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Sample records for advective contaminant transport

  1. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  2. THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN GEOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AND ADVECTION-DISPERSION IN CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AT A URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface are controlled by complex processes including advection, dispersion-diffusion, and chemical reactions. However, the interplay between the physical transport processes and chemical reactions, and their...

  3. Removing volatile contaminants from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Hoag, G.E.; Marley, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Organic liquids inadvertently spilled and then distributed in the unsaturated zone can pose a long-term threat to ground water. Many of these substances have significant volatility, and thereby establish a premise for contaminant removal from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport with wells screened in the unsaturated zone. In order to focus attention on the rates of mass transfer from liquid to vapour phases, sand columns were partially saturated with gasoline and vented under steady air-flow conditions. The ability of an equilibrium-based transport model to predict the hydrocarbon vapor flux from the columns implies an efficient rate of local phase transfer for reasonably high air-phase velocities. Thus the success of venting remediations will depend primarily on the ability to induce an air-flow field in a heterogeneous unsaturated zone that will intersect the distributed contaminant. To analyze this aspect of the technique, a mathematical model was developed to predict radially symmetric air flow induced by venting from a single well. This model allows for in-situ determinations of air-phase permeability, which is the fundamental design parameter, and for the analysis of the limitations of a single well design. A successful application of the technique at a site once contaminated by gasoline supports the optimism derived from the experimental and modeliing phases of this study, and illustrates the well construction and field methods used to document the volatile contaminant recovery. ?? 1989.

  4. Pathways for Advective Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-19

    the approach is given and an application to the Gulf of Mexico is described where the analysis precisely identifies the boundaries of coherent vortical structures as well as pathways for advective transport.

  5. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  6. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  7. Advective-diffusive contaminant migration in unsaturated sand and gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, R.K.; Badv, K.

    1996-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating the diffusion coefficients for chloride and sodium in unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel based on parameters obtained from saturated diffusion tests conducted for similar material. The method is tested by comparing the observed and predicted diffusion profiles through unsaturated soil. The method is shown to work well for predicting the advective-diffusive migration of chloride and sodium through a two-layer soil system consisting of a compacted clayey silt underlain by an unsaturated fine gravel. Over the range of conditions examined, it is concluded that existing solute transport theory along with the proposed procedure for estimating the unsaturated diffusion coefficients can adequately predict chloride and sodium diffusion through both unsaturated coarse sand and fine gravel as well as predict advective-diffusive transport through a compacted clayey layer and underlying unsaturated fine gravel.

  8. Assessment of advective porewater movement affecting mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants in marine intertidal sediment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Moffett, Kevan B; Luthy, Richard G

    2010-08-01

    Advective porewater movement and molecular diffusion are important factors affecting the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in marsh and mudflat sediments. This study assessed porewater movement in an intertidal mudflat in South Basin adjacent to Hunters Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA, where a pilot-scale test of sorbent amendment assessed the in situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To quantify advective porewater movement within the top 0-60 cm sediment layer, we used temperature as a tracer and conducted heat transport analysis using 14-day data from multidepth sediment temperature logging stations and one-dimensional heat transport simulations. The best-fit conditions gave an average Darcy velocity of 3.8cm/d in the downward vertical direction for sorbent-amended sediment with a plausible range of 0 cm/d to 8 cm/d. In a limiting case with no net advection, the best-fit depth-averaged mechanical dispersion coefficient was 2.2x10(-7) m2/s with a range of 0.9x10(-7) m2/s to 5.6x10(-7) m2/s. The Peclet number for PCB mobilization showed that molecular diffusion would control PCB mass transfer from sediment to sorbent particles for the case of uniform distribution of sorbent. However, the advective flow and mechanical dispersion in the test site would significantly benefit the stabilization effect of heterogeneously distributed sorbent by acting to smooth out the heterogeneities and homogenizing pollutant concentrations across the entire bioactive zone. These measurements and modeling techniques on intertidal sediment porewater transport could be useful for the development of more reliable mass transfer models for the prediction of contaminant release within the sediment bed, the movement of HOCs in the intertidal aquatic environment, and in situ sequestration by sorbent addition.

  9. A convexity preserving scheme for conservative advection transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng; Peng, Xindong

    2004-08-01

    A simple and practical scheme for advection transport equation is presented. The scheme, namely piecewise rational method (PRM), is a variant of the existing piecewise parabolic method (PPM) of Colella and Woodward (1984). Instead of the parabolic function, a rational function is used for the reconstruction. Making use of the convexity preserving nature of the rational function enables us to obtain oscillation-less numerical solutions, but avoids the adjustments of the cell-interface values to enforce the monotonicity in PPM. The PRM is very simple and computationally efficient. Our numerical results show that PRM is competitive to the PPM in many aspects, such as numerical accuracy and shape-preserving property.

  10. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties and simulated advective transport of contaminated ground water in a fractured rock aquifer at the Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Brown, Jean C.; Carleton, Glen B.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, predominantly trichloroethylene and its degradation products, have been detected in ground water at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. An air-stripping pump-and-treat system has been in operation at the NAWC since 1998. An existing ground-water-flow model was used to evaluate the effect of a change in the configuration of the network of recovery wells in the pump-and-treat system on flow paths of contaminated ground water. The NAWC is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer composed of dipping layers of sedimentary rocks of the Lockatong and Stockton Formations. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties of the part of the aquifer composed of the Lockatong Formation were measured using aquifer tests and tracer tests. The heterogeneity of the rocks causes a wide range of values of each parameter measured. Transmissivity ranges from 95 to 1,300 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient ranges from 9 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3; and the effective porosity ranges from 0.0003 to 0.002. The average linear velocity of contaminated ground water was determined for ambient conditions (when no wells at the site are pumped) using an existing ground-water-flow model, particle-tracking techniques, and the porosity values determined in this study. The average linear velocity of flow paths beginning at each contaminated well and ending at the streams where the flow paths terminate ranges from 0.08 to 130 feet per day. As a result of a change in the pump-and-treat system (adding a 165-foot-deep well pumped at 5 gallons per minute and reducing the pumping rate at a nearby 41-foot-deep well by the same amount), water in the vicinity of three 100- to 165-foot-deep wells flows to the deep well rather than the shallower well.

  11. Analytical solution for one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Guerrero, J. S.; Skaggs, T. H.

    2010-08-01

    SummaryMathematical models describing contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media are often formulated as an advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent transport coefficients. In this work, a general analytical solution is presented for the linear, one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation with distance-dependent coefficients. An integrating factor is employed to obtain a transport equation that has a self-adjoint differential operator, and a solution is found using the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). It is demonstrated that an analytical expression for the integrating factor exists for several transport equation formulations of practical importance in groundwater transport modeling. Unlike nearly all solutions available in the literature, the current solution is developed for a finite spatial domain. As an illustration, solutions for the particular case of a linearly increasing dispersivity are developed in detail and results are compared with solutions from the literature. Among other applications, the current analytical solution will be particularly useful for testing or benchmarking numerical transport codes because of the incorporation of a finite spatial domain.

  12. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bruce S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Passeport, Elodie; Sleep, Brent E

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining "observable" DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C0), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (Dmech/Deff). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C0/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C0/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (<100years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with "typical" well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where Dmech/Deff is larger than 10, DRIF effects will likely not be

  13. Thermally driven advection for radioxenon transport from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-05-01

    Barometric pumping is a ubiquitous process resulting in migration of gases in the subsurface that has been studied as the primary mechanism for noble gas transport from an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). However, at early times following a UNE, advection driven by explosion residual heat is relevant to noble gas transport. A rigorous measure is needed for demonstrating how, when, and where advection is important. In this paper three physical processes of uncertain magnitude (oscillatory advection, matrix diffusion, and thermally driven advection) are parameterized by using boundary conditions, system properties, and source term strength. Sobol' sensitivity analysis is conducted to evaluate the importance of all physical processes influencing the xenon signals. This study indicates that thermally driven advection plays a more important role in producing xenon signals than oscillatory advection and matrix diffusion at early times following a UNE, and xenon isotopic ratios are observed to have both time and spatial dependence.

  14. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  15. Theory of advection-driven long range biotic transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple mechanistic model to examine the effects of advective flow on the spread of fungal diseases spread by wind-blown spores. The model is defined by a set of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for spore densities. One equation describes the long-distance advectiv...

  16. Rigorous upper bounds for fluid and plasma transport due to passive advection

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.; Kim, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    The formulation of variational principles for transport due to passive advection is described. A detailed account of the work has been published elsewhere. In the present paper, the motivations, philosophy, and implications of the method are briefly discussed. 15 refs.

  17. AN EXACT PEAK CAPTURING AND OSCILLATION-FREE SCHEME TO SOLVE ADVECTION-DISPERSION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exact peak capturing and essentially oscillation-free (EPCOF) algorithm, consisting of advection-dispersion decoupling, backward method of characteristics, forward node tracking, and adaptive local grid refinement, is developed to solve transport equations. This algorithm repr...

  18. Advective removal of intraparticle uranium from contaminated vadose zone sediments, Hanford, U.S.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, Dean A; Zachara, John M

    2008-03-01

    A column study on U(VI)-contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford Site, WA, was performed to investigate U(VI) release kinetics with water advection and variable geochemical conditions. The sediments were collected from an area adjacent to and below tank BX-102 that was contaminated as a result of a radioactive tank waste overfill event. The primary reservoir for U(VI) in the sediments are micrometer-size precipitates composed of nanocrystallite aggregates of a Na-U-Silicate phase, most likely Na-boltwoodite, that nucleated and grew within microfractures of the plagioclase component of sand-sized granitic clasts. Two sediment samples, with different U(VI) concentrations and intraparticle mass transfer properties, were leached with advective flows of three different solutions. The influent solutions were all calcite-saturated and in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. One solution was prepared from DI water, the second was a synthetic groundwater (SGW) with elevated Na that mimicked groundwater at the Hanford site, and the third was the same SGW but with both elevated Na and Si. The latter two solutions were employed, in part, to test the effect of saturation state on U(VI) release. For both sediments, and all three electrolytes, there was an initial rapid release of U(VI) to the advecting solution followed by slower near steady-state release. U(VI)aq concentrations increased during subsequent stop-flow events. The electrolytes with elevated Na and Si depressed U(VL)aq concentrations in effluent solutions. Effluent U(VI)aq concentrations for both sediments and all three electrolytes were simulated reasonably well by a three domain model (the advecting fluid, fractures, and matrix) that coupled U(VI) dissolution, intraparticle U(VI)aq diffusion, and interparticle advection, where diffusion and dissolution properties were parameterized in a previous batch study.

  19. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  20. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  1. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  2. New Solution of Diffusion-Advection Equation for Cosmic-Ray Transport Using Ultradistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we exactly solve the diffusion-advection equation (DAE) for cosmic-ray transport. For such a purpose we use the Theory of Ultradistributions of J. Sebastiao e Silva, to give a general solution for the DAE. From the ensuing solution, we obtain several approximations as limiting cases of various situations of physical and astrophysical interest. One of them involves Solar cosmic-rays' diffusion.

  3. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  4. Thermal advection and stratification effects on surface winds and the low level meridional mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, Felice S.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical tests are performed on the Seasat scatterometer observations to examine if and to what degree thermal advection and stratification effects manifest themselves in these remotely sensed measurements of mean wind and wind stress over the ocean. On the basis of a two layer baroclinic boundary layer model which is presented, it is shown that the thermal advection and stratification of the entire boundary layer as well as the geostrophic forcing influence the modeled near surface wind and wind stress profiles. Evidence of diurnal variation in the stratification under barotropic conditions is found in the data, with the daytime marine boundary layer being more convective than its nighttime counterpart. The temporal and spacial sampling pattern of the satellite makes it impossible to recover the full diurnal cycle, however. The observed effects of the thermal advection are shown to be statistically significant during the day (and presumed more convective) hours, causing a systematic increase in the poleward transport of mass and heat. The statistical results are in a qualitative agreement with the model simulations and cannot be reproduced in randomized control tests.

  5. An advection-diffusion model for cross-field runaway electron transport in perturbed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Särkimäki, Konsta; Hirvijoki, Eero; Decker, Joan; Varje, Jari; Kurki-Suonio, Taina

    2016-12-01

    Disruption-generated runaway electrons (RE) present an outstanding issue for ITER. The predictive computational studies of RE generation rely on orbit-averaged computations and, as such, they lack the effects from the magnetic field stochasticity. Since stochasticity is naturally present in post-disruption plasma, and externally induced stochastization offers a prominent mechanism to mitigate RE avalanche, we present an advection-diffusion model that can be used to couple an orbit-following code to an orbit-averaged tool in order to capture the cross-field transport and to overcome the latter’s limitation. The transport coefficients are evaluated via a Monte Carlo method. We show that the diffusion coefficient differs significantly from the well-known Rechester-Rosenbluth result. We also demonstrate the importance of including the advection: it has a two-fold role both in modelling transport barriers created by magnetic islands and in amplifying losses in regions where the islands are not present.

  6. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  7. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  8. Mass transport contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the effects of outgassing and waste dumping on the contamination field around an orbiting spacecraft. The spacecraft was assumed to be spherical in shape with the mass flow emitting uniformly from the spherical surface at a constant rate and in a D'Lambertian spatial distribution. The outflow of gases were assumed to be neutrally charged and of a single species with a molecular weight characteristic of a composite of the actual species involved in the mass flow. The theoretical analysis showed that, for outgassing only, less than 1.5 percent of the outgas products will return to the Skylab spacecraft as a result of intermolecular collisions. When the total mass flow from the spacecraft, including waste dumps and reaction control motor firings, was considered, it was estimated that about 30 percent will return to the spacecraft.

  9. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  10. Simulation of the advective methane transport and AOM in Shenhu area, the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wu, N.

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) occurs in the transition zone between the presence of sulfate and methane. This reaction is an important process for methane and the global carbon cycle. Methane gas hydrates bearing sediments were recovered in Shenhu Area, the Northern South China Sea, and methane advective transport was detected in this area as well. A one dimension numerical simulation tool was implemented to study the AOM process combined with the advective methane transport in Shenhu Area according to the local drilling data and geochemical information. The modeled results suggest that local methane flux will be consumed in the sediment column via dissolution, sorption and AOM reaction. A portion of methane will enter water column and possibly atmosphere if the methane flux was one order of magnitude higher than current level. Furthermore, the calculated rates of AOM in Shenhu area range similar to that of gas hydrate mounds in Mexico Golf. However, AOM is ability to consume more methane than that in Golf of Mexico due to the lower permeable sediment associated with a deeper sulfate methane transition layer.

  11. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 2. Transient storage and decay chain solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminant transport processes in streams, rivers, and other surface water bodies can be analyzed or predicted using the advection-dispersion equation and related transport models. In part 1 of this two-part series we presented a large number of one- and multi-dimensional analytical solutions of t...

  12. Renormalization group estimates of transport coefficients in the advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George

    1993-01-01

    The advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence is considered using recursive renormalization group procedures in the differential sub grid shell thickness limit. It is shown explicitly that the higher order nonlinearities induced by the recursive renormalization group procedure preserve Galilean invariance. Differential equations, valid for the entire resolvable wave number k range, are determined for the eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity coefficients, and it is shown that higher order nonlinearities do not contribute as k goes to 0, but have an essential role as k goes to k(sub c) the cutoff wave number separating the resolvable scales from the sub grid scales. The recursive renormalization transport coefficients and the associated eddy Prandtl number are in good agreement with the k-dependent transport coefficients derived from closure theories and experiments.

  13. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August

  14. Contour advection with surgery: A technique for investigating finescale structure in tracer transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Plumb, R. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We present a trajectory technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), for tracing the evolution of material contours in a specified (including observed) evolving flow. CAS uses the algorithms developed by Dritschel for contour dynamics/surgery to trace the evolution of specified contours. The contours are represented by a series of particles, which are advected by a specified, gridded, wind distribution. The resolution of the contours is preserved by continually adjusting the number of particles, and finescale features are produced that are not present in the input data (and cannot easily be generated using standard trajectory techniques). The reliability, and dependence on the spatial and temporal resolution of the wind field, of the CAS procedure is examined by comparisons with high-resolution numerical data (from contour dynamics calculations and from a general circulation model), and with routine stratospheric analyses. These comparisons show that the large-scale motions dominate the deformation field and that CAS can accurately reproduce small scales from low-resolution wind fields. The CAS technique therefore enables examination of atmospheric tracer transport at previously unattainable resolution.

  15. Single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme for advection-diffusion problems with large diffusion-coefficient heterogeneities and high-advection transport.

    PubMed

    Perko, Janez; Patel, Ravi A

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an approach that extends the flexibility of the standard lattice Boltzmann single relaxation time scheme in terms of spatial variation of dissipative terms (e.g., diffusion coefficient) and stability for high Péclet mass transfer problems. Spatial variability of diffusion coefficient in SRT is typically accommodated through the variation of relaxation time during the collision step. This method is effective but cannot deal with large diffusion coefficient variations, which can span over several orders of magnitude in some natural systems. The approach explores an alternative way of dealing with large diffusion coefficient variations in advection-diffusion transport systems by introducing so-called diffusion velocity. The diffusion velocity is essentially an additional convective term that replaces variations in diffusion coefficients vis-à-vis a chosen reference diffusion coefficient which defines the simulation time step. Special attention is paid to the main idea behind the diffusion velocity formulation and its implementation into the lattice Boltzmann framework. Finally, the performance, stability, and accuracy of the diffusion velocity formulation are discussed via several advection-diffusion transport benchmark examples. These examples demonstrate improved stability and flexibility of the proposed scheme with marginal consequences on the numerical performance.

  16. In situ measurements of advective solute transport in permeable shelf sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Stecher, Hilmar A.; Taghon, Gary L.; Fuller, Charlotte M.; Huettel, Markus; Rusch, Antje; Ryckelynck, Natacha; Wild, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Solute transport rates within the uppermost 2 cm of a rippled continental shelf sand deposit, with a mean grain size of 400-500 μm and permeabilities of 2.0-2.4×10 -11 m 2, have been measured in situ by detecting the breakthrough of a pulse of iodide after its injection into the bottom water. These tracer experiments were conducted on the USA Middle Atlantic Bight shelf at a water depth of ˜13 m using a small tethered tripod that carried a close-up video camera, acoustic current meter, motorized 1.5 liter "syringe", and a microprofiling system for positioning and operating a solid-state voltammetric microelectrode. When triggered on shipboard, the syringe delivered a 0.21 M solution of potassium iodide and red dye through five nozzles positioned around and above the buried tip of the voltammetric sensor for 0.65-5 min. Bottom turbulence rapidly mixed and dispersed the tracer, which then was carried into the bed by interfacial water flows associated with ripple topography. The advective downward transport to the sensor tip was timed by a sequence of repetitive voltammetric scans. The distance-averaged vertical velocity, expressed as the depth of the sensor tip in the sand divided by the time to iodide breakthrough, was found to vary from 6 to 53 cm h -1 and generally to decrease with sediment depth. Because of episodic pumping and dispersion associated with the greatest 5% of wave heights and current speeds recorded, some concentration vs. time responses showed evidence of uneven solute migration. For reasons of mass balance, the advective flow field in the surface layers of permeable beds includes regions of water intrusion, horizontal pore-water flow and upwelling which also may explain some of the observed uneven migration. Pore-water advection was also evident in oxygen profiles measured before and after tracer injection with the voltammetric sensor. These profiles showed irregular distributions and oxygen penetration depths of 4-4.5 cm. Sand cores from the

  17. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  18. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  19. Contaminant transport in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford

    Construction of a new treatment plant and outfall to clean up Boston Harbor is currently one of the world's largest public works projects, costing about $4 billion. There is concern about the long-term impact of contaminants on Massachusetts Bay and adjacent Gulf of Maine because these areas are used extensively for transportation, recreation, fishing, and tourism, as well as waste disposal. Public concern also focuses on Stellwagen Bank, located on the eastern side of Massachusetts Bay, which is an important habitat for endangered whales. Contaminants reach Massachusetts Bay not only from Boston Harbor, but from other coastal communities on the Gulf of Maine, as well as from the atmosphere. Knowledge of the pathways, mechanisms, and rates at which pollutants are transported throughout these coastal environments is needed to address a wide range of management questions.

  20. A subordinated advection model for uniform bed load transport from local to regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Martin, Raleigh L.; Chen, Dong; Baeumer, Boris; Sun, Hongguang; Chen, Li

    2014-12-01

    Sediment tracers moving as bed load can exhibit anomalous dispersion behavior deviating from Fickian diffusion. The presence of heavy-tailed resting time distributions and thin-tailed step length distributions motivate adoption of fractional-derivative models (FDMs) to describe sediment dispersion, but these models require many parameters that are difficult to quantify. Here we propose a considerably simplified FDM for anomalous transport of uniformly sized grains along straight channels, the subordinated advection equation (SAE), which is based on the concept of time subordination. Unlike previous FDM models with time index γ between 0 and 1, our SAE model adopts a value of γ between 1 and 2. This γ describes random velocities deviating significantly from the mean velocity and models both long resting periods and relatively fast displacements. We show that the model quantifies the dynamics of four bed load transport experiments recorded in the literature. In addition to γ, SAE model parameters—velocity and capacity coefficient—are related to the mean and variance of particle velocities, respectively. Successful application of the SAE model also implies a universal probability density for the heavy-tailed waiting time distribution (with finite mean) and a relatively lighter tailed step length distribution for uniform bed load transport from local to regional scales.

  1. Transport and Recruitment of Blue Crab Larvae:a Model with Advection and Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Epifanio, C. E.; Epifanio, C. C.; Wong, K.-C.

    1997-07-01

    The present paper develops a mathematical model for the transport and recruitment of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae, and applies it to the inner continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight near Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Blue crab larvae develop through seven or eight planktonic zoeal stages to a megalopa stage suitable for recruitment to adult populations of east coast estuaries. The larvae are concentrated near the surface, and the currents are primarily forced by alongshelf winds and river discharge through major estuaries. Model currents are prescribed based on a realistic synthesis of their observed relationship to wind and river discharge. Besides the resulting advection, particle diffusion and biological mortality are added to determine the fate of larvae released from their parent estuary. Groups of particles were released across the source region of the outflowing buoyancy-driven current in the model estuary mouth. Most larvae were swept alongshelf to the south with the buoyancy-driven coastal current, and thus were lost as recruits to the population of their parent estuary. However, some larvae released close to the seaward edge of the emerging coastal current were able to cross the coastal current front and move seaward into inner shelf water during upwelling-favorable (northward) wind events. Some of these, in turn, were suitably placed near the parent estuary mouth so that they could be advected landward as megalopae into the estuary during a subsequent downwelling-favorable (southward) wind event and thus join the adult population. The model results for megalopae returns were computed from consecutive daily release of 1000 particles, and were compared with 4 years of blue crab megalopa settlement data for Delaware Bay. The model results for 1989 and 1990 matched the observed data remarkably well, with both years showing dominance by a single return event of a few days duration. For 1991 and 1992, the observed results showed multiple return events

  2. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  3. The predictability of advection-dominated flux-transport solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Sabrina; Fournier, Alexandre; Aubert, Julien

    2014-01-20

    Space weather is a matter of practical importance in our modern society. Predictions of forecoming solar cycles mean amplitude and duration are currently being made based on flux-transport numerical models of the solar dynamo. Interested in the forecast horizon of such studies, we quantify the predictability window of a representative, advection-dominated, flux-transport dynamo model by investigating its sensitivity to initial conditions and control parameters through a perturbation analysis. We measure the rate associated with the exponential growth of an initial perturbation of the model trajectory, which yields a characteristic timescale known as the e-folding time τ {sub e}. The e-folding time is shown to decrease with the strength of the α-effect, and to increase with the magnitude of the imposed meridional circulation. Comparing the e-folding time with the solar cycle periodicity, we obtain an average estimate for τ {sub e} equal to 2.76 solar cycle durations. From a practical point of view, the perturbations analyzed in this work can be interpreted as uncertainties affecting either the observations or the physical model itself. After reviewing these, we discuss their implications for solar cycle prediction.

  4. Numerical simulation of advective-dispersive multisolute transport with sorption, ion exchange and equilibrium chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed that can simulate the effect of certain chemical and sorption reactions simultaneously among solutes involved in advective-dispersive transport through porous media. The model is based on a methodology that utilizes physical-chemical relationships in the development of the basic solute mass-balance equations; however, the form of these equations allows their solution to be obtained by methods that do not depend on the chemical processes. The chemical environment is governed by the condition of local chemical equilibrium, and may be defined either by the linear sorption of a single species and two soluble complexation reactions which also involve that species, or binary ion exchange and one complexation reaction involving a common ion. Partial differential equations that describe solute mass balance entirely in the liquid phase are developed for each tenad (a chemical entity whose total mass is independent of the reaction process) in terms of their total dissolved concentration. These equations are solved numerically in two dimensions through the modification of an existing groundwater flow/transport computer code. (Author 's abstract)

  5. In situ experiment to determine advective-diffusive controls on solute transport in a clay-rich aquitard.

    PubMed

    Barbour, S Lee; Hendry, M Jim; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2012-04-01

    Solute transport in clay-rich aquitards is characterized as molecular diffusion- or advection-dominated based on the Péclet number (P(e)). However, few field-based measurements of the coefficient of molecular diffusion (D(e)) exist, and none with a range of advection- or diffusion-dominated conditions in the same aquitard. In this long-term field experiment, standing water in a recovering well was spiked with deuterium ((2)H), then water-level recovery and δ(2)H values were monitored as the well returned to static conditions over 1054 days. After a second (2)H spike, water levels and δ(2)H values were monitored to day 1644 while under near static conditions. Modeling of the second spike was used to define the D(e) of (2)H as (3-4)× 10(-10)m(2)s(-1) for an accessible porosity of 0.31. Reservoir concentrations from the initial spike were modeled to define the transition from advection- to diffusion-dominated transport. This occurred after 200 days, consistent with a transition in P(e) from <1 to >1 when the length term is taken as the radial extent of the tracer plume (normalized concentration <0.05). This study verifies plume extent as the characteristic length term in the calculation of P(e) and demonstrates the transition from advection- to diffusion-dominated transport as the value of P(e) decreases below unity.

  6. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-07

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  7. MODFLOW-2000 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--documentation of the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the advective component of contaminant transport in steady-state flow fields can provide important information for the calibration of ground-water flow models. This report documents the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package, version 2, which allows advective-transport observations to be used in the three-dimensional ground-water flow parameter-estimation model MODFLOW-2000. The ADV2 Package is compatible with some of the features in the Layer-Property Flow and Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow Packages, but is not compatible with the Block-Centered Flow or Generalized Finite-Difference Packages. The particle-tracking routine used in the ADV2 Package duplicates the semi-analytical method of MODPATH, as shown in a sample problem. Particles can be tracked in a forward or backward direction, and effects such as retardation can be simulated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity. Particles can be discharged at cells that are considered to be weak sinks, in which the sink applied does not capture all the water flowing into the cell, using one of two criteria: (1) if there is any outflow to a boundary condition such as a well or surface-water feature, or (2) if the outflow exceeds a user specified fraction of the cell budget. Although effective porosity could be included as a parameter in the regression, this capability is not included in this package. The weighted sum-of-squares objective function, which is minimized in the Parameter-Estimation Process, was augmented to include the square of the weighted x-, y-, and z-components of the differences between the simulated and observed advective-front locations at defined times, thereby including the direction of travel as well as the overall travel distance in the calibration process. The sensitivities of the particle movement to the parameters needed to minimize the objective function are calculated for any particle location using the exact sensitivity

  8. Assessment of nitrate transport parameters using the advection-diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Aljazzar, Taiseer; Al-Qinna, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to better understand nitrate transport in the soil system in a part of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, in Germany, and to aid in the development of groundwater protection plans. An advection-diffusion (AD) cell was used in a miscible displacement experiment setup to characterize nitrate transport in 12 different soil samples from the study area. The three nitrate sorption isotherms were tested to define the exact nitrate interaction with the soil matrix. Soils varied in their properties which in its turn explain the variations in nitrate transport rates. Soil texture and organic matter content showed to have the most important effect on nitrate recovery and retardation. The miscible displacement experiment indicated a decrease in retardation by increasing sand fraction, and an increase in retardation by increasing soil organic matter content. Soil samples with high sand fractions (up to 94 %) exhibited low nitrate sorption capacity of less than 10 %, while soils with high organic matter content showed higher sorption of about 30 %. Based on parameterization for nitrate transport equation, the pore water velocity for both sandy and loamy soils were significantly different (P < 0.001). Pore water velocity in sandy soil (about 4 × 10(-3) m/s) was about 100 to 1000 larger than in loamy soils (8.7 × 10(-5) m/s). On the other hand, the reduction in nitrate transport in soils associated with high organic matter was due to fine pore pathways clogged by fine organic colloids. It is expected that the existing micro-phobicity increased the nitrate recovery from 9 to 32 % resulting in maximum diffusion rates of about 3.5 × 10(-5) m/s(2) in sandy soils (sample number CS-04) and about 1.4 × 10(-7) m/s(2) in silt loam soils (sample number FS-02).

  9. Advective transport observations with MODPATH-OBS--documentation of the MODPATH observation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Kauffman, L.K.; Hill, M.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.

    2013-01-01

    The MODPATH-OBS computer program described in this report is designed to calculate simulated equivalents for observations related to advective groundwater transport that can be represented in a quantitative way by using simulated particle-tracking data. The simulated equivalents supported by MODPATH-OBS are (1) distance from a source location at a defined time, or proximity to an observed location; (2) time of travel from an initial location to defined locations, areas, or volumes of the simulated system; (3) concentrations used to simulate groundwater age; and (4) percentages of water derived from contributing source areas. Although particle tracking only simulates the advective component of conservative transport, effects of non-conservative processes such as retardation can be approximated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity based on the properties of selected conservative tracers. This program can also account for simple decay or production, but it cannot account for diffusion. Dispersion can be represented through direct simulation of subsurface heterogeneity and the use of many particles. MODPATH-OBS acts as a postprocessor to MODPATH, so that the sequence of model runs generally required is MODFLOW, MODPATH, and MODPATH-OBS. The version of MODFLOW and MODPATH that support the version of MODPATH-OBS presented in this report are MODFLOW-2005 or MODFLOW-LGR, and MODPATH-LGR. MODFLOW-LGR is derived from MODFLOW-2005, MODPATH 5, and MODPATH 6 and supports local grid refinement. MODPATH-LGR is derived from MODPATH 5. It supports the forward and backward tracking of particles through locally refined grids and provides the output needed for MODPATH_OBS. For a single grid and no observations, MODPATH-LGR results are equivalent to MODPATH 5. MODPATH-LGR and MODPATH-OBS simulations can use nearly all of the capabilities of MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-LGR; for example, simulations may be steady-state, transient, or a combination

  10. Chromium isotope variation along a contaminated groundwater plume: a coupled Cr(VI)- reduction, advective mixing perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T.; Izbicki, J.

    2007-12-01

    groundwater samples having <4 ppb Cr(VI), taken to be representative of regional groundwater, and the contaminated water do not pass through the remainder of the data, discounting a simple advective mixing scenario. We hypothesize a more likely scenario that involves both Cr(VI) reduction and advective mixing. As the plume initially expands downgradient, Cr(VI) in water at the leading edge encounters reductant in the aquifer resulting in limited Cr(VI) reduction. As a result of reduction, δ53Cr of Cr(VI) remaining in solution at the leading edge increases along the "reduction" trend from 0 to ~+2‰. Inevitable mixing of this water at the leading edge with regional groundwater results in a suitable mixing end-member to combine with Cr(VI) within the plume in order to explain the bulk of the remaining data. Neither Cr(VI) reduction nor advective mixing of plume and regional groundwaters can explain the data on their own, implying an interplay of at least these two processes during plume evolution. Ellis, A.S., Johnson, T.M. and Bullen, T.D. 2002, Science, 295, 2060-2062.

  11. An approximate calculation of advective gas-phase transport of 14C at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    A quasilinear partial differential equation, which describes gas-phase transport of a 14C kinematic wave through a porous medium, is derived, its sensitivity to system variables is analyzed and it is applied to one possible release scenarion at the porposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada high-level radioactive waste repository. Advection, isotope exchange between CO 2 in a flowing gas phase and HCO 3- in a static aqueous phase, and radioactive decay are incorporated. The governing equation is solved analytically by the method of characteristics. The mass fraction of 14C in the gas phase,X 14g, is controlled by radioactive decay. The relatively long half-line of 14C, about 5720 years, and the relatively shallow proposed burial depth of the radioactive waste, about 350m, requires significant retardation of the 14C wave velocity for significant reduction in X 14g. 14C wave velocity is most sensitive to temperature and pH which control the distribution of total carbon between gas and liquid phase; the greater the partitioning of carbon into the liquid phase, the greater the retardation of the 14C wave velocity and the greater the ultimate reduction in X 14g from initial conditions. Partitioning of total carbon into the liquid phase is greatest at low temperatures, < 100° C, and high pH values, > 8. Increasing water saturation also tends to retard 14C wave velocity but to a lesser extent. The governing equation has been applied using conditions that may possibly occur at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Calculations indicate that the 14C wave takes about 5900 years to reach the surface with a X 14g equal to 25 ppm. Diffusion and dispersion are not of major importance for these conditions. These calculations are approximate due to the number of assumptions involved. Discharge of 14C into the gas before the selected time would accelerate wave arrival and increase the amount of 14C reaching the surface.

  12. Analysis of steady-state flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of ground-water flow directions and traveltimes for advective flow were developed for the regional aquifer system of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The work included: (1) descriptions of compartments in the aquifer that function as intermediate and regional flow systems, (2) descriptions of pathlines for flow originating at or near the water table, and (3) quantitative estimates of traveltimes for advective transport originating at or near the water table. A particle-tracking postprocessing program was used to compute pathlines on the basis of output from an existing three-dimensional steady-state flow model. The flow model uses 1980 conditions to approximate average annual conditions for 1950-80. The advective transport model required additional information about the nature of flow across model boundaries, aquifer thickness, and porosity. Porosity of two types of basalt strata has been reported for more than 1,500 individual cores from test holes, wells, and outcrops near the south side of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The central 80 percent of samples had porosities of 0.08 to 0.25, the central 50 percent of samples, O. 11 to 0.21. Calibration of the model involved choosing a value for porosity that yielded the best solution. Two radiologic contaminants, iodine-129 and tritium, both introduced to the flow system about 40 years ago, are relatively conservative tracers. Iodine- 129 was considered to be more useful because of a lower analytical detection limit, longer half-life, and longer flow path. The calibration value for porosity was 0.21. Most flow in the aquifer is contained within a regional-scale compartment and follows paths that discharge to the Snake River downstream from Milner Dam. Two intermediate-scale compartments exist along the southeast side of the aquifer and near Mud Lake.One intermediate-scale compartment along the southeast side of the aquifer discharges to the Snake River near American Fails

  13. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  14. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Monger, Gregg R; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L

    2014-12-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation.

  15. Modeling Facilitated Contaminant Transport by Mobile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Kim, Seunghyun

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of exogenous biocolloids such as genetically engineered bacteria in a bioremediation operation can enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater by reducing the retardation effects. Because of their colloidal size and favorable surface conditions, bacteria are efficient contaminant carriers. In cases where contaminants have a low mobility in porous media because of their high partition with solid matrix, facilitated contaminant transport by mobile bacteria can create high contaminant fluxes. When metabolically active mobile bacteria are present in a subsurface environment, the system can be treated as consisting of three phases: water phase, bacterial phase, and stationary solid matrix phase. In this work a mathematical model based on mass balance equations is developed to describe the facilitated transport and fate of a contaminant and bacteria in a porous medium. Bacterial partition between the bulk solution and the stationary solid matrix and contaminant partition among three phases are represented by expressions in terms of measurable quantities. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of contaminant and bacterial concentrations. A dimensional analysis of the transport model was utilized to estimate model parameters from the experimental data and to assess the effect of several parameters on model behavior. The model results matched favorably with experimental data of Jenkins and Lion (1993). The presence of mobile bacteria enhances the contaminant transport. However, bacterial consumption of the contaminant, which serves as a bacterial nutrient, can attenuate the contaminant mobility. The work presented in this paper is the first three-phase model to include the effects of substrate metabolism on the fate of groundwater contaminants.

  16. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  17. Verification tests for contaminant transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, R.K.; Nadarajah, P.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of verifying contaminant transport codes and the techniques that may be used in this verification process are discussed. Commonly used contaminant transport codes are characterized as belonging to one of several types or classes of solution, such as analytic, finite layer, boundary element, finite difference and finite element. Both the level of approximation and the solution methodology should be verified for each contaminant transport code. One powerful method that may be used in contaminant transport code verification is cross-checking (benchmarking) with other codes. This technique is used to check the results of codes from one solution class with the results of codes from another solution class. In this paper cross-checking is performed for three classes of solution; these are, analytic, finite layer, and finite element.

  18. Overcoming diffusion-limited processes using enhanced advective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Many subsurface cleanup activities focus on the remediation of organic contaminants using induced advective fields. Subsurface heterogeneities cause most advective transport to occur in more permeable zones, with transport from the lower permeability units being limited by diffusion to the higher permeable units. While diffusion rates can be enhanced using thermal sources, many of the treatment strategies, including pump and treat, vapor extraction and bioremediation, are limited by mass exchange rates between the higher and lower permeability sand and clay mixtures. Instead of relying on the enhancement of diffusion rates, it is proposed that remediation strategies should focus on the enhancement of induced advective transport rates through the lower permeability units. Injection-extraction strategies using crosshole and huff-and-puff methods are presented for maximizing advective transport through lower permeability units. Optimization of the design can incorporate diffusion-enhancement technologies, bionourishment, capillary confinement in the unsaturated zone, and DNAPL slurping.

  19. Temporal signatures of advective versus diffusive radon transport at a geothermal zone in Central Nepal.

    PubMed

    Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Girault, Frédéric; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2011-02-01

    Temporal variation of radon-222 concentration was studied at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located on the Main Central Thrust zone in Central Nepal. This site is characterized by several carbon dioxide discharges having maximum fluxes larger than 10 kg m(-2) d(-1). Radon concentration was monitored with autonomous Barasol™ probes between January 2008 and November 2009 in two small natural cavities with high CO(2) concentration and at six locations in the soil: four points having a high flux, and two background reference points. At the reference points, dominated by radon diffusion, radon concentration was stable from January to May, with mean values of 22 ± 6.9 and 37 ± 5.5 kBq m(-3), but was affected by a large increase, of about a factor of 2 and 1.6, respectively, during the monsoon season from June to September. At the points dominated by CO(2) advection, by contrast, radon concentration showed higher mean values 39.0 ± 2.6 to 78 ± 1.4 kBq m(-3), remarkably stable throughout the year with small long-term variation, including a possible modulation of period around 6 months. A significant difference between the diffusion dominated reference points and the advection-dominated points also emerged when studying the diurnal S(1) and semi-diurnal S(2) periodic components. At the advection-dominated points, radon concentration did not exhibit S(1) or S(2) components. At the reference points, however, the S(2) component, associated with barometric tide, could be identified during the dry season, but only when the probe was installed at shallow depth. The S(1) component, associated with thermal and possibly barometric diurnal forcing, was systematically observed, especially during monsoon season. The remarkable short-term and long-term temporal stability of the radon concentration at the advection-dominated points, which suggests a strong pressure source at depth, may be an important asset to detect possible temporal variations associated with the

  20. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  1. Demonstration of microbial transport into the capillary fringe via advection from below the water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Andrea M.; Silliman, Stephen E.; Dhamwichukorn, Srisuda; Kulpa, Charles F.

    2005-05-01

    A laboratory experiment is used to provide preliminary evidence that microbes can be advected into the capillary fringe from the region below the water table under steady flow conditions. A flow cell was packed so as to contain both a region for which pore-water pressure was greater than atmospheric pressure (termed 'below the water table') and a region, where the pore-water pressure was less than atmospheric with the pores essentially saturated with water (termed the 'capillary fringe'). Steady flow was then established through maintaining a hydraulic gradient across the medium. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) transformed bacteria ( E. coli JM109) were used to visualize migration of bacteria from below the water table into the capillary fringe. These transformed bacteria fluoresce brightly and readily when excited by standard UV light (395 nm) in 100 mL LB medium with 100 μg/mL ampicillin. The concentrations of bacterial inoculum and oxygen were adjusted to ensure GFPuv expression at a large scale. Results demonstrated that microbes can move into the capillary fringe from below the water table under horizontal hydraulic gradients. Motion from the capillary fringe into the region below the water table was also observed as was the absence of advection through regions of entrapped air below the water table.

  2. The role of advection and dispersion in the rock matrix on the transport of leaking CO2-saturated brine along a fractured zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nawaz; Wörman, Anders; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    CO2 that is injected into a geological storage reservoir can leak in dissolved form because of brine displacement from the reservoir, which is caused by large-scale groundwater motion. Simulations of the reactive transport of leaking CO2aq along a conducting fracture in a clay-rich caprock are conducted to analyze the effect of various physical and geochemical processes. Whilst several modeling transport studies along rock fractures have considered diffusion as the only transport process in the surrounding rock matrix (diffusive transport), this study analyzes the combined role of advection and dispersion in the rock matrix in addition to diffusion (advection-dominated transport) on the migration of CO2aq along a leakage pathway and its conversion in geochemical reactions. A sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the effect of fluid velocity and dispersivity. Variations in the porosity and permeability of the medium are found in response to calcite dissolution and precipitation along the leakage pathway. We observe that advection and dispersion in the rock matrix play a significant role in the overall transport process. For the parameters that were used in this study, advection-dominated transport increased the leakage of CO2aq from the reservoir by nearly 305%, caused faster transport and increased the mass conversion of CO2aq in geochemical reactions along the transport pathway by approximately 12.20% compared to diffusive transport.

  3. Contamination transport modeling with CTSP (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2016-09-01

    CTSP (Contamination Transport Simulation Program) is a simulation program for performing detailed molecular and particulate contaminant transport analyses using complex, CAD-generated geometries. CTSP concurrently traces many simulation macroparticles, allowing it to compute contaminant partial pressures. The code uses a detailed surface model that supports multiple trapped gases and a multi-component surface layer. The molecular residence time is computed by considering surface temperature and activation energies. This paper describes the implemented algorithms and demonstrates the code with several test cases. These include outgassing in a vacuum chamber, spacecraft venting, particulate transport in an air flow, and redistribution of paint flakes on an orbiting satellite. The paper is concluded by summarizing the on-going effort to parallelize the code and utilize GPUs, and to add support for electrostatic return modeling by computing space potential using Green's functions.

  4. Computational modeling of 137Cs contaminant transfer associated with sediment transport in Abukuma River.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Nabi, M; Shimizu, Y; Kimura, I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model capable of simulating the transfer of (137)Cs in rivers associated with transport of fine sediment is presented. The accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) released radionuclides into the atmosphere, and after fallout several radionuclides in them, such as radiocesium ((134)Cs, (137)Cs) and radioiodine ((131)I) were adsorbed on surface soil particles around FDNPP and transported by surface water. To understand the transport and deposition of the radioactive contaminant along with surface soil particles and its flux to the ocean, we modeled the transport of the (137)Cs contaminant by computing the water flow and the associated washload and suspended load transport. We have developed a two-dimensional model to simulate the plane flow structure, sediment transport and associated (137)Cs contaminant transport in rivers by combining a shallow water flow model and an advection-diffusion equation for the transport of sediment. The proposed model has been applied to the lower reach of Abukuma River, which is the main river in the highly contaminated area around FDNPP. The numerical results indicate that most (137)Cs supplied from the upstream river reach with washload would directly reach to Pacific Ocean. In contrast, washload-oriented (137)Cs supplied from the upstream river basin has a limited role in the radioactive contamination in the river. The results also suggest that the proposed framework of computational model can be a potential tool for understanding the sediment-oriented (137)Cs behavior in rivers.

  5. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  6. Advective-diffusive/dispersive transport of chemically reacting species in hydrothermal systems. Final report, FY83-85

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1986-06-20

    A general formulation of multi-phase fluid flow coupled to chemical reactions was developed based on a continuum description of porous media. A preliminary version of the computer code MCCTM was constructed which implemented the general equations for a single phase fluid. The computer code MCCTM incorporates mass transport by advection-diffusion/dispersion in a one-dimensional porous medium coupled to reversible and irreversible, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions. These reactions include aqueous complexing, oxidation/reduction reactions, ion exchange, and hydrolysis reactions of stoichiometric minerals. The code MCCTM uses a fully implicit finite difference algorithm. The code was tested against analytical calculations. Applications of the code included investigation of the propagation of sharp chemical reaction fronts, metasomatic alteration of microcline at elevated temperatures and pressures, and ion-exchange in a porous column. Finally numerical calculations describing fluid flow in crystalline rock in the presence of a temperature gradient were compared with experimental results for quartzite.

  7. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  8. User's guide to PHREEQC, a computer program for speciation, reaction-path, advective-transport, and inverse geochemical calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is a computer program written in the C pwgranuning language that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC is based on an ion-association aqueous model and has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations, (2) reaction-path and advective-transport calculations involving specified irreversible reactions, mixing of solutions, mineral and gas equilibria surface-complex-ation reactions, and ion-exchange reactions, and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for composition differences between waters, within specified compositional uncertainties. PHREEQC is derived from the Fortran program PHREEQE, but it has been completely rewritten in C with the addition many new capabilities. New features include the capabilities to use redox couples to distribute redox elements among their valence states in speciation calculations; to model ion-exchange and surface-compiexation reactions; to model reactions with a fixed-pressure, multicomponent gas phase (that is, a gas bubble); to calculate the mass of water in the aqueous phase during reaction and transport calculations; to keep track of the moles of minerals present in the solid phases and determine antomaticaHy the thermodynamically stable phase assemblage; to simulate advective transport in combination with PHREEQC's reaction-modeling capability; and to make inverse modeling calculations that allow for uncertainties in the analytical data. The user interface is improved through the use of a simplified approach to redox reactions, which includes explicit mole-balance equations for hydrogen and oxygen; the use of a revised input that is modular and completely free format; and the use of mineral names and standard chemical symbolism rather than index numbers. The use of (2 eliminates nearly all limitations on army sizes, including numbers of elements, aqueous species, solutions, phases, and lengths of character

  9. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  10. Investigating the impact of advective and diffusive controls in solute transport on geoelectrical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Daniel D.; Singha, Kamini

    2010-09-01

    Multiple types of physical heterogeneity have been suggested to explain anomalous solute transport behavior, yet determining exactly what controls transport at a given site is difficult from concentration histories alone. Differences in timing between co-located fluid and bulk apparent electrical conductivity data have previously been used to estimate solute mass transfer rates between mobile and less-mobile domains; here, we consider if this behavior can arise from other types of heterogeneity. Numerical models are used to investigate the electrical signatures associated with large-scale hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity and small-scale dual-domain mass transfer, and address issues regarding the scale of the geophysical measurement. We examine the transport behavior of solutes with and without dual-domain mass transfer, in: 1) a homogeneous medium, 2) a discretely fractured medium, and 3) a hydraulic conductivity field generated with sequential Gaussian simulation. We use the finite-element code COMSOL Multiphysics to construct two-dimensional cross-sectional models and solve the coupled flow, transport, and electrical conduction equations. Our results show that both large-scale heterogeneity and subscale heterogeneity described by dual-domain mass transfer produce a measurable hysteresis between fluid and bulk apparent electrical conductivity, indicating a lag between electrical conductivity changes in the mobile and less-mobile domains of an aquifer, or mass transfer processes, at some scale. The shape and magnitude of the observed hysteresis is controlled by the spatial distribution of hydraulic heterogeneity, mass transfer rate between domains, and the ratio of mobile to immobile porosity. Because the rate of mass transfer is related to the inverse square of a diffusion length scale, our results suggest that the shape of the hysteresis curve is indicative of the length scale over which mass transfer is occurring. We also demonstrate that the difference in

  11. The effects of temperature and motility on the advective transport of a deep subsurface bacteria through saturated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, Douglas Ray

    1993-01-01

    Replicate column experiments were done to quantify the effects of temperature and bacterial motility on advective transport through repacked, but otherwise unaltered, natural aquifer sediment. The bacteria used in this study, A0500, was a flagellated, spore-forming rod isolated from the deep subsurface at DOE`s Savannah River Laboratory. Motility was controlled by turning on flagellar metabolism at 18°C but off at 40°α), estimated using a steady-state filtration model. The observed greater microsphere removal at the higher temperature agreed with the physical-chemical model, but bacteria removal at 18{degrees}C was only half that at 4°C. The sticking efficiency for non-motile A0500 (4°C) was over three times that of the motile A0500 (18°C), 0.073 versus 0.022 respectively. Analysis of complete breakthrough curves using a non-steady, kinetically limited, transport model to estimate the time scales of attachment and detachment suggested that motile A 0500 bacteria traveled twice as far as non-motile A 0500 bacteria before becoming attached. Once attached, non-motile colloids detached on the time scale of 9 to 17 days. The time scale for detachment of motile A0500 bacteria was shorter, 4 to 5 days. Results indicate that bacterial attachment was reversible and detachment was enhanced by bacterial motifity. The kinetic energy of bacterial motility changed the attachment-detachment kinetics in favor of the detached state. The chemical factors responsible for the enhanced transport are not known. However, motility may have caused weakly held bacteria to detach from the secondary minimum, and possibly from the primary minimum, as described by DLVO theory.

  12. Advective heat transport associated with regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Frondini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we show that the main springs of the central Apennine transport a total amount of heat of ˜2.2×109 J s-1. Most of this heat (57%) is the result of geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. This result indicates that a large area of the central Apennines is very hot with heat flux values >300 mW m-2. These values are higher than those measured in the magmatic and famously geothermal provinces of Tuscany and Latium and about 1/3 of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone. This finding is surprising because the central Apennines have been thought to be a relatively cold area. Translated by CO2 rich fluids, this heat anomaly suggests the existence of a thermal source such as a large magmatic intrusion at depth. Recent tomographic images of the area support the presence of such an intrusion visible as a broad negative velocity anomaly in seismic waves. Our results indicate that the thermal regime of tectonically active areas of the Earth, where meteoric waters infiltrate and deeply circulate, should be revised on the basis of mass and energy balances of the groundwater systems.

  13. Potential for plastics to transport hydrophobic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Teuten, Emma L; Rowland, Steven J; Galloway, Tamara S; Thompson, Richard C

    2007-11-15

    Plastic debris litters marine and terrestrial habitats worldwide. It is ingested by numerous species of animals, causing deleterious physical effects. High concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants have also been measured on plastic debris collected from the environment, but the fate of these contaminants is poorly understood. Here, we examine the uptake and subsequent release of phenanthrene by three plastics. Equilibrium distribution coefficients for sorption of phenanthrene from seawater onto the plastics varied by more than an order of magnitude (polyethylene > polypropylene > polyvinyl chloride (PVC)). In all cases, sorption to plastics greatly exceeded sorption to two natural sediments. Desorption rates of phenanthrene from the plastics or sediments back into solution spanned several orders of magnitude. As expected, desorption occurred more rapidly from the sediments than from the plastics. Using the equilibrium partitioning method, the effects of adding very small quantities of plastic with sorbed phenanthrene to sediment inhabited by the lugworm (Arenicola marina) were evaluated. We estimate that the addition of as little as 1 microg of contaminated polyethylene to a gram of sediment would give a significant increase in phenanthrene accumulation by A. marina. Thus, plastics may be important agents in the transport of hydrophobic contaminants to sediment-dwelling organisms.

  14. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  15. STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING TRANSPORT PARAMETERS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS TO ONE-DOMENSIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Brian J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation nonlinear multiple-regression methodology for estimating parameters that characterize the transport of contaminants is developed and demonstrated. Finite difference containment transport simulation is combined with a nonlinear weighted least squares multiple-regression procedure. The technique provides optimal parameter estimates and gives statistics for assessing the reliability of these estimates under certain general assumptions about the distributions of the random measurement errors. Monte Carlo analysis is used to estimate parameter reliability for a hypothetical homogeneous soil column for which concentration data contain large random measurement errors. The value of data collected spatially versus data collected temporally was investigated for estimation of velocity, dispersion coefficient, effective porosity, first-order decay rate, and zero-order production. The use of spatial data gave estimates that were 2-3 times more reliable than estimates based on temporal data for all parameters except velocity. (Estimated author abstract) Refs.

  16. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated.

  17. Can contaminant transport models predict breakthrough?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, Wei-Shyuan; Hampton, Duane R.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Kambham, Kiran; Benegar, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    A solute breakthrough curve measured during a two-well tracer test was successfully predicted in 1986 using specialized contaminant transport models. Water was injected into a confined, unconsolidated sand aquifer and pumped out 125 feet (38.3 m) away at the same steady rate. The injected water was spiked with bromide for over three days; the outflow concentration was monitored for a month. Based on previous tests, the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the thick aquifer varied by a factor of seven among 12 layers. Assuming stratified flow with small dispersivities, two research groups accurately predicted breakthrough with three-dimensional (12-layer) models using curvilinear elements following the arc-shaped flowlines in this test. Can contaminant transport models commonly used in industry, that use rectangular blocks, also reproduce this breakthrough curve? The two-well test was simulated with four MODFLOW-based models, MT3D (FD and HMOC options), MODFLOWT, MOC3D, and MODFLOW-SURFACT. Using the same 12 layers and small dispersivity used in the successful 1986 simulations, these models fit almost as accurately as the models using curvilinear blocks. Subtle variations in the curves illustrate differences among the codes. Sensitivities of the results to number and size of grid blocks, number of layers, boundary conditions, and values of dispersivity and porosity are briefly presented. The fit between calculated and measured breakthrough curves degenerated as the number of layers and/or grid blocks decreased, reflecting a loss of model predictive power as the level of characterization lessened. Therefore, the breakthrough curve for most field sites can be predicted only qualitatively due to limited characterization of the hydrogeology and contaminant source strength.

  18. Packaging and transportation of radioactively contaminated lead

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, Eugene; Holden, Gerard

    2007-07-01

    Under the management of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) the government of the United Kingdom has launched an ambitious program to remediate the nation's nuclear waste legacy. Over a twenty-five year period NDA plans to decommission several first generation nuclear power plants and other radioactive facilities. The use innovative, safe 'fit for purpose' technologies will be a major part of this complex program. This paper will present a case study of a recently completed project undertaken in support of the nuclear decommissioning activities at the Sellafield site in the United Kingdom. The focus is on an innovative application of new packaging technology developed for the safe transportation of radioactively contaminated lead objects. Several companies collaborated on the project and contributed to its safe and successful conclusion. These companies include British Nuclear Group, Gravatom Engineering, W. F. Bowker Transport, Atlantic Container Lines, MHF Logistical Solutions and Energy Solutions. New containers and a new innovative inter-modal packaging system to transport the radioactive lead were developed and demonstrated during the project. The project also demonstrated the potential contribution of international nuclear recycling activities as a safe, economic and feasible technical option for nuclear decommissioning in the United Kingdom. (authors)

  19. Steady-State and Transient Groundwater Flow and Advective Transport, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and Vicinity, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. C.; Ackerman, D. J.; Rousseau, J. P.; Rattray, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport through the fractured basalts and interbedded sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The model domain covers an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the aquifer. Numerical models simulated 1980 steady-state conditions and transient flow for 1980-95. In the transient model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress. The models were calibrated using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. The steady-state model reasonably simulated the observed water-table altitude and gradients. Simulation of transient conditions reproduced changes in the flow system resulting from episodic infiltration from the Big Lost River. Analysis of simulations shows that flow is (1) dominantly horizontal through interflow zones in basalt, vertical anisotropy resulting from contrasts in hydraulic conductivity of different types of basalt and the interbedded sediments, (2) temporally variable due to streamflow infiltration from the Big Lost River, and (3) moving downward downgradient of the INL. Particle-tracking simulations were used to evaluate how simulated groundwater flow paths and travel times differ between the steady-state and transient flow models, and how well model-derived groundwater flow directions and velocities compare to independently-derived estimates. Particle tracking also was used to simulate the growth of tritium plumes originating at two INL facilities over a 16 year period under steady-state and transient flow conditions (1953-68). The shape, dimensions, and areal extent of these plumes were compared to a map of the plumes for 1968 from tritium releases beginning in 1952

  20. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul [Allentown, PA; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  1. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  2. Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: the effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties.

    PubMed

    Apul, Defne S; Gardner, Kevin H; Eighmy, T Taylor

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m(3)/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils.

  3. Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: The effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties

    SciTech Connect

    Apul, Defne S. Gardner, Kevin H. Eighmy, T. Taylor

    2007-07-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m{sup 3}/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils.

  4. A semi-analytical solution for simulating contaminant transport subject to chain-decay reactions.

    PubMed

    Sudicky, Edward A; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Illman, Walter A; Wu, Yu-Shu; Kool, Jan B; Huyakorn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of new, semi-analytical solutions to simulate three-dimensional contaminant transport subject to first-order chain-decay reactions. The aquifer is assumed to be areally semi-infinite, but finite in thickness. The analytical solution can treat the transformation of contaminants into daughter products, leading to decay chains consisting of multiple contaminant species and various reaction pathways. The solution in its current form is capable of accounting for up to seven species and four decay levels. The complex pathways are represented by means of first-order decay and production terms, while branching ratios account for decay stoichiometry. Besides advection, dispersion, bio-chemical or radioactive decay and daughter product formation, the model also accounts for sorption of contaminants on the aquifer solid phase with each species having a different retardation factor. First-type contaminant boundary conditions are utilized at the source (x=0 m) and can be either constant-in-time for each species, or the concentration can be allowed to undergo first-order decay. The solutions are obtained by exponential Fourier, Fourier cosine and Laplace transforms. Limiting forms of the solutions can be obtained in closed form, but we evaluate the general solutions by numerically inverting the analytical solutions in exponential Fourier and Laplace transform spaces. Various cases are generated and the solutions are verified against the HydroGeoSphere numerical model.

  5. Simulations of groundwater flow, transport, and age in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a study of transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Vulnerability to contamination from manmade and natural sources can be characterized by the groundwater-age distribution measured in a supply well and the associated implications for the source depths of the withdrawn water. Coupled groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the transport of the geochemical age-tracers carbon-14, tritium, and three chlorofluorocarbon species to public-supply wells in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A separate, regional-scale simulation of transport of carbon-14 that used the flow-field computed by a previously documented regional groundwater flow model was calibrated and used to specify the initial concentrations of carbon-14 in the local-scale transport model. Observations of the concentrations of each of the five chemical species, in addition to water-level observations and measurements of intra-borehole flow within a public-supply well, were used to calibrate parameters of the local-scale groundwater flow and transport models. The calibrated groundwater flow model simulates the mixing of “young” groundwater, which entered the groundwater flow system after 1950 as recharge at the water table, with older resident groundwater that is more likely associated with natural contaminants. Complexity of the aquifer system in the zone of transport between the water table and public-supply well screens was simulated with a geostatistically generated stratigraphic realization based upon observed lithologic transitions at borehole control locations. Because effective porosity was simulated as spatially uniform, the simulated age tracers are more efficiently transported through the portions of the simulated aquifer with relatively higher simulated hydraulic conductivity. Non-pumping groundwater wells with long screens that connect aquifer intervals having different hydraulic heads can provide alternate pathways for contaminant transport that are faster than the advective transport through the aquifer material. Simulation of

  6. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  7. A Generalized Model for Transport of Contaminants in Soil by Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Garcia, Juan M.; Baek, Kitae; Alshawabkeh, Iyad D.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized model applicable to soils contaminated with multiple species under enhanced boundary conditions during treatment by electric fields is presented. The partial differential equations describing species transport are developed by applying the law of mass conservation to their fluxes. Transport, due to migration, advection and diffusion, of each aqueous component and complex species are combined to produce one partial differential equation hat describes transport of the total analytical concentrations of component species which are the primary dependent variables. This transport couples with geochemical reactions such as aqueous equilibrium, sorption, precipitation and dissolution. The enhanced model is used to simulate electrokinetic cleanup of lead and copper contaminants at an Army Firing Range. Acid enhancement is achieved by the use of adipic acid to neutralize the basic front produced for the cathode electrochemical reaction. The model is able to simulate enhanced application of the process by modifying the boundary conditions. The model showed that kinetics of geochemical reactions, such as metals dissolution/leaching and redox reactions might be significant for realistic prediction of enhanced electrokinetic extraction of metals in real world applications. PMID:22242884

  8. FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER: PART II. COLLOIDAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of both field and laboratory components. Field studies evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganicgeochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Research at three different metal-contaminated sit...

  9. Surfactant-enhanced remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer. 1. Transport of triton X-100

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.A.; Sahoo, D.; Mclellan, H.M.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.

    1997-01-01

    Transport of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) at aqueous concentrations less than 400 mg/L through a trichloroethene-contaminated sand-and-gravel aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, has been studied through a series of laboratory and field experiments. In the laboratory, batch and column experiments were conducted to quantify the rate and amount of Triton X-100 sorption to the aquifer sediments. In the field, a 400 mg/L aqueous Triton X-100 solution was injected into the aquifer at a rate of 26.5 L/min for a 35-d period. The transport of Triton X-100 was monitored by sampling and analysis of groundwater at six locations surrounding the injection well. Equilibrium batch sorption experiments showed that Triton X-100 sorbs strongly and nonlinearly to the field soil with the sharpest inflection point of the isotherm occurring at an equilibrium aqueous Triton X-100 concentration close to critical micelle concentration. Batch, soil column, and field experimental data were analyzed with zero-, one-, and two- dimensional (respectively) transient solute transport models with either equilibrium or rate-limited sorption. These analyses reveal that Triton X- 100 sorption to the aquifer solids is slow relative to advective and dispersive transport and that an equilibrium sorption model cannot simulate accurately the observed soil column and field data. Comparison of kinetic sorption parameters from batch, column, and field transport data indicate that both physical heterogeneities and Triton X-100 mass transfer between water and soil contribute to the kinetic transport effects.Transport of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) at aqueous concentrations less than 400 mg/L through a trichloroethene-contaminated sand-and-gravel aquifer was studied. Equilibrium batch sorption experiments showed that Triton X-100 sorbs strongly and nonlinearly to the field soil with the sharpest inflection point of the isotherm occurring at an equilibrium aqueous Triton X-100 concentration close to

  10. Wind tunnel measurements of scale-by-scale energy transfer, dissipation, advection and production/transport in equilibrium and nonequilibrium decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro; Vassilicos, Christos

    2012-11-01

    The cornerstone assumption that Cɛ ≡ ɛL /u3 ~ constant was found to breakdown in certain nonequilibrium regions of decaying grid-generated turbulence with wide power-law near -5/3 spectra where the behaviour of Cɛ is, instead, very close to Cɛ ~ ReL- 1 (Valente & Vassilicos, 2012 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 214503]). We investigate nonequilibrium turbulence by measuring with two cross wire anemometers the downstream evolution of the scale-by-scale energy transfer, dissipation, advection, production and transport in the lee of a square-mesh grid and compare with a region of equilibrium turbulence. For the nonequilibrium case it is shown that the production and transport terms are negligible for scales smaller than about a third of L. For both cases it is shown that the peak of the scale-by-scale energy transfer scales as u3 / L which is the expected behaviour for equilibrium turbulence. However, for the nonequilibrium case this implies an imbalance between the energy transfer to the small scales and the dissipation. This imbalance is reflected on the small-scale advection which becomes larger in proportion to the maximum energy transfer as the turbulence decays whereas it stays proportionally constant in the equilibrium case. P. V. acknowledges the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (SFRH/BD/61223/2009, cofinanced by POPH/FSE).

  11. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Ely, D.M.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G.M.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2001-08-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS). The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 underground Test Area (UGTA) sites. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work.

  12. Steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport, Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Daniel J.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Rattray, Gordon W.; Fisher, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The steady-state and transient flow models cover an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the 890 square miles of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Model results can be used in numerical simulations to evaluate the movement of contaminants in the aquifer. Saturated flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer was simulated using the MODFLOW-2000 groundwater flow model. Steady-state flow was simulated to represent conditions in 1980 with average streamflow infiltration from 1966-80 for the Big Lost River, the major variable inflow to the system. The transient flow model simulates groundwater flow between 1980 and 1995, a period that included a 5-year wet cycle (1982-86) followed by an 8-year dry cycle (1987-94). Specified flows into or out of the active model grid define the conditions on all boundaries except the southwest (outflow) boundary, which is simulated with head-dependent flow. In the transient flow model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress, and was variable in time and location. The models were calibrated by adjusting aquifer hydraulic properties to match simulated and observed heads or head differences using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. Various summary, regression, and inferential statistics, in addition to comparisons of model properties and simulated head to measured properties and head, were used to evaluate the model calibration. Model parameters estimated for the steady-state calibration included hydraulic conductivity for seven of nine hydrogeologic zones and a global value of vertical anisotropy. Parameters

  13. Contaminant transport in dual-porosity media with dissolved organic matter and bacteria present as mobile colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Bae; Corapcioglu, M Yavuz

    2002-12-01

    In riverbank filtration, contaminant transport is affected by colloidal particles such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacterial particles. In addition, the subsurface heterogeneity influences the behavior of contaminant transport in riverbank filtration. A mathematical model is developed to describe the contaminant transport in dual-porosity media in the presence of DOM and bacteria as mobile colloids. In the model development, a porous medium is divided into the mobile and immobile regions to consider the presence of ineffective micropores in physically heterogeneous riverbanks. We assume that the contaminant transport in the mobile region is controlled by the advection and dispersion while the contaminant transport in the immobile region occurs due to the molecular diffusion. The contaminant transfer between the mobile and immobile regions takes place by diffusive mass transfer. The mobile region is conceptualized as a four-phase system: two mobile colloidal phases, an aqueous phase, and a solid matrix. The complete set of governing equations is solved numerically with a fully implicit finite difference method. The model results show that in riverbank filtration, the contaminant can migrate further than expected due to the presence of DOM and bacteria. In addition, the contaminant mobility increases further in the presence of the immobile region in aquifers. A sensitivity analysis shows that in dual-porosity media, earlier breakthrough of the contaminant takes place as the volumetric fraction of the mobile region decreases. It is also demonstrated that as the contaminant mass transfer rate coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions increases, the contaminant concentration gradient between the two regions reverses at earlier pore volumes. The contaminant mass transfer coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions mainly controls the tailing effect of the contaminant breakthrough. The contaminant breakthrough curves are sensitive to changes in

  14. Preliminary study of niobium alloy contamination by transport through helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.; Moore, T. J.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    Transport of gaseous contaminants through the working fluid to or from sensitive refractory alloys is theoretically possible during long time operation of Brayton and Stirling space power generation systems which use a gas as the working fluid. A test was designed which could give an answer to whether transport of contaminants through the working fluid was a potential major problem. The findings of that preliminary study are summarized.

  15. Multiple-tracer tests for contaminant transport process identification in saturated municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, N.D. Rees-White, T.C.; Stringfellow, A.M.; Beaven, R.P.; Hudson, A.P.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Multiple tracers were applied to saturated MSW to test dual-porosity properties. • Lithium demonstrated to be non-conservative as a tracer. • 260 mm diameter column too small to test transport properties of MSW. • The classical advection-dispersion mode was rejected due to high dispersivity. • Characteristic diffusion times did not vary with the tracer. - Abstract: Two column tests were performed in conditions emulating vertical flow beneath the leachate table in a biologically active landfill to determine dominant transport mechanisms occurring in landfills. An improved understanding of contaminant transport process in wastes is required for developing better predictions about potential length of the long term aftercare of landfills, currently measured in timescales of centuries. Three tracers (lithium, bromide and deuterium) were used. Lithium did not behave conservatively. Given that lithium has been used extensively for tracing in landfill wastes, the tracer itself and the findings of previous tests which assume that it has behaved conservatively may need revisiting. The smaller column test could not be fitted with continuum models, probably because the volume of waste was below a representative elemental volume. Modelling compared advection-dispersion (AD), dual porosity (DP) and hybrid AD–DP models. Of these models, the DP model was found to be the most suitable. Although there is good evidence to suggest that diffusion is an important transport mechanism, the breakthrough curves of the different tracers did not differ from each other as would be predicted based on the free-water diffusion coefficients. This suggested that solute diffusion in wastes requires further study.

  16. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  17. Transport of trace contaminants through porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.

    1975-01-01

    Research accomplishments in the following areas are discussed: (1) the calibration of the gas chromatograph for acetaldehyde and ethanol; (2) the development of data reduction and analysis methods; (3) the generation and analysis of experimental data for the transport of 100 ppm acetaldehyde through a cylindrical bed packed with activated carbon granules; (4) the generation and analysis of experimental data for the transport of 100 ppm ethanol through a cylindrical bed packed with activated carbon granules; and (5) a comparison of the volume adsorption capacity of activated carbon for 100 ppm concentrations of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and acetone. Activities in progress and planned activities are reviewed.

  18. Preliminary study of niobium alloy contamination by transport through helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Coulson M.; Moore, Thomas J.; Wheeler, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary tests were conducted to determine if interstitial element transport through a circulating helium working fluid was a potential problem in Brayton and Stirling space power systems. Test specimens exposed to a thermal gradient for up to 3000-hr included Nb-1%Zr, a Sm-Co alloy (referred to as SmCo in this paper), Hiperco 50 steel, and alumina to simulate various engine components of the Brayton and Stirling systems. Results indicate that helium transport of interstitial contaminants can be minimized over a 7-yr life with a monometallic Nb-1%Zr design. Exposure with other materials indicated a potential for interstitial contaminant transport. Determination of contamination kinetics and the effects on structural integrity will require additional testing.

  19. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  20. Inverse Reactive Transport Simulator (Inverts): An Inverse Model for Contaminant Transport with Nonlinear Adsorption and Source Terms

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter

    2001-10-31

    A numerically based simulator was developed to assist in the interpretation of complex laboratory experiments examining transport processes of chemical and biological contaminants subject to nonlinear adsorption and/or source terms. The inversion is performed with any of three nonlinear regression methods, Marquardt-Levenberg, conjugate gradient, or quasi-Newton. The governing equations for the problem are solved by the method of finite-differences including any combination of three boundary conditions: (1) Dirichlet, (2) Neumann, and (3) Cauchy. The dispersive terms in the transport equations were solved using the second-order accurate in time and space Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advective terms were handled using a third-order in time and space, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme that damps spurious oscillations around sharp concentration fronts. The numerical algorithms were implemented in the computer code INVERTS, which runs on any standard personal computer. Apart from a comprehensive set of test problems, INVERTS was also used to model the elution of a nonradioactive tracer, {sup 185}Re, in a pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) experiment with a simulated waste glass for low-activity waste immobilization. Interpretation of the elution profile was best described with a nonlinear kinetic model for adsorption.

  1. Outgassing study of spacecraft materials and contaminant transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chung M.; Labatete-Goeppinger, Aura C.; Fowler, Jesse D.; Easton, Myriam P.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Contamination control plays an important role in sustaining spacecraft performance. One spacecraft degradation mechanism involves long-term on-orbit molecular outgassing from spacecraft materials. The outgassed molecules may accumulate on thermal control surfaces and/or optics, causing degradation. In this study, we performed outgassing measurements of multiple spacecraft materials, including adhesives, Nylon Velcro, and other assembly materials through a modified ASTM E595 test method. The modified ASTM E595 test had the source and receiver temperature remained at 125°C and 25°C, respectively, but with prolonged outgassing periods of two weeks. The condensable contaminants were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine their spectral transmission and chemical composition. The FTIR spectra showed several spacecraft materials, primarily adhesives and potting materials, exhibiting slight absorption from contaminants consisting of hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acids. To gain insight into molecular contaminant transport, simulations were conducted to characterize contaminant accumulation inside a hypothetical space system cavity. The simulation indicated that contaminant molecules bouncing inside the hypothetical payload cavity can lead to deposition on colder surfaces, even though large openings are available to provide venting pathways for escaping to space. The newly established molecular contaminant transport simulation capability holds the promise of providing quantitative guidance for future spacecraft and its venting design.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Mary C.; Ely, D. Matthew; Tiedeman, Claire R.; O'Brien, Grady M.; D'Agnese, Frank A.; Faunt, Claudia C.

    2001-01-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system. The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 Underground Test Areas. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work. The methods presented in this report are used in three ways. (1) The ratings for individual observations are obtained by manipulating the measures of prediction uncertainty, and do not involve recalibrating the model. In this analysis, observation locations are each omitted individually and the resulting increase in uncertainty in the predictions is calculated. The uncertainty is quantified as standard deviations on the simulated advective transport. The increase in uncertainty is quantified as the percent increase in the standard deviations caused by omitting the one observation location from the calculation of standard deviations. In general, observation locations associated with larger increases are rated as more important. (2) Ratings for largely geographically based groups are obtained using a straightforward extension of the method used for

  3. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  4. Ammonia gas transport and reactions in unsaturated sediments: implications for use as an amendment to immobilize inorganic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Szecsody, J E; Truex, M J; Williams, M D; Liu, Y

    2015-05-30

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants (such as uranium) because it induces a high pore-water pH, causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application of this treatment, further knowledge of ammonia transport in porous media and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia treatment is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate inter-phase (gas/sediment/pore water) reactions, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions, such as flow rate, gas concentration, and water content. Uranium-contaminated sediment was treated with ammonia gas to demonstrate U immobilization. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases the pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas advection front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase upon exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate when the pH declines due to buffering. Up to 85% of the water-leachable U was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  5. The effects of a perturbed source on contaminant transport near the Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.

    1989-03-01

    The effects of a perturbed contamination source at the Weldon Spring quarry in St. Charles County, Missouri, on downstream solute concentrations were investigated using one-dimensional analytical solutions to an advection-dispersion equation developed for both constant-strength and multiple-stepped source functions. A sensitivity study using parameter base-case values and ranges consistent with the geologic conceptualization of the quarry area indicates that the parameters having the greatest effect on predicted concentrations are the distance from the quarry to the point of interest, the average linear groundwater velocity, the contaminant retardation coefficient, and the amplitude and duration of the source perturbation caused by response action activities. Use of base-case parameter value and realistic values for the amplitude and duration of the source perturbation produced a small effect on solute concentrations near the western extremity of the nearby municipal well field, as well as small uncertainties in the predicted results for the assumed model. The effect of simplifying assumptions made in deriving the analytic solution is unknown: use of a multidimensional flow and transport model and additional field work are needed to validate the model. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  6. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN PARALLEL FRACTURED MEDIA: SUDICKY AND FRIND REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is concerned with a modified, nondimensional form of the parallel fracture, contaminant transport model of Sudicky and Frind (1982). The modifications include the boundary condition at the fracture wall, expressed by a parameter, and the power-law relationship between...

  7. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN PARALLEL FRACTURED MEDIA: SUDICKY AND FRIND REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is concerned with a modified, nondimensional form of the parallel fracture, contaminant transport model of Sudicky and Frind (1982). The modifications include the boundary condition at the fracture wall, expressed by a parameter , and the power-law relationship betwe...

  8. Canyon Disposal Initiative - Numerical Modeling of Contaminant Transport from Grouted Residual Waste in the 221-U Facility (U Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2004-10-12

    This letter report documents initial numerical analyses conducted by PNNL to provide support for a feasibility study on decommissioning of the canyon buildings at Hanford. The 221-U facility is the first of the major canyon buildings to be decommissioned. The specific objective of this modeling effort was to provide estimates of potential rates of migration of residual contaminants out of the 221-U facility during the first 40 years after decommissioning. If minimal contaminant migration is predicted to occur from the facility during this time period, then the structure may be deemed to provide a level of groundwater protection that is essentially equivalent to the liner and leachate collection systems that are required at conventional landfills. The STOMP code was used to simulate transport of selected radionuclides out of a canyon building, representative of the 221-U facility after decommissioning, for a period of 40 years. Simulation results indicate that none of the selected radionuclides that were modeled migrated beyond the concrete structure of the facility during the 40-year period of interest. Jacques (2001) identified other potential contaminants in the 221-U facility that were not modeled, however, including kerosene, phenol, and various metals. Modeling of these contaminants was beyond the scope of this preliminary effort due to increased complexity. Simulation results indicate that contaminant release from the canyon buildings will be diffusion controlled at early times. Advection is expected to become much more important at later times, after contaminants have diffused out of the facility and into the surrounding soil environment. After contaminants have diffused out of the facility, surface infiltration covers will become very important for mitigating further transport of contaminants in the underlying vadose zone and groundwater.

  9. Transportation cask contamination weeping: A program leading to prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P. C.; Doughty, D. H.; Chambers, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the problem of cask contamination weeping, and efforts to understand the phenomenon and to eliminate its occurrence during spent nuclear fuel transport. The paper analyses of field experience and scoping experiments, and concentrates on current modelling and experimental validation efforts. The weeping'' phenomenon associated with spent fuel transportation casks (also known as sweating'') is believed to be due to the conversion of fixed contamination on the external surface of the cask to a removable form. Spent fuel transportation casks are loaded under water at nuclear power plants in a spent fuel storage pool, exposing the cask surfaces to contamination by radionuclides present in the pool water including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 60}Co. The external surfaces of loaded casks are routinely surveyed for removable contamination and decontaminated to 1/10 of the US and IAEA regulatory limits prior to being released for shipment (49CFR 1983, IAEA 1989). However, 3% to 8% of US spent fuel casks have arrived at final destinations with removable surface contamination in excess of that allowed by regulation, though many preshipment surveys have shown contaminant levels to be within allowable limits (Grella 1987). Attempts to reduce the incidence of weeping have met with limited success and resulted in time-consuming operational constraints and procedures that significantly increase cask processing times and occupational exposures at loading facilities. As the US Department of Energy (DOE) moves toward a high volume spent fuel transportation campaign beginning in 1998, the elimination of weeping occurrence and minimization of operational constraints has received increased attention.

  10. Groundwater contamination: identification of source signal by time-reverse mass transport computation and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussis, A. S.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argyriou, A.

    2003-04-01

    Source signal identification is a forensic task, within regulatory and legal activities. Estimation of the contaminant's release history by reverse-solution (stepping back in time) of the mass transport equation, partialC/partialt + u partialC/partialx = D partial^2C/ partialx^2, is an ill-posed problem (its solution is non-unique and unstable). For this reason we propose the recovery of the source signal from measured concentration profile data through a numerical technique that is based on the premise of advection-dominated transport. We derive an explicit numerical scheme by discretising the pure advection equation, partialC/ partialt + u partial C/partialx = 0, such that it also models gradient-transport by matching numerical diffusion (leading truncation error term) to physical dispersion. The match is achieved by appropriate choice of the scheme’s spatial weighting coefficient q as function of the grid Peclet number P = u Δx/D: θ = 0.5 - P-1. This is a novel and efficient direct solution approach for the signal identification problem at hand that can accommodate space-variable transport parameters as well. First, we perform numerical experiments to define proper grids (in terms of Courant {bf C} = uΔt/Δx and grid Peclet P numbers) for control of spurious oscillations (instability). We then assess recovery of source signals, from perfect as well as from error-seeded field data, considering field data resulting from single- and double-peaked source signals. With perfect data, the scheme recovers source signals with very good accuracy. With imperfect data, however, additional data conditioning is required for control of signal noise. Alternating reverse profile computation with Savitzky-Golay low-pass filtering allows the recovery of well-timed and smooth source signals that satisfy mass conservation very well. Current research focuses on: a) optimising the performance of Savitzky-Golay filters, through selection of appropriate parameters (order of least

  11. Contaminant Transport Through Subsurface Material from the DOE Hanford Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, M.N.; Mayes, M.A.; Jardine, P.M.; Fendorf, S.E.; Nehlhorn, T.L.; Yin, X.P.; Ladd, J.; Teerlink, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2003-03-26

    Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation. This paper focuses on the geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. Laboratory scale batch sorption experiments and saturated transport experiments were conducted using reactive tracers U(VI), Sr, Cs, Co and Cr(VI) to investigate geochemical processes controlling the rates and mechanisms of sorption to Hanford subsurface material. Results indicate that the rate of sorption is influenced by changes in solution chemistry such as ionic strength, pH and presence of competing cations. Sediment characteristics such as mineralogy, iron content and cation/anion exchange capacity coupled with the dynamics of flow impact the number of sites available for sorption. Investigative approaches using a combination of batch and transport experiments will contribute to the conceptual and Hanford vadose zone.

  12. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  13. Modelling contaminant transport for pumping wells in riverbank filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Shaymaa; Bahar, Arifah; Aziz, Zainal Abdul; Suratman, Saim

    2016-01-01

    Analytical study of the influence of both the pumping well discharge rate and pumping time on contaminant transport and attenuation is significant for hydrological and environmental science applications. This article provides an analytical solution for investigating the influence of both pumping time and travelling time together for one-dimensional contaminant transport in riverbank filtration systems by using the Green's function approach. The basic aim of the model is to understand how the pumping time and pumping rate, which control the travelling time, can affect the contaminant concentration in riverbank filtration systems. Results of analytical solutions are compared with the results obtained using a MODFLOW numerical model. Graphically, it is found that both analytical and numerical solutions have almost the same behaviour. Additionally, the graphs indicate that any increase in the pumping rate or simulation pumping time should increase the contamination in groundwater. The results from the proposed analytical model are well matched with the data collected from a riverbank filtration site in France. After this validation, the model is then applied to the first pilot project of a riverbank filtration system conducted in Malaysia. Sensitivity analysis results highlight the importance of degradation rates of contaminants on groundwater quality, for which higher utilization rates lead to the faster consumption of pollutants.

  14. Modelling coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Croisé, J.; Altmann, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemico-osmosis is a recognized phenomenon taking place in clay mineral-rich sedimentary formations and a number of questions have been raised concerning its potential effects on pressure fields in and around underground radioactive waste repositories installed in such formations. Certain radioactive waste packages contain large quantities of nitrate salts whose release might result in the presence of highly concentrated salt solutions in the disposal cells, during their resaturation after closure of the facility. This would lead to large solute concentration gradients within the formation's porewater which could then potentially induce significant chemico-osmotic fluxes. In this paper, we assess the impact of chemico-osmotic fluxes on the water pressure during the post-closure period of a typical disposal cell for intermediate-level, long-lived bituminised radioactive waste in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay formation. A numerical model of chemico-osmotic water flow and solute transport has been developed based on the work of Bader and Kooi (2005) [5], and including Bresler's dependence of osmotic efficiency on concentration and compaction state [9]. Model validity has been extended to highly concentrated solutions by incorporating a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, based on the Pitzer's equations. Results show that due to the strong dependence of the osmotic coefficient on concentration, the impact of chemico-osmosis on water flow and on the pressure field around the disposal cell is relatively low. A maximum overpressure of the order of 1 MPa was obtained. No difference in the simulation results were noticed for disposal cell solutions having concentrations higher than 1 M NaNO3. Differences between simulations were found to be almost entirely due to Bresler's relationship i.e., the model of the dependence between osmotic efficiency and concentration, and only slightly on the activity coefficient correction. Questions remain regarding the appropriate

  15. THE IMPACT OF GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AT CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the dynamics of chemical processes that govern contaminant transport and speciation during water exchange across the GW/SW transition zone. A conceptual model of the GW/SW transition zone is defined to serve as a starting...

  16. Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; Campbell, Scott A.

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Area 8 Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively.

  17. IMPACT OF REDOX DISEQUILIBRIA ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning to mineral surfaces exerts significant control on inorganic contaminant transport in subsurface systems. Remedial technologies for in-situ treatment of subsurface contamination are frequently designed to optimize the efficiency of contaminant partitioning to solid s...

  18. Simulation of contaminated sediment transport in White Oak Creek basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Clapp, R.B.; Brenkert, A.L.; Moore, T.D.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a systematic approach to management of the contaminated sediments in the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary contaminant of concern is radioactive cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which binds to soil and sediment particles. The key components in the approach include an intensive sampling and monitoring system for flood events; modeling of hydrological processes, sediment transport, and contaminant flux movement; and a decision framework with a detailed human health risk analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling of watershed rainfall-runoff and contaminated sediment transport during flooding periods using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- Fortran (HSPF) model. Because a large number of parameters are required in HSPF modeling, the major effort in the modeling process is the calibration of model parameters to make simulation results and measured values agree as closely as possible. An optimization model incorporating the concepts of an expert system was developed to improve calibration results and efficiency. Over a five-year simulation period, the simulated flows match the observed values well. Simulated total amount of sediment loads at various locations during storms match with the observed values within a factor of 1.5. Simulated annual releases of {sup 137}Cs off-site locations match the data within a factor of 2 for the five-year period. The comprehensive modeling approach can provide a valuable tool for decision makers to quantitatively analyze sediment erosion, deposition, and transport; exposure risk related to radionuclides in contaminated sediment; and various management strategies.

  19. Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F.; Wilson, G.V.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

  20. Prediction methodology for contaminant transport from rangeland watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Devaurs, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Lane, L.J.; Langhorst, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Weather on arid and semiarid lands can be extremely variable. Runoff is generally emphermeral, and high intensity, short-duration rainfall events are the major stimulus for runoff events. Transport of sediment and associated contaminants occurs with these infrequent events. Incorporation of variability in weather into any prediction technology is essential to provide accurate representations of climate-induced uncertainty in predictions of hydrologic response. The objective of this study is to investigate a method for including short-term climatic variations in analyses for contaminant transport from rangeland watersheds in arid/semiarid regions. Short term is defined here as a twenty to fifty time frame and it is assumed that lone term climatic fluctuations are not observed during this time. Also, most weather records are available for this time period; predictions of greater length are extrapolations of existing records unless corroborative data for longer term trends are collected. Predictions are being made with condensable uncertainty in the weather inputs even if the models for water, sediment, and contaminant transport are perfectly unknown. This study will incorporate uncertainty in weather inputs into the prediction process and address the ramifications of this uncertainty. Uncertainty introduced by improper model or parameter specification is only briefly addressed.

  1. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  2. Transport of soluble and unsoluble contaminants in compound vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Eugenia

    2010-05-01

    Transport of solvable substances by separate vortices and vortex flows is studied regularly in environmental and laboratory conditions. The compound vortex is generated in the cylindrical container by the rotating disk. It is possible to observe strongly pronounced area - a vortex core by means of dye injection into the centre of surface trough. Inside the fluid the dye gathers in the central cylindrical area. On a free surface contaminants are located in separate compact areas - in bounded areas near the vertical axis of compound vortex and spiral arms. The separate tinted and clear water areas are observed for a long time in scales of activator rotation period. Parameters of flow patterns geometry are measured in wide range of basic flow conditions. Strong effect of unsoluble contaminant on general flow dynamics in the container is found. Registered flow patterns are compared with environmental observations.

  3. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M. Sinan; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors

  4. Characterization of Anomalous Contaminant Transport via Push-Pull Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. K.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Push-pull (single-well-injection-withdrawal) tracer tests are widely used as an economical means of characterizing field-scale solute transport properties such as sorption and dispersion. Typically, these are analyzed by means of analytic solutions that assume transport obeys the radial advection-dispersion equation. We revisit this approach as: (1) Recognition of the ubiquity of anomalous transport and its impact on contaminant remediation necessitates the use of new methods to characterize it, and (2) Improved computational power and numerical methods have rendered reliance on analytical solutions obsolete. Here, we present a technique for characterizing diffusion-driven anomalous transport (i.e., anomalous transport driven by a "trapping" process whose trapping and release statistics are independent of the groundwater flow velocity). Examples include diffusion into low permeability zones, kinetic sorption, and matrix diffusion. Using field observations, we simultaneously calibrate an exponential probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the mobile domain and a truncated power law probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the immobile domain via a stochastic global optimization technique. The calibrated distributions, being independent of the flow regime, are applicable to the same domain under any flow conditions, including linear flow. In the context of the continuous time random walk (CTRW), one may simply define a transition to represent a single trap-and-release cycle, and directly compute the spatiotemporal transition distribution that defines the CTRW from the two calibrated distributions and the local seepage velocity (so that existing CTRW transport theory applies). A test of our methodology against a push-pull test from the MADE site demonstrated fitting performance comparable to that of a 3-D MODFLOW/MT3DMS model with a variety of hydraulic conductivity zones and explicit treatment of mobile-immobile mass

  5. Assessing conceptual models for subsurface reactive transport of inorganic contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, James A.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Steefel, Carl; Zachara, John M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Redden, George D.; Criscenti, Louise J.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2004-01-01

    In many subsurface situations where human health and environmental quality are at risk (e.g., contaminant hydrogeology petroleum extraction, carbon sequestration, etc.),scientists and engineers are being asked by federal agency decision-makers to predict the fate of chemical species under conditions where both reactions and transport are processes of first-order importance.In 2002, a working group (WG) was formed by representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Agriculture, and Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess the role of reactive transport modeling (RTM) in addressing these situations. Specifically the goals of the WG are to (1) evaluate the state of the art in conceptual model development and parameterization for RTM, as applied to soil,vadose zone, and groundwater systems, and (2) prioritize research directions that would enhance the practical utility of RTM.

  6. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.E.

    1999-07-28

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

  7. Analysis of Contaminant Transport through the Vadose and Saturated Zones for Source Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedekar, V.; Neville, C. J.; Tonkin, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    At complex sites there may be many potential source areas. Screening level analyses are useful to identify which of the source areas should be the focus of detailed investigation and analysis. A screening tool has been developed to evaluate the threat posed by waste sites on groundwater quality. This tool implements analytical solutions to simulate contaminant transport through the vadose and saturated zones and predict time-varying concentrations at potential groundwater receptors. The screening tool is developed within a user friendly, Microsoft ExcelTM based interface; however, care has been taken to implement rigorous solutions. The screening tool considers the following mechanisms: (a) Partitioning of soil contamination in to an equivalent dissolved concentration. For a time-invariant source, the solution is generalized from [3] for sorption and decay. For a time-varying source, the solution represents a special, degenerate, case of a solution implemented in ATRANS [2]; (b) One-dimensional (1D) transport of the dissolved contamination through the vadose zone considering 1D dispersion, equilibrium sorption, and first order transformation reactions. Steady state infiltration and moisture content are assumed; (c) Blending (mixing) of ambient water quality in the saturated zone with the contaminated water leaching from the vadose zone; and (d) Three-dimensional (3D) transport through the saturated zone using the formulation provided in [2], considering advection, dispersion, sorption, and first-order transformation reactions. The solution is derived using integral transform methods, following approaches adopted in [1] and [4]. Independent verification showed that the analytical techniques implemented in this study generate solutions that closely approximate those obtained using sophisticated numerical approaches, with a systematic over-estimate of the likely impact to groundwater that (predictably) stems from the use of a 1D approximation in the vadose zone. As a

  8. HEMP advection model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R.W. Jr.; Barton, R.T.

    1981-01-21

    A continuous rezoning procedure has been implemented in the computational cycle of a version of the HEMP two-dimensional, Lagrange, fluid dynamics code. The rezoning problem is divided into two steps. The first step requires the solving of ordinary Lagrange equations of motion; the second step consists of adding equipotential grid relaxation along with an advective remapping scheme.

  9. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  10. Free-surface turbulent flow and contaminants transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The requirement of maintaining the environmental quality and ecological balance of the surface water systems at the acceptable level both now and in the future has accelerated the development and refinement of a cost-effective engineering analysis and design tool--Computational Modeling. This paper presents the progress of an on-going study to develop and refine computational models to simulate the free-surface turbulent flows and contaminants transport phenomena. New developments include: the efficient Element Method, which adopts the advantages of both Finite Element and Finite Difference; the most effective up-winding and/or characteristic-path integration; the prescribed solution forcing to conduct modeling verification studies of this correctness and capabilities in prediction of nonlinear effects; among others. The newly refined computational models have been applied to simulate unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent, free-surface flows and pollutant transport in lakes, reservoirs, streams, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters with natural (highly-irregular) geometric configurations. They have been verified in some cases to be able to predict basic physical characteristics of the free surface flows including boundary layer separations and re-attachments, wake flow and vortex shedding, corner separation and re-circulation, etc. They are also capable of simulating the transport of solute substances, solid particles and heat energy in these waters. Results can be displayed in stationary (snapshots) color graphics and in animation (motion pictures) recorded on video cassettes.

  11. A Linear Systems Approach to Segmented Watershed Contaminant Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) employs simulation models to estimate concentrations of pesticide residues in surface waters for risk assessment. These models have historically been used to simulate runoff loadings from homogeneous landscapes to isolated, well-mixed lentic systems that generically represent vulnerable waters. Recent efforts to refine this approach in terms of realism and geographic specificity have focused on enhancing the level of detail of the landscape representation, rather than that of receiving water hydrology. Linear systems theory and transfer function based approaches have been applied by various investigators to the representation of contaminant leaching through soils, and to surface water hydrology (e.g., unit hydrographs), but rarely to contaminant transport either within surface waters, or through multi-compartment systems such as stream networks. This poster describes a straightforward approach to simulating watersheds as segmented into collections of linked water bodies. The approach employs convolution integrals, impulse response functions, and the Discrete Fourier Transform to propagate concentration time series from upstream to downstream locations. Given knowledge only of estimated mean stream residence times, with appropriately-scaled segmentations of catchments, realistic representations of concentration dynamics are shown to be achievable. These representations are based upon high-frequency atrazine monitoring data sets collected over common time periods from upstream and downstream locations within the same small watersheds. Simulated concentrations are shown to match measured concentrations well in both the temporal and spectral domains without the need for calibration, and despite inherent simplifying assumptions such as steady flow. The approach may have utility for enhancing surface water hydrologic representation in contaminant modeling used for regulatory purposes.

  12. Coliform contamination of a coastal embayment: Sources and transport pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, P.K.; Howes, B.L.; Heufelder, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Fecal bacterial contamination of nearshore waters has direct economic impacts to coastal communities through the loss of shellfisheries and restrictions of recreational uses. We conducted seasonal measurements of fecal coliform (FC) sources and transport pathways contributing to FC contamination of Buttermilk Bay, a shallow embayment adjacent to Buzzards Bay, MA. Typical of most coastal embayments, there were no direct sewage discharges (i.e., outfalls), and fecal bacteria from human, domestic animal, and wildlife pools entered open waters primarily through direct deposition or after transport through surface waters or groundwaters. Direct fecal coliform inputs to bay waters occurred primarily in winter (December-March) from waterfowl, ~33 x 1012 FC yr-1 or ~67% of the total annual loading. Effects of waterfowl inputs on bay FC densities were mitigated by their seasonality, wide distribution across the bay surface, and the apparent limited dispersal from fecal pellets. On-site disposal of sewage by septic systems was the single largest FC source in the watershed-embayment system, 460 x 1012 FC yr-1, but due to attenuation during subsurface transport only a minute fraction, < 0.006 x 1012 FC yr-1, reached bay waters (<0.01% of annual input to bay). Instead, surface water flows, via storm drains and natural streams under both wet- and dry-weather conditions, contributed the major terrestrial input, 12 x 1012 FC yr-1 (24% of annual input), all from animal sources. Since most of the surface water FC inputs were associated with periodic, short-duration rain events with discharge concentrated in nearshore zones, wet-weather flows were found to have a disproportionately high impact on nearshore FC levels. Elution of FC from shoreline deposits of decaying vegetation (wrack) comprised an additional coliform source. Both laboratory and field experiments suggest significant elution of bacteria from wrack, ~3 x 1012 FC yr-1 on a bay-wide basis (6% of annual input), primarily

  13. Contaminant transport in the sub-surface soil of an uncontrolled landfill site in China: site investigation and two-dimensional numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haijian; Chen, Yunmin; Thomas, Hywel R; Sedighi, Majid; Masum, Shakil A; Ran, Qihua

    2016-02-01

    A field investigation of contaminant transport beneath and around an uncontrolled landfill site in Huainan in China is presented in this paper. The research aimed at studying the migration of some chemicals present in the landfill leachate into the surrounding clayey soils after 17 years of landfill operation. The concentrations of chloride and sodium ions in the pore water of soil samples collected at depths up to 15 m were obtained through an extensive site investigation. The contents of organic matter in the soil samples were also determined. A two-dimensional numerical study of the reactive transport of sodium and chloride ion in the soil strata beneath and outside the landfill is also presented. The numerical modelling approach adopted is based on finite element/finite difference techniques. The domain size of approximately 300 × 30 m has been analysed and major chemical transport parameters/mechanisms are established via a series of calibration exercises. Numerical simulations were then performed to predict the long-term behaviour of the landfill in relation to the chemicals studied. The lateral migration distance of the chloride ions was more than 40 m which indicates that the advection and mechanical dispersion are the dominant mechanism controlling the contaminant transport at this site. The results obtained from the analysis of chloride and sodium migration also indicated a non-uniform advective flow regime of ions with depth, which were localised in the first few metres of the soil beneath the disposal site. The results of long-term simulations of contaminant transport indicated that the concentrations of ions can be 10 to 30 times larger than that related to the allowable limit of concentration values. The results of this study may be of application and interest in the assessment of potential groundwater and soil contamination at this site with a late Pleistocene clayey soil. The obtained transport properties of the soils and the contaminant transport

  14. Ammonia Gas Transport and Reactions in Unsaturated Sediments: Implications for Use as an Amendment to Immobilize Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-05-01

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has been studied and has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants such as uranium because it induces a high pore-water pH causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application, knowledge of ammonia transport and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate reactions among gas, sediment, and water, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Measured diffusion front movement was 0.05, 0.03, and 0.02 cm/hr. in sediments with 2.0%, 8.7%, and 13.0% water content, respectively. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase on exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate with declining pH. When uranium is present in the sediment and pore water, up to 85% of the water-leachable uranium was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  15. Potential contaminant pathways from hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathways-advective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fractures-could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of hydraulic fracturing requires that monitoring systems be employed to track the movement of contaminants and that gas wells have a reasonable offset from faults.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE STATE-OF-THE-ART CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND FATE MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling approaches for evaluating the transport and fate of sediment and associated contaminants are briefly reviewed. The main emphasis is on: 1) the application of EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code), the state-of-the-art contaminated sediment transport and fate public do...

  17. Pore Water PAH Transport in Amended Sediment Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidley, P. T.; Kwon, S.; Ghosh, U.

    2009-05-01

    Capping is a common remediation strategy for contaminated sediments that creates a physical barrier between contaminated sediments and the water column. Diffusive flux of contaminants through a sediment cap is small. However, under certain hydrodynamic conditions such as groundwater potential and tidal pumping, groundwater advection can accelerate contaminant transport. Hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be transported through the cap under advective conditions. To better understand PAH migration under these conditions, physical models of sediment caps were evaluated in the laboratory through direct measurement of pore water using solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Contaminated sediment and capping material was obtained from an existing Superfund site that was capped at Eagle Harbor, Washington. A PAH dissolution model linked to an advection-dispersion equation with retardation using published organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) was compared to measured PAHs in the sediment and cap porewater of the physical model.

  18. Enhanced subsurface characterization for prediction of contaminant transport using co-kriging

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Rashad, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Groundwater flow and advective transport were simulated in a heterogeneous synthetic aquifer. These simulations were conducted when the aquifer was fully defined and when it was characterized using a limited amount of hard and soft data (hydraulic conductivity data and soil classifications). Co-kriging was used to combine the data types when estimating the hydraulic conductivity field throughout the aquifer. Results of the flow and transport simulations showed that soil classifications were useful in characterizing the hydraulic conductivity field and reducing errors in statistics describing the plume.

  19. Pollutant advective spreading in beach sand exposed to high-energy tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itugha, Okuroghoboye D.; Chen, Daoyi; Guo, Yakun

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents field measurements in which dye solute was injected into coastal sand to investigate contaminant advection in intertidal beach sand. The measurements show the pathways of a contaminated plume in the unsaturated zone during both the flood and ebb tides. A prescribed amount of dye tracer solution was directly injected through the topsoil, with average porosity 0.3521 ± 0.01, at predetermined locations of the River Mersey's outer estuarial beach during ebb-tide. The injected dye was monitored, sampled and photographed over several tidal cycles. The distinctive features of the plume (full two dimensional cross-sections), sediments and water-table depth were sampled in-situ, close to the injection point (differing from previous contaminant monitoring tests in aquifers). The advective movement is attributed to tidal impact which is different from contaminant transport in aquifers. The experimental results show that plumes have significantly large spatial variability, diverging upwards and converging downwards, with a conical geometric shape which is different from the usual spherical/elliptical shape reported in literature. The mean vertical motion of the plume reaches three times the top-width within ten tidal cycles, exceeding the narrow bottom-width by a factor of order 2. The observed transport features of the plume within the beach sand have significant relevance to saltwater intrusion, surface water and groundwater quality. The field observations are unique and can serve as a valuable benchmark database for relevant numerical studies.

  20. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  1. Influence of Cemented Layers on Contaminant Transport in Mine Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacek, C.; Blowes, D.; Jambor, J.; Moncur, M.; Gunsinger, M.; Doerr, N.

    2004-12-01

    Exposure of sulfide-mine tailings to atmospheric oxygen leads to the initiation of a series of reactions, including sulfide oxidation, acid neutralization and metal attenuation reactions. As oxygen ingresses into the tailings, the oxidation front moves downward and inward from the edges of the tailings surface. At or near the acid neutralization front, secondary phases can accumulate, leading to the formation of hardpan layers. Field studies were conducted at three mine sites to evaluate the role of cemented layers in influencing contaminant transport from oxidized tailings. Detailed field measurements were made, including collection of water and gas samples from the vadose and groundwater zones. Cores were collected for mineralogical and chemical analyses to evaluate the extent of sulfide mineral oxidation and accumulation of secondary phases. Calculations of mineral saturation indices were made using ion-pair and ion-interaction models that were modified to account for the very high solute concentrations observed in the tailings pore waters. At a site that has been oxidizing for 25 years, a massive Fe(III)-bearing hardpan, containing gypsum, goethite and jarosite, has formed over the last 15 years. At a site that has been oxidizing for 35 years, an Fe(III)-bearing hardpan is also present. At a site that has been oxidizing for 70 years, a massive Fe(II)-bearing hardpan containing melanterite and gypsum is present below the zone of active oxidation. Above this zone, there are discontinuous Fe(III)-bearing cemented layers that are likely oxidized remnants of the original Fe(II) hardpan. Calculated mineral saturation indices are consistent with the observed accumulations of secondary phases. Transient perched water table conditions have developed above the massive Fe(II) hardpan, leading to the lateral transport of sulfide oxidation products along the hardpan and the formation of seepage zones above the permanent water table. Chemical extractions and mineralogical

  2. Contaminant transport and biodegradation in saturated porous media: model development and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae

    2005-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the contaminant transport, sorption, and biodegradation in saturated porous media. In the model development, sorption was accounted for as a kinetic process for the contaminant transport. In addition, a double Monod function was incorporated into the model to describe the biodegradation of contaminants and utilization of oxygen. In the description of bacterial transport, reversible and irreversible depositions of bacteria were considered as kinetic processes in the model. The model equations were solved numerically with a fully implicit finite-difference method along with the Runge-Kutta method. The simulation showed that contaminant transport in porous media could be greatly affected by sorption and biodegradation processes. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the contaminant transport model was insensitive to the changes of desorption rate constant for contaminants kb, half-saturation constant for oxygen Ko, bacterial yield factor Y, and oxygen use coefficient F. However, the model was sensitive to the changes of adsorption rate constant for contaminants kf, maximum utilization rate of contaminants max, and half-saturation constant for contaminants Kc, and so their values should be selected carefully in the modelling process. Copyright

  3. Critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis - surface water transport for nonradioactive contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kuo-Fu

    1996-11-01

    The health risks for an individual exposed to contaminants released from SRS outfalls from 1989 to 1995 were estimated. The exposure pathways studied are ingestion of drinking water, ingestion of contaminated fish and dermal contact with contaminants in water while swimming. The estimated incremental risks for an individual developing cancer vary from 3.E-06 to 1.0E-05. The estimated total exposure chronic noncancer hazard indices vary from 6.E-02 to 1.E-01. The critical contaminants were ranked based on their cancer risks and chronic noncarcinogenic hazard quotients. For cancer risks, the critical contaminants released from SRS outfalls are arsenic, tetrachloroethylene, and benzene. For chronic noncarcinogenic risks, the critical contaminants released from srs outfalls are cadmium, arsenic, silver, chromium, mercury, selenium, nitrate, manganese, zinc, nickel, uranium, barium, copper, tetrachloroethylene, cyanide, and phenol. The critical pathways in decreasing risk order are ingestion of contaminated fish, ingestion of drinking water and dermal contact with contaminants in water while swimming.

  4. Analytical power series solution for contaminant transport with hyperbolic asymptotic distance-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chiang, Chen-Chung

    2008-11-01

    SummaryA hyperbolic asymptotic function, which characterizes that the dispersivity initially increases with travel distance and eventually reaches an asymptotic value at long travel distance, is adopted and incorporated into the general advection-dispersion equation for describing scale-dependent solute transport in porous media in this study. An analytical technique for solving advection-dispersion equation with hyperbolic asymptotic distance-dependent dispersivity is presented. The analytical solution is derived by applying the extended power series method coupling with the Laplace transform. The developed analytical solution is compared with the corresponding numerical solution to evaluate its accuracy. Results demonstrate that the breakthrough curves at different locations obtained from the derived power series solution agree closely with those from the numerical solution. Moreover, breakthrough curves obtained from the hyperbolic asymptotic dispersivity model are compared with those obtained from the constant dispersivity model to scrutinize the relationship of the transport parameters derived by Mishra and Parker [Mishra, S., Parker, J.C., 1990. Analysis of solute transport with a hyperbolic scale dependent dispersion model. Hydrol. Proc. 4(1), 45-47]. The result reveals that the relationship postulated by Mishra and Parker [Mishra, S., Parker, J.C., 1990. Analysis of solute transport with a hyperbolic scale dependent dispersion model. Hydrol. Proc. 4(1), 45-47] is only valid under conditions with small dimensionless asymptotic dispersivity ( aa) and large dimensionless characteristic half length ( b).

  5. LAYER DEPENDENT ADVECTION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advection methods used in CMAQ require that the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition be satisfied for numerical stability and accuracy. In CMAQ prior to version 4.3, the ADVSTEP algorithm established CFL-safe synchronization and advection timesteps that were uniform throu...

  6. Chemical contaminants in the Wadden Sea: Sources, transport, fate and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laane, R. W. P. M.; Vethaak, A. D.; Gandrass, J.; Vorkamp, K.; Köhler, A.; Larsen, M. M.; Strand, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Wadden Sea receives contaminants from various sources and via various transport routes. The contaminants described in this overview are various metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn) and various organic contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and lindane (hexachlorocyclohexane, γ-HCH)). In addition, information is presented about other and emerging contaminants such as antifouling biocides (e.g. TBT and Irgarol), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), poly- and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs). Special attention is given to biogeochemical processes that contribute to the mobilization of contaminants in the surface sediments of the Wadden Sea. Finally, the effects on organisms of contaminants are reviewed and discussed. The main source of contaminants in the Wadden Sea are the rivers Rhine (via de Dutch coastal zone), Elbe and Weser. The Wadden Sea is not a sink for contaminants and adsorbed contaminants are transported from east to west. The surface sediments of the Wadden Sea are an important source for contaminants to the water above. The input and concentration of most contaminants have significantly decreased in water, sediments, organisms (e.g., mussel, flounder and bird eggs) in various parts of the Wadden Sea in the last three decades. Remarkably, the Cd concentration in mussels is increasing the last decades. In recent decades, the effects of contaminants on organisms (e.g., flounder, seal) have fallen markedly. Most of the affected populations have recovered, except for TBT induced effects in snails. Little is known about the concentration and effects of most emerging contaminants and the complex environmental mixtures of contaminants. It is recommended to install an international coordinated monitoring programme for contaminants and their effects in the whole Wadden Sea and to identify the chemical contaminants that really cause the effect.

  7. Relative importance of gas-phase diffusive and advective tichloroethene (TCE) fluxes in the unsaturated zone under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee-Won; Tillman, Fred D; Smith, James A

    2002-07-15

    It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure changes can induce gas flow in the unsaturated zone to such an extent that the advective flux of organic vapors in unsaturated-zone soil gas can be significant relative to the gas-phase diffusion flux of these organic vapors. To test this hypothesis, a series of field measurements and computer simulations were conducted to simulate and compare diffusion and advection fluxes at a trichloroethene-contaminated field site at Picatinny Arsenal in north-central New Jersey. Moisture content temperature, and soil-gas pressure were measured at multiple depths (including at land surface) and times for three distinct sampling events in August 1996, October 1996, and August 1998. Gas pressures in the unsaturated zone changed significantly over time and followed changes measured in the atmosphere. Gas permeability of the unsaturated zone was estimated using data from a variety of sources, including laboratory gas permeability measurements made on intact soil cores from the site, a field air pump test, and calibration of a gas-flow model to the transient, one-dimensional gas pressure data. The final gas-flow model reproduced small pressure gradients as observed in the field during the three distinct sampling events. The velocities calculated from the gas-flow model were used in transient, one-dimensional transport simulations to quantify advective and diffusive fluxes of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere as a function of time for each sampling event. Effective diffusion coefficients used for these simulations were determined from independent laboratory measurements made on intact soil cores collected from the field site. For two of the three sampling events (August 1996 and August 1998), the TCE gas-phase diffusion flux at land surface was significantly greater than the advection flux over the entire sampling period. For the second sampling event (October 1996), the advection flux was frequently larger than the

  8. Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand s...

  9. COLLOIDAL-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER: PART I. SAMPLING CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen,...

  10. Time series analysis of contaminant transport in the subsurface: applications to conservative tracer and engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunmei; Li, Yusong

    2014-08-01

    Accurately predicting the transport of contaminants in the field is subject to multiple sources of uncertainty due to the variability of geological settings, the complexity of field measurements, and the scarcity of data. Such uncertainties can be amplified when modeling some emerging contaminants, such as engineered nanomaterials, when a fundamental understanding of their fate and transport is lacking. Typical field work includes collecting concentration at a certain location for an extended period of time, or measuring the movement of plume for an extended period time, which would result in a time series of observation data. This work presents an effort to evaluate the possibility of applying time series analysis, particularly, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, to forecast contaminant transport and distribution in the subsurface environment. ARIMA modeling was first assessed in terms of its capability to forecast tracer transport at two field sites, which had different levels of heterogeneity. After that, this study evaluated the applicability of ARIMA modeling to predict the transport of engineered nanomaterials at field sites, including field measured data of nanoscale zero valent iron and (nZVI) and numerically generated data for the transport of nano-fullerene aggregates (nC60). This proof-of-concept effort demonstrates the possibility of applying ARIMA to predict the contaminant transport in the subsurface environment. Like many other statistical models, ARIMA modeling is only descriptive and not explanatory. The limitation and the challenge associated with applying ARIMA modeling to contaminant transport in the subsurface are also discussed.

  11. Time series analysis of contaminant transport in the subsurface: Applications to conservative tracer and engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chunmei; Li, Yusong

    2014-08-01

    Accurately predicting the transport of contaminants in the field is subject to multiple sources of uncertainty due to the variability of geological settings, the complexity of field measurements, and the scarcity of data. Such uncertainties can be amplified when modeling some emerging contaminants, such as engineered nanomaterials, when a fundamental understanding of their fate and transport is lacking. Typical field work includes collecting concentration at a certain location for an extended period of time, or measuring the movement of plume for an extended period time, which would result in a time series of observation data. This work presents an effort to evaluate the possibility of applying time series analysis, particularly, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, to forecast contaminant transport and distribution in the subsurface environment. ARIMA modeling was first assessed in terms of its capability to forecast tracer transport at two field sites, which had different levels of heterogeneity. After that, this study evaluated the applicability of ARIMA modeling to predict the transport of engineered nanomaterials at field sites, including field measured data of nanoscale zero valent iron and (nZVI) and numerically generated data for the transport of nano-fullerene aggregates (nC60). This proof-of-concept effort demonstrates the possibility of applying ARIMA to predict the contaminant transport in the subsurface environment. Like many other statistical models, ARIMA modeling is only descriptive and not explanatory. The limitation and the challenge associated with applying ARIMA modeling to contaminant transport in the subsurface are also discussed.

  12. Characterization of Contaminant Transport Using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    TEH-LUNG KU

    2001-06-01

    Study the migration of nuclear waste contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Radioactive disequilibria among members of these decay-series nuclides can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting.

  13. Evaluating Transport and Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in the Vadose Zone for Aqueous Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2015-09-01

    An approach was developed for evaluating vadose zone transport and attenuation of aqueous wastes containing inorganic (non-volatile) contaminants that were disposed of at the land surface (i.e., directly to the ground in cribs, trenches, tile fields, etc.) and their effect on the underlying groundwater. The approach provides a structured method for estimating transport of contaminants through the vadose zone and the resulting temporal profile of groundwater contaminant concentrations. The intent of the approach is also to provide a means for presenting and explaining the results of the transport analysis in the context of the site-specific waste disposal conditions and site properties, including heterogeneities and other complexities. The document includes considerations related to identifying appropriate monitoring to verify the estimated contaminant transport and associated predictions of groundwater contaminant concentrations. While primarily intended for evaluating contaminant transport under natural attenuation conditions, the approach can also be applied to identify types of, and targets for, mitigation approaches in the vadose zone that would reduce the temporal profile of contaminant concentrations in groundwater, if needed.

  14. Modèle d'aide à la gestion des eaux souterraines (MAGES). 1. Théorie du modèle numérique de transport des contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Frédérick; Banton, Olivier; Porel, Gilles

    1998-08-01

    MAGES is software for forecasting pollution hazards of groundwater which is in the process of development at INRS-Eau (Canada). The main distinctive feature of the model is the use of stationary truncated temporal moment equations instead of the classical time dependent advection-dispersion equation to solve the transport of contaminants. The aim of this work is to describe the theory of truncated temporal moment equations and to show how the curves of the concentration versus time can be calculated from temporal moments. The discrete method used to solve the equations and its stability is also discussed.

  15. BIOPLUME MODEL FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY OXYGEN LIMITED BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the organic pollutants entering ground water are potentially biodegradable in the subsurface. This potential has been demonstrated in aquifers contaminated by wood-creosoting process wastes. The persistence of many of these organic compounds in the subsurface indicated ...

  16. Capillary deposition of advected floating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Debaisieux, Aymeric; Gregori, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The deposition and aggregation of particles flowing through a confined environment can dramatically hinder the transport of suspensions. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of particles in shear flow are not fully understood. Here, we use an experimental model system in which floating particles are advected on the surface of a water channel and deposited on fixed obstacles through attractive capillary effects. By varying the flow rate of the liquid, the wetting properties and size of the particles and obstacles, we can tune the magnitude of the capillary and hydrodynamic forces that determine the probability of deposition and the equilibrium position on the substrate. We show that arrays of obstacles can be designed to efficiently capture the floating particles advected by the flow.

  17. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  18. Soil and biosolid nano- and macro-colloid properties and contaminant transport behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Jessique L.

    Despite indications that they are potential contaminant transport systems and threats to groundwater quality, very little effort has been invested in comparing contaminant transport behavior of natural environmental nanocolloids and their corresponding macrocolloid fractions in the presence of As, Se, Pb, and Cu contaminants. This study involved physico-chemical, mineralogical, stability and contaminant-transport characterizations of nano- (< 100 nm) and macro-colloids (100-2000 nm) fractionated from three Kentucky soils and one biosolid waste. Particle size was investigated with SEM/TEM and dynamic light scattering. Surface reactivity was estimated using CEC and zeta potential. Mineralogical composition was determined by XRD, FTIR, and thermogravimetric analyses. Sorption isotherms assessed affinities for Cu2+, Pb2+, AsO3-, and SeO4 -2 contaminants, while settling kinetics experiments of suspensions at 0, 2 and 10 mg/L contaminants determined stability and transportability potential. Undisturbed 18x30 cm KY Ashton Loam soil monoliths were also used for transport experiments, involving infusion of 50 mg L-1 colloid suspensions spiked with 2 mg L-1 mixed contaminant loads in unsaturated, steady state, unit gradient downward percolation experiments. Overall, nanocolloids exhibited greater stability over corresponding macrocolloids in the presence and absence of contaminants following specific mineralogy trends. Physicochemical characterizations indicated that extensive organic carbon surface coatings and higher Al/Fe:Si ratios may have induced higher stability in the nanocolloid fractions, in spite of some hindrance by nano-aggregation phenomena. In the transport experiments, nanocolloids eluted significantly higher concentrations of colloids, total, and colloid-bound metals than corresponding macrocolloids. Contaminant elutions varied by colloid type, mineralogy and contaminant, with the following sequences: soil-colloids>bio-colloids, smectitic

  19. Prediction of contaminant fate and transport in potable water systems using H2OFate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Venkat; Manickavasagam, Sivakumar; VanBlaricum, Vicki; Ginsberg, Mark

    2009-05-01

    BlazeTech has recently developed a software called H2OFate to predict the fate and transport of chemical and biological contaminants in water distribution systems. This software includes models for the reactions of these contaminants with residual disinfectant in bulk water and at the pipe wall, and their adhesion/reactions with the pipe walls. This software can be interfaced with sensors through SCADA systems to monitor water distribution networks for contamination events and activate countermeasures, as needed. This paper presents results from parametric calculations carried out using H2OFate for a simulated contaminant release into a sample water distribution network.

  20. Comparison of contaminant transport in agricultural drainage water and urban stormwater runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transport of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural and urban landscapes to surface water bodies can cause adverse environmental impacts including hypoxia and harmful algal blooms. The main objective of this long-term study was to quantify and compare contaminant transport from a subsurface-drain...

  1. FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.E.

    2000-05-05

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

  2. BIODEGRADATION DURING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA: 1. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF CONTROLLING FACTORS. (R825415)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Interest in coupled biodegradation and transport of organic contaminants has expanded greatly in the past several years. In a system in which biodegradation is coupled with solute transport, the magnitude and rate of biodegradation is influenced not only by pr...

  3. Contaminant transport in two central Missouri karst recharge areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Karst watersheds with significant losing streams represent a particularly vulnerable setting for ground water contamination because of the direct connection to surface water. Because of the existing agricultural land-use and future likelihood of urbanization, two losing stream karst basins were chos...

  4. Contaminant transport in two central Missouri karst recharge areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Karst watersheds with significant losing streams represent a particularly vulnerable setting for ground water contamination because of the direct connection to surface water. Because of the existing agricultural land-use and future threat of heavy urbanization, two losing stream karst basins were ch...

  5. Contaminant Transport in Two Central Missouri Karst Recharge Areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Karst watersheds with significant losing streams represent a particularly vulnerable setting for ground water contamination because of the direct connection to surface water. Because of the existing agricultural land-use and future threat of heavy urbanization, two losing stream karst basins were ch...

  6. EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN THE WATER CYCLE: FATE AND TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade, the scientific community and general public have become increasingly aware of the potential for the presence of unregulated, and generally unmonitored contaminants, found at low concentrations in surface, ground and drinking water. The most common pathway for...

  7. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  8. Estimation of contaminant transport in groundwater beneath radioactive waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.C.; Tauxe, J.D.; Lee, D.W.

    1995-05-25

    Performance assessments are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives, consider human exposures from water, air, and inadvertent intruder pathways. Among these, the groundwater pathway analysis usually involves complex numerical simulations with results which are often difficult to verify and interpret. This paper presents a technique to identify and simplify the essential parts of the groundwater analysis. The transport process of radionuclides including infiltration of precipitation, leachate generation, and advection and dispersion in the groundwater is divided into several steps. For each step, a simple analytical model is constructed and refined to capture the dominant phenomena represented in the complex analysis included in a site-specific performance assessment. This step-wise approach provides a means for gaining insights into the transport process and obtaining reasonable estimates of relevant quantities for facility design and site evaluation.

  9. Influencing factors on particle-bound contaminant transport in the Elbe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleisinger, Carmen; Haase, Holger; Schubert, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter, i.e. suspended particulate matter and sediments in rivers and estuaries, often are contaminated with trace metals and selected organic contaminants and are mainly associated with fine-grained fractions. Transport processes and fate of particles in estuaries are influenced by several factors, e.g. freshwater discharge, tide, flow velocity and dredging activities (Kappenberg et al., 2007). Understanding the transport processes in estuaries may help to achieve the objectives of the Water Framework Directive and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. The German Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) operates for more than 20 years five monitoring sites in the Elbe estuary in order to monitor the development of particle-bound contaminant concentrations over time and to understand their transport mechanisms. Results of the monitoring revealed freshwater discharge as an important influencing factor on the transport of contaminated particulate matter (Ackermann et al., 2007). The bidirectional transport of marine and fluvial water and particulate matter in estuaries results in a turbidity zone where large amounts of particulate matter are temporarily retained and thus in a delayed transport of particulate matter towards the sea. The extent and the location of the turbidity zone as well as the ratio of highly contaminated fluvial and less contaminated marine sediments at a given location are mainly influenced by the freshwater discharge (Kowalewska et al., 2011). Furthermore, at high freshwater discharge conditions the highly contaminated particulate matter from fluvial origin are transported downstream the estuary, whereas at low freshwater discharges, upstream transport of less contaminated marine sediments prevails. Hence, residence times of particulate matter in the estuary are difficult to estimate. Furthermore, sedimentation areas with flow reduced conditions, e.g. wadden areas or branches of the Elbe estuary, may act as sinks for particle bound

  10. How to Find a Bug in Ten Thousand Lines Transport Solver? Outline of Experiences from AN Advection-Diffusion Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, K.; Bombardelli, F.

    2011-12-01

    Almost all natural phenomena on Earth are highly nonlinear. Even simplifications to the equations describing nature usually end up being nonlinear partial differential equations. Transport (ADR) equation is a pivotal equation in atmospheric sciences and water quality. This nonlinear equation needs to be solved numerically for practical purposes so academicians and engineers thoroughly rely on the assistance of numerical codes. Thus, numerical codes require verification before they are utilized for multiple applications in science and engineering. Model verification is a mathematical procedure whereby a numerical code is checked to assure the governing equation is properly solved as it is described in the design document. CFD verification is not a straightforward and well-defined course. Only a complete test suite can uncover all the limitations and bugs. Results are needed to be assessed to make a distinction between bug-induced-defect and innate limitation of a numerical scheme. As Roache (2009) said, numerical verification is a state-of-the-art procedure. Sometimes novel tricks work out. This study conveys the synopsis of the experiences we gained during a comprehensive verification process which was done for a transport solver. A test suite was designed including unit tests and algorithmic tests. Tests were layered in complexity in several dimensions from simple to complex. Acceptance criteria defined for the desirable capabilities of the transport code such as order of accuracy, mass conservation, handling stiff source term, spurious oscillation, and initial shape preservation. At the begining, mesh convergence study which is the main craft of the verification is performed. To that end, analytical solution of ADR equation gathered. Also a new solution was derived. In the more general cases, lack of analytical solution could be overcome through Richardson Extrapolation and Manufactured Solution. Then, two bugs which were concealed during the mesh convergence

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Motion-Induced Contaminant Transports in Room Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack

    2011-11-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of contaminant transports due to complex human and door motions is conducted for characterizing the effect of the motion-induced wakes on the contaminant transports in room compartments where a contaminated and clean room are connected by a vestibule. We utilize a LES technique with an immersed-boundary method for moving objects (Choi et al., JCP 2007; Choi and Edwards, Indoor Air 2008) and extend the technique to include Eulerian descriptions of gas-phase contaminant transport as well as thermal energy transfer. We demonstrate details of contaminant transport due to human- and door-motion induced wake development during a short-duration event involving the movement of a person (or persons) from a contaminated room, through a vestibule, into a clean room. Parametric studies that capture the effects of human walking pattern, door operation, over-pressure level, and vestibule size are systematically conducted. The results of parameteric studies will be shown in the final presentation. Supported by DARPA/SPO program (HR0011-05-C-0157) and WCU program (R31-10049) of NRF.

  12. Controlling Transport Processes in Groundwater Contamination in the North Coast Karst Aquifer of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Steele, K.

    2008-05-01

    The karst aquifer of the North Coast of Puerto Rico represents a significant source of water for drinking purposes, as well as ecosystem sustainability. The same characteristics making this aquifer the most productive in the island, fast infiltration and rapid flow in karst conduits, make the aquifers vulnerable highly vulnerable to contamination. Once in the ground water, organic contaminants move through the karst aquifers by complex pathways dictated by system characteristics and flow regimes. Ground water flow in karst aquifers is subscribed to two types of flow systems: conduit flow and diffuse flow. Transport in conduit-flow dominated systems tends to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge or point without much attenuation. Transport in diffuse- flow systems, on the other hand, causes significant solute retardation and serves as a long-term source of contamination. Although it is common to attribute one type of predominant flow regime, most carbonate aquifers are characterized by a mixture of both flow systems. The north coast aquifer of Puerto Rico has been impacted by a large number of contaminates sites. During the last 25 years, 10 Superfund sites have been declared in the zone and others are being evaluated for inclusion in the National Priority List. The work presented herein addresses the potential impact of these sites on the extent of contamination and discusses the transport mechanisms affecting the transport and persistence of organic contaminants in the north coast aquifer of Puerto Rico. Preliminary evaluation indicates that fate and transport of these contaminants is controlled by a combinations of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms, where conduits tend to concentrate water and contaminants and convey it rapidly or to "trapping" diffusive-flow zones of smaller pore-size zones.

  13. Impacts of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity on basin-scale solute transport: Vulnerability of deep groundwater to arsenic contamination in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Holly A.; Khan, Mahfuzur R.

    2016-12-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity presents a primary challenge in predicting the movement of solutes in groundwater systems. The problem is particularly difficult on very large scales, across which permeability, chemical properties, and pumping rates may vary by many orders of magnitude and data are often sparse. An example is the fluvio-deltaic aquifer system of Bangladesh, where naturally-occurring arsenic (As) exists over tens of thousands of square kilometers in shallow groundwater. Millions of people in As-affected regions rely on deep (≥150 m) groundwater as a safe source of drinking water. The sustainability of this resource has been evaluated with models using effective properties appropriate for a basin-scale contamination problem, but the extent to which preferential flow affects the timescale of downward migration of As-contaminated shallow groundwater is unknown. Here we embed detailed, heterogeneous representations of hydraulic conductivity (K), pumping rates, and sorptive properties (Kd) within a basin-scale numerical groundwater flow and solute transport model to evaluate their effects on vulnerability and deviations from simulations with homogeneous representations in two areas with different flow systems. Advective particle tracking shows that heterogeneity in K does not affect average travel times from shallow zones to 150 m depth, but the travel times of the fastest 10% of particles decreases by a factor of ∼2. Pumping distributions do not strongly affect travel times if irrigation remains shallow, but increases in the deep pumping rate substantially reduce travel times. Simulation of advective-dispersive transport with sorption shows that deep groundwater is protected from contamination over a sustainable timeframe (>1000 y) if the spatial distribution of Kd is uniform. However, if only low-K sediments sorb As, 30% of the aquifer is not protected. Results indicate that sustainable management strategies in the Bengal Basin should consider impacts of both

  14. Wastewater contaminant transport and treatment in a nutrient limited ribbed fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarter, C. P. R.; Price, J. S.; Branfireun, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    To minimize the discharge of wastewater contaminants from remote northern communities and mining operations, fen peatlands in sub-arctic regions are used for tertiary wastewater treatment to detain, transform, and remove these contaminants. However, there is a limited understanding of contaminant transport and treatment in fen peatlands, particularly in sub-arctic Canada. To better characterize wastewater contaminant transport and treatment in these systems, approximately 44 m3 day-1 of simulated wastewater, concentrated custom-blend fertilizer (NO3-, PO33-, and SO42-) and Cl- diluted with water, was pumped into a small 0.5 ha sub-arctic ribbed fen continuously for 47 days (July 15th -August 31st 2014). Contaminant concentration of 3 similar ribbed fens varied between 0.0-3.0 mg L-1 over the study period (May - September 2014). An exponential increase in transmissivity (2.4 to 16.8 m2 day-1) as the water table rose (~0.16 m) increased the average linear groundwater velocity (0.5 to 3.4 m day-1) and resulted in rapid SO42- (0.8 m day-1) and Cl- (1.9 m day-1) transport. Notwithstanding the rapid transport of Cl-, diffusion into inactive pores still retarded Cl- transport by a factor of 1.8. Contrary to the rapid transport of SO42- and Cl-, the other contaminants were rapidly removed from the pore water (likely through biological uptake or adsorption) and minimal transport was observed (0.29 and 0.04 m day-1 for PO33- and NO3-, respectively). Northern ribbed fens have a large capacity to detain certain wastewater contaminants (e.g., NO3- and PO33-), yet allow rapid transport of others (e.g., SO42- and Cl-). Thus, these peatlands have the potential to significantly decrease wastewater contamination in northern aquatic environment by both biogeochemical and physical processes but careful management of the hydrology is required to prevent the release of mobile contaminants.

  15. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling, Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    POWELL, KIMBERLYR.

    2004-05-25

    Implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation method requires a mechanistic understanding of the natural attenuation processes occurring at a given site. For inorganic contaminants, natural attenuation typically involves a decrease in metal toxicity and/or mobility. These natural processes include dilution, dispersion, sorption (including adsorption, absorption, and precipitation), and redox processes. In order to better quantify these processes in terms of metal availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site. These laboratory scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding the solid phases in the soils associated with natural attenuation of the contaminant metals. This data provides input to be evaluated in the definition of the contaminant source term as well as transport of contaminants for site transport models.

  16. Characterization of contaminant transport by gravity, capillarity and barometric pumping in heterogeneous. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hudson, G.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The intent of this research program is to obtain an improved understanding of vadose zone transport processes and to develop field and modeling techniques required to characterize contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone at DOE sites. For surface spills and near-surface leaks of chemicals, the vadose zone may well become a long-term source of contamination for the underlying water table. Transport of contaminants can occur in both the liquid and gas phases of the unsaturated zone. This transport occurs naturally as a result of diffusion, buoyancy forces (gravity), capillarity and barometric pressure variations. In some cases transport can be enhanced by anisotropies present in hydrologic regimes. This is particularly true for gas-phase transport which may be subject to vertical pumping resulting from atmospheric pressure changes. For liquid-phase flows, heterogeneity may enhance the downward transport of contaminants to the water table depending on soil properties and the scale of the surface spill or near-surface leak. Characterization techniques based upon the dynamics of transport processes are likely to yield a better understanding of the potential for contaminant transport at a specific site than methods depending solely on hydrologic properties derived from a borehole. Such dynamic-characterization techniques can be useful for evaluating sites where contamination presently exists as well as for providing an objective basis to evaluate the efficacy of proposed as well as implemented clean-up technologies. The real-time monitoring of processes that may occur during clean-up of tank waste and the mobility of contaminants beneath the Hanford storage tanks during sluicing operations is one example of how techniques developed in this effort can be applied to current remediation problems. In the future, such dynamic-characterization methods might also be used as part of the site-characterization process for determining suitable locations of new DOE facilities

  17. Transport of PCBs with leachate water from the contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobasić, Vedranka Hodak; Picer, Mladen; Picer, Nena; Calić, Violeta

    2008-08-01

    Contaminated soil was taken from the area around the damaged capacitor of an electrical transformer station in Zadar (Croatia) and a phytoremediation experimental field was constructed with lysimeters. The levels of PCBs in the leachate water samples were measured nearly 3 years. The experiment was conducted under natural climatic conditions, through hot summers and mild winters. Although the amounts of leachated PCBs from the polluted soil were relatively small, their concentrations in leachate water samples from 1,500 to 29,000 ng L(-1) substantially exceeded the maximum allowed concentration of the total PCBs in the fishponds of Croatia (1 ng L(-1)).

  18. Advances in Dynamic Transport of Organic Contaminants in Karst Groundwater Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Vesper, D.; Alshawabkeh, A.; Hellweger, F.

    2011-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems develop in soluble rocks such as limestone, and are characterized by high permeability and well-developed conduit porosity. These systems provide important freshwater resources for human consumption and ecological integrity of streams, wetlands, and coastal zones. The same characteristics that make karst aquifers highly productive make them highly vulnerable to contamination. As a result, karst aquifers serve as an important route for contaminants exposure to humans and wildlife. Transport of organic contaminants in karst ground-water occurs in complex pathways influenced by the flow mechanism predominating in the aquifer: conduit-flow dominated systems tend to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge point without much attenuation; diffuse-flow systems, on the other hand, can cause significant solute retardation and slow movement. These two mechanisms represent end members of a wide spectrum of conditions found in karst areas, and often a combination of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms is encountered, where both flow mechanisms can control the fate and transport of contaminants. This is the case in the carbonate aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. This work addresses advances made on the characterization of fate and transport processes in karst ground-water systems characterized by variable conduit and/or diffusion dominated flow under high- and low-flow conditions. It involves laboratory-scale physical modeling and field-scale sampling and historical analysis of contaminant distribution. Statistical analysis of solute transport in Geo-Hydrobed physical models shows the heterogeneous character of transport dynamics in karstic units, and its variability under different flow regimes. Field-work analysis of chlorinated volatile organic compounds and phthalates indicates a large capacity of the karst systems to store and transmit contaminants. This work is part of the program "Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination

  19. Modeling Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Fractured Aquifers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    1987. Wu, Yu-Shu, H.H. Liu, and G.S. Bodvarsson . "Effect of small-scale fractures on flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada...34 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Paper LBNL-51848 (December 5, 2002). Wu, Y.S., H.H. Liu, and G.S. Bodvarsson . “A triple-continuum approach for

  20. Bioaccumulation and transport of contaminants: migrating sockeye salmon as vectors of mercury.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew R; Schindler, Daniel E; Holtgrieve, Gordon W; St Louis, Vincent L

    2009-12-01

    Biological transport by migratory animals is increasingly recognized as important to the long-range dispersal of toxic contaminants. Mercury (Hg) contamination is a widespread environmental concern with serious health implications for humans and wildlife. Due to their unique life history, anadromous salmon may act as important vectors for this contaminant, transferring Hg between marine and freshwater ecosystems. Previous analyses have considered contaminant transport by salmon to be unidirectional. These studies have evaluated Hg import to freshwater by spawning adults, but have not quantitatively assessed export through the migration of juveniles to the ocean. To determine the total Hg burden to freshwater systems by sockeye salmon, we reconstructed the net transport of Hg to the Wood River System in Bristol Bay, Alaska accounting for fluxes in (via adults) and out (via juveniles) of the system. Hg concentrations were higher in juvenile than adult salmon. Hg export from freshwater systems by salmon ranged from 3 to 30% of total import. Proportional export by smolts may be higher for populations under heavy exploitation with strong density dependence in juvenile recruitment. Full consideration of contaminant loading by migratory species requires attention to the relative contaminant flux at all life history stages and the effects of density dependent growth and survival.

  1. Color image analysis of contaminants and bacteria transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.; Dehmeshid, J.; Dacini, F.; Cole, L.; Dickenson, E.

    1997-07-01

    Transport of contaminants and bacteria in aqueous heterogeneous saturated porous systems have been studies experimentally using a novel fluorescent microscopic imaging (FMI) technique. The approach involves color visualization and quantification of bacterium and contaminant distributions within a transparent porous column. By introducing stained bacteria and an organic dye as a contaminant into the column and illuminating the porous regions with a planar sheet of laser beam, contaminant and bacterial transport processes through the porous medium can be observed and measured microscopically. A computer controlled CCD camera is used to record the fluorescent images as a function of time. These images are recorded by a frame accurate high resolution VCR and are then analyzed using a color image analysis code written in our laboratories. The color images are digitalized this way and simultaneously concentration and velocity distributions of both contaminant and bacterium are evaluated as a function of time and pore characteristics. The approach provides a unique dynamic probe to observe these transport processes microscopically. These results are extremely valuable in in-situ bioremediation problems since microscopic particle-contaminant-bacterium interactions are the key to understanding and optimization of these processes.

  2. Influence of long-term sediment transport on contaminant dispersal in a turbid estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.; Woodrow, T. Y.; Stephens, J. A.

    1987-11-01

    Theoretical calculations are made of the long-term transport of fine sediment in a turbid estuary, and its possible consequences for the tidally averaged distribution of a contaminant whose partitioning between dissolved and particulate phases is dependent on salinity. It is found that the partitioning has a crucial effect on the levels of dissolved contaminant, in agreement with the observations of MORRIS (1986, The Science of the Total Environment, 49, 297-304). Calculations also imply that the vertical fluxes of particulate contaminant between water column and bed have a profound influence on these levels.

  3. Impact of scaling and body movement on contaminant transport in airliner cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Sagnik; Poussou, Stephane B.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-10-01

    Studies of contaminant transport have been conducted using small-scale models. This investigation used validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to examine if a small-scale water model could reveal the same contaminant transport characteristics as a full-scale airliner cabin. But due to similarity problems and the difficulty of scaling the geometry, a perfect scale up from a small water model to an actual air model was found to be impossible. The study also found that the seats and passengers tended to obstruct the lateral transport of the contaminants and confine their spread to the aisle of the cabin. The movement of a crew member or a passenger could carry a contaminant in its wake to as many rows as the crew member or passenger passed. This could be the reason why a SARS infected passenger could infect fellow passengers who were seated seven rows away. To accurately simulate the contaminant transport, the shape of the moving body should be a human-like model.

  4. Modeling the emission, transport and deposition of contaminated dust from a mine tailing site.

    PubMed

    Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo; Villar, Omar Ignacio Felix; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, Mackenzie R; King, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of contaminants from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are significantly contaminated with lead and arsenic with an average soil concentration of 1616 and 1420 ppm, respectively. Similar levels of these contaminants have also been measured in soil samples taken from the area surrounding the mine tailings. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we have been able to model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes a distributed Eulerian model to simulate fine aerosol transport and a Lagrangian approach to model fate and transport of larger particles. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations.

  5. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: Evolution of knowledge and understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-07-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  6. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: evolution of knowledge and understanding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  7. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  8. Transport of PCBs with leachate water from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobasić, Vedranka Hodak; Picer, Mladen; Picer, Nena; Calić, Violeta

    2008-08-01

    Natural soil contaminated with PCBs was used in this study. The soil was excavated from the area around the damaged capacitor of an electrical transformer station in Zadar (ETS 110/35 kV). A lysimeter experiment was conducted for 17 months under natural climatic conditions and designed to measure the concentration of PCB in the soil and leachates. Our research field was composed of four plots and there were three lysimeters on each plot. After 12 months, a negligible quantity of Aroclor 1248 (an average of 0.24%) and the Sigma 7 key PCB congeners (SigmaPCB(7); IUPAC No.: PCB 28, PCB 52, PCB 101, PCB 118, PCB 138, PCB 153 and PCB 180) were leached from the soils into the water collected under the lysimeters (an average of 0.32%). During two soil samplings, the soil was taken at three depths from each lysimeter. The distribution of Aroclor 1248 and 7 individual PCB congeners in the soil layers was determined before and after planting. Plot No. 1 had the highest percentage of contaminant removal after 12 months. The data indicate that the Sigma 7 key PCBs in the surface soil layers of all the plots decreased and the removal percentages ranged between 19.0% (Plot No. 2) and 47.6% (Plot No. 1). Volatilization from the soil surface may be the most important mechanism for the loss of these "more volatile" PCB congeners. The results showed an accumulation of PCBs in the deepest level of the soil plots, probably due to the vertical transfer of the PCBs and the lack of volatilization.

  9. Evaluation of Different Modeling Approaches to Simulate Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Limestone Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Rosenberg, L.; Balbarini, N.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P. L.; Binning, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to understand the fate and transport of contaminants in limestone aquifers because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are highly heterogeneous; with micro-porous grains, flint inclusions, and being heavily fractured. Several modeling approaches have been developed to describe contaminant transport in fractured media, such as the discrete fracture (with various fracture geometries), equivalent porous media (with and without anisotropy), and dual porosity models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for limestone geologies. Given available field data and model purpose, this paper therefore aims to develop, examine and compare modeling approaches for transport of contaminants in fractured limestone aquifers. The model comparison was conducted for a contaminated site in Denmark, where a plume of a dissolved contaminant (PCE) has migrated through a fractured limestone aquifer. Multilevel monitoring wells have been installed at the site and available data includes information on spill history, extent of contamination, geology and hydrogeology. To describe the geology and fracture network, data from borehole logs was combined with an analysis of heterogeneities and fractures from a nearby excavation (analog site). Methods for translating the geological information and fracture mapping into each of the model concepts were examined. Each model was compared with available field data, considering both model fit and measures of model suitability. An analysis of model parameter identifiability and sensitivity is presented. Results show that there is considerable difference between modeling approaches, and that it is important to identify the right one for the actual scale and model purpose. A challenge in the use of field data is the determination of relevant hydraulic properties and interpretation of aqueous and solid phase contaminant concentration sampling data. Traditional water sampling has a bias

  10. Contaminant transport in a single fracture: Periodic boundary and flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Robert P.

    1989-05-01

    The effects of time-periodic inlet contaminant concentration and groundwater flow velocity on contaminant transport in a single, planar fracture, imbedded in a relatively impermeable rock matrix, are investigated. The calculations show that the contaminant propagates as a damped traveling wave into the matrix and along the fracture. If longitudinal dispersion is neglected, penetration of the wave into the matrix and fracture depends upon the input frequency σ as σ-½. Under uniform flow conditions, a daily oscillation penetrates into the matrix and fracture approximately 1 cm and 1 m, respectively. An annual oscillation penetrates approximately 10 cm and tens of meters for the matrix and fracture, respectively. These results depend upon physical properties of the rock matrix and fracture, and upon the flow velocity. Because longitudinal dispersion acts to further damp the amplitude of the traveling waves, these results give maximum penetration distances for the waves. If the flow velocity also has a small, time-periodic component, the downstream contaminant oscillations are virtually unchanged unless the inlet condition and flow have the same frequency. In this case, a dc transport of contaminant transport occurs that may have an amplitude as large as one-half of the magnitude of the velocity oscillation. These results indicate that in the absence of resonance, negligible error occurs in treating contaminant transport using mean inlet and flow conditions rather than more realistic time-varying ones. Observations of oscillations, however, can be used to provide useful information on rock and fracture transport properties such as D' and D.

  11. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    PubMed Central

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  12. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction.

  13. Chemical factors influencing colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Sujoy B.; Dzombak, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of colloids on the transport of two strongly sorbing solutesa hydrophobic organic compound, phenanthrene, and a metal ion, Ni2+were studied in sand-packed laboratory columns under different pH and ionic strength conditions. Two types of column experiments were performed as follows:  (i) sorption/mobilization experiments where the contaminant was first sorbed in the column under conditions where no colloids were released and mobilized under conditions where colloids were released as a result of ionic strength reduction in the influent; and (ii) transport experiments where the contaminant, dissolved or sorbed on colloids, was injected into columns packed with a strongly sorbing porous medium. In the first type of experiment, contaminant mobilization was significant only when all releasable colloids were flushed from the column. In all other cases, although high colloid particle concentrations were encountered, there was no marked effect on total contaminant concentrations. In the second type of experiment, colloid deposition efficiencies were shown to control the enhancement of transport. The deposition efficiency was a function of the pH (for a high organic content sand) and of the contaminant concentration (for a charged species such as Ni2+).

  14. Efficient reconstruction of contaminant release history

    SciTech Connect

    Alezander, Francis; Anghel, Marian; Gulbahce, Natali; Tartakovsky, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We present a generalized hybrid Monte Carlo (GHMC) method for fast, statistically optimal reconstruction of release histories of reactive contaminants. The approach is applicable to large-scale, strongly nonlinear systems with parametric uncertainties and data corrupted by measurement errors. The use of discrete adjoint equations facilitates numerical implementation of GHMC, without putting any restrictions on the degree of nonlinearity of advection-dispersion-reaction equations that are used to described contaminant transport in the subsurface. To demonstrate the salient features of the proposed algorithm, we identify the spatial extent of a distributed source of contamination from concentration measurements of a reactive solute.

  15. Influence of seaward boundary condition on contaminant transport in unconfined coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Volker, R. E.; Lockington, D. A.

    2001-06-01

    Contaminant transport in coastal aquifers is complicated partly due to the conditions at the seaward boundary including seawater intrusion and tidal variations of sea level. Their inclusion in modelling this system will be computationally expensive. Therefore, it will be instructive to investigate the consequence of simplifying the seaward boundary condition by neglecting the seawater density and tidal variations in numerical predictions of contaminant transport in this zone. This paper presents a comparison of numerical predictions for a simplified seaward boundary condition with experimental results for a corresponding realistic one including a saltwater interface and tidal variations. Different densities for contaminants are considered. The comparison suggests that the neglect of the seawater intrusion and tidal variations does not affect noticeably the overall migration rate of the plume before it reaches the saltwater interface. However, numerical prediction shows that a more dense contaminant travels further seaward and part of the solute mass exits under the sea if the seawater density is not included. This is not consistent with the experimental result, which shows that the contaminant travels upwards to the shoreline along the saltwater interface. Neglect of seawater density, therefore, will result in an underestimation of the exit rate of solute mass around the coastline and fictitious migration paths under the seabed. For a less dense contaminant, neglect of seawater density has little effect on numerical prediction of migration paths.

  16. Influence of seaward boundary condition on contaminant transport in unconfined coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Volker, R E; Lockington, D A

    2001-06-01

    Contaminant transport in coastal aquifers is complicated partly due to the conditions at the seaward boundary including seawater intrusion and tidal variations of sea level. Their inclusion in modelling this system will be computationally expensive. Therefore, it will be instructive to investigate the consequence of simplifying the seaward boundary condition by neglecting the seawater density and tidal variations in numerical predictions of contaminant transport in this zone. This paper presents a comparison of numerical predictions for a simplified seaward boundary condition with experimental results for a corresponding realistic one including a saltwater interface and tidal variations. Different densities for contaminants are considered. The comparison suggests that the neglect of the seawater intrusion and tidal variations does not affect noticeably the overall migration rate of the plume before it reaches the saltwater interface. However, numerical prediction shows that a more dense contaminant travels further seaward and part of the solute mass exits under the sea if the seawater density is not included. This is not consistent with the experimental result, which shows that the contaminant travels upwards to the shoreline along the saltwater interface. Neglect of seawater density, therefore, will result in an underestimation of the exit rate of solute mass around the coastline and fictitious migration paths under the seabed. For a less dense contaminant, neglect of seawater density has little effect on numerical prediction of migration paths.

  17. Mineralogical compositions of aquifer matrix as necessary initial conditions in reactive contaminant transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Burden, David S.

    2001-10-01

    Mineralogical compositions and their spatial distributions are important initial conditions for reactive transport modeling. However, popular Kd-based "reactive" transport models only require contaminant concentrations in the pore fluids as initial conditions, and minerals implicitly represent infinite sources and sinks in these models. That situation results in a general neglect of mineralogical characterization in site investigations. This study uses a coupled multi-component reactive mass transport model to predict the natural attenuation of a ground water plume at a uranium mill tailings site in western USA. Numerous ground water geochemistry data are available at this site, but mineralogical data are sketchy. Even given the well-defined pore fluid chemistry, variations of secondary mineral species and mineral abundances in the aquifer resulted in significantly different modeling outcomes. Results show that the amount of calcite in the aquifer determines the distances of plume migration. The possible presence of jurbanite, an aluminum sulfate phase, can store acidity temporarily but cause more severe contamination on a later date. The surfaces of iron oxyhydroxides can store significant amounts of sulfate and protons and serve as a second source for prolonged contamination. These simulations under field conditions illustrate that mineralogical compositions are an essential requirement for accurate prediction of contaminant fate and transport.

  18. Mineralogical compositions of aquifer matrix as necessary initial conditions in reactive contaminant transport models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C; Burden, D S

    2001-10-01

    Mineralogical compositions and their spatial distributions are important initial conditions for reactive transport modeling. However, popular Kd-based "reactive" transport models only require contaminant concentrations in the pore fluids as initial conditions, and minerals implicitly represent infinite sources and sinks in these models. That situation results in a general neglect of mineralogical characterization in site investigations. This study uses a coupled multi-component reactive mass transport model to predict the natural attenuation of a ground water plume at a uranium mill tailings site in western USA. Numerous ground water geochemistry data are available at this site, but mineralogical data are sketchy. Even given the well-defined pore fluid chemistry, variations of secondary mineral species and mineral abundances in the aquifer resulted in significantly different modeling outcomes. Results show that the amount of calcite in the aquifer determines the distances of plume migration. The possible presence of jurbanite, an aluminum sulfate phase, can store acidity temporarily but cause more severe contamination on a later date. The surfaces of iron oxyhydroxides can store significant amounts of sulfate and protons and serve as a second source for prolonged contamination. These simulations under field conditions illustrate that mineralogical compositions are an essential requirement for accurate prediction of contaminant fate and transport.

  19. PREDICTION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN THE MAURICE RIVER-UNION LAKE, NEW JERSEY, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a sediment and contaminant transport model and its application to the Maurice River-Union Lake system in southern New Jersey, USA for the purpose of characterizing and forecasting sediment and arsenic distributions before and after proposed dredging activitie...

  20. PREDICTION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN THE MAURICE RIVER-UNION LAKE, NEW JERSEY, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sediment and contaminant transport model and its application to the Maurice River-Union Lake system in southern New Jersey, USA is described. The application is meant to characterize and forecast sediment and arsenic (As) distributions before and after proposed dredging activit...

  1. Postaudit evaluation of conceptual model uncertainty for a glacial aquifer groundwater flow and contaminant transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Lawrence D.; Cypher, Joseph A.

    2010-06-01

    Numerical groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling incorporating three alternative conceptual models was conducted in 2005 to assess remedial actions and predict contaminant concentrations in an unconfined glacial aquifer located in Milford, Michigan, USA. Three alternative conceptual models were constructed and independently calibrated to evaluate uncertainty in the geometry of an aquitard underlying the aquifer and the extent to which infiltration from two manmade surface water bodies influenced the groundwater flow field. Contaminant transport for benzene, cis-DCE, and MTBE was modeled for a 5-year period that included a 2-year history match from July 2003 to May 2005 and predictions for a 3-year period ending in July 2008. A postaudit of model performance indicates that predictions for pumping wells, which integrated the transport signal across multiple model layers, were reliable but unable to differentiate between alternative conceptual model responses. In contrast, predictions for individual monitoring wells with limited screened intervals were less consistent, but held promise for evaluating alternative hydrogeologic models. Results of this study suggest that model conceptualization can have important practical implications for the delineation of contaminant transport pathways using monitoring wells, but may exert less influence on integrated predictions for pumping wells screened over multiple numerical model layers.

  2. Predicting Channel Evolution and Sediment and Contaminant Transport Following the Cerro Grande Fire, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. J.; Canfield, H. E.; Crowell, K. J.; Lane, L. J.

    2003-12-01

    The May 2000 Cerro Grande Fire severely burned the headwaters of many of the canyon streams draining through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos County and Pueblos in Northern New Mexico. The fire increased observed flood magnitudes and hillslope erosion rates by one to two orders of magnitude above pre-fire conditions. A set of modeling activities was undertaken to predict the potential impacts of post-fire floods on channel and floodplain evolution, and sediment and contaminant transport in the steep streams draining the burn area. A contaminant transport model, Reach6, was developed and coupled to the HEC6T sediment transport model to predict redistribution and offsite transport of contaminated channel and floodplain sediments. Model predictions were tested against observed flood data. In particular, the HEC6T predictions were tested against high-resolution Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) topographic data, collected before and after a 1440 cfs flash flood in a canyon contaminated with low levels of legacy Pu. The ALSM data showed the spatial distribution of channel and floodplain scour and deposition throughout the canyon. These data formed the backbone of our model testing process, along with observed sediment and Pu concentration data. Good correlation was found between predicted and observed data for the 1440cfs event, and led to application of the HEC6T model in assessing the effectiveness of remediation and stabilization strategies for Pueblo Canyon. LANL LA-UR-03-6382.

  3. THE ONSITE ON-LINE CALCULATORS AND TRAINING FOR SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a suite of on-line calculators called "OnSite" for assessing transport of environmental contaminants in the subsurface. The purpose of these calculators is to provide methods and data for common calculations used in assessing impacts from subsurface contaminatio...

  4. Techniques to better understand complex epikarst hydrogeology and contaminant transport in telogenetic karst settings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The movement of autogenic recharge through the shallow epikarstic zone in soil-mantled karst aquifers is important in understanding recharge areas and rates, groundwater storage, and contaminant transport processes. The groundwater flow in agricultural karst areas, such as Kentucky’s Pennyroyal Plat...

  5. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: groundwater contaminant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Arbogast; Steve Bryant; Clint N. Dawson; Mary F. Wheeler

    1998-08-31

    This report describes briefly the work of the Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM) of the University of Texas at Austin (and Rice University prior to September 1995) on the Partnership in Computational Sciences Consortium (PICS) project entitled Grand Challenge Problems in Environmental Modeling and Remediation: Groundwater Contaminant Transport.

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls removal from contaminated soils using a transportable indirect thermal dryer unit: implications for emissions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Xue, Nandong; Ding, Qiong; Vogt, Rolf David; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng; Wu, Guanglong; Zhang, Shilei; Zhou, Dandan; Liu, Bo; Yan, Yunzhong

    2014-11-01

    An assessment in China of the application of a transportable indirect thermal dryer unit for the remediation of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) demonstrated that it is well suited to remove PCBs from soils. A remarkable reduction of total PCBs in soils from 163-770 μg g(-1) to 0.08-0.15 μg g(-1) was achieved. This represented removal efficiencies of greater than 99.9% and an approximate 100% removal of the toxic equivalent of the PCBs. Furthermore, the emissions to the atmosphere from the unit were in compliance with current PCBs regulations. In conclusion, remediation of PCBs-contaminated soils based on a transportable indirect thermal dryer unit appears to be a highly efficient and environmentally sound treatment technology that has huge implications for cleaning thousands of regionally dispersed sites of PCBs contamination in China.

  7. Simulation of ground-water flow and potential contaminant transport at Area 6 Landfill, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Island County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simonds, F. William

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference steady-state ground-water flow model was developed to simulate hydraulic conditions at the Area 6 Landfill, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, near Oak Harbor, Washington. Remediation efforts were started in 1995 in an attempt to contain trichloroethene and other contaminants in the ground water. The model was developed as a tool to test the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat remediation efforts as well as alternative remediation strategies. The model utilized stratigraphic data from approximately 76 Navy and 19 private wells to define the geometry of the shallow, intermediate, and deep aquifers and the intervening confining layers. Initial aquifer parameters and recharge estimates from aquifer tests and published remedial investigation reports were used in the model and then adjusted until simulated water levels closely matched observed water-level data collected prior to the onset of remediation in 1995. The calibrated model was then modified to depict the remedial pump-and-treat system, in which contaminated ground water is extracted, treated, and returned to the ground surface for infiltration. The water levels simulated by the modified model were compared with observed water levels for the 1998 calendar year, during which time the pump-and-treat system was in nearly continuous operation and the ground-water system had equilibrated to steady-state conditions. Although artificial boundaries were used in the model, the choice of model boundary conditions was simulation in the area of primary concern surrounding the western contaminant plume and extraction wells. Particle tracking results indicate that the model can effectively simulate the advective transport of contaminants from the source area to the pumping wells and thus be used to test alternative remedial pumping strategies.

  8. BUOYANT ADVECTION OF GASES IN UNSATURATED SOIL

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Gregory E.; Falta, Ronald W.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    In unsaturated soil, methane and volatile organic compounds can significantly alter the density of soil gas and induce buoyant gas flow. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a two-dimensional, homogeneous sand pack with gas permeabilities ranging from 110 to 3,000 darcy. Pure methane gas was injected horizontally into the sand and steady-state methane profiles were measured. Experimental results are in close agreement with a numerical model that represents the advective and diffusive components of methane transport. Comparison of simulations with and without gravitational acceleration permits identification of conditions where buoyancy dominates methane transport. Significant buoyant flow requires a Rayleigh number greater than 10 and an injected gas velocity sufficient to overcome dilution by molecular diffusion near the source. These criteria allow the extension of laboratory results to idealized field conditions for methane as well as denser-than-air vapors produced by volatilizing nonaqueous phase liquids trapped in unsaturated soil. PMID:20396624

  9. Perched-Water Analysis Related to Deep Vadose Zone Contaminant Transport and Impact to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, KC; Chronister, Glen B.

    2013-11-15

    Perched-water conditions have been observed in the vadose zone above a fine-grained zone that is located just a few meters above the water table beneath the B-complex at the Hanford Site. The perched water, containing elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99, is important to consider in evaluating the future flux of contaminated water into the groundwater. A study was conducted to examine the perched-water conditions and quantitatively evaluate 1) factors that control perching behavior, 2) contaminant flux toward groundwater, and, 3) associated groundwater impact. Based on the current vertical transport pathways and large areal extent of the perched system, the evaluation was conducted using a one-dimensional (1-D) analysis. Steady-state scoping calculations showed that the perching-layer hydraulic conductivity is likely to be up to two orders of magnitude less than the base case value obtained from Hanford site literature. Numerical flow and transport simulations provided both steady-state and transient system estimates of water and contaminant behavior and were used to further refine the range of conditions consistent with current observations of perched water height and to provide estimates of future water and contaminant flux to groundwater. With a recharge rate of 6 cm/yr, representative of current disturbed surface conditions, contaminant flux from the perched water occurs over a time interval of tens of years. However, if the recharge rate is 0.35 cm/yr, representative of returning recharge to pre-Hanford Site levels, the contaminant flux into the groundwater is spread over hundreds of years. It was also demonstrated that removal of perched water by pumping would reduce the flux of water (and associated contaminants) to the groundwater, thereby impacting the long-term rate of contaminant movement to the groundwater.

  10. Comparing discrete fracture and continuum models to predict contaminant transport in fractured porous media.

    PubMed

    Blessent, Daniela; Jørgensen, Peter R; Therrien, René

    2014-01-01

    We used the FRAC3Dvs numerical model (Therrien and Sudicky 1996) to compare the dual-porosity (DP), equivalent porous medium (EPM), and discrete fracture matrix diffusion (DFMD) conceptual models to predict field-scale contaminant transport in a fractured clayey till aquitard. The simulations show that the DP, EPM, and DFMD models could be equally well calibrated to reproduce contaminant breakthrough in the till aquitard for a base case. In contrast, when groundwater velocity and degradation rates are modified with respect to the base case, the DP method simulated contaminant concentrations up to three orders of magnitude different from those calculated by the DFMD model. In previous simulations of well-characterized column experiments, the DFMD method reproduced observed changes in solute transport for a range of flow and transport conditions comparable to those of the field-scale simulations, while the DP and EPM models required extensive recalibration to avoid high magnitude errors in predicted mass transport. The lack of robustness with respect to variable flow and transport conditions suggests that DP models and effective porosity EPM models have limitations for predicting cause-effect relationships in environmental planning. The study underlines the importance of obtaining well-characterized experimental data for further studies and evaluation of model key process descriptions and model suitability.

  11. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  12. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF THE INFLUENCE OF DENITRIFYING SEDIMENTS ON NITRATE TRANSPORT IN AQUIFERS WITH SLOPING BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denitrification is a significant process for the removal of nitrate transported in groundwater drainage from agricultural watersheds. In this paper analytical solutions are developed for advective-reactive and nonpoint-source contaminant transport in a two-layer unconfined aquife...

  13. Effects of dissolved organic matter on the co-transport of mineral colloids and sorptive contaminants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Saiers, James E

    2015-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone has important implications to groundwater quality, and has received considerable attention. Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in subsurface environments, and its influence on mineral colloids and solute transport has been well documented. However, research on the influence of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport is limited. The objective of this paper is to elucidate the effects of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport of a radioactive contaminant (Cs-137) within partially-saturated sediments. Measurements made with re-packed columns reveal that Cs-137 mobility was low when mineral colloids were absent and was unaffected by the presence of NOM. The addition of mineral colloids to influent increased Cs-137 mobility, and effluent Cs-137 was dominated by the colloid-associated form. When NOM was added to systems that contained mineral colloids and Cs-137, the mobility of Cs-137 further increased. A mathematical model simulating colloid-facilitated transport showed that NOM increases Cs-137 transport by increasing colloid mobility and reducing the rate of Cs-137 adsorption to the porous medium.

  14. Coupled Geochemical and Reactive Transport Modeling of Organic Contaminants in a Pyrite-Rich Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarioglu, S. M.; Copty, N. K.

    2004-12-01

    Although pH is recognized as a key factor influencing bacterial activity, existing groundwater transport models generally do not directly account for the effect of pH on the biodegradation of organic compounds. The purpose of this study is to develop a coupled reactive transport and geochemical model that explicitly incorporates the effect of spatial and temporal variations of the pH on the biodegradation of organic contaminants. The model consists of two modules: a transport module and a geochemical module. The transport module uses a Crank-Nicholson finite-difference formulation to solve the groundwater flow and transport equations for the hydrocarbon, dissolved oxygen, microbial mass and all reactive groundwater species influencing the hydrocarbon biodegradation and pH distribution. The geochemical module allows for the simulation of both kinetically defined as well as geochemical equilibrium reactions. The governing non-linear system of equations is solved using an iterative multi-step operator-splitting algorithm. Both modules account for heterogeneity in the definition of the hydrogeological and biochemical parameters. For demonstration, the model is applied to a hypothetical pyrite-rich aquifer contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. A commonly used practice for the remediation of aquifers contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons is the delivery of oxygen for the enhanced aerobic biodegradation of the organic contaminant. However, the presence of pyrite may interfere with the intended purpose of the supplied oxygen, leading to undesirable side effects. Specifically, oxygen readily reacts with the sulfide minerals leading to depletion of oxygen and acidification of the subsurface environment and, subsequently, the inadvertent inhibition of the microbial activity. The developed coupled geochemical and reactive transport model is used to quantify these processes and assess the dominance of the various chemical reactions. Both abiotic and biotic pyrite

  15. Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.H.; Saiers, J.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Noe, G.B.; Mylon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of particulate matter within wetland surface waters affects nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility, and the evolution of the wetland landscape. Despite the importance of particle transport in influencing wetland form and function, there are few data sets that illuminate, in a quantitative way, the transport behavior of particulate matter within surface waters containing emergent vegetation. We report observations from experiments on the transport of 1 ??m latex microspheres at a wetland field site located in Water Conservation Area 3A of the Florida Everglades. The experiments involved line source injections of particles inside two 4.8-m-long surface water flumes constructed within a transition zone between an Eleocharis slough and Cladium jamaicense ridge and within a Cladium jamaicense ridge. We compared the measurements of particle transport to calculations of two-dimensional advection-dispersion model that accounted for a linear increase in water velocities with elevation above the ground surface. The results of this analysis revealed that particle spreading by longitudinal and vertical dispersion was substantially greater in the ridge than within the transition zone and that particle capture by aquatic vegetation lowered surface water particle concentrations and, at least for the timescale of our experiments, could be represented as an irreversible, first-order kinetics process. We found generally good agreement between our field-based estimates of particle dispersion and water velocity and estimates determined from published theory, suggesting that the advective-dispersive transport of particulate matter within complex wetland environments can be approximated on the basis of measurable properties of the flow and aquatic vegetation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Solid waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions Volume 2: Contaminant transport under unsaturated moisture contents

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenmeier, C.W.; Serne, R.J.; Conca, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development and optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release of contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments and (2) the creation of empirical data that become input parameters to performance assessment (PA) analyses for future Hanford Site disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing solid waste disposal units. For this report, efforts focused on developing methodologies to evaluate contaminant transport in Trench 8 (W-5 Burial Ground) sediments under unsaturated (vadose zone) conditions. To accomplish this task, a series of flow-through column tests were run using standard saturated column systems, Wierenga unsaturated column systems (both commercial and modified), and the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA). The reactants investigated were {sup 85}Sr, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U as reactive tracers, and tritium as a non-reactive tracer. Results indicate that for moderately unsaturated conditions (volumetric water contents >50 % of saturation), the Wierenga system performed reasonably well such that long water residence times (50-147 h) were achieved, and reasonably good steady-state flow conditions were maintained. The major drawbacks in using this system for reactive tracer work included (1) the inability to achieve reproducible and constant moisture content below 50% of saturation, (2) the four to six month time required to complete a single test, and (3) the propensity for mechanical failure resulting from laboratory power outages during the prolonged testing period.

  17. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  18. New interpretation of glacial history of Cape Cod may have important implications for groundwater contaminant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Ann; Uchupi, Elazar

    Fresh water resources of sufficient quantity and quality are critical for maintaining societies and for supporting additional growth and development. When these resources are threatened or compromised, as can occur through the release of hazardous compounds, additional stress is placed on the water supply system from loss of the resource and changes in the demand structure.In western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, such problems are currently being encountered as a result of contaminant releases from the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). An effective long-term response to subsurface contamination requires, among other things, determining the lithology, stratigraphy, and structure of aquifer materials and their effects on groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A recent review and analysis of subsurface data across Cape Cod offers a new interpretation of the geologic history of the Cape, with potential implications for groundwater issues facing western Cape Cod (the Upper Cape).

  19. Sensitivity analysis of unsaturated flow and contaminant transport with correlated parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feng; Zhu, Jianting; Ye, Ming; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2011-02-01

    SummaryThis study conducts sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for predicting unsaturated flow and contaminant transport in a layered heterogeneous system. The objectives of this work are to: (1) examine the effects of parameter correlations on the sensitivity of unsaturated flow and contaminant transport and (2) assess the relative contributions of parameter uncertainties to the uncertainties of flow and transport at each hydrogeologic layer. Using the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain (YM) in Nevada, USA, as an example, the study considers cases of independent and correlated parameters. A sampling-based regression method is used, when the model input parameters are independent, and a decomposition method is used for the correlated case. When the parameters are independent, the uncertainty in permeability has the largest contribution to the uncertainties in simulated percolation flux and mass of the reactive tracer arriving at the water table. For the percolation flux, the second largest contribution is from the van Genuchten α; the sorption coefficient of the reactive tracer is the second most important parameter for the tracer mass arrival uncertainty. The sensitivity to the sorption coefficient is larger in the layers of devitrified and zeolitic tuffs than in the layers of vitric tuff. Contributions of the uncertainties in van Genuchten n and porosity to the percolation flux and tracer transport uncertainties are larger in the case of correlated parameters compared with the case of independent parameters due to the correlations of n and porosity with the van Genuchten α and permeability, respectively. These results illustrate the significant effects of parameter correlations on the sensitivity and uncertainty of unsaturated flow and transport. The findings are of significance in facilitating future characterizations to reduce the parameter uncertainties and associated predictive uncertainties of flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated fractured

  20. Comparison of Contaminant Transport in Agricultural Drainage Water and Urban Stormwater Runoff.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Ranaivoson, Andry Z; Feyereisen, Gary W; Rosen, Carl J; Moncrief, John F

    2016-01-01

    Transport of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural and urban landscapes to surface water bodies can cause adverse environmental impacts. The main objective of this long-term study was to quantify and compare contaminant transport in agricultural drainage water and urban stormwater runoff. We measured flow rate and contaminant concentration in stormwater runoff from Willmar, Minnesota, USA, and in drainage water from subsurface-drained fields with surface inlets, namely, Unfertilized and Fertilized Fields. Commercial fertilizer and turkey litter manure were applied to the Fertilized Field based on agronomic requirements. Results showed that the City Stormwater transported significantly higher loads per unit area of ammonium, total suspended solids (TSS), and total phosphorus (TP) than the Fertilized Field, but nitrate load was significantly lower. Nitrate load transport in drainage water from the Unfertilized Field was 58% of that from the Fertilized Field. Linear regression analysis indicated that a 1% increase in flow depth resulted in a 1.05% increase of TSS load from the City Stormwater, a 1.07% increase in nitrate load from the Fertilized Field, and a 1.11% increase in TP load from the Fertilized Field. This indicates an increase in concentration with a rise in flow depth, revealing that concentration variation was a significant factor influencing the dynamics of load transport. Further regression analysis showed the importance of targeting high flows to reduce contaminant transport. In conclusion, for watersheds similar to this one, management practices should be directed to load reduction of ammonium and TSS from urban areas, and nitrate from cropland while TP should be a target for both.

  1. Comparison of Contaminant Transport in Agricultural Drainage Water and Urban Stormwater Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Ranaivoson, Andry Z.; Feyereisen, Gary W.; Rosen, Carl J.; Moncrief, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Transport of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural and urban landscapes to surface water bodies can cause adverse environmental impacts. The main objective of this long-term study was to quantify and compare contaminant transport in agricultural drainage water and urban stormwater runoff. We measured flow rate and contaminant concentration in stormwater runoff from Willmar, Minnesota, USA, and in drainage water from subsurface-drained fields with surface inlets, namely, Unfertilized and Fertilized Fields. Commercial fertilizer and turkey litter manure were applied to the Fertilized Field based on agronomic requirements. Results showed that the City Stormwater transported significantly higher loads per unit area of ammonium, total suspended solids (TSS), and total phosphorus (TP) than the Fertilized Field, but nitrate load was significantly lower. Nitrate load transport in drainage water from the Unfertilized Field was 58% of that from the Fertilized Field. Linear regression analysis indicated that a 1% increase in flow depth resulted in a 1.05% increase of TSS load from the City Stormwater, a 1.07% increase in nitrate load from the Fertilized Field, and a 1.11% increase in TP load from the Fertilized Field. This indicates an increase in concentration with a rise in flow depth, revealing that concentration variation was a significant factor influencing the dynamics of load transport. Further regression analysis showed the importance of targeting high flows to reduce contaminant transport. In conclusion, for watersheds similar to this one, management practices should be directed to load reduction of ammonium and TSS from urban areas, and nitrate from cropland while TP should be a target for both. PMID:27930684

  2. Packaging, Transportation, and Disposal Logistics for Large Radioactively Contaminated Reactor Decommissioning Components

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark S.

    2008-01-15

    The packaging, transportation and disposal of large, retired reactor components from operating or decommissioning nuclear plants pose unique challenges from a technical as well as regulatory compliance standpoint. In addition to the routine considerations associated with any radioactive waste disposition activity, such as characterization, ALARA, and manifesting, the technical challenges for large radioactively contaminated components, such as access, segmentation, removal, packaging, rigging, lifting, mode of transportation, conveyance compatibility, and load securing require significant planning and execution. In addition, the current regulatory framework, domestically in Titles 49 and 10 and internationally in TS-R-1, does not lend itself to the transport of these large radioactively contaminated components, such as reactor vessels, steam generators, reactor pressure vessel heads, and pressurizers, without application for a special permit or arrangement. This paper addresses the methods of overcoming the technical and regulatory challenges. The challenges and disposition decisions do differ during decommissioning versus component replacement during an outage at an operating plant. During decommissioning, there is less concern about critical path for restart and more concern about volume reduction and waste minimization. Segmentation on-site is an available option during decommissioning, since labor and equipment will be readily available and decontamination activities are routine. The reactor building removal path is also of less concern and there are more rigging/lifting options available. Radionuclide assessment is necessary for transportation and disposal characterization. Characterization will dictate the packaging methodology, transportation mode, need for intermediate processing, and the disposal location or availability. Characterization will also assist in determining if the large component can be transported in full compliance with the transportation

  3. Advection, diffusion, and delivery over a network.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Luke L M; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K; Fricker, Mark D; Jones, Nick S

    2012-08-01

    Many biological, geophysical, and technological systems involve the transport of a resource over a network. In this paper, we present an efficient method for calculating the exact quantity of the resource in each part of an arbitrary network, where the resource is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. The key conceptual step is to partition the resource into material that does or does not reach a node over a given time step. As an example application, we consider resource allocation within fungal networks, and analyze the spatial distribution of the resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, and such growth necessarily involves the movement of fluid. We develop a model of delivery in growing fungal networks, and find good empirical agreement between our model and experimental data gathered using radio-labeled tracers. Our results lead us to suggest that in foraging fungi, growth-induced mass flow is sufficient to account for long-distance transport, if the system is well insulated. We conclude that active transport mechanisms may only be required at the very end of the transport pathway, near the growing tips.

  4. [Influences of surfactant on the transport of PAHs in artificially contaminated soil columns].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Xue-jun; Hu, Jun-dong; Tao, Shu; Liu, Wen-xin

    2005-03-01

    The effect of anionic surfactant LAS on leaching of PAHs from artificially contaminated soil was studied. The interaction of these processes were studied in a two-layer column experiment with a base layer of uncontaminated soil(9cm) and a top layer of artificially contaminated soil(1cm). Results show that 5 critical micelle concentration (CMC) LAS enhanced the transport of PAHs. The breakthrough curves of low ring PAHs followed the normal distribution and the relative leaching ratios of 4 or more rings PAHs were low, and not more than 10%. The transport of PAHs was retarded compared with LAS, and the high ring PAHs were retarded more significantly. Linear correlation was observed between the relative leachability of the individual PAHs and the octanol/water coefficient of PAHs.

  5. Impact of Temporally Variable and Uniform Pumping Regimes on Contaminant Transport in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libera, A.; de Barros, F.; Guadagnini, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study and compare the effect of temporally variable and uniform pumping regimes on key features of contaminant transport in a randomly heterogeneous aquifer. Pumping wells are used for groundwater supply in the context of urban, agricultural, and industrial activities. Groundwater management agencies typically schedule groundwater extraction through a predefined sequence of pumping periods to balance benefits to anthropogenic activities and environmental needs. The impact of the spatial variability of aquifer hydraulic properties, such as hydraulic conductivity, on contaminant transport and associated solute residence times are widely studied. Only a limited number of studies address the way a given pumping schedule affects contaminant plume behavior in heterogeneous aquifers. In this context, the feedback between a transient pumping regime and contaminant breakthrough curves is largely unexplored. Our goal is to investigate the way diverse groundwater extraction strategies affect the history of solute concentration recovered at the well while accounting for the natural variability of the geological system, in the presence of incomplete information on hydraulic conductivity distribution. Considering the joint effects of spatially heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity and temporally varying well pumping rates, this work offers a realistic evaluation of groundwater contamination risk. The latter is here considered in the context of human health and is quantified in terms of the probability that harm will result from exposure to a contaminant found in groundwater. Two scenarios are considered: a pumping well that extracts a given amount of water operating (a) at a constant pumping rate and (b) under transient conditions. The analysis is performed within a numerical Monte Carlo framework. We probe the impact of diverse geostatistical structures to describe aquifer heterogeneity on solute breakthrough curves and the statistics of target environmental performance

  6. The transport of contaminants during storms in the White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.K.; Marsh, J.D.; Wickliff, D.S.; Larsen, I.L.; Clapp, R.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents are transport of contaminants from SWSA 5 along two principle pathways: the saturated groundwater system and the intermittently saturated stormflow system. The results of a baseflow sampling effort and a dye tracer study, indicated that much of the transport through the saturated groundwater system occurs along discrete geologic features. These features appear to be related to the contact between the Maryville and Nolichucky members of the Conasauga shale. Three discrete sources of tritium to Melton Branch Stream (MBS) were identified and traced to SWSA 5 by measuring soil moisture and evapotranspiration along transects between MBS and SWSA 5.

  7. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  8. Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, Jon; Perdrial, Nico; Mueller, Karl; Strepka, Caleb; O’Day, Peggy; Rivera, Nelson; Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Steefel, Carl; Thompson, Aaron

    2012-11-05

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. In this final report, we provide detailed descriptions of our results from this three-year study, completed in 2012 following a one-year no cost extension.

  9. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  10. Testing of a benchscale Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport system for treating contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, K.M.; Lunsford, T.R.; Panjabi, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport process is a innovative means of removing radionuclides from contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site. Specifically, groundwater in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site has been contaminated with uranium, technetium, and nitrate. Investigations are proceeding to determine the most cost effective method to remove these contaminants. The process described in this paper combines three different membrane technologies (reverse osmosis, coupled transport, and nanofiltration to purify the groundwater while extracting and concentrating uranium, technetium, and nitrate into separate solutions. This separation allows for the future use of the radionuclides, if needed, and reduces the amount of waste that will need to be disposed of. This process has the potential to concentrate the contaminants into solutions with volumes in a ratio of 1/10,000 of the feed volume. This compares to traditional volume reductions of 10 to 100 for ion exchange and stand-alone reverse osmosis. The successful demonstration of this technology could result in significant savings in the overall cost of decontaminating the groundwater.

  11. Characterizing the Transport of a Novel, Engineered Nanoparticle for Use in Remediation of Hydrophobic Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. E.; Miller, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (MSCKs) were originally engineered to aid in the cleanup of oil spills. These polymeric particles are spherical and approximately 70 nm in diameter. MSCKs have a hydrophobic shell and hydrophilic core which encapsulates suspended iron oxide nanoparticles, rendering them magnetic. MSCKs operate like discrete surfactant packets: increasing the mobility and apparent solubility of hydrophobic species, but do so within the confines of discrete particles which can then be recovered by filtration or magnetic removal. MSCKs accomplish this via sequestration of hydrophobic species from through the hydrophilic shell and into the hydrophobic core where hydrocarbon contaminants are entropically stabilized. In batch reactor testing, MSCKs have been shown to sequester crude oil up to ten times their mass (1000 mg of oil per 100 mg of MSCKs). This study examines the transport characteristics and contaminant sequestration capabilities of MSCKs in saturated porous media, in order to establish their potential for use in groundwater remediation. Baseline MSCK transport parameters were determined via one dimensional impulse column experiments. MSCKs were readily transported in saturated sand, with an average recovery rate of 99%. In the presence of 10% clay particles, recovery was reduced to 68%. MSCKs were able to completely sequester an aqueous phase pollutant (8.7 mg/L m-xylene), although it further reduced their recovery rate to 61% in sand and 53% in clay. The presence of a free phase contaminant (5% of pore space occupied by mineral oil) reduced MSCKs recovery in sand to 53%. The MSCKs recovered in the effluent had sequestered the mineral at ratios far below their capability (3-10 mg of oil per 100 mg of MSCKs). Overall, this study indicated that MSCKs show a number of promising attributes for use in remediation. However, further manipulation of their chemical and morphological properties is needed, with the objective of

  12. Safety analysis report for packaging, onsite, long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-05-09

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks.

  13. A Fast Fourier transform stochastic analysis of the contaminant transport problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deng, F.W.; Cushman, J.H.; Delleur, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional stochastic analysis of the contaminant transport problem is developed in the spirit of Naff (1990). The new derivation is more general and simpler than previous analysis. The fast Fourier transformation is used extensively to obtain numerical estimates of the mean concentration and various spatial moments. Data from both the Borden and Cape Cod experiments are used to test the methodology. Results are comparable to results obtained by other methods, and to the experiments themselves.

  14. Characterization of complex mineral assemblages: Implications for contaminant transport and environmental remediation

    PubMed Central

    Bertsch, Paul M.; Seaman, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Surface reactive phases of soils and aquifers, comprised of phyllosilicate and metal oxohydroxide minerals along with humic substances, play a critical role in the regulation of contaminant fate and transport. Much of our knowledge concerning contaminant-mineral interactions at the molecular level, however, is derived from extensive experimentation on model mineral systems. Although these investigations have provided a foundation for understanding reactive surface functional groups on individual mineral phases, the information cannot be readily extrapolated to complex mineral assemblages in natural systems. Recent studies have elucidated the role of less abundant mineral and organic substrates as important surface chemical modifiers and have demonstrated complex coupling of reactivity between permanent-charge phyllosilicates and variable-charge Fe-oxohydroxide phases. Surface chemical modifiers were observed to control colloid generation and transport processes in surface and subsurface environments as well as the transport of solutes and ionic tracers. The surface charging mechanisms operative in the complex mineral assemblages cannot be predicted based on bulk mineralogy or by considering surface reactivity of less abundant mineral phases based on results from model systems. The fragile nature of mineral assemblages isolated from natural systems requires novel techniques and experimental approaches for investigating their surface chemistry and reactivity free of artifacts. A complete understanding of the surface chemistry of complex mineral assemblages is prerequisite to accurately assessing environmental and human health risks of contaminants or in designing environmentally sound, cost-effective chemical and biological remediation strategies. PMID:10097043

  15. Bioassessment of contaminant transport and distribution in aquatic ecosystems by chemical analysis of burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steingraeber, M.T.; Wiener, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Burrowing mayfly nymphs (Ephemeroptera) inhabit and ingest fine-grained sediments and detritus that may be enriched with metals and persistent organic compounds. The burrowing nymphs can externally adsorb and internally assimilate these contaminants, providing a link for the food chain transfer of potentially toxic substances from sediments to organisms in higher trophic levels. The emergent adults are short-lived and do not feed, thus their gut contents do not contribute greatly to their total contaminant burden. These characteristics make Hexagenia spp. And certain other burrowing mayflies useful for assessing ecosystem contamination. General protocols are presented for the collection, processing and analysis of emergent mayflies to assess the spatial distribution and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Two essential components of this bioassessment approach are a network of on-site volunteers with the materials and instructions needed to correctly collect and store samples and quality assurance procedures to estimate the accuracy of chemical analyses. The utility of this approach is demonstrated with an example of its application to the Upper Mississippi River (USA). Determination of cadmium, mercury and polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in emergent Hexagenia bilineata from a 1250 km reach of this river revealed (1) several source areas of contaminants and (2) distinct patterns in the bioaccumulation (and apparent sediment-associated transport) of each residue on both small and large spatial scales.

  16. Transport of contaminants by Arctic sea ice and surface ocean currents

    SciTech Connect

    Pfirman, S.

    1995-12-31

    Sea ice and ocean currents transport contaminants in the Arctic from source areas on the shelves, to biologically active regions often more than a thousand kilometers away. Coastal regions along the Siberian margin are polluted by discharges of agricultural, industrial and military wastes in river runoff, from atmospheric deposition and ocean dumping. The Kara Sea is of particular concern because of deliberate dumping of radioactive waste, as well as the large input of polluted river water. Contaminants are incorporated in ice during suspension freezing on the shelves, and by atmospheric deposition during drift. Ice releases its contaminant load through brine drainage, surface runoff of snow and meltwater, and when the floe disintegrates. The marginal ice zone, a region of intense biological activity, may also be the site of major contaminant release. Potentially contaminated ice from the Kara Sea is likely to influence the marginal ice zones of the Barents and Greenland seas. From studies conducted to date it appears that sea ice from the Kara Sea does not typically enter the Beaufort Gyre, and thus is unlikely to affect the northern Canadian and Alaskan margins.

  17. Chaotic Advection in a Bounded 3-Dimensional Potential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Smith, Lachlan; Lester, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    3-dimensional potential, or Darcy flows, are central to understanding and designing laminar transport in porous media; however, chaotic advection in 3-dimensional, volume-preserving flows is still not well understood. We show results of advecting passive scalars in a transient 3-dimensional potential flow that consists of a steady dipole flow and periodic reorientation. Even for the most symmetric reorientation protocol, neither of the two invarients of the motion are conserved; however, one invarient is closely shadowed by a surface of revolution constructed from particle paths of the steady flow, creating in practice an adiabatic surface. A consequence is that chaotic regions cover 3-dimensional space, though tubular regular regions are still transport barriers. This appears to be a new mechanism generating 3-dimensional chaotic orbits. These results contast with the experimental and theoretical results for chaotic scalar transport in 2-dimensional Darcy flows. Wiggins, J. Fluid Mech. 654 (2010).

  18. BLT-EC (Breach, Leach and Transport-Equilibrium Chemistry) data input guide. A computer model for simulating release and coupled geochemical transport of contaminants from a subsurface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, R.J. |; Sullivan, T.M.; Kinsey, R.R.

    1997-05-01

    The BLT-EC computer code has been developed, implemented, and tested. BLT-EC is a two-dimensional finite element computer code capable of simulating the time-dependent release and reactive transport of aqueous phase species in a subsurface soil system. BLT-EC contains models to simulate the processes (container degradation, waste-form performance, transport, chemical reactions, and radioactive production and decay) most relevant to estimating the release and transport of contaminants from a subsurface disposal system. Water flow is provided through tabular input or auxiliary files. Container degradation considers localized failure due to pitting corrosion and general failure due to uniform surface degradation processes. Waste-form performance considers release to be limited by one of four mechanisms: rinse with partitioning, diffusion, uniform surface degradation, and solubility. Transport considers the processes of advection, dispersion, diffusion, chemical reaction, radioactive production and decay, and sources (waste form releases). Chemical reactions accounted for include complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, oxidation-reduction, and ion exchange. Radioactive production and decay in the waste form is simulated. To improve the usefulness of BLT-EC, a pre-processor, ECIN, which assists in the creation of chemistry input files, and a post-processor, BLTPLOT, which provides a visual display of the data have been developed. BLT-EC also includes an extensive database of thermodynamic data that is also accessible to ECIN. This document reviews the models implemented in BLT-EC and serves as a guide to creating input files and applying BLT-EC.

  19. Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels: FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Campbell, Scott A.

    2012-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Management’s Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, CAU 370, suggest that radioactive material may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Although DRI initially looked at the CAU 370 site, given that it could not be confirmed that migration of contamination into the channel was natural, an alternate study site was selected at CAU 550. Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radioactivity may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). Figure 1 shows the results of a low-elevation aerial survey (Colton, 1999) in Area 8. The numbered markers in Figure 1 identify ground zero for three safety experiments conducted in 1958 [Oberon (number 1), Ceres (number 2), and Titania (number 4)] and a weapons effects test conducted in 1964, Mudpack (number 3). This survey suggests contaminants may be migrating down the ephemeral channels that traverse CAU 550. Note particularly the lobe of higher concentration extending southeastward at the south end of the high concentration area marked as number 3 in Figure 1. CAU 550 in Area 8 of the NNSS was selected for

  20. TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability and transport of radiolabeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from a shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study incl...

  1. Modeling water exchange and contaminant transport through a Baltic coastal region.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Anders; Döös, Kristofer; Andrejev, Oleg

    2006-12-01

    The water exchange of the Baltic coastal zone is characterized by its seasonally varying regimes. In the safety assessment of a potential repository for spent nuclear fuel, it is important to assess the consequences of a hypothetical leak of radionuclides through the seabed into a waterborne transport phase. In particular, estimates of the associated residence times in the near-shore coastal zone are of interest. There are several methods to quantify such measures, of which three are presented here. Using the coastal location of Forsmark (Sweden) as an example, methods based on passive tracers, particle trajectories, and the average age distribution of exogeneous water parcels are compared for a representative one-year cycle. Tracer-based methods can simulate diffusivity more realistically than the other methods. Trajectory-based methods can handle Lagrangian dispersion processes due to advection but neglect diffusion on the sub-grid scale. The method based on the concept of average age (AvA) of exogeneous water can include all such sources simultaneously not only boundary water bodies but also various (fresh)-water discharges. Due to the inclusion of sub-grid diffusion this method gives a smoother measure of the water renewal. It is shown that backward in time trajectories and AvA-times are basically equipollent methods, yielding correlated results within the limits set by the diffusivity.

  2. Potential contaminant transport in the regional Carbonate Aquifer beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredehoeft, John; King, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the site of the proposed US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The repository is to be a mine, sited approximately 300 m below the crest of the mountain, in a sequence of variably welded and fractured mid-Miocene rhylolite tuffs, in the unsaturated zone, approximately 300 m above the water table. Beneath the proposed repository, at a depth of 2 km, is a thick sequence of Paleozoic carbonate rocks that contain the highly transmissive Lower Carbonate Aquifer. In the area of Yucca Mountain the Carbonate Aquifer integrates groundwater flow from north of the mountain, through the Amargosa Valley, through the Funeral Mountains to Furnace Creek in Death Valley, California where the groundwater discharges in a set of large springs. Data that describe the Carbonate Aquifer suggest a concept for flow through the aquifer, and based upon the conceptual model, a one-layer numerical model was constructed to simulate groundwater flow in the Carbonate Aquifer. Advective transport analyses suggest that the predicted travel time of a particle from Yucca Mountain to Death Valley through the Carbonate Aquifer might be as short as 100 years to as long 2,000 years, depending upon the porosity.

  3. Application of SPARROW modeling to understanding contaminant fate and transport from uplands to streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott; Garcia, Ana Maria.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding spatial variability in contaminant fate and transport is critical to efficient regional water-quality restoration. An approach to capitalize on previously calibrated spatially referenced regression (SPARROW) models to improve the understanding of contaminant fate and transport was developed and applied to the case of nitrogen in the 166,000 km2 Chesapeake Bay watershed. A continuous function of four hydrogeologic, soil, and other landscape properties significant (α = 0.10) to nitrogen transport from uplands to streams was evaluated and compared among each of the more than 80,000 individual catchments (mean area, 2.1 km2) in the watershed. Budgets (including inputs, losses or net change in storage in uplands and stream corridors, and delivery to tidal waters) were also estimated for nitrogen applied to these catchments from selected upland sources. Most (81%) of such inputs are removed, retained, or otherwise processed in uplands rather than transported to surface waters. Combining SPARROW results with previous budget estimates suggests 55% of this processing is attributable to denitrification, 23% to crop or timber harvest, and 6% to volatilization. Remaining upland inputs represent a net annual increase in landscape storage in soils or biomass exceeding 10 kg per hectare in some areas. Such insights are important for planning watershed restoration and for improving future watershed models.

  4. Evaluation of wastewater contaminant transport in surface waters using verified Lagrangian sampling.

    PubMed

    Antweiler, Ronald C; Writer, Jeffrey H; Murphy, Sheila F

    2014-02-01

    Contaminants released from wastewater treatment plants can persist in surface waters for substantial distances. Much research has gone into evaluating the fate and transport of these contaminants, but this work has often assumed constant flow from wastewater treatment plants. However, effluent discharge commonly varies widely over a 24-hour period, and this variation controls contaminant loading and can profoundly influence interpretations of environmental data. We show that methodologies relying on the normalization of downstream data to conservative elements can give spurious results, and should not be used unless it can be verified that the same parcel of water was sampled. Lagrangian sampling, which in theory samples the same water parcel as it moves downstream (the Lagrangian parcel), links hydrologic and chemical transformation processes so that the in-stream fate of wastewater contaminants can be quantitatively evaluated. However, precise Lagrangian sampling is difficult, and small deviations - such as missing the Lagrangian parcel by less than 1h - can cause large differences in measured concentrations of all dissolved compounds at downstream sites, leading to erroneous conclusions regarding in-stream processes controlling the fate and transport of wastewater contaminants. Therefore, we have developed a method termed "verified Lagrangian" sampling, which can be used to determine if the Lagrangian parcel was actually sampled, and if it was not, a means for correcting the data to reflect the concentrations which would have been obtained had the Lagrangian parcel been sampled. To apply the method, it is necessary to have concentration data for a number of conservative constituents from the upstream, effluent, and downstream sites, along with upstream and effluent concentrations that are constant over the short-term (typically 2-4h). These corrections can subsequently be applied to all data, including non-conservative constituents. Finally, we show how data

  5. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  6. Contaminant transport in riverbank filtration in the presence of dissolved organic matter and bacteria: a kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    2002-09-01

    In riverbank filtration, the removal of organic contaminants is an important task for the production of good quality drinking water. The transport of an organic contaminant in riverbank filtration can be retarded by sorption on to the solid matrix and facilitated by the presence of mobile colloids. In the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacteria, the subsurface environment can be modeled as a four-phase porous medium: two mobile colloidal phases, an aqueous phase, and a solid matrix. In this study, a kinetic model is developed to simulate the contaminant transport in riverbank filtration in the presence of DOM and bacteria. The bacterial deposition and the contaminant sorption on bacteria and DOM are expressed with kinetic expressions. The model equations are solved numerically with a fully implicit finite difference method. Simulation results show that the contaminant mobility increases greatly in riverbank filtration due to the presence of DOM. The mobility can be enhanced further when the bacteria and DOM are present together in the aquifer. In this system, the total aqueous phase contaminant concentration, Cct+, includes the contaminant dissolved in the aqueous phase, Cc+, the contaminant sorbed to DOM, σcd+, and the contaminant sorbed to mobile bacteria, Cb+σcbm+, (i.e. Cct+= Cc++ σcd++ Cb+σcbm+). Sensitivity analysis illustrates that the distribution of the total aqueous phase contaminants among the dissolved phase, DOM and bacteria is changed significantly with various Damköhler numbers related to the contaminant sorption on mobile colloids.

  7. Integrating Hydrogeological, Microbiological, and Geochemical Data Using a Multi-Component Reactive Transport Model: Quantifying the Biogeochemical Evolution of Redox Zones in a Contaminated Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Long, D. T.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    Hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical processes operating in a shallow sandy aquifer contaminated by waste fuels and chlorinated solvents were integrated using high-resolution mechanistic models. A 3-D, transient, reactive transport model was developed to quantitatively describe coupled processes via thermodynamic and kinetic arguments. The model was created by linking the hydrodynamic model MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988), with advection, dispersion and user defined kinetic reactions based on RT3D 2.0, (Clement and Jones, 1998) and geochemical model PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). This model, BGTK3D 2.0, describes 1) the biodegradation of organic matter based on the influence of transport processes on microbial growth, 2) the complex suite of biogeochemical reactions operating in the aquifer, and 3) sharp chemical gradients. Some key features of this model are an ability to incorporate realistic solid phases to test hypotheses regarding mineral-water interactions, and an ability to accurately describe small-scale biogeochemical cycling (cm variability) observed in the field without oscillations or excessive numerical damping. BGTK3D was used to test hypotheses regarding the evolution of redox chemistry in a contaminated aquifer. The conceptual model that terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) distribute themselves sequentially into redox zones down flow path in aqueous systems is often used to interpret how and at what rates organic compounds will be degraded in the environment. Geochemical and microbiological data collected from a mixed contaminant plume at the former Wurtsmith AFB in Oscoda, Michigan suggests that under steady-state, mature plume conditions, traditional redox zonation may not be a realistic model of the distribution of TEAPs and therefore may not be the best model to evaluate the potential degradation of organic compounds. Based on these data, a conceptual model of TEAP evolution in contaminated systems was

  8. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT RESULTING FROM MULTICOMPONENT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID POOL DISSOLUTION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS (R823579)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-analytical method for simulating transient contaminant transport originating from the dissolution of multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pools in three-dimensional, saturated, homogeneous porous media is presented. Each dissolved component may undergo first-order...

  9. CHROMATOGRAPHIC ALTERATION OF A NONIONIC SURFACTANT MIXTURE DURING TRANSPORT IN DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT (R826650)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromatographic alteration of a nonionic surfactant mixture during transport through DNAPL-contaminated aquifer sediment may occur due to differential loss of oligomers to sediment and to dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). These losses may significantly alter the solubilizing...

  10. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  11. Using Contaminant Transport Modeling to Determine Historical Discharges at the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwell, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    When it is determined that a contaminated site needs to be remediated, the issue of who is going to pay for that remediation is an immediate concern. This means that there needs to be a determination of who the responsible parties are for the existing contamination. Seldom is it the case that records have been made and kept of the surface contaminant discharges. In many cases it is possible to determine the relative amount of contaminant discharge at the surface of the various responsible parties by employing a careful analysis of the history of contaminant transport through the surface, through the vadose zone, and within the saturated zone. The process begins with the development of a dynamic conceptual site model that takes into account the important features of the transport of the contaminants through the vadose zone and in the groundwater. The parameters for this model can be derived from flow data available for the site. The resulting contaminant transport model is a composite of the vadose zone transport model, together with the saturated zone (groundwater) flow model. Any calibration of the model should be carefully employed in order to avoid using information about the conclusions of the relative discharge amounts of the responsible parties in determining the calibrated parameters. Determination of the leading edge of the plume is an important first step. It is associated with the first discharges from the surface of the site. If there were several discharging parties at the same time, then it is important to establish a chemical or isotopic signature of the chemicals that were discharged. The time duration of the first discharger needs to be determined as accurately as possible in order to establish the appropriate characterization of the leading portion of the resulting plume in the groundwater. The information about the first discharger and the resulting part of the plume associated with this discharger serves as a basis for the determination of the

  12. Isotopic evolution of groundwater in a telogenetic karst aquifer: A method to study recharge and contaminant transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There exists a limited understanding of hydrogeologic flow and contaminant transport within karst aquifers, particularly in the epikarst zone, which are highly susceptible to natural and anthropogenic contamination, such as agricultural runoff, due to the interconnected nature of the surface and sub...

  13. Are reactive transport models reliable tools for reconstructing historical contamination scenarios?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, P.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will be based on a recent project effort that I completed while serving as a member of National Academy of Sciences and Engineering panel. The primary goal of this congressionally-mandated project effort was to review scientific evidence on the association between adverse health effect s and exposure to a contaminated water supply system at the U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (CLJ) in North Carolina. The detailed NRC study report was released in June 2009, and is available at this NRC weblink: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12618. Multiple water supply systems at this Marine Base were contaminated with harmful chemicals, such as PCE, TCE and other waste products, since the early 50s. In 1982, a routine water quality survey completed at the site indicated the presence of several volatile organic compounds including PCE and TCE. Further investigations revealed that there are several waste disposal facilities located on-site that have discharged TCE and other waste products into groundwater systems. In addition, there was also an off-site dry cleaning facility located close to the Tarawa Terrace in-take well locations that disposed PCE into the subsurface environment. The dry cleaner has been using PCE since 1953 and disposed various forms of PCE-contaminated wastes in a septic tank and in several shallow pits. Therefore, the residents who lived in Tarawa Terrace on-site family housing units had the potential to be exposed to these harmful environmental contaminants through the drinking water source. In late 1980s, the concerns raised by CLJ public lead to an epidemiological study to evaluate the potential associations of utero and infant exposures to the VOCs and childhood cancers and birth defects. The study included births occurring during the period of 1968-1985 to women who were pregnant while they resided at the base. Since there was no monitoring data available for the study period (1968-1982), researchers used reactive transport

  14. Simulation of advective flow under steady-state and transient recharge conditions, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.; Masterson, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed several ground-water models in support of an investigation of ground-water contamination being conducted by the Army National Guard Bureau at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation on western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Regional and subregional steady-state models and regional transient models were used to (1) improve understanding of the hydrologic system, (2) simulate advective transport of contaminants, (3) delineate recharge areas to municipal wells, and (4) evaluate how model discretization and time-varying recharge affect simulation results. A water-table mound dominates ground-water-flow patterns. Near the top of the mound, which is within Camp Edwards, hydraulic gradients are nearly vertically downward and horizontal gradients are small. In downgradient areas that are further from the top of the water-table mound, the ratio of horizontal to vertical gradients is larger and horizontal flow predominates. The steady-state regional model adequately simulates advective transport in some areas of the aquifer; however, simulation of ground-water flow in areas with local hydrologic boundaries, such as ponds, requires more finely discretized subregional models. Subregional models also are needed to delineate recharge areas to municipal wells that are inadequately represented in the regional model or are near other pumped wells. Long-term changes in recharge rates affect hydraulic heads in the aquifer and shift the position of the top of the water-table mound. Hydraulic-gradient directions do not change over time in downgradient areas, whereas they do change substantially with temporal changes in recharge near the top of the water-table mound. The assumption of steady-state hydraulic conditions is valid in downgradient area, where advective transport paths change little over time. In areas closer to the top of the water-table mound, advective transport paths change as a function of time, transient and steady-state paths

  15. Study of the contaminant transport into granite microfractures using nuclear ion beam techniques.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Patelli, Alessandro; Rigato, Valentino; Rivas, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    Hydrated bentonite is a very plastic material and it is expected to enter in the rock microfractures at the granite/bentonite boundary of a deep geological high-level waste repository. This process is enhanced by the high swelling pressure of the clay. Since bentonite has a very good sorption capability for many radionuclides, the displacement of the clay might lead to a "clay-mediated" contaminant transport into the rock. The aim of this work is to study the contaminant transport into granite microfractures using nuclear ion beam techniques, and to determine to what extent the clay can favour it. To do so, bentonite previously doped with uranium, cesium and europium was put in contact with the surface of granite sheets. Granite sheets contacted with non-doped bentonite and with radionuclide solutions were also prepared as references. This allowed analysing the differences in the diffusion behaviour of the three systems: clay, radionuclides and clay plus radionuclides. A combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and other nuclear ion-beam techniques such as particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and microPIXE was used to study the depth and lateral distribution of clay and contaminants inside granite. It was also tried to evaluate not only the diffusion depth and diffusion coefficients but also the different areas of the granite where the diffusants have a preferential access.

  16. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  17. Kinetic Desorption and Sorption of U(VI) During Reactive Transport in a Contaminated Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Qafoku, Odeta; Smith, Steven C.

    2005-05-12

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, contaminated (22.7 µmol kg-1) capillary fringe sediment that had experienced long-term exposure to U(VI). The clay fraction mineralogy of the sediment was dominated by montmorillonite, muscovite, vermiculite, and chlorite. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl–carbonate and calcium–uranyl–carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI) free solution was used to study U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Uranium(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic behavior was observed for both U(VI) desorption and sorption. Although U(VI) is semi–mobile in mildly alkaline, calcareous subsurface environments, our results showed substantial U(VI) sorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of short-term U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled.

  18. Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site,WA

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    2006-11-01

    Processes of fluid flow and chemical transport through thevadose zone can be characterized through the isotopic systematics ofnatural soils, minerals, pore fluids and groundwater. In thiscontribution, we first review our research using measured isotopicvariations, due both to natural and site related processes, of theelements H, O, N, Sr and U, to study the interconnection between vadosezone and groundwater contamination at the Hanford Site in south-centralWashington. We follow this brief review with a presentation of new datapertaining to vadose zone and groundwater contamination in the WMAT-TX-TY vicinity. Uranium (U) isotopic data for the C3832 core (WMA TX)indicates the involvement of processed natural U fuel, and links theobserved U contamination to the nearby single shelled tank TX-104. Thedata also precludes contamination from an early 1970 s TX-107 leak. Inthe case of the C4104 core (WMA T), the U isotopic data indicates amixture of processed natural and enriched U fuels consistent with themajor leak from T-106 in 1973. Uranium and Strontium isotopic data forthe cores also provides direct evidence for chemical interaction betweenhigh-pH waste fluid and sediment. Isotopic data for groundwater nitratecontamination in the vicinity of WMA-T strongly suggests high-level tankwaste (most likely from T-106) as the source of very high 99Tcconcentrations recently observed at the NE corner of WMAT.

  19. Reactive transport modelling of the interaction of fission product ground contamination with alkaline and cementitious leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Small, J.

    2007-07-01

    The fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90 are amongst the most common radionuclides occurring in ground contamination at the UK civil nuclear sites. Such contamination is often associated with alkaline liquids and the mobility of these fission products may be affected by these chemical conditions. Similar geochemical effects may also result from cementitious leachate associated with building foundations and the use of grouts to remediate ground contamination. The behaviour of fission products in these scenarios is a complex interaction of hydrogeological and geochemical processes. A suite of modelling tools have been developed to investigate the behaviour of a radioactive plume containing Cs and Sr. Firstly the effects of sorption due to cementitious groundwater is modelled using PHREEQC. This chemical model is then incorporated into PHAST for the 3-D reactive solute transport modeling. Results are presented for a generic scenario including features and processes that are likely to be relevant to a number of civil UK nuclear sites. Initial results show that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the complex hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved. Modelling can help predict the mobility of contaminants in a range of site end point scenarios, and in assessing the consequences of decommissioning activities. (authors)

  20. Assessment of Contaminated Brine Fate and Transport in MB139 at WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2014-07-01

    Following the radionuclide release event of February 14, 2014 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), actinide contamination has been found on the walls and floor in Panel 7 as a result of a release in Room 7 of Panel 7. It has been proposed to decontaminate Panel 7 at the WIPP by washing contaminated surfaces in the underground with fresh water. A cost-effective cleanup of this contamination would allow for a timely return to waste disposal operations at WIPP. It is expected that the fresh water used to decontaminate Panel 7 will flow as contaminated brine down into the porosity of the materials under the floor – the run-of-mine (ROM) salt above Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and MB139 itself – where its fate will be controlled by the hydraulic and transport properties of MB139. Due to the structural dip of MB139, it is unlikely that this brine would migrate northward towards the Waste-Handling Shaft sump. A few strategically placed shallow small-diameter observation boreholes straddling MB139 would allow for monitoring the flow and fate of this brine after decontamination. Additionally, given that flow through the compacted ROM salt floor and in MB139 would occur under unsaturated (or two-phase) conditions, there is a need to measure the unsaturated flow properties of crushed WIPP salt and salt from the disturbed rock zone (DRZ).

  1. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling: Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, Kimberly P.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Pishko, Adrian L.; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Lee, Cindy M.; Schank, Anja

    2005-08-18

    To quantify metal natural attenuation processes in terms of environmental availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Despite significant heterogeneity resulting both from natural and anthropogenic factors, sequential extraction results demonstrate that pH is a controlling factor in the prediction of the distribution of metal contaminants within the solid phases in soils at the site as well as the contaminant partitioning between the soil and the soil solution. Results for beryllium, the most mobile metal evaluated, exhibit increasing attenuation along the plume flow path which corresponds to an increasing plume pH. These laboratory- and field-scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding partitioning of metals to soils at the site (one of the major attenuation mechanisms for the metals at the field site). Subsequently, these data have been used in the definition of the contaminant source terms and contaminant transport factors in risk modeling for the site.

  2. Modeling water chemistry change and contaminant transport in riverbank filtration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Shaymaa; Bahar, Arifah; Aziz, Zainal Abdul; Suratman, Saim

    2016-06-01

    Riverbank filtration system is river water treatment approach based on natural removal of contaminants due to physical, chemical and biological processes. In this article, an analytical model is developed by using Green's function method to simulate the effects of pumping well and microbial activity that occurs in riverbed sediments on contaminant transport and evolution of water chemistry. The model is tested with data collected previously for RBF site in France. The results are compared with numerical simulation conducted in the literature by using finite difference method. Graphically, it is noticed that both numerical and analytical results have almost the same behavior. Also it is found that the model can simulate the decreasing of one pollutant concentration at the zone where the bacteria starts to consume this pollutant.

  3. FLAME: A finite element computer code for contaminant transport n variably-saturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-06-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model referred to as the FLAME computer code, is designed to simulate subsurface contaminant transport in a variably-saturated media. The code can be applied to model two-dimensional contaminant transport in an and site vadose zone or in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code has the capability to describe transport processes in a porous media with discrete fractures. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual framework and mathematical theory, derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms, computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code, and input instructions for the general use of the code. The development of the FLAME computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of energy Order 5820.2A.

  4. Development and applications of two finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: FEWA and FEMA

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Wong, K.V.; Craig, P.M.; Davis, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the construction, verification, and application of two groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: A Finite Element Model of Water Flow through Aquifers (FEWA) and A Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The construction is based on the finite element approximation of partial differential equations of groundwater flow (FEWA) and of solute movement (FEMA). The particular features of FEWA and FEMA are their versatility and flexibility for dealing with nearly all vertically integrated two-dimensional problems. The models were verified against both analytical solutions and widely used US Geological Survey finite difference approximations. They were then applied for calibration and validation, using data obtained in experiments at the Engineering Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results indicated that the models are valid for this specific site. To demonstrate the versatility anf flexibility of the models, they were applied to two hypothetical, but realistic, complex problems and three field sites across the United States. In these applications the models yielded good agreement with the field data for all three sites. Finally, the predictive capabilities of the models were demonstrated using data obtained at the Hialeah Preston site in Florida. This case illustrates the capability of FEWA and FEMA as predictive tools and their usefulness in the management of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. 25 refs.

  5. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem.

    PubMed

    Nick, H M; Raoof, A; Centler, F; Thullner, M; Regnier, P

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers.

  6. A probabilistic cellular automaton for two dimensional contaminant transport simulation in ground water.

    PubMed

    Palanichamy, Jegathambal; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Palani, Sundarambal

    2008-01-01

    In recent years evolutionary computing algorithms have been proposed to solve many engineering problems. Genetic algorithms, Neural Networks, and Cellular Automata are the branches of evolutionary computing techniques. In this study, it is proposed to simulate the contaminant transport in porous media using a Cellular Automaton. The physical processes and chemical reactions occurring in the ground water system are intricately connected at various scales of space, time, transport coefficients and molecular concentration. The validity of continuous approach for the simulation of chemical systems with low concentration of species and intracellular environments has become subtle. Due to the difference in scales of various processes that occur in the ground water system, the description of the system can be well defined in the intermediate scale called mesoscopic scale, which is in between microscopic and macroscopic description. Mesoscopic models provide the relationship between various parameters and their evolvement in time, thus establishing the contact between modeling at various scales at the interface. In this paper, a Probabilistic Cellular Automaton (PCA) model has been developed based on the transport and reaction probability values. The developed model was verified and validated for one, two dimensional transport systems and also for the simulation of BTEX transport in two dimensional system in ground water.

  7. A Quasi-Conservative Adaptive Semi-Lagrangian Advection-Diffusion Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Many processes in atmospheric or oceanic tracer transport are conveniently represented by advection-diffusion type equations. Depending on the magnitudes of both components, the mathematical representation and consequently the discretization is a non-trivial problem. We will focus on advection-dominated situations and will introduce a semi-Lagrangian scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for high local resolution. This scheme is well suited for pollutant transport from point sources, or transport processes featuring fine filamentation with corresponding local concentration maxima. In order to achieve stability, accuracy and conservation, we combine an adaptive mesh refinement quasi-conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme, based on an integral formulation of the underlying advective conservation law (Behrens, 2006), with an advection diffusion scheme as described by Spiegelman and Katz (2006). The resulting scheme proves to be conservative and stable, while maintaining high computational efficiency and accuracy.

  8. Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Method for Advection-Diffusion Equations Subject to Heterogeneous Reactive Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-10-13

    We present a hybrid scheme for the coupling of macro and microscale continuum models for reactive contaminant transport in fractured and porous media. The transport model considered is the advection-dispersion equation, subject to linear heterogeneous reactive boundary conditions. The Multiscale Finite Volume method (MsFV) is employed to define an approximation to the microscale concentration field defined in terms of macroscopic or \\emph{global} degrees of freedom, together with local interpolator and corrector functions capturing microscopic spatial variability. The macroscopic mass balance relations for the MsFV global degrees of freedom are coupled with the macroscopic model, resulting in a global problem for the simultaneous time-stepping of all macroscopic degrees of freedom throughout the domain. In order to perform the hybrid coupling, the micro and macroscale models are applied over overlapping subdomains of the simulation domain, with the overlap denoted as the handshake subdomain $\\Omega^{hs}$, over which continuity of concentration and transport fluxes between models is enforced. Continuity of concentration is enforced by posing a restriction relation between models over $\\Omega^{hs}$. Continuity of fluxes is enforced by prolongating the macroscopic model fluxes across the boundary of $\\Omega^{hs}$ to microscopic resolution. The microscopic interpolator and corrector functions are solutions to local microscopic advection-diffusion problems decoupled from the global degrees of freedom and from each other by virtue of the MsFV decoupling ansatz. The error introduced by the decoupling ansatz is reduced iteratively by the preconditioned GMRES algorithm, with the hybrid MsFV operator serving as the preconditioner.

  9. Simulation of Groundwater Contaminant Transport at a Decommissioned Landfill Site—A Case Study, Tainan City, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Shi; Tu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Contaminant transport in subsurface water is the major pathway for contamination spread from contaminated sites to groundwater supplies, to remediate a contaminated site. The aim of this paper was to set up the groundwater contaminant transport model for the Wang-Tien landfill site, in southwestern Taiwan, which exhibits high contamination of soil and groundwater and therefore represents a potential threat for the adjacent Hsu-Hsian Creek. Groundwater Modeling System software, which is the most sophisticated groundwater modeling tool available today, was used to numerically model groundwater flow and contaminant transport. In the simulation, the total mass of pollutants in the aquifer increased by an average of 72% (65% for ammonium nitrogen and 79% for chloride) after 10 years. The simulation produced a plume of contaminated groundwater that extends 80 m in length and 20 m in depth northeastward from the landfill site. Although the results show that the concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and chlorides in most parts are low, they are 3.84 and 467 mg/L, respectively, in the adjacent Hsu-Hsian Creek. PMID:27153078

  10. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FIELD EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING (EPA/600/S-99/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  11. Surfactant-enhanced remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer. 2. Transport of TCE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sahoo, D.; Smith, J.A.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Mclellan, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Field studies were conducted under an induced gradient in a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, to study (a) the rate-limited desorption of TCE from aquifer sediments to water and (b) the effect of a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the desorption and transport of TCE. Clean water was injected into the contaminated aquifer for 206 day. Triton X-100 was added for a 36-day period (days 36-71 from the start of clean water injection). The effect of Triton X-100 on the desorption and transport of TCE in the field was examined by observing the concentrations of these two solutes in four monitoring wells 3-9 m from the injection wells. These data show a small but discernible increase in the TCE concentration in two of the wells corresponding approximately to the time when surfactant reaches the wells; in the other two monitoring wells, the increase in TCE concentration is negligible. A solute transport model that assumes local sorption equilibrium and used a laboratory-derived distribution coefficient could not adequately describe TCE desorption and transport observed in the aquifer. Two model formulations that accounted for rate-limited sorption - two-site and multisite models - fit the data well. TCE concentrations after surfactant injection were underpredicted by the models unless mass transfer rate was increased to account for the effect of surfactant on the rate of TCE desorption. The concentration data from the two wells and the model analysis suggest that the rate of TCE desorption is increased (by approximately 30%) as a result of Triton X-100 injection.Field studies were conducted under an induced gradient in a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, to study (a) the rate-limited desorption of TCE from aquifer sediments to water and (b) the effect of a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the desorption and transport of TCE. Clean water was injected into the contaminated aquifer for 206 day. Triton X-100 was added

  12. Assessing of Conceptual Models for Subsurface Reactive Transport of Inorganic Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, James A.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Steefel, Carl I.; Zachara, John M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Redden, George D.; Criscenti, Louise J.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2004-11-01

    In many subsurface situations where human health and environmental quality are at risk (e.g., contaminant hydrogeology, petroleum extraction, carbon sequestration, etc.), scientists and engineers are being asked by federal agency decision-makers to predict the fate of chemical species under conditions where both reactions and transport are processes of first-order importance. In 2002, a working group (WG) was formed by representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Agriculture, and Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess the role of reactive transport modeling (RTM) in addressing these situations. Specifically, the goals of the WG are to (1) evaluate the state of the art in conceptual model development and parameterization for RTM, as applied to soil, vadose zone, and groundwater systems, and (2) prioritize research directions that would enhance the practical utility of RTM.

  13. Transport and Degradation of Semivolatile Hydrocarbons in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer, Bemidji, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, E.T.; Koleis, J.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were used as probes to identify the processes controlling the transport and fate of aqueous semivolatile hydrocarbons (SVHCs) in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. PAH and other SVHCs were isolated from ground water by field solid-phase extraction and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Close to the oil body, aqueous aliphatic hydrocarbon compositions are substantially different from the parent oil, suggesting microbial alteration prior to or during dissolution. Aqueous PAH concentrations are elevated above oil-water equilibrium concentrations directly beneath the oil and decrease dramatically at distances ranging from the 25 to 65 m downgradient from the leading edge of the oil body. Variations in downgradient distributions of naphthalene, fluorene and phenanthrene, coupled with their biodegradation, partitioning and volatility characteristics, suggest that the PAH are useful probes for distinguishing between the biogeochemical processes affecting SVHC transport and persistence in ground water.

  14. Evolution and advection of solar mesogranulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard; Auffret, Herve; Roudier, Thierry; Vigneau, Jean; Simon, George W.; Frank, Zoe; Shine, Richard A.; Title, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    A three-hour sequence of observations at the Pic du Midi observatory has been obtained which shows the evolution of solar mesogranules from appearance to disappearance with unprecedented clarity. It is seen that the supergranules, which are known to advect the granules with their convective motion, also advect the mesogranules to their boundaries. This process controls the evolution and disappearance of mesogranules.

  15. Modeling aeolian transport in response to succession, disturbance and future climate: Dynamic long-term risk assessment for contaminant redistribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breshears, D.D.; Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, J.J.; Field, J.P.; Allen, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aeolian sediment transport is a fundamental process redistributing sediment, nutrients, and contaminants in dryland ecosystems. Over time frames of centuries or longer, horizontal sediment fluxes and associated rates of contaminant transport are likely to be influenced by succession, disturbances, and changes in climate, yet models of horizontal sediment transport that account for these fundamental factors are lacking, precluding in large part accurate assessment of human health risks associated with persistent soil-bound contaminants. We present a simple model based on empirical measurements of horizontal sediment transport (predominantly saltation) to predict potential contaminant transport rates for recently disturbed sites such as a landfill cover. Omnidirectional transport is estimated within vegetation that changes using a simple Markov model that simulates successional trajectory and considers three types of short-term disturbances (surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced plant mortality) under current and projected climates. The model results highlight that movement of contaminated soil is sensitive to vegetation dynamics and increases substantially (e.g., > fivefold) when disturbance and/or future climate are considered. The time-dependent responses in horizontal sediment fluxes and associated contaminant fluxes were sensitive to variability in the timing of disturbance, with longer intervals between disturbance allowing woody plants to become dominant and crown fire and drought abruptly reducing woody plant cover. Our results, which have direct implications for contaminant transport and landfill management in the specific context of our assessment, also have general relevance because they highlight the need to more fully account for vegetation dynamics, disturbance, and changing climate in aeolian process studies. ?? 2011.

  16. Experimental studies of thermal environment and contaminant transport in a commercial aircraft cabin with gaspers on.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Duan, R; Li, J; Huang, Y; Yin, H; Lin, C-H; Wei, D; Shen, X; Liu, J; Chen, Q

    2016-10-01

    Gaspers installed in commercial airliner cabins are used to improve passengers' thermal comfort. To understand the impact of gasper airflow on the air quality in a cabin, this investigation measured the distributions of air velocity, air temperature, and gaseous contaminant concentration in five rows of the economy-class section of an MD-82 commercial aircraft. The gaseous contaminant was simulated using SF6 as a tracer gas with the source located at the mouth of a seated manikin close to the aisle. Two-fifths of the gaspers next to the aisle were turned on in the cabin, and each of them supplied air at a flow rate of 0.66 l/s. The airflow rate in the economy-class cabin was controlled at 10 l/s per passenger. Data obtained in a previous study of the cabin with all gaspers turned off were used for comparison. The results show that the jets from the gaspers had a substantial impact on the air velocity and contaminant transport in the cabin. The air velocity in the cabin was higher, and the air temperature slightly more uniform, when the gaspers were on than when they were off, but turning on the gaspers may not have improved the air quality.

  17. A reactive transport model for mercury fate in contaminated soil--sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Leterme, Bertrand; Jacques, Diederik

    2015-11-01

    We present a sensitivity analysis of a reactive transport model of mercury (Hg) fate in contaminated soil systems. The one-dimensional model, presented in Leterme et al. (2014), couples water flow in variably saturated conditions with Hg physico-chemical reactions. The sensitivity of Hg leaching and volatilisation to parameter uncertainty is examined using the elementary effect method. A test case is built using a hypothetical 1-m depth sandy soil and a 50-year time series of daily precipitation and evapotranspiration. Hg anthropogenic contamination is simulated in the topsoil by separately considering three different sources: cinnabar, non-aqueous phase liquid and aqueous mercuric chloride. The model sensitivity to a set of 13 input parameters is assessed, using three different model outputs (volatilized Hg, leached Hg, Hg still present in the contaminated soil horizon). Results show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration in soil solution and the binding constant to DOM thiol groups are critical parameters, as well as parameters related to Hg sorption to humic and fulvic acids in solid organic matter. Initial Hg concentration is also identified as a sensitive parameter. The sensitivity analysis also brings out non-monotonic model behaviour for certain parameters.

  18. Transport of Aquatic Contaminant and Assessment of Radioecological Exposure with Spatial and Temporal Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the radioecological exposure assessment for a contaminated aquatic ecosystem has been performed in this dissertation. The primary objectives of this research were to advance the understanding of radiation exposure in nature and to increase current capabilities for estimating aquatic radiation exposure with the consideration of spatial and temporal effect in nature. This was accomplished through the development of a two-dimensional aquatic exposure assessment framework and by applying the framework to the contaminated Chernobyl cooling lake (pond). This framework integrated spatial and temporal heterogeneity effects of contaminant concentration, abundance and distribution of ecosystem populations, spatial- and temporal-dependent (or density-dependent) radionuclide ingestion, and alternative food web structures. The exposure model was built on the population level to allow for the integration of density dependent population regulation into the exposure assessment. Plankton population dynamics have been integrated into the hydrodynamic-transport model to determine plankton biomass density changes and distributions. The distribution of contaminant in water was also calculated using a hydrodynamic-transport model. The significance of adding spatial and temporal effects, spatial and temporal related ecological functions, and hydrodynamics in the exposure assessment was illustrated through a series of case studies. The results suggested that the spatial and temporal heterogeneity effects of radioactive environments were substantial. Among the ecological functions considered, the food web structure was the most important contributor to the variations of fish exposure. The results obtained using a multiple prey food web structure differed by a factor of 20 from the equilibrium concentration, and by a factor of 2.5 from the concentration obtained using a single-prey food web. Impacts of changes in abundance and distribution of biomass on contaminant

  19. Large-scale Sedimentary Structures and Contaminant Transport: an Example from Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, A.; Uchupi, E.

    2002-05-01

    A review of 289 borehole logs collected across Cape Cod reveals that two large glacial lakes once covered the peninsula. The older lake, which existed about 19,000 years ago, covered the east-west portion of Cape Cod and deposited clay, silt, and very fine sand across the area. The southern dam of this lake ultimately failed and large drainage channels were carved into the surface of the glaciolacustrine sediments. These eroded lake deposits were subsequently buried by the outwash plains of sand and gravel that make up the surficial geology of today. One of the major drainage channels in the lake deposit surface is located below the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), a 34 square mile facility with >10 known groundwater contaminant plumes. We will present preliminary evidence that the buried paleochannel is exerting a strong control on the transport of several plumes at MMR and thus are critical stratigraphic structures that must be understood and delineated. Although fine-grained sediments are described in borehole logs from the MMR, infering the origin and significance of these deposits is made difficult by local-scale heterogeneities. The existence of the proglacial lake and the extensive, deep drainage channels are only apparent from investigating borehole data across a larger scale. This work illustrates the importance of characterizing the stratigraphic framework beyond the confines of a specific contamination site and further shows the controls that paleochannels filled with high permeability sediments can exert on flow and transport.

  20. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Burman, Jan; Edlund, Christina; Simonsson, Louise; Berglind, Rune; Leffler, Per; Qvarfort, Ulf; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Meuken, Denise; Duvalois, Willem; Martel, Richard; Sjöström, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammunition which penetrates underground prior to exploding, either by design or by defective fuze mechanisms. A 105 mm artillery round was detonated 2.6 m underground, and hydraulic conductivity measurements were taken before and after the explosion. A total of 114 hydraulic conductivity measurements were obtained within a radius of 3 m from the detonation point, at four different depths and at three different time periods separated by 18 months. This data was used to produce a three dimensional numerical model of the soil affected by the exploding artillery round. This model was then used to investigate potential changes to aquifer recharge and contaminant transport caused by the detonating round. The results indicate that an exploding artillery round can strongly affect the hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone, increasing it locally by over an order of magnitude. These variations, however, appear to cause relatively small changes to both local groundwater recharge and contaminant transport.

  1. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Burman, Jan; Edlund, Christina; Simonsson, Louise; Berglind, Rune; Leffler, Per; Qvarfort, Ulf; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Meuken, Denise; Duvalois, Willem; Martel, Richard; Sjöström, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammunition which penetrates underground prior to exploding, either by design or by defective fuze mechanisms. A 105 mm artillery round was detonated 2.6 m underground, and hydraulic conductivity measurements were taken before and after the explosion. A total of 114 hydraulic conductivity measurements were obtained within a radius of 3m from the detonation point, at four different depths and at three different time periods separated by 18months. This data was used to produce a three dimensional numerical model of the soil affected by the exploding artillery round. This model was then used to investigate potential changes to aquifer recharge and contaminant transport caused by the detonating round. The results indicate that an exploding artillery round can strongly affect the hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone, increasing it locally by over an order of magnitude. These variations, however, appear to cause relatively small changes to both local groundwater recharge and contaminant transport.

  2. Distribution and transport of sediment-bound metal contaminants in the rio grande de tarcoles, costa rica (Central America)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.; Cain, D.J.; Lamothe, P.J.; Fries Fernandez, T.L.G.; Vargas, J.A.; Murillo, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    A reconnaissance survey of the extent of metal contamination in the Rio Grande de Tarcoles river system of Costa Rica indicated high levels of chromium (Cr) in the fine-grain bed sediments (83 times Cr background or 3000->5000 ??g/g). In the main channel of the river downstream of the San Jose urban area, Cr contamination in sediments was 4-6 times background and remained relatively constant over 50 km to the mouth of the river. Sediment from a mangrove swamp at the river mouth had Cr levels 2-3 times above background. Similar patterns of dilution were observed for lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) sediment contamination, although the contamination levels were lower. The high affinity of Cr towards particulate phases, probably as Cr(III), allows the use of Cr contamination levels for delineating regions of deposition of fine-grained sediments and dilution of particle associated contaminants during transport and deposition.A reconnaissance survey of the extent of metal contamination in the Rio Grande de Tarcoles river system of Costa Rica indicated high levels of chromium (Cr) in the fine-grain bed sediments (83 times Cr background or 3000->5000 ??g/g). In the main channel of the river downstream of the San Jose urban area, Cr contamination in sediments was 4-6 times background and remained relatively constant over 50 km to the mouth of the river. Sediments from a mangrove swamp at the river mouth had Cr levels 2-3 times above background. Similar patterns of dilution were observed for lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) sediment contamination, although the contamination levels were lower. The high affinity of Cr towards particulate phases, probably as Cr(III), allows the use of Cr contamination levels for delineating regions of deposition of fine-grained sediments and dilution of particle associated contaminants during transport and deposition.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  5. Advective velocity and energy dissipation rate in an oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ziaul; Hondzo, Miki; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    Characterizing the transport processes at the sediment-water interface along sloping boundaries in lakes and reservoirs is of fundamental interest in lake and reservoir water quality management. The turbulent bottom boundary layer (TBBL) along a slope, induced by the breaking of internal waves in a linearly stratified fluid, was investigated through laboratory measurements. Fast response micro-scale conductivity and temperature probes in conjunction with laser-Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the time series of salinity, temperature, and velocity along a sloping boundary. Turbulent energy spectra were computed from the velocity data using a time-dependent advective velocity and Taylor's hypothesis. The energy spectra were used to estimate the energy dissipation rate at different positions in the TBBL. The advective velocity in this near-zero mean shear flow is based on an integral time scale (T(int)). The integral time scale is related to the average frequency of the spectral energy density of the flow velocity. The energy dissipation rate estimated from the variable advective velocity with an averaging time window equal to the integral time scale (T=T(int)) was 43% higher than the energy dissipation rate estimated from a constant advective velocity. The estimated dissipation rates with T=T(int) were comparable to values obtained by curve-fitting a theoretical Batchelor spectrum for the temperature gradient spectra. This study proposes the integral time scale to be used for the oscillatory flows as (a) a time-averaging window to estimate the advective velocity and associated energy dissipation level, and (b) a normalizing parameter in the energy spectrum.

  6. An operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Liaqat Ali; Liu, Philip L.-F.

    1998-09-01

    Operator splitting algorithms are frequently used for solving the advection-diffusion equation, especially to deal with advection dominated transport problems. In this paper an operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation is presented. The algorithm represents a second-order-accurate adaptation of the Holly and Preissmann scheme for three-dimensional problems. The governing equation is split into an advection equation and a diffusion equation, and they are solved by a backward method of characteristics and a finite element method, respectively. The Hermite interpolation function is used for interpolation of concentration in the advection step. The spatial gradients of concentration in the Hermite interpolation are obtained by solving equations for concentration gradients in the advection step. To make the composite algorithm efficient, only three equations for first-order concentration derivatives are solved in the diffusion step of computation. The higher-order spatial concentration gradients, necessary to advance the solution in a computational cycle, are obtained by numerical differentiations based on the available information. The simulation characteristics and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several advection dominated transport problems.

  7. Current conceptual model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area V.

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Brennon R.; Dettmers, Dana L.

    2004-04-01

    The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) requires a Corrective Measures Evaluation to evaluate potential remedial alternatives for contaminants of concern (COCs) in groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNUNM) Technical Area (TA)-V. These COCs consist of trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate. This document presents the current conceptual model of groundwater flow and transport at TA-V that will provide the basis for a technically defensible evaluation. Characterization is defined by nine requirement areas that were identified in the NMED Compliance Order on Consent. These characterization requirement areas consist of geohydrologic characteristics that control the subsurface distribution and transport of contaminants. This conceptual model document summarizes the regional geohydrologic setting of SNUNM TA-V. The document also presents a summary of site-specific geohydrologic data and integrates these data into the current conceptual model of flow and contaminant transport. This summary includes characterization of the local geologic framework; characterization of hydrologic conditions at TA-V, including recharge, hydraulics of vadose-zone and aquifer flow, and the aquifer field of flow as it pertains to downgradient receptors. The summary also discusses characterization of contaminant transport in the subsurface, including discussion about source term inventory, release, and contaminant distribution and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer.

  8. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    James Saiers; Joseph Ryan

    2006-07-02

    Radionuclides, metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids have contaminated about six billion cubic meters of soil at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The subsurface transport of many of these contaminants is facilitated by colloids (i.e., microscopic, waterborne particles). The first step in the transport of contaminants from their sources to off-site surface water and groundwater is migration through the vadose zone. Developing our understanding of the migration of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants through the vadose zone is critical to assessing and controlling the release of contaminants from DOE sites. In this study, we examined the mobilization, transport, and filtration (retention) of mineral colloids and colloidassociated radionuclides within unsaturated porous media. This investigation involved laboratory column experiments designed to identify properties that affect colloid mobilization and retention and pore-scale visualization experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms that govern these colloid-mass transfer processes. The experiments on colloid mobilization and retention were supplemented with experiments on radionuclide transport through porous media and on radionuclide adsorption to mineral colloids. Observations from all of these experiments – the column and visualization experiments with colloids and the experiments with radionuclides – were used to guide the development of mathematical models appropriate for describing colloids and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through the vadose zone.

  9. Modeling contaminant transport and remediation at an acrylonitrile spill site in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengör, S Sevinç; Unlü, Kahraman

    2013-07-01

    The August 1999 earthquake in Turkey damaged three acrylonitrile (AN) storage tanks at a plant producing synthetic fiber by polymerization. A numerical modeling study was carried out to analyze the groundwater flow and contaminant (AN) transport at the spill site. This study presents the application of a numerical groundwater model to determine the hydrogeological parameters of the site, where such data were not available during the field surveys prior to the simulation studies. The two- and three-dimensional transient flow and transport models were first calibrated using the first 266days of observed head and concentration data and then verified using the remaining 540-day observed data set. Off-site migration of the contaminant plume was kept under control within the site boundaries owing to the favorable geology of the site, the characteristics of the local groundwater flow regime and the pumping operations. As expected, the applied pump-and-treat system was effective at high-permeability zones, but not fully effective at low-permeability zones. The results of long-term simulations for unconfined aquifer showed that the size of the plume in the high permeability zone shrank significantly due to the dilution by natural recharge. However, in the low permeability zone, it was not significantly affected. The study showed that accurate and sufficient data regarding the source characteristics, concentration and groundwater level measurements, groundwater pumping rates and their durations at each of the extraction points involved in the pump-and-treat system along with the hydrogeological site characterization are the key parameters for successful flow and transport model calibrations.

  10. Final Project Report: Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Chorover, University of Arizona; Peggy O'€™Day, University of California, Merced; Karl Mueller, Penn State University; Wooyong Um, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl Steefel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2012-10-01

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided detailed characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions.

  11. Long-range atmospheric transport and deposition of anthropogenic contaminants and their potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, T.J.; Barker, J.R.; Tingey, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Through the processes of atmospheric transport and deposition, many anthropogenic contaminants such as industrial organics, pesticides, and trace metals have become widely distributed around the globe. Due to the phenomenon of long-range atmospheric transport, even the most remote areas of the plant are not out of range of contaminants emitted from distant anthropogenic sources. Many of these airborne contaminants are toxic and persistent, can bioaccumulate, and may remain biologically harmful for long periods of time. Although airborne contaminants are considered primarily a human health problem, there is increasing concern that they may have deleterious ecological consequences. When sensitive terrestrial plants and other biota experience chronic exposure to low concentrations of airborne toxic chemicals, sublethal effects may occur, with subsequent impacts on ecosystem structure and function.

  12. The Role of Natural Organic Matter and Mineral Colloids in the Transport of Contaminants through Heterogeneous Vadose-Zone Environments

    SciTech Connect

    James Saiers, Yale University; Joseph Ryan, University of Colorado

    2009-01-31

    Our research was guided by a key objective of the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP), which is to improve conceptual and predictive models for contaminant movement in complex vadose zone environments. In this report, increases in the understanding of colloidcontaminant interactions, colloid mobilization, and colloid deposition within unsaturated soils are cited as requisite needs for predicting contaminant fate and distribution in the vadose zone. We addressed these needs by pursuing three key goals: 1. Identify the mechanisms that govern OM and mineral-colloid reaction and transport in heterogeneous, unsaturated porous media; 2. Quantify the role of OM and mineral colloids in scavenging and facilitating the transport of contaminants of concern to DOE; and 3. Develop and test a mathematical model suitable for simulating the movement of OM- and colloid-associated contaminants through heterogeneous, unsaturated porous media.

  13. Modeling and testing of reactive contaminant transport in drinking water pipes: chlorine response and implications for online contaminant detection.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey Yang, Y; Goodrich, James A; Clark, Robert M; Li, Sylvana Y

    2008-03-01

    A modified one-dimensional Danckwerts convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model is numerically simulated to explain the observed chlorine residual loss for a "slug" of reactive contaminants instantaneously introduced into a drinking water pipe of assumed no or negligible wall demand. In response to longitudinal dispersion, a contaminant propagates into the bulk phase where it reacts with disinfectants in the water. This process generates a U-shaped pattern of chlorine residual loss in a time-series concentration plot. Numerical modeling indicates that the residual loss curve geometry (i.e., slope, depth, and width) is a function of several variables such as axial Péclet number, reaction rate constants, molar fraction of the fast- and slow-reacting contaminants, and the quasi-steady-state chlorine decay inside the "slug" which serves as a boundary condition of the CDR model. Longitudinal dispersion becomes dominant for less reactive contaminants. Pilot-scale pipe flow experiments for a non-reactive sodium fluoride tracer and the fast-reacting aldicarb, a pesticide, were conducted under turbulent flow conditions (Re=9020 and 25,000). Both the experimental results and the CDR modeling are in agreement showing a close relationship among the aldicarb contaminant "slug", chlorine residual loss and its variations, and a concentration increase of chloride as the final reaction product. Based on these findings, the residual loss curve and its geometry are useful tools to identify the presence of a contaminant "slug" and infer its reactive properties in adaptive contaminant detections.

  14. Evaluation of bioaerosol components, generation factors, and airborne transport associated with lime treatment of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Barth, Edwin F; Reponen, Tiina; Succop, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well known, but potential aerosolization of bioaerosol components has not been evaluated. A physical model of a contaminated sediment treatment and airborne transport process and an experimental protocol were developed to identify specific bioaerosol components (bacteria, fungi, cell structural components, and particles) that may be aerosolized and transported. Key reaction variables (amount of lime addition, rate of lime addition, mixing energy supplied) that may affect the aerosolization of bioaerosol components were evaluated. Lime treatment of a sediment contaminated with heavy metals, petroleum-based organics, and microorganisms increased the sediment pH and solids content. Lime treatment reduced the number of water-extractable bacteria and fungi in the sediment from approximately 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) x mL(-1) to less than the detection limit of 10(3) CFU x mL(-1). This reduction was seen immediately for bacteria and within 21 days for fungi. Lime treatment immediately reduced the amount of endotoxin in the sediment, but the effects of lime treatment on beta-D-glucan could not be determined. The temperature of the treated sediment was linearly related to the amount of lime added within the range of 0-25%. Bacteria were aerosolized during the treatment trials, but there was no culturable evidence of aerosolization of fungi, most likely because of either their particular growth stage or relatively larger particle size that reduced their aerosolization potential and their collection into the impingers. Nonbiological particles, endotoxin, and beta-D-glucan were not detected in air samples during the treatment trials. The amount of lime added to the reaction beaker and the relative

  15. Geohydrology and contamination at the Michigan Department of Transportation maintenance garage area, Kalamazoo County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, E.A.; Huffman, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    A leaking underground storage tank was removed from the Michigan Department of Transportation maintenance garage area in Kalamazoo County., Mich., in 1985. The tank had been leaking unleaded gasoline. Although a remediation system was operational at the site for several years after the tank was removed, ground-water samples collected from monitoring wells in the area consistently showed high concentrations of benzene, toluene. ethylbenzene, and xylenes--indicators of the presence of gasoline. The U.S. Geological Survey did a study in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Transportation, to define the geology, hydrology, and occurrence of gasoline contamination in the maintenance garage area. The aquifer affected by gasoline contamination is an unconfined glaci'a.l sand and gravel aquifer. The average depth to water in the study area is about 74.7 feet. Water-level fluctuations are small; maximum fluctuation was slightly more than 1 foot during August 1993-August 1994. Hydraulic conductivities based on aquifer-test data collected for the study and estimated by use of the Cooper-Jacob method of solution ranged from 130 to 144 feet per day. Ground water is moving in an east-southeasterly direction at a rate of about I foot per day. Leakage from perforated pipes leading from the underground storage tanks to the pump station was identified as a second source of gasoline contamination to saturated and unsaturated zones. The existence of this previously unknown second source is part of the reason that previous remediation efforts were ineffective. Residual contaminants in the unsaturated zone are expected to continue to move to the water table with recharge, except in a small area covered by asphalt at the land surface. The gasoline plume from the perforated pipe source has merged with that from the leaking underground storage tank, and the combined plume in the saturated zone is estimated to cover an area of 30,000 square feet. The combined plume is in the upper 20

  16. Optimization of monitoring networks based on uncertainty quantification of model predictions of contaminant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D.

    2010-12-01

    The process of decision making to protect groundwater resources requires a detailed estimation of uncertainties in model predictions. Various uncertainties associated with modeling a natural system, such as: (1) measurement and computational errors; (2) uncertainties in the conceptual model and model-parameter estimates; (3) simplifications in model setup and numerical representation of governing processes, contribute to the uncertainties in the model predictions. Due to this combination of factors, the sources of predictive uncertainties are generally difficult to quantify individually. Decision support related to optimal design of monitoring networks requires (1) detailed analyses of existing uncertainties related to model predictions of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, (2) optimization of the proposed monitoring network locations in terms of their efficiency to detect contaminants and provide early warning. We apply existing and newly-proposed methods to quantify predictive uncertainties and to optimize well locations. An important aspect of the analysis is the application of newly-developed optimization technique based on coupling of Particle Swarm and Levenberg-Marquardt optimization methods which proved to be robust and computationally efficient. These techniques and algorithms are bundled in a software package called MADS. MADS (Model Analyses for Decision Support) is an object-oriented code that is capable of performing various types of model analyses and supporting model-based decision making. The code can be executed under different computational modes, which include (1) sensitivity analyses (global and local), (2) Monte Carlo analysis, (3) model calibration, (4) parameter estimation, (5) uncertainty quantification, and (6) model selection. The code can be externally coupled with any existing model simulator through integrated modules that read/write input and output files using a set of template and instruction files (consistent with the PEST

  17. A nonequilibrium model for reactive contaminant transport through fractured porous media: Model development and semianalytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitin; Ojha, C. S. P.; Sharma, P. K.

    2012-10-01

    In this study a conceptual model that accounts for the effects of nonequilibrium contaminant transport in a fractured porous media is developed. Present model accounts for both physical and sorption nonequilibrium. Analytical solution was developed using the Laplace transform technique, which was then numerically inverted to obtain solute concentration in the fracture matrix system. The semianalytical solution developed here can incorporate both semi-infinite and finite fracture matrix extent. In addition, the model can account for flexible boundary conditions and nonzero initial condition in the fracture matrix system. The present semianalytical solution was validated against the existing analytical solutions for the fracture matrix system. In order to differentiate between various sorption/transport mechanism different cases of sorption and mass transfer were analyzed by comparing the breakthrough curves and temporal moments. It was found that significant differences in the signature of sorption and mass transfer exists. Applicability of the developed model was evaluated by simulating the published experimental data of Calcium and Strontium transport in a single fracture. The present model simulated the experimental data reasonably well in comparison to the model based on equilibrium sorption assumption in fracture matrix system, and multi rate mass transfer model.

  18. Coupling between geochemical reactions and multicomponent gas and solute transport in unsaturated media: A reactive transport modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K. U.

    2007-05-01

    The two-way coupling that exists between biogeochemical reactions and vadose zone transport processes, in particular gas phase transport, determines the composition of soil gas. To explore these feedback processes quantitatively, multicomponent gas diffusion and advection are implemented into an existing reactive transport model that includes a full suite of geochemical reactions. Multicomponent gas diffusion is described on the basis of the dusty gas model, which accounts for all relevant gas diffusion mechanisms. The simulation of gas attenuation in partially saturated landfill soil covers, methane production, and oxidation in aquifers contaminated by organic compounds (e.g., an oil spill site) and pyrite oxidation in mine tailings demonstrate that both diffusive and advective gas transport can be affected by geochemical reactions. Methane oxidation in landfill covers reduces the existing upward pressure gradient, thereby decreasing the contribution of advective methane emissions to the atmosphere and enhancing the net flux of atmospheric oxygen into the soil column. At an oil spill site, methane oxidation causes a reversal in the direction of gas advection, which results in advective transport toward the zone of oxidation both from the ground surface and the deeper zone of methane production. Both diffusion and advection contribute to supply atmospheric oxygen into the subsurface, and methane emissions to the atmosphere are averted. During pyrite oxidation in mine tailings, pressure reduction in the reaction zone drives advective gas flow into the sediment column, enhancing the oxidation process. In carbonate-rich mine tailings, calcite dissolution releases carbon dioxide, which partly offsets the pressure reduction caused by O2 consumption.

  19. Coupling between geochemical reactions and multicomponent gas and solute transport in unsaturated media: A reactive transport modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.

    2007-01-01

    The two-way coupling that exists between biogeochemical reactions and vadose zone transport processes, in particular gas phase transport, determines the composition of soil gas. To explore these feedback processes quantitatively, multicomponent gas diffusion and advection are implemented into an existing reactive transport model that includes a full suite of geochemical reactions. Multicomponent gas diffusion is described on the basis of the dusty gas model, which accounts for all relevant gas diffusion mechanisms. The simulation of gas attenuation in partially saturated landfill soil covers, methane production, and oxidation in aquifers contaminated by organic compounds (e.g., an oil spill site) and pyrite oxidation in mine tailings demonstrate that both diffusive and advective gas transport can be affected by geochemical reactions. Methane oxidation in landfill covers reduces the existing upward pressure gradient, thereby decreasing the contribution of advective methane emissions to the atmosphere and enhancing the net flux of atmospheric oxygen into the soil column. At an oil spill site, methane oxidation causes a reversal in the direction of gas advection, which results in advective transport toward the zone of oxidation both from the ground surface and the deeper zone of methane production. Both diffusion and advection contribute to supply atmospheric oxygen into the subsurface, and methane emissions to the atmosphere are averted. During pyrite oxidation in mine tailings, pressure reduction in the reaction zone drives advective gas flow into the sediment column, enhancing the oxidation process. In carbonate-rich mine tailings, calcite dissolution releases carbon dioxide, which partly offsets the pressure reduction caused by O2 consumption.

  20. Modeling and testing of reactive contaminant transport in drinking water pipes: Chlorine response and implications for online contaminant detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive contaminants introduced to chlorinated drinking water can cause water quality change directly related to their reactivity and other physiochemical properties. This general principle is further developed and utilized in a proposed real-time event adaptive detection, iden...

  1. Sorption/Desorption and Transport of Trichloroethene in Freshly-amended, Synthetically- aged, and Field-contaminated Aquifer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. R.; Norris, D. K.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of long-term contaminant aging on the sorption/desorption and transport of trichloroethene in a low organic-carbon content aquifer material collected from the source zone of a chlorinated-solvent contaminated federal Superfund site in Arizona. This was accomplished by comparing elution behavior for field-contaminated, synthetically-aged (contact times of approximately four years), and freshly-amended aquifer material. Elution of trichloroethene exhibited extensive low-concentration tailing, despite minimal retention of trichloroethene by the aquifer material. The observed nonideal behavior indicates significant mass-transfer constraints influenced trichloroethene transport in this aquifer material. The elution behavior of trichloroethene for the field-contaminated and aged treatments was essentially identical to that observed for the fresh treatments. In addition, the results of three independent mass- balance analyses, total mass eluted, solvent-extraction analysis of residual sorbed mass, and flow- interruption rebound, showed equivalent recoveries for the aged and fresh treatments. These results indicate that long-term contaminant aging did not significantly influence the transport and fate behavior of trichloroethene in this low organic-carbon aquifer material. The observed nonideal behavior of trichloroethene (i.e., nonlinear sorption and significantly rate-limited sorption/desorption) suggests physically condensed carbonaceous material, comprising 61% of this media's organic-carbon content, mediates the transport and fate behavior of trichloroethene in this low organic-carbon content aquifer material.

  2. Numerical model for the uptake of groundwater contaminants by phreatophytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widdowson, M.A.; El-Sayed, A.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional solute transport models do not adequately account for the effects of phreatophytic plant systems on contaminant concentrations in shallow groundwater systems. A numerical model was developed and tested to simulate threedimensional reactive solute transport in a heterogeneous porous medium. Advective-dispersive transport is coupled to biodegradation, sorption, and plantbased attenuation processes including plant uptake and sorption by plant roots. The latter effects are a function of the physical-chemical properties of the individual solutes and plant species. Models for plant uptake were tested and evaluated using the experimental data collected at a field site comprised of hybrid poplar trees. A non-linear equilibrium isotherm model best represented site conditions.

  3. Sediment Capping and Natural Recovery, Contaminant Transport Fundamentals With Applications to Sediment Caps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    the diffusion model and the advection-dispersion model include a second-order derivative of concentration with respect to distance ( M2C /Mz2 or M/Mz...dispersion are ignored, the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (DLZ) can be set equal to zero, and the terms DLZ /R  M2C /Mz2 and DLZ M2C /Mz2 drop from

  4. Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code: a compartmental pathways computer model of contaminant transport

    SciTech Connect

    King, C M; Wilhite, E L; Root, Jr, R W; Fauth, D J; Routt, K R; Emslie, R H; Beckmeyer, R R; Fjeld, R A; Hutto, G A; Vandeven, J A

    1985-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code has been used since 1978 for environmental pathway analysis of potential migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals. The DOSTOMAN work is reviewed including a summary of historical use of compartmental models, the mathematical basis for the DOSTOMAN code, examples of exact analytical solutions for simple matrices, methods for numerical solution of complex matrices, and mathematical validation/calibration of the SRL code. The review includes the methodology for application to nuclear and hazardous chemical waste disposal, examples of use of the model in contaminant transport and pathway analysis, a user's guide for computer implementation, peer review of the code, and use of DOSTOMAN at other Department of Energy sites. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Vadose Zone Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis for the 216-B-26 Trench

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.

    2004-10-14

    The BC Cribs and Trenches, part of the 200 TW 1 OU waste sites, received about 30 Mgal of scavenged tank waste, with possibly the largest inventory of 99Tc ever disposed to the soil at Hanford and site remediation is being accelerated. The purpose of this work was to develop a conceptual model for contaminant fate and transport at the 216-B-26 Trench site to support identification and development and evaluation of remediation alternatives. Large concentrations of 99Tc high above the water table implicated stratigraphy in the control of the downward migration. The current conceptual model accounts for small-scale stratigraphy; site-specific changes soil properties; tilted layers; and lateral spreading. It assumes the layers are spatially continuous causing water and solutes to move laterally across the boundary if conditions permit. Water influx at the surface is assumed to be steady. Model parameters were generated with pedotransfer functions; these were coupled high resolution neutron moisture logs that provided information on the underlying heterogeneity on a scale of 3 inches. Two approaches were used to evaluate the impact of remedial options on transport. In the first, a 1-D convolution solution to the convective-dispersive equation was used, assuming steady flow. This model was used to predict future movement of the existing plume using the mean and depth dependent moisture content. In the second approach, the STOMP model was used to first predict the current plume distribution followed by its future migration. Redistribution of the 99Tc plume was simulated for the no-action alternative and on-site capping. Hypothetical caps limiting recharge to 1.0, 0.5, and 0.1 mm yr-1 were considered and assumed not to degrade in the long term. Results show that arrival time of the MCLs, the peak arrival time, and the arrival time of the center of mass increased with decreasing recharge rate. The 1-D convolution model is easy to apply and can easily accommodate initial

  6. Source identification of hydrocarbon contaminants and their transportation over the Zonguldak shelf, Turkish Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unlu, S.; Alpar, B.

    2009-04-01

    Under great anthropogenic pressure due to the substantial freshwater input from the surrounding industrial and agricultural areas, especially central and middle-Eastern Europe, the Black Sea basin is ranked among the most ecologically threatened water bodies of the world. Oil levels are unacceptable in many coastal areas perilously close to polluted harbors and many river mouths; the places presenting the highest levels of bio-diversity and having a high socio-economic importance due to human use of coastal resources. There are about sixty sources of pollution which resulted in "hot spots" having disastrous impacts on sensitive marine and coastal areas and needing immediate priorities for action. Beyond such land-based sources, trans-boundary pollution sources from Black Sea riparian countries, heavy maritime traffic, particularly involving petroleum transports and fishing boats, and the improper disposal of ballast and bilge waters and solid waste are also important marine sources of pollution. Found in fossil fuels such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons are generated by incomplete combustion of organic matter. In order to estimate their distribution in sediment and their sources, they were monitored from the bottom samples offshore the Zonguldak industry region, one of the most polluted spots in the Turkish Black Sea. There the budget of pollutants via rivers is not precisely known due to an evident lack of data on chemical and granulometric composition of the river runoff and their fluxes. Therefore the marine sediments, essential components of marine ecosystems, are very important in our estimating the degree of the damage given to the ecosystem by such inputs. Realization of the sources and transport of these contaminants will be a critical tool for future management of the Zonguldak industry region and its watershed. The sea bottom in study area is composed of mainly sand and silt mixtures with small amount of clay. Geochemical analyses have shown that oil

  7. The role of colloids in the transport of contaminants at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, B.D.; Mackay, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    A forced-gradient, pilot-study of ground contaminant transport in an existing plume was conducted at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal in November 1991. Plume contaminants included halogenated VOCs, aromatic hydrocarbons, organchlorine pesticides and other more polar organic compounds. The pilot system consisted of an injection well screened over the entire saturated zone, an extraction well located 30 feet away and granulated activated carbon canisters for the treatment of extracted water. Treated water was spiked with bromide prior to reinjection. A series of observation wells was established between the injection and extraction wells. Organic analysis of extracted colloidal material (10K daltons - 0.1{mu}m) showed the colloids to be with substantional amounts of a number of the target analytes including atrazine (100{mu}g/g colloids), dde (3200{mu}g/g) and DDT (400{mu}g/g). In addition, colloidal material was found to be mobile, although slightly retarded (R{sub f} = 1.5 - 2.0) relativeomide tracer.

  8. Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) Simulation of Groundwater Hydraulics and Contaminant Transport in Karst Aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Hellweger, Ferdi; Padilla, Ingrid; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Karst aquifers have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy in their geologic and hydrogeologic properties which makes predicting their behavior difficult. This paper evaluates the application of the Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) approach to simulate groundwater hydraulics and contaminant transport in karst aquifers using an example from the North Coast limestone aquifer system in Puerto Rico. The goal is to evaluate if the EPM approach, which approximates the karst features with a conceptualized, equivalent continuous medium, is feasible for an actual project, based on available data and the study scale and purpose. Existing National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data and previous hydrogeological U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies were used to define the model input parameters. Hydraulic conductivity and specific yield were estimated using measured groundwater heads over the study area and further calibrated against continuous water level data of three USGS observation wells. The water-table fluctuation results indicate that the model can practically reflect the steady-state groundwater hydraulics (normalized RMSE of 12.4%) and long-term variability (normalized RMSE of 3.0%) at regional and intermediate scales and can be applied to predict future water table behavior under different hydrogeological conditions. The application of the EPM approach to simulate transport is limited because it does not directly consider possible irregular conduit flow pathways. However, the results from the present study suggest that the EPM approach is capable to reproduce the spreading of a TCE plume at intermediate scales with sufficient accuracy (normalized RMSE of 8.45%) for groundwater resources management and the planning of contamination mitigation strategies. PMID:26422202

  9. Phytoremediation: modeling plant uptake and contaminant transport in the soil plant atmosphere continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Ying

    2002-09-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants and their associated rhizospheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, detoxify, or contain contaminants located in the soil, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and even the atmosphere. This study investigates phytoremediation of 1,4-dioxane from a contaminated sandy soil by a poplar cutting, which is associated with water flow in the soil as well as water movement and 1,4-dioxane translocation in the xylem and phloem systems. An existing one-dimensional mathematical model for coupled transport of water, heat, and solutes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (CTSPAC) is modified for the purpose of this study. The model is calibrated with the laboratory experimental measurements prior to its applications. A simulation scenario is then performed to investigate phytoremediation of 1,4-dioxane by a poplar cutting in response to daily water flow and 1,4-dioxane transport for a simulation period of 7 days. Simulation shows that 1,4-dioxane concentration is high in leaves and low in roots with the stem in between. However, 1,4-dioxane mass in the stem (60%) is higher than that of leaves (28%) and roots (12%). This occurs because the stem volume used in this study is larger than those of leaves and roots. The simulation further reveals that about 30% of the soil 1,4-dioxane is removed within 7 days, resulting mainly from root uptake. A plot of the 1,4-dioxane concentrations in plant compartments as a function of time shows that the highest concentration in leaves is about 2600 μg/cm 3 and the lowest concentration in roots is about 350 μg/cm 3 at the end of the simulation. Results indicate that leaves are an important compartment for 1,4-dioxane accumulation and transpiration. This study suggests that the modified CTSPAC model could be a useful tool for phytoremediation estimations.

  10. Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) Simulation of Groundwater Hydraulics and Contaminant Transport in Karst Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Hellweger, Ferdi; Padilla, Ingrid; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Karst aquifers have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy in their geologic and hydrogeologic properties which makes predicting their behavior difficult. This paper evaluates the application of the Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) approach to simulate groundwater hydraulics and contaminant transport in karst aquifers using an example from the North Coast limestone aquifer system in Puerto Rico. The goal is to evaluate if the EPM approach, which approximates the karst features with a conceptualized, equivalent continuous medium, is feasible for an actual project, based on available data and the study scale and purpose. Existing National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data and previous hydrogeological U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies were used to define the model input parameters. Hydraulic conductivity and specific yield were estimated using measured groundwater heads over the study area and further calibrated against continuous water level data of three USGS observation wells. The water-table fluctuation results indicate that the model can practically reflect the steady-state groundwater hydraulics (normalized RMSE of 12.4%) and long-term variability (normalized RMSE of 3.0%) at regional and intermediate scales and can be applied to predict future water table behavior under different hydrogeological conditions. The application of the EPM approach to simulate transport is limited because it does not directly consider possible irregular conduit flow pathways. However, the results from the present study suggest that the EPM approach is capable to reproduce the spreading of a TCE plume at intermediate scales with sufficient accuracy (normalized RMSE of 8.45%) for groundwater resources management and the planning of contamination mitigation strategies.

  11. UNCERT: geostatistics, uncertainty analysis and visualization software applied to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingle, William L.; Poeter, Eileen P.; McKenna, Sean A.

    1999-05-01

    UNCERT is a 2D and 3D geostatistics, uncertainty analysis and visualization software package applied to ground water flow and contaminant transport modeling. It is a collection of modules that provides tools for linear regression, univariate statistics, semivariogram analysis, inverse-distance gridding, trend-surface analysis, simple and ordinary kriging and discrete conditional indicator simulation. Graphical user interfaces for MODFLOW and MT3D, ground water flow and contaminant transport models, are provided for streamlined data input and result analysis. Visualization tools are included for displaying data input and output. These include, but are not limited to, 2D and 3D scatter plots, histograms, box and whisker plots, 2D contour maps, surface renderings of 2D gridded data and 3D views of gridded data. By design, UNCERT's graphical user interface and visualization tools facilitate model design and analysis. There are few built in restrictions on data set sizes and each module (with two exceptions) can be run in either graphical or batch mode. UNCERT is in the public domain and is available from the World Wide Web with complete on-line and printable (PDF) documentation. UNCERT is written in ANSI-C with a small amount of FORTRAN77, for UNIX workstations running X-Windows and Motif (or Lesstif). This article discusses the features of each module and demonstrates how they can be used individually and in combination. The tools are applicable to a wide range of fields and are currently used by researchers in the ground water, mining, mathematics, chemistry and geophysics, to name a few disciplines.

  12. Evolution and Advection of Solar Mesogranulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    unprecedented clarity. We see that the supergranules, which are known to carry along (advect) the granules with their convective motion, also advect...I Solar mesogranulation, Solar observations, Solar super- 2 granulation 16. PRICE COCE 1i7. SECJ-3T LSiIATO 8 EUITY CLASSIFICA ION 19. SECURITY CLAS...mo~iesý sho~ed that granules are adl~ectedl b• Richard Muller*, Hers& Auffret*, Thierry Roudiert, the larger-scale consectie flowss. and thu, could

  13. Geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical interpretations of mineral deposits as analogs for understanding transport of environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Berger, B.R.

    2006-01-01

    Base- and precious-metal mineral deposits comprise anomalous concentrations of metals and associated elements, which may be useful subjects for study as analogs for migration of environmental contaminants. In the geologic past, hydrothermal mineral deposits formed at the intersection of favorable geologic, hydrologic and geochemical gradients. In the present, weathering of these sulfide-rich deposits occurs as a result of the interplay between rates of oxygen supply versus rates of ground or surface-water flow. Transport and spatial dispersion of elements from a mineral deposit occurs as a function of competing rates of water flow versus rates of attenuation mechanisms such as adsorption, dilution, or (co)precipitation. In this paper we present several case studies from mineralized and altered sedimentary and crystalline aquifers in the western United States to illustrate the geologic control of ground-water flow and solute transport, and to demonstrate how this combined approach leads to a more complete understanding of the systems under study as well as facilitating some capability to predict major flow directions in aquifers.

  14. Transport of Organic Contaminants Mobilized from Coal through Sandstone Overlying a Geological Carbon Sequestration Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-02-01

    Column experiments were conducted using a wetted sandstone rock installed in a tri-axial core holder to study the flow and transport of organic compounds mobilized by scCO2 under simulated geologic carbon storage (GCS) conditions. The sandstone rock was collected from a formation overlying a deep saline reservoir at a GCS demonstration site. Rock core effluent pressures were set at 0, 500, or 1000 psig and the core temperature was set at 20 or 50°C to simulate the transport to different subsurface depths. The concentrations of the organic compounds in the column effluent and their distribution within the sandstone core were monitored. Results indicate that the mobility though the core sample was much higher for BTEX compounds than for naphthalene. Retention of organic compounds from the vapor phase to the core appeared to be primarily controlled by partitioning from the vapor phase to the aqueous phase. Adsorption to the surfaces of the wetted sandstone was also significant for naphthalene. Reduced temperature and elevated pressure resulted in greater partitioning of the mobilized organic contaminants into the water phase.

  15. Importance and Use of Plants in Evaluating Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraski, B. J.; Sandstrom, M. W.; Michel, R. L.; Radyk, J. C.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Johnson, M. J.; Mayers, C. J.

    2002-12-01

    Improved understanding of soil-plant-atmosphere interactions is critical to water-resource and waste management decisions. Multiple-year field studies of soil-water movement at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS; http://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/) near Beatty, Nevada identified plants as the primary control on the near-surface water balance and showed that the boundary conditions imposed by plant activity in the uppermost soil layer results in episodic, deep drying well below the root zone during periods of below-average precipitation. The results help to explain the evidence for negligible recharge and upward flow that has been inferred from environmental-tracer and soil-physics based studies of undisturbed, arid sites. The findings have contributed to the development of new conceptual models that incorporate the influence of desert vegetation in analyses of paleo- to present-day water fluxes in deep unsaturated zones. Studies at the ADRS are also using plants to investigate the transport of contaminants away from a closed low-level radioactive waste disposal area. Soil-gas sampling results indicated that tritium has moved as much as 300 m from the disposal area, and that transport primarily occurs in the gas phase with preferential transport through coarse-textured sediment layers. The need for an efficient means of gathering plume-scale data led to the development of a method that uses plant water to identify the presence and distribution of tritium. The method entails field sampling and solar distillation of foliage to collect plant water, followed by laboratory filtration and adsorption of scintillation-interfering constituents on a graphite-based, solid-phase-extraction (SPE) column. The method was evaluated using an evergreen shrub (creosote bush; Larrea tridentata (DC.) Cov.). Tritium concentrations in plant water determined with the distillation-SPE method did not differ significantly from those determined with the standard (and more laborious) toluene

  16. Understanding Contaminant Transport Pathways at Rocky Flats - A Basis for the Remediation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, Ian

    2008-01-15

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a Department of Energy facility located approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Processing and fabrication of nuclear weapons components occurred at Rocky Flats from 1952 through 1989. Operations at the Site included the use of several radionuclides, including plutonium-239/240 (Pu), americium-241 (Am), and various uranium (U) isotopes, as well as several types of chlorinated solvents. The historic operations resulted in legacy contamination, including contaminated facilities, process waste lines, buried wastes and surface soil contamination. Decontamination and removal of buildings at the site was completed in late 2005, culminating more than ten years of active environmental remediation work. The Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision was subsequently approved in 2006, signifying regulatory approval and closure of the site. The use of RFETS as a National Wildlife Refuge is scheduled to be in full operation by 2012. To develop a plan for remediating different types of radionuclide contaminants present in the RFETS environment required understanding the different environmental transport pathways for the various actinides. Developing this understanding was the primary objective of the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) project. Findings from the AME studies were used in the development of RFETS remediation strategies. The AME project focused on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in surface water, groundwater, air, soil and biota at RFETS. For the purposes of the AME studies, actinide elements addressed included Pu, Am, and U. The AME program, funded by DOE, brought together personnel with a broad range of relevant expertise in technical investigations. The AME advisory panel identified research investigations and approaches that could be used to solve issues related to actinide migration at the Site. An initial step of the AME was to develop a conceptual model to provide a

  17. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  18. REPORT ON THE HOMELAND SECURITY WORKSHOP ON TRANSPORT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTES FROM FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes discussions from the "Homeland Security Workshop on Transport and Disposal of Wastes From Facilities Contaminated With Chemical or Biological Agents." The workshop was held on May 28-30, 2003, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and its objectives were to:

    .Documen...

  19. Modeling fate and transport of "Contaminants of Emerging Concern" (CECs): is the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) the appropriate model?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Question/Methods As the scientific and regulatory communities realize the significant environmental impacts and ubiquity of “contaminants of emerging concern” (CECs), it is increasingly imperative to develop quantitative assessment tools to evaluate and predict the fate and transport of...

  20. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, Jon; Mueller, Karl T.; O'Day, Peggy; Serne, R. Jeff; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl

    2006-06-01

    Our work is aimed at developing a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering from caustic waste release and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) fate and transport in waste-impacted sediments across space, time and geochemical gradients that encompass the process-level heterogeneity observed at the Hanford DOE site. Our specific objectives are: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts through sedimentary media; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments (from (1) and (2)) that accurately simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption at the bench-scale, and that can be applied to--and validated at--field sites such as Hanford.

  1. Characterization of contaminant transport using naturally-occurring U-series disequilibria. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, M.; Ku, T.L.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of the research is to study the migratory behavior of contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium- and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Naturally occurring U- and Th-series disequilibria can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting. The authors are developing a realistic model of contaminant migration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer beneath the INEEL by evaluating the retardation processes involved in the rock/water interaction. The major tasks are to: (1) determine the natural distribution of U, Th, Pa and Ra isotopes in the groundwater as well as in rock minerals and sorbed phases, and (2) study rock/water interaction processes using U/Th series disequilibria and a statistical analysis-based model code for the calculation of in-situ retardation factors of radionuclides and rock/water interaction time scales. This study will also provide an improved understanding of the hydrogeologic features of the site and their impact on the migration of contaminants. This report summarizes results after 20 months of a 36-month project. Studies performed at LANL include analysis of the long-lived nuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 231}Pa by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Studies performed at the Univ. of Southern California include the measurement of short-lived naturally occurring radionuclides by decay-counting techniques and the development of models to predict the migration behavior of these radionuclides. Initial efforts began with analysis of 31, 0.5L water samples obtained through routine sampling by USGS and INEEL personnel. One significant observation from these data is that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios are highest in waters that emanate from local recharge

  2. Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2007-09-01

    This report documents transport data and data analyses for Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97. The purpose of the data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU transport model. Specific task objectives were as follows: • Identify and compile currently available transport parameter data and supporting information that may be relevant to the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. • Assess the level of quality of the data and associated documentation. • Analyze the data to derive expected values and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability. The scope of this document includes the compilation and assessment of data and information relevant to transport parameters for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU subsurface within the context of unclassified source-term contamination. Data types of interest include mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, matrix and effective porosity, dispersivity, matrix diffusion, matrix and fracture sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport parameters.

  3. Modeling Grain-Scale Diffusion Kinetics Controlling Uranium Sorption and Transport in Contaminated Sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, M. B.; Stoliker, D. L.; Johnson, K. J.; Curtis, G. P.; Kent, D. B.; Davis, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The mobility of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers is limited by adsorption to mineral surfaces. While the chemical sorption step proceeds rapidly, the achievement of equilibrium can be kinetically limited by the diffusion of U(VI) through soil aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral coatings. The diffusion kinetics are in turn dependent on the adsorption equilibrium, due to the sorptive retardation effect that occurs within the intragranular diffusion regime. Since adsorption equilibrium is dependent on chemical conditions (e.g., pH, alkalinity, Ca concentration), diffusion of these chemical species as solution conditions change may also affect U(VI) kinetics. These coupled effects are difficult to capture in generic rate models that do not explicitly include a diffusion mechanism, particularly when the diffusion regime is heterogeneous. We present a grain-scale diffusion model for contaminated sediments from Naturita, CO and Hanford, WA, constrained by kinetic U(VI) desorption data and non-reactive tracer uptake and release measurements with tritiated water. Batch and column-scale tracer results are modeled using a multi-rate mass transfer scheme to extract intragranular diffusion parameters. These results suggest a high degree of heterogeneity in the diffusivity of the intragranular pore space, as indicated by a wide, bi/multimodal distribution of mass transfer rates. These results are used to constrain a U(VI) diffusion model with surface complexation and multicomponent diffusion that can be incorporated into field-scale reactive transport models. Preliminary results suggest that the sorptive retardation effect is significant; U(VI) batch-scale diffusion kinetics requiring hundreds to thousands of hours for equilibration appear to be controlled by intragranular pore space that requires less than 24 hours for equilibration of a non-reactive tracer.

  4. Transport of tritium contamination to the atmosphere in an arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Andraski, Brian J.; Johnson, Michael J.; Stonestrom, David A.; Michel, Robert L.; Cooper, C.A.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    Soil–plant–atmosphere interactions strongly influence water movement in desert unsaturated zones, but little is known about how such interactions affect atmospheric release of subsurface water-borne contaminants. This 2-yr study, performed at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site in southern Nevada, quantified the magnitude and spatiotemporal variability of tritium (3H) transport from the shallow unsaturated zone to the atmosphere adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) facility. Tritium fluxes were calculated as the product of 3H concentrations in water vapor and respective evaporation and transpiration water-vapor fluxes. Quarterly measured 3H concentrations in soil water vapor and in leaf water of the dominant creosote-bush [Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville] were spatially extrapolated and temporally interpolated to develop daily maps of contamination across the 0.76-km2 study area. Maximum plant and root-zone soil concentrations (4200 and 8700 Bq L−1, respectively) were measured 25 m from the LLRW facility boundary. Continuous evaporation was estimated using a Priestley–Taylor model and transpiration was computed as the difference between measured eddy-covariance evapotranspiration and estimated evaporation. The mean evaporation/transpiration ratio was 3:1. Tritium released from the study area ranged from 0.12 to 12 μg d−1 and totaled 1.5 mg (8.2 × 1010 Bq) over 2 yr. Tritium flux variability was driven spatially by proximity to 3H source areas and temporally by changes in 3H concentrations and in the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. Evapotranspiration removed and limited penetration of precipitation beneath native vegetation and fostered upward movement and release of 3H from below the root zone.

  5. Transport of tritium contamination to the atmosphere in an arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Johnson, M.J.; Michel, R.L.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    Soil-plant-atmosphere interactions strongly infl uence water movement in desert unsaturated zones, but litile is known about how such interactions aff ect atmospheric release of subsurface water-borne contaminants. This 2-yr study, performed at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site in southern Nevada, quantifi ed the magnitude and spatiotemporal variability of tritium (3H) transport from the shallow unsaturated zone to the atmosphere adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) facility. Tritium fl uxes were calculated as the product of 3H concentrations in water vapor and respective evaporation and transpiration water-vapor fl uxes. Quarterly measured 3H concentrations in soil water vapor and in leaf water of the dominant creosote-bush [Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville] were spatially extrapolated and temporally interpolated to develop daily maps of contamination across the 0.76-km2 study area. Maximum plant and root-zone soil concentrations (4200 and 8700 Bq L-1, respectively) were measured 25 m from the LLRW facility boundary. Continuous evaporation was estimated using a Priestley-Taylor model and transpiration was computed as the diff erence between measured eddy-covariance evapotranspiration and estimated evaporation. The mean evaporation/transpiration ratio was 3:1. Tritium released from the study area ranged from 0.12 to 12 ??g d-1 and totaled 1.5 mg (8.2 ?? 1010 Bq) over 2 yr. Tritium fl ux variability was driven spatially by proximity to 3H source areas and temporally by changes in 3H concentrations and in the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. Evapotranspiration removed and limited penetration of precipitation beneath native vegetation and fostered upward movement and release of 3H from below the root zone. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  6. Is Chaotic Advection Inherent to Porous Media Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Daniel; Metcalfe, Guy; Trefry, Mike

    2013-11-01

    All porous media, including granular and packed media, fractured and open networks, are typified by the inherent topological complexity of the pore-space. This topological complexity admits a large number density of stagnation points under steady Stokes flow, which in turn generates a 3D fluid mechanical analouge of the Bakers map, termed the Baker's flow. We demonstrate that via this mechanism, chaotic advection at the pore-scale is inherent to almost all porous media under reasonable conditions, and such dynamics have significant implications for a range of fluid-borne processes including transport and mixing, chemical reactions and biological activity.

  7. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  8. Effects of demographic stochasticity on population persistence in advective media.

    PubMed

    Kolpas, Allison; Nisbet, Roger M

    2010-07-01

    Many populations live and disperse in advective media. A fundamental question, known as the "drift paradox" in stream ecology, is how a closed population can survive when it is constantly being transported downstream by the flow. Recent population-level models have focused on the role of diffusive movement in balancing the effects of advection, predicting critical conditions for persistence. Here, we formulate an individual-based stochastic analog of the model described in (Lutscher et al., SIAM Rev. 47(4):749-772, 2005) to quantify the effects of demographic stochasticity on persistence. Population dynamics are modeled as a logistic growth process and dispersal as a position-jump process on a finite domain divided into patches. When there is no correlation in the interpatch movement of residents, stochasticity simply smooths the persistence-extinction boundary. However, when individuals disperse in "packets" from one patch to another and the flow field is memoryless on the timescale of packet transport, the probability of persistence is greatly enhanced. The latter transport mechanism may be characteristic of larval dispersal in the coastal ocean or wind-dispersed seed pods.

  9. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  10. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  11. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, William Jowett

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  12. Investigating the role of gas bubble formation and entrapment in contaminated aquifers: Reactive transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Richard T.; Ulrich Mayer, K.

    2006-09-01

    In many natural and contaminated aquifers, geochemical processes result in the production or consumption of dissolved gases. In cases where methanogenesis or denitrification occurs, the production of gases may result in the formation and growth of gas bubbles below the water table. Near the water table, entrapment of atmospheric gases during water table rise may provide a significant source of O 2 to waters otherwise depleted in O 2. Furthermore, the presence of bubbles will affect the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer, resulting in changes to the groundwater flow regime. The interactions between physical transport, biogeochemical processes, and gas bubble formation, entrapment and release is complex and requires suitable analysis tools. The objective of the present work is the development of a numerical model capable of quantitatively assessing these processes. The multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P has been enhanced to simulate bubble growth and contraction due to in-situ gas production or consumption, bubble entrapment due to water table rise and subsequent re-equilibration of the bubble with ambient groundwater, and permeability changes due to trapped gas phase saturation. The resulting formulation allows for the investigation of complex geochemical systems where microbially mediated redox reactions both produce and consume gases as well as affect solution chemistry, alkalinity, and pH. The enhanced model has been used to simulate processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer where methanogenesis is an important redox process. The simulations are constrained by data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN. Our results suggest that permeability reduction in the methanogenic zone due to in-situ formation of gas bubbles, and dissolution of entrapped atmospheric bubbles near the water table, both work to attenuate the dissolved gas plume emanating from the source zone. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that under the given

  13. Investigating the role of gas bubble formation and entrapment in contaminated aquifers: Reactive transport modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, Richard T.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    In many natural and contaminated aquifers, geochemical processes result in the production or consumption of dissolved gases. In cases where methanogenesis or denitrification occurs, the production of gases may result in the formation and growth of gas bubbles below the water table. Near the water table, entrapment of atmospheric gases during water table rise may provide a significant source of O2 to waters otherwise depleted in O2. Furthermore, the presence of bubbles will affect the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer, resulting in changes to the groundwater flow regime. The interactions between physical transport, biogeochemical processes, and gas bubble formation, entrapment and release is complex and requires suitable analysis tools. The objective of the present work is the development of a numerical model capable of quantitatively assessing these processes. The multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P has been enhanced to simulate bubble growth and contraction due to in-situ gas production or consumption, bubble entrapment due to water table rise and subsequent re-equilibration of the bubble with ambient groundwater, and permeability changes due to trapped gas phase saturation. The resulting formulation allows for the investigation of complex geochemical systems where microbially mediated redox reactions both produce and consume gases as well as affect solution chemistry, alkalinity, and pH. The enhanced model has been used to simulate processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer where methanogenesis is an important redox process. The simulations are constrained by data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN. Our results suggest that permeability reduction in the methanogenic zone due to in-situ formation of gas bubbles, and dissolution of entrapped atmospheric bubbles near the water table, both work to attenuate the dissolved gas plume emanating from the source zone. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that under the given

  14. Effect of dissolved organic carbon on the transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and carboxylate-modified microspheres advected through temperate humic and tropical volcanic agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Metge, David W; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-02-21

    Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and microspheres in two disparate (a clay- and Fe-rich, volcanic and a temperate, humic) agricultural soils were studied in the presence and absence of 100 mg L(-1) of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 5.0-6.0. Transport of carboxylate-modified, 1.8 μm microspheres in soil columns was highly sensitive to the nature of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas oocysts transport was more affected by soil mineralogy. SDBS increased transport of microspheres from 48% to 87% through the tropical soil and from 43% to 93% in temperate soil. In contrast, SRHA reduced transport of microspheres from 48% to 28% in tropical soil and from 43% to 16% in temperate soil. SDBS also increased oocysts transport through the temperate soil 5-fold, whereas no oocyst transport was detected in tropical soil. SRHA had only a nominal effect in increasing oocysts transport in tropical soil, but caused a 6-fold increase in transport through the temperate soil. Amendments of only 4 mg L(-1) SRHA and SDBS decreased oocyst hydrophobicity from 66% to 20% and from 66% to 5%, respectively. However, SDBS increased microsphere hydrophobicity from 16% to 33%. Soil fines, which includes clays, and SRHA, both caused the oocysts zeta potential (ζ) to become more negative, but caused the highly hydrophilic microspheres to become less negatively charged. The disparate behaviors of the two colloids in the presence of an ionic surfactant and natural organic matter suggest that microspheres may not be suitable surrogates for oocysts in certain types of soils. These results indicate that whether or not DOC inhibits or promotes transport of oocysts and microspheres in agricultural soils and by how much, depends not only on the surface characteristics of the colloid, but the nature of the DOC and the soil mineralogy.

  15. Characterization of Contaminant Transport by Gravity, Capillarity and Barometric Pumping in Heterogeneous Vadose Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C R; Martins, S A; Ramirez, A L; Daily, W D; Hudson, G B; Ralsont, D; Ekwurzel, B

    2001-02-27

    in the vadose zone. From the VZO at the LLNL site and from 3-D diagnostic simulations of our very first tracer-spiked plume infiltration event, we produced a much better understanding of the implications of soil heterogeneity for unsaturated zone contaminant transport at DOE sites. Even though the LLNL VZO site is considered to be hydrologically ''tight'' owing to the low permeability of the clays and silts that dominate the soil formations there, we find that saturation increases resulting from a near-surface ''leak'' reach the water table across the 20-meter-thick vadose zone in only tens of hours. This rapid transport at the site cannot be accurately simulated by layered models that derive their hydrologic properties from borehole-soil samples. In the LLNL vadose zone, layered infiltration models clearly underpredict of the rate of contaminant infiltration to the water table. Chemical transport simulations based on layered models of the Hanford vadose zone also appear to drastically underpredict contaminant migration. Furthermore, only simulations assuming a heterogeneous regime ''threaded'' by extremely high-permeability pathways can explain the rapid increase in saturation observed with ERT near the water table. Three-dimensional predictive models of a hypothetical tritiated water leak that are based on the above mentioned VZO infiltration-experiment diagnostic models were run. Tritiated water is an excellent conservative tracer and the infiltration simulations predict, in very good agreement with VZO experiments, that a continuous hypothetical tritium release (2-3 liters/rein) would be expected to reach the water table at significant concentrations within days. The numerical model suggests that this arrival time is determined by the amount of time required, infiltrating liquid at a given rate, to flush one pore volume in the soil between the infiltration point and the water table. Another infiltration event monitored by ERT demonstrated that infiltration could

  16. Osmium isotopes demonstrate distal transport of contaminated sediments in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, G.R.; Adelson, J.M.; Miller, C.V.; Cornwell, J.C.; Hill, J.M.; Horan, M.; Walker, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    Because the isotopic composition of anthropogenic Os is normally distinctive in comparison to continental crust and is precisely measurable, this platinum-group element is attractive as a tracer of transport pathways for contaminated sediments in estuaries. Evidence herein and elsewhere suggest that biomedical research institutions are the chief source of anthropogenic Os. In the Chesapeake Bay region, uncontaminated sediments bear a crustal 187Os/188Os signature of 0.73 ?? 0.10. Slightly higher 187Os/188Os ratios occur in Re-rich Coastal Plain deposits due to post- Miocene 187Re decay. The upper Susquehanna Basin yields sediments also with higher 187Os/188Os. Beginning in the late 1970s, this signal was overprinted by a low 187Os/188Os (anthropogenic) source in the lower Susquehanna Basin. In the vicinity of Baltimore, which is a major center of heavy industry as well as biomedical research, anthropogenic Os has been found only in sediments impacted by the principal wastewater treatment plant. Surprisingly, a mid-Bay site distant from anthropogenic sources contains the strongest anthropogenic Os signal in the data set, having received anthropogenic Os sporadically since the mid-20th Century. Transport of particles to this site overrode the northward flowing bottom currents. Finding anthropogenic Os at this site cautions that other particle-borne substances, including hazardous ones, could be dispersed broadly in this estuary.Because the isotopic composition of anthropogenic Os is normally distinctive in comparison to continental crust and is precisely measurable, this platinum-group element is attractive as a tracer of transport pathways for contaminated sediments in estuaries. Evidence herein and elsewhere suggest that biomedical research institutions are the chief source of anthropogenic Os. In the Chesapeake Bay region, uncontaminated sediments bear a crustal 187Os/188Os signature of 0.73 ?? 0.10. Slightly higher 187Os/188Os ratios occur in Re-rich Coastal

  17. Transport and transformations of chlorinated-solvent contamination in a saprolite and fractured rock aquifer near a former wastewater-treatment plant, Greenville, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Lane, J.W.; Robertson, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    The transport and fate of chlorinated-ethene contamination was investigated in a fractured-rock aquifer downgradient from a wastewater-treatment plant at a gas-turbine manufacturing facility in Greenville, South Carolina. A vapor-diffusion-sampler technique, developed for this investigation, located fracture zones that discharged contaminated ground water to surface water. The distribution of chlorinated compounds and sulfate, comparison of borehole geophysical data, driller's logs, and the aquifer response to pumpage allowed subsurface contaminant-transport pathways to be delineated.The probable contaminant-transport pathway from the former aeration lagoon was southward. The probable pathway of contaminant transport from the former sludge lagoon was southward to and beneath Little Rocky Creek. South of the creek, the major pathway of contaminant transport appeared to be at a depth of approximately 80 to 107 feet below land surface. The contaminant-transport pathway from the former industrial lagoon was not readily discernible from existing data. A laboratory investigation, as well as examination of ground- water-chemistry data collected during this investigation and concentrations of chlorinated compounds collected during previous investigations,indicates that higher chlorinated compounds are being degraded to lower-chlorinated compounds in the contaminated aquifer. The approaches used in this investigation, as well as the findings, have potential application to other fractured-rock aquifers contaminated by chlorinated ethenes.

  18. EVALUATION OF BIOAEROSOL COMPONENTS, GENERATION FACTORS, AND AIRBORNE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LIME TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well kno...

  19. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, J.; Mueller, K. T.; O'Day, P. A.; Serne, R. J.; Steefel, C. I.

    2009-10-30

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed below. We observed unique molecular mechanisms for sequestration of Sr, Cs and I during native silicate weathering in caustic waste. Product solids, which included poorly crystalline aluminosilicates and well-crystallized zeolites and feldspathoids, accumulate contaminant species during crystal growth.

  20. An adaptive hybrid EnKF-OI scheme for efficient state-parameter estimation of reactive contaminant transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharamti, M. E.; Valstar, J.; Hoteit, I.

    2014-09-01

    Reactive contaminant transport models are used by hydrologists to simulate and study the migration and fate of industrial waste in subsurface aquifers. Accurate transport modeling of such waste requires clear understanding of the system’s parameters, such as sorption and biodegradation. In this study, we present an efficient sequential data assimilation scheme that computes accurate estimates of aquifer contamination and spatially variable sorption coefficients. This assimilation scheme is based on a hybrid formulation of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and optimal interpolation (OI) in which solute concentration measurements are assimilated via a recursive dual estimation of sorption coefficients and contaminant state variables. This hybrid EnKF-OI scheme is used to mitigate background covariance limitations due to ensemble under-sampling and neglected model errors. Numerical experiments are conducted with a two-dimensional synthetic aquifer in which cobalt-60, a radioactive contaminant, is leached in a saturated heterogeneous clayey sandstone zone. Assimilation experiments are investigated under different settings and sources of model and observational errors. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed hybrid EnKF-OI scheme successfully recovers both the contaminant and the sorption rate and reduces their uncertainties. Sensitivity analyses also suggest that the adaptive hybrid scheme remains effective with small ensembles, allowing to reduce the ensemble size by up to 80% with respect to the standard EnKF scheme.

  1. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County, California 2. Transport in the saturated subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loague, Keith; Abrams, Robert H.; Davis, Stanley N.; Nguyen, Anh; Stewart, Iris T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is the second installment of a multipaper series concerned with simulating regional-scale groundwater contamination in Fresno County, CA as the result of long-term nonpoint source applications of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP). In the first part of this study [Loague, K., Lloyd, D., Nguyen, A., Davis, S.N., Abrams, R.H., 1997. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County, California: 1. Leaching through the unsaturated subsurface. J. Contamin. Hydrol. (this issue)], our focus was on the unsaturated zone and DBCP leaching to the water table. Our focus in this paper is the assessment of DBCP transport in the saturated subsurface. Here, the groundwater flow code MODFLOW is coupled to the solute transport code MT3D to simulate the potential fate and transport of DBCP below the water table in the Fresno County study area for a 35-yr period. The results presented here illustrate the long-term regional-scale evolution of the DBCP plume in the study area. The simulated DBCP concentrations are limited to the relatively shallow younger sediments and are generally well below the maximum contaminant level set for the chemical. The simulations presented here suggest that nonpoint source applications of DBCP are not responsible for the observed hot spots in the study area. At the end of this paper we discuss the implications and extensions of the Fresno case study which has been reported here and in the companion paper mentioned above (Loague et al., 1997).

  2. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  3. Colloidal-facilitated transport of inorganic contaminants in ground water: part 1, sampling considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puls, Robert W.; Eychaner, James H.; Powell, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen, and filter pore diameter. During well purging and sample collection, suspended particle size and number as well as dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, pH, and redox potential were monitored. Laboratory analyses of both unfiltered samples and the filtrates were performed by inductively coupled argon plasma, atomic absorption with graphite furnace, and ion chromatography. Scanning electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray was also used for analysis of filter particulates. Suspended particle counts consistently required approximately twice as long as the other field-monitored indicators to stabilize. High-flow-rate pumps entrained normally nonmobile particles. Difference in elemental concentrations using different filter-pore sizes were generally not large with only two wells having differences greater than 10 percent in most wells. Similar differences (>10%) were observed for some wells when samples were collected under nitrogen rather than in air. Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios for air-collected samples were smaller than for samples collected under a nitrogen atmosphere, reflecting sampling-induced oxidation.

  4. Reactive transport of metal contaminants in alluvium - Model comparison and column simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Bassett, R.L.; Glynn, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative assessment of two reactive-transport models, PHREEQC and HYDROGEOCHEM (HGC), was done to determine the suitability of each for simulating the movement of acidic contamination in alluvium. For simulations that accounted for aqueous complexation, precipitation and dissolution, the breakthrough and rinseout curves generated by each model were similar. The differences in simulated equilibrium concentrations between models were minor and were related to (1) different units in model output, (2) different activity coefficients, and (3) ionic-strength calculations. When adsorption processes were added to the models, the rinseout pH simulated by PHREEQC using the diffuse double-layer adsorption model rose to a pH of 6 after pore volume 15, about 1 pore volume later than the pH simulated by HGC using the constant-capacitance model. In PHREEQC simulation of a laboratory column experiment, the inability of the model to match measured outflow concentrations of selected constituents was related to the evident lack of local geochemical equilibrium in the column. The difference in timing and size of measured and simulated breakthrough of selected constituents indicated that the redox and adsorption reactions in the column occurred slowly when compared with the modeled reactions. MINTEQA2 and PHREEQC simulations of the column experiment indicated that the number of surface sites that took part in adsorption reactions was less than that estimated from the measured concentration of Fe hydroxide in the alluvium.

  5. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Madilyn Fletcher

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

  6. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media.

  7. Application of the Discrimination Inference to Reduce Expected Cost Technique (DIRECT) to a Contaminant Transport Problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, T. W.; Ferré, T. P. A.

    2014-12-01

    There is growing recognition in the hydrologic community that deterministic hydrologic models are imperfect tools for decision support. Despite this insight, the state of practice for a hydrologic investigation follows this sequence: data collection, conceptual model development, numerical model development, and finally decision making based on model projections. This approach, based on relatively unconsidered design of data collection, may result in uninformative data. As a result, it is commonly repeated several times to resolve critical uncertainties. We present a novel two step multi-model approach to optimizing data collection to aid decision making, risk analysis. Here, we describe the application this approach (Discrimination Inference to Reduce Expected Cost Technique - DIRECT) for a contaminant transport problem. DIRECT has 7 steps. First, outcomes of concern were defined explicitly. Next a probabilistic analysis of the outcomes was conducted that incorporated multiple conceptual and parametric realizations. The likelihood of each model was assessed based on goodness of fit to existing data. A cost function was developed and used to define the projected costs based on the model-predicted outcomes of concern. Data collection was then optimized to identify the data that could test the models of greatest concern (cost) against the other models in the ensemble. Finally a field program was conducted that included gathering lithologic, hydrologic, and chemical data from 22 new wells that were drilled in projected high value locations. The additional data reduced the expected cost of model projections to an acceptable level for defining new site compliance conditions.

  8. Using OTIS to model solute transport in streams and rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Solute transport in streams and rivers is governed by a suite of hydrologic and geochemical processes. Knowledge of these processes is needed when assessing the fate of contaminants that are released into surface waters. The study of solute fate and transport often is aided by solute transport models that mathematically describe the underlying processes. This fact sheet describes a model that considers One-Dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage (OTIS). As shown by several example applications, OTIS may be used in conjunction with field-scale data to quantify hydrologic processes (advection, dispersion, and transient storage) and certain chemical reactions (sorption and first-order decay).

  9. The role of rivers in transporting organic contaminants in the marine environment of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2013-04-01

    The study of trace organic contaminants in coastal marine environments and especially in estuarine systems is of great importance, since these areas, being biologically productive and receiving considerable pollutant inputs from land-based sources via river runoff, act as a transit zone in which contaminants are transported to the sea. The aim of this work is to identify the significance of estuarine export of organic pollution in the marine environment of Greece. For this reason, the distribution, composition and sources of hydrocarbon mixtures were investigated in sediments collected from eight major Greek estuarine systems, by using a molecular marker approach and several diagnostic criteria and indices. Surface sediment samples were collected from the estuaries of five rivers in Northern Greece flowing into Aegean sea (Axios, Aliakmonas, Strymon, Nestos, Evros), one river in Central Greece (Asopos) also flowing into Aegean Sea and two rivers in Western Greece flowing into Ionian sea (Acheloos, Acherontas). The highest aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations (>100 μg/g), indicative of petroleum pollution, were recorded in Asopos estruaries, followed by Aliakmonas, Axios, Strymon and Evros estuaries (50-100 μg/g). On the contrary, in Nestos delta, as well as in Acheloos and Acherontas estuaries, hydrocarbon values were found low and similar to those measured in open sea (< 25 μg/g), indicating that these rivers are not major hydrocarbon suppliers in the marine environment. The unresolved complex mixture (UCM) was the main component of the aliphatic fraction in most cases demonstrating some petroleum inputs in all areas, but high values of the ratio unresolved to resolved compounds (U/R), which are clearly indicative of petroleum residues, were measured only in Asopos, Axios and Evros estuary (U/R: 5.1-10.4). The n-alkane distribution was generally similar with that of total aliphatics. The high molecular weight n-alkanes (>C23) predominated in most cases, showing

  10. Sensitivity of solute advective travel time to porosities of hydrogeologic units.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianting; Pohlmann, Karl F; Chapman, Jenny B; Russell, Charles E; Carroll, Rosemary W H; Shafer, David S

    2010-01-01

    An integral approach is proposed to quantify uncertainty and sensitivity of advective travel time to the effective porosities of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) along groundwater flow paths. The approach is applicable in situations where a groundwater flow model exists, but a full solute transport model is not available. The approach can be used to: (1) determine HGUs whose porosities are influential to the solute advective travel time; and (2) apportion uncertainties of solute advective travel times to the uncertainty contributions from individual HGU porosities. A simple one-dimensional steady-state flow example is used to illustrate the approach. Advective travel times of solutes are obtained based on the one-dimensional steady-state flow results in conjunction with the HGU porosities. The approach can be easily applicable to more complex multi-dimensional cases where advective solute travel time can be calculated based on simulated flow results from groundwater flow models. This approach is particularly valuable for optimizing limited resources when designing field characterization programs for uncertainty reduction by identifying HGUs that contribute most to the estimation uncertainty of advective travel times of solutes.

  11. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  12. Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Drici, Warda

    2003-08-01

    This report documents the analysis of the available transport parameter data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  13. Diffusion and Advection using Cellular Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Glazier, James

    2005-03-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a robust cell level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Standard diffusion solvers in the CPM use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. These methods have difficulty in simulating local advection in the ECM due to physiology and morphogenesis. To circumvent the problem of instabilities we simulate advection-diffusion within the framework of CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalised fluid "cells" or particles which separate advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid cells by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. CPM movement of the cells by spin flips handles the advection. The extension allows the CPM to model viscosity explicitly by including a relative velocity constraint on the fluid. The extended CPM correctly reproduces flow profiles of viscous fluids in cylindrical tube, during Stokes flow across a sphere and in flow in concentric cylindrical shells. We illustrate various conditions for diffusion including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation by comparing with analytical and established numerical solutions.

  14. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  15. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-04-24

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site.

  16. A novel method for analytically solving a radial advection-dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Keng-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Sie, Bing-Ruei

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution for solute transport in a radial flow field has a variety of practical applications in the study of the transport in push-pull/divergent/convergent flow tracer tests, aquifer remediation by pumping and aquifer storage and recovery. However, an analytical solution for radial advective-dispersive transport has been proven very difficult to develop and relatively few in subsurface hydrology have made efforts to do so, because variable coefficients in the governing partial differential equations. Most of the solutions for radial advective-dispersive transport presented in the literature have generally been solved semi-analytically with the final concentration values being obtained with the help of a numerical Laplace inversion. This study presents a novel solution strategy for analytically solving the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. A Laplace transform with respect to the time variable and a generalized integral transform technique with respect to the spatial variable are first performed to convert the transient governing partial differential equations into an algebraic equation. Subsequently, the algebraic equation is solved using simple algebraic manipulations, easily yielding the solution in the transformed domain. The solution in the original domain is ultimately obtained by successive applications of the Laplace and corresponding generalized integral transform inversions. A convergent flow tracer test is used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method for deriving an exact analytical solution to the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. The developed analytical solution is verified against a semi-analytical solution taken from the literature. The results show perfect agreement between our exact analytical solution and the semi-analytical solution. The solution method presented in this study can be applied to create more comprehensive analytical models for a great variety of radial advective

  17. An adaptive hybrid EnKF-OI scheme for efficient state-parameter estimation of reactive contaminant transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gharamti, Mohamad; Valstar, Johan; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-05-01

    Reactive contaminant transport models are used by hydrologists to simulate and study the migration and fate of industrial waste in subsurface aquifers. Accurate transport modeling of such waste requires clear understanding of the system's parameters, such as sorption and biodegradation. In this study, we present an efficient sequential data assimilation scheme that computes accurate estimates of aquifer contamination and spatially variable sorption coefficients. This assimilation scheme is based on a hybrid formulation of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and optimal interpolation (OI) in which solute concentration measurements are assimilated via a recursive dual estimation of sorption coefficients and contaminant state variables. This hybrid EnKF-OI scheme is used to mitigate background covariance limitations due to ensemble under-sampling and neglected model errors. Numerical experiments are conducted with a two-dimensional synthetic aquifer in which cobalt-60, a radioactive contaminant, is leached in a saturated heterogeneous clayey sandstone zone. Assimilation experiments are investigated under different settings and sources of model and observational errors. Our results suggest that the proposed scheme allows a reduction of around 80% of the ensemble size as compared to the standard EnKF scheme.

  18. Modeling transport and deposition of contaminants to ecosystems of concern: A case study for the Laurentian Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Matthew; Mackay, Don

    2003-12-01

    Transfer efficiency (TE) is introduced as a model output that can be used to characterize the relative ability of chemicals to be transported in the environment and deposited to specific target ecosystems. We illustrate this concept by applying the Berkeley Trent North American contaminant fate model (BETR North America) to identify organic chemicals with properties that result in efficient atmospheric transport and deposition to the Laurentian Great Lakes. By systematically applying the model to hypothetical organic chemicals that span a wide range of environmental partitioning properties, we identify combinations of properties that favor efficient transport and deposition to the Lakes. Five classes of chemicals are identified based on dominant transport and deposition pathways, and specific examples of chemicals in each class are identified and discussed. The role of vegetation in scavenging chemicals from the atmosphere is assessed, and found to have a negligible influence on transfer efficiency to the Great Lakes. Results indicate chemicals with octanol water (Kow) and air water (Kaw) partition coefficients in the range of 105 107 and 104 101 combine efficient transport and deposition to the Great Lakes with potential for bioaccumulation in the aquatic food web once they are deposited. A method of estimating the time scale for atmospheric transport and deposition process is suggested, and the effects of degrading reactions in the atmosphere and meteorological conditions on transport efficiency of different classes of chemicals are discussed. In total, this approach provides a method of identifying chemicals that are subject to long-range transport and deposition to specific target ecosystems as a result of their partitioning and persistence characteristics. Supported by an appropriate contaminant fate model, the approach can be applied to any target ecosystem of concern.

  19. Measuring and predicting the transport of actinides and fission product contaminants in unsaturated prairie soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, D. J.

    Soil samples have been taken in 2001 from the area of a 1951 release from an underground storage tank of 6.7 L of an aqueous solution of irradiated uranium (360 GBq). A simulation of the dispersion of the actinides and fission products was conducted in the laboratory using irradiated natural uranium, non-irradiated natural uranium and metal standards dissolved in acidic aqueous solutions and added to soil columns containing uncontaminated prairie soil. The lab soil columns were allowed 12 to 14 months for contaminant transport. Soil samples were analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis (NAA) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to determine the elemental concentrations of U, Cs and Sr. Diffusion coefficients from the 50 year soil samples and the lab soil samples were determined. The measured diffusion coefficients from the field samples were 3.0 x 10-4 cm2 s-1 (Cs-137), 1.8 x 10-5 cm2 s-1 (U-238) and 2.6 x 10-3 cm2 s-1 (Sr-90) and the values determined from lab simulation were 5 x 10-6 cm 2 s-1 (Cs-137), 3 x 10-5 cm2 s-1 (U-238) and 1.9 x 10-5 cm 2 s-1 (Sr-90). The differences between the sets of diffusion coefficients can be attributed to differences in retardation effects, weather effects and changes in the soil characteristics when transporting, such as porosity. The analytical work showed that Cs-137 content of soil can be determined effectively using gamma-ray spectroscopy; U-238 content can be measured using NAA; and Sr-90 content can be measured using LSC. For non- and low-radioactive species, it was shown that both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) gave comparable results for Sr, Cs and Sm, with the average values ranging from 0.5 to 4.5 ppm of each other. The U-238 content results from NAA and from ICP-MS showed general agreement with an average difference of 81.3 ppm on samples having concentrations up to 988.2 ppm. The difference may have been due to matrix

  20. Investigation of Contaminant Transport and Dispersion in New York Harbor by a High Resolution SF6 Tracer Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplow, T.; Schlosser, P.; Ho, D. T.

    2002-12-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has been used successfully as a deliberate tracer for rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas, due to its inert nature, non-toxicity, and extremely low detection limit. An automated, high-resolution SF6 measurement system mounted on a boat was recently developed for several projects on the Hudson River. The system has a sampling interval of two minutes and a detection limit of 1 x 10-14 mol L-1. Real-time data visualization enables revisions of sampling strategy during the experiment. A single injection has allowed observation of advection rates, dispersion processes, and air-water gas exchange for up to two weeks, and longer experiments are possible. This equipment, with minor modifications, was applied to New York Harbor in July 2002. New York Harbor is one of the busiest seaports in the United States, processing nearly \\100 billion in cargo each year. Most of the shipping facilities are located in Newark Bay (approximately 15 km^{2}) or in two adjacent channels: the Kill van Kull (6 km long) and the Arthur Kill (20 km long). Newark Bay, which is mostly saline, is fed by the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers, both of which flow through heavily industrialized areas. Ultimately, these waters drain through the Kills to Raritan Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Due to a combination of point sources, runoff, wastewater treatment plants, and emissions from the shipping industry, Newark Bay and the Kills receive a large volume and variety of contaminants, including petroleum, heavy metals, PCBs, and dioxins. In addition, much of the area is subject to ongoing and extensive navigational dredging, causing widespread re-suspension of previously deposited contaminants. A small quantity (ca. 2 mols) of SF_{6}$ was injected into northern Newark Bay to investigate the spreading of water throughout the Bay, the Kills, and the tidal portions of the Passaic and Hackensack Rivers. The tracer was successfully monitored across most of this area for 12 consecutive days

  1. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Accurate simulation of matrix diffusion in regional-scale dual-porosity and dual-permeability media is a critical issue for the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, given the prevalence of fractured geologic media on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Contaminant transport through regional-scale fractured media is typically quantified by particle-tracking based Lagrangian solvers through the inclusion of dual-domain mass transfer algorithms that probabilistically determine particle transfer between fractures and unfractured matrix blocks. UGTA applications include a wide variety of fracture aperture and spacing, effective diffusion coefficients ranging four orders of magnitude, and extreme end member retardation values. This report incorporates the current dual-domain mass transfer algorithms into the well-known particle tracking code RWHet [LaBolle, 2006], and then tests and evaluates the updated code. We also develop and test a direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach to replace the classical transfer probability method in characterizing particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface. The final goal of this work is to implement the algorithm identified as most efficient and effective into RWHet, so that an accurate and computationally efficient software suite can be built for dual-porosity/dual-permeability applications. RWHet is a mature Lagrangian transport simulator with a substantial user-base that has undergone significant development and model validation. In this report, we also substantially tested the capability of RWHet in simulating passive and reactive tracer transport through regional-scale, heterogeneous media. Four dual-domain mass transfer methodologies were considered in this work. We first developed the empirical transfer probability approach proposed by Liu et al. [2000], and coded it into RWHet. The particle transfer probability from one continuum to the other is proportional to the ratio of the mass entering the other

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  3. Subsoil contaminant Cr fate and transport: The complex reality of the Hanford subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Sahajpal, Rahul

    2016-03-09

    Chromium-contaminated subsurface sites are common throughout the globe. In this chapter the discussion will be focused on one Cr-contaminated, i.e., Hanford site, WA, USA. The chapter summarizes the work conducted at this site to study contaminant Cr6+ fate and behavior under conditions imposed by different waste chemistries ranging from acidic to hyperalkaline. The objectives of this chapter are to present an overview of different aspects of Cr interaction with minerals; present evidence of similar and contrasting Cr6+ reactions, processes and attenuation mechanisms operating in subsurface environments under different conditions imposed by acidic, neutral and alkaline waste liquids; provide inputs to conceptual Cr geochemical models (either site specific or general and suitable for many contaminated sites); present ideas on potential remedial measures. The insights presented and discussed in this chapter should be useful for other Cr contaminated sites across the world.

  4. Hydrogeologic Settings and Ground-Water Flow Simulations for Regional Studies of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to Public-Supply Wells - Studies Begun in 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2007-01-01

    This study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) is being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and was designed to increase understanding of the most important factors to consider in ground-water vulnerability assessments. The seven TANC studies that began in 2001 used retrospective data and ground-water flow models to evaluate hydrogeologic variables that affect aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability at a regional scale. Ground-water flow characteristics, regional water budgets, pumping-well information, and water-quality data were compiled from existing data and used to develop conceptual models of ground-water conditions for each study area. Steady-state regional ground-water flow models were used to represent the conceptual models, and advective particle-tracking simulations were used to compute areas contributing recharge and traveltimes from recharge to selected public-supply wells. Retrospective data and modeling results were tabulated into a relational database for future analysis. Seven study areas were selected to evaluate a range of hydrogeologic settings and management practices across the Nation: the Salt Lake Valley, Utah; the Eagle Valley and Spanish Springs Valley, Nevada; the San Joaquin Valley, California; the Northern Tampa Bay region, Florida; the Pomperaug River Basin, Connecticut; the Great Miami River Basin, Ohio; and the Eastern High Plains, Nebraska. This Professional Paper Chapter presents the hydrogeologic settings and documents the ground-water flow models for each of the NAWQA TANC regional study areas that began work in 2001. Methods used to compile retrospective data, determine contributing areas of public-supply wells, and characterize oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions also are presented. This Professional Paper Chapter provides the foundation for future susceptibility and vulnerability analyses in the TANC

  5. Long-term environmental and health implications of morphological change and sediment transport with respect to contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneddon, Christopher; Copplestone, David; Tyler, Andrew; Hunter, Peter; Smith, Nick

    2014-05-01

    The EPSRC-funded Adaptation and Resilience of Coastal Energy Supply (ARCoES) project encompasses four research strands, involving 14 institutions and six PhD studentships. ARCoES aims to determine the threats posed to future energy generation and the distribution network by flooding and erosion, changing patterns of coastal sedimentation, water temperature and the distribution of plants and animals in the coastal zone. Whilst this research has direct benefits for the operation of coastal power stations, ARCoES aims to have a wider stakeholder engagement through assessing how the resilience of coastal communities may be altered by five hundred years of coastal evolution. Coastal evolution will have substantial implications for the energy sector of the North West of England as former waste storage sites are eroded and remobilised within the intertidal environment. The current intertidal environmental stores of radioactivity will also experience reworking as ocean chemistry changes and saltmarsh chronologies are reworked in response to rising sea levels. There is a duel requirement to understand mass sediment movement along the North West coast of England as understanding the sediment transport dynamics is key to modelling long term coastal change and understanding how the environmental store of radioactivity will be reworked. The University of Stirling is researching the long-term environmental and health implications of remobilisation and transport of contaminated sediments around the UK coastline. Using a synergy of hyperspectral and topographic information the mobilisation of sediment bound contaminants within the coastal environment will be investigated. Potential hazards posed by contaminants are determined by a set of environmental impact test criteria which evaluate the bio-accessibility and ionising dose of contaminants. These test criteria will be used to comment on the likely environmental impact of modelled sediment transport and anticipated changes in

  6. A whole cell bioreporter approach to assess transport and bioavailability of organic contaminants in water unsaturated systems.

    PubMed

    Schamfuß, Susan; Neu, Thomas R; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y

    2014-12-24

    Bioavailability of contaminants is a prerequisite for their effective biodegradation in soil. The average bulk concentration of a contaminant, however, is not an appropriate measure for its availability; bioavailability rather depends on the dynamic interplay of potential mass transfer (flux) of a compound to a microbial cell and the capacity of the latter to degrade the compound. In water-unsaturated parts of the soil, mycelia have been shown to overcome bioavailability limitations by actively transporting and mobilizing organic compounds over the range of centimeters. Whereas the extent of mycelia-based transport can be quantified easily by chemical means, verification of the contaminant-bioavailability to bacterial cells requires a biological method. Addressing this constraint, we chose the PAH fluorene (FLU) as a model compound and developed a water unsaturated model microcosm linking a spatially separated FLU point source and the FLU degrading bioreporter bacterium Burkholderia sartisoli RP037-mChe by a mycelial network of Pythium ultimum. Since the bioreporter expresses eGFP in response of the PAH flux to the cell, bacterial FLU exposure and degradation could be monitored directly in the microcosms via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM and image analyses revealed a significant increase of the eGFP expression in the presence of P. ultimum compared to controls without mycelia or FLU thus indicating FLU bioavailability to bacteria after mycelia-mediated transport. CLSM results were supported by chemical analyses in identical microcosms. The developed microcosm proved suitable to investigate contaminant bioavailability and to concomitantly visualize the involved bacteria-mycelial interactions.

  7. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  8. Probing Contaminant Transport to and from Clay Surfaces in Organic Solvents and Water Using Solution Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pourmohammadbagher, Amin; Shaw, John M

    2015-09-15

    Clays, in tailings, are a significant ongoing environmental concern in the mining and oilsands production industries, and clay rehabilitation following contamination poses challenges episodically. Understanding the fundamentals of clay behavior can lead to better environmental impact mitigation strategies. Systematic calorimetric measurements are shown to provide a framework for parsing the synergistic and antagonistic impacts of trace (i.e., parts per million level) components on the surface compositions of clays. The enthalpy of solution of as-received and "contaminated" clays, in as-received and "contaminated" organic solvents and water, at 60 °C and atmospheric pressure, provides important illustrative examples. Clay contamination included pre-saturation of clays with water and organic liquids. Solvent contamination included the addition of trace water to organic solvents and trace organic liquids to water. Enthalpy of solution outcomes are interpreted using a quantitative mass and energy balance modeling framework that isolates terms for solvent and trace contaminant sorption/desorption and surface energy effects. Underlying surface energies are shown to dominate the energetics of the solvent-clay interaction, and organic liquids as solvents or as trace contaminants are shown to displace water from as-received clay surfaces. This approach can be readily extended to include pH, salts, or other effects and is expected to provide mechanistic and quantitative insights underlying the stability of clays in tailings ponds and the behaviors of clays in diverse industrial and natural environments.

  9. Space-fractional advection-diffusion and reflective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Krepysheva, Natalia; Di Pietro, Liliana; Néel, Marie-Christine

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous diffusive transport arises in a large diversity of disordered media. Stochastic formulations in terms of continuous time random walks (CTRWs) with transition probability densities showing space- and/or time-diverging moments were developed to account for anomalous behaviors. A broad class of CTRWs was shown to correspond, on the macroscopic scale, to advection-diffusion equations involving derivatives of noninteger order. In particular, CTRWs with Lévy distribution of jumps and finite mean waiting time lead to a space-fractional equation that accounts for superdiffusion and involves a nonlocal integral-differential operator. Within this framework, we analyze the evolution of particles performing symmetric Lévy flights with respect to a fluid moving at uniform speed . The particles are restricted to a semi-infinite domain limited by a reflective barrier. We show that the introduction of the boundary condition induces a modification in the kernel of the nonlocal operator. Thus, the macroscopic space-fractional advection-diffusion equation obtained is different from that in an infinite medium.

  10. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  11. Transport and transformation of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern from wastewater discharge through surface water to drinking water intake and treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ubiquitous presence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in surface-water resources have necessitated research that better elucidates pathways of transport and transformation for these compounds from their discharged wastewater, thro...

  12. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  13. The effect of a zero-concentration sink on contaminant transport and remedial-action designs for the Weldon Spring quarry, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.

    1990-04-01

    One-dimensional analytical expressions are developed to simulate two processes in a homogeneous porous medium: contaminant transport through a porous medium that has a zero-concentration sink located at a finite distance from a step-function source; and contaminant transport through a porous medium that has an initial steady-state distribution corresponding to a constant strength source and zero-concentration sink separated by a finite distance. The governing equations are cast in dimensionless form, making use of the flow system's Peclet number. Evaluation of the analytical expressions is accomplished by numerical inversion of Laplace-space concentrations using either a full Fourier series approach with acceleration, or the Stehfest algorithm. The analytical expressions are used to evaluate possible contaminant conditions at the Weldon Spring quarry near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The following results have been found: contaminant concentrations should be at or near steady-state conditions; the spatial distribution of contaminants should be a function of the flow system's Peclet number; contaminant concentrations near the Femme Osage Slough should approach zero; contaminant concentrations near the quarry during dewatering and bulk-waste removal should monotonically decrease with time; and the spatial distribution of contaminants during remedial activities should be relatively flat, especially near the dewatering pumps. Future work will entail evaluating existing radionuclide or chemical concentration data to determine the applicability of the proposed contaminant transport model and to improve the hydrogeological conceptualization of the quarry area and vicinity. 20 refs., 27 figs.

  14. Multiphase transport simulation and venting experiments to identify NAPL source in vadose zone at a site contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joun, W.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    In many countries, groundwater is threatened by contamination from Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids such as chlorinated solvents (e.g. TCE). Existing as a residual or trapped source in the unsaturated zone, NAPLs remain in a continuous contamination source to groundwater even after groundwater itself was remediated because the residual NAPL source could be dissolved into the groundwater intermittently. In this study, 1-D and 2-D experiments were conducted. For 1-D experiment, a column (1 m) packed with well-sorted sand was used for developing the hydraulic properties in VOC transport. In 2-D experiment, hydraulic and contaminant properties in unsaturated condition were investigated including gas-phase concentration of a volatile organic compound (trichloroethylene, TCE) originated from residual or trapped NAPLs with different distances between an extraction well and source point, with different extraction rates and with different extraction intervals. While extracting air from the sand-tank (50 x 30 x 5 cm), temperature, humidity and pressure data were compiled with logging sensors. One and two-dimensional STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator were used to simulate the experimental conditions. The experimental and simulation results can be used to estimate distances from extraction wells to source locations of residual NAPLs.

  15. Delineation of recharge patterns and contaminant transport using 3H-3He in a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated solvents in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaown, Dugin; Koh, Dong-Chan; Solomon, D. Kip; Yoon, Yoon-Yeol; Yang, Jaeha; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2014-08-01

    Stable isotopes of water and 3H-3He were used to delineate recharge patterns and contaminant transport for a granitic regolith aquifer in an industrial complex in Wonju, South Korea, that has historically been contaminated with chlorinated solvents including trichloroethene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CT). Groundwater recharge mainly occurred in upgradient forested areas while little recharge occurred in the downgradient industrial areas covered with extensive sections of impermeable pavement and paddy fields. δ18O and δD data indicated that groundwater was mainly derived from summer precipitation. The apparent groundwater ages using 3H-3He ranged from 1 to 4 yrs in the upgradient area and from 9 to 10 yrs in the downgradient area. Comparison of groundwater flow velocities based on Darcy's law and those calculated with simple mass balance models and groundwater age supported the presence of preferential pathways for TCE movement in the study area. Measureable TCE was observed in groundwater irrespective of groundwater age. Considering the 3-yr duration of the TCE spill, 14 yrs before sampling, this indicates that TCE plumes were continuously fed from sources in the unsaturated zone after the spill ended and moved downgradient without significant degradation in the aquifer.

  16. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation In Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects on Contaminant Fate and Transport (Project no. 99272)

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, G.D.; Fujita, Y.; Scheibe, T.D.; Tartakovsky, A.M.; Smith, R.W.; Reddy, M.M.; Kelly, S.D.

    2006-04-05

    This project is aimed at understanding how contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media is impacted by precipitation and dissolution events through chemical interactions with precipitates and as a consequence of coupling between precipitation and flow. We hypothesize that precipitation/coprecipitation, encapsulation, isolation from flow and alteration of reactive surfaces will contribute to altering contaminant mobility during precipitation events, and that predicting the release of contaminants during precipitate dissolution requires an understanding of how precipitates are distributed and how contaminants are released from the different compartments over time. Using calcium carbonate as a model system, physical experiments and modeling at the pore-scale and continuum-scale will be used to improve the conceptual approach to predicting the impact of flow-precipitation coupling on solute migration. Column and 2-dimensional intermediate-scale experiments with constructed physical and chemical heterogeneities will be used to investigate the movement of fluids and reactive solutes during different types of mixing events that lead to calcium carbonate supersaturation and precipitation. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling will be used to simulate pore-scale mixing and precipitation in heterogeneous porous media and estimate continuum-scale parameters. Continuum-scale modeling will be used to test conceptual models and associated effective parameters that simulate the macroscopic behavior of the experimental domains.

  17. Groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling at an air weapons range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Schäfer, Dirk; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-07-01

    Numerical modelling was done at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, Canada, to test whether the dissolved RDX and nitrate detected in groundwater come from the same sources, and to predict whether contamination poses a threat to the surface water receptors near the site. Military live fire training activities may indeed pose a risk of contamination to groundwater resources, however field investigations on military bases are quite recent, and little information is available on the long-term behaviour of munition residues related contaminants. Very limited information was available about the contaminant source zones, which were assigned based on our knowledge of current training activities. The RDX plume was well represented with the model, but the heterogeneous distribution of nitrate concentrations was more difficult to reproduce. It was nonetheless determined that both contaminants originate from the same areas. According to the model, both contaminants should reach the nearby river, but concentrations in the river should remain very low if the source zone concentration does not change. Finally, the model allowed the recommendation of a new location for the main bombing target, which would offer added protection to the river and the lake into which it flows.

  18. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. The effect of diffusion and advection across the snow pores on the snow microstructure were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments and possible effects on natural snowpacks discussed. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective permeability. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Isothermal snow metamorphism is driven by sublimation deposition caused by the Kelvin effect and is the limiting factor independently of the transport regime in the pores.

  19. A Study of the Physical Processes of an Advection Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duan Yang; Yan, Wen Lian; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei Juan; Niu, Sheng Jie; Li, Zi Hua

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of advection fog appeared in the Yangtze River delta region between 1 and 2 December 2009. Here, we detail the fog formation and dissipation processes and the background weather conditions. The fog boundary layer and its formation and dissipation mechanisms have also been analyzed using field data recorded in a northern suburb of Nanjing. The results showed the following: (1) This advection fog was generated by interaction between advection of a north-east cold ground layer and a south-east warm upper layer. The double-inversion structure generated by this interaction between the cold and warm advections and steady south-east vapour transport was the main cause of this long-lasting fog. The double-inversion structure provided good thermal conditions for the thick fog, and the south-east vapour transport was not only conducive to maintaining the thickness of the fog but also sustained its long duration. (2) The fog-top altitude was over 600 m for most of the time, and the fog reduced visibility to less than 100 m for approximately 12 h. (3) The low-level jet near the lower inversion layer also played a role in maintaining the thick fog system by promoting heat, momentum and south-east vapour transport.

  20. Interfacial Reduction-Oxidation Mechanisms Governing Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Principal Investigator: Baolin Deng, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Co-Principal Investigator: Silvia Sabine Jurisson, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Co-Principal Investigator: Edward C. Thornton, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA; Co-Principal Investigator: Jeff Terry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL

    2008-05-12

    There are many soil contamination sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) installations that contain radionuclides and toxic metals such as uranium (U), technetium (Tc), and chromium (Cr). Since these contaminants are the main 'risk drivers' at the Hanford site (WA) and some of them also pose significant risk at other DOE facilities (e.g., Oak Ridge Reservation - TN; Rocky Flats - CO), development of technologies for cost effective site remediation is needed. Current assessment indicates that complete removal of these contaminants for ex-situ disposal is infeasible, thus in-situ stabilization through reduction to insoluble species is considered one of the most important approaches for site remediation. In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for vadose zone soil remediation. The ISGR approach uses hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) for reductive immobilization of contaminants that show substantially lower mobility in their reduced forms (e.g., Tc, U, and Cr). The technology can be applied in two ways: (i) to immobilize or stabilize pre-existing contaminants in the vadose zone soils by direct H{sub 2}S treatment, or (ii) to create a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that prevents the migration of contaminants. Direct treatment involves reduction of the contaminants by H{sub 2}S to less mobile species. Formation of a PRB is accomplished through reduction of ferric iron species in the vadose zone soils by H{sub 2}S to iron sulfides (e.g., FeS), which provides a means for capturing the contaminants entering the treated zone. Potential future releases may occur during tank closure activities. Thus, the placement of a permeable reactive barrier by ISGR treatment can be part of the leak mitigation program. Deployment of these ISGR approaches, however, requires a better understanding of the immobilization kinetics and mechanisms, and a better assessment of the long-term effectiveness of treatment. The primary

  1. Retardation of ammonium and potassium transport through a contaminated sand and gravel aquifer: The Role of cation exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ceazan, M.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Smith, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The role of cation exchange in the retardation of ammonium (NH4+) and potassium (K+) transport in a shallow sand and gravel aquifer was evaluated by use of observed distributions of NH4+ and K+ within a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater, small-scale tracer injection tests, and batch sorption experiments on aquifer material. Both NH4+ and K+ were transported ???2 km in the 4-km-long contaminant plume (retardation factor, Rf = 2.0). Sediments from the NH4+-containing zone of the plume contained significant quantities of KCl-extractable NH4+ (extraction distribution coefficient, Kd,extr = 0.59-0.87 mL/g of dry sediment), and when added to uncontaminated sediments, NH4+ sorption followed a linear isotherm. Small-scale tracer tests demonstrated that NH4+ and K+ were retarded (Rf =3.5) relative to a nonreactive tracer (Br-). Sorption of dissolved NH4+ was accompanied by concomitant release of calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and sodium (Na+) from aquifer sediments, suggesting involvement of cation exchange. In contrast, nitrate (NO3-) was not retarded and cleanly separated from NH4+ and K+ in the small-scale tracer tests. This study demonstrates that transport of NH4+ and K+ through a sand and gravel aquifer can be markedly affected by cation-exchange processes even at a clay content less than 0.1%.

  2. Enhancing Transport of Hydrogenophaga flava ENV735 for Bioaugmentation of Aquifers Contaminated with Methyl tert-Butyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Streger, Sheryl H.; Vainberg, Simon; Dong, Hailiang; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2002-01-01

    The gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has become a widespread contaminant in groundwater throughout the United States. Bioaugmentation of aquifers with MTBE-degrading cultures may be necessary to enhance degradation of the oxygenate in some locations. However, poor cell transport has sometimes limited bioaugmentation efforts in the past. The objective of this study was to evaluate the transport characteristics of Hydrogenophaga flava ENV735, a pure culture capable of growth on MTBE, and to improve movement of the strain through aquifer solids. The wild-type culture moved only a few centimeters in columns of aquifer sediment. An adhesion-deficient variant (H. flava ENV735:24) of the wild-type strain that moved more readily through sediments was obtained by sequential passage of cells through columns of sterile sediment. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography revealed that the wild-type strain is much more hydrophobic than the adhesion-deficient variant. Electrophoretic mobility assays and transmission electron microscopy showed that the wild-type bacterium contains two distinct subpopulations, whereas the adhesion-deficient strain has only a single, homogeneous population. Both the wild-type strain and adhesion-deficient variant degraded MTBE, and both were identified by 16S rRNA analysis as pure cultures of H. flava. The effectiveness of surfactants for enhancing transport of the wild-type strain was also evaluated. Many of the surfactants tested were toxic to ENV735; however, one nonionic surfactant, Tween 20, enhanced cell transport in sand columns. Improving microbial transport may lead to a more effective bioaugmentation strategy for MTBE-contaminated sites where indigenous oxygenate degraders are absent. PMID:12406751

  3. Investigating redox processes under diffusive and advective flow conditions using a coupled omics and synchrotron approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Kelly, S.; Skinner, K.; Mishra, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Wu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    FeIII- and SO42--reducing microorganisms and the mineral phases they produce have profound implications for many processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems. In addition, many of these microbially-catalysed geochemical transformations are highly dependent upon introduction of reactants via advective and diffusive hydrological transport. We have characterized microbial communities from a set of static microcosms to test the effect of ethanol diffusion and sulfate concentration on UVI-contaminated sediment. The spatial distribution, valence states, and speciation of both U and Fe were monitored in situ throughout the experiment by synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in parallel with solution measurements of pH and the concentrations of sulfate, ethanol, and organic acids. After reaction initiation, a ~1-cm thick layer of sediment near the sediment-water (S-W) interface became visibly dark. Fe XANES spectra of the layer were consistent with the formation of FeS. Over the 4 year duration of the experiment, U LIII-edge XANES indicated reduction of U, first in the dark layer and then throughout the sediment. Next, the microcosms were disassembled and samples were taken from the overlying water and different sediment regions. We extracted DNA and characterized the microbial community by sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the Illumina MiSeq platform and found that the community evolved from its originally homogeneous composition, becoming significantly spatially heterogeneous. We have also developed an x-ray accessible column to probe elemental transformations as they occur along the flow path in a porous medium with the purpose of refining reactive transport models (RTMs) that describe coupled physical and biogeochemical processes in environmental systems. The elemental distribution dynamics and the RTMs of the redox driven processes within them will be presented.

  4. A locally conservative non-negative finite element formulation for anisotropic advective-diffusive-reactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudunuru, M. K.; Shabouei, M.; Nakshatrala, K.

    2015-12-01

    Advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) equations appear in various areas of life sciences, hydrogeological systems, and contaminant transport. Obtaining stable and accurate numerical solutions can be challenging as the underlying equations are coupled, nonlinear, and non-self-adjoint. Currently, there is neither a robust computational framework available nor a reliable commercial package known that can handle various complex situations. Herein, the objective of this poster presentation is to present a novel locally conservative non-negative finite element formulation that preserves the underlying physical and mathematical properties of a general linear transient anisotropic ADR equation. In continuous setting, governing equations for ADR systems possess various important properties. In general, all these properties are not inherited during finite difference, finite volume, and finite element discretizations. The objective of this poster presentation is two fold: First, we analyze whether the existing numerical formulations (such as SUPG and GLS) and commercial packages provide physically meaningful values for the concentration of the chemical species for various realistic benchmark problems. Furthermore, we also quantify the errors incurred in satisfying the local and global species balance for two popular chemical kinetics schemes: CDIMA (chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid) and BZ (Belousov--Zhabotinsky). Based on these numerical simulations, we show that SUPG and GLS produce unphysical values for concentration of chemical species due to the violation of the non-negative constraint, contain spurious node-to-node oscillations, and have large errors in local and global species balance. Second, we proposed a novel finite element formulation to overcome the above difficulties. The proposed locally conservative non-negative computational framework based on low-order least-squares finite elements is able to preserve these underlying physical and mathematical properties

  5. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  6. MODELING MICROBIAL TRANSPORT IN SOIL AND GROUNDWATER: MICROBIOLOGISTS CAN ASSIST IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODELS OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large body of literature describes the processes affecting the fate of microorganisms in the subsurface environment (i.e., soil and groundwater). The fate of microorganisms depends on two main components: survival and transport. other components must be considered when determin...

  7. Factors influencing aquatic-to-terrestrial contaminant transport to terrestrial arthropod consumers in a multiuse river system.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Jeremy M; Sullivan, S Mažeika P

    2016-06-01

    Emerging aquatic insects are important vectors of contaminant transfer from aquatic to terrestrial food webs. However, the environmental factors that regulate contaminant body burdens in nearshore terrestrial consumers remain largely unexplored. We investigated the relative influences of riparian landscape composition (i.e., land use and nearshore vegetation structure) and contaminant flux via the emergent aquatic insect subsidy on selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) body burdens of riparian ants (Formica subsericea) and spiders of the family Tetragnathidae along 11 river reaches spanning an urban-rural land-use gradient in Ohio, USA. Model-selection results indicated that fine-scale land cover (e.g., riparian zone width, shrub cover) in the riparian zone was positively associated with reach-wide body burdens of Se and Hg in both riparian F. subsericea and tetragnathid spiders (i.e., total magnitude of Hg and Se concentrations in ant and spider populations, respectively, for each reach). River distance downstream of Columbus, Ohio - where study reaches were impounded and flow through a large urban center - was also implicated as an important factor. Although stable-isotope analysis suggested that emergent aquatic insects were likely vectors of Se and Hg to tetragnathid spiders (but not to F. subsericea), emergent insect contaminant flux did not emerge as a significant predictor for either reach-wide body burdens of spider Hg or Se. Improved understanding of the pathways and influences that control aquatic-to-terrestrial contaminant transport will be critical for effective risk management and remediation.

  8. Fate and transport of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in a sewage- contaminated aquifer: A comparison of natural-gradient pulsed tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Barber, L.B.; Metge, D.W.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Two natural-gradient tracer tests were conducted to determine the transport and biodegradation behavior of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant under in situ conditions in a sewage-contaminated aquifer. The tests were conducted in two biogeochemically distinct zones of the aquifer: (1) an aerobic uncontaminated zone (oxic zone) and (2) a moderately aerobic, sewage-contaminated zone (transition zone). Chromatographic separation of the surfactant mixture was observed in both zones and attributed to the retardation of the longer alkyl chain homologues during transport. No significant loss of IAS mass was observed for the oxic zone while 20% of the LAS mass injected into the transition zone was removed due to biodegradation. Biodegradation preferentially removed the longer alkyl chain homologues and the external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). The removal of LAS mass coincided with a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentrations, the appearance of LAS metabolites, and an increase in the number of free-living bacteria with a concomitant change in bacteria morphology. The formation of LAS metabolites accounted for 86% of the LAS mass removed in the transition zone. Over the duration of the test, sorption and biodegradation enriched the LAS mixture in the more water-soluble and biologically resistant components.Two natural-gradient tracer tests were conducted to determine the transport and biodegradation behavior of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant under in situ conditions in a sewage-contaminated aquifer. The tests were conducted in two biogeochemically distinct zones of the aquifer: (1) an aerobic uncontaminated zone (oxic zone) and (2) a moderately aerobic, sewage-contaminated zone (transition zone). Chromatographic separation of the surfactant mixture was observed in both zones and attributed to the retardation of the longer alkyl chain homologues during transport. No significant loss of LAS mass was observed for the oxic zone while 20% of the LAS

  9. New HYDRUS Modules for Simulating Preferential Flow, Colloid-Facilitated Contaminant Transport, and Various Biogeochemical Processes in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, J.; Sejna, M.; Jacques, D.; Langergraber, G.; Bradford, S. A.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    2012-04-01

    We have dramatically expanded the capabilities of the HYDRUS (2D/3D) software package by developing new modules to account for processes not available in the standard HYDRUS version. These new modules include the DualPerm, C-Hitch, HP2/3, Wetland, and Unsatchem modules. The dual-permeability modeling approach of Gerke and van Genuchten [1993] simulating preferential flow and transport is implemented into the DualPerm module. Colloid transport and colloid-facilitated solute transport, the latter often observed for many contaminants, such as heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and explosives [Šimůnek et al., 2006] are implemented into the C-Hitch module. HP2 and HP3 are the two and three-dimensional alternatives of the HP1 module, currently available with HYDRUS-1D [Jacques and Šimůnek, 2005], that couple HYDRUS flow and transport routines with the generic geochemical model PHREEQC of Parkhurst and Appelo [1999]. The Wetland module includes two alternative approaches (CW2D of Langergraber and Šimůnek [2005] and CWM1 of Langergraber et al. [2009]) for modeling aerobic, anaerobic, and anoxic biogeochemical processes in natural and constructed wetlands. Finally, the Unsatchem module simulates the transport and reactions of major ions in a soil profile. Brief descriptions and an application of each module will be presented. Except for HP3, all modules simulate flow and transport processes in two-dimensional transport domains. All modules are fully supported by the HYDRUS graphical user interface. Further development of these modules, as well as of several other new modules (such as Overland), is still envisioned. Continued feedback from the research community is encouraged.

  10. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA USING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT AND FINITE VOLUME METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Dong, C.; Sun, S.

    2010-03-18

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. The model is used to investigate the interaction of adsorption with transport and to extract information on effective adsorption distribution coefficients. Numerical examples in different fractured media illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model.

  11. Transport of microbial tracers in clean and organically contaminated silica sand in laboratory columns compared with their transport in the field.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Louise; Sinton, Lester W; Pang, Liping; Dann, Rod; Close, Murray

    2013-01-15

    Waste disposal on land and the consequent transport of bacterial and viral pathogens in soils and aquifers are of major concern worldwide. Pathogen transport can be enhanced in the presence of organic matter due to occupation of attachment sites in the aquifer materials thus preventing pathogen attachment leading to their faster transport for longer distances. Laboratory column studies were carried out to investigate the effect of organic matter, in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), on the transport of Escherichia coli and MS2 phage in saturated clean silica sand. Transport rates of these microbial tracers were also studied in a contaminated field site. Laboratory column studies showed that low concentrations (0.17 mg L(-1)) of DOC had little effect on E. coli J6-2 removal and slightly reduced the attachment of MS2 phage. After progressive conditioning of the column with DOC (1.7 mg L(-1) and 17 mg L(-1)), neither E. coli J6-2 nor MS2 phage showed any attachment and recovery rates increased dramatically (up to 100%). The results suggest that DOC can affect the transport rates of microbial contaminants. For E. coli J6-2 the predominant effect appeared to be an increase in the secondary energy minimum leading to an increase in E. coli attachment initially. However, after 17 mg L(-1) DOC conditioning of the silica sand no attachment of E. coli was observed as the DOC took up attachment sites in the porous media. MS2 phage appeared to be affected predominantly by out-competition of binding sites in the clean silica sand and a steady reduction in attachment was observed as the DOC conditioning increased. Field study showed a high removal of both E. coli and MS2 phage, although E. coli was removed at a lower rate than MS2 phage. In the field it is likely that a combination of effects are seen as the aquifer material will be heterogeneous in its surface nanoscale properties, demonstrated by the differing removal of E. coli and MS2 phage compared to the

  12. Applicability of the Linear Sorption Isotherm Model to Represent Contaminant Transport Processes in Site Wide Performance Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    FOGWELL, T.W.; LAST, G.V.

    2003-07-11

    The estimation of flux of contaminants through the vadose zone to the groundwater under varying geologic, hydrologic, and chemical conditions is key to making technically credible and sound decisions regarding soil site characterization and remediation, single-shell tank retrieval, and waste site closures (DOE 2000). One of the principal needs identified in the science and technology roadmap (DOE 2000) is the need to improve the conceptual and numerical models that describe the location of contaminants today, and to provide the basis for forecasting future movement of contaminants on both site-specific and site-wide scales. The State of Knowledge (DOE 1999) and Preliminary Concepts documents describe the importance of geochemical processes on the transport of contaminants through the Vadose Zone. These processes have been identified in the international list of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) (NEA 2000) and included in the list of FEPS currently being developed for Hanford Site assessments (Soler et al. 2001). The current vision for Hanford site-wide cumulative risk assessments as performed using the System Assessment Capability (SAC) is to represent contaminant adsorption using the linear isotherm (empirical distribution coefficient, K{sub d}) sorption model. Integration Project Expert Panel (PEP) comments indicate that work is required to adequately justify the applicability of the linear sorption model, and to identify and defend the range of K{sub d} values that are adopted for assessments. The work plans developed for the Science and Technology (S&T) efforts, SAC, and the Core Projects must answer directly the question of ''Is there a scientific basis for the application of the linear sorption isotherm model to the complex wastes of the Hanford Site?'' This paper is intended to address these issues. The reason that well documented justification is required for using the linear sorption (K{sub d}) model is that this approach is strictly empirical and is

  13. NUTRIENT TRANSPORT DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED BEACHES: EVALUATION WITH LITHIUM AS A CONSERVATIVE TRACER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil-contaminated beaches typically involves fertilization with nutrients that are thought to limit the growth rate of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Much of the available technology involves application of fertilizers that release nutrients in a water-soluble ...

  14. Role of benthic communities in organic contaminant transport and fate. 2: Bioaccumulation and biotransformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dickhut, R.M.; Schaffner, L.C.; Lay, P.W.; Mitra, S. |

    1994-12-31

    Numerous macrobenthic organisms from lower Chesapeake Bay have been observed to rapidly accumulate and transform a series of organic contaminants (OCs). Bioaccumulation and biotransformation vary both within and among major taxa, and with the OC physical-chemical properties. Bioaccumulation of OCs is rapid for various organisms regardless of feeding behavior indicating that uptake of contaminants from the dissolved phase may be important. Comparison of OC and metabolite body burdens to those in the corresponding sediment indicate three types of behavior for OC fluxes through the organisms over 56 days of exposure to contaminated sediments: steady state between contaminant uptake and elimination, faster uptake than elimination corresponding to bioaccumulation, and rapid loss relative to uptake, with decreasing bioaccumulation factors with time. OC loss mechanisms from operationally defined detectable pools in benthic biota may include: elimination of parent compound or metabolites, and binding of reactive metabolites to cellular structures. OC metabolite production and loss rates in benthic macrofauna from Chesapeake Bay are currently under investigation. Bioaccumulation and transformation of OCs by benthic organisms are of importance in determining their effects, including trophic transfer of organic pollutants, on aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Striated populations in disordered environments with advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.; Succi, Sauro

    2017-01-01

    Growth in static and controlled environments such as a Petri dish can be used to study the spatial population dynamics of microorganisms. However, natural populations such as marine microbes experience fluid advection and often grow up in heterogeneous environments. We investigate a generalized Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov (FKPP) equation describing single species population subject to a constant flow field and quenched random spatially inhomogeneous growth rates with a fertile overall growth condition. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that the non-equilibrium steady-state population density develops a flow-driven striation pattern. The striations are highly asymmetric with a longitudinal correlation length that diverges linearly with the flow speed and a transverse correlation length that approaches a finite velocity-independent value. Linear response theory is developed to study the statistics of the steady states. Theoretical predictions show excellent agreement with the numerical steady states of the generalized FKPP equation obtained from Lattice Boltzmann simulations. These findings suggest that, although the growth disorder can be spatially uncorrelated, correlated population structures with striations emerge naturally at sufficiently strong advection.

  16. Waves, advection, and cloud patterns on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Smith, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The stable layers adjacent to the nearly neutral layer within the Venus clouds are found to be capable of supporting vertically trapped, horizontally propagating waves with horizontal wavelengths of about 10 km and speeds of a few meters per second relative to the mean wind in the neutral layer. These waves may possibly be excited by turbulence within the neutral layer. Here, the properties of the waves, and the patterns which they might produce within the visible clouds if excited near the subsolar point are examined. The patterns can be in agreement with many features in images. The waves are capable of transferring momentum latitudinally to help maintain the general atmospheric spin, but at present we are not able to evaluate wave amplitudes. We also examine an alternative possibility that the cloud patterns are produced by advection and shearing by the mean zonal and meridional flow of blobs formed near the equator. It is concluded that advection and shearing by the mean flow is the most likely explanation for the general pattern of small scale striations.

  17. Parallel algorithms for semi-lagrangian advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevsky, A. V.; Thomas, S. J.

    1997-08-01

    Numerical time step limitations associated with the explicit treatment of advection-dominated problems in computational fluid dynamics are often relaxed by employing Eulerian-Lagrangian methods. These are also known as semi-Lagrangian methods in the atmospheric sciences. Such methods involve backward time integration of a characteristic equation to find the departure point of a fluid particle arriving at a Eulerian grid point. The value of the advected field at the departure point is obtained by interpolation. Both the trajectory integration and repeated interpolation influence accuracy. We compare the accuracy and performance of interpolation schemes based on piecewise cubic polynomials and cubic B-splines in the context of a distributed memory, parallel computing environment. The computational cost and interprocessor communication requirements for both methods are reported. Spline interpolation has better conservation properties but requires the solution of a global linear system, initially appearing to hinder a distributed memory implementation. The proposed parallel algorithm for multidimensional spline interpolation has almost the same communication overhead as local piecewise polynomial interpolation. We also compare various techniques for tracking trajectories given different values for the Courant number. Large Courant numbers require a high-order ODE solver involving multiple interpolations of the velocity field.

  18. Transport of contaminants in geologic media: Radioactive waste in salt, corrosion of copper, and colloid migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong Soo

    Analytical and numerical models on mass transfer of radionuclides from a waste package to surrounding rock are analyzed. Based on developed models corresponding computer programs are developed. These models would be used to evaluate possible hazardous radionuclide release rates into the surrounding rock/biosphere. Specifically the following fields are studied. (1) Analysis on the possible copper canister pitting corrosion by sulfide intrusion is performed to predict the canister lifetime. The study includes both steady-state and time-dependent cases. (2) Analysis on the brine migration in a salt repository is studied. Brine was traditionally thought to be the major factor on radionuclide migration in salt. But results given in this dissertation provide that the brine migration velocity is small enough to be neglected. Two analyses are developed for open bore hole as well as consolidated salt cases. (3) Analysis on the radionuclide migration in a salt repository is carried out. After proving that the diffusion is a dominant migration mechanism, the time-dependent diffusive mass transfer theory is used to predict fractional release rates of low-soluble as well as highly-soluble nuclides. Also the steady-state radionuclide migration through interbeds is analyzed based on the potential flow theory. Finally assuming no advective flow inside interbeds the transient radionuclide migration into interbeds is studied. Results show that salt is a good host rock for a future high-level waste repository. (4) Analysis on the radiocolloid migration through the porous media with filtration effect is performed. Results show that due to the strong filtration radiocolloid would not migrate significant distance in geologic media. Cylindrical geometry is used. For this analysis due to the complexity of the prescribed problem the numerical analysis based on upwind scheme is developed. (5) Analysis on the radiocolloid migration through fractures with solute matrix diffusion into

  19. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers--1, Theory and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate-limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate-limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower-energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one-dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and geochemical codes

  20. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers: 1: Theory and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-08-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate-limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate-limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower-energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one-dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and geochemical codes

  1. Fate and transportation of PAH and metal contaminants in the Anacostia River tidal region. Program overview, June 1997--June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Coffin, R.B.; Pohlman, J.W.; Mitchell, C.S.

    1999-02-12

    PAH and metal contaminant transport has been studied in the Anacostia River tidal region quarterly since June 1997. Data from this report indicates that the physical transport of total suspended solids (TSS) through the tidal region of the Anacostia River has a substantial impact on the concentrations and fate of PAHs. Result show that the upper tidal region is a source of PAHs to the lower region. To initiate an understanding of the fate of PAHs attached to TSS, sediment traps were placed through the river. Sediment deposition at the wide and deep region of the river was similar to or greater than values measured in the upper regions where TSS concentrations are elevated This observation has been supported with the following approaches: (1) comparison of river volumes in the upper river relative to the wide and deep region, and (2) measurements in the variation of current velocity through the river. These results indicate that this segment of the river is a region of substantial sedimentation of TSS attached PAHs attached. This correlates with previous studies that report high concentrations of PAH contaminants in sediments at this region of the river.

  2. Numerical Study of Fractional Ensemble Average Transport Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Park, Y.; Gyeong, C. B.; Lee, O.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation, a newly developed theory is applied to the case of stationary and non-stationary stochastic advective flow field, and a numerical solution method is presented for the resulting fractional Fokker-Planck equation (fFPE), which describes the evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of contaminant concentration. The derived fFPE is evaluated for three different form: 1) purely advective form, 2) second-order moment form and 3) second-order cumulant form. The Monte Carlo analysis of the fractional governing equation is then performed in a stochastic flow field, generated by a fractional Brownian motion for the stationary and non-stationary stochastic advection, in order to provide a benchmark for the results obtained from the fFPEs. When compared to the Monte Carlo simulation based PDFs and their ensemble average, the second-order cumulant form gives a good fit in terms of the shape and mode of the PDF of the contaminant concentration. Therefore, it is quite promising that the non-Fickian transport behavior can be modeled by the derived fractional ensemble average transport equations either by means of the long memory in the underlying stochastic flow, or by means of the time-space non-stationarity of the underlying stochastic flow, or by means of the time and space fractional derivatives of the transport equations. This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "The Eco Innovation Project : Non-point source pollution control research group"

  3. Numerical simulation of seasonal heat storage in a contaminated shallow aquifer - Temperature influence on flow, transport and reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Steffi; Beyer, Christof; Dahmke, Andreas; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The energy market in Germany currently faces a rapid transition from nuclear power and fossil fuels towards an increased production of energy from renewable resources like wind or solar power. In this context, seasonal heat storage in the shallow subsurface is becoming more and more important, particularly in urban regions with high population densities and thus high energy and heat demand. Besides the effects of increased or decreased groundwater and sediment temperatures on local and large-scale groundwater flow, transport, geochemistry and microbiology, an influence on subsurface contaminations, which may be present in the urban surbsurface, can be expected. Currently, concerns about negative impacts of temperature changes on groundwater quality are the main barrier for the approval of heat storage at or close to contaminated sites. The possible impacts of heat storage on subsurface contamination, however, have not been investigated in detail yet. Therefore, this work investigates the effects of a shallow seasonal heat storage on subsurface groundwater flow, transport and reaction processes in the presence of an organic contamination using numerical scenario simulations. A shallow groundwater aquifer is assumed, which consists of Pleistoscene sandy sediments typical for Northern Germany. The seasonal heat storage in these scenarios is performed through arrays of borehole heat exchangers (BHE), where different setups with 6 and 72 BHE, and temperatures during storage between 2°C and 70°C are analyzed. The developing heat plume in the aquifer interacts with a residual phase of a trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. The plume of dissolved TCE emitted from this source zone is degraded by reductive dechlorination through microbes present in the aquifer, which degrade TCE under anaerobic redox conditions to the degradation products dichloroethene, vinyl chloride and ethene. The temperature dependence of the microbial degradation activity of each degradation step is

  4. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation in Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects On Contaminant Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Redden, George D.; Yoshiko Fujita; Scheibe, Tim; Smith, Robert; Reddy, Michael; Kelly, Shelly

    2006-06-01

    Reactive mixing fronts can occur at large scales, e.g. when chemical amendments are injected in wells, or at small scales (pore-scales) when reactive intermediates are being generated in situ at grain boundaries, cell surfaces and adjacent to biofilms. The product of the reactions such as mineral precipitates, biofilms or filtered colloids modifies permeability leading to the complex coupling between flow and reactions and precipitation. The objectives are to determine how precipitates are distributed within large and small scale mixing fronts, how permeability and flow is modified by precipitation, how the mobility of a representative contaminant, strontium, is affected by the precipitation of carbonates, and how subsequent dissolution of the carbonates result in mobilization of Sr and increased flow. The desired outcomes of the project are to help develop methods leading to sequestration of metal contaminants, and to determine how macroscopic field-scale modeling can be applied to predict the outcome of remediation activities.

  5. Herbicide transport in rivers: Importance of hydrology and geochemistry in nonpoint-source contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and metribuzin were measured at six sites during 1984 and 1985 in large subbasins within the Cedar River, IA. A computer model separated the Cedar River discharge hydrograph into groundwater and overland-flow components. The concentration of herbicides in the river when groundwater was the major flow component was less than 1.0 μg/L and averaged 0.2 μg/L. The maximum concentrations of herbicides occurred when overland flow was the major component of river discharge, exceeding 50 pg/L for total herbicides. About 6% of the annual river load of atrazine was transported with the groundwater component, while 94% was transported with overland flow. From 1.5 to 5% of the atrazine applied during the year was transported from the basin. Atrazine concentrations in the river in- creased according to the discharge divided by the drainage area. This correlation indicates that rivers with large normalized 2-year peak flows have the potential to transport large concentrations of herbicides. A diagrammatic model of nonpoint-source transport of herbicides was developed that suggests that sorbed transport from fields occurs during episodes of overland flow with rapid dissolution of herbicides downstream. 

  6. Validation Testing a Contaminant Transport and Natural Attenuation Simulation Model Using Field Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    biomass production. The redox potential of an electron acceptor affects the order in which the electron acceptors are involved in the biodegradation...would occur. Chemically, there are a number of likely pathways for the biological degradation of BTEX. The Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Bacillus ...gasoline contamination site near Empire , Michigan, revealed dissolved oxygen levels in the surrounding area 18 ground water so low as to be

  7. Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz; Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

  8. FINAL REPORT: Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T; Chorover, John C; ODay, Peggy A; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl I

    2009-10-05

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed in this Final Report.

  9. Experimental evaluation of a Markov multizone model of particulate contaminant transport.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachael M; Nicas, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The performance of a Markov chain model of the three-dimensional transport of particulates in indoor environments is evaluated against experimentally measured supermicrometer particle deposition. Previously, the model was found to replicate the predictions of relatively simple particle transport and fate models; and this work represents the next step in model evaluation. The experiments modeled were (i) the release of polydispersed particles inside a building lobby, and (ii) the release of monodispersed fluorescein-tagged particles inside an experimental chamber under natural and forced mixing. The Markov model was able to reproduce the spatial patterns of particle deposition in both experiments, though the model predictions were sensitive to the parameterization of the particle release mechanism in the second experiment. Overall, the results indicate that the Markov model is a plausible tool for modeling the fate and transport of supermicrometer particles.

  10. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

  11. Interfacial Reduction-Oxidation Mechanisms Governing Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Baolin Deng; Edward Thornton; Kirk Cantrell; Khris Olsen; James Amonette

    2004-01-11

    Immobilization of toxic and radioactive metals in the vadose zone by In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a promising technology for soil remediation. Earlier laboratory and field studies have shown that Cr(VI) can be effectively immobilized by treatment with dilute gaseous H2S. The objective of this project is to characterize the interactions among H2S, the metal contaminants, and soil components. Understanding these interactions is needed to assess the long-term effectiveness of the technology and to optimize the remediation system.

  12. Source water assessment and nonpoint sources of acutely toxic contaminants: A review of research related to survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark J.; Montemagno, Carlo D.; Jenkins, Michael B.

    1998-12-01

    Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (PL-930123) in 1996 required that public water supply managers identify potential sources of contamination within contributing areas. Nonpoint sources of acutely toxic microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium parvum, challenge current approaches to source identification and management as a first step toward developing management plans for public water supply protection. Little may be known about survival and transport in the field environment, prescribed practices may not be designed to manage such substances, and infective stages may be present in vast numbers and may resist water treatment and disinfection processes. This review summarizes research related to survival and transport of C. parvum oocysts, as an example of an acutely toxic contaminant with nonpoint sources in animal agriculture. It discusses ∥1) significance of infected domesticated animals as potential sources of C. parvum, (2) laboratory and field studies of survival and transport, and (3) approaches to source control in the context of public health protection.

  13. ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, G

    2007-05-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.

  14. Determining Sources and Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments with Plutonium, Neptunium, and Cesium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.; Chaky, D. A.; Simpson, H. J.; McHugh, C. M.; Shuster, E. L.; Bopp, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    Different sources of radioactive contamination contain characteristic and identifiable isotopic signatures, which can be used to study sediment transport. We focus on Pu-239, Pu-240, Np-237 and Cs-137, which are strongly bound to fine grained sediments. The Hudson River drainage basin has received contamination from at least three separate sources: 1) global fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which contributed Pu, Np and Cs; 2) contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River Estuary ˜70km north of New York Harbor, where records document releases of Cs-137; 3) contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, where incomplete records document releases of Cs-137 but no mention is made of Pu or Np. Here we report measurements of Pu isotopes, Np-237 and Cs-137 for a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the drainage basin: 1) Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) Hudson River upstream of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. In addition, we present data from selected samples from two other lower Hudson River locations: One site located ˜30km downstream of IPNPP and another ˜30km upstream of IPNPP. By comparing the isotopic ratios Pu-240/Pu-239, Np-237/Pu-239, and Cs-137/Pu-239, measured in fluvial sediments to mean global fallout values, it is possible to identify and resolve different sources of non-fallout contamination. To date, isotopic data for sediments indicate non-fallout sources of Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137; Np-237, however, appears to originate from global fallout only. Mohawk River sediments downstream of KAPL exhibit enrichments in Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137 that are 7 to 20 times higher than levels expected from global fallout as indicated from Np-237. The elevated levels, non-fallout isotopic signatures

  15. Modeling the transport behavior of 16 emerging organic contaminants during soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Nham, Hang Thuy Thi; Greskowiak, Janek; Nödler, Karsten; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Spachos, Thomas; Rusteberg, Bernd; Massmann, Gudrun; Sauter, Martin; Licha, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    In this study, four one-dimensional flow and transport models based on the data of a field scale experiment in Greece were constructed to investigate the transport behavior of sixteen organic trace pollutants during soil aquifer treatment. At the site, tap water and treated wastewater were intermittently infiltrated into a porous aquifer via a small pilot pond. Electrical conductivity data was used to calibrate the non-reactive transport models. Transport and attenuation of the organic trace pollutants were simulated assuming 1st order degradation and linear adsorption. Sorption was found to be largely insignificant at this site for the compounds under investigation. In contrast, flow path averaged first order degradation rate constants were mostly higher compared to the literature and lay between 0.036 d(-1) for clofibric acid and 0.9 d(-1) for ibuprofen, presumably owing to the high temperatures and a well adapted microbial community originating from the wastewater treatment process. The study highlights the necessity to obtain intrinsic attenuation parameters at each site, as findings cannot easily be transferred from one site to another.

  16. RELIABILITY-BASED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a discussion of the application of the first- and second-order reliability methods (FORM and SORM, respectively) to ground-water transport and remediation, and to public health risk assessment. Using FORM and SORM allows the formal incorporation of parameter...

  17. Summary of Vadose -- Zone Conceptual Models for Flow and Contaminant Transport and 1999 - 2003 Progress on Resolving Deficiencies in Understanding the Vadose Zone at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Starr; Dana L. Dettmers; Brennon R. Orr; Thomas R. Wood

    2003-12-01

    The thick vadose zone that underlies the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been recognized both as an avenue through which contaminants disposed at or near the ground surface can migrate to groundwater in the underlying Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, and as a barrier to the movement of contaminants into the aquifer. Flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the INEEL is complicated by the highly heterogeneous nature of the geologic framework and by the variations in the behavior of different contaminants in the subsurface. The state of knowledge concerning flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at and near the INEEL IN 1999 was summarized in Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (Wood et al., 2000). These authors identified deficiencies in knowledge of flow and contaminant transport processes in the vadose zone, and provided recommendations for additional work that should be conducted to address these deficiencies. In the period since (Wood et al., 2000) was prepared, research has been published that, to some degree, address these deficiencies. This document provides a bibliography of reports, journal articles, and conference proceedings published 1999 through mid-2003 that are relevant to the vadose zone at or near the INEEL and provides a brief description of each work. Publications that address specific deficiencies or recommendations are identified, and pertinent information from selected publications is presented.

  18. Two- and Three-Dimensional Depiction of Subsurface Geology Using Commercial Software for Support of Groundwater Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis - 13345

    SciTech Connect

    Ivarson, Kristine A.; Miller, Charles W.; Arola, Craig C.

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other nuclear reactor operation-related contaminants has resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas (the Hanford Site 100 Area). The large geographic extent of the resultant contaminant plumes requires an extensive level of understanding of the aquifer structure, characteristics, and configuration to support assessment and design of remedial alternatives within the former 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K reactor areas. The authors have prepared two- and three-dimensional depictions of the key subsurface geologic structures at two Hanford Site reactor operable units (100-K and 100-D/H). These depictions, prepared using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) visualization software, provide a basis for expanding the understanding of groundwater contaminant migration pathways, including identification of geologically-defined preferential groundwater flow pathways. These identified preferential flow pathways support the conceptual site model and help explain both historical and current contaminant distribution and transport. (authors)

  19. Impact of plastics on fate and transport of organic contaminants in landfills.

    PubMed

    Saquing, Jovita M; Saquing, Carl D; Knappe, Detlef R U; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-08-15

    Factors controlling organic contaminant sorption to common plastics in municipal solid waste were identified. Consumer plastics [drinking water container, prescription drug bottle, soda bottle, disposable cold cup, computer casing, furniture foam, carpet, vinyl flooring, formica sheet] and model polymers [high-density polyethylene (HDPE), medium-density polyethylene, low-density polyethylene, poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)] were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis. The material characterization was used to interpret batch isotherm and kinetic data. K(p) values describing toluene sorption to rubbery or "soft" polymers could be normalized by the amorphous polymer fraction (f(amorphous)) but not by the organic carbon fraction (f(oc)). Diffusion coefficients (D) describing the uptake rate of toluene by rubbery plastics (HDPE, drinking water container, prescription drug bottle) were similar (D approximately 10(-10) cm(2)/s), indicating that pure HDPE can be used as a model for rubbery plastics. Toluene diffusivity was similar among glassy or "hard" plastics (PVC, soda bottle, computer casing, disposable cold cup; D approximately 10(-12) cm(2)/s) but lower than for rubbery plastics. Plastics in landfills are potential sinks of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) because of their higher affinity for HOCs compared to lignocellulosic materials and the slow desorption of HOCs from glassy plastics.

  20. Numerical advection by conservation of second-order moments. [for trace element spatial distribution and chemical interaction in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new, accurate, and nondiffusive method for three-dimensional advection of trace species is presented. The method preserves tracer structures by conserving the second-order moments of the spatial distribution of tracer during advection. Upstream transport and second-order tracer distribution are described, and the moments of the tracer distribution about the center of a grid box are formally defined and related to the polynomial distribution. Formulas are presented which describe how the moments of a grid box are decomposed into a unique set of moments centered about each subbox and how they are reassembled into new grid boxes. A one-dimensional example if tracer transport is given, and limits necessary to maintain positive tracer concentrations are derived. The accuracy and stability of this method are analytically examined, and numerical experiments testing the effective resolution are presented. The method is compared with other methods for numerical advection of tracers.

  1. Coupled reaction/transport modeling of a chemical barrier for controlling uranium(VI) contamination in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Stan J.; Tripathi, Vijay S.; Spangler, Robert R.

    1995-02-01

    Adsorption of uranium onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide can be used for in situ containment of uranium(VI) present in mill tailings and for prevention of potential groundwater contamination. Adsorption of uranium(VI) is strongly influenced by groundwater chemistry, especially pH and total dissolved carbonate concentration. To evaluate the effectiveness of adsorption onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide as a containment barrier, the extent of uranium adsorption was quantified as a function of solution chemistry and other adsorption parameters. The adsorption model was used within a coupled hydrogeochemical transport model to evaluate the conditions under which amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide can be effective in preventing groundwater contamination. The modeling results depicted spatial and temporal evolution of the tailings-groundwater system, and permitted delineation of the uranium(VI) plume in groundwater under different scenarios. The analysis showed that adsorption of uranium(VI) onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide can be an effective mechanism for preventing release of uranium(VI) into groundwater especially for neutral-pH mill tailings. It was also found that essentially no retardation occurred in tailings with alkaline pore fluids. An economic analysis showed that the amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide treatment can be applied to neutral-pH mill tailings in a cost-effective manner. The results obtained in the study support the conceptual foundation of geochemical engineering in waste management.

  2. A novel modeling tool with multi-stressor functionality for organic contaminant transport and fate in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Undeman, E; Gustafsson, E; Gustafsson, B G

    2014-11-01

    The coupled physical-biogeochemical model BALTSEM, previously used to assess nutrient/carbon cycles and eutrophication in the Baltic Sea, has been expanded to include algorithms for calculations of organic contaminant environmental transport and fate. This novel model version (BALTSEM-POP) is evaluated for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in Baltic Sea surface water and sediment. Modeled dissolved concentrations are usually within a factor of 2-4 of observed concentrations, however with larger deviations for furans. Calculated concentrations in particulate organic matter are less accurate (within factors of 1-700), likely due to errors in estimated pelagic biomass, particulate matter-water partitioning, and large natural variability in field data. Concentrations in sediments are usually predicted within a factor of 6. The good performance of the model illustrates its usefulness for exploration of contaminant fate in response to variations in nutrient input and climatic conditions in the Baltic Sea marine environment.

  3. Transport of organic contaminants in subsoil horizons and effects of dissolved organic matter related to organic waste recycling practices.

    PubMed

    Chabauty, Florian; Pot, Valérie; Bourdat-Deschamps, Marjolaine; Bernet, Nathalie; Labat, Christophe; Benoit, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Compost amendment on agricultural soil is a current practice to compensate the loss of organic matter. As a consequence, dissolved organic carbon concentration in soil leachates can be increased and potentially modify the transport of other solutes. This study aims to characterize the processes controlling the mobility of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in deep soil layers and their potential impacts on the leaching of organic contaminants (pesticides and pharmaceutical compounds) potentially present in cultivated soils receiving organic waste composts. We sampled undisturbed soil cores in the illuviated horizon (60-90 cm depth) of an Albeluvisol. Percolation experiments were made in presence and absence of DOM with two different pesticides, isoproturon and epoxiconazole, and two pharmaceutical compounds, ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole. Two types of DOM were extracted from two different soil surface horizons: one sampled in a plot receiving a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge applied once every 2 years since 1998 and one sampled in an unamended plot. Results show that DOM behaved as a highly reactive solute, which was continuously generated within the soil columns during flow and increased after flow interruption. DOM significantly increased the mobility of bromide and all pollutants, but the effects differed according the hydrophobic and the ionic character of the molecules. However, no clear effects of the origin of DOM on the mobility of the different contaminants were observed.

  4. PAH contamination in soils adjacent to a coal-transporting facility in Tapin district, south Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mizwar, Andy; Trihadiningrum, Yulinah

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the level of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), listed as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in surface soils around a coal-transporting facility in the western part of South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Three composite soil samples were collected from a coal stockpile, coal-hauling road, and coal port. Identification and quantification of PAH was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total content of 16 USEPA-PAH ranged from 11.79 to 55.30 mg/kg with arithmetic mean value of 33.14 mg/kg and median of 32.33 mg/kg. The 16 USEPA-PAH measured levels were found to be greater compared with most of the literature values. The levels of high molecular-weight PAH (5- and 6-ring) were dominant and formed 67.77-80.69 % of the total 16 USEPA-PAH The most abundant of individual PAH are indeno[1,2,3-cd] pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene with concentration ranges of 2.11-20.56 and 1.59-17.84 mg/kg, respectively. The degree of PAH contamination and subsequent toxicity assessment suggest that the soils of the study area are highly contaminated and pose a potential health risk to humans.

  5. Future trends in transport and fate of diffuse contaminants in catchments, with special emphasis on stable isotope applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J.; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Bonell, M.; Duguet, J.-P.; Harris, B.; Meckenstock, R.; McGuire, K.; Moussa, R.; Peters, N.; Richnow, H.H.; Sherwood-Lollar, B.; Uhlenbrook, S.; van, Lanen H.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is provided of the first of a series of proposed Integrated Science Initiative workshops supported by the UNESCO International Hydrological Programme. The workshop brought together hydrologists, environmental chemists, microbiologists, stable isotope specialists and natural resource managers with the purpose of communicating new ideas on ways to assess microbial degradation processes and reactive transport at catchment scales. The focus was on diffuse contamination at catchment scales and the application of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) in the assessment of biological degradation processes of agrochemicals. Major outcomes were identifying the linkage between water residence time distribution and rates of contaminant degradation, identifying the need for better information on compound specific microbial degradation isotope fractionation factors and the potential of CSIA in identifying key degradative processes. In the natural resource management context, a framework was developed where CSIA techniques were identified as practically unique in their capacity to serve as distributed integrating indicators of process across a range of scales (micro to diffuse) of relevance to the problem of diffuse pollution assessment. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Investigating the fate and transport of fecal coliform contamination in a tidal estuarine system using a three-dimensional model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng

    2017-03-15

    A three-dimensional fecal coliform transport model was developed and incorporated into a hydrodynamic and suspended sediment transport model to better understand the microbiological water quality in the tidal Tamsui River estuarine system of northern Taiwan, which includes three main tributaries: Dahan River, Xindian River, and Keelung River. The model was calibrated using the water level, salinity, suspended sediment concentration, and fecal coliform data measured in 2010. The predictive skill, a statistical approach, is used to evaluate the model performance. There was quantitatively good agreement between the simulation and measurement results. Further, the calibrated model underwent model sensitivity analysis by varying the model parameters which include the settling velocity, darkness decay rate, partition coefficient, and fecal coliform concentration in the sediment bed. The results indicated that the settling velocity played the most important role in affecting fecal coliform concentrations followed by partition coefficient, darkness decay rate, and fecal coliform concentration in the sediment bed. The model was also used to investigate the effects of salinity and suspended sediment on fecal coliform contamination. The salinity module was excluded in the simulations, resulting in an increase of fecal coliform concentration. However the effect of salinity on fecal coliform concentration is minor. If the suspended sediment transport was excluded in the simulations, the predicted results of fecal coliform concentration decrease to be underestimated the measured data. The modeling results revealed that the inclusion of the suspended sediment transport model in the simulations was of crucial importance because the fecal coliform concentrations were significantly influenced by the suspended sediment concentration in the estuarine system.

  7. A Numerical Model Simulating Flow, Contaminant, and Sediment Transport in Watershed Systems (WASH12D)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    a g aZou +(PhKSs+ S ÷ S 1Si+ S +S2)uc--•tl-H +𔃻) Tu a B x cx 2)J - "•t (Ss + S R-SI+ S I+ S 2)+(U rS R-Uis I+UYISI1+U Y2S2)+!trs + a vhBa xlp -g~ (H_-H2...260 s for the example of 2-D overland transport. Sec4-18 Figure 4.19. Concentration contour of the second dissolved chemical at time = 260 s for the...example of 2-D overland transport. Sec4-19 Figure 4.20. Concentration contour of the third dissolved chemical at time = 260 s for the example of 2-D

  8. Numerical modeling of ground water flow and contaminant transport in a saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valipour, Mohammad S.; Sadeghi, Masoomeh; Mahmoudi, Amir H.; Shahi, Mina; Gandaghi, Hadi

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, numerical modeling and experimental testing of the distribution of pollutants along the water flow in a porous medium is discussed. Governing equations including overall continuity, momentum and species continuity equations are derived for porous medium. The governing equations have been solved numerical using the Finite Volume Method based on collocated grids. The SIMPLE algorithm has been adopted for the pressure _ velocity linked equations. In order to validate the numerical results, experimental data from laboratory apparatus are applied and there is a good agreement among numerical results and experimental test. Finally, the main affecting parameters on the distribution and transport of pollutants porous medium were investigated. Results indicate that, the domain of pollution rises with increasing dispersion coefficient and the dispersion phenomenon overcomes on pollutant transfer. Reduction of porosity has decreased the pollutant transfer and increased velocity has result in the increasing pollutant transport phenomenon but has reduced the domain of the pollution.

  9. An analytical model for contaminant transport in landfill composite liners considering coupled effect of consolidation, diffusion, and degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haijian; Yan, Huaxiang; Feng, Shijin; Wang, Qiao; Chen, Peixiong

    2016-10-01

    One-dimensional mathematical model is developed to investigate the behavior of contaminant transport in landfill composite liner system considering coupled effect of consolidation, diffusion, and degradation. The first- and second-type bottom boundary conditions are used to derive the steady-state and quasi-steady-state analytical solutions. The concentration profiles obtained by the proposed analytical solution are in good agreement with those obtained by the laboratory tests. The bottom concentration and flux of the soil liners can be greatly reduced when the degradation effect and porosity changing are considered. For the case under steady-state, the bottom flux and concentration for the case with t 1/2 =10 years can be 2.8 and 5.5 times lower than those of the case with t 1/2 =100 years, respectively. The bottom concentration and flux of the soil liners can be greatly reduced when the coefficient of volume compressibility decreases. For quasi-steady-state and with t 1/2 = 10 years, the bottom flux and concentration for the case with m v  = 0.02/MPa can be 17.4 and 21 times lower than the case with m v  = 0.5/MPa. This may be due to the fact that the true fluid velocity induced by consolidation is greater for the case with high coefficient of volume compressibility. The bottom flux for the case with single compacted clay liner (CCL) can be 1.5 times larger than that for the case with GMB/CCL considering diffusion and consolidation for DCM. The proposed analytical model can be used for verification of more complicated numerical models and assessment of the coupled effect of diffusion, consolidation, and degradation on contaminant transport in landfill liner systems.

  10. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  11. Fate and transport of trichloroethane and trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater, building 719, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Melchiorre, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene are common chlorinated aliphatic industrial organic solvents used in degreasing operations. Both are typically found in groundwater environments as a result of leaking underground storage tanks, leachate from landfills, and contaminant migration from hazardous waste dump sites. Transformation by-products are also found in association with trichloroethane and trichloroethylene without any known source other than from reductive dechlorination. Dechlorinated by-products include 1,1-dichloroethane; cis and trans 1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, chloroethane, and vinyl chloride. Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene and their transformation by-products are suspected human health hazards. Vinyl chloride is a known human carcinogen, while trichloroethylene is considered a probable human carcinogen, and 1,1-dichloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethane possible human carcinogens.

  12. A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

    1990-06-01

    The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. A comprehensive analysis of contaminant transport in the vadose zone beneath tank SX-109

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, A.L.; Gee, G.W.; White, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Vadose Zone Characterization Project is currently investigating the subsurface distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in S and SX Waste Management Area (WMA-S-SX) located in the 200 West Area of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Spectral-gamma logging of boreholes has detected elevated {sup 137}Cs concentrations as deep as 38 m, a depth considered excessive based on the assumed geochemistry of {sup 137}Cs in Hanford sediments. Routine groundwater sampling under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) have also detected elevated levels of site-specific contaminants downgradient of WMA-S-SX. The objective of this report is to explore the processes controlling the migration of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 99}Tc, and NO{sub 3} through the vadose zone of WMA-S-SX, particularly beneath tank SX-109.

  14. Addressing Uncertainty in Contaminant Transport in Groundwater Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, D.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate in groundwater shows significant uncertainty which arises from sparse data and interaction among multiple geophysical factors such as source availability (land use), thickness and composition of the vadose zone, types of aquifers (confined or unconfined), aquifer heterogeneity (geological and alluvial), precipitation characteristics, etc. This work presents the fusion of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with the numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW and the solute transport model MT3DMS. The EnKF is a sequential data assimilation approach, which is applied to quantify and reduce the uncertainty of groundwater flow and solute transport models. We conducted numerical simulation experiments for the period January 1990 to December 2005 with MODFLOW and MT3DMS models for variably saturated groundwater flow in various aquifers across Texas. The EnKF was used to update the model parameters, hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head and solute concentration. Results indicate that the EnKF method notably improves the estimation of the hydraulic conductivity distribution and solute transport prediction by assimilating piezometric head measurements with a known nitrate initial condition. A better estimation of hydraulic conductivity and assimilation of continuous measurements of solute concentrations resulted in reduced uncertainty in MODFLOW and MT3DMS models. It was found that the observation locations and locations in spatial proximity were appropriately corrected by the EnKF. The knowledge of nitrate plume evolution provided an insight into model structure, parameters, and sources of uncertainty.

  15. Transport of E. coli in aquifer sediments of Bangladesh: Implications for widespread microbial contamination of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feighery, John; Mailloux, Brian J.; Ferguson, A. S.; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Geen, Alexander; Culligan, Patricia J.

    2013-07-01

    Fecal bacteria are frequently found at much greater distances than would be predicted by laboratory studies, indicating that improved models that incorporate more complexity might be needed to explain the widespread contamination of many shallow aquifers. In this study, laboratory measurements of breakthrough and retained bacteria in columns of intact and repacked sediment cores from Bangladesh were fit using a two-population model with separate reversible and irreversible attachment sites that also incorporated bacterial decay rates. Separate microcosms indicated an average first-order decay rate of 0.03 log10/day for both free bacteria in the liquid phase and bacteria attached to the solid phase. Although two thirds of the column results could be well fit with a dual-deposition site, single-population model, fitting of one third of the results required a two-population model with a high irreversible attachment rate (between 5 and 60 h-1) for one population of bacteria and a much lower rate (from 5 h-1 to essentially zero) for the second. Inferred attachment rates for the reversible sites varied inversely with grain size (varying from 1 to 20 h-1 for grain sizes between 0.1 and 0.3 mm) while reversible detachment rates were found to be nearly constant (approximately 0.5 h-1). Field simulations based on the fitted two-population model parameters predict only a twofold reduction in fecal source concentration over a distance of 10 m, determined primarily by the decay rate of the bacteria. The existence of a secondary population of bacteria with a low attachment rate might help explain the observed widespread contamination of tubewell water with E. coli at the field site where the cores were collected as well as other similar sites.

  16. Transport of E. coli in Aquifer Sediments of Bangladesh: Implications for Widespread Microbial Contamination of Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Feighery, John; Mailloux, Brian J; Ferguson, A S; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; van Geen, Alexander; Culligan, Patricia J

    2013-07-01

    Fecal bacteria are frequently found at much greater distances than would be predicted by laboratory studies, indicating that improved models that incorporate more complexity are might be needed to explain the widespread contamination of many shallow aquifers. In this study, laboratory measurements of breakthrough and retained bacteria in columns of intact and repacked sediment cores from Bangladesh were fit using a two-population model with separate reversible and irreversible attachment sites that also incorporated bacterial decay rates. Separate microcosms indicated an average first order decay rate of 0.03 log10 / day for free bacteria in both the liquid phase and bacteria attached to the solid phase. Although two-thirds of the column results could be well fit with a dual deposition site, single population model, fitting of one third of the results required a two-population model with a high irreversible attachment rate (between 5 and 60 hr(-1)) for one population of bacteria and a much lower rate (from 5 hr(-1) to essentially zero) for the second. Inferred attachment rates for the reversible sites varied inversely with grain size (varying from 1 - 20 hr(-1) for grain sizes between 0.1 and 0.3 mm) while reversible detachment rates were found to be nearly constant (approximately 0.5 hr(-1)). Field simulations based on the fitted two-population model parameters predict only a two-fold reduction in fecal source concentration over a distance of 10 m, determined primarily by the decay rate of the bacteria. The existence of a secondary population of bacteria with a low attachment rate might help explain the observed widespread contamination of tubewell water with E. coli at the field site where the cores were collected, as well as other similar sites.

  17. Transport of E. coli in Aquifer Sediments of Bangladesh: Implications for Widespread Microbial Contamination of Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Feighery, John; Mailloux, Brian J.; Ferguson, A.S.; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; van Geen, Alexander; Culligan, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal bacteria are frequently found at much greater distances than would be predicted by laboratory studies, indicating that improved models that incorporate more complexity are might be needed to explain the widespread contamination of many shallow aquifers. In this study, laboratory measurements of breakthrough and retained bacteria in columns of intact and repacked sediment cores from Bangladesh were fit using a two-population model with separate reversible and irreversible attachment sites that also incorporated bacterial decay rates. Separate microcosms indicated an average first order decay rate of 0.03 log10 / day for free bacteria in both the liquid phase and bacteria attached to the solid phase. Although two-thirds of the column results could be well fit with a dual deposition site, single population model, fitting of one third of the results required a two-population model with a high irreversible attachment rate (between 5 and 60 hr-1) for one population of bacteria and a much lower rate (from 5 hr-1 to essentially zero) for the second. Inferred attachment rates for the reversible sites varied inversely with grain size (varying from 1 - 20 hr-1 for grain sizes between 0.1 and 0.3 mm) while reversible detachment rates were found to be nearly constant (approximately 0.5 hr-1). Field simulations based on the fitted two-population model parameters predict only a two-fold reduction in fecal source concentration over a distance of 10 m, determined primarily by the decay rate of the bacteria. The existence of a secondary population of bacteria with a low attachment rate might help explain the observed widespread contamination of tubewell water with E. coli at the field site where the cores were collected, as well as other similar sites. PMID:24653543

  18. A tracer-based inversion method for diagnosing eddy-induced diffusivity and advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bryan, F. O.

    2015-02-01

    A diagnosis method is presented which inverts a set of tracer flux statistics into an eddy-induced transport intended to apply for all tracers. The underlying assumption is that a linear flux-gradient relationship describes eddy-induced tracer transport, but a full tensor coefficient is assumed rather than a scalar coefficient which allows for down-gradient and skew transports. Thus, Lagrangian advection and anisotropic diffusion not necessarily aligned with the tracer gradient can be diagnosed. In this method, multiple passive tracers are initialized in an eddy-resolving flow simulation. Their spatially-averaged gradients form a matrix, where the gradient of each tracer is assumed to satisfy an identical flux-gradient relationship. The resulting linear system, which is overdetermined when using more than three tracers, is then solved to obtain an eddy transport tensor R which describes the eddy advection (antisymmetric part of R) and potentially anisotropic diffusion (symmetric part of R) in terms of coarse-grained variables. The mathematical basis for this inversion method is presented here, along with practical guidelines for its implementation. We present recommendations for initialization of the passive tracers, maintaining the required misalignment of the tracer gradients, correcting for nonconservative effects, and quantifying the error in the diagnosed transport tensor. A method is proposed to find unique, tracer-independent, distinct rotational and divergent Lagrangian transport operators, but the results indicate that these operators are not meaningfully relatable to tracer-independent eddy advection or diffusion. With the optimal method of diagnosis, the diagnosed transport tensor is capable of predicting the fluxes of other tracers that are withheld from the diagnosis, including even active tracers such as buoyancy, such that relative errors of 14% or less are found.

  19. Source, Transport, and Fate of Groundwater Contamination at Site 45, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Landmeyer, James E.; Lowery, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by tetrachloroethene and its dechlorination products is present in two partially intermingled plumes in the surficial aquifer near a former dry-cleaning facility at Site 45, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina. The northern plume originates from the vicinity of former above-ground storage tanks. Free-phase tetrachloroethene from activities in this area entered the groundwater and the storm sewer. The southern plume originates at a nearby new dry-cleaning facility, but probably was the result of contamination released to the aquifer from a leaking sanitary sewer line from the former dry-cleaning facility. Discharge of dissolved groundwater contamination is primarily to leaking storm sewers below the water table. Extensive biodegradation of the contamination takes place in the surficial aquifer; however, the biodegradation is insufficient to reduce trichloroethene to less than milligram-per-liter concentrations prior to discharging into the storm sewers. The groundwater volatile organic compounds entering the storm sewers are substantially diluted by tidal flushing upon entry and are subject to volatilization as they are transported through the storm sewer to a discharge point in a tributary to Ballast Creek. TCE concentrations of about 2-6 micrograms per liter were present in storm-sewer water near the discharge point (sampled at manhole STS26). On three out of four sampling events at manhole STS14, the storm-sewer water contained no vinyl chloride. During a time of relatively high groundwater levels, however, 20 micrograms per liter of vinyl chloride was present in STS14 storm-sewer water. Because groundwater leaks into that storm sewer and because the storm sewer upgradient from manhole STS14 is adjacent to part of the aquifer where 2,290 micrograms per liter of vinyl chloride have been detected, there is a potential for substantially increased concentrations of vinyl chloride to discharge at the storm-sewer outfall

  20. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the

  1. Review: Selenium contamination, fate, and reactive transport in groundwater in relation to human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Ryan T.

    2016-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micro-nutrient for humans, but can be toxic at high levels of intake. Se deficiency and Se toxicity are linked with serious diseases, with some regions worldwide experiencing Se deficiency due to Se-poor rocks and soils and other areas dealing with Se toxicity due to the presence of Se-enriched geologic materials. In addition, Se is consumed primarily through plants that take up Se from soil and through animal products that consume these plants. Hence, the soil and groundwater system play important roles in determining the effect of Se on human health. This paper reviews current understanding of Se fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems and its relation to human health, with a focus on alluvial systems, soil systems, and the interface between alluvial systems and Cretaceous shale that release Se via oxidation processes. The review focuses first on the relation between Se and human health, followed by a summary of Se distribution in soil-aquifer systems, with an emphasis on the quantitative relationship between Se content in soil and Se concentration in underlying groundwater. The physical, chemical, and microbial processes that govern Se fate and transport in subsurface systems then are presented, followed by numerical modeling techniques used to simulate these processes in study regions and available remediation strategies for either Se-deficient or Se-toxic regions. This paper can serve as a guide to any field, laboratory or modeling study aimed at assessing Se fate and transport in groundwater systems and its relation to human health.

  2. Solute movement through unsaturated fen peat: Lab and greenhouse experiments for transport study of contaminants from Athabasca oil sands tailing pond water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J. S.; Rezanezhad, F.; Graf, M.; Rochefort, L.

    2009-12-01

    In the Athabasca oil sands region, wetlands specially peatland dominate the landscape. Processing oil sands produces large volumes of wet material called oil sands tailing water. Discharge of organic liquid contaminants such as Naphthenic Acids (NA) and Sodium (Na) from tailing waters have a toxic effect on plants in this region. One of the greatest barriers to peatland creation will be the elevated amount of toxins (naphthenic acid, metals and salinity) present in the post-mined landscapes. Variability in solute transport properties in the unsaturated zone is of growing concern due to environmental hazards and there are no many scientific challenges in the field of organic liquid contaminants transport through the unsaturated peat soils. The attenuation, degradation and transport of NA and Na in peat are essentially unknown. The ionizable nature of NA and Na along with the complex structure of peat soils poses challenges to characterizing the transport properties of NA and Na in the filed and laboratory. In this experimental research project, we examine the plant responses in 64 greenhouse tubs filled with peat and process-water; and study the transport and attenuation processes of NA and Na through peat in a series of laboratory column experiments. We developed an analytical method for evaluating the transport and adsorption characteristics of NA and Na to derive a clear understanding of the transport, sorption mechanisms and desorption behaviour of NA and Na with temporal evolution of the solute concentration distribution from groundwater to fen plants. The goal of this research project is to investigate how oil sands process-affected waters will affect peatland vegetation, specifically fen vegetation. In particular, we would like to know how contaminants present in oil sand process affected water will be transported through peat and how typical fen vegetation will react to a realistic contamination scenario in a controlled macrocosm environment? Research that

  3. Investigation of effects of cadmium, lead, nickel and vanadium contamination on the uptake and transport processes in cucumber plants by TXRF spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Anita; Martinez, Rosa Maria Garcinuño; Záray, Gyula; Fodor, Ferenc

    1999-10-01

    Uptake and transport processes of some essential nutrient elements (K, Ca, Fe, Mn and Zn) in cucumber plants grown in contamination-free or in contaminated (10 -5 M Cd, Ni, Pb or V) nutrient solutions containing iron in the chemical form of Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA or Fe-chloride were studied by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF). The root samples were dissolved using a microwave assisted acidic digestion procedure, while the xylem sap samples were directly analysed after addition of internal standard. It was established that the accumulation in the roots and the transport rate of the four heavy metals investigated increase in order of Vtransport of V in the plant it has the smallest influence on the uptake and transport of the essential elements. Cd hampers the water uptake and thereby the amount of all transported essential elements, and in addition results in higher accumulation of Ca, Fe and Zn in the roots. Pb contamination leads to a drastic reduction of Ca accumulated in the roots and mostly a slight increment in the transport of the essential nutrient elements investigated. Ni contamination hinders the transport of K and Zn, and leads to a higher accumulation of Mn in the roots. The chemical form of iron and hereby the presence of complex forming agents play an important role first of all for the uptake and transport processes of Fe and K.

  4. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E.; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK–enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective forestablis hingmicrobial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils. PMID:22365139

  5. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers--2, Field-scale simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the second of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], reports the field-scale application of COMPTRAN (compartmentalized solute transport model) for simulating the development of redox zones. COMPTRAN is fully developed and described in the companion paper. Redox zones, which are often delineated by the relative concentrations of dissolved oxygen, have been observed around the globe. The distribution of other redox-sensitive species is affected by redox zonation. At the U.S. Geological Survey's Cape Cod research site, an anoxic zone containing high concentrations of dissolved iron has been observed. Field data were abstracted from the Cape Cod site for the one-dimensional and two-dimensional COMPTRAN simulations reported in this paper. The purpose of the concept-development simulations was to demonstrate that the compartmentalized approach reported by Abrams et al. [1998] can be linked with a solute transport model to simulate field-scale phenomena. The results presented in this paper show that COMPTRAN successfully simulated the development of redox zones at the field scale, including trends in pH and alkalinity. Thermodynamic constraints were used to prevent lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium among all redox species. Empirical methods of reaction inhibition were not needed for the simulations conducted for this study. COMPTRAN can be extended easily to include additional compartments and reactions and is capable of handling complex velocity fields in more than one dimension.

  6. Grand Challenge Problems in Environmental Modeling and Remediation: Groundwater Contaminant Transport (Partnerships in Computational Science)

    SciTech Connect

    Celia, M.A.

    1999-03-11

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Princeton University component of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1998. Seven institutions were primarily involved in this project: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton University, SUNY at Stony Brook, Texas A&M University, The University of South Carolina, and the University of Texas at Austin, with contributing efforts from the Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center. Each institution had primary responsibility for specific research components, but strong collaboration among all institutions was essential for the success of the project and in producing the final deliverables. PICS deliverables include source code for the suite of research simulators and auxiliary HPC tools, associated documentation, and test problems. These materials will be available as indicated from each institution's web page or from the Center for Computational Sciences Oak Ridge National Laboratory in January 1998.

  7. Grand Challenge Problems in Environmental Modeling and Remediation: Groundwater Contaminant Transport (Partnerships in Computational Science)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpley, Robert C.

    1997-12-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the University of South Carolina component of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997. Seven institutions were primarily involved in this project: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton University, SUNY at Stony Brook, Texas A&M University, The University of South Carolina, and the University of Texas at Austin, with contributing efforts from the Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center. Each institution had primary responsibility for specific research components, but strong collaboration among all institutions was essential for the success of the project and in producing the final deliverables. PICS deliverables include source code for the suite of research simulators and auxiliary HPC tools, associated documentation, and test problems. These materials will be available as indicated from each institution's web page or from the Center for Computational Sciences Oak Ridge National Laboratory in January 1998.

  8. COMIS -- an international multizone air-flow and contaminant transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    A number of interzonal models have been developed to calculate air flows and pollutant transport mechanisms in both single and multizone buildings. A recent development in multizone air-flow modeling, the COMIS model, has a number of capabilities that go beyond previous models, much as COMIS can be used as either a stand-alone air-flow model with input and output features or as an infiltration module for thermal building simulation programs. COMIS was designed during a 12 month workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in 1988-89. In 1990, the Executive Committee of the International Energy Agency`s Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems program created a working group on multizone air-flow modeling, which continued work on COMIS. The group`s objectives were to study physical phenomena causing air flow and pollutant (e.g., moisture) transport in multizone buildings, develop numerical modules to be integrated in the previously designed multizone air flow modeling system, and evaluate the computer code. The working group supported by nine nations, officially finished in late 1997 with the release of IISiBat/COMIS 3.0, which contains the documented simulation program COMIS, the user interface IISiBat, and reports describing the evaluation exercise.

  9. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers: 2. Field-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-08-01

    This paper, the second of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], reports the field-scale application of COMPTRAN (compartmentalized solute transport model) for simulating the development of redox zones. COMPTRAN is fully developed and described in the companion paper. Redox zones, which are often delineated by the relative concentrations of dissolved oxygen, have been observed around the globe. The distribution of other redox-sensitive species is affected by redox zonation. At the U.S. Geological Survey's Cape Cod research site, an anoxic zone containing high concentrations of dissolved iron has been observed. Field data were abstracted from the Cape Cod site for the one-dimensional and two-dimensional COMPTRAN simulations reported in this paper. The purpose of the concept-development simulations was to demonstrate that the compartmentalized approach reported by Abrams et al. [1998] can be linked with a solute transport model to simulate field-scale phenomena. The results presented in this paper show that COMPTRAN successfully simulated the development of redox zones at the field scale, including trends in pH and alkalinity. Thermodynamic constraints were used to prevent lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium among all redox species. Empirical methods of reaction inhibition were not needed for the simulations conducted for this study. COMPTRAN can be extended easily to include additional compartments and reactions and is capable of handling complex velocity fields in more than one dimension.

  10. Cyanazine, Atrazine, and Their Metabolites as Geochemical Indicators of Contaminant Transport in the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, M.T.; Thurman, E.M.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The geochemical transport of cyanazine and its metabolite cyanazine amide (CAM) was compared to atrazine and its metabolite deethylatrazine (DEA) at three sites in the Mississippi River basin during 1992 and six sites during 1993. The floods of 1993 caused an uninterrupted exponential decline in herbicide concentrations; whereas, in 1992 herbicide concentrations varied mostly in response to two discrete discharge pulses in the spring and midsummer and were stable during an extended period of summer low-flow. Concentration half-lives calculated from the 1993 data for atrazine were approximately twice those of cyanazine at all sites. The half-life for atrazine and cyanazine was shortest, 22 and 14 days, respectively at the Mississippi River at Clinton, Ill. - the farthest upstream site - and longest, 42 and 22 days, respectively, at the Baton Rouge, La. site - the farthest downstream site. The concentration of CAM exceeded the concentration of DEA through September at all sites where the mean ratio of atrazine-to-cyanazine (ACR) was less than 4.0. The ratio of CAM-to-cyanazine (CAMCR) increased from 0.2 to more than 1.0 and the ratio of DEA-to-atrazine (DAR) increased from less than 0.1 to 0.3 from application in May through early to mid-July. Temporal changes in the CAMCR were used to identify pre- and post-application "slugs" of water transported along the reaches of the Mississippi River.

  11. Interfacial Reduction-Oxidation Mechanisms Governing Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Baolin; Thornton, Edward C.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Amonette, James E.

    2003-06-01

    Immobilization of toxic and radioactive metals (e.g., Cr, Tc, and U) in the vadose zone by the In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a promising technology for soil remediation. Earlier laboratory studies have shown that Cr(VI) in soil samples can be effectively immobilized by treatment with dilute gaseous H2S. A field test completed in 1999 at White Sand Missile Range, New Mexico, has shown a 70% immobilization of Cr(VI). The objective of this EMSP project is to characterize the interactions among H2S, the metal contaminants, and soil components. Understanding these interactions is needed to optimize the remediation system and to assess the long-term effectiveness of the technology. Proposed research tasks included: (A) Evaluation of the potential catalytic effect of mineral surfaces on the rate of Cr(VI) reduction by H2S and the rate of H2S oxidation by air; (B) Identification of the reactions of soil minerals with H2S and determination of associated reaction rates; (C) Evaluation of the role of soil water chemistry on the reduction of Cr(VI) by H2S; (D) Assessment of the reductive buffering capacity of H2S-reduced soil and the potential for emplacement of long-term vadose zone reactive barriers; and (E) Evaluation of the potential for immobilization of Tc and U in the vadose zone by reduction and an assessment of the potential for remobilization by subsequent reoxidation.

  12. Application of nonequilibrium fracture matrix model in simulating reactive contaminant transport through fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitin; Ojha, C. S. P.; Sharma, P. K.; Madramootoo, Chandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Nonequilibrium and nonlinear sorption of the contaminants in the fractured porous media could significantly influence the shape of the breakthrough curve (BTC). For the fracture-matrix system, there are very few studies which consider these processes. In this study, the nonequilibrium fracture-matrix model with two different nonlinear sorption isotherms, namely nonlinear Freundlich and Langmuir sorption isotherms were developed. The effect of sorption nonlinearity and nonequilibrium conditions on the shape of the BTC was studied using the temporal moments. The developed models along with the linear equilibrium, linear nonequilibrium fracture matrix models, and the multirate mass transfer model were used to simulate the BTC, which were compared with the experimental data available in the literature. Both sorption nonequilibrium and nonlinearity were found to significantly influence the shape of the BTC. Presence of sorption nonlinearity reduces the solute spreading, whereas presence of nonequilibrium conditions increases the solute spreading. Considering the sorption nonequilibrium along with the sorption nonlinearity leads to an improved simulation of the BTC. The nonequilibrium nonlinear sorption models could simulate the extended BTC tailing resulting from sorption nonlinearity and rate-limited interaction in the fracture-matrix system.

  13. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  14. Annotated bibliography of literature relating to wind transport of plutonium-contaminated soils at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.

    1993-12-01

    During the period from 1954 through 1963, a number of tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to determine the safety of nuclear devices with respect to storage, handling, transport, and accidents. These tests were referred to as ``safety shots.`` ``Safety`` in this context meant ``safety against fission reaction.`` The safety tests were comprised of chemical high explosive detonations with components of nuclear devices. The conduct of these tests resulted in the dispersion of plutonium, and some americium over areas ranging from several tens to several hundreds of hectares. Of the various locations used for safety tests, the site referred to as ``Plutonium Valley`` was subject to a significant amount of plutonium contamination. Plutonium Valley is located in Area 11 on the eastern boundary of the NTS at an elevation of about 1036 m (3400 ft). Plutonium Valley was the location of four safety tests (A,B,C, and D) conducted during 1956. A major environmental, health, and safety concern is the potential for inhalation of Pu{sup 239,240} by humans as a result of airborne dust containing Pu particles. Thus, the wind transport of Pu{sup 239,240} particles has been the subject of considerable research. This annotated bibliography was created as a reference guide to assist in the better understanding of the environmental characteristics of Plutonium Valley, the safety tests performed there, the processes and variables involved with the wind transport of dust, and as an overview of proposed clean-up procedures.