m, respectively. Samples collected during

  19. A constrained transport scheme for MHD on unstructured static and moving meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocz, Philip; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical systems and a detailed understanding of their impact on the gas dynamics requires robust numerical simulations. Here we present a new method to evolve the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations on unstructured static and moving meshes that preserves the magnetic field divergence-free constraint to machine precision. The method overcomes the major problems of using a cleaning scheme on the magnetic fields instead, which is non-conservative, not fully Galilean invariant, does not eliminate divergence errors completely, and may produce incorrect jumps across shocks. Our new method is a generalization of the constrained transport (CT) algorithm used to enforce the ∇ · B = 0 condition on fixed Cartesian grids. Preserving ∇ · B = 0 at the discretized level is necessary to maintain the orthogonality between the Lorentz force and B. The possibility of performing CT on a moving mesh provides several advantages over static mesh methods due to the quasi-Lagrangian nature of the former (i.e. the mesh generating points move with the flow), such as making the simulation automatically adaptive and significantly reducing advection errors. Our method preserves magnetic fields and fluid quantities in pure advection exactly.

  20. Regional-scale advective, diffusive, and eruptive dynamics of CO2 and brine leakage through faults and wellbores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Na-Hyun; Han, Weon Shik; Han, Kyungdoe; Park, Eungyu

    2015-05-01

    Regional-scale advective, diffusive, and eruptive transport dynamics of CO2 and brine within a natural analogue in the northern Paradox Basin, Utah, were explored by integrating numerical simulations with soil CO2 flux measurements. Deeply sourced CO2 migrates through steeply dipping fault zones to the shallow aquifers predominantly as an aqueous phase. Dense CO2-rich brine mixes with regional groundwater, enhancing CO2 dissolution. Linear stability analysis reveals that CO2 could be dissolved completely within only ~500 years. Assigning lower permeability to the fault zones induces fault-parallel movement, feeds up-gradient aquifers with more CO2, and impedes down-gradient fluid flow, developing anticlinal CO2 traps at shallow depths (<300 m). The regional fault permeability that best reproduces field spatial CO2 flux variation is estimated 1 × 10-17 ≤ kh < 1 × 10-16 m2 and 5 × 10-16 ≤ kv < 1 × 10-15 m2. The anticlinal trap serves as an essential fluid source for eruption at Crystal Geyser. Geyser-like discharge sensitively responds to varying well permeability, radius, and CO2 recharge rate. The cyclic behavior of wellbore CO2 leakage decreases with time.

  1. Estimation and correction of advection effects with single and multiple, conventional and Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Chen, T.

    1981-01-01

    The laws of fluid motion are invariant under a Gallilean transformation. For a perfect observing system, the data analysis should, therefore, also be invariant under a Gallilean transformation. This invariance is often not preserved in practical observing systems. In this connection, it is often advisable to perform mesoscale analysis in a frame moving with respect to the earth's surface. In the present investigation the velocity of such a frame is referred to as an advection velocity. The investigation is concerned with remaining problems regarding the Gallilean transformation. The establishment of a frame of reference for the achievement of maximum coherence is considered, taking into account the case of given nonsimultaneous observations of scalars or Cartesian vectors. It is found that advection speed can be estimated objectively if a scalar or Cartesian vector can be observed directly and if, in addition, the time and position of each observation is approximately known.

  2. The effect of advection on the nutrient reservoir in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Palter, Jaime B; Lozier, M Susan; Barber, Richard T

    2005-09-29

    Though critically important in sustaining the ocean's biological pump, the cycling of nutrients in the subtropical gyres is poorly understood. The supply of nutrients to the sunlit surface layer of the ocean has traditionally been attributed solely to vertical processes. However, horizontal advection may also be important in establishing the availability of nutrients. Here we show that the production and advection of North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water introduces spatial and temporal variability in the subsurface nutrient reservoir beneath the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. As the mode water is formed, its nutrients are depleted by biological utilization. When the depleted water mass is exported to the gyre, it injects a wedge of low-nutrient water into the upper layers of the ocean. Contrary to intuition, cold winters that promote deep convective mixing and vigorous mode water formation may diminish downstream primary productivity by altering the subsurface delivery of nutrients.

  3. Scalar variance decay in chaotic advection and Batchelor-regime turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereday, D. R.; Haynes, P. H.; Wonhas, A.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2002-03-01

    The decay of the variance of a diffusive scalar in chaotic advection flow (or equivalently Batchelor-regime turbulence) is analyzed using a model in which the advection is represented by an inhomogeneous baker's map on the unit square. The variance decays exponentially at large times, with a rate that has a finite limit as the diffusivity κ tends to zero and is determined by the action of the inhomogeneous map on the gravest Fourier modes in the scalar field. The decay rate predicted by recent theoretical work that follows scalar evolution in linear flow and then averages over all stretching histories is shown to be incorrect. The exponentially decaying scalar field is shown to have a spatial power spectrum of the form P(k)~k-σ at wave numbers small enough for diffusion to be neglected, with σ<1.

  4. Advective-diffusive motion on large scales from small-scale dynamics with an internal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Aurell, Erik

    2016-06-01

    We consider coupled diffusions in n -dimensional space and on a compact manifold and the resulting effective advective-diffusive motion on large scales in space. The effective drift (advection) and effective diffusion are determined as a solvability conditions in a multiscale analysis. As an example, we consider coupled diffusions in three-dimensional space and on the group manifold SO(3) of proper rotations, generalizing results obtained by H. Brenner [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 80, 548 (1981), 10.1016/0021-9797(81)90214-9]. We show in detail how the analysis can be conveniently carried out using local charts and invariance arguments. As a further example, we consider coupled diffusions in two-dimensional complex space and on the group manifold SU(2). We show that although the local operators may be the same as for SO(3), due to the global nature of the solvability conditions the resulting diffusion will differ and generally be more isotropic.

  5. Comparison of Nonlinear and Linear Stabilization Schemes for Advection-Diffusion Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, R. R.; Heister, T.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately solving advection-diffusion equations that appear in the finite element discretization of a mantle convection simulation is an important computational issue to the computational geoscience community. This is because it allows for users studying mantle convection to create reliable simulations for something as small and simple as a 2D simulation on their personal laptop to something as complex as a massively parallel 3D simulation on their university supercomputer. Standard finite element discretizations of advection-diffusion equations introduce unphysical oscillations around steep gradients. Therefore, stabilization must be added to the discrete formulation to obtain correct solutions. Using the open source scientific library ASPECT, the SUPG and Entropy Viscosity schemes are compared using stationary and non-stationary test equations. Differences in maximum overshoot and undershoot, smear, and convergence orders are compared to see if improvements can be made to the existing numerical method existing in ASPECT.

  6. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  7. CO2 transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; LeMone, M.A.; Monson, Russell K.; Anderson, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, were investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2-rich air was transported downslope at night and upslope in the early morning at this forest site situated on a ???5% east-facing slope. We found that CO2 advection dominated the total CO2 transport in the NEE estimate at night although there are large uncertainties because of partial cancellation of horizontal and vertical advection. The horizontal CO2 advection captured not only the CO2 loss at night, but also the CO2 uptake during daytime. We found that horizontal CO2 advection was significant even during daytime especially when turbulent mixing was not significant, such as in early morning and evening transition periods and within the canopy. Similar processes can occur anywhere regardless of whether flow is generated by orography, synoptic pressure gradients, or surface heterogeneity as long as CO2 concentration is not well mixed by turbulence. The long-term net effect of all the CO2 budget terms on estimates of NEE needs to be investigated. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimating Advective Near-surface Currents from Ocean Color Satellite Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 01/23/2015 Journal Article Estimating advective near-surface currents from ocean color ...currents from the sequential ocean color imagery provided by multiple newer generations of satellite sensors on hourly scales in the Yellow Sea and the...optical properties are discussed regarding the performances of various color products on the retrieval of currents. Similarities of velocity

  9. A family of compact high order coupled time-space unconditionally stable vertical advection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarié, Florian; Debreu, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Recent papers by Shchepetkin (2015) and Lemarié et al. (2015) have emphasized that the time-step of an oceanic model with an Eulerian vertical coordinate and an explicit time-stepping scheme is very often restricted by vertical advection in a few hot spots (i.e. most of the grid points are integrated with small Courant numbers, compared to the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, except just few spots where numerical instability of the explicit scheme occurs first). The consequence is that the numerics for vertical advection must have good stability properties while being robust to changes in Courant number in terms of accuracy. An other constraint for oceanic models is the strict control of numerical mixing imposed by the highly adiabatic nature of the oceanic interior (i.e. mixing must be very small in the vertical direction below the boundary layer). We examine in this talk the possibility of mitigating vertical Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction, while avoiding numerical inaccuracies associated with standard implicit advection schemes (i.e. large sensitivity of the solution on Courant number, large phase delay, and possibly excess of numerical damping with unphysical orientation). Most regional oceanic models have been successfully using fourth order compact schemes for vertical advection. In this talk we present a new general framework to derive generic expressions for (one-step) coupled time and space high order compact schemes (see Daru & Tenaud (2004) for a thorough description of coupled time and space schemes). Among other properties, we show that those schemes are unconditionally stable and have very good accuracy properties even for large Courant numbers while having a very reasonable computational cost.

  10. Statistical evaluation of thermal advection and stratification effects in scatterometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, F. S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of thermal advection and atmospheric stratification are statistically evaluated using Seasat scatterometer observations as a data base. The results indicate that, whenever the surface winds or wind stress are related to the atmospheric pressure field, the appropriate stratification and baroclinic corrections should be applied. Without such corrections, errors of 15-25 percent are likely to arise in the surface fluxes computed from model low-level winds or pressure measurements.

  11. Approximate Solution of Time-Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation via Fractional Variational Iteration Method

    PubMed Central

    İbiş, Birol

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to obtain the approximate solution of time-fractional advection-dispersion equation (FADE) involving Jumarie's modification of Riemann-Liouville derivative by the fractional variational iteration method (FVIM). FVIM provides an analytical approximate solution in the form of a convergent series. Some examples are given and the results indicate that the FVIM is of high accuracy, more efficient, and more convenient for solving time FADEs. PMID:24578662

  12. Noise Prevents Infinite Stretching of the Passive Field in a Stochastic Vector Advection Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandoli, Franco; Maurelli, Mario; Neklyudov, Mikhail

    2014-09-01

    A linear stochastic vector advection equation is considered; the equation may model a passive magnetic field in a random fluid. When the driving velocity field is rough but deterministic, in particular just Hölder continuous and bounded, one can construct examples of infinite stretching of the passive field, arising from smooth initial conditions. The purpose of the paper is to prove that infinite stretching is prevented if the driving velocity field contains in addition a white noise component.

  13. Multiphase Advection and Radiation Diffusion with Material Interfaces on Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-10-03

    A collection of numerical methods are presented for the advection or remapping of material properties on unstructured and staggered polyhedral meshes in arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian calculations. The methods include several new procedures to track and capture sharp interface boundaries, and to partition radiation energy into multi-material thermal states. The latter is useful for extending and applying consistently single material radiation diffusion solvers to multi-material problems.

  14. LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observation of traveling planetary waves and potential vorticity advection in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1991-02-01

    Eastward and westward traveling waves were observed by the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) during the northern winter 1978-1979. Eastward waves were prevalent in early winter and were involved in a minor Canadian warming in December 1978. A large westward traveling wave, as described by previous authors, was observed in January 1979 during a series of minor warmings. By comparing these two events, it is shown that in both cases the superposition of traveling and quasi-stationary waves led to constructive interference that was responsible for the warmings. However, there was significant asymmetry between eastward and westward traveling components. A local Eulerian analysis of potential vorticity (PV) transport indicates that adiabatic, geostrophic advection by the resolvable scales of motion explains qualitatively (but not quantitatively) the observed potential vorticity tendencies in the LIMS Northern Hemisphere winter. In particular, calculated advection explains the eastward rotation of the main vortex, intrusion of low PV air into the polar cap, and formation of high PV filaments at the vortex periphery.

  15. Interpreting layer thickness advection in terms of eddy-topography interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanyu; Köhl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef

    2014-09-01

    A parameterization for the spatial pattern of the eddy induced thickness advection parameter estimated from a dynamically consistent data assimilation procedure is presented. Values of the thickness advection parameter are predominantly negative (positive) over seamounts, and positive (negative) over the deep ocean in the southern (northern) hemisphere along strong currents; its magnitude is large at high latitudes but low in the tropical regions. Those characteristics motivate a parameterization based on the Coriolis parameter, the bottom depth and an eddy length scale. As a parameterization for an eddy streamfunction, the associated bolus velocities advect density anti-cyclonically (cyclonically) around seamounts (troughs). Although the parameterization has the same form as Holloway’s streamfunction for the Neptune effect, and is also related to eddy-topography interactions, Holloway’s streamfunction is in contrast applied to the momentum equation. The parameterization is independently confirmed by the flux-mean gradient relation from the output of a high resolution model. The effect of the proposed scheme is investigated using a channel model with idealized bottom topographies and a global ocean circulation model with realistic bottom topography. In agreement with the high resolution model, our scheme generates cold (warm) domes and cyclonic circulations over seamounts (troughs), which is consistent with the eddy movement in presence of the topographic β effect. This provides a different mechanism for eddy-topography interaction than the Neptune effect, which generates circulations of opposing sign.

  16. Reactive-Diffusive-Advective Traveling Waves in a Family of Degenerate Nonlinear Equations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Garduño, Faustino; Pérez-Velázquez, Judith

    This paper deals with the analysis of existence of traveling wave solutions (TWS) for a diffusion-degenerate (at D(0) = 0) and advection-degenerate (at h'(0) = 0) reaction-diffusion-advection (RDA) equation. Diffusion is a strictly increasing function and the reaction term generalizes the kinetic part of the Fisher-KPP equation. We consider different forms of the convection term h(u): (1)  h'(u) is constant k, (2)  h'(u) = ku with k > 0, and (3) it is a quite general form which guarantees the degeneracy in the advective term. In Case 1, we prove that the task can be reduced to that for the corresponding equation, where k = 0, and then previous results reported from the authors can be extended. For the other two cases, we use both analytical and numerical tools. The analysis we carried out is based on the restatement of searching TWS for the full RDA equation into a two-dimensional dynamical problem. This consists of searching for the conditions on the parameter values for which there exist heteroclinic trajectories of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) system in the traveling wave coordinates. Throughout the paper we obtain the dynamics by using tools coming from qualitative theory of ODE.

  17. Reactive-Diffusive-Advective Traveling Waves in a Family of Degenerate Nonlinear Equations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Garduño, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of existence of traveling wave solutions (TWS) for a diffusion-degenerate (at D(0) = 0) and advection-degenerate (at h′(0) = 0) reaction-diffusion-advection (RDA) equation. Diffusion is a strictly increasing function and the reaction term generalizes the kinetic part of the Fisher-KPP equation. We consider different forms of the convection term h(u): (1)  h′(u) is constant k, (2)  h′(u) = ku with k > 0, and (3) it is a quite general form which guarantees the degeneracy in the advective term. In Case 1, we prove that the task can be reduced to that for the corresponding equation, where k = 0, and then previous results reported from the authors can be extended. For the other two cases, we use both analytical and numerical tools. The analysis we carried out is based on the restatement of searching TWS for the full RDA equation into a two-dimensional dynamical problem. This consists of searching for the conditions on the parameter values for which there exist heteroclinic trajectories of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) system in the traveling wave coordinates. Throughout the paper we obtain the dynamics by using tools coming from qualitative theory of ODE. PMID:27689131

  18. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Weimin

    2012-07-10

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above {approx}0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Hoiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  19. Anisotropic Turbulent Advection of a Passive Vector Field: Effects of the Finite Correlation Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    The turbulent passive advection under the environment (velocity) field with finite correlation time is studied. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is investigated by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and prescribed pair correlation function. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations and depend on the relation between the exponents in the energy energy spectrum ɛ ∝ k⊥1-ξ and the dispersion law ω ∝ k⊥2-η . The corresponding anomalous exponents are associated with the critical dimensions of tensor composite operators built solely of the passive vector field itself. In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale L has a logarithmic behavior: instead of power-like corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of L. Due to the presence of the anisotropy in the model, all multiloop diagrams are equal to zero, thus this result is exact.

  20. Advection-Dominant MHD Computation for External Kinks and Edge-Localized Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Separation of temporal and spatial scales is the primary consideration for computation of macroscopic dynamics in magnetically confined plasma. Dynamic shock capturing is not needed, but nonlinear external kinks and ELMs advect large gradients near the plasma surface. Using an implicit time-advance with Galerkin projection can be problematic in these applications when advection is stronger than dissipation on the spatial scale of the mesh. The applied math community has investigated many approaches to stabilizing numerical advection. One approach is the least-squares finite element method, which has previously been applied to MHD and plasma-fluid models. Here, we adapt this technique for MHD computation with the NIMROD code, starting with the scalar dependent fields that need to have definite sign: density and temperature. Time-splitting physical diffusion maintains the original size of the algebraic systems that are solved at each time-step. Upwinding explicit terms where derivatives are discontinuous avoids overshoot error while minimizing numerical dissipation. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  1. Tracer transport by the diabatic circulation deduced from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Kiehl, J. T.; Garcia, R. R.; Grose, W.

    1986-01-01

    Nimbus-7 sensor data were used to track the diabatic circulation in the stratosphere to study the advective transport of CH4 and N2O as tracer species. Advective transport by the mean circulation was found to be a function of the temperature field and associated deviations from radiative equilibrium. A photochemical model was applied to account for the disappearance of the tracer species from the stratosphere. Comparisons between the SAMS data and modeling on the basis of the chemical loss rates of the tracers and the LIMS circulation data showed that the model predictions underestimated the resident abundances, although the global distributions and circulations exhibited a good match.

  2. Prediction of the moments in advection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann method. I. Truncation dispersion, skewness, and kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the heterogeneity in the soil structure or the nonuniformity of the velocity field on the modeled resident time distribution (RTD) and breakthrough curves is quantified by their moments. While the first moment provides the effective velocity, the second moment is related to the longitudinal dispersion coefficient (kT) in the developed Taylor regime; the third and fourth moments are characterized by their normalized values skewness (Sk) and kurtosis (Ku), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the role of the truncation corrections of the numerical scheme in kT, Sk, and Ku because of their interference with the second moment, in the form of the numerical dispersion, and in the higher-order moments, by their definition. Our symbolic procedure is based on the recently proposed extended method of moments (EMM). Originally, the EMM restores any-order physical moments of the RTD or averaged distributions assuming that the solute concentration obeys the advection-diffusion equation in multidimensional steady-state velocity field, in streamwise-periodic heterogeneous structure. In our work, the EMM is generalized to the fourth-order-accurate apparent mass-conservation equation in two- and three-dimensional duct flows. The method looks for the solution of the transport equation as the product of a long harmonic wave and a spatially periodic oscillating component; the moments of the given numerical scheme are derived from a chain of the steady-state fourth-order equations at a single cell. This mathematical technique is exemplified for the truncation terms of the two-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme, using plug and parabolic flow in straight channel and cylindrical capillary with the d2Q9 and d3Q15 discrete velocity sets as simple but illustrative examples. The derived symbolic dependencies can be readily extended for advection by another, Newtonian or non-Newtonian, flow profile in any-shape open-tabular conduits. It is

  3. Prediction of the moments in advection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann method. I. Truncation dispersion, skewness, and kurtosis.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the heterogeneity in the soil structure or the nonuniformity of the velocity field on the modeled resident time distribution (RTD) and breakthrough curves is quantified by their moments. While the first moment provides the effective velocity, the second moment is related to the longitudinal dispersion coefficient (k_{T}) in the developed Taylor regime; the third and fourth moments are characterized by their normalized values skewness (Sk) and kurtosis (Ku), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the role of the truncation corrections of the numerical scheme in k_{T}, Sk, and Ku because of their interference with the second moment, in the form of the numerical dispersion, and in the higher-order moments, by their definition. Our symbolic procedure is based on the recently proposed extended method of moments (EMM). Originally, the EMM restores any-order physical moments of the RTD or averaged distributions assuming that the solute concentration obeys the advection-diffusion equation in multidimensional steady-state velocity field, in streamwise-periodic heterogeneous structure. In our work, the EMM is generalized to the fourth-order-accurate apparent mass-conservation equation in two- and three-dimensional duct flows. The method looks for the solution of the transport equation as the product of a long harmonic wave and a spatially periodic oscillating component; the moments of the given numerical scheme are derived from a chain of the steady-state fourth-order equations at a single cell. This mathematical technique is exemplified for the truncation terms of the two-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme, using plug and parabolic flow in straight channel and cylindrical capillary with the d2Q9 and d3Q15 discrete velocity sets as simple but illustrative examples. The derived symbolic dependencies can be readily extended for advection by another, Newtonian or non-Newtonian, flow profile in any-shape open-tabular conduits. It is

  4. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  5. Ballistic transport in Saturn's rings - An analytic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ejecta from impacts of micrometeoroids on Saturn's ring particles will, in most cases, remain in orbit about Saturn and eventually be reaccreted by the rings, possibly at a different radial location. The resulting mass transport has been suggested as the cause of some of the features observed in Saturn's rings. Previous attempts to model this transport have used numerical simulations which have not included the effects of the angular momentum transport coincident with mass transport. An analytical model for ballistic mass transport in Saturn's rings is developed. The model includes the effects of angular momentum advection and shows that the net material movement due to angular momentum advection is comparable to that caused by direct ballistic mass transport.

  6. Using PHREEQC to simulate solute transport in fractured bedrock.

    PubMed

    Lipson, David S; McCray, John E; Thyne, Geoffrey D

    2007-01-01

    The geochemical computer model PHREEQC can simulate solute transport in fractured bedrock aquifers that can be conceptualized as dual-porosity flow systems subject to one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport in the bedrock fractures and diffusive transport in the bedrock matrix. This article demonstrates how the physical characteristics of such flow systems can be parameterized for use in PHREEQC, it provides a method for minimizing numerical dispersion in PHREEQC simulations, and it compares PHREEQC simulations with results of an analytical solution. The simulations assumed a dual-porosity conceptual model involving advective-reactive-dispersive transport in the mobile zone (bedrock fracture) and diffusive-reactive transport in the immobile zone (bedrock matrix). The results from the PHREEQC dual-porosity transport model that uses a finite-difference approach showed excellent agreement compared with an analytical solution.

  7. Inverse Reactive Transport Simulator (Inverts): An Inverse Model for Contaminant Transport with Nonlinear Adsorption and Source Terms

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter

    2001-10-31

    A numerically based simulator was developed to assist in the interpretation of complex laboratory experiments examining transport processes of chemical and biological contaminants subject to nonlinear adsorption and/or source terms. The inversion is performed with any of three nonlinear regression methods, Marquardt-Levenberg, conjugate gradient, or quasi-Newton. The governing equations for the problem are solved by the method of finite-differences including any combination of three boundary conditions: (1) Dirichlet, (2) Neumann, and (3) Cauchy. The dispersive terms in the transport equations were solved using the second-order accurate in time and space Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advective terms were handled using a third-order in time and space, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme that damps spurious oscillations around sharp concentration fronts. The numerical algorithms were implemented in the computer code INVERTS, which runs on any standard personal computer. Apart from a comprehensive set of test problems, INVERTS was also used to model the elution of a nonradioactive tracer, {sup 185}Re, in a pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) experiment with a simulated waste glass for low-activity waste immobilization. Interpretation of the elution profile was best described with a nonlinear kinetic model for adsorption.

  8. Influence of turbulent advection on a phytoplankton ecosystem with nonuniform carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    McKiver, William J; Neufeld, Zoltán

    2009-06-01

    In this work we study a plankton ecosystem model in a turbulent flow. The plankton model we consider contains logistic growth with a spatially varying background carrying capacity and the flow dynamics are generated using the two-dimensional (2D) Navier-Stokes equations. We characterize the system in terms of a dimensionless parameter, gamma identical with TB/TF, which is the ratio of the ecosystem biological time scales TB and the flow time scales TF. We integrate this system numerically for different values of gamma until the mean plankton reaches a statistically stationary state and examine how the steady-state mean and variance of plankton depends on gamma. Overall we find that advection in the presence of a nonuniform background carrying capacity can lead to very different plankton distributions depending on the time scale ratio gamma. For small gamma the plankton distribution is very similar to the background carrying capacity field and has a mean concentration close to the mean carrying capacity. As gamma increases the plankton concentration is more influenced by the advection processes. In the largest gamma cases there is a homogenization of the plankton concentration and the mean plankton concentration approaches the harmonic mean, <1/K>(-1). We derive asymptotic approximations for the cases of small and large gamma. We also look at the dependence of the power spectra exponent, beta, on gamma where the power spectrum of plankton is proportional to k(-beta). We find that the power spectra exponent closely obeys beta=1+2/gamma as predicted by earlier studies using simple models of chaotic advection.

  9. Permeability generation and resetting of tracers during metamorphic fluid flow: implications for advection-dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ian

    Advection-dispersion fluid flow models implicitly assume that the infiltrating fluid flows through an already fluid-saturated medium. However, whether rocks contain a fluid depends on their reaction history, and whether any initial fluid escapes. The behaviour of different rocks may be illustrated using hypothetical marble compositions. Marbles with diverse chemistries (e.g. calcite + dolomite + quartz) are relatively reactive, and will generally produce a fluid during heating. By contrast, marbles with more restricted chemistries (e.g. calcite + quartz or calcite-only) may not. If the rock is not fluid bearing when fluid infiltration commences, mineralogical reactions may produce a reaction-enhanced permeability in calcite + dolomite + quartz or calcite + quartz, but not in calcite-only marbles. The permeability production controls the pattern of mineralogical, isotopic, and geochemical resetting during fluid flow. Tracers retarded behind the mineralogical fronts will probably be reset as predicted by the advection-dispersion models; however, tracers that are expected to be reset ahead of the mineralogical fronts cannot progress beyond the permeability generating reaction. In the case of very unreactive lithologies (e.g. pure calcite marbles, cherts, and quartzites), the first reaction to affect the rocks may be a metasomatic one ahead of which there is little pervasive resetting of any tracer. Centimetre-scale layering may lead to the formation of self-perpetuating fluid channels in rocks that are not fluid saturated due to the juxtaposition of reactants. Such layered rocks may show patterns of mineralogical resetting that are not predicted by advection-dispersion models. Patterns of mineralogical and isotopic resetting in marbles from a number of terrains, for example: Chillagoe, Marulan South, Reynolds Range (Australia); Adirondack Mountains, Old Woman Mountains, Notch Peak (USA); and Stephen Cross Quarry (Canada) vary as predicted by these models.

  10. Pore Water PAH Transport in Amended Sediment Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidley, P. T.; Kwon, S.; Ghosh, U.

    2009-05-01

    Capping is a common remediation strategy for contaminated sediments that creates a physical barrier between contaminated sediments and the water column. Diffusive flux of contaminants through a sediment cap is small. However, under certain hydrodynamic conditions such as groundwater potential and tidal pumping, groundwater advection can accelerate contaminant transport. Hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be transported through the cap under advective conditions. To better understand PAH migration under these conditions, physical models of sediment caps were evaluated in the laboratory through direct measurement of pore water using solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Contaminated sediment and capping material was obtained from an existing Superfund site that was capped at Eagle Harbor, Washington. A PAH dissolution model linked to an advection-dispersion equation with retardation using published organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) was compared to measured PAHs in the sediment and cap porewater of the physical model.

  11. Variational Integration for Ideal MHD with Built-in Advection Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Qin, Hong; Burby, J. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-08-05

    Newcomb's Lagrangian for ideal MHD in Lagrangian labeling is discretized using discrete exterior calculus. Variational integrators for ideal MHD are derived thereafter. Besides being symplectic and momentum preserving, the schemes inherit built-in advection equations from Newcomb's formulation, and therefore avoid solving them and the accompanying error and dissipation. We implement the method in 2D and show that numerical reconnection does not take place when singular current sheets are present. We then apply it to studying the dynamics of the ideal coalescence instability with multiple islands. The relaxed equilibrium state with embedded current sheets is obtained numerically.

  12. Observations of the microclimate of a lake under cold air advective conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. G., Jr.; Sutherland, R. A.; Bartholic, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    The moderating effects of Lake Apopka, Florida, on downwind surface temperatures were evaluated under cold air advective conditions. Point temperature measurements north and south of the lake and data obtained from the NOAA satellite and a thermal scanner flown at 1.6 km, indicate that, under conditions of moderate winds (approximately 4m/sec), surface temperatures directly downwind may be higher than surrounding surface temperatures by as much as 5 C. With surface wind speed less than 1m/sec, no substantial temperature effects were observed. Results of this study are being used in land use planning, lake level control and in agriculture for selecting planting sites.

  13. Multigrid techniques for the solution of the passive scalar advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. E.; Schmidt, F. W.

    1985-01-01

    The solution of elliptic passive scalar advection-diffusion equations is required in the analysis of many turbulent flow and convective heat transfer problems. The accuracy of the solution may be affected by the presence of regions containing large gradients of the dependent variables. The multigrid concept of local grid refinement is a method for improving the accuracy of the calculations in these problems. In combination with the multilevel acceleration techniques, an accurate and efficient computational procedure is developed. In addition, a robust implementation of the QUICK finite-difference scheme is described. Calculations of a test problem are presented to quantitatively demonstrate the advantages of the multilevel-multigrid method.

  14. Preconditioned iterative methods for space-time fractional advection-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi; Jin, Xiao-Qing; Lin, Matthew M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose practical numerical methods for solving a class of initial-boundary value problems of space-time fractional advection-diffusion equations. First, we propose an implicit method based on two-sided Grünwald formulae and discuss its stability and consistency. Then, we develop the preconditioned generalized minimal residual (preconditioned GMRES) method and preconditioned conjugate gradient normal residual (preconditioned CGNR) method with easily constructed preconditioners. Importantly, because resulting systems are Toeplitz-like, fast Fourier transform can be applied to significantly reduce the computational cost. We perform numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficiency of our preconditioners, even in cases with variable coefficients.

  15. Reformulations for general advection-diffusion-reaction equations and locally implicit ADER schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, Gino I.; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2014-10-01

    Following Cattaneo's original idea, in this article we first present two relaxation formulations for time-dependent, non-linear systems of advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Such formulations yield time-dependent non-linear hyperbolic balance laws with stiff source terms. Then we present a locally implicit version of the ADER method to solve these stiff systems to high accuracy. The new ingredient of the numerical methodology is a locally implicit solution of the generalised Riemann problem. We illustrate the formulations and the resulting numerical approach by solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. Design and analysis of ADER-type schemes for model advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busto, S.; Toro, E. F.; Vázquez-Cendón, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    We construct, analyze and assess various schemes of second order of accuracy in space and time for model advection-diffusion-reaction differential equations. The constructed schemes are meant to be of practical use in solving industrial problems and are derived following two related approaches, namely ADER and MUSCL-Hancock. Detailed analysis of linear stability and local truncation error are carried out. In addition, the schemes are implemented and assessed for various test problems. Empirical convergence rate studies confirm the theoretically expected accuracy in both space and time.

  17. Hygroscopic chemicals and the formation of advection warm fog: A numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of advection fog is closely associated with the characteristics of the aerosol particles, including the chemical composition, mass of the nuclei, particle size, and concentration. Both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution.

  18. Fundamental emission via wave advection from a collapsing wave packet in electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jenet, F. A.; Melatos, A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-10-15

    Zakharov simulations of nonlinear wave collapse in continuously driven two-dimensional, electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence with electron thermal speeds v{>=}0.01c show that for v < or approx. 0.1c, dipole radiation occurs near the plasma frequency, mainly near arrest, but for v > or approx. 0.1c, a new mechanism applies in which energy oscillates between trapped Langmuir and transverse modes until collapse is arrested, after which trapped transverse waves are advected into incoherent interpacket turbulence by an expanding annular density well, where they detrap. The multipole structure, Poynting flux, source current, and radiation angular momentum are computed.

  19. A field study of air flow and turbulent features of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The setup and initial operation of a set of specialized meteorological data collection hardware are described. To study the life cycle of advection fogs at a lake test site, turbulence levels in the fog are identified, and correlated with the temperature gradients and mean wind profiles. A meteorological tower was instrumented to allow multiple-level measurements of wind and temperature on a continuous basis. Additional instrumentation was: (1)hydrothermograph, (2)microbarograph, (3)transmissometers, and (4)a boundary layer profiler. Two types of fogs were identified, and important differences in the turbulence scales were noted.

  20. Variational integration for ideal magnetohydrodynamics with built-in advection equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Burby, J. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Qin, Hong

    2014-10-15

    Newcomb's Lagrangian for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Lagrangian labeling is discretized using discrete exterior calculus. Variational integrators for ideal MHD are derived thereafter. Besides being symplectic and momentum-preserving, the schemes inherit built-in advection equations from Newcomb's formulation, and therefore avoid solving them and the accompanying error and dissipation. We implement the method in 2D and show that numerical reconnection does not take place when singular current sheets are present. We then apply it to studying the dynamics of the ideal coalescence instability with multiple islands. The relaxed equilibrium state with embedded current sheets is obtained numerically.

  1. Computation of traveling wave fronts for a nonlinear diffusion-advection model.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M B A

    2009-01-01

    This paper utilizes a nonlinear reaction-diffusion-advection model for describing the spatiotemporal evolution of bacterial growth. The traveling wave solutions of the corresponding system of partial differential equations are analyzed. Using two methods, we then find such solutions numerically. One of the methods involves the traveling wave equations and solving an initial-value problem, which leads to accurate computations of the wave profiles and speeds. The second method is to construct time-dependent solutions by solving an initial-moving boundary-value problem for the PDE system, showing another approximation for such wave solutions.

  2. Advection of sulfur dioxide over the western Atlantic Ocean during CITE 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. C.; Bandy, A. R.; Beltz, N.; Driedger, A. R., III; Ferek, R.

    1993-01-01

    During the NASA Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation 3 sulfur intercomparison over the western Atlantic Ocean, five techniques for the determination of sulfur dioxide were evaluated. The response times of the techniques varied from 3 to 30 min. Based on the ensemble of measurements reported, it was clear that advection of SO2 from the North American continent occurred in the boundary layer (altitude less than 1 km) with only one exception. The vertical distribution of SO2 above the boundary layer for the northern and southern Atlantic Ocean was remarkably similar duing this experiment.

  3. On a free boundary problem for a reaction-diffusion-advection logistic model in heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monobe, Harunori; Wu, Chang-Hong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate a reaction-diffusion-advection equation with a free boundary which models the spreading of an invasive species in one-dimensional heterogeneous environments. We assume that the species has a tendency to move upward along the resource gradient in addition to random dispersal, and the spreading mechanism of species is determined by a Stefan-type condition. Investigating the sign of the principal eigenvalue of the associated linearized eigenvalue problem, under certain conditions we obtain the sharp criteria for spreading and vanishing via system parameters. Also, we establish the long-time behavior of the solution and the asymptotic spreading speed. Finally, some biological implications are discussed.

  4. Shifted Feedback Suppression of Turbulent Behavior in Advection-Diffusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evain, C.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Couprie, M.-E.; Hosaka, M.; Mochihashi, A.; Katoh, M.

    2009-04-03

    In spatiotemporal systems with advection, suppression of noise-sustained structures involves questions that are outside of the framework of deterministic dynamical systems control (such as Ott-Grebogi-Yorke-type methods). Here we propose and test an alternate strategy where a nonlocal additive feedback is applied, with the objective to create a new deterministic solution that becomes robust to noise. As a remarkable fact - though the needed parameter perturbations required have essentially a finite size - they turn out to be extraordinarily small in principle: 10{sup -8} in the free-electron laser experiment presented here.

  5. Asymptotic analysis of reaction-diffusion-advection problems: Fronts with periodic motion and blow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, Nikolay

    2017-02-01

    This is an extended variant of the paper presented at MURPHYS-HSFS 2016 conference in Barcelona. We discuss further development of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities to investigate existence and stability of sharp internal layers (fronts) for nonlinear singularly perturbed periodic parabolic problems and initial boundary value problems with blow-up of fronts for reaction-diffusion-advection equations. In particular, we consider periodic solutions with internal layer in the case of balanced reaction. For the initial boundary value problems we prove the existence of fronts and give their asymptotic approximation including the new case of blowing-up fronts. This case we illustrate by the generalised Burgers equation.

  6. Escarpment evolution on high-elevation rifted margins: Insights derived from a surface processes model that combines diffusion, advection and reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Experiments with a surface processes model of large-scale (1-1000 km) long-term (1-100 m.y.) erosional denudation are used to establish the controls on the evolution of a model escarpment that is related to the rifting of a continent. The mdoel describes changes in topographic form as a result of sumultaneous short- and long-range mass transport representing hillslope (diffusive) processes and fluvial transport (advection), repsectively. Fluvial entrainment is modeled as a first-order kinetic reaction which reflects the erodibility of the substrate, and therefore the fluvial system is not necessarily carrying at capacity. One dimensional and planform models demonstrate that the principal controls on the evolution of an initially steep model escarpment are (1) antecedent topography/drainage; (2) the timesale (or equivalently a length scale) in the fluvial entrainment reaction; (3) the flexural response of the lithosphere to denudation; and (4) the relative efficiencies of the short- and long-range transport processes. When rainfall and substrate lithology are uniform, a significant amount of discharge draining over the escarpment top causes it to degrade. Only when the top of the model escarpment coincides with a drainage divide can escarpment retreat occur for these conditions. An additional requirement for retreat of a model escarpment without decline is a long reaction time scale for fluvial entrainment. This corresponds to a substrate that is hard to detach by flucial erosion, and therefore to fluvial erosion that is not transport limited. Coninuous backtilting of an escarpment due ot flexural isostatic uplift in response to denudational unloading helps maintain the scarp top as a divide. It is essntial if the escarpment gradient is to be preserved during retreat in a uniform lithology. Low flexural rigidieties propote steep and slowly retreating escarpments. For given rainfall and substrate conditions, the morphology of a retraeating model escarpment is

  7. A new multidimensional, energy-dependent two-moment transport code for neutrino-hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, O.; Obergaulinger, M.; Janka, H.-T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the new code ALCAR developed to model multidimensional, multienergy-group neutrino transport in the context of supernovae and neutron-star mergers. The algorithm solves the evolution equations of the zeroth- and first-order angular moments of the specific intensity, supplemented by an algebraic relation for the second-moment tensor to close the system. The scheme takes into account frame-dependent effects of the order O(v/c) as well as the most important types of neutrino interactions. The transport scheme is significantly more efficient than a multidimensional solver of the Boltzmann equation, while it is more accurate and consistent than the flux-limited diffusion method. The finite-volume discretization of the essentially hyperbolic system of moment equations employs methods well-known from hydrodynamics. For the time integration of the potentially stiff moment equations we employ a scheme in which only the local source terms are treated implicitly, while the advection terms are kept explicit, thereby allowing for an efficient computational parallelization of the algorithm. We investigate various problem set-ups in one and two dimensions to verify the implementation and to test the quality of the algebraic closure scheme. In our most detailed test, we compare a fully dynamic, one-dimensional core-collapse simulation with two published calculations performed with well-known Boltzmann-type neutrino-hydrodynamics codes and we find very satisfactory agreement.

  8. AN ALGORITHM FOR RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS BASED ON SOLVING THE TIME-DEPENDENT TRANSFER EQUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a new algorithm for solving the coupled frequency-integrated transfer equation and the equations of magnetohydrodynamics in the regime that light-crossing time is only marginally shorter than dynamical timescales. The transfer equation is solved in the mixed frame, including velocity-dependent source terms accurate to O(v/c). An operator split approach is used to compute the specific intensity along discrete rays, with upwind monotonic interpolation used along each ray to update the transport terms, and implicit methods used to compute the scattering and absorption source terms. Conservative differencing is used for the transport terms, which ensures the specific intensity (as well as energy and momentum) are conserved along each ray to round-off error. The use of implicit methods for the source terms ensures the method is stable even if the source terms are very stiff. To couple the solution of the transfer equation to the MHD algorithms in the ATHENA code, we perform direct quadrature of the specific intensity over angles to compute the energy and momentum source terms. We present the results of a variety of tests of the method, such as calculating the structure of a non-LTE atmosphere, an advective diffusion test, linear wave convergence tests, and the well-known shadow test. We use new semi-analytic solutions for radiation modified shocks to demonstrate the ability of our algorithm to capture the effects of an anisotropic radiation field accurately. Since the method uses explicit differencing of the spatial operators, it shows excellent weak scaling on parallel computers.

  9. The effect of forcing on the spatial structure and spectra of chaotically advected passive scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Zoltán; Haynes, Peter H.; Picard, Guillemette

    2000-10-01

    The stationary distribution of passive tracers chaotically advected by a two-dimensional large-scale flow is investigated. The value of the tracer is conserved following each fluid element except when the element enters certain localized regions. The tracer value is then instantenously reset to a value associated with the region entered. This resetting acts as a forcing for the tracer field. This problem is mathematically equivalent to advection in open flows and results in a fractal tracer structure. The spectral exponent of the tracer field is different from that for a passive tracer with the usual additive forcing (the so-called Batchelor spectrum) and is related to the fractal dimension of the set of points that have never visited the forcing regions. We illustrate this behavior by considering a time-periodic flow whose effect is equivalent to a simple two-dimensional area-preserving map. We also show that similar structure in the tracer field is found when the flow is aperiodic in time.

  10. Effects of local advection on the spatial sensible heat flux variation on a mountain glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Tobias; Galos, Stephan Peter

    2016-11-01

    Distributed mass balance models, which translate micrometeorological conditions into local melt rates, have proven deficient to reflect the energy flux variability on mountain glaciers. This deficiency is predominantly related to shortcomings in the representation of local processes in the forcing data. We found by means of idealized large-eddy simulations that heat advection, associated with local wind systems, causes small-scale sensible heat flux variations by up to 100 Wm-2 during clear sky conditions. Here we show that process understanding at a few observation sites is insufficient to infer the wind and temperature distributions across the glacier. The glacier-wide hourly averaged sensible heat fluxes are both over- and underestimated by up to 16 Wm-2 when using extrapolated temperature and wind fields. The sign and magnitude of the differences depend on the site selection, which is used for extrapolation as well as on the large-scale flow direction. Our results demonstrate how the shortcomings in the local sensible heat flux estimates are related to topographic effects and the insufficient characterization of the temperature advection process.

  11. Evaluation of advection-aridity complementary relations at the lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    A common view of evaporation from terrestrial surfaces considers limitations due to water supply in arid regions, and atmospheric demand (or energy) limitations to evaporation from wet surfaces in temperate regions. Evidence suggests that at large scales, energy and water limitations are not independent. While a surface dries and a larger fraction of the radiative energy is converted into sensible heat, that heat is injected into the air and altering its properties. This land-atmosphere feedback gives rise to the so-called complementary relationship (Bouchet 1963), referring to the simultaneous decrease in actual evaporation while potential evaporation increases as the surface dries. The effect of surface drying on atmospheric water demand is two-fold: an increase in air temperature and a decrease in water vapour content for fixed advective exchange rate across the system boundaries. To isolate the various mechanisms and improve understanding of the feedbacks, we designed an insulated wind tunnel, where wind speed, radiation, surface moisture and exchange rates of air and heat across the boundaries are controlled. Preliminary results show the magnitude of the feedbacks in terms of air and surface temperatures, and evaporation rates from drying and wet surfaces simultaneously. Experimental and associated simulation results provide a direct demonstration of the roles of advective exchange and the interplay between atmospheric boundary layer thickness and temporal variations in radiative energy input in determining the strength of surface-atmosphere feedbacks and the resulting phenomenon known as the complementary relationship.

  12. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer.

    DOE PAGES

    Solis, Kyle Jameson; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length, and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one wouldmore » expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range, to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.« less

  13. On the Offshore Advection of Boundary-Layer Structures and the Influence on Offshore Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörenkämper, Martin; Optis, Michael; Monahan, Adam; Steinfeld, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    The coastal discontinuity imposes strong signals to the atmospheric conditions over the sea that are important for wind-energy potential. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation of the influence of the land-sea transition on wind conditions in the Baltic Sea using data from an offshore meteorological tower, data from a wind farm, and mesoscale model simulations. Results show a strong induced stable stratification when warm inland air flows over a colder sea. This stratification demonstrates a strong diurnal pattern and is most pronounced in spring when the land-sea temperature difference is greatest. The strength of the induced stratification is proportional to this parameter and inversely proportional to fetch. Extended periods of stable stratification lead to increased influence of inertial oscillations and increased frequency of low-level jets. Furthermore, heterogeneity in land-surface roughness along the coastline is found to produce pronounced horizontal streaks of reduced wind speeds that under stable stratification are advected several tens of kilometres over the sea. The intensity and length of the streaks dampen as atmospheric stability decreases. Increasing sea surface roughness leads to a deformation of these streaks with increasing fetch. Slight changes in wind direction shift the path of these advective streaks, which when passing through an offshore wind farm are found to produce large fluctuations in wind power. Implications of these coastline effects on the accurate modelling and forecasting of offshore wind conditions, as well as damage risk to the turbine, are discussed.

  14. Optimizing meridional advection of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) dynamics for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.-L.

    2015-05-01

    The most widely used community weather forecast and research model in the world is the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Two distinct varieties of WRF exist. The one we are interested is the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) is an experimental, advanced research version featuring very high resolution. The WRF Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) has been designed for forecasting operations. WRF consists of dynamics code and several physics modules. The WRF-ARW core is based on an Eulerian solver for the fully compressible nonhydrostatic equations. In the paper, we optimize a meridional (north-south direction) advection subroutine for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Advection is of the most time consuming routines in the ARW dynamics core. It advances the explicit perturbation horizontal momentum equations by adding in the large-timestep tendency along with the small timestep pressure gradient tendency. We will describe the challenges we met during the development of a high-speed dynamics code subroutine for MIC architecture. Furthermore, lessons learned from the code optimization process will be discussed. The results show that the optimizations improved performance of the original code on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 1.2x.

  15. Impact of Ridge Induced Latent Heat Advection on Sea Ice Global Heat Budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E.; Gosselin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The effects of permeability on ice keel induced latent heat fluxes are examined using pressure ridge density statistics computed from SAR images and a prognostic simulation of forced brine advection through the bottom ice layer. Under pressure gradients generated in the wake of an ice keel sea water is pushed into and brine pumped out of the bottom ice layer. This in turn causes a new thermodynamic equilibrium to be reached. At spring when the ice permeability increases, brine export combined with sea water import translates into an advective heat flow that is balanced by the latent heat absorbed by volume melting of brine channel walls. Sea ice within the sheltered areas behind keels is modelled as an anisotropic heteregeneous mushy layer. The non-linear equation system within each cell is implemented on a finite volume grid and include volume melt of the brine channels from which porosity, water density, temperature and salinity are computed. Outputs from these simulations are then combined with ridge distribution statistics to evaluate the global impact of latent heat absorbed due to volume melting in the wake of ridges. As anticipated, results are highly dependent on permeability, nevertheless, they show that pressure ridge induced melting within the ice is a significant component of the heat budget when compared with melting at the ice water interface. This work underlines needs for further researches to improve our understanding of ice permeability changes during the melt season, it also calls for better tools to extract pressure ridge characteristics from satellite images.

  16. Effect of advection on variations in zooplankton at a single location near Cabo Nazca, Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S L; Brink, K H; Santander, H; Cowles, T J; Huyer, A

    1980-04-01

    Temporal variations in the biomass and species composition of zooplankton at a single midshelf station in an upwelling area off Peru can be explained to a large extent by onshore-offshore advection in the upper 20 m of the water column. During periods of strong or sustained near-surface onshore flow, peaks in biomass of zooplankton were observed at midshelf and typically oceanic species of copepod were collected. In periods of offshore flow at the surface, a copepod capable of migrating into oxygen-depleted layers deeper than 30 m was collected. A simple translocation model of advection applied to the cross-shelf distribution of Paracalanus parvus suggests that the fluctuations in P. pavus observed in the midshelf time-series were closely related to onshore-offshore flow in the upper 20 m. Fluctuations in abundance of the numerically dominant copepod, Acartia tonsa, were apparently affected by near surface flow also. The population age-structure suggests that A. tonsa was growing at maximal rates, due in part to its positive feeding response to the dinoflagellate/diatom assemblage of phytoplankton.

  17. A Hybrid Advection Scheme for Conserving Angular Momentum on a Refined Cartesian Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, Zachary D.; Adelstein-Lelbach, Bryce; Tohline, Joel E.; Marcello, Dominic C.

    2014-06-01

    We test a new "hybrid" scheme for simulating dynamical fluid flows in which cylindrical components of the momentum are advected across a rotating Cartesian coordinate mesh. This hybrid scheme allows us to conserve angular momentum to machine precision while capitalizing on the advantages offered by a Cartesian mesh, such as a straightforward implementation of mesh refinement. Our test focuses on measuring the real and imaginary parts of the eigenfrequency of unstable nonaxisymmetric modes that naturally arise in massless polytropic tori having a range of different aspect ratios and on quantifying the uncertainty in these measurements. Our measured eigenfrequencies show good agreement with the results obtained from the linear stability analysis of Kojima and from nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations performed on a cylindrical coordinate mesh by Woodward et al. When compared against results conducted with a traditional Cartesian advection scheme, the hybrid scheme achieves qualitative convergence at the same or, in some cases, much lower grid resolutions and conserves angular momentum to a much higher degree of precision. As a result, this hybrid scheme is much better suited for simulating astrophysical fluid flows such as accretion disks and mass-transferring binary systems.

  18. The orientation field of fibers advected by a two-dimensional chaotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, Bardia; Mehlig, Bernhard; Voth, Greg

    2016-11-01

    We examine the orientation of slender fibers advected by a 2D chaotic flow. The orientation field of these fibers show fascinating structures called scar lines, where they rotate by π over short distances. We use the standard map as a convenient model to represent a time-periodic 2D incompressible fluid flow. To understand the fiber orientation field, we consider the stretching field, given by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Cauchy-Green strain tensors. The eigenvector field is strongly aligned with the fibers over almost the entire field, but develops topological singularities at certain points which do not exist in the advected fiber field. The singularities are points that have experienced zero stretching, and the number of such points increases rapidly with time. A key feature of both the fiber orientation and the eigenvector field are the scar lines. We show that certain scar lines form from fluid elements that are initially stretched in one direction and then stretched in an orthogonal direction to cancel the initial stretching. The scar lines that satisfy this condition contain the singularities of the eigenvector field. These scar lines highlight the major differences between the passive director field and the much more widely studied passive scalar field.

  19. Krylov single-step implicit integration factor WENO methods for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian; Zhang, Yong-Tao

    2016-04-01

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) methods were developed in the literature for solving time-dependent stiff partial differential equations (PDEs). Recently, IIF methods were combined with weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes in Jiang and Zhang (2013) [19] to efficiently solve stiff nonlinear advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The methods can be designed for arbitrary order of accuracy. The stiffness of the system is resolved well and the methods are stable by using time step sizes which are just determined by the non-stiff hyperbolic part of the system. To efficiently calculate large matrix exponentials, Krylov subspace approximation is directly applied to the implicit integration factor (IIF) methods. So far, the IIF methods developed in the literature are multistep methods. In this paper, we develop Krylov single-step IIF-WENO methods for solving stiff advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The methods are designed carefully to avoid generating positive exponentials in the matrix exponentials, which is necessary for the stability of the schemes. We analyze the stability and truncation errors of the single-step IIF schemes. Numerical examples of both scalar equations and systems are shown to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the new methods.

  20. Krylov implicit integration factor WENO methods for semilinear and fully nonlinear advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian; Zhang, Yong-Tao

    2013-11-01

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) methods are originally a class of efficient “exactly linear part” time discretization methods for solving time-dependent partial differential equations (PDEs) with linear high order terms and stiff lower order nonlinear terms. For complex systems (e.g. advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) systems), the highest order derivative term can be nonlinear, and nonlinear nonstiff terms and nonlinear stiff terms are often mixed together. High order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) methods are often used to discretize the hyperbolic part in ADR systems. There are two open problems on IIF methods for solving ADR systems: (1) how to obtain higher than the second order global time discretization accuracy; (2) how to design IIF methods for solving fully nonlinear PDEs, i.e., the highest order terms are nonlinear. In this paper, we solve these two problems by developing new Krylov IIF-WENO methods to deal with both semilinear and fully nonlinear advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The methods can be designed for arbitrary order of accuracy. The stiffness of the system is resolved well and the methods are stable by using time step sizes which are just determined by the nonstiff hyperbolic part of the system. Large time step size computations are obtained. We analyze the stability and truncation errors of the schemes. Numerical examples of both scalar equations and systems in two and three spatial dimensions are shown to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the methods.

  1. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Kyle Jameson; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length, and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one would expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range, to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.

  2. Low-Dissipation Advection Schemes Designed for Large Eddy Simulations of Hypersonic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Jeffrey A.; Baurle, Robert A.; Fisher, Travis C.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Black, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The 2nd-order upwind inviscid flux scheme implemented in the multi-block, structured grid, cell centered, finite volume, high-speed reacting flow code VULCAN has been modified to reduce numerical dissipation. This modification was motivated by the desire to improve the codes ability to perform large eddy simulations. The reduction in dissipation was accomplished through a hybridization of non-dissipative and dissipative discontinuity-capturing advection schemes that reduces numerical dissipation while maintaining the ability to capture shocks. A methodology for constructing hybrid-advection schemes that blends nondissipative fluxes consisting of linear combinations of divergence and product rule forms discretized using 4th-order symmetric operators, with dissipative, 3rd or 4th-order reconstruction based upwind flux schemes was developed and implemented. A series of benchmark problems with increasing spatial and fluid dynamical complexity were utilized to examine the ability of the candidate schemes to resolve and propagate structures typical of turbulent flow, their discontinuity capturing capability and their robustness. A realistic geometry typical of a high-speed propulsion system flowpath was computed using the most promising of the examined schemes and was compared with available experimental data to demonstrate simulation fidelity.

  3. Tidal Mixing and Buoyancy Advection: Joint Influences on Lobster Distribution in Coastal Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) flows southwestward from the mouth of the Bay of Fundy to Penobscot Bay on the central Maine coast. Maximum non-tidal surface speeds reach 20-30 cm/s about 20 km offshore during April-May when the outflow from the Saint John River is strongest. Vigorous tides cause strong vertical and horizontal mixing, so that dispersal of neutral particles is influenced both by advection and tidal mixing. To survive, planktonic lobsters carried southwestward in the surface flow must settle to a nearshore cobble substrate. Larvae hatched near the Bay of Fundy can be advected to the central coast in 2-3 weeks, roughly the time needed to reach settlement stage. Over the same period, transverse tidal mixing is sufficient to raise nearshore larval concentrations to about half that offshore in the axis of the EMCC. Both processes may be necessary to explain the observed lobster distribution, which exhibits a distinct maximum in the central coastal region. The seasonal development of the EMCC is also influenced by winds and the larger circulation of the Gulf of Maine. This work is part of a multidisciplinary synthesis study funded by the NOAA Coastal Ocean Program.

  4. Striped pattern selection by advective reaction-diffusion systems: Resilience of banded vegetation on slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siero, E.; Doelman, A.; Eppinga, M. B.; Rademacher, J. D. M.; Rietkerk, M.; Siteur, K.

    2015-03-01

    For water-limited arid ecosystems, where water distribution and infiltration play a vital role, various models have been set up to explain vegetation patterning. On sloped terrains, vegetation aligned in bands has been observed ubiquitously. In this paper, we consider the appearance, stability, and bifurcations of 2D striped or banded patterns in an arid ecosystem model. We numerically show that the resilience of the vegetation bands is larger on steeper slopes by computing the stability regions (Busse balloons) of striped patterns with respect to 1D and transverse 2D perturbations. This is corroborated by numerical simulations with a slowly decreasing water input parameter. Here, long wavelength striped patterns are unstable against transverse perturbations, which we also rigorously prove on flat ground through an Evans function approach. In addition, we prove a "Squire theorem" for a class of two-component reaction-advection-diffusion systems that includes our model, showing that the onset of pattern formation in 2D is due to 1D instabilities in the direction of advection, which naturally leads to striped patterns.

  5. Modelling sensitivities to mixing and advection in a sill-basin estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontiens, Nancy; Allen, Susan E.

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of a high resolution regional ocean model to several choices in mixing and advection. The oceanographic process examined is a deep water renewal event in the Juan de Fuca Strait-Strait of Georgia sill-basin estuarine system located on the west coast of North America. Previous observational work has shown that the timing of the renewal events is linked to the spring/neap tidal cycle, and in turn, is sensitive to the amount of vertical mixing induced by tidal currents interacting with sills and complicated bathymetry. It is found that the model's representation of deep water renewal is relatively insensitive to several mixing choices, including the vertical turbulence closure and direction of lateral mixing. No significant difference in deep or intermediate salinity was found between cases that used k - ɛ versus k - ω closures and isoneutral versus horizontal lateral mixing. Modifications that had a stronger effect included those that involved advection such as modifying the salinity of the open boundary conditions which supply the source waters for the renewal event. The strongest impact came from the removal of the Hollingsworth instability, a kinetic energy sink in the energy-enstrophy discretization of the momentum equations. A marked improvement to the salinity of the deep water renewal suggests that the removal of the Hollingsworth instability will correct a fresh drift in the deep and intermediate waters in an operational version of this model.

  6. Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Williams, C.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes several new quantum algorithms. These include a polynomial time algorithm that uses a quantum fast Fourier transform to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian operator, and that can be applied in cases for which all know classical algorithms require exponential time.

  7. Maximum Principles and Application to the Analysis of An Explicit Time Marching Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeTallec, Patrick; Tidriri, Moulay D.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we develop local and global estimates for the solution of convection-diffusion problems. We then study the convergence properties of a Time Marching Algorithm solving Advection-Diffusion problems on two domains using incompatible discretizations. This study is based on a De-Giorgi-Nash maximum principle.

  8. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  9. A Stratospheric Mixing and Transport Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparling, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    The mixing and transport of stratospheric chemical species occurs by a variety of physical mechanisms on a range of length and time scales. Slow vertical diffusion resembles Taylor diffusion in pipe flow, while rapid stirring by chaotic advection is essentially a "baker's transformation", via the stretching and folding of material lines in the flow. Other examples include global scale transport by large organized flow structures, such as the winter stratospheric "eggbeater" that brings tropical air to the north pole. This presentation is a survey of these different mixing and transport phenomena and how we see their signatures in observations of chemical tracers.

  10. LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observation of traveling planetary waves and potential vorticity advection in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkerton, T.J. )

    1991-02-20

    Eastward and westward traveling waves were observed by the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) during the northern winter 1978-1979. Eastward waves were prevalent in early winter and were involved in a minor Canadian warming in December 1978. A large westward traveling wave, as described by previous authors, was observed in January 1979 during a series of minor warmings. By comparing these two events, it is shown that in both cases the superposition of traveling and quasi-stationary waves led to constructive interference that was responsible for the warmings. However, there was significant asymmetry between eastward and westward traveling components. Eastward disturbances were confined mostly within the polar vortex, whereas quasi-stationary and westward traveling components propagated to the vortex periphery and beyond, into the tropics and mid-latitude mesosphere. This behavior is consistent with Rossby wave propagation and indicates that the location and magnitude of planetary wave breaking is sensitive to the frequency spectrum entering the middle atmosphere. However, this asymmetry is also a signature of the nonlinear critical layer as it projects onto the frequency spectrum. Both interpretations are shown to be valid during wave events observed by LIMS. A local Eulerian analysis of potential vorticity (PV) transport indicates that adiabatic, geostrophic advection by the resolvable scales of motion explains qualitatively (but not quantitatively) the observed potential vorticity tendencies in the LIMS northern hemisphere winter. In particular, calculated advection explains the eastward rotation of the main vortex, intrusion of low PV air into the polar cap, and formation of high PV filaments at the vortex periphery.

  11. North Atlantic Surface Winds Examined as the Source of Warm Advection into Europe in Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Angell, J. K.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, Robert; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Wu, M.-L.

    2002-01-01

    When from the southwest, North Atlantic ocean surface winds are known to bring warm and moist airmasses into central Europe in winter. By tracing backward trajectories from western Europe, we establish that these airmasses originate in the southwestern North Atlantic, in the very warm regions of the Gulf Stream. Over the eastern North Atlantic, Lt the gateway to Europe, the ocean-surface winds changed directions in the second half of the XXth century, those from the northwest and from the southeast becoming so infrequent, that the direction from the southwest became even more dominant. For the January-to-March period, the strength of south-westerlies in this region, as well as in the source region, shows in the years 1948-1995 a significant increase, above 0.2 m/sec/ decade. Based on the sensitivity of the surface temperature in Europe, slightly more than 1 C for a 1m/sec increase in the southwesterly wind, found in the previous studies, the trend in the warm advection accounts for a large part of the warming in Europe established for this period in several reports. However, for the most recent years, 1996-2001, the positive trend in the southwesterly advection appears to be is broken, which is consistent with unseasonally cold events reported in Europe in those winters. This study had, some bearing on evaluating the respective roles of the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Greenhouse Gas Global warming, GGG, in the strong winter warming observed for about half a century over the northern-latitude continents. Changes in the ocean-surface temperatures induced by GGG may have produced the dominant southwesterly direction of the North Atlantic winds. However, this implies a monotonically (apart from inherent interannual variability) increasing advection, and if the break in the trend which we observe after 1995 persists, this mechanism is counter-indicated. The 1948-1995 trend in the south-westerlies could then be considered to a large degree attributable to the

  12. Advection from the North Atlantic as the Forcing of Winter Greenhouse Effect Over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Angell, J.; Atlas, R.; Bungato, D.; Shubert, S.; Starr, David OC.; Susskind, J.; Wu, M.-L. C.

    2002-01-01

    In winter, large interannual fluctuations in the surface temperature are observed over central Europe. Comparing warm February 1990 with cold February 1996, a satellite-retrieved surface (skin) temperature difference of 9.8 K is observed for the region 50-60 degrees N; 5-35 degrees E. Previous studies show that advection from the North Atlantic constitutes the forcing to such fluctuations. The advection is quantified by Index I(sub na), the average of the ocean-surface wind speed over the eastern North Atlantic when the direction is from the southwest (when the wind is from another direction, it counts as a zero speed to the average). Average I(sub na) for February 1990 was 10.6 m/s, but for February 1996 I(sub na) was only 2.4 m/s. A large value of I(sub na) means a strong southwesterly flow which brings warm and moist air into central Europe at low level, producing a steeper tropospheric lapse rate. Strong ascending motions at 700 mb are observed in association with the occurrence of enhanced warm, moist advection from the ocean in February 1990 producing clouds and precipitation. Total precipitable water and cloud-cover fraction have larger values in February 1990 than in 1996. The difference in the greenhouse effect between these two scenarios, this reduction in heat loss to space, can be translated into a virtual radiative heating of 2.6 W/square m above the February 1990 surface/atmosphere system, which contributes to a warming of the surface on the order of 2.6 K. Accepting this estimate as quantitatively meaningful, we evaluate the direct effect, the rise in the surface temperature in Europe as a result of maritime-air inflow, as 7.2 K (9.8 K-2.6 K). Thus, fractional reinforcement by the greenhouse effect is 2.6/7.2, or 36%, a substantial positive feedback.

  13. Helical turbulent Prandtl number in the A model of passive vector advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatič, M.; Zalom, P.

    2016-11-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation, turbulent Prandtl numbers are obtained in the general A model of passive vector advected by fully developed turbulent velocity field with violation of spatial parity introduced via the continuous parameter ρ ranging from ρ =0 (no violation of spatial parity) to |ρ |=1 (maximum violation of spatial parity). Values of A represent a continuously adjustable parameter which governs the interaction structure of the model. In nonhelical environments, we demonstrate that A is restricted to the interval -1.723 ≤A ≤2.800 (rounded to 3 decimal places) in the two-loop order of the field theoretic model. However, when ρ >0.749 (rounded to 3 decimal places), the restrictions may be removed, which means that presence of helicity exerts a stabilizing effect onto the possible stationary regimes of the system. Furthermore, three physically important cases A ∈{-1 ,0 ,1 } are shown to lie deep within the allowed interval of A for all values of ρ . For the model of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (A =-1 ) up to date unknown helical values of the turbulent Prandtl number have been shown to equal 1 regardless of parity violation. Furthermore, we have shown that interaction parameter A exerts strong influence on advection-diffusion processes in turbulent environments with broken spatial parity. By varying A continuously, we explain high stability of the kinematic MHD model (A =1 ) against helical effects as a result of its proximity to the A =0.912 (rounded to 3 decimal places) case where helical effects are completely suppressed. Contrary, for the physically important A =0 model, we show that it lies deep within the interval of models where helical effects cause the turbulent Prandtl number to decrease with |ρ | . We thus identify internal structure of interactions given by the parameter A , and not the vector character of the admixture itself being the dominant factor influencing

  14. Helical turbulent Prandtl number in the A model of passive vector advection.

    PubMed

    Hnatič, M; Zalom, P

    2016-11-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation, turbulent Prandtl numbers are obtained in the general A model of passive vector advected by fully developed turbulent velocity field with violation of spatial parity introduced via the continuous parameter ρ ranging from ρ=0 (no violation of spatial parity) to |ρ|=1 (maximum violation of spatial parity). Values of A represent a continuously adjustable parameter which governs the interaction structure of the model. In nonhelical environments, we demonstrate that A is restricted to the interval -1.723≤A≤2.800 (rounded to 3 decimal places) in the two-loop order of the field theoretic model. However, when ρ>0.749 (rounded to 3 decimal places), the restrictions may be removed, which means that presence of helicity exerts a stabilizing effect onto the possible stationary regimes of the system. Furthermore, three physically important cases A∈{-1,0,1} are shown to lie deep within the allowed interval of A for all values of ρ. For the model of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (A=-1) up to date unknown helical values of the turbulent Prandtl number have been shown to equal 1 regardless of parity violation. Furthermore, we have shown that interaction parameter A exerts strong influence on advection-diffusion processes in turbulent environments with broken spatial parity. By varying A continuously, we explain high stability of the kinematic MHD model (A=1) against helical effects as a result of its proximity to the A=0.912 (rounded to 3 decimal places) case where helical effects are completely suppressed. Contrary, for the physically important A=0 model, we show that it lies deep within the interval of models where helical effects cause the turbulent Prandtl number to decrease with |ρ|. We thus identify internal structure of interactions given by the parameter A, and not the vector character of the admixture itself being the dominant factor influencing diffusion-advection

  15. Semi-analytical solution of the steady three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, C. P.; Vilhena, M. T.; Moreira, D. M.; Tirabassi, T.

    We present a three-dimensional solution of the steady-state advection-diffusion equation considering a vertically inhomogeneous planetary boundary layer (PBL). We reach this goal applying the generalized integral transform technique (GITT), a hybrid method that had solved a wide class of direct and inverse problems mainly in the area of heat transfer and fluid mechanics. The transformed problem is solved by the advection-diffusion multilayer model (ADMM) method, a semi-analytical solution based on a discretization of the PBL in sub-layers where the advection-diffusion equation is solved by the Laplace transform technique. Numerical simulations are presented and the performances of the solution are compared against field experiments data.

  16. The prediction of sea-surface temperature variations by means of an advective mixed-layer ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An advective mixed layer ocean model was developed by eliminating the assumption of horizontal homogeneity in an already existing mixed layer model, and then superimposing a mean and anomalous wind driven current field. This model is based on the principle of conservation of heat and mechanical energy and utilizes a box grid for the advective part of the calculation. Three phases of experiments were conducted: evaluation of the model's ability to account for climatological sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the cooling and heating seasons, sensitivity tests in which the effect of hypothetical anomalous winds was evaluated, and a thirty-day synoptic calculation using the model. For the case studied, the accuracy of the predictions was improved by the inclusion of advection, although nonadvective effects appear to have dominated.

  17. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 2. Transient storage and decay chain solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminant transport processes in streams, rivers, and other surface water bodies can be analyzed or predicted using the advection-dispersion equation and related transport models. In part 1 of this two-part series we presented a large number of one- and multi-dimensional analytical solutions of t...

  18. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF THE INFLUENCE OF DENITRIFYING SEDIMENTS ON NITRATE TRANSPORT IN AQUIFERS WITH SLOPING BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denitrification is a significant process for the removal of nitrate transported in groundwater drainage from agricultural watersheds. In this paper analytical solutions are developed for advective-reactive and nonpoint-source contaminant transport in a two-layer unconfined aquife...

  19. TODS BioCast User Manual, Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-17

    BioCast User Manual Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure Version 1.0 Sean Mccarthy Sherwin Ladner JaSon...18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT TODS BioCast User Manual Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection...defined by the AOPS input file. BioCast is designed to apply a simple advection approach to satellite derived products in order to forecast the

  20. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  1. Preconditioned time-difference methods for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.; Rodrigue, G.; Wolitzer, D.

    1994-12-31

    Explicit time differencing methods for solving differential equations are advantageous in that they are easy to implement on a computer and are intrinsically very parallel. The disadvantage of explicit methods is the severe restrictions placed on stepsize due to stability. Stability bounds for explicit time differencing methods on advection-diffusion-reaction problems are generally quite severe and implicit methods are used instead. The linear systems arising from these implicit methods are large and sparse so that iterative methods must be used to solve them. In this paper the authors develop a methodology for increasing the stability bounds of standard explicit finite differencing methods by combining explicit methods, implicit methods, and iterative methods in a novel way to generate new time-difference schemes, called preconditioned time-difference methods.

  2. Modeling breakup and relaxation of Newtonian droplets using the advected phase-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucourt, J.; Biben, T.; Leyrat, A.; Verdier, C.

    2007-02-01

    The relaxation and breakup of Newtonian droplets is considered using the advected field approach. This method allows one to follow the deformation of interfaces using an order parameter field [Biben , Europhys. Lett. 63, 623 (2003)] based on a Ginzburg-Landau equation. Using this method, it is possible to follow the breakup of droplets and stability curves can be obtained in both two- and three-dimensional shear and elongational flows. Finally, relaxation of a droplet is considered, following the application of an elongational flow. The results are compared with previous experimental data [Ha and Leal, Phys. Fluids 13, 1568 (2001)], and are found to be in satisfactory agreement. The method is general enough to be applied to other non-Newtonian fluids, such as Oldroyd-B fluids or viscoplastic materials.

  3. Observations of the convective plume of a lake under cold-air advective conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. G., Jr.; Sutherland, R. A.; Bartholic, J. F.; Chen, E.

    1978-01-01

    Moderating effects of Lake Apopka, Florida, on downwind surface temperatures were evaluated under cold-air advective conditions. Point temperature measurements north and south of the lake and data obtained from a thermal scanner flown at 1.6 km indicate that surface temperatures directly downwind may be higher than surrounding surface temperatures by as much as 5 C under conditions of moderate winds (about 4 m/s). No substantial temperature effects were observed with surface wind speed less than 1 m/s. Fluxes of sensible and latent heat from Lake Apopka were calculated from measurements of lake temperature, net radiation, relative humidity, and air temperature above the lake. Bulk transfer coefficients and the Bowen ratio were calculated and found to be in agreement with reported data for nonadvective conditions.

  4. Numerical studies of three-dimensional stochastic Darcy's equation and stochastic advection-diffusion-dispersion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we solve the three-dimensional stochastic Darcy's equation and stochastic advection-diffusion-dispersion equation using a probabilistic collocation method (PCM) on sparse grids. Karhunen-Lo\\`{e}ve (KL) decomposition is employed to represent the three-dimensional log hydraulic conductivity $Y=\\ln K_s$. The numerical examples which demonstrate the convergence of PCM are presented. It appears that the faster convergence rate in the variance can be obtained by using the Jacobi-chaos representing the truncated Gaussian distributions than using the Hermite-chaos for the Gaussian distribution. The effect of dispersion coefficient on the mean and standard deviation of the hydraulic head and solute concentration is investigated. Additionally, we also study how the statistical properties of the hydraulic head and solute concentration vary while using different types of random distributions and different standard deviations of random hydraulic conductivity.

  5. Advection fog formation and aerosols produced by combustion-originated air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The way in which pollutants produced by the photochemical reaction of NO(X) and SO(X) affect the quality of the human environment through such phenomena as the formation of advection fog is considered. These pollutants provide the major source of condensation nuclei for the formation of fog in highways, airports and seaports. Results based on the monodisperse, multicomponent aerosol model show that: (1) condensation nuclei can grow and form a dense fog without the air having attained supersaturation; (2) the mass concentration range for NO(X) is one-third that of SO(X); and (3) the greater the mass concentration, the particle concentration, and the radius of condensation nuclei, the denser the fog that is formed.

  6. Self-advection of density perturbations on a sloping continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ping-Tung Shaw; Csanady, G.T.

    1983-05-01

    Bottom water movement on the continental shelf is modeled by the nonlinear interaction between longshore bottom geostrophic flow and the density field. Bottom geostrophic velocity, subject to linear steady momentum equations with linear bottom friction, can be generated by along-isobath density variations over a sloping bottom. At the same time, the density field is slowly advected by the velocity field. Away from boundary layers, the interplay is governed by Burgers' equation, which shows the formation and self-propulsion of strong density gradients along an isobath. The direction of propagation of a dense water blob is to have shallow water on the right- (left-) hand side facing downstream in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. The propagation of a light water blob is opposite to that of a dense water blob.

  7. Milstein Approximation for Advection-Diffusion Equations Driven by Multiplicative Noncontinuous Martingale Noises

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Andrea Lang, Annika

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the strong approximation of a stochastic partial differential equation, whose differential operator is of advection-diffusion type and which is driven by a multiplicative, infinite dimensional, cadlag, square integrable martingale, is presented. A finite dimensional projection of the infinite dimensional equation, for example a Galerkin projection, with nonequidistant time stepping is used. Error estimates for the discretized equation are derived in L{sup 2} and almost sure senses. Besides space and time discretizations, noise approximations are also provided, where the Milstein double stochastic integral is approximated in such a way that the overall complexity is not increased compared to an Euler-Maruyama approximation. Finally, simulations complete the paper.

  8. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for unsteady advection-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borker, Raunak; Farhat, Charbel; Tezaur, Radek

    2017-03-01

    A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method with Lagrange multipliers is presented for the solution of unsteady advection-diffusion problems in the high Péclet number regime. It operates directly on the second-order form of the governing equation and does not require any stabilization. Its spatial basis functions are chosen among the free-space solutions of the homogeneous form of the partial differential equation obtained after time-discretization. It also features Lagrange multipliers for enforcing a weak continuity of the approximated solution across the element interface boundaries. This leads to a system of differential-algebraic equations which are time-integrated by an implicit family of schemes. The numerical stability of these schemes and the well-posedness of the overall discretization method are supported by a theoretical analysis. The performance of this method is demonstrated for various high Péclet number constant-coefficient model flow problems.

  9. Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Tubes in an Advective Flow around a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Giri, Kinsuk

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields cannibalized by an accretion flow would very soon have a dominant toroidal component. Without changing the topology, we study the movements of these flux tubes inside a geometrically thick advective disk which undergo centrifugal pressure supported shocks. We also consider the effects of the flux tubes on the flow. We use a finite element method (Total Variation Diminishing) for this purpose and specifically focussed whether the flux tubes contribute to changes in outflow properties in terms of its collimation and outflow rates. It is seen that depending upon the cross sectional radius of the flux tubes (which control the drag force), these field lines may move towards the central object or oscillate vertically before eventually escaping out of the funnel wall (pressure zero surface). These interesting results obtained with and without flux tubes point to the role the flux tubes play in collimation of jets and outflows.

  10. GRID REFINEMENT TESTS OF A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF REACTIVE SPECIES. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber-except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  12. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pr