Science.gov

Sample records for advective gas transport

  1. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  2. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-10-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms.

  3. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  4. Advective turbulent transport in the fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2013-10-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model (HWM) has been employed in pedagogical analyses of the physics behind the behavior of the tokamak plasmas. In addition to the geometric simplicity HWM has an appealing feature of sustaining autonomous quasi-steady state, unstable modes providing the power that is being transported by the nonlinear interactions and is eventually dissipated by the collisional damping at small scales. Emergence of the zonal flow out of the turbulence is a main candidate to cause the transition from the low plasma confinement to the high mode. In the study of such LH transition with the HWM, the adiabaticity parameter has been shown to play an important role in forcing the zonal flow that results in the regulation of the drift-wave turbulence. Instead of concentrating on the physics of the feedback loop between the turbulence and the zonal flow the present study focuses on the presence of the advective transport of the energy. Numerical simulations of HWM are performed and the connections between the advective transport and the zonal flow will be presented. This work was supported by the Supercpmputing Center/Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information with supercomputing resources including technical support (KSC-2013-C1-009).

  5. Thermally driven advection for radioxenon transport from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-05-01

    Barometric pumping is a ubiquitous process resulting in migration of gases in the subsurface that has been studied as the primary mechanism for noble gas transport from an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). However, at early times following a UNE, advection driven by explosion residual heat is relevant to noble gas transport. A rigorous measure is needed for demonstrating how, when, and where advection is important. In this paper three physical processes of uncertain magnitude (oscillatory advection, matrix diffusion, and thermally driven advection) are parameterized by using boundary conditions, system properties, and source term strength. Sobol' sensitivity analysis is conducted to evaluate the importance of all physical processes influencing the xenon signals. This study indicates that thermally driven advection plays a more important role in producing xenon signals than oscillatory advection and matrix diffusion at early times following a UNE, and xenon isotopic ratios are observed to have both time and spatial dependence.

  6. Contributions of advective and diffusive oxygen transport through multilayer composite caps over mine waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Benson, Craig H

    2004-07-01

    The relative contributions of four mechanisms of oxygen transport in multilayer composite (MLC) caps placed over oxygen-consuming mine waste were evaluated using numerical and analytical methods. MLC caps are defined here as caps consisting of earthen and geosynthetic (polymeric) components where a composite barrier layer consisting of a geomembrane (1-2 mm thick polymeric sheet) overlying a clay layer is the primary barrier to transport. The transport mechanisms that were considered are gas-phase advective transport, gas-phase diffusive transport, liquid-phase advective transport via infiltrating precipitation and liquid-phase diffusive transport. A numerical model was developed to simulate gas-phase advective-diffusive transport of oxygen through a multilayer cap containing seven layers. This model was also used to simulate oxygen diffusion in the liquid phase. An approximate analytical method was used to compute the advective flux of oxygen in the liquid phase. The numerical model was verified for limiting cases using an analytical solution. Comparisons were also made between model predictions and field data for earthen caps reported by others. Results of the analysis show that the dominant mechanism for oxygen transport through MLC caps is gas-phase diffusion. For the cases that were considered, the gas-phase diffusive flux typically comprises at least 99% of the total oxygen flux. Thus, designers of MLC caps should focus on design elements and features that will limit diffusion of gas-phase oxygen. PMID:15145567

  7. Advective and diffusive cosmic ray transport in galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesen, Volker; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Stein, Yelena

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D cosmic ray transport models, numerically solving equations of pure advection and diffusion for the electrons and calculating synchrotron emission spectra. We find that for exponential halo magnetic field distributions advection leads to approximately exponential radio continuum intensity profiles, whereas diffusion leads to profiles that can be better approximated by a Gaussian function. Accordingly, the vertical radio spectral profiles for advection are approximately linear, whereas for diffusion they are of `parabolic' shape. We compare our models with deep Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of two edge-on galaxies, NGC 7090 and 7462, at λλ 22 and 6 cm. Our result is that the cosmic ray transport in NGC 7090 is advection dominated with V=150^{+80}_{-30} km s^{-1}, and that the one in NGC 7462 is diffusion dominated with D=3.0± 1.0 × 10^{28}E_GeV^{0.5} cm^2 s^{-1}. NGC 7090 has both a thin and thick radio disc with respective magnetic field scale heights of hB1 = 0.8 ± 0.1 kpc and hB2 = 4.7 ± 1.0 kpc. NGC 7462 has only a thick radio disc with hB2 = 3.8 ± 1.0 kpc. In both galaxies, the magnetic field scale heights are significantly smaller than what estimates from energy equipartition would suggest. A non-negligible fraction of cosmic ray electrons can escape from NGC 7090, so that this galaxy is not an electron calorimeter.

  8. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN SEDIMENT UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ADVECTIVE FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical flux across the sediment/water interface is controlled by a combination of diffusive, dispersive and advective processes. The advective process is a function of submarine groundwater discharge and tidal effects. In areas where surface water interacts with groundwater, ...

  9. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  10. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-01

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration. PMID:26322369

  11. Sediment transport in a surface-advected estuarine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. Y.; Leonardi, N.; Li, J. F.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2016-03-01

    The interplay between suspended-sediment transport and plume hydrodynamics in a surface-advected estuarine plume is studied using a three-dimensional numerical model. Our analysis focuses on the formation of a sediment-rich alongshore current and on the effect of sediments on the structure of the recirculating freshwater bulge. We introduce the ratio Y between the traveling time of sediment along the bulge edge and the settling timescale. When Y <1, suspended sediments enter the alongshore coastal current. When Y >1 the sediments are deposited within the bulge. We find that a critical range of settling velocities exist above which no transport in the costal current is allowed. Critical settling-velocity values increase with river discharge. Therefore, low magnitude and long-lasting floods promote sediment sorting in the continental shelf. We further find that, for a given flood duration, intermediate flood magnitudes at the limit between subcritical and supercritical flow maximize the alongshore sediment transport. Similarly, for a fixed input of water and sediments, intermediate discharge durations maximize alongshore sediment transport.

  12. Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Evaluation of an advective- dispersive formulation and the dusty-gas model including comparison to data for binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.

    1996-05-01

    Two models for gas-phase diffusion and advection in porous media, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-Gas Model (DGM), are reviewed. The ADM, which is more widely used, is based on a linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy`s Law and ordinary diffusion using Fick`s Law. Knudsen diffusion is often included through the use of a Klinkenberg factor for advection, while the effect of a porous medium on the diffusion process is through a porosity-tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier. Another, more comprehensive approach for gas-phase transport in porous media has been formulated by Evans and Mason, and is referred to as the Dusty- Gas Model (DGM). This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or ``dust``) to develop an approach for combined transport due to ordinary and Knudsen diffusion and advection including porous medium effects. While these two models both consider advection and diffusion, the formulations are considerably different, especially for ordinary diffusion. The various components of flow (advection and diffusion) are compared for both models. Results from these two models are compared to isothermal experimental data for He-Ar gas diffusion in a low-permeability graphite. Air-water vapor comparisons have also been performed, although data are not available, for the low-permeability graphite system used for the helium-argon data. Radial and linear air-water heat pipes involving heat, advection, capillary transport, and diffusion under nonisothermal conditions have also been considered.

  13. Fractional Advective-Dispersive Equation as a Model of Solute Transport in Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and modeling transport of solutes in porous media is a critical issue in the environmental protection. The common model is the advective-dispersive equation (ADE) describing the superposition of the advective transport and the Brownian motion in water-filled pore space. Deviations from...

  14. The nature and role of advection in advection-diffusion equations used for modelling bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, Christophe; Bohorquez, Patricio; Heyman, Joris

    2016-04-01

    The advection-diffusion equation arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Stochastic models can also be used to derive this equation, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. Stochastic models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. We develop an approach based on birth-death Markov processes, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received little attention. We show that particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due to velocity fluctuations), with the important consequence that local measurements depend on both the intrinsic properties of particle displacement and the dimensions of the measurement system.

  15. Magnetic helicity transport in the advective gauge family

    SciTech Connect

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel; Hubbard, Alexander; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2011-01-15

    Magnetic helicity fluxes are investigated in a family of gauges in which the contribution from ideal magnetohydrodynamics takes the form of a purely advective flux. Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in this advective gauge family exhibit instabilities triggered by the build-up of unphysical irrotational contributions to the magnetic vector potential. As a remedy, the vector potential is evolved in a numerically well behaved gauge, from which the advective vector potential is obtained by a gauge transformation. In the kinematic regime, the magnetic helicity density evolves similarly to a passive scalar when resistivity is small and turbulent mixing is mild, i.e., when the fluid Reynolds number is not too large. In the dynamical regime, resistive contributions to the magnetic helicity flux in the advective gauge are found to be significant owing to the development of small length scales in the irrotational part of the magnetic vector potential.

  16. Simulation of the advective methane transport and AOM in Shenhu area, the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wu, N.

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) occurs in the transition zone between the presence of sulfate and methane. This reaction is an important process for methane and the global carbon cycle. Methane gas hydrates bearing sediments were recovered in Shenhu Area, the Northern South China Sea, and methane advective transport was detected in this area as well. A one dimension numerical simulation tool was implemented to study the AOM process combined with the advective methane transport in Shenhu Area according to the local drilling data and geochemical information. The modeled results suggest that local methane flux will be consumed in the sediment column via dissolution, sorption and AOM reaction. A portion of methane will enter water column and possibly atmosphere if the methane flux was one order of magnitude higher than current level. Furthermore, the calculated rates of AOM in Shenhu area range similar to that of gas hydrate mounds in Mexico Golf. However, AOM is ability to consume more methane than that in Golf of Mexico due to the lower permeable sediment associated with a deeper sulfate methane transition layer.

  17. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  18. Theory of advection-driven long range biotic transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple mechanistic model to examine the effects of advective flow on the spread of fungal diseases spread by wind-blown spores. The model is defined by a set of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for spore densities. One equation describes the long-distance advectiv...

  19. AN EXACT PEAK CAPTURING AND OSCILLATION-FREE SCHEME TO SOLVE ADVECTION-DISPERSION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exact peak capturing and essentially oscillation-free (EPCOF) algorithm, consisting of advection-dispersion decoupling, backward method of characteristics, forward node tracking, and adaptive local grid refinement, is developed to solve transport equations. This algorithm repr...

  20. A New 2D-Advection-Diffusion Model Simulating Trace Gas Distributions in the Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Peter, T.; Wirth, V.; Fischer, H.; Hoor, P.

    2004-12-01

    Tracer distributions in the lowermost stratosphere are affected by both, transport (advective and non-advective) and in situ sources and sinks. They influence ozone photochemistry, radiative forcing, and heating budgets. In-situ measurements of long-lived species during eight measurement campaigns revealed relatively simple behavior of the tracers in the lowermost stratosphere when represented in an equivalent-latitude versus potential temperature framework. We here present a new 2D-advection-diffusion model that simulates the main transport pathways influencing the tracer distributions in the lowermost stratosphere. The model includes slow diabatic descent of aged stratospheric air and vertical and/or horizontal diffusion across the tropopause and within the lowermost stratosphere. The diffusion coefficients used in the model represent the combined effects of different processes with the potential of mixing tropospheric air into the lowermost stratosphere such as breaking Rossby and gravity waves, deep convection penetrating the tropopause, turbulent diffusion, radiatively driven upwelling etc. They were specified by matching model simulations to observed distributions of long-lived trace gases such as CO and N2O obtained during the project SPURT. The seasonally conducted campaigns allow us to study the seasonal dependency of the diffusion coefficients. Despite its simplicity the model yields a surprisingly good description of the small scale features of the measurements and in particular of the observed tracer gradients at the tropopause. The correlation coefficients between modeled and measured trace gas distributions were up to 0.95. Moreover, mixing across isentropes appears to be more important than mixing across surfaces of constant equivalent latitude (or PV). With the aid of the model, the distribution of the fraction of tropospheric air in the lowermost stratosphere can be determined.

  1. Experimental study of advective-diffusive gaseous CO2 transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirat, Farzad; Sharma, Prabhakar; Niemi, Auli; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2014-05-01

    Leakage of gaseous CO2 into the shallow subsurface system is one of the main concerns associated with geologic storage resources. A better understanding of CO2 leakage in the shallow subsurface plays an important role for developing leakage monitoring programs. CO2 may reach the unsaturated zone by different leak mechanisms such as exsolution from CO2 supersaturated water and continuous bubbling or gas flow along a leakage path. In the unsaturated zone, the CO2 is heavier than air and may accumulate below the ground surface and move laterally. We developed a small-scale experiment setup to study the possible gaseous CO2 transport mechanisms with different controlled conditions. In this study, the experiment setup was applied to measure CO2 distributions in time and space through homogenous dry sand in which the CO2 concentrations through the domain were measured by sensitive gas sensors. The preliminary analysis of the result suggests that the transport and distribution of gaseous CO2 is spatially and temporally sensitive for the selected experimental conditions of gas flow rate and porous media. To better understand the advection and diffusion processes through the unsaturated zone, the experimental results are coupled with the dusty gas model (DGM) of Mason et al. (1967). The dusty gas model's constitutive relationships are integrated into a numerical model for multicomponent gas mixture flow and transport in porous media. The DGM considers interactions between all gaseous species and Knudsen diffusion which is important in fine grained soils. Results from the applied model were consistent with the experimental breakthrough curves obtained in this study.

  2. Curves to determine the relative importance of advection and dispersion for solute and vapor transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garges, J.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of advection and dispersion for both solute and vapor transport can be determined from type curves or concentration, flux, or cumulative flux. The dimensionless form of the type curves provides a means to directly evaluate the importance of mass transport by advection relative to that of mass transport by diffusion and dispersion. Type curves based on an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation are plotted in terms of dimensionless time and Peclet number. Flux and cumulative flux type curves provide additional rationale for transport regime determination in addition to the traditional concentration type curves. The extension of type curves to include vapor transport with phase partitioning in the unsaturated zone is a new development. Type curves for negative Peclet numbers also are presented. A negative Peclet number characterizes a problem in which one direction of flow is toward the contamination source, and thereby diffusion and advection can act in opposite directions. Examples are the diffusion of solutes away from the downgradient edge of a pump-and-treat capture zone, the upward diffusion of vapors through the unsaturated zone with recharge, and the diffusion of solutes through a low hydraulic conductivity cutoff wall with an inward advective gradient.

  3. General solution of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this effort we exactly solve the fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport and give its general solution in terms of hypergeometric distributions. Numerical analysis of this equation shows that its solutions resemble power-laws.

  4. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  5. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture. PMID:26232976

  6. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  7. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  8. THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN GEOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AND ADVECTION-DISPERSION IN CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AT A URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface are controlled by complex processes including advection, dispersion-diffusion, and chemical reactions. However, the interplay between the physical transport processes and chemical reactions, and their...

  9. Anomalous transport regimes and asymptotic concentration distributions in the presence of advection and diffusion on a comb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoretskaya, Olga A.; Kondratenko, Peter S.

    2009-04-01

    We study the transport of impurity particles on a comb structure in the presence of advection. The main body concentration and asymptotic concentration distributions are obtained. Seven different transport regimes occur on the comb structure with finite teeth: classical diffusion, advection, quasidiffusion, subdiffusion, slow classical diffusion, and two kinds of slow advection. Quasidiffusion deserves special attention. It is characterized by a linear growth of the mean-square displacement. However, quasidiffusion is an anomalous transport regime. We established that a change in transport regimes in time leads to a change in regimes in space. Concentration tails have a cascade structure, namely, consisting of several parts.

  10. Analytical solution of the advection-diffusion transport equation using a change-of-variable and integral transform technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a formal exact solution of the linear advection-diffusion transport equation with constant coefficients for both transient and steady-state regimes. A classical mathematical substitution transforms the original advection-diffusion equation into an exclusively diffusive equation. ...

  11. Parallel simulation of particle transport in an advection field applied to volcanic explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzli, Pierre; Tsunematsu, Kae; Albuquerque, Paul; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Chopard, Bastien; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersal models typically describe particle motion via a turbulent velocity field. Particles are advected inside this field from the moment they leave the vent of the volcano until they deposit on the ground. Several techniques exist to simulate particles in an advection field such as finite difference Eulerian, Lagrangian-puff or pure Lagrangian techniques. In this paper, we present a new flexible simulation tool called TETRAS (TEphra TRAnsport Simulator) based on a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model. This scheme offers the advantages of being numerically stable with no numerical diffusion and easily parallelizable. It also allows us to output particle atmospheric concentration or ground mass load at any given time. The model is validated using the advection-diffusion analytical equation. We also obtained a good agreement with field observations of the tephra deposit associated with the 2450 BP Pululagua (Ecuador) and the 1996 Ruapehu (New Zealand) eruptions. As this kind of model can lead to computationally intensive simulations, a parallelization on a distributed memory architecture was developed. A related performance model, taking into account load imbalance, is proposed and its accuracy tested.

  12. Numerical advection algorithms and their role in atmospheric transport and chemistry models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    During the last 35 years, well over 100 algorithms for modeling advection processes have been described and tested. This review summarizes the development and improvements that have taken place. The nature of the errors caused by numerical approximation to the advection equation are highlighted. Then the particular devices that have been proposed to remedy these errors are discussed. The extensive literature comparing transport algorithms is reviewed. Although there is no clear cut 'best' algorithm, several conclusions can be made. Spectral and pseudospectral techniques consistently provide the highest degree of accuracy, but expense and difficulties assuring positive mixing ratios are serious drawbacks. Schemes which consider fluid slabs bounded by grid points (volume schemes), rather than the simple specification of constituent values at the grid points, provide accurate positive definite results.

  13. Stochastic interpretation of the advection-diffusion equation and its relevance to bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.; Bohorquez, P.; Heyman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The advection-diffusion equation is one of the most widespread equations in physics. It arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Phenomenological laws are usually sufficient to derive this equation and interpret its terms. Stochastic models can also be used to derive it, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. These models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. Among these stochastic models, the most common approach consists of random walk models. For instance, they have been used to model the random displacement of tracers in rivers. Here we explore an alternative approach, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. Birth-death Markov processes are well suited to this objective. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received no attention. We therefore look into the possibility of deriving the advection-diffusion equation (with a source term) within the framework of birth-death Markov processes. We show that in the continuum limit (when the cell size becomes vanishingly small), we can derive an advection-diffusion equation for particle activity. Yet while this derivation is formally valid in the continuum limit, it runs into difficulty in practical applications involving cells or meshes of finite length. Indeed, within our stochastic framework, particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due

  14. Universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations: The ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    A fresh approach is taken to the embarrassingly difficult problem of adequately modeling simple pure advection. An explicit conservative control-volume formation makes use of a universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations. This ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme is applied to unsteady, one-dimensional scalar pure advection at constant velocity, using three critical test profiles: an isolated sine-squared wave, a discontinuous step, and a semi-ellipse. The goal, of course, is to devise a single robust scheme which achieves sharp monotonic resolution of the step without corrupting the other profiles. The semi-ellipse is particularly challenging because of its combination of sudden and gradual changes in gradient. The ULTIMATE strategy can be applied to explicit conservation schemes of any order of accuracy. Second-order schemes are unsatisfactory, showing steepening and clipping typical of currently popular so-called high resolution shock-capturing of TVD schemes. The ULTIMATE third-order upwind scheme is highly satisfactory for most flows of practical importance. Higher order methods give predictably better step resolution, although even-order schemes generate a (monotonic) waviness in the difficult semi-ellipse simulation. Little is to be gained above ULTIMATE fifth-order upwinding which gives results close to the ultimate for which one might hope.

  15. Advective transport and decomposition of chain-forming planktonic diatoms in permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Huettel, Markus

    2004-09-01

    In laboratory chamber experiments we demonstrate that permeable sediments (>7×10 -12 m 2) exposed to boundary flows filter chain-forming coastal bloom diatoms ( Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira rotula) from the water column, causing rapid transfer of fresh organic particulate matter into sediment layers as deep as 5 cm within 72 h. The penetration depth of the diatoms depends on the permeability of the bed and the length of the chains. Long chains were not transported as deep into the sediment as short chains or single cells. The fast advective transfer of phytoplankton cells into sandy sediments may be an important process facilitating organic matter uptake and preventing resuspension of deposited organic material in high-energy coastal environments. High advective flushing rates in medium- and coarse-grained sandy sediments enhanced the mineralisation of the trapped diatoms (2300 to 3200 μmol C m -2 d -1), stimulated benthic oxygen consumption (2300 to 3000 μmol O 2 m -2 d -1), as well as nitrification (up to 20 μmol NO 3- m -2 d -1), relative to sediment where diffusion dominated the solute exchange. Advective solute exchange rates that increase with increasing permeability prevent the accumulation of Si(OH) 4 near the dissolving frustules and in the pore water, leading to an effective recycling of dissolved silica to the production process in the water column (95 to 101 μmol Si(OH) 4 m -2 d -1). This process may also enhance dissolution rates of the deposited opal in coarse-grained sands by maintaining higher degrees of undersaturation than in fine-grained sediments. Our results suggest that advective filtration of planktonic diatoms into permeable sediments increases mineralisation and recycling of Si(OH) 4 and organic matter in high energetic shelf areas.

  16. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  17. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  18. Modeling of advection-diffusion-reaction processes using transport dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-11-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. In particular, the transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of Lagrangian particles. To validate the proposed tDPD model and the boundary conditions, three benchmark simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions are performed, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. Also, two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems are performed and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, an application of tDPD to the spatio-temporal dynamics of blood coagulation involving twenty-five reacting species is performed to demonstrate the promising biological applications of the tDPD model. Supported by the DOE Center on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and an INCITE grant.

  19. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  20. Exact PDF equations and closure approximations for advective-reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, D.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical models of advection–reaction phenomena rely on advective flow velocity and (bio) chemical reaction rates that are notoriously random. By using functional integral methods, we derive exact evolution equations for the probability density function (PDF) of the state variables of the advection–reaction system in the presence of random transport velocity and random reaction rates with rather arbitrary distributions. These PDF equations are solved analytically for transport with deterministic flow velocity and a linear reaction rate represented mathematically by a heterog eneous and strongly-correlated random field. Our analytical solution is then used to investigate the accuracy and robustness of the recently proposed large-eddy diffusivity (LED) closure approximation [1]. We find that the solution to the LED-based PDF equation, which is exact for uncorrelated reaction rates, is accurate even in the presence of strong correlations and it provides an upper bound of predictive uncertainty.

  1. Renormalization group estimates of transport coefficients in the advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George

    1993-01-01

    The advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence is considered using recursive renormalization group procedures in the differential sub grid shell thickness limit. It is shown explicitly that the higher order nonlinearities induced by the recursive renormalization group procedure preserve Galilean invariance. Differential equations, valid for the entire resolvable wave number k range, are determined for the eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity coefficients, and it is shown that higher order nonlinearities do not contribute as k goes to 0, but have an essential role as k goes to k(sub c) the cutoff wave number separating the resolvable scales from the sub grid scales. The recursive renormalization transport coefficients and the associated eddy Prandtl number are in good agreement with the k-dependent transport coefficients derived from closure theories and experiments.

  2. User's guide to PHREEQC, a computer program for speciation, reaction-path, advective-transport, and inverse geochemical calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is a computer program written in the C pwgranuning language that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC is based on an ion-association aqueous model and has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations, (2) reaction-path and advective-transport calculations involving specified irreversible reactions, mixing of solutions, mineral and gas equilibria surface-complex-ation reactions, and ion-exchange reactions, and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for composition differences between waters, within specified compositional uncertainties. PHREEQC is derived from the Fortran program PHREEQE, but it has been completely rewritten in C with the addition many new capabilities. New features include the capabilities to use redox couples to distribute redox elements among their valence states in speciation calculations; to model ion-exchange and surface-compiexation reactions; to model reactions with a fixed-pressure, multicomponent gas phase (that is, a gas bubble); to calculate the mass of water in the aqueous phase during reaction and transport calculations; to keep track of the moles of minerals present in the solid phases and determine antomaticaHy the thermodynamically stable phase assemblage; to simulate advective transport in combination with PHREEQC's reaction-modeling capability; and to make inverse modeling calculations that allow for uncertainties in the analytical data. The user interface is improved through the use of a simplified approach to redox reactions, which includes explicit mole-balance equations for hydrogen and oxygen; the use of a revised input that is modular and completely free format; and the use of mineral names and standard chemical symbolism rather than index numbers. The use of (2 eliminates nearly all limitations on army sizes, including numbers of elements, aqueous species, solutions, phases, and lengths of character

  3. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August

  4. Contour advection with surgery: A technique for investigating finescale structure in tracer transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Plumb, R. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We present a trajectory technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), for tracing the evolution of material contours in a specified (including observed) evolving flow. CAS uses the algorithms developed by Dritschel for contour dynamics/surgery to trace the evolution of specified contours. The contours are represented by a series of particles, which are advected by a specified, gridded, wind distribution. The resolution of the contours is preserved by continually adjusting the number of particles, and finescale features are produced that are not present in the input data (and cannot easily be generated using standard trajectory techniques). The reliability, and dependence on the spatial and temporal resolution of the wind field, of the CAS procedure is examined by comparisons with high-resolution numerical data (from contour dynamics calculations and from a general circulation model), and with routine stratospheric analyses. These comparisons show that the large-scale motions dominate the deformation field and that CAS can accurately reproduce small scales from low-resolution wind fields. The CAS technique therefore enables examination of atmospheric tracer transport at previously unattainable resolution.

  5. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bruce S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Passeport, Elodie; Sleep, Brent E

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining "observable" DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C0), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (Dmech/Deff). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C0/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C0/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (<100years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with "typical" well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where Dmech/Deff is larger than 10, DRIF effects will likely not be

  6. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  7. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  8. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  9. Effect of advective flow in fractures and matrix diffusion on natural gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Painter, Scott L.; Hyman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-10-12

    Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for natural gas production for the past couple of decades, there are significant uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curves that are seen in the field. A discrete fracture network based reservoir-scale work flow is used to identify the relative effect of flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on the production curve. With realistic three dimensional representations of fracture network geometry and aperture variability, simulated production decline curves qualitatively resemble observed production decline curves. The high initial peak of the production curve is controlled by advective fracture flow of free gas within the network and is sensitive to the fracture aperture variability. Matrix diffusion does not significantly affect the production decline curve in the first few years, but contributes to production after approximately 10 years. These results suggest that the initial flushing of gas-filled background fractures combined with highly heterogeneous flow paths to the production well are sufficient to explain observed initial production decline. Lastly, these results also suggest that matrix diffusion may support reduced production over longer time frames.

  10. Effect of advective flow in fractures and matrix diffusion on natural gas production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Painter, Scott L.; Hyman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-10-12

    Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for natural gas production for the past couple of decades, there are significant uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curves that are seen in the field. A discrete fracture network based reservoir-scale work flow is used to identify the relative effect of flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on the production curve. With realistic three dimensional representations of fracture network geometry and aperture variability, simulated production decline curves qualitatively resemble observed production decline curves. The high initial peak of the production curve is controlled by advective fracture flow of freemore » gas within the network and is sensitive to the fracture aperture variability. Matrix diffusion does not significantly affect the production decline curve in the first few years, but contributes to production after approximately 10 years. These results suggest that the initial flushing of gas-filled background fractures combined with highly heterogeneous flow paths to the production well are sufficient to explain observed initial production decline. Lastly, these results also suggest that matrix diffusion may support reduced production over longer time frames.« less

  11. Effect of advective flow in fractures and matrix diffusion on natural gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Painter, Scott L.; Hyman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-06-26

    Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for natural gas production for the past couple of decades, there are significant uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curves that are seen in the field. A discrete fracture network based reservoir-scale work flow is used to identify the relative effect of flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on the production curve. With realistic three dimensional representations of fracture network geometry and aperture variability, simulated production decline curves qualitatively resemble observed production decline curves. The high initial peak of the production curve is controlled by advective fracture flow of free gas within the network and is sensitive to the fracture aperture variability. Matrix diffusion does not significantly affect the production decline curve in the first few years, but contributes to production after approximately 10 years. These results suggest that the initial flushing of gas-filled background fractures combined with highly heterogeneous flow paths to the production well are sufficient to explain observed initial production decline. Lastly, these results also suggest that matrix diffusion may support reduced production over longer time frames.

  12. Effect of advective flow in fractures and matrix diffusion on natural gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Painter, Scott L.; Hyman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-10-01

    Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for natural gas production for the past couple of decades, there are significant uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curves that are seen in the field. A discrete fracture network-based reservoir-scale work flow is used to identify the relative effect of flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on the production curve. With realistic three-dimensional representations of fracture network geometry and aperture variability, simulated production decline curves qualitatively resemble observed production decline curves. The high initial peak of the production curve is controlled by advective fracture flow of free gas within the network and is sensitive to the fracture aperture variability. Matrix diffusion does not significantly affect the production decline curve in the first few years, but contributes to production after approximately 10 years. These results suggest that the initial flushing of gas-filled background fractures combined with highly heterogeneous flow paths to the production well are sufficient to explain observed initial production decline. These results also suggest that matrix diffusion may support reduced production over longer time frames.

  13. Transport and Recruitment of Blue Crab Larvae:a Model with Advection and Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Epifanio, C. E.; Epifanio, C. C.; Wong, K.-C.

    1997-07-01

    The present paper develops a mathematical model for the transport and recruitment of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae, and applies it to the inner continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight near Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Blue crab larvae develop through seven or eight planktonic zoeal stages to a megalopa stage suitable for recruitment to adult populations of east coast estuaries. The larvae are concentrated near the surface, and the currents are primarily forced by alongshelf winds and river discharge through major estuaries. Model currents are prescribed based on a realistic synthesis of their observed relationship to wind and river discharge. Besides the resulting advection, particle diffusion and biological mortality are added to determine the fate of larvae released from their parent estuary. Groups of particles were released across the source region of the outflowing buoyancy-driven current in the model estuary mouth. Most larvae were swept alongshelf to the south with the buoyancy-driven coastal current, and thus were lost as recruits to the population of their parent estuary. However, some larvae released close to the seaward edge of the emerging coastal current were able to cross the coastal current front and move seaward into inner shelf water during upwelling-favorable (northward) wind events. Some of these, in turn, were suitably placed near the parent estuary mouth so that they could be advected landward as megalopae into the estuary during a subsequent downwelling-favorable (southward) wind event and thus join the adult population. The model results for megalopae returns were computed from consecutive daily release of 1000 particles, and were compared with 4 years of blue crab megalopa settlement data for Delaware Bay. The model results for 1989 and 1990 matched the observed data remarkably well, with both years showing dominance by a single return event of a few days duration. For 1991 and 1992, the observed results showed multiple return events

  14. Exploring a semimechanistic episodic Langevin model for bed load transport: Emergence of normal and anomalous advection and diffusion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Niannian; Singh, Arvind; Guala, Michele; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Wu, Baosheng

    2016-04-01

    Bed load transport is a highly stochastic, multiscale process, where particle advection and diffusion regimes are governed by the dynamics of each sediment grain during its motion and resting states. Having a quantitative understanding of the macroscale behavior emerging from the microscale interactions is important for proper model selection in the absence of individual grain-scale observations. Here we develop a semimechanistic sediment transport model based on individual particle dynamics, which incorporates the episodic movement (steps separated by rests) of sediment particles and study their macroscale behavior. By incorporating different types of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of particle resting times Tr, under the assumption of thin-tailed PDF of particle velocities, we study the emergent behavior of particle advection and diffusion regimes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For exponential PDFs of resting times Tr, we observe normal advection and diffusion at long time scales. For a power-law PDF of resting times (i.e., f>(Tr>)˜Tr-ν), the tail thickness parameter ν is observed to affect the advection regimes (both sub and normal advective), and the diffusion regimes (both subdiffusive and superdiffusive). By comparing our semimechanistic model with two random walk models in the literature, we further suggest that in order to reproduce accurately the emerging diffusive regimes, the resting time model has to be coupled with a particle motion model able to produce finite particle velocities during steps, as the episodic model discussed here.

  15. TESTING THE FRACTIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE EQUATION FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN SOIL WITH DATA FROM MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and modeling transport of solutes in porous media is a critical issue in the environmental protection. Contaminants from various industrial and agricultural sources can travel in soil and ground water and eventually affect human and animal health. The parabolic advective-dispersive equ...

  16. The advective-dispersive equation with spatial fractional derivatives as a model for tracer transport in structured soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical model to describe solute transport in soil is based on the advective-dispersive equation where Fick’s law is used to explain dispersion. From the microscopic point of view this is equivalent to consider that the motion of the particles of solute may be simulated by the Brownian motion....

  17. The predictability of advection-dominated flux-transport solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Sabrina; Fournier, Alexandre; Aubert, Julien

    2014-01-20

    Space weather is a matter of practical importance in our modern society. Predictions of forecoming solar cycles mean amplitude and duration are currently being made based on flux-transport numerical models of the solar dynamo. Interested in the forecast horizon of such studies, we quantify the predictability window of a representative, advection-dominated, flux-transport dynamo model by investigating its sensitivity to initial conditions and control parameters through a perturbation analysis. We measure the rate associated with the exponential growth of an initial perturbation of the model trajectory, which yields a characteristic timescale known as the e-folding time τ {sub e}. The e-folding time is shown to decrease with the strength of the α-effect, and to increase with the magnitude of the imposed meridional circulation. Comparing the e-folding time with the solar cycle periodicity, we obtain an average estimate for τ {sub e} equal to 2.76 solar cycle durations. From a practical point of view, the perturbations analyzed in this work can be interpreted as uncertainties affecting either the observations or the physical model itself. After reviewing these, we discuss their implications for solar cycle prediction.

  18. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  19. Numerical simulation of advective-dispersive multisolute transport with sorption, ion exchange and equilibrium chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed that can simulate the effect of certain chemical and sorption reactions simultaneously among solutes involved in advective-dispersive transport through porous media. The model is based on a methodology that utilizes physical-chemical relationships in the development of the basic solute mass-balance equations; however, the form of these equations allows their solution to be obtained by methods that do not depend on the chemical processes. The chemical environment is governed by the condition of local chemical equilibrium, and may be defined either by the linear sorption of a single species and two soluble complexation reactions which also involve that species, or binary ion exchange and one complexation reaction involving a common ion. Partial differential equations that describe solute mass balance entirely in the liquid phase are developed for each tenad (a chemical entity whose total mass is independent of the reaction process) in terms of their total dissolved concentration. These equations are solved numerically in two dimensions through the modification of an existing groundwater flow/transport computer code. (Author 's abstract)

  20. Relative effects of advection, sorption and diffusion on transport and tailing of chlorinated solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M.; Jankovic, I.; Rabideau, A. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    Effects of three key transport mechanisms (advection, diffusion and sorption) on transport and contaminant tailing of chlorinated solvents have been investigated using a numerical model. Thousands of model simulations have been conducted for various combinations of transport parameters that govern three key mechanisms in order to quantify tailing and relative importance of each mechanism. Hydraulic conductivity model contains a single inclusion of constant conductivity K embedded in a homogeneous anisotropic background of conductivity Kh,Kv. The inclusion is shaped as an oblate ellipsoid and subject to uniform flow. The background represents "average" conductivity of a heterogeneous formation while inclusion is used to represent geologic units that are more or less conductive than the background. The ratio of long to short semi-axis of the inclusion (a/b) models the ratio of horizontal to vertical integral scales (Ih/Iv) of different geologic units, where integral scales can be obtained, for example, using indicator variograms. The flow solution for present problem is obtained analytically as a closed form solution with exact expressions for Darcy velocity valid both inside and outside the inclusion. Sorption is modeled as an equilibrium process governed by a linear isotherm. The effects on transport and tailing are accounted for using retardation factors. Sorption heterogeneity is created by allowing different values of retardation factor for the interior (Ri) and the exterior of the inclusion (Rb). Diffusive displacements have been added to retarded advective displacements using random walk method. Peclet number, defined as Pe=U Ih/D (U is the groundwater velocity, D is the molecular diffusion coefficient for chlorinated solvents), is used to quantify the diffusion process. Very large numbers of particles (hundreds of thousands) have been tracked using very small time steps (as small as a/10,000) to provide sufficient resolution to breakthrough curves and to

  1. Correcting transport errors during advection of aerosol and cloud moment sequences in eulerian models

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw R.

    2012-03-01

    Moment methods are finding increasing usage for simulations of particle population balance in box models and in more complex flows including two-phase flows. These highly efficient methods have nevertheless had little impact to date for multi-moment representation of aerosols and clouds in atmospheric models. There are evidently two reasons for this: First, atmospheric models, especially if the goal is to simulate climate, tend to be extremely complex and take many man-years to develop. Thus there is considerable inertia to the implementation of novel approaches. Second, and more fundamental, the nonlinear transport algorithms designed to reduce numerical diffusion during advection of various species (tracers) from cell to cell, in the typically coarse grid arrays of these models, can and occasionally do fail to preserve correlations between the moments. Other correlated tracers such as isotopic abundances, composition of aerosol mixtures, hydrometeor phase, etc., are subject to this same fate. In the case of moments, this loss of correlation can and occasionally does give rise to unphysical moment sets. When this happens the simulation can come to a halt. Following a brief description and review of moment methods, the goal of this paper is to present two new approaches that both test moment sequences for validity and correct them when they fail. The new approaches work on individual grid cells without requiring stored information from previous time-steps or neighboring cells.

  2. Characterization of the role of heterogeneous advection and diffusion on transport in weathered and fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Marechal, J.; Nigon, B.; Wajiddudin, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of transport in weathered and fractured rocks is critical as it represents the primary control of contaminant transfer from the subsurface in many parts of the world. This is the case in Southern India, where the subsurface is composed mainly of weathered and fractured granite and where the overexploitation of the groundwater resource since the 70's has led to high water table depletion and strong groundwater quality deterioration. One key issue for modelling transport in such systems is to quantify the respective role of advective heterogeneities and matrix diffusion, which can both lead to strongly non Fickian transport properties. We investigate this question by analysing tracer test experiments performed under different flow configurations at a fractured granite experimental site located in Andhra Pradesh (India). We performed both convergent and push-pull tracer tests within the same fracture and at different scales. Three convergent tracer tests were performed with a solution of fluorescein for different pumping rate and for different distances between injection and pumping boreholes: 6, 30 and 41 meters. To evaluate diffusive process, we performed two long-duration push-pull tests (push time of 3 hours) with a solution of two conservative tracers of different diffusion coefficient (fluorescein and sodium chloride). We performed also six others push-pull tests with only fluorescein but for a variable push times of 14 min and 55 min with or without resting time of about 60 min. The late-time behaviour on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained for all convergent tracer tests showed a power-law slope of -2. Two of them showed an inflexion in the BTCs suggesting the existence of two independent flow paths and thus a highly channelized flow. The long-duration push-pull tests showed similar late-time behaviour with a power-law slope of -2.2 for both tracers. The six others push-pull tests showed a variation of power-law exponent from -3 to -2

  3. Modelling transport in media with heterogeneous advection properties and mass transfer with a Continuous Time Random Walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Moussey, Charlie; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in groundwater systems are strongly affected by the presence of heterogeneity. The heterogeneity leads to non-Fickian features, that manifest themselves in the heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, as well as in the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement and in the non-Gaussian plumes of solute particles. The causes of non-Fickian transport can be the heterogeneity in the flow fields and the processes of mass exchange between mobile and immobile phases, such as sorption/desorption reactions and diffusive mass transfer. Here, we present a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model that describes the transport of solutes in d-dimensional systems by taking into account both heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile mass transfer. In order to account for these processes in the CTRW, the heterogeneities are mapped onto a distribution of transition times, which can be decomposed into advective transition times and trapping times, the latter being treated as a compound Poisson process. While advective transition times are related to the Eulerian flow velocities and, thus, to the conductivity distribution, trapping times depend on the sorption/desorption time scale, in case of reactive problems, or on the distribution of diffusion times in the immobile zones. Since the trapping time scale is typically much larger than the advective time scale, we observe the existence of two temporal regimes. The pre-asymptotic regime is defined by a characteristic time scale at which the properties of transport are fully determined by the heterogeneity of the advective field. On the other hand, in the asymptotic regime both the heterogeneity and the mass exchange processes play a role in conditioning the behaviour of transport. We consider different scenarios to discuss the relative importance of the advective heterogeneity and the mass transfer for the occurrence of non-Fickian transport. For each case we calculate analytically the scalings of the breakthrough

  4. Advective transport observations with MODPATH-OBS--documentation of the MODPATH observation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Kauffman, L.K.; Hill, M.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.

    2013-01-01

    The MODPATH-OBS computer program described in this report is designed to calculate simulated equivalents for observations related to advective groundwater transport that can be represented in a quantitative way by using simulated particle-tracking data. The simulated equivalents supported by MODPATH-OBS are (1) distance from a source location at a defined time, or proximity to an observed location; (2) time of travel from an initial location to defined locations, areas, or volumes of the simulated system; (3) concentrations used to simulate groundwater age; and (4) percentages of water derived from contributing source areas. Although particle tracking only simulates the advective component of conservative transport, effects of non-conservative processes such as retardation can be approximated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity based on the properties of selected conservative tracers. This program can also account for simple decay or production, but it cannot account for diffusion. Dispersion can be represented through direct simulation of subsurface heterogeneity and the use of many particles. MODPATH-OBS acts as a postprocessor to MODPATH, so that the sequence of model runs generally required is MODFLOW, MODPATH, and MODPATH-OBS. The version of MODFLOW and MODPATH that support the version of MODPATH-OBS presented in this report are MODFLOW-2005 or MODFLOW-LGR, and MODPATH-LGR. MODFLOW-LGR is derived from MODFLOW-2005, MODPATH 5, and MODPATH 6 and supports local grid refinement. MODPATH-LGR is derived from MODPATH 5. It supports the forward and backward tracking of particles through locally refined grids and provides the output needed for MODPATH_OBS. For a single grid and no observations, MODPATH-LGR results are equivalent to MODPATH 5. MODPATH-LGR and MODPATH-OBS simulations can use nearly all of the capabilities of MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-LGR; for example, simulations may be steady-state, transient, or a combination

  5. Coupling between geochemical reactions and multicomponent gas and solute transport in unsaturated media: A reactive transport modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K. U.

    2007-05-01

    The two-way coupling that exists between biogeochemical reactions and vadose zone transport processes, in particular gas phase transport, determines the composition of soil gas. To explore these feedback processes quantitatively, multicomponent gas diffusion and advection are implemented into an existing reactive transport model that includes a full suite of geochemical reactions. Multicomponent gas diffusion is described on the basis of the dusty gas model, which accounts for all relevant gas diffusion mechanisms. The simulation of gas attenuation in partially saturated landfill soil covers, methane production, and oxidation in aquifers contaminated by organic compounds (e.g., an oil spill site) and pyrite oxidation in mine tailings demonstrate that both diffusive and advective gas transport can be affected by geochemical reactions. Methane oxidation in landfill covers reduces the existing upward pressure gradient, thereby decreasing the contribution of advective methane emissions to the atmosphere and enhancing the net flux of atmospheric oxygen into the soil column. At an oil spill site, methane oxidation causes a reversal in the direction of gas advection, which results in advective transport toward the zone of oxidation both from the ground surface and the deeper zone of methane production. Both diffusion and advection contribute to supply atmospheric oxygen into the subsurface, and methane emissions to the atmosphere are averted. During pyrite oxidation in mine tailings, pressure reduction in the reaction zone drives advective gas flow into the sediment column, enhancing the oxidation process. In carbonate-rich mine tailings, calcite dissolution releases carbon dioxide, which partly offsets the pressure reduction caused by O2 consumption.

  6. Rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection by inhomogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    A variational procedure, due originally to Howard and explored by Busse and others for self-consistent turbulence problems, is employed to determine rigorous upper bounds for the advection of a passive scalar through an inhomogeneous turbulent slab with arbitrary generalized Reynolds number R and Kubo number K. In the basic version of the method, the steady-state energy balance is used as a constraint; the resulting bound, though rigorous, is independent of K. A pedagogical reference model (one dimension, K = infinity) is described in detail; the bound compares favorably with the exact solution. The direct-interaction approximation is also worked out for this model; it is somewhat more accurate than the bound, but requires considerably more labor to solve. For the basic bound, a general formalism is presented for several dimensions, finite correlation length, and reasonably general boundary conditions. Part of the general method, in which a Green's function technique is employed, applies to self-consistent as well as to passive problems, and thereby generalizes previous results in the fluid literature. The formalism is extended for the first time to include time-dependent constraints, and a bound is deduced which explicitly depends on K and has the correct physical scalings in all regimes of R and K. Two applications from the theory of turbulent plasmas ae described: flux in velocity space, and test particle transport in stochastic magnetic fields. For the velocity space problem the simplest bound reproduces Dupree's original scaling for the strong turbulence diffusion coefficient. For the case of stochastic magnetic fields, the scaling of the bounds is described for the magnetic diffusion coefficient as well as for the particle diffusion coefficient in the so-called collisionless, fluid, and double-streaming regimes.

  7. Gamma irradiation test report of simulated grout specimens for gas generation/liquid advection

    SciTech Connect

    Hinman, C.A.

    1994-10-14

    This report presents the results from an irradiation test performed on four specimens of grout that were fabricated from synthetic Double Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) liquid waste. The objective was to investigate the radiolytic generation of gases and the potential for advective rejection of waste liquids from the grout matrix and to provide experimental information for the validation of the C-Cubed calculated model. It has been demonstrated that a number of gases can be formed within the grout due to radiolytic decomposition of various chemical components that make up the grout. This observation leads to the conjecture that the potential exists for the rejection of a portion of the 60 vol% free liquid from the grout matrix driven by pressurization by these gases. It was found that, for the specimen geometries used in this test series, and for peak radiation dose accumulation rates on the order of 4 to 60 times of the initial rate expected in the grout vaults (300 Rads/hr), no liquid rejection was observed from 2% to 35% of the target exposure expected in the grout vaults (1E+08 Rads). When the irradiation rate exceeded the projected grout vault dose rate by a factor of 200 a small amount of liquid rejection was observed from one of two specimens that had received 20% more than the goal exposure. Because of the differences in the magnitudes of the relative radiation field strengths between this study and an actual grout vault, it is concluded that the potential for liquid rejection by internal gas pressurization from presently configured grout waste forms is very low for the expected conditions.

  8. Natural gas marketing and transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers: Overview of the natural gas industry; Federal regulation of marketing and transportation; State regulation of transportation; Fundamentals of gas marketing contracts; Gas marketing options and strategies; End user agreements; Transportation on interstate pipelines; Administration of natural gas contracts; Structuring transactions with the nonconventional source fuels credit; Take-or-pay wars- a cautionary analysis for the future; Antitrust pitfalls in the natural gas industry; Producer imbalances; Natural gas futures for the complete novice; State non-utility regulation of production, transportation and marketing; Natural gas processing agreements and Disproportionate sales, gas balancing, and accounting to royalty owners.

  9. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  10. A study of turbulent transport of an advective nature in a fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2014-08-01

    The advective nature of the electrostatic turbulent flux of plasma energy in Fourier space is studied numerically in a nearly adiabatic state. Such a state is represented by the Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is driven by a noise that may model the destabilization due to the phase mismatch of the plasma density and the electric potential. The noise is assumed to be Gaussian and not to be invariant under reflection along a direction ŝ. The flux density induced by such noise is found to be anisotropic: While it is random along ŝ, it is not along the perpendicular direction ŝ ⊥, and the flux is not diffusive. The renormalized response may be approximated as advective, with the velocity being proportional to ( kρ s )2, in the Fourier space.

  11. An efficient horizontal advection scheme for the modeling of global transport of constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Hundsdorfer, W.; Spee, E.J.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper the authors consider a dimensional-splitting scheme for horizontal advection on a sphere with a uniform longitude-latitude grid. The 1D subprocesses that arise within the splitting are solved with an explicit finite-volume type scheme, which is made unconditionally stable by allowing the stencil to vary with the Courant numbers. The scheme is made positive by flux limiting. For the inaccuracies at the poles some special measures are discussed. Numerical tests show that the scheme is almost shape preserving and conservative, and it gives accurate results at low computational costs. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Temporal signatures of advective versus diffusive radon transport at a geothermal zone in Central Nepal.

    PubMed

    Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Girault, Frédéric; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2011-02-01

    Temporal variation of radon-222 concentration was studied at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located on the Main Central Thrust zone in Central Nepal. This site is characterized by several carbon dioxide discharges having maximum fluxes larger than 10 kg m(-2) d(-1). Radon concentration was monitored with autonomous Barasol™ probes between January 2008 and November 2009 in two small natural cavities with high CO(2) concentration and at six locations in the soil: four points having a high flux, and two background reference points. At the reference points, dominated by radon diffusion, radon concentration was stable from January to May, with mean values of 22 ± 6.9 and 37 ± 5.5 kBq m(-3), but was affected by a large increase, of about a factor of 2 and 1.6, respectively, during the monsoon season from June to September. At the points dominated by CO(2) advection, by contrast, radon concentration showed higher mean values 39.0 ± 2.6 to 78 ± 1.4 kBq m(-3), remarkably stable throughout the year with small long-term variation, including a possible modulation of period around 6 months. A significant difference between the diffusion dominated reference points and the advection-dominated points also emerged when studying the diurnal S(1) and semi-diurnal S(2) periodic components. At the advection-dominated points, radon concentration did not exhibit S(1) or S(2) components. At the reference points, however, the S(2) component, associated with barometric tide, could be identified during the dry season, but only when the probe was installed at shallow depth. The S(1) component, associated with thermal and possibly barometric diurnal forcing, was systematically observed, especially during monsoon season. The remarkable short-term and long-term temporal stability of the radon concentration at the advection-dominated points, which suggests a strong pressure source at depth, may be an important asset to detect possible temporal variations associated with the

  13. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  14. Advective-diffusive/dispersive transport of chemically reacting species in hydrothermal systems. Final report, FY83-85

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1986-06-20

    A general formulation of multi-phase fluid flow coupled to chemical reactions was developed based on a continuum description of porous media. A preliminary version of the computer code MCCTM was constructed which implemented the general equations for a single phase fluid. The computer code MCCTM incorporates mass transport by advection-diffusion/dispersion in a one-dimensional porous medium coupled to reversible and irreversible, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions. These reactions include aqueous complexing, oxidation/reduction reactions, ion exchange, and hydrolysis reactions of stoichiometric minerals. The code MCCTM uses a fully implicit finite difference algorithm. The code was tested against analytical calculations. Applications of the code included investigation of the propagation of sharp chemical reaction fronts, metasomatic alteration of microcline at elevated temperatures and pressures, and ion-exchange in a porous column. Finally numerical calculations describing fluid flow in crystalline rock in the presence of a temperature gradient were compared with experimental results for quartzite.

  15. Modeling Solute Transport in Soil Columns Using Advective-Dispersive Equation with Fractional Spatial Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been reported that this model cannot take into account several important features of solute movement through soil. Recently, a new model has been suggested that results in a solute transport equation with fractional spatial derivatives, or FADE. We have assembled a database on published solu...

  16. The impact of fluid advection on gas hydrate stability: Investigations at sites of methane seepage offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutchley, G. J.; Klaeschen, D.; Planert, L.; Bialas, J.; Berndt, C.; Papenberg, C.; Hensen, C.; Hornbach, M. J.; Krastel, S.; Brueckmann, W.

    2014-09-01

    Fluid flow through marine sediments drives a wide range of processes, from gas hydrate formation and dissociation, to seafloor methane seepage including the development of chemosynthetic ecosystems, and ocean acidification. Here, we present new seismic data that reveal the 3D nature of focused fluid flow beneath two mound structures on the seafloor offshore Costa Rica. These mounds have formed as a result of ongoing seepage of methane-rich fluids. We show the spatial impact of advective heat flow on gas hydrate stability due to the channelled ascent of warm fluids towards the seafloor. The base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) imaged in the seismic data constrains peak heat flow values to ∼60 mW m and ∼70 mW m beneath two separate seep sites known as Mound 11 and Mound 12, respectively. The initiation of pronounced fluid flow towards these structures was likely controlled by fault networks that acted as efficient pathways for warm fluids ascending from depth. Through the gas hydrate stability zone, fluid flow has been focused through vertical conduits that we suggest developed as migrating fluids generated their own secondary permeability by fracturing strata as they forced their way upwards towards the seafloor. We show that Mound 11 and Mound 12 (about 1 km apart on the seafloor) are sustained by independent fluid flow systems through the hydrate system, and that fluid flow rates across the BGHS are probably similar beneath both mounds. 2D seismic data suggest that these two flow systems might merge at approximately 1 km depth, i.e. much deeper than the BGHS. This study provides a new level of detail and understanding of how channelled, anomalously-high fluid flow towards the seafloor influences gas hydrate stability. Thus, gas hydrate systems have good potential for quantifying the upward flow of subduction system fluids to seafloor seep sites, since the fluids have to interact with and leave their mark on the hydrate system before reaching the seafloor.

  17. MT3DMS: A MODULAR THREE-DIMENSIONAL MULTISPECIES TRANSPORT MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ADVECTION, DISPERSION, AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS OF CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS: DOCUMENTATION AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual describes the next generation of the modular three-dimensional transport model, MT3D, with significantly expanded capabilities, including the addition of (a) a third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) scheme for solving the advection term that is mass conservativ...

  18. Improved rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection described by simple models of bounded systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Bae; Krommes, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The work of Krommes and Smith on rigorous upper bounds for the turbulent transport of a passively advected scalar (/ital Ann. Phys./ 177:246 (1987)) is extended in two directions: (1) For their ''reference model,'' improved upper bounds are obtained by utilizing more sophisticated two-time constraints which include the effects of cross-correlations up to fourth order. Numerical solutions of the model stochastic differential equation are also obtained; they show that the new bounds compare quite favorably with the exact results, even at large Reynolds and Kubo numbers. (2) The theory is extended to take account of a finite spatial autocorrelation length L/sub c/. As a reasonably generic example, the problem of particle transport due to statistically specified stochastic magnetic fields in a collisionless turbulent plasma is revisited. A bound is obtained which reduces for small L/sub c/ to the quasilinear limit and for large L/sub c/ to the strong turbulence limit, and which provides a reasonable and rigorous interpolation for intermediate values of L/sub c/. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  19. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  20. Advective heat transport associated to regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Chiarabba, Claudio; Frondini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The main springs of central Italy Apennines were investigated, in order to compute the amount of heat transported by groundwaters and to compute the fraction of heat due to the geothermal heat flux. The 46 investigated springs represent a significant portion of the permeable structures of the Apennine being characterised by a cumulative flow rate of 130 m3/s, i.e. ~ 50% of the water discharged in this sector of the Apennines. The groundwaters are characterised by relatively low temperatures, but the occurrence of an heat anomaly is evident when the differences between the temperatures of springs and recharge waters are compared with the corresponding altitude difference. A total amount of heat of ~ 2.1 × 109 J/s has been estimated to be transported by these groundwaters. Most of this heat (57%) is given by geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. The computed geothermal warming implies very high heat flux, with values higher than 300 mW/m2, in a large sector of the Apennines which was considered to date be characterised by normal to low conductive heat flux. The same area is affected by high fluxes of CO2 from a deep source and the strict correlation between the geothermal warming and the input of deep CO2-rich fluids is testified by the fact that all the thermally anomalous groundwaters are also affected by the input of deeply derived CO2 contrary to those not thermally anomalous which display any input of deeply derived CO2. This correspondence reasonably suggest the geothermal heat is transported from depth by CO2 rich fluids, which enter the aquifers and mix with infiltrating waters. The amount of geothermal heat transported by central Apennine cold groundwaters is in absolute very high. It results the double than the hydrothermal heat discharge of the US Cascade Range (~1×103 MW) and is about the half of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone, one of the largest hydrothermal system of the world (5-6

  1. The effects of temperature and motility on the advective transport of a deep subsurface bacteria through saturated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    Replicate column experiments were done to quantify the effects of temperature and bacterial motility on advective transport through repacked, but otherwise unaltered, natural aquifer sediment. The bacteria used in this study, A0500, was a flagellated, spore-forming rod isolated from the deep subsurface at DOE`s Savannah River Laboratory. Motility was controlled by turning on flagellar metabolism at 18{degrees}C but off at 40{degrees}C. Microspheres were used to independently quantify the effects of temperature on the sticking efficiency ({alpha}), estimated using a steady-state filtration model. The observed greater microsphere removal at the higher temperature agreed with the physical-chemical model, but bacteria removal at 18{degrees}C was only half that at 4{degrees}C. The sticking efficiency for non-motile A0500 (4{degrees}C) was over three times that of the motile A0500 (18{degrees}C), 0.073 versus 0.022 respectively. Analysis of complete breakthrough curves using a non-steady, kinetically limited, transport model to estimate the time scales of attachment and detachment suggested that motile A 0500 bacteria traveled twice as far as non-motile A 0500 bacteria before becoming attached. Once attached, non-motile colloids detached on the time scale of 9 to 17 days. The time scale for detachment of motile A0500 bacteria was shorter, 4 to 5 days. Results indicate that bacterial attachment was reversible and detachment was enhanced by bacterial motifity. The kinetic energy of bacterial motility changed the attachment-detachment kinetics in favor of the detached state. The chemical factors responsible for the enhanced transport are not known. However, motility may have caused weakly held bacteria to detach from the secondary minimum, and possibly from the primary minimum, as described by DLVO theory.

  2. Advective heat transport associated with regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Frondini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we show that the main springs of the central Apennine transport a total amount of heat of ˜2.2×109 J s-1. Most of this heat (57%) is the result of geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. This result indicates that a large area of the central Apennines is very hot with heat flux values >300 mW m-2. These values are higher than those measured in the magmatic and famously geothermal provinces of Tuscany and Latium and about 1/3 of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone. This finding is surprising because the central Apennines have been thought to be a relatively cold area. Translated by CO2 rich fluids, this heat anomaly suggests the existence of a thermal source such as a large magmatic intrusion at depth. Recent tomographic images of the area support the presence of such an intrusion visible as a broad negative velocity anomaly in seismic waves. Our results indicate that the thermal regime of tectonically active areas of the Earth, where meteoric waters infiltrate and deeply circulate, should be revised on the basis of mass and energy balances of the groundwater systems.

  3. A Study on the Effect of Fracture Aperture Variability on Advective Transport in aFractured Shale using Discrete Fracture Network Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Gable, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas from unconventional fossil energy sources such as shale and tight gasformations has a profound impact on US energy independence. The current state ofproduction of methane and other hydrocarbons from low permeability shale involvesprocesses such as hydraulic fracturing of rock, multiphase flow, and recovery of the gasvia these fractures. Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for the past couple ofdecades, little is known about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curvesthat are seen in the field, such as, reasons for 50-60% decline after the first year in typicalproduction curves.Numerical experiments on a realistic fractured shale system are presented toidentify the effect of complex flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on theproduction curve. For characterizing flow, including the characteristics and geometriesfor the fracture networks, we use a methodology that incorporates a recently developeddiscrete fracture network meshing approach [1], which is combined with the highlyparallel PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport code [2] and a new particletracking capability [3]. The results of this reservoir-scale methodology for analyzing thedecline in gas production rates indicate dominant flow in fractures in the initial highproduction rate. Increase in matrix diffusivity improves production recovery after theinitial production of gas from fractures. Moreover, it is observed that increasing aperturevariability within a single fracture has little effect on the production compared tovariations of the mean fracture aperture from fracture to fracture in a fracture network. [1] Hyman, J.D., Gable C.W., Painter S.L., and Makedonska N., ConformingDelaunay Triangulation of Stochastically Generated Three Dimensional DiscreteFracture Networks: a Feature Rejection Algorithm f or Meshing Strategy, SIAM J.Sci. Comput, 2014 (in press). [2] Lichtner, P.C., Hammond G.E., Lu C., Karra S., Bisht G., Mills R.T., and KumarJ., PFLOTRAN User

  4. A HIGHWAY MODEL FOR THE ADVECTION, DIFFUSION AND CHEMICAL REACTION OF POLLUTANTS RELEASED BY AUTOMOBILES: PART I. ADVECTION AND DIFFUSION OF SF6 TRACER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-dimensional, finite-difference model simulating a highway has been developed which is able to handle linear and nonlinear chemical reactions. Transport of the pollutants is accomplished by use of an upstream-flux-corrected algorithm developed at the Naval Research Laborator...

  5. Analysis of steady-state flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of ground-water flow directions and traveltimes for advective flow were developed for the regional aquifer system of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The work included: (1) descriptions of compartments in the aquifer that function as intermediate and regional flow systems, (2) descriptions of pathlines for flow originating at or near the water table, and (3) quantitative estimates of traveltimes for advective transport originating at or near the water table. A particle-tracking postprocessing program was used to compute pathlines on the basis of output from an existing three-dimensional steady-state flow model. The flow model uses 1980 conditions to approximate average annual conditions for 1950-80. The advective transport model required additional information about the nature of flow across model boundaries, aquifer thickness, and porosity. Porosity of two types of basalt strata has been reported for more than 1,500 individual cores from test holes, wells, and outcrops near the south side of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The central 80 percent of samples had porosities of 0.08 to 0.25, the central 50 percent of samples, O. 11 to 0.21. Calibration of the model involved choosing a value for porosity that yielded the best solution. Two radiologic contaminants, iodine-129 and tritium, both introduced to the flow system about 40 years ago, are relatively conservative tracers. Iodine- 129 was considered to be more useful because of a lower analytical detection limit, longer half-life, and longer flow path. The calibration value for porosity was 0.21. Most flow in the aquifer is contained within a regional-scale compartment and follows paths that discharge to the Snake River downstream from Milner Dam. Two intermediate-scale compartments exist along the southeast side of the aquifer and near Mud Lake.One intermediate-scale compartment along the southeast side of the aquifer discharges to the Snake River near American Fails

  6. BUOYANT ADVECTION OF GASES IN UNSATURATED SOIL

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Gregory E.; Falta, Ronald W.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    In unsaturated soil, methane and volatile organic compounds can significantly alter the density of soil gas and induce buoyant gas flow. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a two-dimensional, homogeneous sand pack with gas permeabilities ranging from 110 to 3,000 darcy. Pure methane gas was injected horizontally into the sand and steady-state methane profiles were measured. Experimental results are in close agreement with a numerical model that represents the advective and diffusive components of methane transport. Comparison of simulations with and without gravitational acceleration permits identification of conditions where buoyancy dominates methane transport. Significant buoyant flow requires a Rayleigh number greater than 10 and an injected gas velocity sufficient to overcome dilution by molecular diffusion near the source. These criteria allow the extension of laboratory results to idealized field conditions for methane as well as denser-than-air vapors produced by volatilizing nonaqueous phase liquids trapped in unsaturated soil. PMID:20396624

  7. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  8. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated. PMID:26605833

  9. MODFLOW-2000 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--documentation of the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the advective component of contaminant transport in steady-state flow fields can provide important information for the calibration of ground-water flow models. This report documents the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package, version 2, which allows advective-transport observations to be used in the three-dimensional ground-water flow parameter-estimation model MODFLOW-2000. The ADV2 Package is compatible with some of the features in the Layer-Property Flow and Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow Packages, but is not compatible with the Block-Centered Flow or Generalized Finite-Difference Packages. The particle-tracking routine used in the ADV2 Package duplicates the semi-analytical method of MODPATH, as shown in a sample problem. Particles can be tracked in a forward or backward direction, and effects such as retardation can be simulated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity. Particles can be discharged at cells that are considered to be weak sinks, in which the sink applied does not capture all the water flowing into the cell, using one of two criteria: (1) if there is any outflow to a boundary condition such as a well or surface-water feature, or (2) if the outflow exceeds a user specified fraction of the cell budget. Although effective porosity could be included as a parameter in the regression, this capability is not included in this package. The weighted sum-of-squares objective function, which is minimized in the Parameter-Estimation Process, was augmented to include the square of the weighted x-, y-, and z-components of the differences between the simulated and observed advective-front locations at defined times, thereby including the direction of travel as well as the overall travel distance in the calibration process. The sensitivities of the particle movement to the parameters needed to minimize the objective function are calculated for any particle location using the exact sensitivity

  10. Transport and reaction processes affecting the attenuation of landfill gas in cover soils.

    PubMed

    Molins, S; Mayer, K U; Scheutz, C; Kjeldsen, P

    2008-01-01

    Methane and trace organic gases produced in landfill waste are partly oxidized in the top 40 cm of landfill cover soils under aerobic conditions. The balance between the oxidation of landfill gases and the ingress of atmospheric oxygen into the soil cover determines the attenuation of emissions of methane, chlorofluorocarbons, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons to the atmosphere. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of oxidation reactions on the overall gas transport regime and to evaluate the contributions of various gas transport processes on methane attenuation in landfill cover soils. For this purpose, a reactive transport model that includes advection and the Dusty Gas Model for simulation of multicomponent gas diffusion was used. The simulations are constrained by data from a series of counter-gradient laboratory experiments. Diffusion typically accounts for over 99% of methane emission to the atmosphere. Oxygen supply into the soil column is driven exclusively by diffusion, whereas advection outward offsets part of the diffusive contribution. In the reaction zone, methane consumption reduces the pressure gradient, further decreasing the significance of advection near the top of the column. Simulations suggest that production of water or accumulation of exopolymeric substances due to microbially mediated methane oxidation can significantly reduce diffusive fluxes. Assuming a constant rate of methane production within a landfill, reduction of the diffusive transport properties, primarily due to exopolymeric substance production, may result in reduced methane attenuation due to limited O(2) -ingress. PMID:18268309

  11. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  12. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  13. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Ely, D.M.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G.M.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2001-08-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS). The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 underground Test Area (UGTA) sites. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work.

  14. Natural gas: Formation of hydrates -- Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskara Rao, B.K.

    1998-07-01

    The significant growth of Natural gas based industries in India and elsewhere obviously forced the industry to hunt for new fields and sources. This has naturally led to the phenomenal growth of gas networks. The transportation of gas over thousands of kilometers through caprious ambient conditions requires a great effort. Many difficulties such as condensation of light liquids (NGLS), choking of lines due to formation of hydrates, improper distribution of gas into branches are experienced during pipe line transportation of Natural gas. The thermodynamic conditions suitable for formation of solid hydrates have been derived depending upon the constituents of natural gas. Further effects of branching in pipe line transportation have been discussed.

  15. A mesh-adaptive collocation technique for the simulation of advection-dominated single- and multiphase transport phenomena in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new mesh-adaptive 1D collocation technique has been developed to efficiently solve transient advection-dominated transport problems in porous media that are governed by a hyperbolic/parabolic (singularly perturbed) PDE. After spatial discretization a singularly perturbed ODE is obtained which is solved by a modification of the COLNEW ODE-collocation code. The latter also contains an adaptive mesh procedure that has been enhanced here to resolve linear and nonlinear transport flow problems with steep fronts where regular FD and FE methods often fail. An implicit first-order backward Euler and a third-order Taylor-Donea technique are employed for the time integration. Numerical simulations on a variety of high Peclet-number transport phenomena as they occur in realistic porous media flow situations are presented. Examples include classical linear advection-diffusion, nonlinear adsorption, two-phase Buckley-Leverett flow without and with capillary forces (Rapoport-Leas equation) and Burgers` equation for inviscid fluid flow. In most of these examples sharp fronts and/or shocks develop which are resolved in an oscillation-free manner by the present adaptive collocation method. The backward Euler method has some amount of numerical dissipation is observed when the time-steps are too large. The third-order Taylor-Donea technique is less dissipative but is more prone to numerical oscillations. The simulations show that for the efficient solution of nonlinear singularly perturbed PDE`s governing flow transport a careful balance must be struck between the optimal mesh adaptation, the nonlinear iteration method and the time-stepping procedure. More theoretical research is needed with this regard.

  16. Evaluation of soil-gas transport of organic chemicals into residential buildings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Daisey, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    This investigation consisted of theoretical, laboratory, and field study phases with the overall objective of determining the importance of pressure-driven flow of soil gas in the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from soil into a house. In the first phase, the mechanisms of advection, diffusion, and retardation of VOC in soil were evaluated. Using the theory of fluid mechanics and empirical for equilibrium partitioning of VOC among gas, aqueous, and solid phase of soil, a one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation or the transport of gas-phase VOC through soil was developed. An experimental apparatus and method were developed for the direct observation of pressure-driven transport of VOC through soil under controlled laboratory conditions. The retardation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) and hexafluorobenzene with respect to the flow of the bulk gas was measured in soil-column experiments using different soils and soil-moisture conditions. The results were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Since SF/sub 6/ was not lost by sorption to soil, it was selected for use as a tracer gas in the field study to study the advective flow of soil gas. The overall objective of the investigation was directly addressed by the field study. This study was conducted at a house which has a basement and which was located adjacent to a covered municipal landfill. The soil at the site was characterized, pressure coupling between the basement and surrounding soil was measured, the entry rate of soil gas as a function of basement depressurization was measured, and VOC in soil gas, indoor air and outdoor air were quantified. 46 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  18. Dissolved gas transport in the presence of a trapped gas phase: Experimental evaluation of a two-dimensional kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, J.H.; Istok, J.D.; O`Reilly, K.T.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative information on dissolved gas transport in ground water aquifers is needed for a variety of site characterization and remedial design applications. The objective of this study was to gain further understanding of dissolved gas transport in the presence of trapped gas in the pore space of an otherwise water saturated porous medium, using a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical modeling. Transport experiments were conducted in a large-scale laboratory physical aquifer model containing a homogeneous sandpack. Tracer (Br{sup {minus}}) and dissolved gas (O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}) plumes were created using a two-well injection/extraction scheme and then were allowed to drift in a uniform flow field. Plume locations and shapes were monitored by measuring tracer and dissolved gas concentrations as a function of position within the sandpack and time. In all experiments, partitioning of the dissolved gases between the mobile ground water and stationary trapped gas phases resulted in substantial retardation and tailing of the dissolved O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plumes relative to the Br{sup {minus}} plumes. Most observed plume features could be reproduced in simulations performed with a numerical model that combined the advection-dispersion equation with diffusion controlled mass transfer of dissolved gas between the mobile aqueous and stationary trapped gas phases. Fitted values of the volumetric trapped gas content and mass transfer coefficient ranged from 0.04 to 0.08 and from 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup {minus}5} sec{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Sensitivity analyses were used to examine how systematic variations in these parameters would be expected to affect dissolved gas transport under a range of potential field conditions. The experimental and modeling results indicate that diffusion controlled mass transfer should be considered when predicting dissolved gas transport in ground water aquifers in the presence of trapped gas.

  19. STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING TRANSPORT PARAMETERS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS TO ONE-DOMENSIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Brian J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation nonlinear multiple-regression methodology for estimating parameters that characterize the transport of contaminants is developed and demonstrated. Finite difference containment transport simulation is combined with a nonlinear weighted least squares multiple-regression procedure. The technique provides optimal parameter estimates and gives statistics for assessing the reliability of these estimates under certain general assumptions about the distributions of the random measurement errors. Monte Carlo analysis is used to estimate parameter reliability for a hypothetical homogeneous soil column for which concentration data contain large random measurement errors. The value of data collected spatially versus data collected temporally was investigated for estimation of velocity, dispersion coefficient, effective porosity, first-order decay rate, and zero-order production. The use of spatial data gave estimates that were 2-3 times more reliable than estimates based on temporal data for all parameters except velocity. (Estimated author abstract) Refs.

  20. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  1. Impact of hot fluid advection on hydrocarbon gas production and seepage in mud volcano sediments of thick Cenozoic deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, Marianne; Elvert, Marcus; Schmidt, Mark; Scholz, Florian; Reitz, Anja; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hensen, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps are ubiquitous at gas-prone Cenozoic deltas such as the Nile Deep Sea Fan (NDSF) On the contrary at the periphery, a lower but sustained CH4 flux is indicated by deeper sulphate-methane transition zones and the presence of 13C-depleted biomarkers of AOM, consistent with predominantly immature organic matter. Values of δ13C-CH4∼-60‰VPDB and decreased concentrations of 13C-enriched C2+ are typical of mixed microbial CH4 and biodegraded thermogenic gas from Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs of the region. The maturity of gas condensate migrated from pre-Miocene sources into Miocene reservoirs of the Western NDSF is higher than that of the gas vented at the centre of NAMV, supporting the hypothesis that it is rather released from the degradation of oil in Neogene reservoirs. Combined with the finding of hot pore water and petroleum at the centre, our results suggest that clay mineral dehydration of Neogene sediments, which takes place posterior to reservoir filling, may contribute to intense gas generation at high sedimentation rate deltas.

  2. Convert natural gas into clean transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Agee, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new process economically converts natural gas into synthetic transportation fuels that are free of sulfur, metals, aromatics and are clear in appearance. The process, developed by Syntroleum Corp., is energy self-sufficient and can be implemented in sizes small enough to fit a large number of the world`s gas fields. The process is described.

  3. Modelling coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Croisé, J.; Altmann, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemico-osmosis is a recognized phenomenon taking place in clay mineral-rich sedimentary formations and a number of questions have been raised concerning its potential effects on pressure fields in and around underground radioactive waste repositories installed in such formations. Certain radioactive waste packages contain large quantities of nitrate salts whose release might result in the presence of highly concentrated salt solutions in the disposal cells, during their resaturation after closure of the facility. This would lead to large solute concentration gradients within the formation's porewater which could then potentially induce significant chemico-osmotic fluxes. In this paper, we assess the impact of chemico-osmotic fluxes on the water pressure during the post-closure period of a typical disposal cell for intermediate-level, long-lived bituminised radioactive waste in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay formation. A numerical model of chemico-osmotic water flow and solute transport has been developed based on the work of Bader and Kooi (2005) [5], and including Bresler's dependence of osmotic efficiency on concentration and compaction state [9]. Model validity has been extended to highly concentrated solutions by incorporating a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, based on the Pitzer's equations. Results show that due to the strong dependence of the osmotic coefficient on concentration, the impact of chemico-osmosis on water flow and on the pressure field around the disposal cell is relatively low. A maximum overpressure of the order of 1 MPa was obtained. No difference in the simulation results were noticed for disposal cell solutions having concentrations higher than 1 M NaNO3. Differences between simulations were found to be almost entirely due to Bresler's relationship i.e., the model of the dependence between osmotic efficiency and concentration, and only slightly on the activity coefficient correction. Questions remain regarding the appropriate

  4. Designing for chaos: applications of chaotic advection at the microscale: One contribution of 11 to a Theme 'Transport and mixing at the microscale'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremler, Mark A.; Haselton, F. R.; Aref, Hassan

    2004-05-01

    Chaotic advection can play an important role in efficient microfluidic mixers. We discuss a design paradigm that exploits chaotic advection and illustrate by two recent examples, namely enhancing gene expression profiling and constructing an in-line microfluidic mixing channel, how application of this paradigm has led to successful micromixers. We suggest that 'designing for chaos', that is, basing practical mixer design on chaotic advection analysis, is a promising approach to adopt in this developing field which otherwise has little to guide it and is constrained by issues of scale and manufacturability.

  5. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  6. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  7. Hot Gas Desulfurization Using Transport Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Moorehead, E.L.

    1996-12-31

    Sierra Pacific Power Company is building a 100 MW, IGCC power plant based on KRW fluid bed gasifier technology that utilizes transport reactors for hot gas desulfurization and sorbent regeneration. Use of a transport absorber avoids the need for pre-filtration of dust-laden gasifier effluent, while a transport regenerator allows for the use of 100% air without the need for heat exchange equipment. Selection of transport reactors for hot gas desulfurization using a proprietary sorbent, based on testing performed in a transport reactor test unit (TRTU) at the M. W. Kellogg Technology Development Center and in a fixed bed reactor at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is outlined. The results obtained in these two test facilities and reasons for selecting transport reactors for the IGCC power plant in preference to either fixed bed or fluidized bed reactors are discussed. This paper reviews the evolution of the hot gas desulfurization system designs and includes selected results on H{sub 2}S absorption and regeneration of sulfided sorbent over several absorption/regeneration cycles conducted in the TRTU and the METC fixed bed reactor. The original design for the Sierra Pacific Project was based on fixed bed reactors with zinc ferrite as the sorbent. Owing to the high steam requirements of this sorbent, zinc titanate was selected and tested in a fixed bed reactor and was found unacceptable due to loss of strength on cyclic absorption/regeneration operation. Another sorbent evaluated was Z-Sorb{reg_sign}, a proprietary sorbent developed by Phillips Petroleum Company, was found to have excellent sulfur capacity, structural strength and regenerability. Steam was found unsuitable as fixed bed regenerator diluent, this results in a requirement for a large amount of inert gas, whereas a transport regenerator requires no diluent. The final Sierra design features transport reactors for both desulfurization and regeneration steps using neat air. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. [CASCADER Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  9. Experiments and modeling of the soil-gas transport of volatile organic compounds into a residential basement: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.

    1988-12-01

    It is assumed that the major pathway for migration of contaminants from landfills was through contamination and movement of groundwater. The migration of methane gas from landfills into nearby residences has indicated the importance of gas-phase transport. Research on the entry of radon gas into houses indicates that the pressure-driven entry of soil gas can result in high indoor concentrations of soil-gas contaminants. This paper presents theoretical and laboratory studies of the advective flow of volatile organics compounds (VOC) through soil, and a field investigation of the pressure-driven entry of VOC into a house adjacent to a municipal landfill. The principals of fluid mechanics are used to derive an analytical model of the pressure-driven flow of VOC in soil. The calculation results in the definition of a retardation factor of VOC with respect to the velocity of the bulk soil gas. The retardation equation is then tested in soil-column experiments using sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) and hexafluorobenzene (HFB). These experiments are used to evaluate the potential of SF/sub 6/ and HFB as tracer gases for use in a field investigation of the advective flow of soil gas into and near the basement of a house near a landfill and to evaluate the potential of the soil-column apparatus for use in screening the advective mobility of VOC important as landfill gas contaminants. The field study consisted of experiments investigating the influence of basement depressurization on the surrounding soil gas, and quantifying VOC contamination at the site. Soil-gas entry into the house during artificial basement depressurization was measured using SF/sub 6/ as a tracer, and pressure coupling was measured between the basement and the surrounding soil. Measurements of VOC in ambient air, indoor air, and soil gas indicate that a number of halogenated and oxygenated contaminants present in indoor air had a soil-gas source. 39 refs., 24 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Multimodel analysis of anisotropic diffusive tracer-gas transport in a deep arid unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Christopher T.; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Andraski, Brian J.; Striegl, Robert G.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Gas transport in the unsaturated zone affects contaminant flux and remediation, interpretation of groundwater travel times from atmospheric tracers, and mass budgets of environmentally important gases. Although unsaturated zone transport of gases is commonly treated as dominated by diffusion, the characteristics of transport in deep layered sediments remain uncertain. In this study, we use a multimodel approach to analyze results of a gas-tracer (SF6) test to clarify characteristics of gas transport in deep unsaturated alluvium. Thirty-five separate models with distinct diffusivity structures were calibrated to the tracer-test data and were compared on the basis of Akaike Information Criteria estimates of posterior model probability. Models included analytical and numerical solutions. Analytical models provided estimates of bulk-scale apparent diffusivities at the scale of tens of meters. Numerical models provided information on local-scale diffusivities and feasible lithological features producing the observed tracer breakthrough curves. The combined approaches indicate significant anisotropy of bulk-scale diffusivity, likely associated with high-diffusivity layers. Both approaches indicated that diffusivities in some intervals were greater than expected from standard models relating porosity to diffusivity. High apparent diffusivities and anisotropic diffusivity structures were consistent with previous observations at the study site of rapid lateral transport and limited vertical spreading of gas-phase contaminants. Additional processes such as advective oscillations may be involved. These results indicate that gases in deep, layered unsaturated zone sediments can spread laterally more quickly, and produce higher peak concentrations, than predicted by homogeneous, isotropic diffusion models.

  11. Multimodel analysis of anisotropic diffusive tracer-gas transport in a deep arid unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Christopher T.; Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian J.; Striegl, Rob; Stonestrom, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in the unsaturated zone affects contaminant flux and remediation, interpretation of groundwater travel times from atmospheric tracers, and mass budgets of environmentally important gases. Although unsaturated zone transport of gases is commonly treated as dominated by diffusion, the characteristics of transport in deep layered sediments remain uncertain. In this study, we use a multimodel approach to analyze results of a gas-tracer (SF6) test to clarify characteristics of gas transport in deep unsaturated alluvium. Thirty-five separate models with distinct diffusivity structures were calibrated to the tracer-test data and were compared on the basis of Akaike Information Criteria estimates of posterior model probability. Models included analytical and numerical solutions. Analytical models provided estimates of bulk-scale apparent diffusivities at the scale of tens of meters. Numerical models provided information on local-scale diffusivities and feasible lithological features producing the observed tracer breakthrough curves. The combined approaches indicate significant anisotropy of bulk-scale diffusivity, likely associated with high-diffusivity layers. Both approaches indicated that diffusivities in some intervals were greater than expected from standard models relating porosity to diffusivity. High apparent diffusivities and anisotropic diffusivity structures were consistent with previous observations at the study site of rapid lateral transport and limited vertical spreading of gas-phase contaminants. Additional processes such as advective oscillations may be involved. These results indicate that gases in deep, layered unsaturated zone sediments can spread laterally more quickly, and produce higher peak concentrations, than predicted by homogeneous, isotropic diffusion models.

  12. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 3: Heterogeneous layered porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  13. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  14. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the

  15. Architecture for gas transport through cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thai Hoa; Frizon, Fabien; Lorente, Sylvie

    2009-05-01

    This paper documents the transport of gaseous species through porous media, with application to cementitious materials. An artificial pore network was created based on mercury intrusion porometry results obtained with samples of cement paste. The flow architecture model consists of parallel channels made of assemblies of truncated cones. Gas diffusion is described as a function of the saturation degree of the material. The model accounts for the effects of the liquid curtains, and the impact of tortuosity on gas diffusion. The results show that constructing an artificial architecture based on Hg porometry allows us to describe with a good accuracy the material porous network. The liquid curtains operate as an obstacle to H2 diffusion. They are determined as a function of the water saturation level and the pore channels geometry. Furthermore, the role of tortuosity as an indicator of gas diffusion accessibility is captured. The sudden drop in the effective diffusion coefficient around a saturation degree of 70% is predicted accurately.

  16. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  17. VAC: Versatile Advection Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; Keppens, Rony

    2012-07-01

    The Versatile Advection Code (VAC) is a freely available general hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulation software that works in 1, 2 or 3 dimensions on Cartesian and logically Cartesian grids. VAC runs on any Unix/Linux system with a Fortran 90 (or 77) compiler and Perl interpreter. VAC can run on parallel machines using either the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library or a High Performance Fortran (HPF) compiler.

  18. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  19. Steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport, Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Daniel J.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Rattray, Gordon W.; Fisher, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The steady-state and transient flow models cover an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the 890 square miles of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Model results can be used in numerical simulations to evaluate the movement of contaminants in the aquifer. Saturated flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer was simulated using the MODFLOW-2000 groundwater flow model. Steady-state flow was simulated to represent conditions in 1980 with average streamflow infiltration from 1966-80 for the Big Lost River, the major variable inflow to the system. The transient flow model simulates groundwater flow between 1980 and 1995, a period that included a 5-year wet cycle (1982-86) followed by an 8-year dry cycle (1987-94). Specified flows into or out of the active model grid define the conditions on all boundaries except the southwest (outflow) boundary, which is simulated with head-dependent flow. In the transient flow model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress, and was variable in time and location. The models were calibrated by adjusting aquifer hydraulic properties to match simulated and observed heads or head differences using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. Various summary, regression, and inferential statistics, in addition to comparisons of model properties and simulated head to measured properties and head, were used to evaluate the model calibration. Model parameters estimated for the steady-state calibration included hydraulic conductivity for seven of nine hydrogeologic zones and a global value of vertical anisotropy. Parameters

  20. Antidiffusive velocities for multipass donor cell advection

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.; Smolarkiewicz, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    Multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA) is an iterative process for approximating the advection equation, which uses a donor cell approximation to compensate for the truncation error of the originally specified donor cell scheme. This step may be repeated an arbitrary number of times, leading to successfully more accurate solutions to the advection equation. In this paper, the authors show how to sum the successive approximations analytically to find a single antidiffusive velocity that represents the effects of an arbitrary number of passes. The analysis is first done in one dimension to illustrate the method and then is repeated in two dimensions. The existence of cross terms in the truncation analysis of the two-dimensional equations introduces an extra complication into the calculation. The authors discuss the implementation of the antidiffusive velocities and provide some examples of applications, including a third-order accurate scheme.

  1. Ammonia gas transport and reactions in unsaturated sediments: implications for use as an amendment to immobilize inorganic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Szecsody, J E; Truex, M J; Williams, M D; Liu, Y

    2015-05-30

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants (such as uranium) because it induces a high pore-water pH, causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application of this treatment, further knowledge of ammonia transport in porous media and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia treatment is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate inter-phase (gas/sediment/pore water) reactions, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions, such as flow rate, gas concentration, and water content. Uranium-contaminated sediment was treated with ammonia gas to demonstrate U immobilization. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases the pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas advection front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase upon exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate when the pH declines due to buffering. Up to 85% of the water-leachable U was immobilized by ammonia treatment. PMID:25723886

  2. Effects of atmospheric pressures on gas transport in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, J. ); Farrier, D.F. )

    1992-03-01

    Temporal variations in barometric pressure due to weather patterns may induce air intrusion into the subsurface. This air intrusion can affect monitoring activities aimed at characterizing the composition and movement of gases in the vadose zone. Expressions are presented to estimate gas fluxes due to the combined effects of Knudsen diffusion, multicomponent molecular diffusion, and viscous flow. These expressions are used to evaluate the validity of the single-component advection-dispersion equation for simulating gas transport in the presence of atmospheric pressure variations. The single-component equation provides reasonable results when used to simulate transport in media with relatively high gas permeability. Computer simulations of vertical transport at sites with homogeneous soils indicate that fresh' air can migrate several meters into the subsurface during a typical barometric pressure cycle. Horizontal pressure gradients can develop at sites with near-surface heterogeneities. These gradients may cause fresh air to intrude meters or tens of meters into the vadose zone during a storm event.

  3. The efficient use of natural gas in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

  4. The efficient use of natural gas in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

  5. Concentration through large advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleja, D.; López-Gómez, J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we extend the elegant results of Chen, Lam and Lou [6, Section 2], where a concentration phenomenon was established as the advection blows up, to a general class of adventive-diffusive generalized logistic equations of degenerate type. Our improvements are really sharp as we allow the carrying capacity of the species to vanish in some subdomain with non-empty interior. The main technical devices used in the derivation of the concentration phenomenon are Proposition 3.2 of Cano-Casanova and López-Gómez [5], Theorem 2.4 of Amann and López-Gómez [1] and the classical Harnack inequality. By the relevance of these results in spatial ecology, complete technical details seem imperative, because the proof of Theorem 2.2 of [6] contains some gaps originated by an “optimistic” use of Proposition 3.2 of [5]. Some of the general assumptions of [6] are substantially relaxed.

  6. Modeling the adsorption of Cr(III) from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass: study of the advective and dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Romero-González, J; Walton, J C; Peralta-Videa, J R; Rodríguez, E; Romero, J; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2009-01-15

    The biosorption of Cr(III) onto packed columns of Agave lechuguilla was analyzed using an advective-dispersive (AD) model and its analytical solution. Characteristic parameters such as axial dispersion coefficients, retardation factors, and distribution coefficients were predicted as functions of inlet ion metal concentration, time, flow rate, bed density, cross-sectional column area, and bed length. The root-mean-square-error (RMSE) values 0.122, 0.232, and 0.285 corresponding to the flow rates of 1, 2, and 3 (10(-3))dm3min(-1), respectively, indicated that the AD model provides an excellent approximation of the simulation of lumped breakthrough curves for the adsorption of Cr(III) by lechuguilla biomass. Therefore, the model can be used for design purposes to predict the effect of varying operational conditions. PMID:18462882

  7. RAETRAD MODEL OF RADON GAS GENERATION, TRANSPORT, AND INDOOR ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the theoretical basis, implementation, and validation of the Radon Emanation and Transport into Dwellings (RAETRAD) model, a conceptual and mathematical approach for simulating radon (222Rn) gas generation and transport from soils and building foundations to ...

  8. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 1, Basic physics and mathematics

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  9. LAYER DEPENDENT ADVECTION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advection methods used in CMAQ require that the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition be satisfied for numerical stability and accuracy. In CMAQ prior to version 4.3, the ADVSTEP algorithm established CFL-safe synchronization and advection timesteps that were uniform throu...

  10. Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

    2010-01-01

    A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near

  11. Low Voltage Gas Transport TE CO(2) Laser.

    PubMed

    Seguin, H J; Sedgwick, G

    1972-04-01

    The constructional and operational aspects of a low voltage transversely excited gas transport CO(2) laser are presented. This compact device incorporates a recirculating wind tunnel type geometry and possesses features of the gas dynamic, gas transport, and TEA lasers. The structure with an active length of 36 cm produced a cw power of approximately 200 W at an over-all system efficiency of 5% using a discharge potential of 1200 V. PMID:20119038

  12. Gas gathering and transportation issues in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, S.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Texas Railroad Commission was established in 1891 to prevent waste of the states oil and gas. The Commission regulates both oil and gas from the time the well permit is granted until it is used. In 1995 the Commission was reorganized with increased emphasis on natural gas issues. The Gas Services Division was formed to address the growing importance of natural gas to the state. The significant aspects of this new division are discussed.

  13. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  14. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 2, User`s manual for CASCADR8

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas.

  15. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack C.; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  16. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  17. Advection, diffusion and delivery over a network

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Luke L.M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological, geophysical and technological systems involve the transport of resource over a network. In this paper we present an algorithm for calculating the exact concentration of resource at any point in space or time, given that the resource in the network is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. We consider the implications of advection, diffusion and delivery for simple models of glucose delivery through a vascular network, and conclude that in certain circumstances, increasing the volume of blood and the number of glucose transporters can actually decrease the total rate of glucose delivery. We also consider the case of empirically determined fungal networks, and analyze the distribution of resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, which necessarily involves the movement of fluid. In three empirically determined fungal networks we found that the minimum currents consistent with the observed growth would effectively transport resource throughout the network over the time-scale of growth. This suggests that in foraging fungi, the active transport mechanisms observed in the growing tips may not be required for long range transport. PMID:23005783

  18. Pore-scale interfacial dynamics during gas-supersaturated water injection in porous media - on nucleation, growth and advection of disconnected fluid phases (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ioannidis, M.

    2010-12-01

    Degassing and in situ development of a mobile gas bubbles occur when injecting supersaturated aqueous phase into water-saturated porous media. Supersaturated water injection (SWI) has potentially significant applications in remediation of soils contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids and in enhanced oil recovery. Pore network simulations indicate the formation of a region near the injection boundary where gas phase nuclei are activated and grow by mass transfer from the flowing supersaturated aqueous phase. Ramified clusters of gas-filled pores develop which, owing to the low prevailing Bond number, grow laterally to a significant extent prior to the onset of mobilization, and are thus likely to coalesce. Gas cluster mobilization invariably results in fragmentation and stranding, such that a macroscopic region containing few tenuously connected large gas clusters is established. Beyond this region, gas phase nucleation and mass transfer from the aqueous phase are limited by diminishing supply of dissolved gas. New insights into SWI dynamics are obtained using rapid micro-visualization in transparent glass micromodels. Using high-speed imaging, we observe the nucleation, initial growth and subsequent fate (mobilization, fragmentation, collision, coalescence and stranding) of CO2 bubbles and clusters of gas-filled pores and analyze cluster population statistics. We find significant support for the development of invasion-percolation-like patterns, but also report on hitherto unaccounted for gas bubble behavior. Additionally, we report for the first time on the acoustic emission signature of SWI in porous media and relate it to the dynamics of bubble nucleation and growth. Finally, we identify the pore-scale mechanisms associated with the mobilization and subsequent recovery of a residual non-aqueous phase liquid due to gas bubble dynamics during SWI.

  19. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  20. Natural gas gathering and transportation issues, 1998 Texas perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    In 1996 and 1997, the natural gas industry was intensely focused on the debate surrounding proposed new rules governing the gathering and transportation of natural gas in Texas by the Railroad Commission. This paper reviews that debate and several other regulatory issues that could impact the natural gas and gas processing industries over the next few years. In addition to the review of the Code of Conduct, this paper focuses on results of the informal complaint process, implementation of new legislation requiring the approval of construction of sour gas pipelines and several other natural gas related issues.

  1. NATURAL GRADIENT EXPERIMENT ON SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A SAND AQUIFER. 2. SPATIAL MOMENTS AND THE ADVECTION AND DISPERSION OF NONREACTIVE TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three-dimensional movement of a tracer plume containing bromide and chloride is investigated using the data base from a large-scale natural gradient field experiment on groundwater solute transport. The analysis focuses on the zeroth-, first-, and second-order spatial moments...

  2. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-ɛ) where ɛ is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values

  3. Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Comparison of models

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.

    1998-09-01

    Two models are commonly used to analyze gas-phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy`s law and ordinary diffusion using Fick`s law with a porosity-tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or dust) to combine transport due to diffusion and advection that includes porous medium effects. The two approaches are compared in this paper.

  4. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  5. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  6. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-20

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  7. How to Find a Bug in Ten Thousand Lines Transport Solver? Outline of Experiences from AN Advection-Diffusion Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, K.; Bombardelli, F.

    2011-12-01

    Almost all natural phenomena on Earth are highly nonlinear. Even simplifications to the equations describing nature usually end up being nonlinear partial differential equations. Transport (ADR) equation is a pivotal equation in atmospheric sciences and water quality. This nonlinear equation needs to be solved numerically for practical purposes so academicians and engineers thoroughly rely on the assistance of numerical codes. Thus, numerical codes require verification before they are utilized for multiple applications in science and engineering. Model verification is a mathematical procedure whereby a numerical code is checked to assure the governing equation is properly solved as it is described in the design document. CFD verification is not a straightforward and well-defined course. Only a complete test suite can uncover all the limitations and bugs. Results are needed to be assessed to make a distinction between bug-induced-defect and innate limitation of a numerical scheme. As Roache (2009) said, numerical verification is a state-of-the-art procedure. Sometimes novel tricks work out. This study conveys the synopsis of the experiences we gained during a comprehensive verification process which was done for a transport solver. A test suite was designed including unit tests and algorithmic tests. Tests were layered in complexity in several dimensions from simple to complex. Acceptance criteria defined for the desirable capabilities of the transport code such as order of accuracy, mass conservation, handling stiff source term, spurious oscillation, and initial shape preservation. At the begining, mesh convergence study which is the main craft of the verification is performed. To that end, analytical solution of ADR equation gathered. Also a new solution was derived. In the more general cases, lack of analytical solution could be overcome through Richardson Extrapolation and Manufactured Solution. Then, two bugs which were concealed during the mesh convergence

  8. Advection and diffusion in shoreline change prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Frazer, L. N.

    2010-12-01

    We added longshore advection and diffusion to the simple cross-shore rate calculation method, as used widely by the USGS and others, to model historic shorelines and to predict future shoreline positions; and applied this to Hawaiian Island beach data. Aerial photographs, sporadically taken throughout the past century, yield usable, albeit limited, historic shoreline data. These photographs provide excellent spatial coverage, but poor temporal resolution, of the shoreline. Due to the sparse historic shoreline data, and the many natural and anthropogenic events influencing coastlines, we constructed a simplistic shoreline change model that can identify long-term behavior of a beach. Our new, two-dimensional model combines the simple rate method to accommodate for cross-shore sediment transport with the classic Pelnard-Considère model for diffusion, as well as a longshore advection speed term. Inverse methods identify cross-shore rate, longshore advection speed, and longshore diffusivity down a sandy coastline. A spatial averaging technique then identifies shoreline segments where one parameter can reasonably account for the cross-shore and longshore transport rates in that area. This produces model results with spatial resolution more appropriate to the temporal spacing of the data. Because changes in historic data can be accounted for by varying degrees of cross-shore and longshore sediment transport - for example, beach erosion can equally be explained by sand moving either off-shore or laterally - we tested several different model scenarios on the data: allowing only cross-shore sediment movement, only longshore movement, and a combination of the two. We used statistical information criteria to determine both the optimal spatial resolution and best-fitting scenario. Finally, we employed a voting method predicting the relaxed shoreline position over time.

  9. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  10. Use of Gas Transported Reactants for Uranium Remediation in Vadose Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Truex, Michael J.; Resch, Charles T.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-03-10

    This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Because uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases, changes in U surface phases were evaluated with a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases and electron microbe identification of mineral phases. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U transport, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals.

  11. Double-porosity modelling of oscillatory gas motion and contaminant transport in a fractured porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, R.H.; Lie, K.H. )

    1987-12-01

    A double-porosity model is used to describe the oscillatory gas motion and associated contaminant transport induced by cyclical variations in the barometric pressure at the surface of a fractured porous medium. Flow along the fractures and within the permeable matrix blocks is locally one-dimensional. The interaction between fractures and blocks includes the Darcian seepage of fluid as well as the Fickian diffusion of contaminant. To guard against artificial numerical diffusion, the FRAM filtering remedy and methodology of Chapman is used in calculating the advective fluxes along fractures and within blocks. The entire system of equations, including the fracture/matrix interaction terms, is solved by a largely implicit non-computational time step is large compared to the cross-block transit time of Darcian pressure waves. The numerical accuracy is tested by comparison with exact solutions for oscillatory and unidirectional flows, some of which include Darcian seepage or Fickian diffusion interaction between the fracture and the matrix. The method is used to estimate the rate of transport of radioactive gases through the rubblized chimney produced by an underground nuclear explosion.

  12. Cloud draft structure and trace gas transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Thompson, Anne M.; Simpson, Joanne; Garstang, Michael; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Browell, Edward V.; Sachse, Glen W.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Torres, Arnold L.

    1990-01-01

    During the second Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2B), meteorological observations, chemical measurements, and model simulations are utilized in order to interpret convective cloud draft structure and to analyze its role in transport and vertical distribution of trace gases. One-dimensional photochemical model results suggest that the observed poststorm changes in ozone concentration can be attributed to convective transports rather than photochemical production and the results of a two-dimensional time-dependent cloud model simulation are presented for the May 6, 1987 squall system. The mesoscale convective system exhibited evidence of significant midlevel detrainment in addition to transports to anvil heights. Chemical measurements of O3 and CO obtained in the convective environment are used to predict photochemical production within the troposphere and to corroborate the cloud model results.

  13. ANALYSIS OF ESTUARINE TRACER-GAS TRANSPORT AND DESORPTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Holley, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    The riverine tracer-gas technique provides a direct, reach-averaged measure of gas exchange, is fairly simple to implement, and is widely accepted for determining reaeration-rate coefficients in rivers. The method, however, is not directly applicable to flows having vertical density gradients. Consequently, studies were undertaken to develop and evaluate methods for obtaining surface-exchange coefficients from estuarine tracer-gas data. Reasonable estimates of the desorption coefficient (within 50 percent of the correct value) were obtained when an analytical solution of the transport equation was compared with data from a numerically simulated continuous release of tracer gas.

  14. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction.

  15. Ammonia Gas Transport and Reactions in Unsaturated Sediments: Implications for Use as an Amendment to Immobilize Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-05-01

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has been studied and has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants such as uranium because it induces a high pore-water pH causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application, knowledge of ammonia transport and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate reactions among gas, sediment, and water, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Measured diffusion front movement was 0.05, 0.03, and 0.02 cm/hr. in sediments with 2.0%, 8.7%, and 13.0% water content, respectively. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase on exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate with declining pH. When uranium is present in the sediment and pore water, up to 85% of the water-leachable uranium was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  16. Noble Gas Tracing of Fluid Transport in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, W. P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Robinson, D. G.; Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fluid transport mechanisms in a shale reservoir using natural noble gas tracers. Noble gas tracing is promising due to sensitivity of transport to: pore structure and sizes; phase partitioning between groundwater and liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing and creation of surface area. A time-series of over thirty wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells with different oil-to-gas ratios, along with production data (i.e., flowrate and pressure). Tracer and production data sets can be combined to infer production flow regimes, to estimate reservoir transport parameters, and to improve forecasts of production decline. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  18. Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Hajicek, D.R.

    2002-09-18

    Today, coal supplies over 55% of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being developed for advanced electric power generation is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system that converts coal to a combustible gas, cleans the gas of pollutants, and combusts the gas in a gas turbine to generate electricity. The hot exhaust from the gas turbine is used to produce steam to generate more electricity from a steam turbine cycle. The utilization of advanced hot-gas particulate and sulfur control technologies together with the combined power generation cycles make IGCC one of the cleanest and most efficient ways available to generate electric power from coal. One of the strategic objectives for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) IGCC research and development program is to develop and demonstrate advanced gasifiers and second-generation IGCC systems. Another objective is to develop advanced hot-gas cleanup and trace contaminant control technologies. One of the more recent gasification concepts to be investigated is that of the transport reactor gasifier, which functions as a circulating fluid-bed gasifier while operating in the pneumatic transport regime of solid particle flow. This gasifier concept provides excellent solid-gas contacting of relatively small particles to promote high gasification rates and also provides the highest coal throughput per unit cross-sectional area of any other gasifier, thereby reducing capital cost of the gasification island.

  19. Advective Mechanisms in Tree Island Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S.

    2002-05-01

    Tree islands are important landscape features in the Florida Everglades. Tres islands are formed of peat deposited on the shallow limestone bedrock, and have been stressed as the system has changed in response to anthropogenic activities due to the sensitivity of organic soils to hydrologic cycles. The plume shape aligned with flow direction for typical tree islands is characteristic of advective transport, despite the rather low flow velocities in the system. Hypothesized mechanisms for the plume shape include sediment transport downstream from the head of the island (often anchored by a bedrock rise), or nutrient transport downstream allowing plants to produce more sediments in situ. Understanding mechanisms controlling tree island shape will aid in understanding the response of tree islands to hydrologic management. An integrated system of field, laboratory, and modeling studies is underway, with the first effort aimed at bounding the importance of the simpler sediment transport processes before tackling more-complex nutrient transport processes. The numerical model integrating the field and laboratory efforts is a 3D finite volume model considering water flow in the shallow groundwater/surface-water system together with sediment transport. The model can account for variable vegetative resistance through the flow column, including the important case where a dense mat forms at the surface. Model components specific for this system and associated data requirements are presented.

  20. Generalized hydrodynamic transport in lattice-gas automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Li-Shi; Chen, Hudong; Chen, Shiyi; Doolen, Gary D.; Lee, Yee-Chun

    1991-01-01

    The generalized hydrodynamics of two-dimensional lattice-gas automata is solved analytically in the linearized Boltzmann approximation. The dependence of the transport coefficients (kinematic viscosity, bulk viscosity, and sound speed) upon wave number k is obtained analytically. Anisotropy of these coefficients due to the lattice symmetry is studied for the entire range of wave number, k. Boundary effects due to a finite mean free path (Knudsen layer) are analyzed, and accurate comparisons are made with lattice-gas simulations.

  1. Generalized hydrodynamic transport in lattice-gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, L. School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 ); Chen, H. Department of Physics, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 ); Chen, S. Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 ); Doolen, G.D.; Lee, Y. )

    1991-06-15

    The generalized hydrodynamics of two-dimensional lattice-gas automata is solved analytically in the linearized Boltzmann approximation. The dependence of the transport coefficients (kinematic viscosity, bulk viscosity, and sound speed) upon wave number {bold k} is obtained analytically. Anisotropy of these coefficients due to the lattice symmetry is studied for the entire range of wave number, {bold k}. Boundary effects due to a finite mean free path (Knudsen layer) are analyzed, and accurate comparisons are made with lattice-gas simulations.

  2. A community firn densification and gas transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, C.; Lundin, J.; Harris, P.; Leahy, W.; Waddington, E. D.

    2012-12-01

    Gas bubbles trapped in ice preserve a record of Earth's climate history. Interpretation of ice-core records is complicated by the difference in age (called delta age) between the gas trapped in bubbles and the ice enclosing the gas. Determining delta age requires understanding both densification of polar firn and gas transport through the firn. Independent models of firn densification and firn gas transport have been developed in the past by individual research groups. We are developing a web-based model of firn densification and gas transport that combines the best features of those models and is freely accessible to research teams. Users input site-specific data, and the model provides depth-density-age and delta-age results. In addition to the web-based model, state-of-the-art transient firn-densification and gas-transport models are in development. These models allow physical properties to evolve, which results in more accurate delta-age approximations at times of rapid climate change in the past. These community models will be downloadable as open-source code. They will provide a baseline to make intercomparisons between datasets or other models. The models are modular, allowing users to choose preferred physical models and physical processes to include, based on available pre-coded options. Alternatively, users can adapt the code to include new or different physics. Here, we present results from the web-based model and early stages of the transient models and compare with known firn-density and gas-concentration profiles.

  3. Consistency problem with tracer advection in the Atmospheric Model GAMIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen

    2008-03-01

    The radon transport test, which is a widely used test case for atmospheric transport models, is carried out to evaluate the tracer advection schemes in the Grid-Point Atmospheric Model of IAP-LASG (GAMIL). Two of the three available schemes in the model are found to be associated with significant biases in the polar regions and in the upper part of the atmosphere, which implies potentially large errors in the simulation of ozone-like tracers. Theoretical analyses show that inconsistency exists between the advection schemes and the discrete continuity equation in the dynamical core of GAMIL and consequently leads to spurious sources and sinks in the tracer transport equation. The impact of this type of inconsistency is demonstrated by idealized tests and identified as the cause of the aforementioned biases. Other potential effects of this inconsistency are also discussed. Results of this study provide some hints for choosing suitable advection schemes in the GAMIL model. At least for the polar-region-concentrated atmospheric components and the closely correlated chemical species, the Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian advection scheme produces more reasonable simulations of the large-scale transport processes without significantly increasing the computational expense.

  4. ADVECTION INFLUENCES ON EVAPOTRANSPIRATION OF ALFALFA IN A SEMIARID ENVIRONMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advective enhancement of crop evapotranspiration (ET) occurs when drier, hotter air is transported into the crop by wind and can be an important factor in the water balance of irrigated crops in a semiarid climate. Thirteen days of moderate to extremely high ET rates of irrigated alfalfa (Medicago ...

  5. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - Interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O2, and the release of CH4 and CO2 from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O2, CH4, and CO2) and non-reactive (Ar and N2) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH4 concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH4 generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N2 and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH4 oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N2 and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH4, and to a more limited extent to O2 ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon

  6. Assimilate transport in phloem sets conditions for leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Nikinmaa, Eero; Hölttä, Teemu; Hari, Pertti; Kolari, Pasi; Mäkelä, Annikki; Sevanto, Sanna; Vesala, Timo

    2013-03-01

    Carbon uptake and transpiration in plant leaves occurs through stomata that open and close. Stomatal action is usually considered a response to environmental driving factors. Here we show that leaf gas exchange is more strongly related to whole tree level transport of assimilates than previously thought, and that transport of assimilates is a restriction of stomatal opening comparable with hydraulic limitation. Assimilate transport in the phloem requires that osmotic pressure at phloem loading sites in leaves exceeds the drop in hydrostatic pressure that is due to transpiration. Assimilate transport thus competes with transpiration for water. Excess sugar loading, however, may block the assimilate transport because of viscosity build-up in phloem sap. Therefore, for given conditions, there is a stomatal opening that maximizes phloem transport if we assume that sugar loading is proportional to photosynthetic rate. Here we show that such opening produces the observed behaviour of leaf gas exchange. Our approach connects stomatal regulation directly with sink activity, plant structure and soil water availability as they all influence assimilate transport. It produces similar behaviour as the optimal stomatal control approach, but does not require determination of marginal cost of water parameter. PMID:22934921

  7. 75 FR 2126 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season Pre... season for an Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Project. The Workshop is being hosted by the Alaska... docket, FERC enacted regulations under the Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline Act which established...

  8. Geochemical and petrological observations of gas transport at arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Herd, R. A.; Humphreys, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Guida, R.; Moretti, R.; Christopher, T. E.; Rawson, H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the abundance and composition of vapour in magma chambers and the mechanisms of vapour transport in volcanic systems is of immense importance. Exsolved vapour in a magma storage area affects eruption style and duration, and influences ground deformation and other geophysical manifestations owing to its compressibility. Ultimately, we wish to understand how much pre-eruptive exsolved vapour exists and what role mafic magma supply at depth plays in supplying it. Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, has become an exceptionally well-monitored volcanic system and there is now an abundance of detailed geochemical and petrological information regarding magma degassing and gas transport processes. The eruption provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of open system mafic magma injection, mingling and degassing, which is occurring on the same time scale as eruption. We examine the geochemical and petrological evidence for magma mingling, degassing and gas fluxing at Soufriere Hills Volcano. We use measurements of gas flux and composition, using DOAS and a multigas sensor. We examine petrological and textural evidence for mafic magma supplying volatiles to the system, including evidence from phenocryst zoning and composition. We show that the mafic magma supplies volatiles as well as heat to the overlying resident andesite. Due to the strong partitioning of sulphur into a vapour phase at depth under oxidising conditions, the sulphur dissolved in the intruding mafic magma becomes segregated into vapour, along with carbon dioxide and water. The vapour is transported to the surface during both eruptive and non-eruptive periods, implying either that significant permeability exists within the system, or that magma convection operates. There is some evidence for gas fluxing, which suggests that gas may be transported through the magma. We draw comparisons with other recent studies of volatile transport in arc systems to show that some observations may be

  9. Short-range, overpressure-driven methane migration in coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2016-08-31

    Two methane migration mechanisms have been proposed for coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs: short-range diffusive gas migration and long-range advective fluid transport from depth. Herein we demonstrate that short-range fluid flow due to overpressure in marine sediments is a significant additional methane transport mechanism that allows hydrate to precipitate in large quantities in thick, coarse-grained hydrate reservoirs. Two-dimensional simulations demonstrate that this migration mechanism, short-range advective transport, can supply significant amounts of dissolved gas and is unencumbered by limitations of the other two end-member mechanisms. Here, short-range advective migration can increase the amount of methane delivered to sands as compared tomore » the slow process of diffusion, yet it is not necessarily limited by effective porosity reduction as is typical of updip advection from a deep source.« less

  10. Role of naturally occurring gas hydrates in sediment transport

    SciTech Connect

    McIver, R.D.

    1982-06-01

    Naturally occurring gas hydrates have the potential to store enormous volumes of both gas and water in semi-solid form in ocean-bottom sediments and then to release that gas and water when the hydrate's equilibrium condition are disturbed. Therefore, hydrates provide a potential mechanism for transporting large volumes of sediments. Under the combined low bottom-water temperatures and moderate hydrostatic pressures that exist over most of the continental slopes and all of the continental rises and abyssal plains, hydrocarbon gases at or near saturation in the interstitial waters of the near-bottom sediments will form hydrates. The gas can either be autochthonous, microbially produced gas, or allochthonous, catagenic gas from deeper sediments. Equilibrium conditions that stabilize hydrated sediments may be disturbed, for example, by continued sedimentation or by lowering of sea level. In either case, some of the solid gas-water matrix decomposes. Released gas and water volume exceeds the volume occupied by the hydrate, so the internal pressure rises - drastically if large volumes of hydrate are decomposed. Part of the once rigid sediment is converted to a gas- and water-rich, relatively low density mud. When the internal pressure, due to the presence of the compressed gas or to buoyancy, is sufficiently high, the overlying sediment may be lifted and/or breached, and the less dense, gas-cut mud may break through. Such hydrate-related phenomena can cause mud diapirs, mud volcanos, mud slides, or turbidite flows, depending on sediment configuration and bottom topography. 4 figures.

  11. Advection, diffusion, and delivery over a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Luke L. M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-08-01

    Many biological, geophysical, and technological systems involve the transport of a resource over a network. In this paper, we present an efficient method for calculating the exact quantity of the resource in each part of an arbitrary network, where the resource is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. The key conceptual step is to partition the resource into material that does or does not reach a node over a given time step. As an example application, we consider resource allocation within fungal networks, and analyze the spatial distribution of the resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, and such growth necessarily involves the movement of fluid. We develop a model of delivery in growing fungal networks, and find good empirical agreement between our model and experimental data gathered using radio-labeled tracers. Our results lead us to suggest that in foraging fungi, growth-induced mass flow is sufficient to account for long-distance transport, if the system is well insulated. We conclude that active transport mechanisms may only be required at the very end of the transport pathway, near the growing tips.

  12. Research on gas transport in chimneys: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.

    1986-03-18

    The results of the AGRINI and TIERRA experiments have led us to study three general topics: collapse phenomenology, CO/sub 2/ content measurement, and gas transport in chimneys. Our results so far are fragmentary, but we have been able to come to some tentative conclusions: (1) a layer of strong material between depths of 24 and 32 m, and perhaps some relatively strong material deeper, may have caused the AGRINI crater shape. This layer was absent at the nearby LABAN and CROWDIE events. We were unable to locate the layer with a surface penetrometer or surface seismic methods, but it may be possible to measure strength vs depth in situ by examining the penetration depth of a projectile. (2) We can probably improve our knowledge of the in situ CO/sub 2/ content by calibrating a commercial carbon/oxygen logging system for NTS conditions. (3) It is possible to measure the response of the gas in a chimney to changes in atmospheric pressure. There can be significantly different gas transport in chimneys with the same pressure response, depending on the porosity and the distribution of the porosity. It is possible to perform an inexpensive experiment to study the gas transport in an existing chimney.

  13. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  14. Impurity transport through a strongly interacting bosonic quantum gas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T. H.; Clark, S. R.; Bruderer, M.; Jaksch, D.

    2011-08-15

    Using near-exact numerical simulations, we study the propagation of an impurity through a one-dimensional Bose lattice gas for varying bosonic interaction strengths and filling factors at zero temperature. The impurity is coupled to the Bose gas and confined to a separate tilted lattice. The precise nature of the transport of the impurity is specific to the excitation spectrum of the Bose gas, which allows one to measure properties of the Bose gas nondestructively, in principle, by observing the impurity; here we focus on the spatial and momentum distributions of the impurity as well as its reduced density matrix. For instance, we show it is possible to determine whether the Bose gas is commensurately filled as well as the bandwidth and gap in its excitation spectrum. Moreover, we show that the impurity acts as a witness to the crossover of its environment from the weakly to the strongly interacting regime, i.e., from a superfluid to a Mott insulator or Tonks-Girardeau lattice gas, and the effects on the impurity in both of these strongly interacting regimes are clearly distinguishable. Finally, we find that the spatial coherence of the impurity is related to its propagation through the Bose gas.

  15. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  16. Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, B.

    2014-10-01

    A collaborative partnership of DOE National Laboratories is working with DOE to identify critical RD&D needs to significantly increase the speed and breadth of NG uptake into the transportation sector. Drivers for increased utilization of natural gas for transportation are discussed. Key needs in research, development, and deployment are proposed, as well as possible pathways to address those needs. This presentation is intended to serve as a catalyst to solicit input from stakeholders regarding what technical areas they deem the most important.

  17. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest. PMID:26871141

  18. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η* (shear viscosity), κ* (thermal conductivity), and μ* (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ* characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η* and μ* is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ* is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  19. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  20. EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. uch characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. eneralization of characteristic...

  1. Transport of a lattice gas under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequence on a quantum system. While this backaction has hitherto been discussed as a limitation to the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. By suitably designing measurement landscapes we can control the transport properties of the lattice gas. We describe a quantitative study of lattice gas dynamics under continuous quantum measurement in the context of a quantum to classical transition where the atom dynamics goes from a quantum walk at low measurement strengths to classical diffusion at high measurement strengths. We further discuss the prospect of using disorder measurement landscapes to realize a new form of Anderson localization. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  2. Impact of Adsorption on Gas Transport in Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tianhao; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2016-03-01

    Given the complex nature of the interaction between gas and solid atoms, the development of nanoscale science and technology has engendered a need for further understanding of gas transport behavior through nanopores and more tractable models for large-scale simulations. In the present paper, we utilize molecular dynamic simulations to demonstrate the behavior of gas flow under the influence of adsorption in nano-channels consisting of illite and graphene, respectively. The results indicate that velocity oscillation exists along the cross-section of the nano-channel, and the total mass flow could be either enhanced or reduced depending on variations in adsorption under different conditions. The mechanisms can be explained by the extra average perturbation stress arising from density oscillation via the novel perturbation model for micro-scale simulation, and approximated via the novel dual-region model for macro-scale simulation, which leads to a more accurate permeability correction model for industrial applications than is currently available.

  3. Liquid water transport mechanism in the gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C. W.

    We developed an equivalent capillary model of a microscale fiber-fence structure to study the microscale evolution and transport of liquid in a porous media and to reveal the basic principles of water transport in gas diffusion layer (GDL). Analytical solutions using the model show that a positive hydraulic pressure is needed to drive the liquid water to penetrate through the porous GDL even consisting of the hydrophilic fibers. Several possible contributions for the water configuration, such as capillary pressure, gravity, vapor condensation, wettability and microstructures of the GDL, are discussed using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that the distribution manners of the fibers and the spatial mixed-wettability in the GDL also play an important role in the transport of liquid water.

  4. Gas transport through magma near the percolation threshold (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Blower, J.; Leslie, D.

    2009-12-01

    Explosive silicic eruptions may simultaneously produce both tube pumice - containing highly-elongate vesicles - and pumice containing sub-spherical vesicles. This has been cited as evidence for strain localization within the volcanic conduit: in a relatively-undeformed axial ‘plug’ bubbles are spherical (regime 1) whilst near the conduit margin rapidly-shearing magma bears elongate bubbles (regime 2). Published numerical studies support this model and indicate that bubbly-magma rheology or viscous heating may be responsible for strain localization. The difference in bubble morphology in these two regimes has important consequences for magma permeability. We present the results of fluid dynamic simulations which quantify the anisotropy of permeability in regime 2 as a function of gas volume fraction and bubble aspect ratio. In this regime, we find that vertical permeability may be many times greater than radial permeability, and that permeability anisotropy is most pronounced near the percolation threshold. We further use a network model to quantify the development of permeability in regime 1. In the case where the predominantly vertical expansion of the magma is slow compared with bubble relaxation time, we find that permeability is, again, anisotropic, but that radial permeability dominates. This effect is also most pronounced near the percolation threshold, and percolation is expected to occur radially before vertical percolation occurs. Our findings imply that gas transport in regime 1 is predominantly radial, whilst vertical gas transport is favoured in regime 2. Consequently, near the percolation threshold, conditions are appropriate for effective degassing of the central magma plug as gas permeates radially to the conduit margin and then vertically upwards. Repeated cycles of percolation, radial gas loss and densification may degas the central magma plug without the development of large gas volume fractions.

  5. The Effect of Microstructure on Firn Gas Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M.

    The processes affecting gas transport through the firn column are important to understand in order to accurately interpret climate records from ice cores. Historically, density measurements have been used to estimate open and closed porosity in the firn layers to inform firn densification models. These densification models directly affect the gas-age ice-age calculation that is used to determine the offset between ice and air bubble proxies of the ice core climate records. Through studies of firn microstructure, we hope to learn more about pore geometry and ultimately how gas transports through firn layers. Such studies will directly influence our understanding of the gas-age ice-age difference. In this thesis, we present three examples of firn microstructure affecting the gas transport through the firn column, in ways that are inconsistent with the current understanding of the firn column. First, we examine the effect melt layers found in firn cores from dry snow region of Greenland. From permeability measurements, we find that the assumption that these melt layers are impermeable, or at least disrupt gas transport, to be incorrect. We compare the melt layers found at NEEM to other Greenlandic firn cores, to reveal that a widespread melt event occurred in 1889 and that warm temperatures combined with black carbon deposition due to forest fires were the cause of such event. The second example we examine is the lock-in zone of the NEEM firn column. We find that the lock-in depth of the NEEM firn to consist of 4.5 m of low permeability firn layers, unlike the single impermeable firn layer that is typically described. This extended lock-in depth of the NEEM lock-in zone helps in the understanding of a NEEM firn air campaign that requires a diffusion term within the lock-in zone, because the extended lock-in depth is capable of allowing a small amount of diffusion through the layers. Lastly, we examine the effect of impurities in the firn layers and their ability to

  6. Modeling 3H-3He Gas-Liquid Phase Transport for Interpretation of Groundwater Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carle, S. F.; Esser, B.; Moran, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    California’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program has measured many hundreds of tritium (3H) and helium-3 (3He) concentrations in well water samples to derive estimates of groundwater age at production and monitoring wells in California basins. However, a 3H-3He age differs from an ideal groundwater age tracer in several respects: (1) the radioactive decay of 3H results in the accumulation of 3He being first-order with respect to 3H activity (versus a zero-order age-mass accumulation process for an ideal tracer), (2) surface concentrations of 3H as measured in precipitation over the last several decades have not been uniform, and (3) the 3H-3He “clock” begins at the water table and not at the ground surface where 3H source measurements are made. To better understand how these non-idealities affect interpretation of 3H-3He apparent groundwater age, we are modeling coupled gas-liquid phase flow and 3H-3He transport including processes of radiogenic decay, phase equilibrium, and molecular diffusion for water, air, 3H, and 3He components continuously through the vadose zone and saturated zone. Assessment of coupled liquid-gas phase processes enables consideration of 3H-3He residence time and dispersion within the vadose zone, including partitioning of tritiogenic 3He to the gas phase and subsequent diffusion into the atmosphere. The coupled gas-liquid phase modeling framework provides direct means to compare apparent 3H-3He age to ideal mean or advective groundwater ages for the same groundwater flow conditions. Examples are given for common groundwater flow systems involving areal recharge, discharge to streams or long-screened wells, and aquifer system heterogeneity. The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment program is sponsored by the California State Water Resources Control Board and carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by

  7. Reactive Gas transport in soil: Kinetics versus Local Equilibrium Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Jia, Ruijan

    2010-05-01

    Gas transport through the unsaturated soil zone was studied using an analytical solution of the gas transport model that is mathematically equivalent to the Two-Region model. The gas transport model includes diffusive and convective gas fluxes, interphase mass transfer between the gas and water phase, and biodegradation. The influence of non-equilibrium phenomena, spatially variable initial conditions, and transient boundary conditions are studied. The objective of this paper is to compare the kinetic approach for interphase mass transfer with the standard local equilibrium approach and to find conditions and time-scales under which the local equilibrium approach is justified. The time-scale of investigation was limited to the day-scale, because this is the relevant scale for understanding gas emission from the soil zone with transient water saturation. For the first time a generalized mass transfer coefficient is proposed that justifies the often used steady-state Thin-Film mass transfer coefficient for small and medium water-saturated aggregates of about 10 mm. The main conclusion from this study is that non-equilibrium mass transfer depends strongly on the temporal and small-scale spatial distribution of water within the unsaturated soil zone. For regions with low water saturation and small water-saturated aggregates (radius about 1 mm) the local equilibrium approach can be used as a first approximation for diffusive gas transport. For higher water saturation and medium radii of water-saturated aggregates (radius about 10 mm) and for convective gas transport, the non-equilibrium effect becomes more and more important if the hydraulic residence time and the Damköhler number decrease. Relative errors can range up to 100% and more. While for medium radii the local equilibrium approach describes the main features both of the spatial concentration profile and the time-dependence of the emission rate, it fails completely for larger aggregates (radius about 100 mm

  8. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A new multi-gas constrained model of trace gas non-homogeneous transport in firn: evaluation and behaviour at eleven polar sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witrant, E.; Martinerie, P.; Hogan, C.; Laube, J. C.; Kawamura, K.; Capron, E.; Montzka, S. A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Etheridge, D.; Blunier, T.; Sturges, W. T.

    2012-12-01

    Insoluble trace gases are trapped in polar ice at the firn-ice transition, at approximately 50 to 100 m below the surface, depending primarily on the site temperature and snow accumulation. Models of trace gas transport in polar firn are used to relate firn air and ice core records of trace gases to their atmospheric history. We propose a new model based on the following contributions. First, the firn air transport model is revised in a poromechanics framework with emphasis on the non-homogeneous properties and the treatment of gravitational settling. We then derive a nonlinear least square multi-gas optimisation scheme to calculate the effective firn diffusivity (automatic diffusivity tuning). The improvements gained by the multi-gas approach are investigated (up to ten gases for a single site are included in the optimisation process). We apply the model to four Arctic (Devon Island, NEEM, North GRIP, Summit) and seven Antarctic (DE08, Berkner Island, Siple Dome, Dronning Maud Land, South Pole, Dome C, Vostok) sites and calculate their respective depth-dependent diffusivity profiles. Among these different sites, a relationship is inferred between the snow accumulation rate and an increasing thickness of the lock-in zone defined from the isotopic composition of molecular nitrogen in firn air (denoted δ15N). It is associated with a reduced diffusivity value and an increased ratio of advective to diffusive flux in deep firn, which is particularly important at high accumulation rate sites. This has implications for the understanding of δ15N of N2 records in ice cores, in relation with past variations of the snow accumulation rate. As the snow accumulation rate is clearly a primary control on the thickness of the lock-in zone, our new approach that allows for the estimation of the lock-in zone width as a function of accumulation may lead to a better constraint on the age difference between the ice and entrapped gases.

  10. Transport of Ions Out of the LEBIT Gas Stopping Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schury, Peter; Bollen, Georg; Lofy, Patrick; Morrissey, David; Ringle, Ryan; Schwarz, Stefan; Sun, Tao; Wiggins, David; van Wasshenova, Daniel; Varentsov, Victor

    2002-10-01

    The Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) project will convert high-energy ( 100 MeV/A) fragmentation beams into very low emittance, low energy (5 keV) beams. These brilliant beams are requisite for high precision experiments. In particular, they will be used for high precision mass measurements of short-lived species. To facilitate the conversion to a low energy beam, a high-pressure (1 bar) gas cell is utilized. To be extracted from the gas cell, the ions must pass through the 1 mm inner diameter nozzle at the end of the gas cell. After the gas cell, a series of three linear radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion guides carry the ions through differential pumping and into high vacuum. In contrast to similar systems used elsewhere we plan to drive these RFQs with square waves, which greatly simplifies the tuning and operation. In order to find optimum geometrical and operational parameters, ion trajectories were calculated based upon a combination of ion optics and gas flow. Our calculations show efficient transport through the system.

  11. Analysis of glycylsarcosine transport by lobster intestine using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Maria L; Lane, Amy L; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography was used to measure transepithelial transport of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) by perfused lobster (Homarus americanus) intestine. Unidirectional and net fluxes of dipeptide across the tissue and luminal factors affecting their magnitude and direction were characterized by perfusing the lumen with the dipeptide and measuring its appearance in saline on the serosal side of the organ. Transmural transport of 10 mM Gly-Sar resulted in serosal accumulation of only the dipeptide; no appearance of corresponding monomeric amino acids glycine or sarcosine was observed. Carrier-mediated and diffusional transmural intestinal transport of Gly-Sar was estimated at 1-15 mM luminal concentrations and followed a curvilinear equation providing a K m = 0.44 ± 0.17 mM, a J max = 1.27 ± 0.12 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), and a diffusional coefficient = 0.026 ± 0.008 nmol cm(-2) min(-1) mM(-1). Unidirectional mucosal to serosal and serosal to mucosal fluxes of 10 mM Gly-Sar provided a significant (p < 0.05) net absorptive flux toward the serosa of 3.54 ± 0.77 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), further supporting carrier-mediated dipeptide transport across the gut. Alkaline (pH 8.5) luminal pH more than doubled transmural Gly-Sar transport as compared to acidic (pH 5.5) luminal pH, while luminal amino acid-metal chelates (e.g., Leu-Zn-Leu), and high concentrations of amino acids alone significantly (p < 0.001) reduced intestinal Gly-Sar transfer by inhibiting carrier transport of the dipeptide. Proposed mechanisms accounting for intestinal dipeptide transport and luminal factors affecting this process are discussed. PMID:25260349

  12. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  13. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Stauffer, Philip H; Knight, Earl E; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  14. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  15. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  16. Gas transport and vesicularity in low-viscosity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, Laura; Bonadonna, Costanza; Abdulkareem, Lokman; Azzopardi, Barry; Phillips, Jeremy

    2010-05-01

    that gas is mainly transported by large, conduit-size bubbles rising in a microvesicular liquid. Coalescence processes occur throughout the whole column, and are strongly affected by bubble size, shearing and flow dynamics. Increasing gas fluxes increases frequency and length of the large bubbles but does not affect the concentration of small bubbles in the liquid matrix. Scaling of these experiments suggest that these conditions could be met in low viscosity, crystal-poor magmas and we therefore suggest that this dynamics could also characterize two-phase flow in open conduit mafic systems.

  17. Anomalous diffusion of a tracer advected by wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2001-02-01

    We consider the advection of a passive tracer when the velocity field is a superposition of random waves. Green's function for the turbulent transport (turbulent diffusion and turbulent drift) is derived. This Green's function is shown to imply sub-diffusive or super-diffusive behavior of the tracer. For the analysis we introduce the statistical near-identity transformation. The results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  18. A Quasi-Conservative Adaptive Semi-Lagrangian Advection-Diffusion Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Many processes in atmospheric or oceanic tracer transport are conveniently represented by advection-diffusion type equations. Depending on the magnitudes of both components, the mathematical representation and consequently the discretization is a non-trivial problem. We will focus on advection-dominated situations and will introduce a semi-Lagrangian scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for high local resolution. This scheme is well suited for pollutant transport from point sources, or transport processes featuring fine filamentation with corresponding local concentration maxima. In order to achieve stability, accuracy and conservation, we combine an adaptive mesh refinement quasi-conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme, based on an integral formulation of the underlying advective conservation law (Behrens, 2006), with an advection diffusion scheme as described by Spiegelman and Katz (2006). The resulting scheme proves to be conservative and stable, while maintaining high computational efficiency and accuracy.

  19. [Characteristics of water-gas two-phase CO2 transport in unsaturated zone].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanxin; Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Jinsheng; Yun, Ying; Li, Shushen; Wang, Zhiming

    2003-07-01

    The migration of CO2 in soil was simulated through use of soil column, especially the transformation of CO2 between water and gas phases at wetting front was studied. The soil column in the test was 1 m long and the concentration of CO2 solution was 748 mg/L. Through analysis, it was shown that CO2 migration in water phase was governed by advection, dispersion, reaction and mass transfer between water and gas phases, that in gas phase by advection, dispersion, mass transfer between two phases. Sampling method under dynamic condition of two phase flow in soil column was approached and mass transfer coefficient from water phase to gas phase was determined as 0.00061. This showed that there was certain mass transformation of CO2 from water phase to gas phase and yet it was not so significant. This study can provide the quantitative scientific bases for safety assessment of geological disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste and environmental impact assessment of solid waste disposal by landfilling. PMID:14551970

  20. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  1. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering. PMID:27176431

  3. Unified account of gas pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions: Chinese transportation 1978-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xi; Chen, G. Q.

    2010-09-01

    To facilitate the aggregation of both quantity and quality of waste emissions, the concept of chemical exergy combining the first and second laws of thermodynamics is introduced for a unified account of gas pollutants and greenhouse gases, by a case study for the Chinese transportation system 1978-2004 with main gas pollutants of NO, SO2, CO and main greenhouse gases of CO2 and CH4. With chemical exergy emission factors concretely estimated, the total emission as well as emission intensity by exergy of the overall transportation system and of its four modes of highways, railways, waterways and civil aviation are accounted in full detail and compared with those by the conventionally prevailing metrics of mass, with essential implications for environmental policy making.

  4. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties and simulated advective transport of contaminated ground water in a fractured rock aquifer at the Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Brown, Jean C.; Carleton, Glen B.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, predominantly trichloroethylene and its degradation products, have been detected in ground water at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. An air-stripping pump-and-treat system has been in operation at the NAWC since 1998. An existing ground-water-flow model was used to evaluate the effect of a change in the configuration of the network of recovery wells in the pump-and-treat system on flow paths of contaminated ground water. The NAWC is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer composed of dipping layers of sedimentary rocks of the Lockatong and Stockton Formations. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties of the part of the aquifer composed of the Lockatong Formation were measured using aquifer tests and tracer tests. The heterogeneity of the rocks causes a wide range of values of each parameter measured. Transmissivity ranges from 95 to 1,300 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient ranges from 9 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3; and the effective porosity ranges from 0.0003 to 0.002. The average linear velocity of contaminated ground water was determined for ambient conditions (when no wells at the site are pumped) using an existing ground-water-flow model, particle-tracking techniques, and the porosity values determined in this study. The average linear velocity of flow paths beginning at each contaminated well and ending at the streams where the flow paths terminate ranges from 0.08 to 130 feet per day. As a result of a change in the pump-and-treat system (adding a 165-foot-deep well pumped at 5 gallons per minute and reducing the pumping rate at a nearby 41-foot-deep well by the same amount), water in the vicinity of three 100- to 165-foot-deep wells flows to the deep well rather than the shallower well.

  5. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gasmore » breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.« less

  6. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  7. Chaotic advection in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schelin, A B; Károlyi, Gy; de Moura, A P S; Booth, N A; Grebogi, C

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we argue that the effects of irregular chaotic motion of particles transported by blood can play a major role in the development of serious circulatory diseases. Vessel wall irregularities modify the flow field, changing in a nontrivial way the transport and activation of biochemically active particles. We argue that blood particle transport is often chaotic in realistic physiological conditions. We also argue that this chaotic behavior of the flow has crucial consequences for the dynamics of important processes in the blood, such as the activation of platelets which are involved in the thrombus formation. PMID:19658798

  8. Impact of Adsorption on Gas Transport in Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianhao; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2016-01-01

    Given the complex nature of the interaction between gas and solid atoms, the development of nanoscale science and technology has engendered a need for further understanding of gas transport behavior through nanopores and more tractable models for large-scale simulations. In the present paper, we utilize molecular dynamic simulations to demonstrate the behavior of gas flow under the influence of adsorption in nano-channels consisting of illite and graphene, respectively. The results indicate that velocity oscillation exists along the cross-section of the nano-channel, and the total mass flow could be either enhanced or reduced depending on variations in adsorption under different conditions. The mechanisms can be explained by the extra average perturbation stress arising from density oscillation via the novel perturbation model for micro-scale simulation, and approximated via the novel dual-region model for macro-scale simulation, which leads to a more accurate permeability correction model for industrial applications than is currently available. PMID:27020130

  9. Impact of Adsorption on Gas Transport in Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianhao; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2016-01-01

    Given the complex nature of the interaction between gas and solid atoms, the development of nanoscale science and technology has engendered a need for further understanding of gas transport behavior through nanopores and more tractable models for large-scale simulations. In the present paper, we utilize molecular dynamic simulations to demonstrate the behavior of gas flow under the influence of adsorption in nano-channels consisting of illite and graphene, respectively. The results indicate that velocity oscillation exists along the cross-section of the nano-channel, and the total mass flow could be either enhanced or reduced depending on variations in adsorption under different conditions. The mechanisms can be explained by the extra average perturbation stress arising from density oscillation via the novel perturbation model for micro-scale simulation, and approximated via the novel dual-region model for macro-scale simulation, which leads to a more accurate permeability correction model for industrial applications than is currently available. PMID:27020130

  10. Gas generation phenomena in radioactive waste transportation packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1997-11-01

    The interaction of radiation from radioactive materials with the waste matrix can lead to the deterioration of the waste form resulting in the possible formation of gaseous species. Depending on the type and characteristics of the radiation source, the generation of hydrogen may predominate. Since the interaction of alpha particles with the waste form results in significant energy transfer, other gases such as carbon oxides, methane, nitrogen oxides, oxygen, water, and helium are possible. The type of gases produced from the waste forms is determined by the mechanisms involved in the waste degradation. For transuranic wastes, the identified degradation mechanisms are reported to be caused by radiolysis, thermal decomposition or dewatering, chemical corrosion, and bacterial action. While all these mechanisms may be responsible for the buildup of gases during the storage of wastes, radiolysis and thermal decomposition appear to be the main contributors during waste transport operations. In this paper, the authors provide a review of applicable gas generation data resulting from the degradation of various waste forms under conditions typical for transport. The effects of radiolytic and thermal degradation mechanisms will be discussed in the context of transportation safety.

  11. Universal spin transport in a strongly interacting Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ariel; Ku, Mark; Roati, Giacomo; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2011-04-14

    Transport of fermions, particles with half-integer spin, is central to many fields of physics. Electron transport runs modern technology, defining states of matter such as superconductors and insulators, and electron spin is being explored as a new carrier of information. Neutrino transport energizes supernova explosions following the collapse of a dying star, and hydrodynamic transport of the quark-gluon plasma governed the expansion of the early Universe. However, our understanding of non-equilibrium dynamics in such strongly interacting fermionic matter is still limited. Ultracold gases of fermionic atoms realize a pristine model for such systems and can be studied in real time with the precision of atomic physics. Even above the superfluid transition, such gases flow as an almost perfect fluid with very low viscosity when interactions are tuned to a scattering resonance. In this hydrodynamic regime, collective density excitations are weakly damped. Here we experimentally investigate spin excitations in a Fermi gas of (6)Li atoms, finding that, in contrast, they are maximally damped. A spin current is induced by spatially separating two spin components and observing their evolution in an external trapping potential. We demonstrate that interactions can be strong enough to reverse spin currents, with components of opposite spin reflecting off each other. Near equilibrium, we obtain the spin drag coefficient, the spin diffusivity and the spin susceptibility as a function of temperature on resonance and show that they obey universal laws at high temperatures. In the degenerate regime, the spin diffusivity approaches a value set by [planck]/m, the quantum limit of diffusion, where [planck]/m is Planck's constant divided by 2π and m the atomic mass. For repulsive interactions, our measurements seem to exclude a metastable ferromagnetic state. PMID:21490670

  12. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth; Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Nagamori, Masanao; Moldrup, Per; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, ρ(b), and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D(p)/D(o), ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k(a)) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting ρ(b) values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm(-3). Results showed that D(p) and k(a) values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content (ε), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D(p)/D(f), the ratio of measured D(p) to D(p) in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k(a)/k(a)(,pF4.1), the ratio of measured k(a) to k(a) at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content (ε) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D(p)(ε/f) and k(a)(ε/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D(p) and P for k(a)). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to ρ(b) values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models. PMID:21813272

  13. Quantum critical transport in the unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Tilman

    2012-07-01

    The thermodynamic and transport properties of the unitary Fermi gas at finite temperature T are governed by a quantum critical point at T=0 and zero density. We compute the universal shear viscosity to entropy ratio η/s in the high-temperature quantum critical regime T≫|μ| and find that this strongly coupled quantum fluid comes close to perfect fluidity η/s=ℏ/(4πkB). Using a controlled large-N expansion, we show that already at the first nontrivial order the equation of state and the Tan contact density C agree well with the most recent experimental measurements and theoretical Luttinger-Ward and bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo calculations.

  14. Element variations in rhyolitic magma resulting from gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlo, K.; Tuffen, H.; Smith, V. C.; Castro, J. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; Geraki, K.

    2013-11-01

    Tuffisite veins are glass-filled fractures formed when magma fragments during degassing within the conduit. These veins form transient channels through which exsolved gases can escape from magma. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which chemical heterogeneity within the melt results from gas transport, and assess how this can be used to study magma degassing. Two tuffisite veins from contrasting rhyolitic eruptions at Torfajökull (Iceland) and Chaitén (Chile) were studied in detail. The tuffisite vein from Torfajökull is from a shallow dissected conduit (∼70 ka) that fed a degassed lava flow, while the sample from Chaitén was a bomb ejected during the waning phases of Plinian activity in May 2008. The results of detailed in situ chemical analyses (synchrotron XRF, FTIR, LA-ICP-MS) show that in both veins larger vesiculated fragments are enriched in volatile elements (Torfajökull: H, Li, Cl; Chaitén: Li, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Sn, Sb) compared to the host, while the surrounding smaller particles are depleted in the Torfajökull vein (Li, Cl, Zn, Br, Rb, Pb), but enriched in the Chaitén vein (K, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Sb, Pb). The lifespans of both veins and the fluxes of gas and particles through them can be estimated using diffusion profiles and enrichment factors. The Torfajökull vein had a longer lifespan (∼a day) and low particle velocities (∼cm/s), while the Chaitén vein was shorter lived (<1 h) with a high gas velocity (∼m/s). These differences are consistent with the contrasting eruption mechanisms (effusive vs. explosive). The amount of magma that degassed through the Chaitén vein is more than ten times the volume of the vein itself, requiring the vein to tap into pre-exsolved gas pockets. This study highlights that tuffisite veins are highly efficient gas pathways and thereby impart chemical diversity in volatile elements on the melt.

  15. Impurity Transport in a Simulated Gas Target Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blush, L. M.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.; Conn, R. W.; Schmitz, L.

    1997-11-01

    Previous simulated gas target divertor experiments in the PISCES-A linear plasma device (n <= 3 × 10^19 m-3, kTe <= 20 eV) indicated enhanced impurity retention near the target in comparison to a high recycling divertor regime. A 1 1\\over2-D fluid modeling code suggested that impurities are impeded from transporting away from the target by friction with the neutral and ionized hydrogen. In recent experiments with a PISCES-A ``slot-type'' divertor configuration, we have implemented a spectroscopic detection system to measure the axial density profiles of several impurity charge states. Moreover, we envision adding two extended cylindrical baffles spanning a pumped vacuum section to achieve strong differential pumping. This arrangement will isolate the plasma source from the gas target region and allow us to seed the background hydrogen plasma with higher impurities concentrations and investigate a regime dominated by impurity radiation. In preliminary design experiments, PISCES-A was successfully operated with an electrically isolated, copper baffle (d=5 cm, l=33.5 cm) mounted to reduce the vacuum conductance between the source and target regions. This work supported by US-DoE contract DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  16. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  17. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-15

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  18. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Lawler, J E

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3). A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena. PMID:22462957

  19. Transport of dissolved gas and its ecological impact after a gas release from deepwater.

    PubMed

    Wimalaratne, Malinda R; Yapa, Poojitha D; Nakata, Kisaburo; Premathilake, Lakshitha T

    2015-11-15

    Previous models on simulating gas releases in deepwater were not focused on the dissolved component and its impact on water quality. This paper presents a new model developed for simulating the transport/spread of dissolved methane from an underwater release and its impact on dissolved oxygen in ambient water. Methane dissolves into ambient water from gas phase, direct from hydrate phase, and from dissociating hydrates formed earlier. Dissolved methane affects the dissolved oxygen levels in ambient water due to microbial interaction and possible direct absorption of oxygen into methane bubbles. We use new model simulations of Deepspill field experiments to compare with instantaneous profiles which were unpublished until now. The comparisons are very good with a short time lag, but are within the acceptable discrepancy for models for emergency response and contingency planning. Scenario simulations show the effect on dissolved oxygen due to different methane release situations. PMID:26364205

  20. Super-diffusion versus competitive advection: a simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, D.; Giannattasio, F.; Berrilli, F.; Consolini, G.; Lepreti, F.; Gošić, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Magnetic element tracking is often used to study the transport and diffusion of the magnetic field on the solar photosphere. From the analysis of the displacement spectrum of these tracers, it has recently been agreed that a regime of super-diffusivity dominates the solar surface. Quite habitually this result is discussed in the framework of fully developed turbulence. Aims: However, the debate whether the super-diffusivity is generated by a turbulent dispersion process, by the advection due to the convective pattern, or even by another process is still open, as is the question of the amount of diffusivity at the scales relevant to the local dynamo process. Methods: To understand how such peculiar diffusion in the solar atmosphere takes place, we compared the results from two different data sets (ground-based and space-borne) and developed a simulation of passive tracers advection by the deformation of a Voronoi network. Results: The displacement spectra of the magnetic elements obtained by the data sets are consistent in retrieving a super-diffusive regime for the solar photosphere, but the simulation also shows a super-diffusive displacement spectrum: its competitive advection process can reproduce the signature of super-diffusion. Conclusions: Therefore, it is not necessary to hypothesize a totally developed turbulence regime to explain the motion of the magnetic elements on the solar surface.

  1. Laser speckle contrast imaging is sensitive to advective flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-07-01

    Unlike laser Doppler flowmetry, there has yet to be presented a clear description of the physical variables that laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is sensitive to. Herein, we present a theoretical basis for demonstrating that LSCI is sensitive to total flux and, in particular, the summation of diffusive flux and advective flux. We view LSCI from the perspective of mass transport and briefly derive the diffusion with drift equation in terms of an LSCI experiment. This equation reveals the relative sensitivity of LSCI to both diffusive flux and advective flux and, thereby, to both concentration and the ordered velocity of the scattering particles. We demonstrate this dependence through a short series of flow experiments that yield relationships between the calculated speckle contrast and the concentration of the scatterers (manifesting as changes in scattering coefficient), between speckle contrast and the velocity of the scattering fluid, and ultimately between speckle contrast and advective flux. Finally, we argue that the diffusion with drift equation can be used to support both Lorentzian and Gaussian correlation models that relate observed contrast to the movement of the scattering particles and that a weighted linear combination of these two models is likely the most appropriate model for relating speckle contrast to particle motion.

  2. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  3. Distinguishing resuspension and advection signals in a hypertidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, David; Souza, Alex; Jago, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial material is supplied to an estuary system by the river, while marine material is supplied by the sea. Whether the estuary acts as a trap or a bypass zone for SPM (suspended particulate matter) depends upon the properties and dynamics of both the estuary, including the tidal and residual behaviour of the currents, and the SPM, including particle sizes and settling velocities and concentration gradients, which together control the dynamics, such as the trapping efficiency, of the estuary. Whether an SPM signal is regarded as being one of resuspension or advection depends upon the area of interest, and therefore distinguishing between resuspension and advection can be complex. Material that is resuspended within the area of study is regarded as resuspension, while that which is resuspended outside, but passes through, the area of interest, is regarded as advection. The results of a measurement campaign undertaken in a hypertidal UK estuary during the pre-spring bloom February-March and post-spring bloom May-June are presented utilising a combination of acoustic and optical instruments, moorings, and CTD stations. A characteristic asymmetric "twin peak" signal is present during both time periods, implying the presence of both resuspension and advection. This is confirmed through the use of harmonic analysis. A seasonal variation in the relative importance of the resuspension and advection components is seen between the two observation periods, with the small (<122µm) and large (>122µm) particles displaying different behaviours and providing a strong indication of the presence of flocculation. Approximate point flux calculations showed a reduction in the horizontal gradient of concentration, and subsequently the flood dominance of sediment transport, between May-June and February-March. This has been attributed to changes in biological activity and atmospheric forcing between the two observational periods. Ebb-dominant concentrations brought about by the

  4. Common inconsistencies in modeling gas transport in porous electrodes: The dusty-gas model and the Fick law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertei, A.; Nicolella, C.

    2015-04-01

    The paper shows as two assumptions typically made in modeling gas transport in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes, i.e., a) uniform pressure in the dusty-gas model, and b) validity of the Bosanquet formula in the Fick model, may lead to serious inconsistencies (such as molar fractions that do not sum up to one or fluxes that do not obey reaction stoichiometry), thus nullifying the efforts of the mechanistic modeling of transport phenomena. The nature of the inconsistent use of the models is explained with clear examples, then the correct implementation of the gas transport models is discussed. The study aims to promote a coherent physically-based modeling of gas transport phenomena in porous electrodes in order to assist their rational design.

  5. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  6. 75 FR 6370 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season Pre-Filing Workshop... hold a workshop on the procedures and process for holding and commenting on an open season for...

  7. 75 FR 8329 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Rescheduled Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season Pre-Filing Workshop February 17, 2010....

  8. Positron transport and thermalization - the plasma-gas interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, Joan

    2008-11-01

    Low energy positrons are now used in many fields including atomic physics, material science and medicine [1]. Plasma physics is providing new tools for this research, including Penning-Malmberg buffer-gas traps to accumulate positrons and the use of rotating electric fields (the ``rotating wall'' technique) to compress positrons radially and create tailored beams [1]. These devices (now available commercially), which rely in key instances on positron-neutral interactions, are a convenient way to create plasmas and beams for a variety of applications. A deeper understanding of the relevant cooling and loss mechanisms is required to take full advantage of this technology. This talk focuses on a recent study of positrons in such a tenuous gaseous environment in the presence of an applied electric field [2]. Energy-resolved collision cross sections and a Monte Carlo code modified to include positrionium (Ps) formation are used to obtain transport coefficients and the thermalization and Ps-formation rates. A markedly different type of negative differential conductivity is observed (i.e., not seen in electron systems), due to the non-conservative nature of the Ps-formation process. It is particularly prominent in gases with large, highly energy dependent Ps-formation cross sections. The relevance of these calculations to other positron applications will also be discussed, including a currently planned study of positrons in gaseous water. It is hoped that these calculations will inspire a new generation of positron transport experiments.*Work done in collaboration with Z.Lj. Petrovi'c, A. Bankovi'c, M. Suvakov, G. Malovi'c, S. Dujko, S.J. Buckman. 1. C. M. Surko and R. G. Greaves, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2333-2348 (2004).2. A. Bankovi'c, J. P. Marler, M. Suvakov, G. Malovi'c, and Z. Lj. Petrovi'c, Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 266, 462-465 (2008).

  9. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  10. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  11. Radon as a tracer of biogenic gas equilibration and transport from methane-saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1989-01-01

    Data on Rn-222 activity in methane-rich gas bubbles from anoxic coastal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, were used to determine gas equilibration with pore waters and the rates of ebullitive stripping and transport of gases to overlying waters and the atmosphere. Results showed that, during summer months, the bubble ebullition process strips and transports 1.9-4.8 percent/day of the standing crop of radon (and, by inference, other gases equilibrated with gas bubbles) in surface sediments of Cape Lookout Bight to the troposphere. Thus, the ebullitive mode of gas transport represents an effective mechanism for delivering reduced biogenic gases directly to the atmosphere.

  12. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  13. Advection fog formation in a polluted atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, R.J.; Liaw, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ have been detected in highly industrialized areas. The major portions of aerosol products are the results of energy related fuel combustion. Both microphysical and macrophysical processes are considered in investigating the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with both polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results show that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog with condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere for monodisperse distribution.

  14. MAGNETIC ADVECTION DUE TO DIFFUSIVITY GRADIENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    We derive and discuss an important source of advection of magnetic fields in plasmas, for a completely general case. Magnetic diffusivity is proportional to electrical resistivity: where the value this parameter is high, it is well known that magnetic fields can leak (or diffuse) rapidly into (or out) of the plasma. Magnetohydrodynamic lore has it that where gradients, or changes in space, of the value of the diffusivity are high, magnetic fields can have enhanced flow (or advection). We derive this phenomenon rigorously, compare our results to other work in the literature, and discuss its implications, especially for kinematic dynamos. As an extra mathematical bonus, we find that the magnetic advection due to diffusivity gradients can be expressed in terms of a diffusion equation within the induction equation, making its computational implementation especially simple.

  15. Trace gas transport out of the Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsche, Laura; Pozzer, Andrea; Zimmermann, Peter; Parchatka, Uwe; Fischer, Horst

    2016-04-01

    The trace gas transport out of the Indian summer monsoon was investigated during the aircraft campaign OMO (Oxidation Mechanism Observations) with the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) in July/August 2015. HALO was based at Paphos/Cyprus and also on Gan/Maledives. Flights took place over the Mediterranean Sea, the Arabian Peninsula and the Arabian Sea. In this work the focus is on the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) in the upper troposphere. They were measured with the laser absorption spectrometer TRISTAR on board of HALO. During the Indian summer monsoon strong convection takes place over India and the Bay of Bengal. In this area the population is high accompanied by many emission sources e.g. wetlands and cultivation of rice. Consequently the boundary layer is polluted containing high concentrations of trace gases like methane and carbon monoxide. Due to vertical transport these polluted air masses are lifted to the upper troposphere. Here they circulate with the so called Asian monsoon anticyclone. In the upper troposphere polluted air masses lead to a change in the chemical composition thus influence the chemical processes. Furthermore the anticyclone spreads the polluted air masses over a larger area. Thus the outflow of the anticyclone in the upper troposphere leads to higher concentrations of trace gases over the Arabian Sea, the Arabian Peninsula and also over the eastern part of North Africa and the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea. During OMO higher concentrations of methane and carbon monoxide were detected at altitudes between 11km and 15km. The highest measured concentrations of carbon monoxide and methane were observed over Oman. The CO concentration in the outflow of the monsoon exceeds background levels by 10-15ppb. However the enhancement in the concentration is not obviously connected to the monsoon due to the natural variability in the troposphere. The enhancement in the

  16. TRU waste transportation -- The flammable gas generation problem

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1997-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed a flammable gas (i.e., hydrogen) concentration limit of 5% by volume on transuranic (TRU) waste containers to be shipped using the TRUPACT-II transporter. This concentration is the lower explosive limit (LEL) in air. This was done to minimize the potential for loss of containment during a hypothetical 60 day period. The amount of transuranic radionuclide that is permissible for shipment in TRU waste containers has been tabulated in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP, 1) to conservatively prevent accumulation of hydrogen above this 5% limit. Based on the SARP limitations, approximately 35% of the TRU waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab (INEEL), Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) cannot be shipped in the TRUPACT-II. An even larger percentage of the TRU waste drums at the Savannah River Site (SRS) cannot be shipped because of the much higher wattage loadings of TRU waste drums in that site`s inventory. This paper presents an overview of an integrated, experimental program that has been initiated to increase the shippable portion of the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste inventory. In addition, the authors will estimate the anticipated expansion of the shippable portion of the inventory and associated cost savings. Such projection should provide the TRU waste generating sites a basis for developing their TRU waste workoff strategies within their Ten Year Plan budget horizons.

  17. Bioinspired gas bubble spontaneous and directional transportation effects in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Wang, Jingming; Yang, Zhongjia; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    A series of well-ordered, 3D gradient porous interconnected network surfaces composed of micro-nano hierarchical geometries is constructed on a copper wire. A continuous gas film can be trapped around its interface in an aqueous medium acting as an effective channel for gas transportation. Driving by the difference of the Laplace pressure, gas bubbles can be transported spontaneously and directionally. PMID:25688855

  18. Effect of dissolved organic carbon on the transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and carboxylate-modified microspheres advected through temperate humic and tropical volcanic agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Metge, David W; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-02-21

    Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and microspheres in two disparate (a clay- and Fe-rich, volcanic and a temperate, humic) agricultural soils were studied in the presence and absence of 100 mg L(-1) of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 5.0-6.0. Transport of carboxylate-modified, 1.8 μm microspheres in soil columns was highly sensitive to the nature of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas oocysts transport was more affected by soil mineralogy. SDBS increased transport of microspheres from 48% to 87% through the tropical soil and from 43% to 93% in temperate soil. In contrast, SRHA reduced transport of microspheres from 48% to 28% in tropical soil and from 43% to 16% in temperate soil. SDBS also increased oocysts transport through the temperate soil 5-fold, whereas no oocyst transport was detected in tropical soil. SRHA had only a nominal effect in increasing oocysts transport in tropical soil, but caused a 6-fold increase in transport through the temperate soil. Amendments of only 4 mg L(-1) SRHA and SDBS decreased oocyst hydrophobicity from 66% to 20% and from 66% to 5%, respectively. However, SDBS increased microsphere hydrophobicity from 16% to 33%. Soil fines, which includes clays, and SRHA, both caused the oocysts zeta potential (ζ) to become more negative, but caused the highly hydrophilic microspheres to become less negatively charged. The disparate behaviors of the two colloids in the presence of an ionic surfactant and natural organic matter suggest that microspheres may not be suitable surrogates for oocysts in certain types of soils. These results indicate that whether or not DOC inhibits or promotes transport of oocysts and microspheres in agricultural soils and by how much, depends not only on the surface characteristics of the colloid, but the nature of the DOC and the soil mineralogy. PMID:21711011

  19. Experiments and modeling of the soil-gas transport of volatile organic compounds into a residential basement

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.

    1988-07-01

    This paper presents theoretical and laboratory studies of the advective flow of volatile organics compounds (VOC) through soil, and a field investigation of the pressure-driven entry of VOC into a house adjacent to a municipal landfill. The principals of fluid mechanics are used to derive an analytical model of the pressure- driven flow of VOC in soil. The calculation results in the definition of a retardation factor of VOC with respect to the velocity of the bulk soil gas. The retardation equation is then tested in soil-column experiments using sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 2/) and hexafluorobenzene (HFB). The measured retardation is in good agreement with the predicted value. These experiments are used to evaluate the potential of SF/sub 6/ and HFB as tracer gases for use in a field investigation of the advective flow of soil gas into and near the basement of a house near a landfill and to evaluate the potential of the soil-column apparatus for use in screening the advective mobility of VOC important as landfill gas containments. The field study consisted of experiments investigating the influence of basement depressurization on the surrounding soil gas, and quantifying VOC contamination at the site. Soil-gas entry into the house during artificial basement depressurization was measured using SF/sub 6/ as a tracer, and pressure coupling was measured between the basement and the surrounding soil. Measurements of VOC in ambient air, indoor air, and soil gas indicate that a number of halogenated and oxygenated contaminants present in indoor air had a soil-gas source. Particularly high concentrations of dichlorodifluoromethane, trichlorofluoromethane, and tetrachloroethylene were identified in the soil gas. The pressure field generated in the soil around the basement by basement underpressure was modeled using a modified groundwater model. 39 refs., 26 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  1. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  2. X-ray computed tomography studies of gas storage and transport in Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Miao, P.; Watson, A.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Pepin, G.P.; Moss, R.M. ); Semmelbeck, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Devonian shales and other unconventional resources can be highly fractured and may have significant amounts of gas stored by adsorption. Conventional experiments are not well suited for characterizing the properties important for describing gas storage and transport in these media. Here, X-ray computed tomography scanning is used to determine gas storage in dynamic gas flow experiments on Devonian shale samples. Several important properties are obtained from these experiments, including fracture widths, adsorption isotherms, and matrix porosities and permeabilities.

  3. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth; Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Nagamori, Masanao; Moldrup, Per; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air

  4. Advection of methane in the hydrate zone: model, analysis and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peszynska, Malgorzata; Showalter, Ralph E.; Webster, Justin T.

    2015-12-01

    A two-phase two-component model is formulated for the advective-diffusive transport of methane in liquid phase through sediment with the accompanying formation and dissolution of methane hydrate. This free-boundary problem has a unique generalized solution in $L^1$; the proof combines analysis of the stationary semilinear elliptic Dirichlet problem with the nonlinear semigroup theory in Banach space for an m-accretive multi-valued operator. Additional estimates of maximum principle type are obtained, and these permit appropriate maximal extensions of the phase-change relations. An example with pure advection indicates the limitations of these estimates and of the model developed here. We also consider and analyze the coupled pressure equation that determines the advective flux in the transport model.

  5. Power law breakthrough curve tailing in a fracture: The role of advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, Aldo; Becker, Matthew W.

    2015-06-01

    We offer an explanation of the strongly tailed solute breakthrough curve typically observed when a tracer test is conducted in fractured bedrock. In this example, we limit the model to a single planar fracture of varying aperture. Flow heterogeneity derives from variable fracture aperture, which implies variable transmissivity (T). The analysis employs a physically based model well-suited to strong heterogeneity and relies only upon advective transport. The purely advective model is able to explain a power-law trend of magnitude -2 to -3 in the breakthrough curve tail; a range that has been found in field tracer experiments. The principle cause of this trend is the comparatively slow transport in zones of small transmissivity (tight aperture). Slow advection occurs when either heterogeneity (variance of lnT) is strong or when the assumed heterogeneity distribution is non-Gaussian. Thus, we link breakthrough tailing to the statistical parameters for the transmissivity field.

  6. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  7. Transport of fission products with a helium gas-jet at TRIGA-SPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibach, M.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Herfurth, F.; Geppert, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Krämer, J.; Krieger, A.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Smorra, C.

    2010-02-01

    A helium gas-jet system for the transport of fission products from the research reactor TRIGA Mainz has been developed, characterized and tested within the TRIGA-SPEC experiment. For the first time at TRIGA Mainz carbon aerosol particles have been used for the transport of radionuclides from a target chamber with high efficiency. The radionuclides have been identified by means of γ-spectroscopy. Transport time, efficiency as well as the absolute number of transported radionuclides for several species have been determined. The design and the characterization of the gas-jet system are described and discussed.

  8. Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface During the ZERT CO2 Release Test

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Dobeck, Laura; Spangler, Lee

    2009-01-15

    We used the multiphase and multicomponent TOUGH2/EOS7CA model to carry out predictive simulations of CO{sub 2} injection into the shallow subsurface of an agricultural field in Bozeman, Montana. The purpose of the simulations was to inform the choice of CO{sub 2} injection rate and design of monitoring and detection activities for a CO{sub 2} release experiment. The release experiment configuration consists of a long horizontal well (70 m) installed at a depth of approximately 2.5 m into which CO{sub 2} is injected to mimic leakage from a geologic carbon sequestration site through a linear feature such as a fault. We estimated the permeability of the soil and cobble layers present at the site by manual inversion of measurements of soil CO{sub 2} flux from a vertical-well CO{sub 2} release. Based on these estimated permeability values, predictive simulations for the horizontal well showed that CO{sub 2} injection just below the water table creates an effective gas-flow pathway through the saturated zone up to the unsaturated zone. Once in the unsaturated zone, CO{sub 2} spreads out laterally within the cobble layer, where liquid saturation is relatively low. CO{sub 2} also migrates upward into the soil layer through the capillary barrier and seeps out at the ground surface. The simulations predicted a breakthrough time of approximately two days for the 100kg d{sup -1} injection rate, which also produced a flux within the range desired for testing detection and monitoring approaches. The seepage area produced by the model was approximately five meters wide above the horizontal well, compatible with the detection and monitoring methods tested. For a given flow rate, gas-phase diffusion of CO{sub 2} tends to dominate over advection near the ground surface, where the CO{sub 2} concentration gradient is large, while advection dominates deeper in the system.

  9. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2008-09-16

    Method for gas purification comprising (a) obtaining a feed gas stream containing one or more contaminants selected from the group consisting of volatile metal oxy-hydroxides, volatile metal oxides, and volatile silicon hydroxide; (b) contacting the feed gas stream with a reactive solid material in a guard bed and reacting at least a portion of the contaminants with the reactive solid material to form a solid reaction product in the guard bed; and (c) withdrawing from the guard bed a purified gas stream.

  10. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  11. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  12. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

    1996-11-12

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

  13. Evaluating Gas-Phase Transport And Detection Of Noble Gas Signals From Underground Nuclear Explosions Using Chemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Hunter, S. L.; Sun, Y.; Wagoner, J. L.; Ruddle, D.; Anderson, G.; Felske, D.; Myers, K.; Zucca, J. J.; Emer, D. F.; Townsend, M.; Drellack, S.; Chipman, V.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) involved detonating 1 kiloton of chemical explosive in a subsurface cavity which also contained bottles of tracer gases (ref 1). That experiment provided an improved understanding of transport processes relevant to the detection of noble gas signals at the surface emanating from a clandestine underground nuclear explosion (UNE). As an alternative to performing large chemical detonations to simulate gas transport from UNEs, we have developed a test bed for subsurface gas transport, sampling and detection studies using a former UNE cavity. The test bed site allows for the opportunity to evaluate pathways to the surface created by the UNE as well as possible transport mechanisms including barometric pumping and cavity pressurization (ref 2). With the test bed we have monitored long-term chemical tracers as well as newly injected tracers. In order to perform high temporal resolution tracer gas monitoring, we have also developed a Subsurface Gas Smart Sampler (SGSS) which has application during an actual On Site Inspection (OSI) and is available for deployment in OSI field exercises planned for 2014. Deployment of five SGSS at the remote test bed has provided unparalleled detail concerning relationships involving tracer gas transport to the surface, barometric fluctuations and temporal variations in the natural radon concentration. We anticipate that the results of our tracer experiments will continue to support the development of improved noble gas detection technology for both OSI and International Monitoring System applications. 1. C.R. Carrigan et al., 1996, Nature, 382, p. 528. 2. Y. Sun and C.R. Carrigan, 2012, Pure Appl. Geophys., DOI 10.1007/s00024-012-0514-4.

  14. Modeling the effect of gas transport on the formation of defects during thermolysis of powder moldings

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.H.; Edirisinghe, M.J.; Evans, J.R.; Twizell, E.H.

    1996-04-01

    The removal of binder from ceramic or metal moldings by thermolysis involves the transport of degradation products through the parent organic phase and the vacated porous body. A numerical model has been developed to combine an equation which takes into account different gas-flow regimes with an equation for the transport of organic molecules in molten polymers. Computer modeling reveals the critical heating rate above which defects occur due to boiling of the polymer-monomer solution at the center of the molding. The situation in which a porous outer layer of the molding develops, offering resistance to flow of the evolved monomer gas, is then treated. This gives rise to a moving boundary with a variable concentration of diffusant which is dependent on the surface flux, gas transport coefficient and thickness of the porous layer. The contributions of diffusion and viscous flow to gas transport are considered. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  15. Evolution of Advection Upstream Splitting Method Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of advection upstream splitting method(AUSM) schemes. The main ingredients that have led to the development of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been reviewed, thus the ideas behind AUSM. First and foremost is the concept of upwinding. Second, the use of Riemann problem in constructing the numerical flux in the finite-volume setting. Third, the necessity of including all physical processes, as characterised by the linear (convection) and nonlinear (acoustic) fields. Fourth, the realisation of separating the flux into convection and pressure fluxes. The rest of this review briefly outlines the technical evolution of AUSM and more details can be found in the cited references. Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics methods, hyperbolic systems, advection upstream splitting method, conservation laws, upwinding, CFD

  16. Passive advection in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekar, Anjor; Schekochihin, Alexander; Hammett, Greg; Dorland, William; Loureiro, Nuno

    2014-10-01

    We consider a simple kinetic model for the evolution of the particle distribution function in a magnetized turbulent plasma that includes both phase mixing (Landau damping) and advection by a stochastic velocity field: a ``kinetic passive scalar'' in the Batchelor regime. The advection due to stochastic velocity field allows for a stochastic version of the plasma echo by coupling the ``phase-mixing'' and the ``un-phase-mixing'' components of the free energy. We have developed a new analytical framework to diagnose the efficiency of such coupling. We have also developed a new GPU code named Gandalf that solves this kinetic model numerically. In this poster, we shall present numerical and analytical results related to this work.

  17. Antidiffusive velocities for multipass donor cell advection

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.G. ); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Smolarkiewicz describes an iterative process for approximating the advection equation. Basically, he uses a donor cell approximation to correct for the truncation error of the originally specified donor cell scheme. This step may be repeated an arbitrary number of times leading to successively more accurate solutions to the advection equation. In this report, we show how to sum the successive approximations analytically to find a single antidiffusive velocity that represents the effects of an arbitrary number of passes. The analysis is first done dimension to illustrate the method. The analysis is then repeated in two dimensions. The existence of cross terms in the truncation analysis of the two-dimensional equations introduces an extra complication into the calculation. We discuss the implementation of our new antidiffusive velocities and provide some examples of applications. 6 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes for high flux gas transport.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangil; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Haibin; Sholl, David S; Marand, Eva

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple, fast, and practical route to vertically align carbon nanotubes on a porous support using a combination of self-assembly and filtration methods. The advantage of this approach is that it can be easily scaled up to large surface areas, allowing the fabrication of membranes for practical gas separation applications. The gas transport properties of thus constructed nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes are analogous to those of carbon nanotube membranes grown by chemical vapor deposition. This paper shows the first data for transport of gas mixtures through carbon nanotube membranes. The permeation of gas mixtures through the membranes exhibits different properties than those observed using single-gas experiments, confirming that non-Knudsen transport occurs. PMID:17685662

  19. Natural Gas Transportation - Infrastructure Issues and Operational Trends

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    This report examines how well the current national natural gas pipeline network has been able to handle today's market demand for natural gas. In addition, it identifies those areas of the country where pipeline utilization is continuing to grow rapidly and where new pipeline capacity is needed or is planned over the next several years.

  20. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  2. ADVECTION, EDGE, AND OASIS EFFECTS ON SPATIAL MOISTURE AND FLUX FIELDS FROM LIDAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively narrow forest stands such as the riparian Tamarisk bordering the Rio Grande are subject to dry air advection from the adjacent semi-desert environment. The transport of warm dry air into the canopy has a profound effect upon the spatial properties of the moisture field and associated lat...

  3. Pore Water PAH Transport in Amended Sediment Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidley, P. T.; Kwon, S.; Ghosh, U.

    2009-05-01

    Capping is a common remediation strategy for contaminated sediments that creates a physical barrier between contaminated sediments and the water column. Diffusive flux of contaminants through a sediment cap is small. However, under certain hydrodynamic conditions such as groundwater potential and tidal pumping, groundwater advection can accelerate contaminant transport. Hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be transported through the cap under advective conditions. To better understand PAH migration under these conditions, physical models of sediment caps were evaluated in the laboratory through direct measurement of pore water using solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Contaminated sediment and capping material was obtained from an existing Superfund site that was capped at Eagle Harbor, Washington. A PAH dissolution model linked to an advection-dispersion equation with retardation using published organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) was compared to measured PAHs in the sediment and cap porewater of the physical model.

  4. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  5. Backward fractional advection dispersion model for contaminant source prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2016-04-01

    The forward Fractional Advection Dispersion Equation (FADE) provides a useful model for non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous porous media. The space FADE captures the long leading tail, skewness, and fast spreading typically seen in concentration profiles from field data. This paper develops the corresponding backward FADE model, to identify source location and release time. The backward method is developed from the theory of inverse problems, and then explained from a stochastic point of view. The resultant backward FADE differs significantly from the traditional backward Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) because the fractional derivative is not self-adjoint and the probability density function for backward locations is highly skewed. Finally, the method is validated using tracer data from a well-known field experiment, where the peak of the backward FADE curve predicts source release time, while the median or a range of percentiles can be used to determine the most likely source location for the observed plume. The backward ADE cannot reliably identify the source in this application, since the forward ADE does not provide an adequate fit to the concentration data.

  6. Gas transport in unsaturated porous media: the adequacy of Fick's law

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Pollock, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of natural unsaturated zones as repositories for landfills and disposal sites for hazardous wastes (chemical and radioactive) requires a greater understanding of transport processes in the unsaturated zone. For volatile constituents an important potential transport mechanism is gaseous diffusion. Diffusion, however, cannot be treated as an independent isolated transport mechanism. A complete understanding of multicomponent gas transport in porous media (unsaturated zones) requires a knowledge of Knudsen transport, the molecular and nonequimolar components of diffusive flux, and viscous (pressure driven) flux. This review presents a brief discussion of the underlying principles and interrelationships among each of the above flux mechanisms. -from Authors

  7. 75 FR 15336 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ...The Commission is amending its regulations, in order to clarify them in response to Order Nos. 717 and 717- A, governing the Standards of Conduct for transmission providers. These amendments are required in order to make clear to prospective applicants for an Alaska natural gas transportation project which Standards of Conduct are applicable to conducting open seasons for Alaska natural gas......

  8. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, Ashok S; Cole, J Vernon

    2008-11-01

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  9. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  14. Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    This report looks at the level of growth that occurred within the U.S. natural gas transportation network during 2004. In addition, it includes discussion and an analysis of recent gas pipeline development activities and an examination of additional projects proposed for completion over the next several years.

  15. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

  17. Water and greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with a transition to a low carbon transportation system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transportation fuels are heavily dominated by the use of petroleum, but concerns over oil depletion, energy security, and greenhouse gas emissions from petroleum combustion are driving the search for alternatives. As we look to shift away from petroleum-based transportation fuels...

  18. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; González-Díaz, Oscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  19. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  20. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  1. Influence of porewater advection on denitrification in carbonate sands: Evidence from repacked sediment column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2012-11-01

    Porewater flow enhances mineralization rates in organic-poor permeable sands. Here, a series of sediment column experiments were undertaken to assess the potential effect of advective porewater transport on denitrification in permeable carbonate sands collected from Heron Island (Great Barrier Reef). Experimental conditions (flow path length, advection rate, and temperature) were manipulated to represent conditions similar to near shore tropical environments. HgCl2-poisoned controls were used to assess whether reactions were microbially mediated. Overall, significant correlations were found between oxygen consumption and N2 production. The N:O2 slope of 0.114 implied that about 75% of all the nitrogen mineralized was denitrified. A 4-fold increase in sediment column length (from 10 to 40 cm) resulted in an overall increase in oxygen consumption (1.6-fold), TCO2 production (1.8-fold), and denitrification (1.9-fold). Oxic respiration increased quickly until advection reached 80 L m-2 h-1 and then plateaued at higher advection rates. Interestingly, denitrification peaked (up to 336 μmol N2 m-2 h-1) at intermediate advection rates (30-80 L m-2 h-1). We speculate that intermediate advection rates enhance the development of microniches (i.e., steep oxygen gradients) within porous carbonate sands, perhaps providing optimum conditions for denitrification. The denitrification peak fell within the broad range of advection rates (often on scales of 1-100 L m-2 h-1) typically found on continental shelves implying that carbonate sands may play a major, but as yet unquantified, role in oceanic nitrogen budgets.

  2. Advective, Diffusive and Eruptive Leakage of CO2 and Brine within Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, N. H.; Han, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated a natural analogue for CO2 leakage near the Green River, Utah, aiming to understand the influence of various factors on CO2 leakage and to reliably predict underground CO2 behavior after injection for geologic CO2 sequestration. Advective, diffusive, and eruptive characteristics of CO2 leakage were assessed via a soil CO2 flux survey and numerical modeling. The field results show anomalous CO2 fluxes (> 10 g m-2 d-1) along the faults, particularly adjacent to CO2-driven cold springs and geysers (e.g., 36,259 g m-2 d-1 at Crystal Geyser), ancient travertines (e.g., 5,917 g m-2 d-1), joint zones in sandstone (e.g., 120 g m-2 d-1), and brine discharge zones (e.g., 5,515 g m-2 d-1). Combined to similar isotopic ratios of gas and progressive evolution of brine chemistry at springs and geysers, a gradual decrease of soil CO2 flux from the Little Grand Wash (LGW; ~36,259 g m-2 d-1) to Salt Wash (SW; ~1,428 g m-2 d-1) fault zones reveals the same CO2 origin and potential southward transport of CO2 over 10-20 km. The numerical simulations overtly exhibit lateral transport of free CO2 and CO2-rich brine from the LGW to SW fault zones through the regional aquifers (e.g., Entrada, Navajo, Kayenta, Wingate, White Rim). CO2 travels predominantly as an aqueous phase (Xco2=~0.045) as previously suggested, giving rise to the convective instability that further accelerates CO2 dissolution. While the buoyant free CO2 always tends to ascend, a fraction of dense CO2-rich brine flows laterally into the aquifer and mixes with the formation fluids during upward migration along the fault. The fault always enhances advective CO2 transport regardless of its permeability (k). However, only the low-k fault scenario engenders development of CO2 anticlinal trap within the shallow aquifers (Entrada and Navajo), concentrating high CO­­­2 fluxes (~1,273 g m-2 d-1) within the northern footwall of the LGW fault similar to the field. Moreover, eruptive CO2 leakage at a well

  3. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  4. Metamorphism during temperature gradient with undersaturated advective airflow in a snow sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography is applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Cold saturated air at the inlet was blown into the snow samples and warmed up while flowing across the sample with a temperature gradient of around 50 K m-1. Changes of the porous ice structure were observed at mid-height of the snow sample. Sublimation occurred due to the slight undersaturation of the incoming air into the warmer ice matrix. Diffusion of water vapor opposite to the direction of the temperature gradient counteracted the mass transport of advection. Therefore, the total net ice change was negligible leading to a constant porosity profile. However, the strong recrystallization of water molecules in snow may impact its isotopic or chemical content.

  5. Construction of the SILAM Eulerian atmospheric dispersion model based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofiev, M.; Vira, J.; Kouznetsov, R.; Prank, M.; Soares, J.; Genikhovich, E.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the transport module of the System for Integrated modeLling of Atmospheric coMposition SILAM v.5 based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin. This advection routine, so far weakly presented in the international literature, is positively defined, stable at any Courant number, and efficient computationally. We present the rigorous description of its original version, along with several updates that improve its monotonicity and shape preservation, allowing for applications to long-living species in conditions of complex atmospheric flows. The scheme is connected with other parts of the model in a way that preserves the sub-grid mass distribution information that is a cornerstone of the advection algorithm. The other parts include the previously developed vertical diffusion algorithm combined with dry deposition, a meteorological pre-processor, and chemical transformation modules. The quality of the advection routine is evaluated using a large set of tests. The original approach has been previously compared with several classic algorithms widely used in operational dispersion models. The basic tests were repeated for the updated scheme and extended with real-wind simulations and demanding global 2-D tests recently suggested in the literature, which allowed one to position the scheme with regard to sophisticated state-of-the-art approaches. The advection scheme performance was fully comparable with other algorithms, with a modest computational cost. This work was the last project of Dr. Sci. Michael Galperin, who passed away on 18 March 2008.

  6. A Study of the Physical Processes of an Advection Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duan Yang; Yan, Wen Lian; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei Juan; Niu, Sheng Jie; Li, Zi Hua

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of advection fog appeared in the Yangtze River delta region between 1 and 2 December 2009. Here, we detail the fog formation and dissipation processes and the background weather conditions. The fog boundary layer and its formation and dissipation mechanisms have also been analyzed using field data recorded in a northern suburb of Nanjing. The results showed the following: (1) This advection fog was generated by interaction between advection of a north-east cold ground layer and a south-east warm upper layer. The double-inversion structure generated by this interaction between the cold and warm advections and steady south-east vapour transport was the main cause of this long-lasting fog. The double-inversion structure provided good thermal conditions for the thick fog, and the south-east vapour transport was not only conducive to maintaining the thickness of the fog but also sustained its long duration. (2) The fog-top altitude was over 600 m for most of the time, and the fog reduced visibility to less than 100 m for approximately 12 h. (3) The low-level jet near the lower inversion layer also played a role in maintaining the thick fog system by promoting heat, momentum and south-east vapour transport.

  7. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  8. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  9. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Driven by the Transportation of Goods Associated with French Consumption.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Troy R; Dente, Sebastien M R

    2010-11-15

    The transportation of goods plays a significant role in the overall greenhouse gas emissions from consumption. This study investigates the connections between French household consumption and production and transportation-related emissions throughout product supply chains. Here a two-region, environmentally extended input-output model is combined with a novel detailed, physical-unit transportation model to examine the connection between product, location of production, choice of transport mode, and greenhouse gas emissions. Total emissions associated with French household consumption are estimated to be 627 MtCO2e, or 11 tCO2e per capita. Of these, 3% are associated with the transportation of goods within France and 10% with transport of goods outside or into France. We find that most transport originating in northern Europe is by road, whereas most transport from other regions is conducted by sea and ocean transport. Rail, inland water, and air transportation play only a minor role in terms of mass, tonne-kilometers, and greenhouse gas emissions. By product, transport of coal and coke and intermediate goods make the largest contribution to overall freight transport emissions associated with French household consumption. In terms of mass, most goods are transported by road while in terms of tonne-kilometers, sea and ocean transport plays the largest role. Road transport contributes the highest share to the transport of all goods with the exceptions of coal and coke and petroleum. We examine the potential for emissions reductions associated with shifting 10% of direct imports by air freight to sea and ocean or road transport and find that the potential reductions are less than 0.03% of total emissions associated with French consumption. We also consider shifting 10% of direct imports by road transport to rail or inland water and find potential reductions on the order of 0.4−0.5% of the total or 3−4% of the freight transport emissions associated with French

  10. Carbon dioxide degassing by advective flow from Usu volcano, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hernández, P A; Notsu, K; Salazar, J M; Mori, T; Natale, G; Okada, H; Virgili, G; Shimoike, Y; Sato, M; Pérez, N M

    2001-04-01

    Magmatic carbon dioxide (CO2) degassing has been documented before the 31 March 2000 eruption of Usu volcano, Hokkaido, Japan. Six months before the eruption, an increase in CO2 flux was detected on the summit caldera, from 120 (September 1998) to 340 metric tons per day (September 1999), followed by a sudden decrease to 39 metric tons per day in June 2000, 3 months after the eruption. The change in CO2 flux and seismic observations suggests that before the eruption, advective processes controlled gas migration toward the surface. The decrease in flux after the eruption at the summit caldera could be due to a rapid release of CO2 during the eruption from ascending dacitic dikes spreading away from the magma chamber beneath the caldera. PMID:11292867

  11. A numerical study for transport phenomena of nanoscale gas flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Tomoya; Yonemura, Shigeru; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Gas flow in porous media occurs in various engineering devices such as catalytic converters and fuel cells. In order to improve the performance of such devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena in porous media. In porous media with pores as small as a molecular mean free path, molecular motions need to be directly considered instead of treating gas flow as a continuum, and effects of complicated channels need to be taken into account. Therefore, such gas flow was analyzed by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is the stochastic solution of the Boltzmann equation. Numerical simulations of gas flow driven by pressure gradient without surface reaction were performed to clarify transport phenomena in porous media imitated by arranging nanoscale solid particles randomly. The effects of pressure gradient, diameter of particles and porosity on gas flow rates and permeability of porous media were investigated.

  12. Coupled ensemble flow line advection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Yuan, Xiaoru; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Xiaomin

    2013-12-01

    Ensemble run simulations are becoming increasingly widespread. In this work, we couple particle advection with pathline analysis to visualize and reveal the differences among the flow fields of ensemble runs. Our method first constructs a variation field using a Lagrangian-based distance metric. The variation field characterizes the variation between vector fields of the ensemble runs, by extracting and visualizing the variation of pathlines within ensemble. Parallelism in a MapReduce style is leveraged to handle data processing and computing at scale. Using our prototype system, we demonstrate how scientists can effectively explore and investigate differences within ensemble simulations. PMID:24051840

  13. Experiments in Advective and Turbulent Hyporheic Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccluskey, A. H.; Grant, S.; Stewardson, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange (HE) is the mixing of stream and subsurface waters beneath the sediment-water interface (SWI). At the patch and reach scales, HE is dominated by periodic upwelling and downwelling zones, induced by pressure variation and processes within the turbulent boundary layer (TBL). This can be caused by (1) the geometry of the stream, imposing a stationary wave at the SWI or (2) by a travelling wave associated with the propagation of turbulent pressure waves generated from the TBL. Case (1) has generally been the favoured model of hyporheic exchange and has been referred to as hyporheic 'pumping' by Elliott and Brooks, and subsequently others. Case (2) can be termed turbulent pumping, and has been proposed as a mechanism to model the combined effects of turbulent dispersion alongside steady-state advection. While this has been represented numerically and analytically, conjecture remains about the physical representation of these combined processes. We present initial results from experiments undertaken to classify the spatial and temporal characteristics of pressure variation at and beneath the SWI, with a periodic sinusoidal geometry of wavelength 0.28m and height 0.02m. As an initial characterisation, the advective flow profile has been examined using time-lapse photography of dyes released across the span of a periodic downwelling zone. These tracer tests confirmed delineation of isolated upwelling and downwelling cells as noted by previous authors in modelling studies. However, their distribution deviates from the typical pumping pattern with increased discharge and stream gradient. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of high frequency (250Hz) pressure measurements, sampled at an array along the centroid of the flume underneath one wavelength gave further insight into the spatial distribution of turbulent signatures arising from roughness-generated turbulence. A turbulent frequency of 6-10Hz dominates, however the penetration depth appears to

  14. Spin-dependent transport in a magnetic two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorchkova, I. P.; Kikkawa, J. M.; Samarth, N.; Awschalom, D. D.

    1998-07-01

    Magneto-transport and magneto-optical probes are used to interrogate spin-dependent transport in magnetic heterostructures wherein a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is exchange-coupled to local moments. At low temperatures, the significant s-d exchange-enhanced spin splitting in these “magnetic” 2DEGs is responsible for the observation of unusual transport properties such as a complete spin polarization of the gas at large Landau level filling factors and a pronounced, non-monotonic background magneto-resistance. Magneto-transport measurements of gated samples performed in a parallel field geometry are used to systematically study the variation of the magneto-resistance with sheet concentration, yielding new insights into the dependence of spin transport on the Fermi energy of the majority spin carriers.

  15. METHANOL PRODUCTION FROM BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS TRANSPORTATION FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (i) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the U.S., (ii) minimizes em...

  16. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  17. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  18. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation. Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-15

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  20. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  1. Waves, advection, and cloud patterns on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Smith, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The stable layers adjacent to the nearly neutral layer within the Venus clouds are found to be capable of supporting vertically trapped, horizontally propagating waves with horizontal wavelengths of about 10 km and speeds of a few meters per second relative to the mean wind in the neutral layer. These waves may possibly be excited by turbulence within the neutral layer. Here, the properties of the waves, and the patterns which they might produce within the visible clouds if excited near the subsolar point are examined. The patterns can be in agreement with many features in images. The waves are capable of transferring momentum latitudinally to help maintain the general atmospheric spin, but at present we are not able to evaluate wave amplitudes. We also examine an alternative possibility that the cloud patterns are produced by advection and shearing by the mean zonal and meridional flow of blobs formed near the equator. It is concluded that advection and shearing by the mean flow is the most likely explanation for the general pattern of small scale striations.

  2. Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2000-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

  3. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  4. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

    1999-10-01

    The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation

  5. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2008-10-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Flow splitting at airway branches is still evident, however, and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to provide a quantitative view of pulmonary gas supply that highlights the correlation of airflow dynamics with lung structure.

  6. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Nevertheless, flow splitting at airway branches is still evident and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to reveal surprising detail that highlights the correlation between gas dynamics and lung structure. PMID:18667344

  7. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  8. Integral Transport Analysis of Ions Flowing Through Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Gilbert; Santarius, John; Alderson, Eric

    2011-10-01

    A computational model for the flow of energetic ions through a background neutral gas is being developed. Its essence is to consider reactions as creating a new source of ions or neutrals if the energy or charge state of the resulting particle is changed. For a given source boundary condition, the creation and annihilation of the various species is formulated as a 1-D Volterra integral equation that can quickly be solved numerically by finite differences. The current work focuses on radially converging, multiple-pass, 1-D ion flow through neutral gas and a nearly transparent, concentric anode and cathode pair in spherical geometry. This has been implemented as a computer code for atomic (3He, 3He+) and molecular (D, D2, D-, D+, D2+, D3+) ion and neutral species, and applied to modeling inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices. The inclusion of negative ions is a recent development. The code yields detailed energy spectra of the various ions and energetic neutral species. Comparisons with experimental data for a University of Wisconsin IEC device will be presented. Research supported by US Dept of Energy, grant DE-FG02-04ER54745, and by the Grainger Foundation.

  9. Transformative Reduction of Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Opportunities for Change in Technologies and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Brown, Austin; Newes, Emily; Markel, Tony; Schroeder, Alex; Zhang, Yimin; Chipman, Peter; Johnson, Shawn

    2015-04-30

    The transportation sector is changing, influenced by concurrent, ongoing, dynamic trends that could dramatically affect the future energy landscape, including effects on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Battery cost reductions and improved performance coupled with a growing number of electric vehicle model offerings are enabling greater battery electric vehicle market penetration, and advances in fuel cell technology and decreases in hydrogen production costs are leading to initial fuel cell vehicle offerings. Radically more efficient vehicles based on both conventional and new drivetrain technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions per vehicle-mile. Net impacts also depend on the energy sources used for propulsion, and these are changing with increased use of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuel resources. Connected and automated vehicles are emerging for personal and freight transportation systems and could increase use of low- or non-emitting technologies and systems; however, the net effects of automation on greenhouse gas emissions are uncertain. The longstanding trend of an annual increase in transportation demand has reversed for personal vehicle miles traveled in recent years, demonstrating the possibility of lower-travel future scenarios. Finally, advanced biofuel pathways have continued to develop, highlighting low-carbon and in some cases carbon-negative fuel pathways. We discuss the potential for transformative reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions through these emerging transportation-sector technologies and trends and present a Clean Transportation Sector Initiative scenario for such reductions, which are summarized in Table ES-1.

  10. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  11. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  12. PARTICLE TRANSPORTATION AND DEPOSITION IN HOT GAS FILTER VESSELS - A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2002-07-01

    In this project, a computational modeling approach for analyzing flow and ash transport and deposition in filter vessels was developed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for studying hot-gas filtration process was established. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas flows in the filter vessel, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the particle transport and deposition. Particular attention was given to the Siemens-Westinghouse filter vessel at Power System Development Facility in Wilsonville in Alabama. Details of hot-gas flow in this tangential flow filter vessel are evaluated. The simulation results show that the rapidly rotation flow in the spacing between the shroud and the vessel refractory acts as cyclone that leads to the removal of a large fraction of the larger particles from the gas stream. Several alternate designs for the filter vessel are considered. These include a vessel with a short shroud, a filter vessel with no shroud and a vessel with a deflector plate. The hot-gas flow and particle transport and deposition in various vessels are evaluated. The deposition patterns in various vessels are compared. It is shown that certain filter vessel designs allow for the large particles to remain suspended in the gas stream and to deposit on the filters. The presence of the larger particles in the filter cake leads to lower mechanical strength thus allowing for the back-pulse process to more easily remove the filter cake. A laboratory-scale filter vessel for testing the cold flow condition was designed and fabricated. A laser-based flow visualization technique is used and the gas flow condition in the laboratory-scale vessel was experimental studied. A computer model for the experimental vessel was also developed and the gas flow and particle transport patterns are evaluated.

  13. Frictional drag reduction by wavy advection of deformable bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Yoshihiko; Murai, Yuichi; Tasaka, Yuji; Yasushi, Takeda

    2009-02-01

    Bubbles can reduce frictional drag in wall turbulence, and its effect is expected to use for ships and pipelines to save their power consumptions. A number of basic experiments have been carried out to date for finding out the best condition for enhancing the drag reduction. One issue that remains at present is the difference of the performance between steady and unsteady status in terms of bubble concentration. All the experiments in the past deal with the steady effect, i.e., the drag reduction is evaluated as a function of mean void fraction or given gas flow rate of continuous injection. Despite to this, the actual phenomena highly depend on local interaction between two phases upon unsteady manner. We focus on this point and elucidate the influence of time-fluctuating void fraction on the total response to the drag reduction. This view is in fact important to estimate the persistency of the bubble-based drag reduction in the flow direction since bubbles formulate wavy advection during their migration. Our experiments are designed to measure the above-mentioned effect from laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows in a horizontal channel. For avoiding the contamination effect that worsens the reproducibility of the experiment, Silicone oil is used as carrier fluid. The oil also simulates the high Weber number bubble condition because of low surface tension. The unsteady interaction between the wavy advection of bubbles and the local skin friction, a synchronized system is constructed to connect the high-speed camera with the shear transducer, which can evaluate the interaction at 1000 fps. From the results, we confirm that the drag reduction is provided at Re>3000 in the turbulent flow regime, and also the total drag reduction is enhanced by the presence of the waves.

  14. Trace gas exchanges and transports over the Amazonian rain forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael; Greco, Steve; Scala, John; Harriss, Robert; Browell, Edward; Sachse, Glenn; Simpson, Joanne; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Torres, Arnold

    1986-01-01

    Early results are presented from a program to model deep convective transport of chemical species by means of in situ data collection and numerical models. Data were acquired during the NASA GTE Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment in July-August 1985. Airborne instrumentation, including a UV-DIAL system, collected data on the O3, CO, NO, temperature and water vapor profiles from the surface to 400 mb altitude, while GOES imagery tracked convective clouds over the study area. A two-dimensional cloud model with small amplitude random temperature fluctuations at low levels, which simulated thermals, was used to describe the movements of the chemical species sensed in the convective atmosphere. The data was useful for evaluating the accuracy of the cloud model, which in turn was effective in describing the circulation of the chemical species.

  15. Analysis of volatile-phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at depth; barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature, and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been observed. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Role of plant-mediated gas transport in CH4 emissions from Phragmites-dominated peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Merit; Ingwersen, Joachim; van den Elzen, Eva; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    A large part of the methane (CH4) produced in peatlands is directly oxidized and the extent of its oxidation depends on the gas transport pathway. In wetland ecosystems, CH4 can be transported from the soil to the atmosphere via diffusion, ebullition and via aerenchyma of roots and stems of vascular plants. Compared to other wetland plants, the very common species Phragmites australis (Common reed) appears to have a high ability to transport gases between the soil and atmosphere. The gas exchange within Phragmites plants takes place via convective flow through the culm, which is believed to be achieved by a humidity-induced pressure gradient and is more than 5-times as efficient as diffusion. By this mechanism, CH4 surpasses the upper (oxic) soil layers and therefore oxidation of CH4 may well be reduced. On the other hand, transport of oxygen in Phragmites plants tends to enhance O2concentration in the rhizosphere, which will foster CH4oxidation in deeper soil layers. It is therefore unknown whether humidity-induced convection leads to higher or lower overall CH4 emission in Phragmites, which is essential to understand their role in the emissions from these very common peatland types. To investigate whether this internal gas transport mechanism of reed promotes or reduces CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere, we conducted manipulative field experiments in a large Phragmites peatland in South-West Germany in October 2014 and July 2015. Using large chambers, we compared CH4 fluxes from intact plots, plots with cut reed, and plots with cut + sealed reed to exclude gas transport through the plants. Additionally, pore water samples from the plots were analyzed for possible changes in soil chemistry due to the change of oxygen transport into the soil by the treatments. Based on our results, we will explain the potential role of rhizosphere oxygenation and convective flow on CH4 emissions from Phragmites-dominated peatlands in relation to other environmental condition.

  17. MR imaging of the lungs with hyperpolarized helium-3 gas transported by air.

    PubMed

    Wild, J M; Schmiedeskamp, J; Paley, M N J; Filbir, F; Fichele, S; Kasuboski, L; Knitz, F; Woodhouse, N; Swift, A; Heil, W; Mill, G H; Wolf, M; Griffiths, P D; Otten, E; van Beek, E J R

    2002-07-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas MRI shows promise in the functional imaging of the pulmonary air spaces. The production of hyperpolarized (HP) gas requires specialized laser optical pumping apparatus, which is not likely to be home built in the majority of clinical MRI radiology centres. There are two routes through which HP gas will be made available to hospitals for clinical use: either the apparatus will be installed locally at a considerable expense to the centre, or a central facility will produce the gas and then deliver it to remote MRI sites as and when required. In this study, the feasibility of transporting large quantities of HP gas for in vivo MR imaging from a remote production facility in Mainz, Germany, by airfreight to Sheffield, UK, was successfully demonstrated. PMID:12164592

  18. Rapid vertical trace gas transport by an isolated midlatitude thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauf, Thomas; Schulte, Peter; Alheit, Reiner; Schlager, Hans

    1995-11-01

    During the cloud dynamics and chemistry field experiment CLEOPATRA in the summer of 1992 in southern Germany, the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) (German Aerospace Research Establishment) research aircraft Falcon traversed four times the anvil of a severe, isolated thunderstorm. The first two traverses were at 8 km altitude and close to the anvil cloud base, while the second two traverses were at 10 km. During the 8-km traverse, measured ozone mixing ratios dropped by 13 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) from the ambient cloud free environment to the anvil cloud, while water vapor increased by 0.3 g kg-1. At the 10-km traverses, ozone dropped by 25 ppbv, while water vapor increased by 0.18 g kg-1. Three-dimensional numerical thunderstorm simulations were performed to understand the cause of these changes. The simulations included the transport of two chemical inert tracers. Ozone was assumed to be one of them. The initial ozone profile was composed from an ozone routine sounding and the in situ Falcon measurements prior to the thunderstorm development. The second tracer is typical for a surface released pollutant with a nonzero, constant value in the boundary layer but zero above it. The redistribution of both tracers by the storm is calculated and compared with the observations. For the anvil penetration at 10 km, the calculated difference in ozone mixing ratios is 21 ppbv, while for water vapor an increase of 0.25 g kg-1 was found, in good agreement with the observations. To validate the model results, the radar reflectivity was calculated from simulated fields of cloud water, rain, graupel, hail, and snow and ice crystals and compared with observed values. With respect to maximum reflectivity values and spatial scales, again, excellent agreement was achieved. It is concluded that the rapid transport from the boundary layer directly into the anvil level is the most likely cause of the observed ozone decrease and water vapor increase

  19. Bubble splitting in bifurcating tubes: a model study of cardiovascular gas emboli transport.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Andrés J; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2005-08-01

    The transport of long gas bubbles, suspended in liquid, through symmetric bifurcations, is investigated experimentally and theoretically as a model of cardiovascular gas bubble transport in air embolism and gas embolotherapy. The relevant dimensionless parameters in the models match the corresponding values for arteries and arterioles. The effects of roll angle (the angle the plane of the bifurcation makes with the horizontal), capillary number (a dimensionless indicator of flow), and bubble volume (or length) on the splitting of bubbles as they pass through the bifurcation are examined. Splitting is observed to be more homogenous at higher capillary numbers and lower roll angles. It is shown that, at nonzero roll angles, there is a critical value of the capillary number below which the bubbles do not split and are transported entirely into the upper branch. The value of the critical capillary number increases with roll angle and parent tube diameter. A unique bubble motion is observed at the critical capillary number and for slightly slower flows: the bubble begins to split, the meniscus in the lower branch then moves backward, and finally the entire bubble enters the upper branch. These findings suggest that, in large vessels, emboli tend to be transported upward unless flow is unusually strong but that a more homogeneous distribution of emboli occurs in smaller vessels. This corresponds to previous observations that air emboli tend to lodge in the upper regions of the lungs and suggests that relatively uniform infarction of tumors by gas embolotherapy may be possible. PMID:15790688

  20. FACTORS IN GEOTROPOSPHERIC PARTICLE-GAS TRANSPORT OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can exist in solid, liquid, or gas phases under ambient environmental conditions. The geotropospheric transport of SVOCs varies according to the particle type. Two classes of SVOCs and two types of particles were analyzed to determine possib...

  1. CDF Solutions of Advection-Reaction equations with uncertain parameters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boso, F.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flow and transport models are affected by parametric uncertainty. Quantitative forecasting of such processes in natural porous media are especially prone to uncertainty because of the inaccessibility and multi-scale nature of the subsurface. We consider a reduced-complexity stochastic transport system which takes into account advection and nonlinear reactions in advection-reaction equations (AREs) with uncertain (random) velocity and reaction parameters. We derive a deterministic equation that governs the evolution of cumulative distribution function (CDF) of a solution of the underlying ARE. Although requiring closure, this differential equation benefits from uniquely defined boundary and initial conditions and can be solved with classic techniques. Here we analyze the accuracy and robustness of the large-eddy-diffusivity closure by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations for different correlation structures and parameters.

  2. Life-cycle assessment of diesel, natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell bus transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Jamie; Pryor, Trevor

    The Sustainable Transport Energy Programme (STEP) is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, to explore hydrogen fuel cell technology as an alternative to the existing diesel and natural gas public transit infrastructure in Perth. This project includes three buses manufactured by DaimlerChrysler with Ballard fuel cell power sources operating in regular service alongside the existing natural gas and diesel bus fleets. The life-cycle assessment (LCA) of the fuel cell bus trial in Perth determines the overall environmental footprint and energy demand by studying all phases of the complete transportation system, including the hydrogen infrastructure, bus manufacturing, operation, and end-of-life disposal. The LCAs of the existing diesel and natural gas transportation systems are developed in parallel. The findings show that the trial is competitive with the diesel and natural gas bus systems in terms of global warming potential and eutrophication. Emissions that contribute to acidification and photochemical ozone are greater for the fuel cell buses. Scenario analysis quantifies the improvements that can be expected in future generations of fuel cell vehicles and shows that a reduction of greater than 50% is achievable in the greenhouse gas, photochemical ozone creation and primary energy demand impact categories.

  3. Nonlinear Advection Algorithms Applied to Inter-related Tracers: Errors and Implications for Modeling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-02-01

    Monotonicity constraints and gradient preserving flux corrections employed by many advection algorithms used in atmospheric models make these algorithms non-linear. Consequently, any relations among model variables transported separately are not necessarily preserved in such models. These errors cannot be revealed by traditional algorithm testing based on advection of a single tracer. New type of tests are developed and conducted to evaluate the preservation of a sum of several number mixing ratios advected independently of each other, as is the case, for example, in models using bin or sectional representation of aerosol or cloud particle size distribution. The tests show that when three tracers are advected in 1D uniform constant velocity flow, local errors in the sum can be on the order of 10%. When cloud-like interactions are allowed among the tracers, errors in total sum of three mixing ratios can reach up to 30%. Several approaches to eliminate the error are suggested, all based on advecting the sum as a separate variable and then normalizing mixing ratios for individual tracers to match the total sum. A simple scalar normalization preserves the total number mixing ratio and positive definiteness of the variables but the monotonicity constraint for individual tracers is no longer maintained. More involved flux normalization procedures are developed for the flux based advection algorithms to maintain the monotonicity for individual scalars and their sum.

  4. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štĕpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux. PMID:22649290

  5. On the Nature of Gas Transport of Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergei; Brandt, Justin; Olson, Brian; Jamieson, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    Historically, all the approaches describing gas diffusion in polymers can be roughly divided in two categories, based on free volume models and the activation molecular models, which take into account the cooperative penetrant-polymer chain motions, chain rigidity and intermolecular forces. Although gas transport characteristics exhibit a general correlation with free volume, alone free volume can not adequately describe gas barrier. The chain rigidity and the strength of intermolecular interactions are two additional important factors which are manifested via activation energy. The main objective of this work was to develop fundamental understanding of oxygen transport in a broad range of EVOH copolymers as it is related to free volume characteristics probed by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and hydrogen bonding interaction.

  6. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S.

    2015-02-01

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation.

  7. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2015-01-01

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation. PMID:25641584

  8. Economical production of transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, and other carbonaceous feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G.; Winslow, J.C.; Venkataraman, V.K.; Driscoll, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    The Nation`s economy and security will continue to be vitally linked to an efficient transportation system of air, rail, and highway vehicles that depend on a continuous supply of liquid fuels at a reasonable price and with characteristics that can help the vehicle manufacturers meet increasingly strict environmental regulations. However, an analysis of US oil production and demand shows that, between now and 2015, a significant increase in imported oil will be needed to meet transportation fuel requirements. One element of an overall Department of Energy`s (DOE) strategy to address this energy security issue while helping meet emissions requirements is to produce premium transportation fuels from non-petroleum feedstocks, such as coal, natural gas, and biomass, via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) and other synthesis gas conversion technologies.

  9. Characterization of Gas Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks By Borehole and Chamber Tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Shimaya, S.; Maejima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Gas transport characteristics of fractured rocks is a great concern to variety of engineering applications such as underground storage of LPG, nuclear waste disposal, CCS and gas flooding in the oil field. Besides absolute permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressure as a function of water saturation have direct influences to the results of two phase flow simulation. However, number of the reported gas flow tests for fractured rocks are limited, therefore, the applicability of the conventional two-phase flow functions used for porous media, such as Mualem-van Genuchten model, to prediction of the gas transport in the fractured rock mass are not well understood. The authors conducted the two types of in-situ tests, with different scales, a borehole gas-injection test and a chamber gas-injection test in fractured granitic rock. These tests were conducted in the Cretaceous granitic rocks at the Namikata underground LPG storage cavern construction site in Ehime Prefecture in Japan, preceding to the cavern scale gas-tightness test. A borehole injection test was conducted using vertical and sub-vertical boreholes drilled from the water injection tunnel nearly at the depth of the top of the cavern, EL-150m. A new type downhole gas injection equipment that is capable to create a small 'cavern' within a borehole was developed. After performing a series of preliminary tests to investigate the hydraulic conductivity and gas-tightness, i.e. threshold pressure, gas injection tests were conducted under different gas pressure. Fig.1 shows an example of the test results From a chamber test using a air pressurizing chamber with volume of approximately166m3, the gas-tightness was confirmed within the uncertainty of 22Pa under the storage pressure of 0.7MPa, however, significant air leakage occurred possibly through an open fracture intersecting the chamber just after cavern pressure exceeds the initial hydrostatic pressure at the ceiling level of the chamber. Anomalies

  10. Hourly and daily evapotranspiration of alfalfa under regional advection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional advection often affects the evapotranspiration rates of irrigated crops in the Southern High Plains. In 1998, during a 10-day period (13-22 June) of unusually strong advection, high evapotranspiration (ET) rates for unstressed, irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were measured with two prec...

  11. A computer model of gas generation and transport within TRU waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III

    1988-06-01

    A computer model has been developed to predict radiolytic gas generation and transport within Transuranic (TRU) waste drums and surrounding enclosures. Gas generation from the radiolytic decomposition of organic material contaminated with plutonium is modeled and the concentrations of gas throughout the waste drum and enclosures are determined using a diffusional transport model. The model accurately reproduces experimentally measured gas concentrations. With polyethylene waste in unvented drums, the model predicts that the concentration of hydrogen gas can exceed 4 mole percent (lower flammable limit) with only about 5 curies of plutonium. If the drum liner is punctured and an unrestricted 0.75-in. carbon composite filter vent is installed in the drum lid, the plutonium loading can be increased to 240 Ci without generating flammable gas mixtures. Larger diameter filters can be used to increase the curie loading. The model has been used to show that shipments of 1000 Ci of plutonium-238 contaminated waste from Savannah River to the WIPP site are feasible using the TRUPACT shipping container. 10 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Advective pore water input of nutrients to the Satilla River Estuary, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, R. A.; Alexander, C. R.; Kostka, J. E.

    2003-03-01

    In situ benthic flux measurements, pore water nutrient profiles, water column nutrient distributions, sediment grain size distributions and side-scan sonar observations suggest that advective transport of pore waters may be a major input pathway of nutrients into the Satilla River Estuary (coastal Georgia, USA). In situ benthic chamber incubations demonstrate the occurrence of highly variable, but occasionally very large sea floor fluxes of silicate, phosphate, and ammonium. Locally occurring benthic microbial mineralization of organic matter, as estimated by S 35-sulphate reduction rate measurements, is insufficient to support these large fluxes. We hypothesize that the observed interlayering of permeable, sandy sediments with fine-grained, organic-rich sediments in the estuary provides conduits for advective transport of pore water constituents out of the sediments. Because permeable layers may extend significant distances beneath the salt marsh, the large fluxes observed may be supported by remineralization occurring over large areas adjacent to the estuary. Advective transport may be induced by pressure gradients generated by a variety of processes, including landward recharge by meteoric or rain waters if sand layers extend far enough into the maritime coastal lands. Alternatively, tidal variations across the salt marsh sediment surface may hydraulically pump water through the sediment system. Because these fluxes appear to be concentrated into small layers, this source may be a significant input of nutrients to the estuary even if permeable, sandy layers comprise a very small proportion of the seabed.

  13. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-02-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  14. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  15. Upscaling momentum and mass transport under Knudsen and binary diffusion gas slip conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Parada, F. J.; Lasseux, D.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling of gas phase flow in porous media is relevant as it is present in a wide variety of applications ranging from nanofluidic systems to subsurface contaminant transport. In this work, we derive a macroscopic model to study slightly compressible gas flow in porous media for conditions in which the tangential fluid velocity undergoes a slip at the solid interface due to Knudsen effects and to mass diffusion in binary conditions. To this end, we use the method of volume averaging to derive the governing equations at the Darcy scale for both mass and momentum transport. The momentum transport model consists on a modification to Darcy's law due to mass dispersion and to total density gradients. For mass transport, the resulting model is the conventional convection-dispersion equation with two correction terms, one affecting convective transport and the second one affecting mass dispersion due to gas compressibility. The macroscopic model reduces to the one reported by Altevogt et al. (2003) for the case in which gas slip is only due to a concentration gradient and to the one by Lasseux et al. (2014) under Knudsen slip conditions. The model is written in terms of effective-medium coefficients that can be predicted from solving the associated closure problems in representative unit cells. For conditions in which the Péclet number is much greater than one and when the Knudsen number is not exceedingly small compared to the unity, our computations show that the predictions of the longitudinal dispersion may reach an error as high as 60% compared to the predictions obtained by ignoring gas slip. Altevogt A.S., Rolston D.E., Whitaker S. New equations for binary gas transport in porous media, Part 1: equation development. Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 26, 695-715, 2003. Lasseux D., Valdés-Parada F.J., Ochoa-Tapia J.A., Goyeau B. A macroscopic model for slightly compressible gas slip-flow in homogeneous porous media. Physics of Fluids, Vol. 26, 053102, 2014.

  16. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  17. Noble Gas Signatures in Antrim Shale Gas in the Michigan Basin - Assessing Compositional Variability and Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Ellis, B. R.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.; Bouvier, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies in the Michigan Basin looked at the atmospheric and terrigenic noble gas signatures of deep brines to place constraints on the past thermal history of the basin and to assess the extent of vertical transport processes within this sedimentary system. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of shale gas samples from the Antrim shale formation in the Michigan Basin. The Antrim shale was one of the first economic shale-gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively developed since the 1980's. This study pioneers the use of noble gases in subsurface shale gas in the Michigan Basin to clarify the nature of vertical transport processes within the sedimentary sequence and to assess potential variability of noble gas signatures in shales. Antrim Shale gas samples were analyzed for all stable noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) from samples collected at depths between 300 and 500m. Preliminary results show R/Ra values (where R and Ra are the measured and atmospheric 3He/4He ratios, respectively) varying from 0.022 to 0.21. Although most samples fall within typical crustal R/Ra range values (~0.02-0.05), a few samples point to the presence of a mantle He component with higher R/Ra ratios. Samples with higher R/Ra values also display higher 20Ne/22Ne ratios, up to 10.4, and further point to the presence of mantle 20Ne. The presence of crustally produced nucleogenic 21Ne and radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent with 21Ne/22Ne ratios up to 0.033 and 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 312. The presence of crustally produced 4He, 21Ne and 40Ar is not spatially homogeneous within the Antrim shale. Areas of higher crustal 4He production appear distinct to those of crustally produced 21Ne and 40Ar and are possibly related the presence of different production levels within the shale with varying concentrations of parent elements.

  18. Stomatal control of gas-exchange is related to assimilate transport from leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikinmaa, E.; Holtta, T.; Sevanto, S.; Makela, A.; Hari, P.; Vesala, T.

    2009-04-01

    In land plants, the carbon fluxes are closely associated with those of water. The loss of water from leaves pulls water from soil in plants. High transpiration relative to compensating water flux from soil increases the tension of water column that may lead to its rupture and catastrophic dysfunction of the xylem if the transpiration rate is not regulated. Modification of the size of stomatal openings in leaves regulates the interconnected fluxes of water and carbon. Stomatal regulation of transpiration has direct influence also on the carbon transport from source leaves to sinks. Under given conditions, the water tension of xylem in leaves is linearly related to stomatal conductance while the assimilation rate, which is linked to the loading capacity, has saturating relationship with stomatal conductance. High sugar loading at source could compensate for the high water tension in xylem resulting from eg. high transpiration. However, excessive loading rate of the most commonly transported sugar, sucrose, causes rapid viscosity build up that effectively blocks the phloem transport. Assimilate transport from the shoot is a clear requirement for continuous photosynthetic production in leaves. Without transport the storage capacity of the leaves would be rapidly exhausted and accumulation of excess sugars in leaves lead to downregulation of photosynthesis. In this presentation we study the stomatal response to environment and its linkage to xylem and phloem tranport with dynamic model. We hypothesize that stomatal reaction to environment would maintain maximal assimilate transport in phloem under those conditions. We added to the xylem phloem transport model stomatal control of leaf gas-exchange, light and CO2 concentration dependent photosynthesis rate and carbon storage in leaf. For each time step we varied the stomatal conductance and selected the sollution that maximised the transport of assimilates in phloem. Our hypothesis reproduced realistically stomatal

  19. Radiation-transport method to simulate noncontinuum gas flows for MEMS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2004-01-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) typically consists of micron-scale parts that move through a gas at atmospheric or reduced pressure. In this situation, the gas-molecule mean free path is comparable to the geometric features of the microsystem, so the gas flow is noncontinuum. When mean-free-path effects cannot be neglected, the Boltzmann equation must be used to describe the gas flow. Solution of the Boltzmann equation is difficult even for the simplest case because of its sevenfold dimensionality (one temporal dimension, three spatial dimensions, and three velocity dimensions) and because of the integral nature of the collision term. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the method of choice to simulate high-speed noncontinuum flows. However, since DSMC uses computational molecules to represent the gas, the inherent statistical noise must be minimized by sampling large numbers of molecules. Since typical microsystem velocities are low (< 1 m/s) compared to molecular velocities ({approx}400 m/s), the number of molecular samples required to achieve 1% precision can exceed 1010 per cell. The Discrete Velocity Gas (DVG) method, an approach motivated by radiation transport, provides another way to simulate noncontinuum gas flows. Unlike DSMC, the DVG method restricts molecular velocities to have only certain discrete values. The transport of the number density of a velocity state is governed by a discrete Boltzmann equation that has one temporal dimension and three spatial dimensions and a polynomial collision term. Specification and implementation of DVG models are discussed, and DVG models are applied to Couette flow and to Fourier flow. While the DVG results for these benchmark problems are qualitatively correct, the errors in the shear stress and the heat flux can be order-unity even for DVG models with 88 velocity states. It is concluded that the DVG method, as described herein, is not sufficiently accurate to simulate the low-speed gas flows

  20. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned

  1. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-term basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.

  2. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, W.H.

    1997-06-30

    This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

  3. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  4. Modeling Transport in Gas Chromatography Columns for the Micro-ChemLab

    SciTech Connect

    ADKINS,DOUGLAS R.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; HUDSON,MARY L.; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; SALINGER,ANDREW G.; SHADID,JOHN N.; WONG, CHUNGNIN CHANN

    1999-09-01

    The gas chromatography (GC) column is a critical component in the microsystem for chemical detection ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) being developed at Sandia. The goal is to etch a meter-long GC column onto a 1-cm{sup 2} silicon chip while maintaining good chromatographic performance. Our design strategy is to use a modeling and simulation approach. We have developed an analytical tool that models the transport and surface interaction process to achieve an optimized design of the GC column. This analytical tool has a flow module and a separation module. The flow module considers both the compressibility and slip flow effects that may significantly influence the gas transport in a long and narrow column. The separation module models analyte transport and physico-chemical interaction with the coated surface in the GC column. It predicts the column efficiency and performance. Results of our analysis will be presented in this paper. In addition to the analytical tool, we have also developed a time-dependent adsorption/desorption model and incorporated this model into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate analyte transport and separation process in GC columns. CFD simulations can capture the complex three-dimensional flow and transport dynamics, whereas the analytical tool cannot. Different column geometries have been studied, and results will be presented in this paper. Overall we have demonstrated that the modeling and simulation approach can guide the design of the GC column and will reduce the number of iterations in the device development.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Quantum Transport Equation for Bose Gas in One Dimensional Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yukiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiya

    The quantum transport equation and the correction of the quasiparticle energy are derived by imposing the renormalization conditions on the improved time-dependent on-shell self-energy in nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics. They are numerically analyzed for the one dimensional system of cold neutral atomic Bose gas confined by a combined harmonic and optical lattice potentials. The analysis indicates that the correction of the quaisparticle energy plays a crucial role in the thermal relaxation processes described by the quantum transport equation.

  6. Electronic transport properties of BN sheet on adsorption of ammonia (NH3) gas.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Bhat, Chetan; Jain, Sumit Kumar; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet

    2015-03-01

    We report the detection of ammonia gas through electronic and transport properties analysis of boron nitride sheet. The density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio approach has been used to calculate the electronic and transport properties of BN sheet in presence of ammonia gas. Analysis confirms that the band gap of the sheet increases due to presence of ammonia. Out of different positions, the bridge site is the most favorable position for adsorption of ammonia and the mechanism of interaction falls between weak electrostatic interaction and chemisorption. On relaxation, change in the bond angles of the ammonia molecule in various configurations has been reported with the distance between NH3 and the sheet. An increase in the transmission of electrons has been observed on increasing the bias voltage and I-V relationship. This confirms that, the current increases on applying the bias when ammonia is introduced while a very small current flows for pure BN sheet. PMID:25666919

  7. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  8. Light-induced cross transport phenomena in a single-component gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.

    2013-07-15

    The cross transport processes that occur in a single-component gas in a capillary and are caused by resonance laser radiation and pressure and temperature gradients are studied. An expression for entropy production is derived using a system of kinetic Boltzmann equations in a linear approximation. The kinetic coefficients that determine the transport processes are shown to satisfy the Onsager reciprocal relations at any Knudsen numbers and any character of the elastic interaction of gas particles with the capillary surface. The light-induced baro- and thermoeffects that take place in a closed heat-insulated system in the field of resonance laser radiation are considered. Analytical expressions are obtained for the Onsager coefficients in an almost free-molecular regime. The light-induced pressure and temperature gradients that appear in a closed heat-insulated capillary under typical experimental conditions are numerically estimated.

  9. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-06-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  10. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the Southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and Southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  11. A deterministic Lagrangian particle separation-based method for advective-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ken T. M.; Lee, Joseph H. W.; Choi, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    A simple and robust Lagrangian particle scheme is proposed to solve the advective-diffusion transport problem. The scheme is based on relative diffusion concepts and simulates diffusion by regulating particle separation. This new approach generates a deterministic result and requires far less number of particles than the random walk method. For the advection process, particles are simply moved according to their velocity. The general scheme is mass conservative and is free from numerical diffusion. It can be applied to a wide variety of advective-diffusion problems, but is particularly suited for ecological and water quality modelling when definition of particle attributes (e.g., cell status for modelling algal blooms or red tides) is a necessity. The basic derivation, numerical stability and practical implementation of the NEighborhood Separation Technique (NEST) are presented. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated through a series of test cases which embrace realistic features of coastal environmental transport problems. Two field application examples on the tidal flushing of a fish farm and the dynamics of vertically migrating marine algae are also presented.

  12. Chaotic advection, diffusion, and reactions in open flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tel, Tamas; Karolyi, Gyoergy; Pentek, Aron; Scheuring, Istvan; Toroczkai, Zoltan; Grebogi, Celso; Kadtke, James

    2000-03-01

    We review and generalize recent results on advection of particles in open time-periodic hydrodynamical flows. First, the problem of passive advection is considered, and its fractal and chaotic nature is pointed out. Next, we study the effect of weak molecular diffusion or randomness of the flow. Finally, we investigate the influence of passive advection on chemical or biological activity superimposed on open flows. The nondiffusive approach is shown to carry some features of a weak diffusion, due to the finiteness of the reaction range or reaction velocity. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. The cause of advective slowdown of tracer pebbles in rivers: Implementation of Exner-Based Master Equation for coevolving streamwise and vertical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, A.; Schumer, R.; Parker, G.; Ferguson, R. I.

    2016-03-01

    Tracer pebbles are often used to study bed load transport processes in gravel bed rivers. Models have been proposed for their downstream dispersion, and also for vertical dispersion, but not for the combined effects of downstream and vertical movement. Here we use the Exner-Based Master Equation to characterize the transient coevolution of streamwise and vertical advection-diffusion of tracer pebbles under equilibrium transport conditions (no net aggradation or degradation). The coevolution of streamwise and vertical dispersion gives rise to behavior that can differ markedly from that associated with purely streamwise processes with no vertical exchange. One example is streamwise advective slowdown. Particles that are advected downward into zones where the probability of reentrainment becomes asymptotically small are essentially trapped and can no longer participate in streamwise advection. As a result, the mean streamwise velocity of the tracer plume declines in time. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons with two field experiments show encouraging agreement despite the simplified boundary conditions in the model.

  14. Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

  15. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-12-16

    At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

  16. Understanding of Neutral Gas Transport in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler; C.S. Pitcher; C.J. Boswell; B. LaBombard; J.L. Terry; J.D. Elder; S. Lisgo

    2002-05-07

    A series of experiments on the effect of divertor baffling on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak provides stringent tests on models of neutral gas transport in and around the divertor region. One attractive feature of these experiments is that a trial description of the background plasma can be constructed from experimental measurements using a simple model, allowing the neutral gas transport to be studied with a stand-alone code. The neutral-ion and neutral-neutral elastic scattering processes recently added to the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code permit the neutral gas flow rates between the divertor and main chamber to be simulated more realistically than before. Nonetheless, the simulated neutral pressures are too low and the deuterium Balmer-alpha emission profiles differ qualitatively from those measured, indicating an incomplete understanding of the physical processes involved in the experiment. Some potential explanations are examined and opportunities for future exploration a re highlighted. Improvements to atomic and surface physics data and models will play a role in the latter.

  17. Gas Transport Resistance in Polymer Electrolyte Thin Films on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hang; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2015-09-15

    Significant reductions in expensive platinum catalyst loading for the oxygen reduction reaction are needed for commercially viable fuel cell electric vehicles as well as other important applications. In reducing loading, a resistance at the Pt surface in the presence of thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) electrolyte film, on the order of 10 nm thick, becomes a significant barrier to adequate performance. However, the resistance mechanism is unresolved and could be due to gas dissolution kinetics, increased diffusion resistance in thin films, or electrolyte anion interactions. A common hypothesis for the origin of the resistance is a highly reduced oxygen permeability in the thin polymer electrolyte films that coat the catalyst relative to bulk permeability that is caused by nanoscale confinement effects. Unfortunately, the prior work has not separated the thin-film gas transport resistance from that associated with PFSA interactions with a polarized catalyst surface. Here, we present the first characterization of the thin-film O2 transport resistance in the absence of a polarized catalyst, using a nanoporous substrate that geometrically mimics the active catalyst particles. Through a parametric study of varying PFSA film thickness, as thin as 50 nm, we observe no enhanced gas transport resistance in thin films as a result of either interfacial effects or structural changes in the PFSA. Our results suggest that other effects, such as anion poisoning at the Pt catalyst, could be the source of the additional resistance observed at low Pt loading. PMID:26299282

  18. Modeling of transport phenomena during gas hydrate decomposition by depressurization and/or thermal stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth*, Sven; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Schicks, Judith M.

    2013-04-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam (Beeskow-Strauch et al., this volume). These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. Processes inside LARS are modeled to study the effects of sediment properties as well as physical and chemical processes on parameters such as hydrate dissociation rate and methane production rate. The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, validate the models through history matching, and feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin and Wright 2005; Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. Uddin and Wright (2005) suggested that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. First results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models featuring gas flow in water. Further experiments with LARS, including hydrate dissociation by depressurization and thermal stimulation by in-situ combustion will be used to

  19. Hot-gas filter testing with the transport reactor demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O.; Haley, J.S.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot-gas filter element performance (particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability) as a function of temperature and filter face velocity during short-term operation (100-200 hours). This filter vessel will be utilized in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot-gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the power systems development facility (PSDF) utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and, indirectly, the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville.

  20. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

  1. Ion Surfing: A new ion transport method for cryogenic gas catchers, simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Bollen, Georg; Brodeur, Maxime; Morrissey, Dave; Pang, Gregory

    2011-10-01

    Gas cells are the tool of choice to thermalize fast rare ion beams produced at projectile fragmentation facilities. After passing through solid degraders, the residual kinetic energy of the ions is dissipated through collisions with the gas atoms and ionization. Previously, ions were directed through a gas cell along a descending electrostatic potential gradient called a ``drag field.'' Some cells apply a drag field over electrodes with alternating (RF) fields to prevent the rare ions from colliding with the walls. ``Ion surfing'' is a new method proposed by Bollen which replaces the drag field with a traveling wave superimposed with RF on numerous, thin electrodes. Large potential differences are no longer required for transport over long distances, and the traveling wave can transport ions at a greater speed. This method is being tested for the new cryogenic linear gas cell of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We will present the concept and simulation results. Work supported by the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy.

  2. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Xianying; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

  3. Scyphozoa in the Bornholm Basin (central Baltic Sea) The role of advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Kristina; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Hirche, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    The usual absence of ephyrae and late appearance of medusae of the Scyphozoa Aurelia aurita and Cyanea capillata in the Bornholm Basin (BB; central Baltic Sea) indicate that these species are not strobilating in the region and their presence depends on advection. To study their potential origin we compared drift from historically known strobilation areas derived from a circulation model with spatial distributions observed during 19 cruises in the BB during 2002 and 2003. The model results are in good accordance with the field observations. According to the model results inter-annual differences in the timing of first appearance and life stage at appearance of A. aurita were clearly related to differences in the hydrodynamic regime during the investigation periods. During the stagnation regime in 2002 young medusae occurred first in June in the BB. In contrast, in 2003 fast transport due to several inflow events advected ephyrae released between January and March in the western Baltic already in April to the BB. Although the Gullmar Fjord (western Sweden) is the nearest known strobilation area for C. capillata, the model did not support advection from there in numbers explaining the occurrence of this species in the BB in 2002 and 2003. If the model works adequately in this regions we have to assume that the Gullmar Fjord is not a main source region of C. capillata in the BB, but other strobilation areas in the Kattegat or the North Sea appear more important. Our results imply that advection and inflow events are critical for the occurrence and distribution of early stages of jellyfish in the central Baltic Sea. They demonstrate the potential of circulation models as tools to study the effect of long-range transport on the spatial composition of these organisms.

  4. Burgers turbulence and passive random advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav Anatolievich

    1999-10-01

    , and the diffusivity is neglected. These considerations illustrate that even with simple statistics of the velocity field, the statistics of advected quantities are nontrivial due to nonlinear interactions of different spatial directions. The last Chapter 5 summarizes the results and discusses future directions of research.

  5. Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

    2013-11-01

    A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

  6. Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Development Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O., Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Environmental Research Center is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot- gas filter elements as a function of particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability during relatively short-term operation (100-200 hours). A filter vessel will be used in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot- gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and indirectly the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville and the Clean Coal IV Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project. This program has a phased approach involving modification and upgrades to the TRDU and the fabrication, assembly, and operation of a hot-gas filter vessel (HGFV) capable of operating at the outlet design conditions of the TRDU. Phase 1 upgraded the TRDU based upon past operating experiences. Additions included a nitrogen supply system upgrade, upgraded LASH auger and 1807 coal feed lines, the addition of a second pressurized coal feed hopper and a dipleg ash hopper, and modifications to spoil the performance of the primary cyclone. Phase 2 included the HGFV design, procurement, and installation. Phases 3 through 5 consist of 200-hour hot-gas filter tests under gasification conditions using the TRDU at temperatures of 540-650{degrees}C (1000-1200{degrees}F), 9.3 bar, and face velocities of 1.4, 2. and 3.8 cm/s, respectively. The increased face velocities are achieved by removing candles between each test.

  7. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  8. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D advection model towards large-scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2015-02-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric advection model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach for advection was chosen to ensure mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to reduce the memory footprint and enable effective parallel performances. In addition, a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the advection scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on algebraic test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred cores.

  9. Adaptive domain decomposition methods for advection-diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlenzoli, C.; Quarteroni, A.

    1995-12-31

    Domain decomposition methods can perform poorly on advection-diffusion equations if diffusion is dominated by advection. Indeed, the hyperpolic part of the equations could affect the behavior of iterative schemes among subdomains slowing down dramatically their rate of convergence. Taking into account the direction of the characteristic lines we introduce suitable adaptive algorithms which are stable with respect to the magnitude of the convective field in the equations and very effective on bear boundary value problems.

  10. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  11. Radon transport into dwellings: Considering groundwater as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostrom, M.; Lenhard, R. J.

    A mathematical model is used to investigate whether radon degassing from groundwater may contribute to indoor radon levels. Specifically, the transport of radon in the soil-gas phase from the groundwater-soil gas interface to under-pressurized dwellings is modelled. The question whether radon in groundwater may contribute to indoor radon levels arises from observed high radon concentrations in groundwater, and recent findings that advection in the gas phase may be an important transport mechanism for radon into slightly under-pressurized dwellings. Most previous radon transport investigations did not consider groundwater as a potential source for contributing to indoor radon. The mathematical model includes a method to directly calculate indoor radon concentrations and an equivalent continuum approach to represent cracks in concrete foundations. The results of the simulations indicate that radon, which partitions from groundwater to the soil gas, may be advectively transported by the gas phase to slightly underpressurized dwellings in relatively permeable soils such that indoor radon concentrations may exceed 148 Bq/m³, which is the action limit imposed by EPA.

  12. A spatial SIS model in advective heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Renhao; Lou, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    We study the effects of diffusion and advection for a susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic reaction-diffusion model in heterogeneous environments. The definition of the basic reproduction number R0 is given. If R0 < 1, the unique disease-free equilibrium (DFE) is globally asymptotically stable. Asymptotic behaviors of R0 for advection rate and mobility of the infected individuals (denoted by dI) are established, and the existence of the endemic equilibrium when R0 > 1 is studied. The effects of diffusion and advection rates on the stability of the DFE are further investigated. Among other things, we find that if the habitat is a low-risk domain, there may exist one critical value for the advection rate, under which the DFE changes its stability at least twice as dI varies from zero to infinity, while the DFE is unstable for any dI when the advection rate is larger than the critical value. These results are in strong contrast with the case of no advection, where the DFE changes its stability at most once as dI varies from zero to infinity.

  13. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  14. Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiamin; Wilson, John L.; Kieft, Thomas L.

    1994-01-01

    In this article, a new mechanism influencing the transport of microorganisms through unsaturated porous media is examined, and a new method for directly visualizing bacterial behavior within a porous medium under controlled chemical and flow conditions is introduced. Resting cells of hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic bacterial strains isolated from groundwater were used as model microorganisms. The degree of hydrophobicity was determined by contact-angle measurements. Glass micromodels allowed the direct observation of bacterial behavior on a pore scale, and three types of sand columns with different gas saturations provided quantitative measurements of the observed phenomena on a porous medium scale. The reproducibility of each break-through curve was established in three to five repeated experiments. The data collected from the column experiments can be explained by phenomena directly observed in the micromodel experiments. The retention rate of bacteria is proportional to the gas saturation in porous media because of the preferential sorption of bacteria onto the gas-water interface over the solid-water interface. The degree of sorption is controlled mainly by cell surface hydrophobicity under the simulated groundwater conditions because of hydrophobic forces between the organisms and the interfaces. The sorption onto the gas-water interface is essentially irreversible because of capillary forces. This preferential and irreversible sorption at the gas-water interface strongly influences the movement and spatial distribution of microorganisms. Images PMID:16349180

  15. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-termmore » basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.« less

  16. Gas transport by thermal transpiration in micro-channels -- A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Hudson, M.L.; Potter, D.L.; Bartel, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    A reliable micro gas pump is an essential element to the development of many micro-systems for chemical gas analyses. At Sandia, the authors are exploring a different pumping mechanism, gas transport by thermal transpiration. Thermal transpiration refers to the rarefied gas dynamics developed in a micro-channel with a longitudinal temperature gradient. To investigate the potential of thermal transpiration for gas pumping in micro-systems, the authors have performed simulations and model analysis to design micro-devices and to assess their design performance before the fabrication process. The effort is to apply ICARUS (a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code developed at Sandia) to characterize the fluid transport and evaluate the design performance. The design being considered has two plenums at different temperatures (hot and cold) separated by a micro-channel of 0.1 micron wide and 1 micron long. The temperature difference between the two plenums is 30 kelvin. ICARUS results, a quasi-steady analysis, predicts a net flow through the micro-channel with a velocity magnitude of about 0.4 m/s due to temperature gradient at the wall (thermal creep flow) at the early time. Later as the pressure builds up in the hot plenum, flow is reversed. Eventually when the system reaches steady state equilibrium, the net flow becomes zero. The thermal creep effect is compensated by the thermo-molecular pressure effect. This result demonstrates that it is important to include the thermo-molecular pressure effect when designing a pumping mechanism based on thermal transpiration. The DSMC technique can model this complex thermal transpiration problem.

  17. Radon as a natural tracer for gas transport within uranium waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Chagas, E G L; Abreu, C B; Dias, D C S; Lopez, D; Guerreiro, E T Z; Alberti, H L C; Braz, M L; Branco, O; Fleming, P

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has been identified as the main cause for outflow of acid water and radioactive/non-radioactive contaminants. AMD encompasses pyrites oxidation when water and oxygen are available. AMD was identified in uranium waste rock piles (WRPs) of Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil-Caldas facility (Brazilian uranium mine), resulting in high costs for water treatment. AMD reduction is the main challenge, and scientific investigation has been conducted to understand oxygen and water transportation within WRPs, where 222Rn is used as natural tracer for oxygen transportation. The study consists of soil radon gas mapping in the top layer of WRP4 using active soil gas pumping, radon adsorption in active charcoal and 222Rn determination using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A sampling network of 71 points was built where samples were collected at a depth of 40 cm. Soil radon gas concentration ranged from 33.7 to 1484.2 kBq m(-3) with mean concentration of 320.7±263.3 kBq m(-3). PMID:24729565

  18. Hybrid life-cycle assessment of natural gas based fuel chains for transportation.

    PubMed

    Strømman, Anders Hammer; Solli, Christian; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2006-04-15

    This research compares the use of natural gas, methanol, and hydrogen as transportation fuels. These three fuel chains start with the extraction and processing of natural gas in the Norwegian North Sea and end with final use in Central Europe. The end use is passenger transportation with a sub-compact car that has an internal combustion engine for the natural gas case and a fuel cell for the methanol and hydrogen cases. The life cycle assessment is performed by combining a process based life-cycle inventory with economic input-output data. The analysis shows that the potential climate impacts are lowest for the hydrogen fuel scenario with CO2 deposition. The hydrogen fuel chain scenario has no significant environmental disadvantage compared to the other fuel chains. Detailed analysis shows that the construction of the car contributes significantly to most impact categories. Finally, it is shown how the application of a hybrid inventory model ensures a more complete inventory description compared to standard process-based life-cycle assessment. This is particularly significant for car construction which would have been significantly underestimated in this study using standard process life-cycle assessment alone. PMID:16683626

  19. Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

  20. Analysis of CO2 Separation from Flue Gas, Pipeline Transportation, and Sequestration in Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-09-01

    This report was written to satisfy a milestone of the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration task of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration project. The report begins to assess the costs associated with separating the CO2 from flue gas and then injecting it into an unminable coal seam. The technical challenges and costs associated with CO2 separation from flue gas and transportation of the separated CO2 from the point source to an appropriate sequestration target was analyzed. The report includes the selection of a specific coal-fired power plant for the application of CO2 separation technology. An appropriate CO2 separation technology was identified from existing commercial technologies. The report also includes a process design for the chosen technology tailored to the selected power plant that used to obtain accurate costs of separating the CO2 from the flue gas. In addition, an analysis of the costs for compression and transportation of the CO2 from the point-source to an appropriate coal bed sequestration site was included in the report.

  1. LASER TRIGGERED GAS SWITCHES UTILIZING BEAM TRANSPORT THROUGH 1 MO-cm DEIONIZED WATER.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Lehr, Jane; Blickem, James R.; Wallace, Zachariah R.; Anaya, Victor Jr; Corley, John P; Lott, John; Hodge, Keith; Zameroski, Nathan D.

    2005-11-01

    We report on the successful attempts to trigger high voltage pressurized gas switches by utilizing beam transport through 1 MO-cm deionized water. The wavelength of the laser radiation was 532 nm. We have investigated Nd: YAG laser triggering of a 6 MV, SF6 insulated gas switch for a range of laser and switch parameters. Laser wavelength of 532 nm with nominal pulse lengths of 10 ns full width half maximum (FWHM) were used to trigger the switch. The laser beam was transported through 67 cm-long cell of 1 MO-cm deionized water constructed with anti reflection UV grade fused silica windows. The laser beam was then focused to form a breakdown arc in the gas between switch electrodes. Less than 10 ns jitter in the operation of the switch was obtained for laser pulse energies of between 80-110 mJ. Breakdown arcs more than 35 mm-long were produced by using a 70 cm focusing optic.

  2. Black Hole Event Horizons and Advection-Dominated Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The XMM data on black-hole X-ray novae are only now becoming available and they have so far not been included in any publications. This work is part of a larger project that makes use of both XMM and Chandra data. Our first publication on the Chandra results is the following: "New Evidence for Black Hole Event Horizons from Chandra" by M.R. Garcia, J.E. McClintock, R. Narayan, P. Callanan, D. Barret and S. Murray (2001, ApJ, 553, L47). Therein we present the luminosities of the two black-hole X-ray novae, GRO J0422+22 and 4U1 543-47, which were observed by Chandra. These results are combined with the luminosities of four additional black-hole X-ray novae, which were observed as part of a Chandra GTO program (PI: S. Murray). The very low, but nonzero, quiescent X-ray luminosities of these black hole binaries is very difficult to understand in the context of standard viscous accretion disk theory. The principal result of this work is that X-ray novae that contain black hole primaries are about 100 times fainter that X-ray novae that contain neutron star primaries. This result had been suggested in earlier work, but the present work very firmly establishes this large luminosity difference. The result is remarkable because the black-hole and the neutron-star systems are believed to be similar in many respects. Most importantly, the mass transfer rate from the secondary star is believed to be very comparable for the two kinds of systems for similar orbital periods. The advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model provides a natural framework for understanding the extraordinarily low luminosities of the black hole systems and the hundred-fold greater luminosities of the neutron star systems. The chief feature of an ADAF is that the heat energy in the accreting gas is trapped in the gas and travels with it, rather than being radiated promptly. Thus the accreting gas reaches the central object with a huge amount of thermal energy. If the accretor is a black hole, the

  3. Trace gas exchanges and convective transports over the Amazonian rain forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael; Harriss, Robert; Beck, Sherwin; Browell, Edward; Sachse, Glen; Gregory, Gerald; Hill, Gerald; Simpson, Joanne; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Torres, Arnold

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2A) based in Manaus, Brazil, in July and August 1985, is used to examine meteorological processes responsible for the vertical and horizontal transport of biogenic and anthropogenic trace gases generated over the Amazon basin. Direct sampling of the surrounding environment of deep convective clouds shows marked changes in the vertical distribution of the lower and midtroposphere concentration of O3 and such surface-derived species as CO, CO2, and NO. Thermodynamic observations, together with two-dimensional cloud model simulations, confirm vertical transports within the convection and provide a basis for an estimation of the magnitude and efficiency of cloud upward and downward exchanges. A distinction is drawn between local changes due to convective updrafts and downdrafts and convective overturning as a net result of the storm processes. Marked variability is seen in trace gas concentrations along horizontal flight paths in the vicinity of the convection. Interpretation of simultaneously measured thermodynamic quantities and trace gas concentrations provide the information to infer the presence and direction of atmospheric transports and/or the presence of anthropogenic influences.

  4. Gas transport and control in thick-liquid inertial fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    Among the numerous potential routes to a commercial fusion power plant, the inertial path with thick-liquid protection is explored in this doctoral dissertation. Gas dynamics phenomena in such fusion target chambers have been investigated since the early 1990s with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. For this doctoral work, the code was redesigned and rewritten entirely to enable the use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers. The new ablation and gas dynamics code is named "Visual Tsunami" to emphasize its graphics-based pre- and post-processors. It is aimed at providing a versatile and user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role. Simultaneously, some of these improvements were implemented in a previous version of the code; the resulting code constitutes the version 2.8 of the TSUNAMI series. Visual Tsunami was used to design and model the novel Condensation Debris Experiment (CDE), which presents many aspects of a typical Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) system and has therefore been used to exercise the code. Numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. In a heavy-ion IFE target chamber, proper beam and target propagation set stringent requirements for the control of ablation debris transport in the target chamber and beam tubes. When the neutralized ballistic transport mode is employed, the background gas density should be adequately low and the beam tube metallic surfaces upstream of the neutralizing region should be free of contaminants. TSUNAMI 2.8 was used for the first simulation of gas transport through the complex geometry of the liquid blanket of a hybrid target chamber and beam lines. Concurrently, the feasibility of controlling the gas density was addressed with a novel beam tube design, which introduces magnetic shutters and a long low

  5. Advection-condensation of water vapor with coherent stirring: a stochastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Yue-Kin; Vanneste, Jacques; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of atmospheric water is an essential ingredient of weather and climate. Water vapor, in particular, is an important greenhouse gas whose distribution has a strong impact on climate. To gain insight into the factors controlling the distribution of atmospheric moisture, we study an advection-condensation model in which water vapor is passively advected by a prescribed velocity and condensation acts as a sink that maintains the specific humidity below a prescribed, spatially dependent saturation value. The velocity consists of two parts: a single vortex representing large-scale coherent flow (e.g. the Hadley cell) and a white noise component mimicking small-scale turbulence. Steady-state is achieved in the presence of a moisture source at a boundary. We formulate this model as a set of stochastic differential equations. In the fast advection limit, analytical expression for the water vapor distribution is obtained by matched asymptotics. This allows us to make various predictions including the dependence of total precipitation on the vortex strength. These analytical results are verified by Monte Carlo simulations. This work is supported by the UK EPSRC Grant EP/I028072/1 and the Feasibility Fund from the UK EPSRC Network ReCoVER.

  6. Modulated point-vortex pairs on a rotating sphere: Dynamics and chaotic advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drótos, Gábor; Tél, Tamás; Kovács, Gergely

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of modulated point-vortex pairs is investigated on a rotating sphere, where modulation is chosen to reflect the conservation of angular momentum (potential vorticity). For sufficiently close vortices (dipoles) the trajectories of their center-of-mass are shown to correspond to those of a point particle moving freely on a rotating sphere. For finite size vortex pairs, a qualitative similarity to the geodesic dynamics is found. The advection dynamics generated by vortex pairs on a rotating sphere is found to be chaotic. In the short time dynamics we point out a transition from closed to open chaotic advection, which implies that the transport properties of the flow might drastically be altered by changing the initial conditions of the pair on the sphere. Due to spherical topology, for long times, even the open advection patterns are found to gradually cross over to that corresponding to a homogeneous closed mixing. This pattern extends along a zonal band, whereas short term closed mixing remains always bounded to the moving pair.

  7. Modulated point-vortex pairs on a rotating sphere: dynamics and chaotic advection.

    PubMed

    Drótos, Gábor; Tél, Tamás; Kovács, Gergely

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of modulated point-vortex pairs is investigated on a rotating sphere, where modulation is chosen to reflect the conservation of angular momentum (potential vorticity). For sufficiently close vortices (dipoles) the trajectories of their center-of-mass are shown to correspond to those of a point particle moving freely on a rotating sphere. For finite size vortex pairs, a qualitative similarity to the geodesic dynamics is found. The advection dynamics generated by vortex pairs on a rotating sphere is found to be chaotic. In the short time dynamics we point out a transition from closed to open chaotic advection, which implies that the transport properties of the flow might drastically be altered by changing the initial conditions of the pair on the sphere. Due to spherical topology, for long times, even the open advection patterns are found to gradually cross over to that corresponding to a homogeneous closed mixing. This pattern extends along a zonal band, whereas short term closed mixing remains always bounded to the moving pair. PMID:23848782

  8. GH-3PAD - a new numerical solver for multiphase transport in porous media - new insights on gas hydrate and free gas co-existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, E.; Rupke, L.; Wallmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    Gas Hydrate-3 Phase Advanced Dynamics (GH-3PAD) code has been developed to study the geophysical and biochemical processes associated with gas hydrate as well as free methane gas formation and dissolution in marine sediments. Biochemical processes influencing in-situ organic carbon decay and, therefore, gas hydrate formation, such as Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM), sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis have been considered. The new model assumes a Lagrangian reference frame that is attached to the deposited sedimentary layers, which compact according to their individual lithological properties. Differential motion of the pore fluids and free gas is modeled as Darcy flow. Gas hydrate and free gas formation is either controlled by 1) instant gas hydrate crystallization assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium or by a 2) kinetically controlled rate of gas hydrate growth. The thermal evolution is computed from an energy equation that includes contributions from all phases present in the model (sediment grains, saline pore fluids, gas hydrate, and free gas). A first application of the GH-3PAD model has been the Blake Ridge Site, offshore South Carolina. Here seismic and well data points to the out-of-equilibrium co-existence of gas hydrate and free gas. It has been reported that these two distinct phases appear within sediment column with a gaseous phase tending to migrate upwards throughout the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (GHSZ) until it reaches the seafloor despite relatively low gas hydrate content (4 - 7 vol. % after Paull et al., 1996). With the GH-3PAD model we quantify the complex transport- reaction processes that control three phase (gas hydrate, free gas, and dissolved CH4) out-of-equilibrium state. References: Paull C. K., Matsumoto R., Wallace P. J., 1996. 9. Site 997, Shipboard Scientific Party. Proceeding of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 164.

  9. Advective hydrogel membrane chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Brower, Mark; Pollard, David; Kanani, Dharmesh; Jacquemart, Renaud; Kachuik, Bradley; Stout, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is widely employed for the capture and purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because of the high cost of protein A resins, there is a significant economic driving force to seek new downstream processing strategies. Membrane chromatography has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional resin based column chromatography. However, to date, the application has been limited to mostly ion exchange flow through (FT) mode. Recently, significant advances in Natrix hydrogel membrane has resulted in increased dynamic binding capacities for proteins, which makes membrane chromatography much more attractive for bind/elute operations. The dominantly advective mass transport property of the hydrogel membrane has also enabled Natrix membrane to be run at faster volumetric flow rates with high dynamic binding capacities. In this work, the potential of using Natrix weak cation exchange membrane as a mAb capture step is assessed. A series of cycle studies was also performed in the pilot scale device (> 30 cycles) with good reproducibility in terms of yield and product purities, suggesting potential for improved manufacturing flexibility and productivity. In addition, anion exchange (AEX) hydrogel membranes were also evaluated with multiple mAb programs in FT mode. Significantly higher binding capacity for impurities (support mAb loads up to 10Kg/L) and 40X faster processing speed were observed compared with traditional AEX column chromatography. A proposed protein A free mAb purification process platform could meet the demand of a downstream purification process with high purity, yield, and throughput. PMID:26018631

  10. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Gas-Transported Reactants: Laboratory Scale Experiments in Support of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Williams, Mark D.; Resch, Charles T.; McKinley, James P.

    2010-01-04

    inconsistent change in aqueous and adsorbed U, but significant coating (likely phosphates) on U-carbonates. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U reduction, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals. In addition, simulations showed the greatest decrease in U mass transport time to reach groundwater (and concentration) for these silicate/phosphate minerals. Advection of reactive gasses was the easiest to implement at the laboratory scale (and presumably field scale). Both mist and foam advection show promise and need further development, but current implementation move reactants shorter distances relative to reactive gasses. Overall, the ammonia and carbon dioxide gas had the greatest overall geochemical performance and ability to implement at field scale. Corresponding mist-delivered technologies (NaOH mist for ammonia and HCl mist for carbon dioxide) performed as well or better geochemically, but are not as easily upscaled. Phosphate delivery by mist was rated slightly higher than by foam delivery simply due to the complexity of foam injection and unknown effect of U mobility by the presence of the surfactant.

  11. CO2 Gas Transport Property of Sulfonated Poly(Arylenen Ether Sulfone) Copolymer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Deuk Ju; Nam, Sang Yong

    2015-03-01

    The effect of functional groups such as sulfuric acid group and metal ions on the CO2 gas transport property of membranes was investigated. Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPAES) was prepared by direct copolymerization with a non-sulfonated monomer and sulfonated monomer. The sulfonation degree of SPAES was controlled from 0 to 50%. Metal ions such as lithium and sodium were substituted for the protons of the -SO3H group. The thermal properties, microstructure of polymer chains, and the permeability and selectivity of membranes were evaluated. The solubility coefficient of CO2 gas increased with an increase in sulfonation degree. But the diffusivity was largely decreased and the CO2/N2 selectivity of the membrane substituted for metal ions was increased. PMID:26413703

  12. Moment model and boundary conditions for energy transport in the phonon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Michael J.; Struchtrup, Henning

    2014-09-01

    Heat transfer in solids is modeled in the framework of kinetic theory of the phonon gas. The microscopic description of the phonon gas relies on the phonon Boltzmann equation and the Callaway model for phonon-phonon interaction. A simple model for phonon interaction with crystal boundaries, similar to the Maxwell boundary conditions in classical kinetic theory, is proposed. Macroscopic transport equation for an arbitrary set of moments is developed and closed by means of Grad's moment method. Boundary conditions for the macroscopic equations are derived from the microscopic model and the Grad closure. As example, sets with 4, 9, 16, and 25 moments are considered and solved analytically for one-dimensional heat transfer and Poiseuille flow of phonons. The results show the influence of Knudsen number on phonon drag at solid boundaries. The appearance of Knudsen layers reduces the net heat conductivity of solids in rarefied phonon regimes.

  13. A case study of electrostatic accidents in the process of oil-gas storage and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuqin; Wang, Diansheng; Liu, Jinyu; Gao, Jianshen

    2013-03-01

    Ninety nine electrostatic accidents were reviewed, based on information collected from published literature. All the accidents over the last 30 years occurred during the process of oil-gas storage and transportation. Statistical analysis of these accidents was performed based on the type of complex conditions where accidents occurred, type of tanks and contents, and type of accidents. It is shown that about 85% of the accidents occurred in tank farms, gas stations or petroleum refineries, and 96% of the accidents included fire or explosion. The fishbone diagram was used to summarize the effects and the causes of the effects. The results show that three major reasons were responsible for accidents, including improper operation during loading and unloading oil, poor grounding and static electricity on human bodies, which accounted for 29%, 24% and 13% of the accidents, respectively. Safety actions are suggested to help operating engineers to handle similar situations in the future.

  14. Transport simulations of the pre-thermal-quench phase in ASDEX Upgrade massive gas injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Pautasso, G.; Lehnen, M.; Dux, R.; Bernert, M.; Mlynek, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-02-01

    The pre-thermal-quench (PTQ) phase of the massive gas injection (MGI) scenario to terminate the tokamak plasma discharge is studied by means of one-dimensional (1D) transport simulations. This phase is characterized by the cold-front penetration in the hot plasma after the gas has been released from the valves, and before the actual thermal quench takes place, with consequent plasma disruption at lower stored energy. The comparison between the simulations and the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) experiments allows to gain insight in the observed dependencies and time scales. Despite the genuine three-dimensional structure of the problem, it is shown that the 1D simulations are already giving experimentally relevant answers, the reason for which will be discussed in detail. Influence of unknown parameters and simplifying assumptions are also discussed.

  15. Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Bergerson, Joule A; Lave, Lester B

    2005-08-15

    We examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. PMID:16173545

  16. Advective Removal of Intraparticle Uranium from Contaminated Vadose Zone Sediments, Hanford, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, D. A.; Zachara, John M.

    2008-03-01

    A column study on U contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford Site, WA, was performed in order to aid the development of a model for predicting U(VI) release rates under a dynamic flow regime and for variable geochemical conditions. The sediments of interest are adjacent to and below tank BX-102, part of the BX tank farm that contained high level liquid radioactive waste. Two sediments, with different U(VI) loadings and intraparticle large fracture vs. smaller fracture ratios, were reacted with three different solutions. The primary reservoir for U(VI) appears to be a micron-sized nanocrystalline Na-U-Si phase, possibly Na-boltwoodite, that nucleated and grew on plagioclase grains that line fractures within sand-sized granitic clasts. The solutions were all calcite saturated and in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2, where one solution was simply DI-water, the second was a synthetic ground water (SGW) with elevated Na, and the third was the same SGW but with both elevated Na and Si. The latter two solutions were employed, in part, to test the effect of saturation state on U(VI) release. For both sediments and all three electrolytes, there was an initial rapid release of U(VI) to the advecting solution followed by a plateau of low U(VI) concentration. U(VI) effluent concentration increased during subsequent stop flow (SF) events. The electrolytes with elevated Na and Si appreciably depressed U(VI) concentrations relative to DI water. The effluent data for both sediments and all three electrolytes was simulated reasonably well by a three domain model (the advecting fluid, fractures, and matrix) that coupled U(VI) dissolution rates, intraparticle U(VI) diffusion, and interparticle advective transport of U(VI); where key transport and dissolution processes had been parameterized in previous batch studies. For the calcite-saturated DI-water, U(VI) concentrations in the effluent remained far below saturation with respect to Na-boltwoodite and release of U(VI) to

  17. Peculiarities of the charge transport in the gas discharge electronic device with irradiated porous zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Sevgul; Koseoglu, Kivilcim; Ozer, Metin; Salamov, Bahtiyar G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of pressure and β-radiation (1 kGy β doses) on the charge transport mechanism, charge trapping effects in porous zeolite surfaces and breakdown voltage (UB) are discussed in atmospheric microplasmas for the first time. This is due to exposure the zeolite cathode (ZC) to β-radiation resulting in substantial decreases in the UB, discharge currents and conductivity due to increase in porosity of the material. Results indicated that the enhancement of plasma light intensity and electron emission from the ZC surface with the release of trapped electrons which are captured by the defect centers following β-irradiation. The porosity of the ZC and radiation defect centers has significant influence on the charge transport of the microstructure and optical properties of the devices manufactured on its base. Thus, we confirm that the ZCir is a suitable cathode material for plasma light source, field emission displays, energy storage devices and low power gas discharge electronic devices.

  18. Explorations into thermodynamics analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Wildman, D.; Tuba, S.T.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new. The idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport cases are also known. Experimental data from several investigators where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubic van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow and voidage. Using the van der Waals format phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems which have been scrutinized. From this information the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced properties plot has been constructed and has been shown to be unique in representing all the data. Exploration into the pressure drop domain has shown a relationship between the phase diagrams by an analytical approach. 9 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  19. Explorations into thermodynamic analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tuba, S.T.; Wildman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new, nor is the idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport phenomena. Experimental data from several investigations, where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally, have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubi van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow, and voidage. Using the van der Waals format, phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems. From this information, the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced-properties plot seems to correlate the existing data satisfactorily. The same approach is pursued to interpret the pressure drop data.

  20. Explorations into thermodynamic analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Wildman, D.J.; Tuba, S.T.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1984-11-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new, nor is the idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport phenomena. Experimental data from several investigations, where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally, have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubic van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow, and voidage. Using the van der Waals format, phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems. From this information, the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced-properties plot seems to correlate the existing data satisfactorily. The same approach is pursued to interpret the pressure drop data. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Hot-gas filter testing with a transport reactor development unit

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O. Jr.; Mann, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the hot-gas cleanup work on the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) located at the Energy and Environmental Research Center is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot-gas filter elements as a function of particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability during relatively short-term operation (100--200 hours). The selected hot-gas filter elements currently being tested include a Fibroplate{trademark} ceramic tube sheet and Fibrosic{trademark} candle filters from industrial Filter and Pump Mfg.; silicon carbide fiber ceramic candle filters from 3M; and metal and Vitropore ceramic candle filters from Pall Advanced Separation Systems. These elements will be used in three 200-hour filter tests under gasification conditions using the TRDU at filter temperatures of approximately 540 C at 9.3 bar and face velocities ranging from 1.4 to 3.8 cm/s. Changes in filter face velocity are achieved by removing six candles between each test. Results from the first 200-hour test are presented.

  2. Control of Chemical, Thermal, and Gas Transport Properties in Dense Phosphazene Polymer Membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart; Mark L. Stone; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2005-10-01

    Polyphosphazenes are hybrid polymers having organic pendant groups attached to an inorganic backbone. Phosphazene polymers can be tailored to specific applications through the attachment of a variety of different pendant groups to the phosphazene backbone. Applications for which these polymers have proven useful include solid polymer electrolytes for batteries and fuel cells, as well as, membranes for gas and liquid separations. In past work, phosphazene polymers have been synthesized using mixtures of pendant groups with differing chemical affinities. Specific ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pendant groups were placed on the phosphazene backbone with a goal of demonstrating control of solubility, and therefore chemical selectivity. In this work, a series of phosphazene homo-polymers were synthesized having varying amounts of hydrophobic and hydrophilic character on each individual pendant group. Polymers were synthesized having a hydrophilic portion next to the polymer backbone and the hydrophobic portion on the terminal end of the pendant group. The effects of these combined hydrophobic/hydrophilic pendant groups on polymer morphology and gas transport properties are presented. The following data will be addressed: thermal characterization, pure gas permeability on seven gases (Ar, H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4 ), and ideal selectivity for the gas pairs: O2/N2, H2/CO2, CO2/H2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2.

  3. Modeled natural and excess radiocarbon: Sensitivities to the gas exchange formulation and ocean transport strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. A.; Joos, F.; Plattner, G.-K.; Edwards, N. R.; Stocker, T. F.

    2008-09-01

    Observation-based surface ocean Δ14C distributions and regional inventories for excess, bomb-produced radiocarbon are compared with results of two ocean models of intermediate complexity. By applying current descriptions of the air-sea gas exchange the models produce similar column inventories for excess 14C among all basins. This result is robust across a wide range of transport parameter settings, but inconsistent with data-based inventories. In the absence of evidence of fundamentally different gas exchange mechanisms in the North Atlantic than in the other basins, we infer regional North Atlantic 14C inventories which are considerably smaller than previous estimates. The results further suggest that the gas exchange velocity field should be reduced by (19 ± 16)%, which corresponds to a global mean air-sea gas transfer rate for CO2 in seawater of 17.1 ± 3.3 cm h-1, to find good agreement of simulated quantities with a range of data-based metrics.

  4. Regimes of gas transport through macroscopic areas of multi-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutilier, Michael; Karnik, Rohit; Sun, Chengzhen; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Nanoporous graphene membranes have the potential to surpass the permeance and selectivity limits of current gas separation membranes. Recent experiments and simulations on individual graphene nanopores have demonstrated that molecule-size-selective nanopores can be created and used to separate components of a gas mixture. However, micrometer-scale tears and nanometer-scale intrinsic defects, inherently present in macroscopic areas of graphene, can severely limit the gas separation performance of graphene membranes of practical size. In this study, we measure the inherent permeance of macroscopic, multi-layer graphene membranes to various gases. A model for the transport of gases through these membranes is developed and shown to accurately explain the measured flow rates. The results quantify the separate contributions of tears and intrinsic defects to the inherent permeance of macroscopic areas of multi-layer graphene. The model is then extended to graphene membranes with engineered selective nanopores to optimize design parameters for defect-tolerant gas separation membranes. This work was supported in part by the MIT Energy Initiative and in part by a NSERC PGS-D3 Fellowship.

  5. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  6. Miniband Transport in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas with a Strong Periodic Unidirectional Potential Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun K.; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we study the Bloch oscillations of a two-dimensional electron gas with a strong periodic potential-modulation and miniband transport along the field at low temperatures, assuming a free motion in the transverse direction. The dependence of the current on the field, the electron density, and the temperature is investigated by using a relaxation-time approximation for inelastic scattering. Moreover, for a fixed total scattering rate, the field dependence of the current is sensitive to the ratio of the elastic and inelastic scattering rates in contrast with the recent result of a multiband but otherwise similar model with a weak potential modulation.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of the noble gas transport and fate model: CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Barker, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    CASCADR9 is a desert alluvial soil site-specific noble gas transport and fate model. Input parameters for CASCADR9 are: man-made source term, background concentration of radionuclides, radon half-life, soil porosity, period of barometric pressure wave, amplitude of barometric pressure wave, and effective eddy diffusivity. Using average flux, total flow, and radon concentration at the 40 day mark as output parameters, a sensitivity analysis for CASCADR9 is carried out, under a variety of scenarios. For each scenario, the parameter to which output parameters are most sensitive are identified.

  8. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  9. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P.; Curran, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to

  10. The role of advection and diffusion in waste disposal by sea urchin embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Aaron; Licata, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    We determine the first passage probability for the absorption of waste molecules released from the microvilli of sea urchin embryos. We calculate a perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation for a linear shear profile similar to the fluid environment which the embryos inhabit. Rapid rotation of the embryo results in a concentration boundary layer of comparable thickness to the length of the microvilli. A comparison of the results to the regime of diffusion limited transport indicates that fluid flow is advantageous for efficient waste disposal.

  11. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  12. Field-scale sulfur hexafluoride tracer experiment to understand long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian; Green, Christopher T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Striegl, Rob

    2014-01-01

    A natural gradient SF6 tracer experiment provided an unprecedented evaluation of long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone (UZ) under controlled (known) conditions. The field-scale gas tracer test in the 110-m-thick UZ was conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. A history of anomalous (theoretically unexpected) contaminant gas transport observed at the ADRS, next to the first commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in the United States, provided motivation for the SF6 tracer study. Tracer was injected into a deep UZ borehole at depths of 15 and 48 m, and plume migration was observed in a monitoring borehole 9 m away at various depths (0.5–109 m) over the course of 1 yr. Tracer results yielded useful information about gas transport as applicable to the spatial scales of interest for off-site contaminant transport in arid unsaturated zones. Modeling gas diffusion with standard empirical expressions reasonably explained SF6 plume migration, but tended to underpredict peak concentrations for the field-scale experiment given previously determined porosity information. Despite some discrepancies between observations and model results, rapid SF6 gas transport commensurate with previous contaminant migration was not observed. The results provide ancillary support for the concept that apparent anomalies in historic transport behavior at the ADRS are the result of factors other than nonreactive gas transport properties or processes currently in effect in the undisturbed UZ.

  13. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  14. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; Moldrup, Per

    2014-08-01

    Growing plants to facilitate life in outer space, for example on the International Space Station (ISS) or at planned deep-space human outposts on the Moon or Mars, has received much attention with regard to NASA’s advanced life support system research. With the objective of in situ resource utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions. Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions for ground-based measurements (1 - g) were scaled to two reduced gravity conditions, Martian gravity (0.38 - g) and lunar gravity (0.16 - g), following the observations in previous reduced gravity studies. We described the observed gas diffusivity with a recently developed model combined with a new approach that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using a substrate-structure parameter related to the gaseous phase, we adequately described the air permeability under reduced gravity conditions.

  15. PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN THE HOT-GAS FILTER AT WILSONVILLE

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    1999-06-24

    Particle transport and deposition in the Wilsonville hot-gas filter vessel is studied. The filter vessel contains a total of 72 filters, which are arranged in two tiers. These are modeled by six upper and one lower cylindrical effective filters. An unstructured grid of 312,797 cells generated by GAMBIT is used in the simulations. The Reynolds stress model of FLUENT{trademark} (version 5.0) code is used for evaluating the gas mean velocities and root mean-square fluctuation velocities in the vessel. The particle equation of motion includes the drag, the gravitational and the lift forces. The turbulent instantaneous fluctuation velocity is simulated by a filtered Gaussian white-noise model provided by the FLUENT code. The particle deposition patterns are evaluated, and the effect of particle size is studied. The effect of turbulent dispersion, the lift force and the gravitational force are analyzed. The results show that the deposition pattern depends on particle size. Turbulent dispersion plays an important role in transport and deposition of particles. Lift and gravitational forces affect the motion of large particles, but has no effect on small particles.

  16. Transport mechanisms of metastable and resonance atoms in a gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu; Gorchakov, S.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-04-01

    Atoms in electronically excited states are of significant importance in a large number of different gas discharges. The spatio-temporal distribution particularly of the lower excited states, the metastable and resonance ones, influences the overall behavior of the plasma because of their role in the ionization and energy budget. This article is a review of the theoretical and experimental studies on the spatial formation and temporal evolution of metastable and resonance atoms in weakly ionized low-temperature plasmas. Therefore, the transport mechanisms due to collisional diffusion and resonance radiation are compared step by step. The differences in formation of spatio-temporal structures of metastable and resonance atoms in plasmas are attributed to these different transport mechanisms. The analysis is performed by obtaining solutions of the diffusion and radiation transport equations. Solutions of stationary and non-stationary problems by decomposition over the eigenfunctions of the corresponding operators showed that there is, on the one hand, an effective suppression of the highest diffusion modes and, on the other hand, a survival of the highest radiation modes. The role of the highest modes is illustrated by examples. In addition, the differences in the Green functions for the diffusion and radiation transport operators are discussed. Numerical methods for the simultaneous solution of the balance equations for metastable and resonance atoms are proposed. The radiation transport calculations consider large absorption coefficients according to the Lorentz contour of a spectral line. Measurements of the distributions of metastable and resonance atoms are reviewed for a larger number of discharge conditions, i.e. in the positive column plasma, afterglow plasma, constricted pulsed discharge, stratified discharge, magnetron discharge, and in a discharge with a cathode spot.

  17. Risks in the transport and storage of liquefied natural gas. Sub-project 5-2: Investigation into building damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouwens, C.; Dragosavic, M.

    The large reserves and increasing use of natural gas as a source of energy have resulted in its storage and transport becoming an urgent problem. Since a liquid of the same mass occupies only a fraction of the volume of a gas, it is economical to store natural gas as a liquid. Liquefied natural gas is stored in insulated tanks and also carried by ship at a temperature of -160 C to 170 C. If a serious accident allows the LNG to escape, a gas cloud forms. The results of a possible explosion from such a gas cloud are studied. The development of a leak, escape and evaporation, size and propagation of the gas cloud, the explosive pressures to be expected and the results on the environment are investigated. Damage to buildings is examined making use of the preliminary conclusions of the other sub-projects and especially the explosive pressures.

  18. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  19. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  20. The Sensitivity of Model Ozone to Advective and Photochemical Processes in the High Latitude Winter Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.; Kawa, S. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three dimensional chemistry and transport models (CTMs) contain a set of coupled continuity equations which describe the evolution of constituents such as ozone and other minor species which affect ozone. Both advection and photochemical processes contribute to constituent evolution, and a CTM provides a means to evaluate these contributions separately. Such evaluation is particularly useful when both terms are important to the modeled tendency. An example is the ozone tendency in the high latitude winter lower stratosphere, where advection tends to increase ozone, and catalytic processes involving chlorine radicals tend to decrease ozone. The Goddard three dimensional chemistry and transport model uses meteorological fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, thus the modeled ozone evolution may reproduce the observed evolution and provide a test of the model representation of photochemical processes if the transport is shown to be modeled appropriately. We have investigated the model advection further using diabatic trajectory calculations. For long lived constituents such as N2O, the model field for a particular time on a potential temperature surface is compared with a field produced by calculating 15 day back trajectories for a fixed latitude longitude grid, and mapping model N2O at the terminus of the back trajectories onto the initial grid. This provides a quantitative means to evaluate two aspects of the CTM transport: one, the model horizontal gradient between middle latitudes and the polar vortex is compared with the gradient produced using the non-diffusive trajectory calculation; two, the model vertical advection, which is produced by the divergence of the horizontal winds, is compared with the vertical transport expected from diabatic cooling.

  1. Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2006-06-30

    Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

  2. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. PMID:26939033

  3. Flow transport and gas mixing during invasive high frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2014-06-01

    A large Eddy simulation (LES) based computational fluid dynamics study was performed to investigate gas transport and mixing in patient specific human lung models during high frequency oscillatory ventilation. Different pressure-controlled waveforms (sinusoidal, exponential and square) and ventilator frequencies (15, 10 and 6Hz) were used (tidal volume=50mL). The waveforms were created by solving the equation of motion subjected to constant lung wall compliance and flow resistance. Simulations were conducted with and without endotracheal tube to understand the effect of invasive management device. Variation of pressure-controlled waveform and frequency exhibits significant differences on counter flow pattern, which could lead to a significant impact on the gas mixing efficiency. Pendelluft-like flow was present for the sinusoidal waveform at all frequencies but occurred only at early inspiration for the square waveform at highest frequency. The square waveform was most efficient for gas mixing, resulting in the least wall shear stress on the lung epithelium layer thereby reducing the risk of barotrauma to both airways and the alveoli for patients undergoing therapy. PMID:24656889

  4. Simulation of gas phase transport of carbon-14 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ross, B.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated gas phase transport of Carbon-14 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Three models were established to calculate travel time of Carbon-14 from the potential repository to the mountain surface: a geochemical model for retardation factors, a coupled gas-flow and heat transfer model for temperature and gas flow fields, and a particle tracker for travel time calculation. The simulations used three parallel, east-west cross-sections that were taken from the Sandia National Laboratories Interactive Graphics Information System (IGIS). Assuming that the repository is filled with 30- year-old waste at an initial areal power density of 57 kw/acre, we found that repository temperatures remain above 60??C for more than 10,000 years. For a tuff permeability of 10-7 cm2, Carbon-14 travel times to the surface are mostly less than 1,000 years, for particles starting at any time within the first 10,000 years. If the tuff permeability is 10-8 cm2, however, Carbon- 14 travel times to the surface range from 3,000 to 12,000 years, for particle starting within the 10,000 years.

  5. Performance Analysis of high-order remap-type advection scheme on icosahedral-hexagonal grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rashmi; Dubey, Sarvesh; Saxena, Vaibhav; Meurdesoif, Yann

    2014-05-01

    A comparative performance analysis on computational cost of second order advection schemes FF-CSLAM (Flux form conservative semi-Lagrangian multi-tracer transport scheme) and it's two simplifications on Icosahedral grid has been presented. Tracer transport is one of the main building blocks in atmospheric models and hence their performance greatly determines the overall performance of the model. FF-CSLAM falls in the category of arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) scheme. It exploits the finite volume formulation and therefore it is inherently conservative. Flux-area through edges are approximated with great circle arcs in an upwind fashion. Bi-quadratic sub-grid scale reconstructions using weighted least-squares method is employed to approximate trace field. Area integrals on the overlapped region of flux-area and static Eulerian meshes are evaluated via line-integrals. A brief description of implementation of FF-CSLAM on icosahedral -hexagonal meshes along with and its numerical accuracy in terms of standard test cases will be presented. A comparative analysis of the computational overhead is necessary to assess the suitability of FF-CSLAM for massively parallel and multi-threading computer architectures in comparison to other advection schemes implemented on icosahedral grids. The main focus of this work is to present the implementation of the shared memory parallelization and to describe the memory access pattern of the numerical scheme. FF-CSLAM is a remap-type advection scheme, thus extra calculation are done in comparison to the other advection schemes. The additional computations are associated with the search required to find the overlap area between the area swept through the edge and the underlining grid. But the experiments shows that the associated computational overhead is minimal for multi-tracer transport. It will be shown that for the Courant Number less than one, FF-CSLAM, the computations are not expensive. Since the grid cells are arranged in

  6. An evaluation and intercomparison of four new advection schemes for use in global chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Arthur C.; Spee, Edwin J.; van Dop, Han; Hundsdorfer, Willem

    1998-08-01

    The need to use a higher spatial resolution and to include more chemical species in global atmospheric chemistry models has led to a demand for efficient advection schemes with high accuracy. We test four newly developed three-dimensional advection schemes named Mol-rg, Split-u, Split-us, and Split-rg. We compare the new schemes with the existing schemes Slopes and Second Moments, both implemented on a uniform grid. Mol-rg and Split-rg make use of a reduced grid. Split-us is an unconditionally stable scheme on a uniform grid. Two tests are performed with all schemes: a solid-body rotation test and a radon transport test. The radon transport test is performed with the off-line global tracer model TM2. The solid-body rotation test shows that none of the new schemes generates undershoot and overshoot and that all of them are mass conservative. Slopes and Second Moments both generate small undershoot and overshoot at all resolutions. The accuracy of the new and old schemes for rotation of a smooth profile is similar for the horizontal resolutions studied. Since the new schemes are slightly more diffusive than the old schemes, they perform worse for rotation of a cone. The radon test shows that the errors related to the numerical schemes are much smaller than other model errors. The main advantage of the new schemes is that they use 75% and 90% less memory than Slopes and Second Moments, respectively. At horizontal resolutions higher than 5° × 5° Split-us and Split-rg are the most efficient of the schemes in terms of cpu time. The new advection schemes are available through Internet.

  7. Transport in a field aligned magnetized plasma/neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher Michael

    The objective of this dissertation is to characterize the physics of a boundary layer between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas along the direction of a confining magnetic field. A series of experiments are performed at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA to study this field aligned Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) at the end of the plasma. A Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode creates a magnetized, current-free helium plasma which terminates on a neutral helium gas without touching any walls. Probes are inserted into the plasma to measure the basic plasma parameters and study the transport in the NBL. The experiment is performed in the weakly ionized limit where the plasma density (ne) is much less than the neutral density (nn) such that ne/nn < 5%. The NBL is characterized by a field-aligned electric field which begins at the point where the plasma pressure equilibrates with the neutral gas pressure. Beyond the pressure equilibration point the electrons and ions lose their momentum by collisions with the neutral gas and come to rest. An electric field is established self consistently to maintain a current-free termination through equilibration of the different species' stopping rates in the neutral gas. The electric field resembles a collisional quasineutral sheath with a length 10 times the electron-ion collision length, 100 times the neutral collision length, and 10,000 times the Debye length. Collisions with the neutral gas dominate the losses in the system. The measured plasma density loss rates are above the classical cross-field current-free ambipolar rate, but below the anomalous Bohm diffusion rate. The electron temperature is below the ionization threshold of the gas, 2.2 eV in helium. The ions are in thermal equilibrium with the neutral gas. A generalized theory of plasma termination in a Neutral Boundary Layer is applied to this case using a two-fluid, current-free, weakly ionized transport model. The electron

  8. Dynamic typology of hydrothermal systems: competing effects of advection, dispersion and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejs, David

    2016-04-01

    Genetic interpretation hydrothermal systems relies on recognition of (i) hydrothermal fluid source, (ii) fluid migration pathways, and (iii) deposition site identified by hydrothermal alteration and/or mineralization. Frequently, only the last object is of interest or accessible to direct observation, but constraints on the fluid source (volume) and pathways can be obtained from evaluation of the time-integrated fluid flux during hydrothermal event. Successful interpretation of the petrological record, that is, progress of alteration reactions, relies on identification of individual contributions arising from solute advection (to the deposition site), its lateral dispersion, and reaction efficiency. Although these terms are all applicable in a mass-conservation relationship within the framework of the transport theory, they are rarely considered simultaneously and their relative magnitudes evaluated. These phenomena operate on variable length and time scales, and may in turn provide insight into the system dynamics such as flow, diffusion and reaction rates, or continuous vs. episodic behavior of hydrothermal events. In addition, here we demonstrate that they also affect estimate of the net fluid flux, frequently by several orders of magnitude. The extent of alteration and mineralization reactions between the hydrothermal fluid and the host environment is determined by: (i) temperature, pressure or any other gradients across the mineralization site, (ii) magnitude of disequilibrium at inflow to the mineralization site, which is related to physico-chemical gradient between the fluid source and the mineralization site, and (iii) chemical redistribution (dispersion) within the mineralization site. We introduce quantitative mass-transport descriptors - Péclet and Damköhler II numbers - to introduce division into dispersion-dominated, advection-dominated and reaction-constrained systems. Dispersive systems are characterized by lateral solute redistribution, driven by

  9. Numerical Simulation of Subsurface Transport and Groundwater Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. T.; Moridis, G. J.; Keen, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown tremendously over the last decade, and concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways that could connect the stimulated reservoir to shallower groundwater aquifers. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a deeper tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying groundwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, assuming that the formation of a connecting pathway has already occurred. We focus on two general transport scenarios: 1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and 2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. The simulations explore a range of permeabilities and geometries over time scales, and evaluate the mechanisms and factors that could lead to the escape of gas or reservoir fluid and the contamination of groundwater resources. We also examine the effects of overpressured reservoirs, and explore long-term transport processes as part of a continuing study. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Gas production from the reservoir via a horizontal well is likely to mitigate release through the reduction of available free gas and the lowering of reservoir pressure. We also find that fractured tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of large volumes of migrating gas, and incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  10. Topology preserving advection of implicit interfaces on Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhipeng; Delaney, Keegan; Riaz, Amir; Balaras, Elias

    2015-06-01

    Accurate representation of implicit interface topology is important for the numerical computation of two phase flow on Cartesian grids. A new method is proposed for the construction of signed distance function by geometrically projecting interface topology onto the Cartesian grid using a multi-level projection framework. The method involves a stepwise improvement in the approximation to the signed distance function based on pointwise, piecewise and locally smooth reconstructions of the interface. We show that this approach provides accurate representation of the projected interface and its topology on the Cartesian grid, including the distance from the interface and the interface normal and curvature. The projected interface can be in the form of either a connected set of marker particles that evolve with Lagrangian advection, or a discrete set of points associated with an implicit interface that evolves with the advection of a scalar function. The signed distance function obtained with geometric projection is independent of the details of the scaler field, in contrast to the conventional approach where advection and reinitialization cannot be decoupled. As a result, errors introduced by reinitialization do not amplify advection errors, which leads to substantial improvement in both volume conservation and topology representation.

  11. The 'optimum' upwind advection on a triangular mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, P. L.

    1990-01-01

    For advection schemes based on fluctuation splitting, a design criterion of optimizing the time step leads to linear schemes that coincide with those designed for least truncation error. A further stage of optimizing the time step using a nonlinear positivity criterion, leads to considerable further gains in resolution.

  12. Tidal variability of lateral advection in a coastal plain estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdurak, N. B.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2013-07-01

    Tidal variability of lateral advection of momentum (vuy, where u and v are along-estuary and lateral flows, respectively, and the subindex indicates differentiation with respect to the cross-estuary direction) was investigated in a coastal plain estuary with observations at Hampton Roads, which is the transition between the James River and Chesapeake Bay. Towed current velocity profiles and hydrographic profiles were captured during 9 expeditions in 2004 and 2005, to determine the intratidal and spatial changes in lateral advection of momentum and its contribution to along-channel flow. Curvature effects and lateral density gradients were important in driving lateral circulation and in modifying intratidal lateral advection of momentum. Lateral advection had the same order of magnitude as the baroclinic pressure gradient. Its contribution to the along-channel momentum balance was greatest during or just after peak flood and weakest at the end of ebb. During peak flood and peak ebb, the spatial distribution of vuy was seaward at the southern (left) side near surface and at the northern side (right) near bed (looking up-estuary), and landward in the rest of the channel. During slack periods the vuy structures were mostly landward. Observations were in good agreement with analytical model results during peak ebb and flood, but inconsistent during slack periods. The discrepancies between model results and field measurements can be attributed to bathymetry-density gradient interactions, which enhanced ebb-to-flood asymmetries in the along-channel and lateral flow.

  13. Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.H.; Saiers, J.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Noe, G.B.; Mylon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of particulate matter within wetland surface waters affects nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility, and the evolution of the wetland landscape. Despite the importance of particle transport in influencing wetland form and function, there are few data sets that illuminate, in a quantitative way, the transport behavior of particulate matter within surface waters containing emergent vegetation. We report observations from experiments on the transport of 1 ??m latex microspheres at a wetland field site located in Water Conservation Area 3A of the Florida Everglades. The experiments involved line source injections of particles inside two 4.8-m-long surface water flumes constructed within a transition zone between an Eleocharis slough and Cladium jamaicense ridge and within a Cladium jamaicense ridge. We compared the measurements of particle transport to calculations of two-dimensional advection-dispersion model that accounted for a linear increase in water velocities with elevation above the ground surface. The results of this analysis revealed that particle spreading by longitudinal and vertical dispersion was substantially greater in the ridge than within the transition zone and that particle capture by aquatic vegetation lowered surface water particle concentrations and, at least for the timescale of our experiments, could be represented as an irreversible, first-order kinetics process. We found generally good agreement between our field-based estimates of particle dispersion and water velocity and estimates determined from published theory, suggesting that the advective-dispersive transport of particulate matter within complex wetland environments can be approximated on the basis of measurable properties of the flow and aquatic vegetation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Hybrid Gas Sensing and Transport Properties of Few-Walled CNTs Decorated with Discrete SnO₂ Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Kamalakannan; Shanmugam, Ilango; Kamruddin, Mohammed; Tyagi, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    CVD grown, few walled carbon nanotubes (FWCNTs) were quasi decorated with SnO₂nanoparticles (FWCNTs-SnO₂) and its gas sensing properties were analyzed with ammonia and ethanol. At room temperature FWCNTs-SnO₂show enhanced 'p type' gas sensing response than FWCNTs. Activation of SnO₂at high temperatures led to systematic changes in the sensing behavior towards 'n type' response. Temperature dependent transport behavior was found to be a one dimensional variable range hopping mechanism (1 D-VRH) for the FWCNTs and a 3D-VRH mechanism for the FWCNTs-SnO2. These temperature dependent gas transport and sensing properties elucidate the hybrid nature of the nanocomposite with novel characteristics. This also implies its importance as a potential gas sensor material. PMID:27398589

  15. Free volumes and gas transport in polymers: amine-modified epoxy resins as a case study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pushkar N; Roilo, David; Brusa, Roberto S; Miotello, Antonio; Aghion, Stefano; Ferragut, Rafael; Checchetto, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The CO2 transport process was studied in a series of amine-modified epoxy resins having different cross-linking densities but the same chemical environment for the penetrant molecules. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to monitor the free volume structure of the samples and experimentally evaluate their fractional free volume fh(T) and its temperature evolution. The analysis of the free volume hole size distribution showed that all the holes have a size large enough to accommodate the penetrant molecules at temperatures T above the glass transition temperature Tg. The measured gas diffusion constants at T > Tg have been reproduced in the framework of the free volume theory of diffusion using a novel procedure based on the use of fh(T) as an input experimental parameter. PMID:26762568

  16. Interfacial strain effect on gas transport in nanostructured electrodes of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Kechun; Han, Yupei; Zou, Minda; Lv, Weiqiang; He, Weidong

    2015-09-01

    Most efforts regarding strain effect at the interfaces between electrolytes and electrodes are mainly focused on enhancing the ionic conductivity in electrolytes. However, fundamental insights into the strain effect on gas transport properties in electrodes of fuel cells are still lacking. In this report, quantitative analysis is performed to evaluate the correlation between interfacial strain and the important fuel cells parameters, including limiting current density and concentration polarization. We demonstrate that the strain effect plays an important role in the performance of solid oxide fuel cells with nanostructured electrodes. Our studies provide a powerful platform for reducing concentration polarization by engineering quantitatively the interfacial strain, and facilitating the development of high-efficiency nanostructured fuel cells.

  17. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  18. Miniband Transport in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas with a Strong Periodic Unidirectional Potential Modulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lyo, Sungkwun K.; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we study the Bloch oscillations of a two-dimensional electron gas with a strong periodic potential-modulation and miniband transport along the field at low temperatures, assuming a free motion in the transverse direction. The dependence of the current on the field, the electron density, and the temperature is investigated by using a relaxation-time approximation for inelastic scattering. Moreover, for a fixed total scattering rate, the field dependence of the current is sensitive to the ratio of the elastic and inelastic scattering rates in contrast with the recent result of a multiband but otherwise similar model with a weakmore » potential modulation.« less

  19. Transport through an electrostatically defined quantum dot lattice in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, M. A.; Siegert, Christoph; Pepper, Michael; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Ghosh, Arindam

    2012-02-01

    Quantum dot lattices (QDLs) have the potential to allow for the tailoring of optical, magnetic, and electronic properties of a user-defined artificial solid. We use a dual gated device structure to controllably tune the potential landscape in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas, thereby enabling the formation of a periodic QDL. The current-voltage characteristics, I(V), follow a power law, as expected for a QDL. In addition, a systematic study of the scaling behavior of I(V) allows us to probe the effects of background disorder on transport through the QDL. Our results are particularly important for semiconductor-based QDL architectures which aim to probe collective phenomena.

  20. Gas transport evaluation in lithium-air batteries with micro/nano-structured cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Wen, Kechun; Song, Yuanqiang; Ye, Luhan; Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Pan, Yu; Lv, Weiqiang; Liao, Yulong; He, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Inefficient gas transport in the porous cathode is disastrous for the lithium-air battery to achieve a high electrochemical performance. Previous evaluation of the cathode diffusivity relies on indirect calculations based on multiple V-I data obtained over the intact battery system, which inevitably induces evaluation uncertainty and material waste. In this report, an electrochemical device is designed for the out-of-cell diffusivity measurement in the lithium-air battery with micro/nano-sized cathodes. With the measured diffusivity, a few electrochemical parameters including the limiting current density and the concentration polarization associated with the porous cathodes can thus be directly evaluated. The work facilitates the development of highly-efficient cathode materials in the general field of metal-air battery field.

  1. Understanding and modelling dissolved gas transport in the bedrock of three Fennoscandian sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchero, Paolo; Delos, Anne; Molinero, Jorge; Dentz, Marco; Pitkänen, Petteri

    2014-05-01

    The origin and transport of dissolved gases in the geosphere is of interest for assessment studies of nuclear waste repositories. In this paper, we analyse available field measurements of helium, methane and hydrogen at three Fennoscandian sites: Forsmark and Laxemar in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. The field data are interpreted using different analytical models all based on the one-dimensional diffusion equation. The results of the different models provide estimates about the amount of deep gas flux, the in situ production and the groundwater residence time of the considered sites. The computed helium fluxes, which fall within the lower range of crustal degassing fluxes reported by Torgersen (2010), are strictly related with the high tightness of the considered fracture media. The very high estimates of groundwater residence time indicate that, at the considered depths, there are only very few flowing fractures while in the rest of the fractured domain groundwater has been almost motionless during a whole glacial cycle.

  2. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L. Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  3. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  4. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ωeτe effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  5. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  6. Laboratory characterization of the structural properties controlling dynamical gas transport in Mars-analog soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    2008-10-01

    Dynamical transport of gases within the martian regolith controls many climatic processes, and is particularly important in the deposition and/or mobilization of shallow ground ice, as well as exchange of other volatiles between the martian regolith and atmosphere. A variety of theoretical studies have addressed issues related to ground ice dynamics on Mars and in the terrestrial analog environment of the Antarctic Dry Valleys. These theoretical studies have drawn on a limited set of empirical measurements to constrain the structural parameters controlling gas diffusion and flow in soils. Here, we investigate five groups of Mars-analog soils: glass spheres, JSC Mars-1, aeolian dune sand, Antarctic Dry Valley soils, and arctic loess. We present laboratory measurements of the structural properties most relevant to gas transport in these soils: porosity, tortuosity, permeability, bulk and intrinsic densities, grain-size distribution, pore-size distribution and BET surface area. Our results bear directly both on the appropriateness of assumptions made in theoretical studies and on current outstanding issues in the study of shallow ground ice on Mars and in the Dry Valleys. Specifically, we find that (1) measured values of tortuosity are lower than values commonly assumed for Mars by a factor of two to three; (2) diffusive loss of ground ice on Mars can likely proceed up to four times faster than predicted by theoretical studies; (3) soil permeabilities are sufficiently high that flushing of the soil column by bulk flow of atmospheric gases may further speed loss or deposition of shallow ground ice; (4) the pore volume in some Mars-analog soils is sufficiently high to explain high volumetric ice abundances inferred from Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer data as simple pore ice; and (5) measured properties of soils collected in Beacon Valley, Antarctica agree well with assumptions made in theoretical studies and are consistent with rapid loss of ground ice in the

  7. Building-Resolved CFD Simulations for Greenhouse Gas Transport and Dispersion over Washington DC / Baltimore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Ghosh, S.; Mueller, K.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The North-East Corridor project aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over urban domains such as Washington DC / Baltimore with high spatial and temporal resolution. Atmospheric transport of tracer gases from an emission source to a tower mounted receptor are usually conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For such simulations, WRF employs a parameterized turbulence model and does not resolve the fine scale dynamics generated by the flow around buildings and communities comprising a large city. The NIST Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) is a computational fluid dynamics model that utilizes large eddy simulation methods to model flow around buildings at length scales much smaller than is practical with WRF. FDS has the potential to evaluate the impact of complex urban topography on near-field dispersion and mixing difficult to simulate with a mesoscale atmospheric model. Such capabilities may be important in determining urban GHG emissions using atmospheric measurements. A methodology has been developed to run FDS as a sub-grid scale model within a WRF simulation. The coupling is based on nudging the FDS flow field towards that computed by WRF, and is currently limited to one way coupling performed in an off-line mode. Using the coupled WRF / FDS model, NIST will investigate the effects of the urban canopy at horizontal resolutions of 10-20 m in a domain of 12 x 12 km. The coupled WRF-FDS simulations will be used to calculate the dispersion of tracer gases in the North-East Corridor and to evaluate the upwind areas that contribute to tower observations, referred to in the inversion community as influence functions. Results of this study will provide guidance regarding the importance of explicit simulations of urban atmospheric turbulence in obtaining accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and transport.

  8. Evaluation of water transport in PEMFC gas diffusion layers using image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daino, Michael Mario

    Liquid water transport through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated through three interrelated studies utilizing the tools of image processing. First, a new framework and model for the digital generation and characterization of the microstructure of GDL materials with localized binder and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) distributions were developed using 3D morphological imaging processing. The new generation technique closely mimics manufacturing processes and produces realistic 3D phase-differentiated digital microstructures in a cost- and time- effective manner. The generated distributions of hydrophobic (PTFE) and hydrophilic (carbon) regions representative of commercial GDL materials provides water transport modeling efforts with more accurate geometries to improve PEMFC water management. Second, through-plane transport in an operating PEMFC was investigated by developing and testing a transparent (visible and infrared) fuel cell. Visible observations and subsequent video processing revealed condensation of microdroplets on the GDL and implied the existence of condensation within the GDL. Temperature gradients across the cathode GDL under realistic operating conditions were obtained in a noninvasive manner using infrared imaging and subsequent image analysis. Recommendations for improving accuracy of PEMFC temperature measurements using infrared imaging were made. The final contribution of this work was the measurement and analysis of water breakthrough dynamics across GDL materials with and without microporous layers (MPLs). Dynamic breakthrough events, or recurrent breakthroughs, were observed for all GDL material investigated indicating the breakdown and re-build of water paths through the GDL caused by an intermittent water drainage process from the GDL surface. GDL materials without an MPL exhibited a dynamic breakthrough location phenomenon and significantly elevated water saturations. The results

  9. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shale gas transport in organic nano-pores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lizhi; Shan, Xiaowen; Guo, Long

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is a key parameter for investigating the flow ability of sedimentary rocks. The conventional model for calculating permeability is derived from Darcy's law, which is valid only for continuum flow in porous rocks. We discussed the feasibility of simulating methane transport characteristics in the organic nano-pores of shale through the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). As a first attempt, the effects of high Knudsen number and the associated slip flow are considered, whereas the effect of adsorption in the capillary tube is left for future work. Simulation results show that at small Knudsen number, LBM results agree well with Poiseuille's law, and flow rate (flow capacity) is proportional to the square of the pore scale. At higher Knudsen numbers, the relaxation time needs to be corrected. In addition, velocity increases as the slip effect causes non negligible velocities on the pore wall, thereby enhancing the flow rate inside the pore, i.e., the permeability. Therefore, the LBM simulation of gas flow characteristics in organic nano-pores provides an effective way of evaluating the permeability of gas-bearing shale. PMID:24784022

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Shale Gas Transport in Organic Nano-Pores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lizhi; Shan, Xiaowen; Guo, Long

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is a key parameter for investigating the flow ability of sedimentary rocks. The conventional model for calculating permeability is derived from Darcy's law, which is valid only for continuum flow in porous rocks. We discussed the feasibility of simulating methane transport characteristics in the organic nano-pores of shale through the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). As a first attempt, the effects of high Knudsen number and the associated slip flow are considered, whereas the effect of adsorption in the capillary tube is left for future work. Simulation results show that at small Knudsen number, LBM results agree well with Poiseuille's law, and flow rate (flow capacity) is proportional to the square of the pore scale. At higher Knudsen numbers, the relaxation time needs to be corrected. In addition, velocity increases as the slip effect causes non negligible velocities on the pore wall, thereby enhancing the flow rate inside the pore, i.e., the permeability. Therefore, the LBM simulation of gas flow characteristics in organic nano-pores provides an effective way of evaluating the permeability of gas-bearing shale. PMID:24784022

  11. Nonlinear transport of semi-insulating GaAs in a semiconductor gas discharge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel Kurt, H.; Salamov, B. G.

    2007-12-01

    Nonlinear transport of a semi-insulating (SI) GaAs photodetector in a semiconductor gas discharge structure (SGDS) is studied experimentally for a wide range of gas pressures p, interelectrode distances d and different diameters D of the detector areas. While being driven with a stationary voltage, the system generates current and discharge light emission (DLE) instabilities with different amplitudes of the oscillations. The transformation of the profile and amplitude of the current density of the filaments in the different regions of the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) has been studied. Instabilities of spatially non-uniform distributions resulting in the formation of multiple current filaments with increasing voltages above the critical values have been observed. It is shown that the interelectrode distance only plays a passive role and is not responsible for the appearance of the DLE instability under the experimental conditions. At the same time, the expanded range of current and DLE oscillations are observed for different diameters D of the infrared (IR) photodetector areas. An SGDS with an N-shaped CVC is analysed using both the current and DLE data which show the electrical instability in the GaAs photodetector. It is found that the application of high feeding voltage to this photodetector gives rise to a non-uniform spatial distribution of the DLE, which disturbs the operation of the system. The experiment also presents a new method to study and visualize the electrical instabilities in a high-resistivity IR photodetector of large diameter.

  12. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  13. Transport coefficients of a granular gas of inelastic rough hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Santos, Andrés; Garzó, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    The Boltzmann equation for inelastic and rough hard spheres is considered as a model of a dilute granular gas. In this model, the collisions are characterized by constant coefficients of normal and tangential restitution, and hence the translational and rotational degrees of freedom are coupled. A normal solution to the Boltzmann equation is obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method for states near the homogeneous cooling state. The analysis is carried out to first order in the spatial gradients of the number density, the flow velocity, and the granular temperature. The constitutive equations for the momentum and heat fluxes and for the cooling rate are derived, and the associated transport coefficients are expressed in terms of the solutions of linear integral equations. For practical purposes, a first Sonine approximation is used to obtain explicit expressions of the transport coefficients as nonlinear functions of both coefficients of restitution and the moment of inertia. Known results for purely smooth inelastic spheres and perfectly elastic and rough spheres are recovered in the appropriate limits.

  14. Subsurface fate and transport of cyanide species at a manufactured-gas plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Nakles, D.V.

    1999-10-01

    Cyanide is present at manufactured-gas plant (MGP) sites in oxide-box residuals, which were often managed on-site as fill during active operations. Cyanide can leach from these materials, causing groundwater contamination. Speciation, fate, and transport of cyanide in a sand-gravel aquifer underlying an MGP site in the upper Midwest region of the US were studied through characterization, monitoring, and modeling of a plume of cyanide-contaminated groundwater emanating from the site. Results indicate that cyanide in the groundwater is primarily in the form of iron-cyanide complexes (>98%), that these complexes are stable under the conditions of the aquifer, and that they are transported as nonreactive solutes in the sand-gravel aquifer material. Weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, which represents a minute fraction of total cyanide in the site groundwater, may undergo chemical-biological degradation in the sand-gravel aquifer. It seems that dilution may be the only natural attenuation mechanism for iron-cyanide complexes in sand-gravel aquifers at MGP sites.

  15. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin-orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and [Formula: see text] at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices. PMID:27479155

  16. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin–orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and {τ }{{s}}=16 {{ns}} at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices.

  17. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation: Continuous load of finite duration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Field studies of solute fate and transport in streams and rivers often involve an. experimental release of solutes at an upstream boundary for a finite period of time. A review of several standard references on surface-water-quality modeling indicates that the analytical solution to the constant-parameter advection-dispersion equation for this type of boundary condition has been generally overlooked. Here an exact analytical solution that considers a continuous load of unite duration is compared to an approximate analytical solution presented elsewhere. Results indicate that the exact analytical solution should be used for verification of numerical solutions and other solute-transport problems wherein a high level of accuracy is required. ?? ASCE.

  18. Estimating the health benefits from natural gas use in transport and heating in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo; Oliva, Estefania; Saide, Pablo; Spak, Scott N; de la Maza, Cristóbal; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastián; Campbell, J Elliott; Tsao, Tsao Es Chi-Chung; Molina, Luisa T

    2012-07-01

    Chilean law requires the assessment of air pollution control strategies for their costs and benefits. Here we employ an online weather and chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, and a gridded population density map, LANDSCAN, to estimate changes in fine particle pollution exposure, health benefits, and economic valuation for two emission reduction strategies based on increasing the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in Santiago, Chile. The first scenario, switching to a CNG public transportation system, would reduce urban PM2.5 emissions by 229 t/year. The second scenario would reduce wood burning emissions by 671 t/year, with unique hourly emission reductions distributed from daily heating demand. The CNG bus scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 0.33 μg/m³ and up to 2 μg/m³ during winter months, while the residential heating scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 2.07 μg/m³, with peaks exceeding 8 μg/m³ during strong air pollution episodes in winter months. These ambient pollution reductions lead to 36 avoided premature mortalities for the CNG bus scenario, and 229 for the CNG heating scenario. Both policies are shown to be cost-effective ways of reducing air pollution, as they target high-emitting area pollution sources and reduce concentrations over densely populated urban areas as well as less dense areas outside the city limits. Unlike the concentration rollback methods commonly used in public policy analyses, which assume homogeneous reductions across a whole city (including homogeneous population densities), and without accounting for the seasonality of certain emissions, this approach accounts for both seasonality and diurnal emission profiles for both the transportation and residential heating sectors. PMID:22595553

  19. Coupling of WRF and Building-resolved CFD Simulations for Greenhouse Gas Transport and Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Hu, H.; McDermott, R.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Davis, K. J.; Whetstone, J. R.; Lauvaux, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over an urban domain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Atmospheric transport of tracer gases from an emission source to a tower mounted receptor are usually conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF is used extensively in the atmospheric community to simulate mesoscale atmospheric transport. For such simulations, WRF employs a parameterized turbulence model and does not resolve the fine scale dynamics that are generated by the flow around buildings and communities that are part of a large city. Since the model domain includes the city of Indianapolis, much of the flow of interest is over an urban topography. The NIST Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) is a computational fluid dynamics model to perform large eddy simulations of flow around buildings, but it has not been nested within a larger-scale atmospheric transport model such as WRF. FDS has the potential to evaluate the impact of complex urban topography on near-field dispersion and mixing that cannot be simulated with a mesoscale atmospheric model, and which may be important to determining urban GHG emissions using atmospheric measurements. A methodology has been developed to run FDS as a sub-grid scale model within a WRF simulation. The coupling is based on nudging the FDS flow field towards the one computed by WRF, and is currently limited to one way coupling performed in an off-line mode. Using the coupled WRF / FDS model, NIST will investigate the effects of the urban canopy at horizontal resolutions of 2-10 m. The coupled WRF-FDS simulations will be used to calculate the dispersion of tracer gases in an urban domain and to evaluate the upwind areas that contribute to tower observations, referred to in the inversion community as influence functions. Predicted mixing ratios will be compared with tower measurements and WRF simulations

  20. Measurements of Horizontal Advection of Carbon Dioxide Within a Forest Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, M.; Falk, M.; Paw U, K.

    2002-12-01

    We present methodology, data and analysis on the horizontal advection of Carbon Dioxide within the understory at the Wind River Canopy Crane AMERIFLUX site. The Crane is located in a Pacific Northwest Old-growth Forest with trees up to 500 years old and 65 meters tall. The forest structure is complex with seven gymnosperm and two angiosperm tree species in the 2.3 ha crane circle, large amounts of woody debris on the forest floor, and a diverse understory. Data presented was collected using a 3-dimensional CO2/H2O profile system using LiCor LI6262 and LI7000 closed-path InfraRed Gas Analyzers (IRGA) with a total of 15 intakes distributed on the tower and throughout the canopy. Additional data was acquired using permanent eddy covariance stations consisting of a Gill-Solent HS Research sonic anemometer and a LiCor LI6262 IRGA, which have been operated for over 4 years at a height of 2.5 meters to complement an identical system measuring total ecosystem exchange at a height of 70 meters. Supplementary micro-meteorological data was collected by a vertical profile of 8 stations. Advection of Carbon Dioxide was calculated using horizontal concentration differences and mean wind speed and direction for half-hour periods. The Net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) estimated by eddy-covariance ranges from a sink of 1.9 tC ha-1 yr-1 to a source of 0.5 tC ha-1 yr-1. The long-term understory eddy covariance data indicate the release of carbon from the soil to be as large as 11 tC ha-1 yr-1 with maximum values of 6 to 8 \\mu mol m-1 s-1. Preliminary data show that advection can account for 20% of Carbon Dioxide fluxes measured by eddy covariance.

  1. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  2. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  3. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  4. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable. PMID:15984768

  5. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  6. Spiral defect chaos in an advection-reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affan, H.; Friedrich, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper comprises numerical and theoretical studies of spatiotemporal patterns in advection-reaction-diffusion systems in which the chemical species interact with the hydrodynamic fluid. Due to the interplay between the two, we obtained the spiral defect chaos in the activator-inhibitor-type model. We formulated the generalized Swift-Hohenberg-type model for this system. Then the evolution of fractal boundaries due to the effect of the strong nonlinearity at the interface of the two chemical species is studied numerically. The purpose of the present paper is to point out that spiral defect chaos, observed in model equations of the extended Swift-Hohenberg equation for low Prandtl number convection, may actually be obtained also in certain advection-reaction-diffusion systems.

  7. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-12

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface. PMID:26919022

  8. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  9. Mass transport in gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Michael J.

    This dissertation describes fundamental properties of gas diffusion media (GDM) and their relationship to the mass transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). First, the accuracy of solving the multi-component equations for PEMFC by using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is examined. This technique uses an approximated multi-component (AMC) model with a correction term that guarantees the overall mass balance. Accuracy is assessed by comparing the species concentrations computed with the Maxwell-Stefan and the AMC model. This comparison is important because the structure of some CFD programs does not permit the direct use of the Maxwell-Stefan equations. Here, it is shown that the maximum error between the two models is less than 5%. Second, the ratio of tortuosity to porosity, known as the MacMullin number, is reported for different carbon cloth and carbon paper GDM. This analysis show that only carbon cloths GDM follow the commonly accepted Bruggeman equation and that carbon paper GDM have a different relationship between the tortuosity and the porosity. These differences are discussed in terms of path length created by the orientation of fibers of each GDM. Third, data for the hydrophilic and hydrophobic pore size distributions (PSD) are presented for two types of GDM used in PEMFCs. The data were obtained by using two common measurement methods, intrusion porosimetry (IP) and the method of standard porosimetry (MSP). The use of multiple working fluids to access hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores is discussed as well as the limitations associated with structural changes of the GDM during the tests. The differences in interpretations of the data between the two methods for both GDM have significant implications relative to the distribution of hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores that control liquid water transport. Finally, a two-phase mass-transport-only model (MTOM) that incorporates the tortuosity and the PSD data described above is

  10. The transportation of fine arts materials aboard the space shuttle Columbia. GAS payload No. 481: Vertical horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Ellery; Wishnow, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The Vertical Horizons experiment represents an initial investigation into the transportation of fine arts materials aboard a space shuttle. Within the confines of a GAS canister, artist quality fine arts materials were packaged and exposed to the rigors of space flight in an attempt to identify adverse effects.

  11. Cellwise conservative unsplit advection for the volume of fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-02-01

    We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced backwards through the flow map. The donating regions of the fluxes are calculated via the streaklines of the grid intersections, represented as polygonal chains whose vertices are determined by backward tracing of particles injected in the flow at different times. High order accuracy is obtained from the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, where intermediate velocities along pathlines are determined with quadratic temporal and bicubic spatial interpolations. The volumes of the donating regions are corrected in order to fulfill the discrete continuity of incompressible flows. Consequently, the calculation produces non-overlapping donating regions and pre-images with conforming edges to their neighbors, resulting in the conservativeness and the boundedness (liquid volume fraction inside the interval [ 0 , 1 ]) of the CCU advection scheme. Finally, the update of the liquid volume fractions is computed from the intersections of the pre-image polygons with the reconstructed interfaces. The CCU scheme is tested on several benchmark tests for the VOF advection, together with the standard piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC). The geometrical errors of the CCU compare favorably with other unsplit VOF-PLIC schemes. Finally, potential improvements of the VOF method with the use of more precise interface representation techniques and the future extension of the CCU scheme to 3D are discussed.

  12. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization. PMID:27113681

  13. Modeling solute advection coupled with sorption kinetics in heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    1992-05-01

    A method for coupling sorption kinetics and solute advection in particle-tracking models is proposed; this method is efficient for the case where sorption rate coefficients can be assumed constant field scale parameters. A simulation example of reactive solute advection in two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is presented. The effect of sorption kinetics on solute advection is investigated. Nonequilibrium effects are exhibited as enhanced tailing in the solute breakthrough. Because high variability in the hydraulic conductivity also yields enhanced tailing, the nonequilibrium effect is more pronounced for the case of low variability. Moreover, it may be difficult to distinguish cases of low variability with nonequilibrium sorption from cases of high variability with equilibrium sorption. A comparison of Monte Carlo ensemble results is made with an analytical model for the mass arrival of kinetically sorbing solute in heterogeneous porous media obtained using first-order perturbation. The comparison indicates that the analytical model provides reasonable approximations of the expected solute breakthrough if the variance of the natural logarithm of the hydraulic conductivity is smaller than 1.

  14. Vertical Structure of Advection-dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra Zeraatgari, Fateme; Abbassi, Shahram

    2015-08-01

    We solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for optically thin advection-dominated accretion flows by assuming a radially self-similar spherical coordinate system (r,θ ,φ ). The disk is considered to be in steady state and axisymmetric. We define the boundary conditions at the pole and the equator of the disk and, to avoid singularity at the rotation axis, the disk is taken to be symmetric with respect to this axis. Moreover, only the {τ }rφ component of the viscous stress tensor is assumed, and we have set {v}θ =0. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the variation of dynamical quantities of the flow in the vertical direction by finding an analytical solution. As a consequence, we found that the advection parameter, {f}{adv}, varies along the θ direction and reaches its maximum near the rotation axis. Our results also show that, in terms of the no-outflow solution, thermal equilibrium still exists and consequently advection cooling can balance viscous heating.

  15. Analysis of gas transport in polymer electrolyte fuel cells using porous structure constructed from X-ray nano CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Oyama, Junpei; Yokoyama, Koji; Kubo, Norio; Tokumasu, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the analysis of gas transport in micro porous layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells based on the three-dimensional structure obtained from X-ray nano computed tomography (CT). The polygonal surface representation of the porous structure was constructed from the cross-sectional CT images using the marching tetrahedrons algorithm. The diffusion flux through the porous layer was evaluated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method since the characteristic pore size is comparable to the mean free path of gas molecules. The numerical simulation well reproduces the experimentally observed pressure dependence of diffusion resistance originating from the transition between Knudsen and molecular diffusion regimes. The effect of porous media morphology on gas transport was examined by an analysis of the trajectories of transmitted molecules through the porous layer. This work was partially supported by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  16. Enhancement of microbial motility due to advection-dependent nutrient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos A.; di Salvo, Mario E.

    2014-03-01

    In their classical work, Berg and Purcell [Biophys. J. 20, 193 (1977)] concluded that the motion of a small microorganism would not significantly increase its nutrient uptake rate, if the nutrient consisted of high diffusivity particles. As a result, it has been generally assumed that nutrient transport to small microorganisms such as bacteria is dominated by molecular diffusion and that swimming and feeding currents play a negligible role. On the other hand, recent studies have found that flagellar motion may increase advection-mediated uptake. We formulate a model to investigate the hypothesis that fast-moving microbes may enhance their swimming speed by taking advantage of advection to increase nutrient absorption. Surprisingly, using realistic parameter values for bacteria and algae, we find that even modest increases in nutrient absorption may lead to a significant increase of the microbial speed. We also show that, optimally, the rate of effective energy transfer to the microbial propulsion system should be proportional to the speed for slow motion, while it should be proportional to a power of the speed close to two for fast motion. We are grateful to SECyT-UNC and CONICET, Argentina, for financial support.

  17. An improved second moment method for solution of pure advection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Abdolreza; Sobouti, Farhad; Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    2000-04-01

    The second moment numerical method (SMM) of Egan and Mahoney [Numerical modeling of advection and diffusion of urban area source pollutant. Journal of Applied Meteorology 1972; 11: 312-322] is adapted to solve for the pure advection transport equation in a variety of flow fields. SMM eliminates numerical diffusion by employing a procedure that takes into account the first and second moments of mass distribution in each grid element. For pure translational flow fields, the method is conservative, positive definite and shape-preserving. In rotational and/or shear flows, the accuracy of SMM is significantly reduced. Two improvements are presented to make the SMM applicable to a wider range of flow problems. It is shown that the improved SMM (ISMM) is less diffusive and more shape-preserving than the SMM in rotational and/or deformational flows. The ISMM can also be used to solve for a color function in compressible flow fields. The computational efficiency of this method is compared with that of other methods and, for a given accuracy, it is shown that ISMM is a cost-effective, non-diffusive and shape-preserving method. Copyright

  18. Advective and Conductive Heat Flow Budget Across the Wagner Basin, Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, F.; Negrete-Aranda, R.; Contreras, J.; Müller, C.; Hutnak, M.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Harris, R. N.; Sclater, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015, we conducted a cruise across the northern Gulf of California, an area of continental rift basin formation and rapid deposition of sediments. The cruise was undertaken aboard the R/V Alpha Helix; our goal was to study variation in superficial conductive heat flow, lateral changes in the shallow thermal conductivity structure, and advective transport of heat across the Wagner basin. We used a Fielax heat flow probe with 22 thermistors that can penetrate up to 6 m into the sediment cover. The resulting data set includes 53 new heat flow measurements collected along three profiles. The longest profile (42 km) contains 30 measurements spaced 1-2 km apart. The western part of the Wagner basin (hanging wall block) exhibit low to normal conductive heat flow whereas the eastern part of the basin (foot wall block) heat flow is high to very high (up to 2500 mWm-2). Two other short profiles (12 km long each) focused on resolving an extremely high heat flow anomaly up to 15 Wm-2 located near the intersection between the Wagner bounding fault system and the Cerro Prieto fault. We hypothesize that the contrasting heat flow values observed across the Wagner basin are due to horizontal water circulation through sand layers and fault pathways of high permeability. Circulation appears to be from west (recharge zone) to east (discharge zone). Additionally, our results reveal strong vertical advection of heat due to dehydration reactions and compaction of fine grained sediments.

  19. Probabilistic exposure risk assessment with advective-dispersive well vulnerability criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhoefer, Rainer; Nowak, Wolfgang; Helmig, Rainer

    2012-02-01

    Time-related advection-based well-head protection zones are commonly used to manage the contamination risk of drinking water wells. According to current water safety plans advanced risk management schemes are needed to better control and monitor all possible hazards within catchments. The goal of this work is to cast the four advective-dispersive intrinsic well vulnerability criteria by Frind et al. [1] into a framework of probabilistic risk assessment framework. These criteria are: (i) arrival time, (ii) level of peak concentration, (iii) time until first arrival of critical concentrations and (iv) exposure time. Our probabilistic framework yields catchment-wide maps of probabilities to not comply with these criteria. This provides indispensable information for catchment managers to perform probabilistic exposure risk assessment and thus improves the basis for risk-informed well-head management. We resolve heterogeneity with high-resolution Monte Carlo simulations and use a new reverse formulation of temporal moment transport equations to keep computational costs low. Our method is independent of dimensionality and boundary conditions, and can account for arbitrary sources of uncertainty. It can be coupled with any method for conditioning on available data. For simplicity, we demonstrate the concept on a 2D example that includes conditioning on synthetic data.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Convection: Advection and Diffusion Schemes for Marker Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's deep mantle can be studied by modeling vigorous convection in a chemically heterogeneous fluid. Numerical modeling of such a system poses several computational challenges. Dominance of heat advection over the diffusive heat transport, and a negligible amount of chemical diffusion results in sharp gradients of thermal and chemical fields. The exponential dependence of the viscosity of mantle materials on temperature also leads to high gradients of the velocity field. The accuracy of many numerical advection schemes degrades quickly with increasing gradient of the solution, while the computational effort, in terms of the scheme complexity and required resolution, grows. Additional numerical challenges arise due to a large range of length-scales characteristic of a thermochemical convection system with highly variable viscosity. To examplify, the thickness of the stem of a rising thermal plume may be a few percent of the mantle thickness. An even thinner filament of an anomalous material that is entrained by that plume may consitute less than a tenth of a percent of the mantle thickness. We have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermochemical convection in a hollow cylinder domain, with a depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity representative of the mantle (Steinberger and Calderwood, 2006). We use marker-in-cell method for advection of chemical and thermal fields. The main advantage of perfoming advection using markers is absence of numerical diffusion during the advection step, as opposed to the more diffusive field-methods. However, in the common implementation of the marker-methods, the solution of the momentum and energy equations takes place on a computational grid, and nodes do not generally coincide with the positions of the markers. Transferring velocity-, temperature-, and chemistry- information between nodes and markers introduces errors inherent to inter- and extrapolation. In the numerical scheme

  1. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  2. Spatial and intertemporal arbitrage in the California natural gas transportation and storage network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uria Martinez, Rocio

    Intertemporal and spatial price differentials should provide the necessary signals to allocate a commodity efficiently inside a network. This dissertation investigates the extent to which decisions in the California natural gas transportation and storage system are taken with an eye on arbitrage opportunities. Daily data about flows into and out of storage facilities in California over 2002-2006 and daily spreads on the NYMEX futures market are used to investigate whether the injection profile is consistent with the "supply-of-storage" curve first observed by Working for wheat. Spatial price differentials between California and producing regions fluctuate throughout the year, even though spot prices at trading hubs across North America are highly correlated. In an analysis of "residual supply", gas volumes directed to California are examined for the influence of those fluctuations in locational differentials. Daily storage decisions in California do seem to be influenced by a daily price signal that combines the intertemporal spread and the locational basis between California and the Henry Hub, in addition to strong seasonal and weekly cycles. The timing and magnitude of the response differs across storage facilities depending on the regulatory requirements they face and the type of customers they serve. In contrast, deviations in spatial price differentials from the levels dictated by relative seasonality in California versus competing regions do not trigger significant reallocations of flows into California. Available data for estimation of both the supply-of-storage and residual-supply curves aggregate the behavior of many individuals whose motivations and attentiveness to prices vary. The resulting inventory and flow profiles differ from those that a social planner would choose to minimize operating costs throughout the network. Such optimal allocation is deduced from a quadratic programming model, calibrated to 2004-2005, that acknowledges relative seasonality

  3. Air Quality Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies in the Power Generation and Transportation Sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Kinnon, Michael

    Future efforts to mitigate the harmful impacts of climate change will include transitions to alternative technologies and fuels targeting reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Currently, economic sectors of greatest concern include transportation and power generation, which combined contribute over half of total U.S. GHG emissions. In addition to GHGs, displacement of conventional energy strategies will impact the emissions of various pollutant species with human health and environmental risks due to common generation processes and sources. In order to fully investigate the air quality (AQ) impacts of deploying various GHG mitigation technologies and fuels in coming decades, spatially and temporally resolved pollutant emissions fields are developed and utilized as input for simulations of atmospheric chemistry and transport via an advanced AQ model. Three areas of the U.S. are chosen for regional analyses in the year 2055. In order to characterize the evolution of regional energy sector emission drivers from current levels, a Base Case is developed that is representative of progression in the absence of aggressive GHG mitigation efforts. To facilitate comparison, alternative scenarios are developed to explore the effects of shifts in technologies, fuels, or behavior with the potential to mitigate GHG emissions. Scenarios are represented by generated spatially and temporally resolved emission fields and evaluated for impacts on primary and secondary air pollutant concentrations. Significant variation in energy profiles, demands, and constraints (e.g., regulatory statutes) between study domains yields significant differences in regional impacts. The magnitude of AQ improvements depends on baseline emission levels and spatial and temporal emission patterns. In addition, the current focus on reducing emissions from the targeted sectors increases the importance of emissions from other areas and sectors.

  4. Laboratory Characterization of the Structural Properties Controlling Dynamical Gas Transport in Mars-Analog Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, H. G.; Mellon, M. T.

    2007-12-01

    Dynamical transport of gases with in the martian regolith controls many climatic processes, and is particularly important in the deposition and/or mobilization of shallow ground ice, as well as exchange of other volatiles between the martian regolith and atmosphere. A variety of theoretical studies have addressed issues related to ground ice dynamics on Mars and in the terrestrial analog environment of the Antarctic Dry Valleys. These theoretical studies have drawn on a limited set of empirical measurements to constrain the structural parameters controlling diffusion and flow in soils. Here, we investigate five groups of Mars-analog soils: glass spheres, JSC Mars-1, aeolian dune sand, Antarctic Dry Valley soils, and arctic loess. We present laboratory measurements of the structural properties most relevant to gas transport in these soils: porosity, tortuosity, permeability, bulk and intrinsic density, grain size distribution, pore size distribution and BET surface area. Our results bear directly both on the appropriateness of assumptions made in theoretical studies and on current outstanding issues in the study of shallow ground ice on Mars and the Dry Valleys. Specifically, we find that 1) measured values of tortuosity are lower than commonly assumed values by a factor of two to three; 2) diffusive loss of ground ice on Mars can likely proceed up to four times faster than predicted by theoretical studies; 3) soil permeabilities are sufficiently high that flushing of the soil column by bulk flow may further speed loss or deposition of shallow ground ice; 4) the pore volume in some Mars-analog soils is adequate to account for high volumetric ice abundances inferred from Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer data; and 5) superlative soil properties cannot resolve the on-going debate concerning the age of shallowly buried ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica.

  5. Vapour transport of rare earth elements (REE) in volcanic gas: Evidence from encrustations at Oldoinyo Lengai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. D.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2008-10-01

    Fumarolic encrustations and natrocarbonatite lava from the active crater of Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania, were sampled and analysed. Two types of encrustation were distinguished on the basis of their REE content, enriched (~ 2800-5600 × [REE chondrite]) and depleted (~ 100-200 × [REE chondrite]) relative to natrocarbonatite (1700-1900 × [REE chondrite]. REE-enriched encrustations line the walls of actively degassing fumaroles, whereas REE-depleted encrustations occur mainly along cracks in and as crusts on cooling natrocarbonatite lava flows; one of the low REE encrustation samples was a stalactite from the wall of a possible fumarole. The encrustations are interpreted to have different origins, the former precipitating from volcanic gas and the latter from meteoric/ground water converted to steam by the heat of the overlying lava flow(s). REE-profiles of encrustations and natrocarbonatite are parallel, suggesting that there was no preferential mobilization of specific REE by either volcanic vapour or meteoric water vapour. The elevated REE-content of the first group of encrustations suggests that direct REE-transport from natrocarbonatite to volcanic vapour is possible. The REE trends observed in samples precipitating directly from the volcanic vapour cannot be explained by dry volatility based on the available data as there is no evidence in the encrustation compositions of the greatly enhanced volatility predicted for Yb and Eu. The observed extreme REE-fractionation with steep La/Sm slopes parallel to those of the natrocarbonatite reflects solvation and complexation reactions in the vapour phase that did not discriminate amongst the different REE or similar transport of REE in both the natrocarbonatite magma and its exsolving vapour. The low concentrations of REE in the encrustations produced by meteoric vapour suggest that the temperature was too low or that this vapour did not contain the ligands necessary to permit significant mobilization of the REE.

  6. Experimental tsunami deposits: Linking hydrodynamics to sediment entrainment, advection lengths and downstream fining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joel P. L.; Delbecq, Katie; Kim, Wonsuck; Mohrig, David

    2016-01-01

    A goal of paleotsunami research is to quantitatively reconstruct wave hydraulics from sediment deposits in order to better understand coastal hazards. Simple models have been proposed to predict wave heights and velocities, based largely on deposit grain size distributions (GSDs). Although seemingly consistent with some recent tsunamis, little independent data exist to test these equations. We conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate inversion assumptions and uncertainties. A computer-controlled lift gate instantaneously released ~ 6.5 m3 of water into a 32 m flume with shallow ponded water, creating a hydraulic bore that transported sand from an upstream source dune. Differences in initial GSDs and ponded water depths influenced entrainment, transport, and deposition. While the source dune sand was fully suspendable based on size alone, experimental tsunamis produced deposits dominated by bed load sand transport in the upstream ~ 1/3 of the flume and suspension-dominated transport downstream. The suspension deposits exhibited downstream fining and thinning. At 95% confidence, a published advection-settling model predicts time-averaged flow depths to approximately a factor of two, and time-averaged downstream flow velocities to within a factor of 1.5. Finally, reasonable scaling is found between flume and field cases by comparing flow depths, inundation distances, Froude numbers, Rouse numbers and grain size trends in suspension-dominated tsunami deposits, justifying laboratory study of sediment transport and deposition by tsunamis.

  7. Microstructural analysis of mass transport phenomena in gas diffusion media for high current density operation in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-04-01

    Cost reduction is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). High current density operation is a solution pathway. In order to realize high current density operation, it is necessary to reduce mass transport resistance in the gas diffusion media commonly consisted of gas diffusion layer (GDL) and micro porous layer (MPL). However, fundamental understanding of the underlying mass transport phenomena in the porous components is not only critical but also not fully understood yet due to the inherent microstructural complexity. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of electron and oxygen transport in the GDL and MPL is conducted experimentally and numerically with three-dimensional (3D) microstructural data to reveal the structure-transport relationship. The results reveal that the mass transport in the GDL is strongly dependent on the local microstructural variations, such as local pore/solid volume fractions and connectivity. However, especially in the case of the electrical conductivity of MPL, the contact resistance between carbon particles is the dominant factor. This suggests that reducing the contact resistance between carbon particles and/or the number of contact points along the transport pathway can improve the electrical conductivity of MPL.

  8. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  9. Gas bubble transport and emissions for shallow peat from a northern peatland: The role of pressure changes and peat structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Slater, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles are an important pathway for methane release from peatlands. The mechanisms controlling gas bubble transport and emissions in peat remain uncertain. The effects of hydrostatic pressure and peat structure on the dynamics of gas bubbles in shallow peat were therefore tested in laboratory experiments. A peat monolith was retrieved from a raised bog and maintained in a saturated state. Three distinct layers were identified from noninvasive permittivity measurements supported by soil physical properties (porosity, bulk density). Phase I of the experiment involved monitoring for the accumulation of gas bubbles under steady pressure and temperature conditions. The data showed evidence for gas bubbles being impeded by a shallow semiconfining layer at depths between 10 and 15 cm. Visible gas bubbles observed on the side of the sample box were recorded over time to estimate changes in the vertical distribution of volumetric gas content. Porosity estimates derived using the Complex Refraction Index Model (CRIM) suggest that gas bubbles enlarge the pore space when the exerted pressure is high enough. Phase II involved triggering release of trapped bubbles by repeatedly increasing and decreasing hydrostatic pressure in an oversaturated condition. Comparison of changes in pressure head and methane density in the head space confirmed that the increasing buoyancy force during drops in pressure is more important for triggering ebullition than increasing mobility during increases in pressure. Our findings demonstrate the importance of changes in hydrostatic pressure on bubble size and variations in resistance of the peat fabric in regulating methane releases from peatlands.

  10. Poly-use multi-level sampling system for soil-gas transport analysis in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Nauer, Philipp A; Chiri, Eleonora; Schroth, Martin H

    2013-10-01

    Soil-gas turnover is important in the global cycling of greenhouse gases. The analysis of soil-gas profiles provides quantitative information on below-ground turnover and fluxes. We developed a poly-use multi-level sampling system (PMLS) for soil-gas sampling, water-content and temperature measurement with high depth resolution and minimal soil disturbance. It is based on perforated access tubes (ATs) permanently installed in the soil. A multi-level sampler allows extraction of soil-gas samples from 20 locations within 1 m depth, while a capacitance probe is used to measure volumetric water contents. During idle times, the ATs are sealed and can be equipped with temperature sensors. Proof-of-concept experiments in a field lysimeter showed good agreement of soil-gas samples and water-content measurements compared with conventional techniques, while a successfully performed gas-tracer test demonstrated the feasibility of the PMLS to determine soil-gas diffusion coefficients in situ. A field application of the PMLS to quantify oxidation of atmospheric CH4 in a field lysimeter and in the forefield of a receding glacier yielded activity coefficients and soil-atmosphere fluxes well in agreement with previous studies. With numerous options for customization, the presented tool extends the methodological choices to investigate soil-gas transport in the vadose zone. PMID:23962070

  11. Movement of NH₃ through the human urea transporter B: a new gas channel.

    PubMed

    Geyer, R Ryan; Musa-Aziz, Raif; Enkavi, Giray; Mahinthichaichan, P; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Boron, Walter F

    2013-06-15

    Aquaporins and Rh proteins can function as gas (CO₂ and NH₃) channels. The present study explores the urea, H₂O, CO₂, and NH₃ permeability of the human urea transporter B (UT-B) (SLC14A1), expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We monitored urea uptake using [¹⁴C]urea and measured osmotic water permeability (Pf) using video microscopy. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of gas permeability, we used microelectrodes to record the maximum transient change in surface pH (ΔpHS) caused by exposing oocytes to 5% CO₂/33 mM HCO₃⁻ (pHS increase) or 0.5 mM NH₃/NH₄⁺ (pHS decrease). UT-B expression increased oocyte permeability to urea by >20-fold, and Pf by 8-fold vs. H₂O-injected control oocytes. UT-B expression had no effect on the CO₂-induced ΔpHS but doubled the NH₃-induced ΔpHS. Phloretin reduced UT-B-dependent urea uptake (Jurea*) by 45%, Pf* by 50%, and (- ΔpHS*)NH₃ by 70%. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate reduced Jurea* by 25%, Pf* by 30%, and (ΔpHS*)NH₃ by 100%. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane-embedded models of UT-B identified the monomeric UT-B pores as the main conduction pathway for both H₂O and NH₃ and characterized the energetics associated with permeation of these species through the channel. Mutating each of two conserved threonines lining the monomeric urea pores reduced H₂O and NH₃ permeability. Our data confirm that UT-B has significant H₂O permeability and for the first time demonstrate significant NH₃ permeability. Thus the UTs become the third family of gas channels. Inhibitor and mutagenesis studies and results of MD simulations suggest that NH₃ and H₂O pass through the three monomeric urea channels in UT-B. PMID:23552862

  12. Movement of NH3 through the human urea transporter B: a new gas channel

    PubMed Central

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Enkavi, Giray; Mahinthichaichan, P.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Boron, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins and Rh proteins can function as gas (CO2 and NH3) channels. The present study explores the urea, H2O, CO2, and NH3 permeability of the human urea transporter B (UT-B) (SLC14A1), expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We monitored urea uptake using [14C]urea and measured osmotic water permeability (Pf) using video microscopy. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of gas permeability, we used microelectrodes to record the maximum transient change in surface pH (ΔpHS) caused by exposing oocytes to 5% CO2/33 mM HCO3− (pHS increase) or 0.5 mM NH3/NH4+ (pHS decrease). UT-B expression increased oocyte permeability to urea by >20-fold, and Pf by 8-fold vs. H2O-injected control oocytes. UT-B expression had no effect on the CO2-induced ΔpHS but doubled the NH3-induced ΔpHS. Phloretin reduced UT-B-dependent urea uptake (Jurea*) by 45%, Pf* by 50%, and (−ΔpHS*)NH3 by 70%. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate reduced Jurea* by 25%, Pf* by 30%, and (ΔpHS*)NH3 by 100%. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane-embedded models of UT-B identified the monomeric UT-B pores as the main conduction pathway for both H2O and NH3 and characterized the energetics associated with permeation of these species through the channel. Mutating each of two conserved threonines lining the monomeric urea pores reduced H2O and NH3 permeability. Our data confirm that UT-B has significant H2O permeability and for the first time demonstrate significant NH3 permeability. Thus the UTs become the third family of gas channels. Inhibitor and mutagenesis studies and results of MD simulations suggest that NH3 and H2O pass through the three monomeric urea channels in UT-B. PMID:23552862

  13. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. Part 2; Thermosolutal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effect of an inert gas on the diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process. We investigate the case when the temperature gradient is stabilizing and the concentration gradient is destabilizing for a wide parametric range. When an inert gas is present, the thermal and solutal convection oppose each other. The solutal field is destabilizing while the thermal field and the advective-diffusive flux stabilize the flow field. When the pressure of the inert component is increased, the stabilizing effect of the advective-diffusive flux is decreased. The intensity of convection as well as the oscillatory transient time increases. Below, the critical Rayleigh number, the nonlinear dynamics of the flow field show an oscillatory approach to steady state. For parametric values in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number, the flow field undergoes a chaotic transient which settles to a periodic state. The asymptotic state of the flow field shows that growth and amalgamation of cells yields an overturning motion which results in an asymmetric cellular structure. The low gravity environment yields the stabilizing advective-diffusive flow which results in uniform temperature and concentration gradients near the crystal interface.

  14. Bulk, surface, and gas-phase limited water transport in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bull, Craig R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-11-15

    The influence of solute species on mass transfer to and from aqueous aerosol droplets is investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with light scattering techniques. In particular, we explore the limitations imposed on water evaporation by slow bulk phase diffusion and by the formation of surface organic films. Measurements of evaporation from ionic salt solutions, specifically sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, are compared with predictions from an analytical model framework, highlighting the uncertainties associated with quantifying gas diffusional transport. The influence of low solubility organic acids on mass transfer is reported and compared to both model predictions and previous work. The limiting value of the evaporation coefficient that can be resolved by this approach, when uncertainties in key thermophysical quantities are accounted for, is estimated. The limitation of slow bulk phase diffusion on the evaporation rate is investigated for gel and glass states formed during the evaporation of magnesium sulfate and sucrose droplets, respectively. Finally, the effect of surfactants on evaporation has been probed, with soluble surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate) leading to little or no retardation of evaporation through slowing of surface layer kinetics. PMID:23095147

  15. Transport Properties of He-N{sub 2} Binary Gas Mixtures for CBC Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-21

    In order to reduce the size and mass of the single-shaft turbo-machines, with little impact on the size of the heat transfer components in the CBC loop, He-Xe binary mixture with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole has been the working fluid of choice in space nuclear reactor power systems with Close Brayton Cycle (CBC) for energy conversion. This working fluid is also a suitable coolant for the fission reactors heat source designed with fast neutron energy spectra. For space nuclear reactors with thermal neutron energy spectra, however, the high capture neutron cross-section of Xe will reduce the beginning-of-life excess reactivity of the reactor, decreasing its effective operation lifetime. In addition, the neutron activation of Xe in the reactor will introduce a radioactivity source term in the CBC loop. Alternative working fluids with no activation concerns and comparable performance are N{sub 2} and the binary mixtures of He-N{sub 2}. This paper calculates the transport properties of these working fluids and compares their values to those of noble gas binary mixtures at the temperatures and pressures expected in CBC space reactor power system applications. Also investigated is the impact of using these working fluids on the pressure losses, heat transfer coefficient, and the aerodynamic loading of the blades in the CBC turbo-machines.

  16. Electrification of the transportation sector offers limited country-wide greenhouse gas reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinrenken, Christoph J.; Lackner, Klaus S.

    2014-03-01

    Compared with conventional propulsion, plugin and hybrid vehicles may offer reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, regional air/noise pollution, petroleum dependence, and ownership cost. Comparing only plugins and hybrids amongst themselves, and focu