Science.gov

Sample records for advective mass transport

  1. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-10-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms.

  2. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  3. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  4. Modelling transport in media with heterogeneous advection properties and mass transfer with a Continuous Time Random Walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Moussey, Charlie; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in groundwater systems are strongly affected by the presence of heterogeneity. The heterogeneity leads to non-Fickian features, that manifest themselves in the heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, as well as in the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement and in the non-Gaussian plumes of solute particles. The causes of non-Fickian transport can be the heterogeneity in the flow fields and the processes of mass exchange between mobile and immobile phases, such as sorption/desorption reactions and diffusive mass transfer. Here, we present a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model that describes the transport of solutes in d-dimensional systems by taking into account both heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile mass transfer. In order to account for these processes in the CTRW, the heterogeneities are mapped onto a distribution of transition times, which can be decomposed into advective transition times and trapping times, the latter being treated as a compound Poisson process. While advective transition times are related to the Eulerian flow velocities and, thus, to the conductivity distribution, trapping times depend on the sorption/desorption time scale, in case of reactive problems, or on the distribution of diffusion times in the immobile zones. Since the trapping time scale is typically much larger than the advective time scale, we observe the existence of two temporal regimes. The pre-asymptotic regime is defined by a characteristic time scale at which the properties of transport are fully determined by the heterogeneity of the advective field. On the other hand, in the asymptotic regime both the heterogeneity and the mass exchange processes play a role in conditioning the behaviour of transport. We consider different scenarios to discuss the relative importance of the advective heterogeneity and the mass transfer for the occurrence of non-Fickian transport. For each case we calculate analytically the scalings of the breakthrough

  5. Advective turbulent transport in the fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2013-10-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model (HWM) has been employed in pedagogical analyses of the physics behind the behavior of the tokamak plasmas. In addition to the geometric simplicity HWM has an appealing feature of sustaining autonomous quasi-steady state, unstable modes providing the power that is being transported by the nonlinear interactions and is eventually dissipated by the collisional damping at small scales. Emergence of the zonal flow out of the turbulence is a main candidate to cause the transition from the low plasma confinement to the high mode. In the study of such LH transition with the HWM, the adiabaticity parameter has been shown to play an important role in forcing the zonal flow that results in the regulation of the drift-wave turbulence. Instead of concentrating on the physics of the feedback loop between the turbulence and the zonal flow the present study focuses on the presence of the advective transport of the energy. Numerical simulations of HWM are performed and the connections between the advective transport and the zonal flow will be presented. This work was supported by the Supercpmputing Center/Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information with supercomputing resources including technical support (KSC-2013-C1-009).

  6. Curves to determine the relative importance of advection and dispersion for solute and vapor transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garges, J.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of advection and dispersion for both solute and vapor transport can be determined from type curves or concentration, flux, or cumulative flux. The dimensionless form of the type curves provides a means to directly evaluate the importance of mass transport by advection relative to that of mass transport by diffusion and dispersion. Type curves based on an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation are plotted in terms of dimensionless time and Peclet number. Flux and cumulative flux type curves provide additional rationale for transport regime determination in addition to the traditional concentration type curves. The extension of type curves to include vapor transport with phase partitioning in the unsaturated zone is a new development. Type curves for negative Peclet numbers also are presented. A negative Peclet number characterizes a problem in which one direction of flow is toward the contamination source, and thereby diffusion and advection can act in opposite directions. Examples are the diffusion of solutes away from the downgradient edge of a pump-and-treat capture zone, the upward diffusion of vapors through the unsaturated zone with recharge, and the diffusion of solutes through a low hydraulic conductivity cutoff wall with an inward advective gradient.

  7. Advective and diffusive cosmic ray transport in galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesen, Volker; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Stein, Yelena

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D cosmic ray transport models, numerically solving equations of pure advection and diffusion for the electrons and calculating synchrotron emission spectra. We find that for exponential halo magnetic field distributions advection leads to approximately exponential radio continuum intensity profiles, whereas diffusion leads to profiles that can be better approximated by a Gaussian function. Accordingly, the vertical radio spectral profiles for advection are approximately linear, whereas for diffusion they are of `parabolic' shape. We compare our models with deep Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of two edge-on galaxies, NGC 7090 and 7462, at λλ 22 and 6 cm. Our result is that the cosmic ray transport in NGC 7090 is advection dominated with V=150^{+80}_{-30} km s^{-1}, and that the one in NGC 7462 is diffusion dominated with D=3.0± 1.0 × 10^{28}E_GeV^{0.5} cm^2 s^{-1}. NGC 7090 has both a thin and thick radio disc with respective magnetic field scale heights of hB1 = 0.8 ± 0.1 kpc and hB2 = 4.7 ± 1.0 kpc. NGC 7462 has only a thick radio disc with hB2 = 3.8 ± 1.0 kpc. In both galaxies, the magnetic field scale heights are significantly smaller than what estimates from energy equipartition would suggest. A non-negligible fraction of cosmic ray electrons can escape from NGC 7090, so that this galaxy is not an electron calorimeter.

  8. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN SEDIMENT UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ADVECTIVE FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical flux across the sediment/water interface is controlled by a combination of diffusive, dispersive and advective processes. The advective process is a function of submarine groundwater discharge and tidal effects. In areas where surface water interacts with groundwater, ...

  9. Sediment transport in a surface-advected estuarine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. Y.; Leonardi, N.; Li, J. F.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2016-03-01

    The interplay between suspended-sediment transport and plume hydrodynamics in a surface-advected estuarine plume is studied using a three-dimensional numerical model. Our analysis focuses on the formation of a sediment-rich alongshore current and on the effect of sediments on the structure of the recirculating freshwater bulge. We introduce the ratio Y between the traveling time of sediment along the bulge edge and the settling timescale. When Y <1, suspended sediments enter the alongshore coastal current. When Y >1 the sediments are deposited within the bulge. We find that a critical range of settling velocities exist above which no transport in the costal current is allowed. Critical settling-velocity values increase with river discharge. Therefore, low magnitude and long-lasting floods promote sediment sorting in the continental shelf. We further find that, for a given flood duration, intermediate flood magnitudes at the limit between subcritical and supercritical flow maximize the alongshore sediment transport. Similarly, for a fixed input of water and sediments, intermediate discharge durations maximize alongshore sediment transport.

  10. Fractional Advective-Dispersive Equation as a Model of Solute Transport in Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and modeling transport of solutes in porous media is a critical issue in the environmental protection. The common model is the advective-dispersive equation (ADE) describing the superposition of the advective transport and the Brownian motion in water-filled pore space. Deviations from...

  11. Parallel simulation of particle transport in an advection field applied to volcanic explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzli, Pierre; Tsunematsu, Kae; Albuquerque, Paul; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Chopard, Bastien; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersal models typically describe particle motion via a turbulent velocity field. Particles are advected inside this field from the moment they leave the vent of the volcano until they deposit on the ground. Several techniques exist to simulate particles in an advection field such as finite difference Eulerian, Lagrangian-puff or pure Lagrangian techniques. In this paper, we present a new flexible simulation tool called TETRAS (TEphra TRAnsport Simulator) based on a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model. This scheme offers the advantages of being numerically stable with no numerical diffusion and easily parallelizable. It also allows us to output particle atmospheric concentration or ground mass load at any given time. The model is validated using the advection-diffusion analytical equation. We also obtained a good agreement with field observations of the tephra deposit associated with the 2450 BP Pululagua (Ecuador) and the 1996 Ruapehu (New Zealand) eruptions. As this kind of model can lead to computationally intensive simulations, a parallelization on a distributed memory architecture was developed. A related performance model, taking into account load imbalance, is proposed and its accuracy tested.

  12. The nature and role of advection in advection-diffusion equations used for modelling bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, Christophe; Bohorquez, Patricio; Heyman, Joris

    2016-04-01

    The advection-diffusion equation arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Stochastic models can also be used to derive this equation, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. Stochastic models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. We develop an approach based on birth-death Markov processes, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received little attention. We show that particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due to velocity fluctuations), with the important consequence that local measurements depend on both the intrinsic properties of particle displacement and the dimensions of the measurement system.

  13. Thermally driven advection for radioxenon transport from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-05-01

    Barometric pumping is a ubiquitous process resulting in migration of gases in the subsurface that has been studied as the primary mechanism for noble gas transport from an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). However, at early times following a UNE, advection driven by explosion residual heat is relevant to noble gas transport. A rigorous measure is needed for demonstrating how, when, and where advection is important. In this paper three physical processes of uncertain magnitude (oscillatory advection, matrix diffusion, and thermally driven advection) are parameterized by using boundary conditions, system properties, and source term strength. Sobol' sensitivity analysis is conducted to evaluate the importance of all physical processes influencing the xenon signals. This study indicates that thermally driven advection plays a more important role in producing xenon signals than oscillatory advection and matrix diffusion at early times following a UNE, and xenon isotopic ratios are observed to have both time and spatial dependence.

  14. Magnetic helicity transport in the advective gauge family

    SciTech Connect

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel; Hubbard, Alexander; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2011-01-15

    Magnetic helicity fluxes are investigated in a family of gauges in which the contribution from ideal magnetohydrodynamics takes the form of a purely advective flux. Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in this advective gauge family exhibit instabilities triggered by the build-up of unphysical irrotational contributions to the magnetic vector potential. As a remedy, the vector potential is evolved in a numerically well behaved gauge, from which the advective vector potential is obtained by a gauge transformation. In the kinematic regime, the magnetic helicity density evolves similarly to a passive scalar when resistivity is small and turbulent mixing is mild, i.e., when the fluid Reynolds number is not too large. In the dynamical regime, resistive contributions to the magnetic helicity flux in the advective gauge are found to be significant owing to the development of small length scales in the irrotational part of the magnetic vector potential.

  15. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  16. Theory of advection-driven long range biotic transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple mechanistic model to examine the effects of advective flow on the spread of fungal diseases spread by wind-blown spores. The model is defined by a set of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for spore densities. One equation describes the long-distance advectiv...

  17. AN EXACT PEAK CAPTURING AND OSCILLATION-FREE SCHEME TO SOLVE ADVECTION-DISPERSION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exact peak capturing and essentially oscillation-free (EPCOF) algorithm, consisting of advection-dispersion decoupling, backward method of characteristics, forward node tracking, and adaptive local grid refinement, is developed to solve transport equations. This algorithm repr...

  18. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bruce S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Passeport, Elodie; Sleep, Brent E

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining "observable" DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C0), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (Dmech/Deff). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C0/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C0/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (<100years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with "typical" well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where Dmech/Deff is larger than 10, DRIF effects will likely not be

  19. Contributions of advective and diffusive oxygen transport through multilayer composite caps over mine waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Benson, Craig H

    2004-07-01

    The relative contributions of four mechanisms of oxygen transport in multilayer composite (MLC) caps placed over oxygen-consuming mine waste were evaluated using numerical and analytical methods. MLC caps are defined here as caps consisting of earthen and geosynthetic (polymeric) components where a composite barrier layer consisting of a geomembrane (1-2 mm thick polymeric sheet) overlying a clay layer is the primary barrier to transport. The transport mechanisms that were considered are gas-phase advective transport, gas-phase diffusive transport, liquid-phase advective transport via infiltrating precipitation and liquid-phase diffusive transport. A numerical model was developed to simulate gas-phase advective-diffusive transport of oxygen through a multilayer cap containing seven layers. This model was also used to simulate oxygen diffusion in the liquid phase. An approximate analytical method was used to compute the advective flux of oxygen in the liquid phase. The numerical model was verified for limiting cases using an analytical solution. Comparisons were also made between model predictions and field data for earthen caps reported by others. Results of the analysis show that the dominant mechanism for oxygen transport through MLC caps is gas-phase diffusion. For the cases that were considered, the gas-phase diffusive flux typically comprises at least 99% of the total oxygen flux. Thus, designers of MLC caps should focus on design elements and features that will limit diffusion of gas-phase oxygen. PMID:15145567

  20. Numerical simulation of advective-dispersive multisolute transport with sorption, ion exchange and equilibrium chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed that can simulate the effect of certain chemical and sorption reactions simultaneously among solutes involved in advective-dispersive transport through porous media. The model is based on a methodology that utilizes physical-chemical relationships in the development of the basic solute mass-balance equations; however, the form of these equations allows their solution to be obtained by methods that do not depend on the chemical processes. The chemical environment is governed by the condition of local chemical equilibrium, and may be defined either by the linear sorption of a single species and two soluble complexation reactions which also involve that species, or binary ion exchange and one complexation reaction involving a common ion. Partial differential equations that describe solute mass balance entirely in the liquid phase are developed for each tenad (a chemical entity whose total mass is independent of the reaction process) in terms of their total dissolved concentration. These equations are solved numerically in two dimensions through the modification of an existing groundwater flow/transport computer code. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Warm-air advection, air mass transformation and fog causes rapid ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, Michael; Shupe, Matthew D.; Brooks, Ian M.; Persson, P. Ola G.; Prytherch, John; Salisbury, Dominic J.; Sedlar, Joseph; Achtert, Peggy; Brooks, Barbara J.; Johnston, Paul E.; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Wolfe, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Direct observations during intense warm-air advection over the East Siberian Sea reveal a period of rapid sea-ice melt. A semistationary, high-pressure system north of the Bering Strait forced northward advection of warm, moist air from the continent. Air-mass transformation over melting sea ice formed a strong, surface-based temperature inversion in which dense fog formed. This induced a positive net longwave radiation at the surface while reducing net solar radiation only marginally; the inversion also resulted in downward turbulent heat flux. The sum of these processes enhanced the surface energy flux by an average of ~15 W m-2 for a week. Satellite images before and after the episode show sea-ice concentrations decreasing from > 90% to ~50% over a large area affected by the air-mass transformation. We argue that this rapid melt was triggered by the increased heat flux from the atmosphere due to the warm-air advection.

  2. General solution of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this effort we exactly solve the fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport and give its general solution in terms of hypergeometric distributions. Numerical analysis of this equation shows that its solutions resemble power-laws.

  3. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  4. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture. PMID:26232976

  5. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  6. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  7. MT3DMS: A MODULAR THREE-DIMENSIONAL MULTISPECIES TRANSPORT MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ADVECTION, DISPERSION, AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS OF CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS: DOCUMENTATION AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual describes the next generation of the modular three-dimensional transport model, MT3D, with significantly expanded capabilities, including the addition of (a) a third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) scheme for solving the advection term that is mass conservativ...

  8. THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN GEOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AND ADVECTION-DISPERSION IN CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AT A URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface are controlled by complex processes including advection, dispersion-diffusion, and chemical reactions. However, the interplay between the physical transport processes and chemical reactions, and their...

  9. Anomalous transport regimes and asymptotic concentration distributions in the presence of advection and diffusion on a comb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoretskaya, Olga A.; Kondratenko, Peter S.

    2009-04-01

    We study the transport of impurity particles on a comb structure in the presence of advection. The main body concentration and asymptotic concentration distributions are obtained. Seven different transport regimes occur on the comb structure with finite teeth: classical diffusion, advection, quasidiffusion, subdiffusion, slow classical diffusion, and two kinds of slow advection. Quasidiffusion deserves special attention. It is characterized by a linear growth of the mean-square displacement. However, quasidiffusion is an anomalous transport regime. We established that a change in transport regimes in time leads to a change in regimes in space. Concentration tails have a cascade structure, namely, consisting of several parts.

  10. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly

  11. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  12. Analytical solution of the advection-diffusion transport equation using a change-of-variable and integral transform technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a formal exact solution of the linear advection-diffusion transport equation with constant coefficients for both transient and steady-state regimes. A classical mathematical substitution transforms the original advection-diffusion equation into an exclusively diffusive equation. ...

  13. Numerical advection algorithms and their role in atmospheric transport and chemistry models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    During the last 35 years, well over 100 algorithms for modeling advection processes have been described and tested. This review summarizes the development and improvements that have taken place. The nature of the errors caused by numerical approximation to the advection equation are highlighted. Then the particular devices that have been proposed to remedy these errors are discussed. The extensive literature comparing transport algorithms is reviewed. Although there is no clear cut 'best' algorithm, several conclusions can be made. Spectral and pseudospectral techniques consistently provide the highest degree of accuracy, but expense and difficulties assuring positive mixing ratios are serious drawbacks. Schemes which consider fluid slabs bounded by grid points (volume schemes), rather than the simple specification of constituent values at the grid points, provide accurate positive definite results.

  14. Advective transport observations with MODPATH-OBS--documentation of the MODPATH observation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Kauffman, L.K.; Hill, M.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.

    2013-01-01

    The MODPATH-OBS computer program described in this report is designed to calculate simulated equivalents for observations related to advective groundwater transport that can be represented in a quantitative way by using simulated particle-tracking data. The simulated equivalents supported by MODPATH-OBS are (1) distance from a source location at a defined time, or proximity to an observed location; (2) time of travel from an initial location to defined locations, areas, or volumes of the simulated system; (3) concentrations used to simulate groundwater age; and (4) percentages of water derived from contributing source areas. Although particle tracking only simulates the advective component of conservative transport, effects of non-conservative processes such as retardation can be approximated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity based on the properties of selected conservative tracers. This program can also account for simple decay or production, but it cannot account for diffusion. Dispersion can be represented through direct simulation of subsurface heterogeneity and the use of many particles. MODPATH-OBS acts as a postprocessor to MODPATH, so that the sequence of model runs generally required is MODFLOW, MODPATH, and MODPATH-OBS. The version of MODFLOW and MODPATH that support the version of MODPATH-OBS presented in this report are MODFLOW-2005 or MODFLOW-LGR, and MODPATH-LGR. MODFLOW-LGR is derived from MODFLOW-2005, MODPATH 5, and MODPATH 6 and supports local grid refinement. MODPATH-LGR is derived from MODPATH 5. It supports the forward and backward tracking of particles through locally refined grids and provides the output needed for MODPATH_OBS. For a single grid and no observations, MODPATH-LGR results are equivalent to MODPATH 5. MODPATH-LGR and MODPATH-OBS simulations can use nearly all of the capabilities of MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-LGR; for example, simulations may be steady-state, transient, or a combination

  15. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Kyle J.; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection (IMA) is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field, and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one would expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper, we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity, and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.

  16. Stochastic interpretation of the advection-diffusion equation and its relevance to bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.; Bohorquez, P.; Heyman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The advection-diffusion equation is one of the most widespread equations in physics. It arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Phenomenological laws are usually sufficient to derive this equation and interpret its terms. Stochastic models can also be used to derive it, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. These models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. Among these stochastic models, the most common approach consists of random walk models. For instance, they have been used to model the random displacement of tracers in rivers. Here we explore an alternative approach, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. Birth-death Markov processes are well suited to this objective. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received no attention. We therefore look into the possibility of deriving the advection-diffusion equation (with a source term) within the framework of birth-death Markov processes. We show that in the continuum limit (when the cell size becomes vanishingly small), we can derive an advection-diffusion equation for particle activity. Yet while this derivation is formally valid in the continuum limit, it runs into difficulty in practical applications involving cells or meshes of finite length. Indeed, within our stochastic framework, particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due

  17. Universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations: The ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    A fresh approach is taken to the embarrassingly difficult problem of adequately modeling simple pure advection. An explicit conservative control-volume formation makes use of a universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations. This ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme is applied to unsteady, one-dimensional scalar pure advection at constant velocity, using three critical test profiles: an isolated sine-squared wave, a discontinuous step, and a semi-ellipse. The goal, of course, is to devise a single robust scheme which achieves sharp monotonic resolution of the step without corrupting the other profiles. The semi-ellipse is particularly challenging because of its combination of sudden and gradual changes in gradient. The ULTIMATE strategy can be applied to explicit conservation schemes of any order of accuracy. Second-order schemes are unsatisfactory, showing steepening and clipping typical of currently popular so-called high resolution shock-capturing of TVD schemes. The ULTIMATE third-order upwind scheme is highly satisfactory for most flows of practical importance. Higher order methods give predictably better step resolution, although even-order schemes generate a (monotonic) waviness in the difficult semi-ellipse simulation. Little is to be gained above ULTIMATE fifth-order upwinding which gives results close to the ultimate for which one might hope.

  18. Advective transport and decomposition of chain-forming planktonic diatoms in permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Huettel, Markus

    2004-09-01

    In laboratory chamber experiments we demonstrate that permeable sediments (>7×10 -12 m 2) exposed to boundary flows filter chain-forming coastal bloom diatoms ( Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira rotula) from the water column, causing rapid transfer of fresh organic particulate matter into sediment layers as deep as 5 cm within 72 h. The penetration depth of the diatoms depends on the permeability of the bed and the length of the chains. Long chains were not transported as deep into the sediment as short chains or single cells. The fast advective transfer of phytoplankton cells into sandy sediments may be an important process facilitating organic matter uptake and preventing resuspension of deposited organic material in high-energy coastal environments. High advective flushing rates in medium- and coarse-grained sandy sediments enhanced the mineralisation of the trapped diatoms (2300 to 3200 μmol C m -2 d -1), stimulated benthic oxygen consumption (2300 to 3000 μmol O 2 m -2 d -1), as well as nitrification (up to 20 μmol NO 3- m -2 d -1), relative to sediment where diffusion dominated the solute exchange. Advective solute exchange rates that increase with increasing permeability prevent the accumulation of Si(OH) 4 near the dissolving frustules and in the pore water, leading to an effective recycling of dissolved silica to the production process in the water column (95 to 101 μmol Si(OH) 4 m -2 d -1). This process may also enhance dissolution rates of the deposited opal in coarse-grained sands by maintaining higher degrees of undersaturation than in fine-grained sediments. Our results suggest that advective filtration of planktonic diatoms into permeable sediments increases mineralisation and recycling of Si(OH) 4 and organic matter in high energetic shelf areas.

  19. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  20. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  1. Modeling of advection-diffusion-reaction processes using transport dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-11-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. In particular, the transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of Lagrangian particles. To validate the proposed tDPD model and the boundary conditions, three benchmark simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions are performed, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. Also, two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems are performed and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, an application of tDPD to the spatio-temporal dynamics of blood coagulation involving twenty-five reacting species is performed to demonstrate the promising biological applications of the tDPD model. Supported by the DOE Center on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and an INCITE grant.

  2. Simulation of the advective methane transport and AOM in Shenhu area, the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wu, N.

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) occurs in the transition zone between the presence of sulfate and methane. This reaction is an important process for methane and the global carbon cycle. Methane gas hydrates bearing sediments were recovered in Shenhu Area, the Northern South China Sea, and methane advective transport was detected in this area as well. A one dimension numerical simulation tool was implemented to study the AOM process combined with the advective methane transport in Shenhu Area according to the local drilling data and geochemical information. The modeled results suggest that local methane flux will be consumed in the sediment column via dissolution, sorption and AOM reaction. A portion of methane will enter water column and possibly atmosphere if the methane flux was one order of magnitude higher than current level. Furthermore, the calculated rates of AOM in Shenhu area range similar to that of gas hydrate mounds in Mexico Golf. However, AOM is ability to consume more methane than that in Golf of Mexico due to the lower permeable sediment associated with a deeper sulfate methane transition layer.

  3. Aerosol composition and properties variation at the ground and over the column under different air masses advection in South Italy.

    PubMed

    Pavese, G; Lettino, A; Calvello, M; Esposito, F; Fiore, S

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol composition and properties variation under the advection of different air masses were investigated, as case studies, by contemporary measurements over the atmospheric column and at the ground in a semi-rural site in South Italy. The absence of local strong sources in this area allowed to characterize background aerosol and to compare particle mixing effects under various atmospheric circulation conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ǻngström parameters from radiometric measurements allowed the detection and identification of polluted, dust, and volcanic atmospheric conditions. AODs were the input for a suitable model to evaluate the columnar aerosol composition, according to six main atmospheric components (water-soluble, soot, sea salt accumulation, sea salt coarse, mineral dus,t and biological). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of particulate sampled with a 13-stage impactor at the ground showed not only fingerprints typical of the different air masses but also the effects of transport and aging on atmospheric particles, suggesting processes that changed their chemical and optical properties. Background columnar aerosol was characterized by 72% of water-soluble and soot, in agreement with ground-based findings that highlighted 60% of contribution from anthropogenic carbonate particles and soot. In general, a good agreement between ground-based and columnar results was observed. Under the advection of trans-boundary air masses, water-soluble and soot were always present in columnar aerosol, whereas, in variable percentages, sea salt and mineral particles characterized both dust and volcanic conditions. At the ground, sulfates characterized the amorphous matrix produced in finer stages by the evaporation of solutions of organic and inorganic aerosols. Sulfates were also one of the key players involved in heterogeneous chemical reactions, producing complex secondary aerosol, as such clay-sulfate internally mixed particle externally mixed

  4. Advective-diffusive/dispersive transport of chemically reacting species in hydrothermal systems. Final report, FY83-85

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1986-06-20

    A general formulation of multi-phase fluid flow coupled to chemical reactions was developed based on a continuum description of porous media. A preliminary version of the computer code MCCTM was constructed which implemented the general equations for a single phase fluid. The computer code MCCTM incorporates mass transport by advection-diffusion/dispersion in a one-dimensional porous medium coupled to reversible and irreversible, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions. These reactions include aqueous complexing, oxidation/reduction reactions, ion exchange, and hydrolysis reactions of stoichiometric minerals. The code MCCTM uses a fully implicit finite difference algorithm. The code was tested against analytical calculations. Applications of the code included investigation of the propagation of sharp chemical reaction fronts, metasomatic alteration of microcline at elevated temperatures and pressures, and ion-exchange in a porous column. Finally numerical calculations describing fluid flow in crystalline rock in the presence of a temperature gradient were compared with experimental results for quartzite.

  5. Exact PDF equations and closure approximations for advective-reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, D.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical models of advection–reaction phenomena rely on advective flow velocity and (bio) chemical reaction rates that are notoriously random. By using functional integral methods, we derive exact evolution equations for the probability density function (PDF) of the state variables of the advection–reaction system in the presence of random transport velocity and random reaction rates with rather arbitrary distributions. These PDF equations are solved analytically for transport with deterministic flow velocity and a linear reaction rate represented mathematically by a heterog eneous and strongly-correlated random field. Our analytical solution is then used to investigate the accuracy and robustness of the recently proposed large-eddy diffusivity (LED) closure approximation [1]. We find that the solution to the LED-based PDF equation, which is exact for uncorrelated reaction rates, is accurate even in the presence of strong correlations and it provides an upper bound of predictive uncertainty.

  6. Renormalization group estimates of transport coefficients in the advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George

    1993-01-01

    The advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence is considered using recursive renormalization group procedures in the differential sub grid shell thickness limit. It is shown explicitly that the higher order nonlinearities induced by the recursive renormalization group procedure preserve Galilean invariance. Differential equations, valid for the entire resolvable wave number k range, are determined for the eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity coefficients, and it is shown that higher order nonlinearities do not contribute as k goes to 0, but have an essential role as k goes to k(sub c) the cutoff wave number separating the resolvable scales from the sub grid scales. The recursive renormalization transport coefficients and the associated eddy Prandtl number are in good agreement with the k-dependent transport coefficients derived from closure theories and experiments.

  7. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August

  8. Contour advection with surgery: A technique for investigating finescale structure in tracer transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Plumb, R. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We present a trajectory technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), for tracing the evolution of material contours in a specified (including observed) evolving flow. CAS uses the algorithms developed by Dritschel for contour dynamics/surgery to trace the evolution of specified contours. The contours are represented by a series of particles, which are advected by a specified, gridded, wind distribution. The resolution of the contours is preserved by continually adjusting the number of particles, and finescale features are produced that are not present in the input data (and cannot easily be generated using standard trajectory techniques). The reliability, and dependence on the spatial and temporal resolution of the wind field, of the CAS procedure is examined by comparisons with high-resolution numerical data (from contour dynamics calculations and from a general circulation model), and with routine stratospheric analyses. These comparisons show that the large-scale motions dominate the deformation field and that CAS can accurately reproduce small scales from low-resolution wind fields. The CAS technique therefore enables examination of atmospheric tracer transport at previously unattainable resolution.

  9. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  10. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  11. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  12. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  13. Transport and Recruitment of Blue Crab Larvae:a Model with Advection and Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Epifanio, C. E.; Epifanio, C. C.; Wong, K.-C.

    1997-07-01

    The present paper develops a mathematical model for the transport and recruitment of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae, and applies it to the inner continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight near Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Blue crab larvae develop through seven or eight planktonic zoeal stages to a megalopa stage suitable for recruitment to adult populations of east coast estuaries. The larvae are concentrated near the surface, and the currents are primarily forced by alongshelf winds and river discharge through major estuaries. Model currents are prescribed based on a realistic synthesis of their observed relationship to wind and river discharge. Besides the resulting advection, particle diffusion and biological mortality are added to determine the fate of larvae released from their parent estuary. Groups of particles were released across the source region of the outflowing buoyancy-driven current in the model estuary mouth. Most larvae were swept alongshelf to the south with the buoyancy-driven coastal current, and thus were lost as recruits to the population of their parent estuary. However, some larvae released close to the seaward edge of the emerging coastal current were able to cross the coastal current front and move seaward into inner shelf water during upwelling-favorable (northward) wind events. Some of these, in turn, were suitably placed near the parent estuary mouth so that they could be advected landward as megalopae into the estuary during a subsequent downwelling-favorable (southward) wind event and thus join the adult population. The model results for megalopae returns were computed from consecutive daily release of 1000 particles, and were compared with 4 years of blue crab megalopa settlement data for Delaware Bay. The model results for 1989 and 1990 matched the observed data remarkably well, with both years showing dominance by a single return event of a few days duration. For 1991 and 1992, the observed results showed multiple return events

  14. Exploring a semimechanistic episodic Langevin model for bed load transport: Emergence of normal and anomalous advection and diffusion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Niannian; Singh, Arvind; Guala, Michele; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Wu, Baosheng

    2016-04-01

    Bed load transport is a highly stochastic, multiscale process, where particle advection and diffusion regimes are governed by the dynamics of each sediment grain during its motion and resting states. Having a quantitative understanding of the macroscale behavior emerging from the microscale interactions is important for proper model selection in the absence of individual grain-scale observations. Here we develop a semimechanistic sediment transport model based on individual particle dynamics, which incorporates the episodic movement (steps separated by rests) of sediment particles and study their macroscale behavior. By incorporating different types of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of particle resting times Tr, under the assumption of thin-tailed PDF of particle velocities, we study the emergent behavior of particle advection and diffusion regimes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For exponential PDFs of resting times Tr, we observe normal advection and diffusion at long time scales. For a power-law PDF of resting times (i.e., f>(Tr>)˜Tr-ν), the tail thickness parameter ν is observed to affect the advection regimes (both sub and normal advective), and the diffusion regimes (both subdiffusive and superdiffusive). By comparing our semimechanistic model with two random walk models in the literature, we further suggest that in order to reproduce accurately the emerging diffusive regimes, the resting time model has to be coupled with a particle motion model able to produce finite particle velocities during steps, as the episodic model discussed here.

  15. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  16. TESTING THE FRACTIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE EQUATION FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN SOIL WITH DATA FROM MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and modeling transport of solutes in porous media is a critical issue in the environmental protection. Contaminants from various industrial and agricultural sources can travel in soil and ground water and eventually affect human and animal health. The parabolic advective-dispersive equ...

  17. The advective-dispersive equation with spatial fractional derivatives as a model for tracer transport in structured soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical model to describe solute transport in soil is based on the advective-dispersive equation where Fick’s law is used to explain dispersion. From the microscopic point of view this is equivalent to consider that the motion of the particles of solute may be simulated by the Brownian motion....

  18. The predictability of advection-dominated flux-transport solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Sabrina; Fournier, Alexandre; Aubert, Julien

    2014-01-20

    Space weather is a matter of practical importance in our modern society. Predictions of forecoming solar cycles mean amplitude and duration are currently being made based on flux-transport numerical models of the solar dynamo. Interested in the forecast horizon of such studies, we quantify the predictability window of a representative, advection-dominated, flux-transport dynamo model by investigating its sensitivity to initial conditions and control parameters through a perturbation analysis. We measure the rate associated with the exponential growth of an initial perturbation of the model trajectory, which yields a characteristic timescale known as the e-folding time τ {sub e}. The e-folding time is shown to decrease with the strength of the α-effect, and to increase with the magnitude of the imposed meridional circulation. Comparing the e-folding time with the solar cycle periodicity, we obtain an average estimate for τ {sub e} equal to 2.76 solar cycle durations. From a practical point of view, the perturbations analyzed in this work can be interpreted as uncertainties affecting either the observations or the physical model itself. After reviewing these, we discuss their implications for solar cycle prediction.

  19. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  20. Relative effects of advection, sorption and diffusion on transport and tailing of chlorinated solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M.; Jankovic, I.; Rabideau, A. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    Effects of three key transport mechanisms (advection, diffusion and sorption) on transport and contaminant tailing of chlorinated solvents have been investigated using a numerical model. Thousands of model simulations have been conducted for various combinations of transport parameters that govern three key mechanisms in order to quantify tailing and relative importance of each mechanism. Hydraulic conductivity model contains a single inclusion of constant conductivity K embedded in a homogeneous anisotropic background of conductivity Kh,Kv. The inclusion is shaped as an oblate ellipsoid and subject to uniform flow. The background represents "average" conductivity of a heterogeneous formation while inclusion is used to represent geologic units that are more or less conductive than the background. The ratio of long to short semi-axis of the inclusion (a/b) models the ratio of horizontal to vertical integral scales (Ih/Iv) of different geologic units, where integral scales can be obtained, for example, using indicator variograms. The flow solution for present problem is obtained analytically as a closed form solution with exact expressions for Darcy velocity valid both inside and outside the inclusion. Sorption is modeled as an equilibrium process governed by a linear isotherm. The effects on transport and tailing are accounted for using retardation factors. Sorption heterogeneity is created by allowing different values of retardation factor for the interior (Ri) and the exterior of the inclusion (Rb). Diffusive displacements have been added to retarded advective displacements using random walk method. Peclet number, defined as Pe=U Ih/D (U is the groundwater velocity, D is the molecular diffusion coefficient for chlorinated solvents), is used to quantify the diffusion process. Very large numbers of particles (hundreds of thousands) have been tracked using very small time steps (as small as a/10,000) to provide sufficient resolution to breakthrough curves and to

  1. User's guide to PHREEQC, a computer program for speciation, reaction-path, advective-transport, and inverse geochemical calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is a computer program written in the C pwgranuning language that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC is based on an ion-association aqueous model and has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations, (2) reaction-path and advective-transport calculations involving specified irreversible reactions, mixing of solutions, mineral and gas equilibria surface-complex-ation reactions, and ion-exchange reactions, and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for composition differences between waters, within specified compositional uncertainties. PHREEQC is derived from the Fortran program PHREEQE, but it has been completely rewritten in C with the addition many new capabilities. New features include the capabilities to use redox couples to distribute redox elements among their valence states in speciation calculations; to model ion-exchange and surface-compiexation reactions; to model reactions with a fixed-pressure, multicomponent gas phase (that is, a gas bubble); to calculate the mass of water in the aqueous phase during reaction and transport calculations; to keep track of the moles of minerals present in the solid phases and determine antomaticaHy the thermodynamically stable phase assemblage; to simulate advective transport in combination with PHREEQC's reaction-modeling capability; and to make inverse modeling calculations that allow for uncertainties in the analytical data. The user interface is improved through the use of a simplified approach to redox reactions, which includes explicit mole-balance equations for hydrogen and oxygen; the use of a revised input that is modular and completely free format; and the use of mineral names and standard chemical symbolism rather than index numbers. The use of (2 eliminates nearly all limitations on army sizes, including numbers of elements, aqueous species, solutions, phases, and lengths of character

  2. Experimental study of advective-diffusive gaseous CO2 transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirat, Farzad; Sharma, Prabhakar; Niemi, Auli; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2014-05-01

    Leakage of gaseous CO2 into the shallow subsurface system is one of the main concerns associated with geologic storage resources. A better understanding of CO2 leakage in the shallow subsurface plays an important role for developing leakage monitoring programs. CO2 may reach the unsaturated zone by different leak mechanisms such as exsolution from CO2 supersaturated water and continuous bubbling or gas flow along a leakage path. In the unsaturated zone, the CO2 is heavier than air and may accumulate below the ground surface and move laterally. We developed a small-scale experiment setup to study the possible gaseous CO2 transport mechanisms with different controlled conditions. In this study, the experiment setup was applied to measure CO2 distributions in time and space through homogenous dry sand in which the CO2 concentrations through the domain were measured by sensitive gas sensors. The preliminary analysis of the result suggests that the transport and distribution of gaseous CO2 is spatially and temporally sensitive for the selected experimental conditions of gas flow rate and porous media. To better understand the advection and diffusion processes through the unsaturated zone, the experimental results are coupled with the dusty gas model (DGM) of Mason et al. (1967). The dusty gas model's constitutive relationships are integrated into a numerical model for multicomponent gas mixture flow and transport in porous media. The DGM considers interactions between all gaseous species and Knudsen diffusion which is important in fine grained soils. Results from the applied model were consistent with the experimental breakthrough curves obtained in this study.

  3. Correcting transport errors during advection of aerosol and cloud moment sequences in eulerian models

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw R.

    2012-03-01

    Moment methods are finding increasing usage for simulations of particle population balance in box models and in more complex flows including two-phase flows. These highly efficient methods have nevertheless had little impact to date for multi-moment representation of aerosols and clouds in atmospheric models. There are evidently two reasons for this: First, atmospheric models, especially if the goal is to simulate climate, tend to be extremely complex and take many man-years to develop. Thus there is considerable inertia to the implementation of novel approaches. Second, and more fundamental, the nonlinear transport algorithms designed to reduce numerical diffusion during advection of various species (tracers) from cell to cell, in the typically coarse grid arrays of these models, can and occasionally do fail to preserve correlations between the moments. Other correlated tracers such as isotopic abundances, composition of aerosol mixtures, hydrometeor phase, etc., are subject to this same fate. In the case of moments, this loss of correlation can and occasionally does give rise to unphysical moment sets. When this happens the simulation can come to a halt. Following a brief description and review of moment methods, the goal of this paper is to present two new approaches that both test moment sequences for validity and correct them when they fail. The new approaches work on individual grid cells without requiring stored information from previous time-steps or neighboring cells.

  4. Characterization of the role of heterogeneous advection and diffusion on transport in weathered and fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Marechal, J.; Nigon, B.; Wajiddudin, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of transport in weathered and fractured rocks is critical as it represents the primary control of contaminant transfer from the subsurface in many parts of the world. This is the case in Southern India, where the subsurface is composed mainly of weathered and fractured granite and where the overexploitation of the groundwater resource since the 70's has led to high water table depletion and strong groundwater quality deterioration. One key issue for modelling transport in such systems is to quantify the respective role of advective heterogeneities and matrix diffusion, which can both lead to strongly non Fickian transport properties. We investigate this question by analysing tracer test experiments performed under different flow configurations at a fractured granite experimental site located in Andhra Pradesh (India). We performed both convergent and push-pull tracer tests within the same fracture and at different scales. Three convergent tracer tests were performed with a solution of fluorescein for different pumping rate and for different distances between injection and pumping boreholes: 6, 30 and 41 meters. To evaluate diffusive process, we performed two long-duration push-pull tests (push time of 3 hours) with a solution of two conservative tracers of different diffusion coefficient (fluorescein and sodium chloride). We performed also six others push-pull tests with only fluorescein but for a variable push times of 14 min and 55 min with or without resting time of about 60 min. The late-time behaviour on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained for all convergent tracer tests showed a power-law slope of -2. Two of them showed an inflexion in the BTCs suggesting the existence of two independent flow paths and thus a highly channelized flow. The long-duration push-pull tests showed similar late-time behaviour with a power-law slope of -2.2 for both tracers. The six others push-pull tests showed a variation of power-law exponent from -3 to -2

  5. Mass-loss from advective accretion disc around rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktar, Ramiz; Das, Santabrata; Nandi, Anuj

    2015-11-01

    We examine the properties of the outflowing matter from an advective accretion disc around a spinning black hole. During accretion, rotating matter experiences centrifugal pressure-supported shock transition that effectively produces a virtual barrier around the black hole in the form of post-shock corona (hereafter PSC). Due to shock compression, PSC becomes hot and dense that eventually deflects a part of the inflowing matter as bipolar outflows because of the presence of extra thermal gradient force. In our approach, we study the outflow properties in terms of the inflow parameters, namely specific energy (E) and specific angular momentum (λ) considering the realistic outflow geometry around the rotating black holes. We find that spin of the black hole (ak) plays an important role in deciding the outflow rate R_{dot{m}} (ratio of mass flux of outflow to inflow); in particular, R_{dot{m}} is directly correlated with ak for the same set of inflow parameters. It is found that a large range of the inflow parameters allows global accretion-ejection solutions, and the effective area of the parameter space (E, λ) with and without outflow decreases with black hole spin (ak). We compute the maximum outflow rate (R^{max}_{dot{m}}) as a function of black hole spin (ak) and observe that R^{max}_{dot{m}} weakly depends on ak that lies in the range ˜10-18 per cent of the inflow rate for the adiabatic index (γ) with 1.5 ≥ γ ≥ 4/3. We present the observational implication of our approach while studying the steady/persistent jet activities based on the accretion states of black holes. We discuss that our formalism seems to have the potential to explain the observed jet kinetic power for several Galactic black hole sources and active galactic nuclei.

  6. Rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection by inhomogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    A variational procedure, due originally to Howard and explored by Busse and others for self-consistent turbulence problems, is employed to determine rigorous upper bounds for the advection of a passive scalar through an inhomogeneous turbulent slab with arbitrary generalized Reynolds number R and Kubo number K. In the basic version of the method, the steady-state energy balance is used as a constraint; the resulting bound, though rigorous, is independent of K. A pedagogical reference model (one dimension, K = infinity) is described in detail; the bound compares favorably with the exact solution. The direct-interaction approximation is also worked out for this model; it is somewhat more accurate than the bound, but requires considerably more labor to solve. For the basic bound, a general formalism is presented for several dimensions, finite correlation length, and reasonably general boundary conditions. Part of the general method, in which a Green's function technique is employed, applies to self-consistent as well as to passive problems, and thereby generalizes previous results in the fluid literature. The formalism is extended for the first time to include time-dependent constraints, and a bound is deduced which explicitly depends on K and has the correct physical scalings in all regimes of R and K. Two applications from the theory of turbulent plasmas ae described: flux in velocity space, and test particle transport in stochastic magnetic fields. For the velocity space problem the simplest bound reproduces Dupree's original scaling for the strong turbulence diffusion coefficient. For the case of stochastic magnetic fields, the scaling of the bounds is described for the magnetic diffusion coefficient as well as for the particle diffusion coefficient in the so-called collisionless, fluid, and double-streaming regimes.

  7. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  8. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  9. A study of turbulent transport of an advective nature in a fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2014-08-01

    The advective nature of the electrostatic turbulent flux of plasma energy in Fourier space is studied numerically in a nearly adiabatic state. Such a state is represented by the Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is driven by a noise that may model the destabilization due to the phase mismatch of the plasma density and the electric potential. The noise is assumed to be Gaussian and not to be invariant under reflection along a direction ŝ. The flux density induced by such noise is found to be anisotropic: While it is random along ŝ, it is not along the perpendicular direction ŝ ⊥, and the flux is not diffusive. The renormalized response may be approximated as advective, with the velocity being proportional to ( kρ s )2, in the Fourier space.

  10. The distribution of neodymium isotopes and concentrations in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific: Water mass advection versus particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasse, Patricia; Stichel, Torben; Stumpf, Roland; Stramma, Lothar; Frank, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The radiogenic isotope composition of the Rare Earth Element (REE) neodymium (Nd) is a powerful water mass proxy for present and past ocean circulation. The processes controlling the Nd budget of the global ocean are not quantitatively understood and in particular source and sink mechanisms are still under debate. In this study we present the first full water column data set of dissolved Nd isotope compositions and Nd concentrations for the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP), where one of the globally largest Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) is located. This region is of particular interest for understanding the biogeochemical cycling of REEs because anoxic conditions may lead to release of REEs from the shelf, whereas high particle densities and fluxes potentially remove the REEs from the water column. Data were obtained between 1°40‧N and 16°S along a nearshore and an offshore transect. Near surface zonal current bands, such as the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) and the Subsurface Countercurrent (SSCC), which are supplying oxygen-rich water to the OMZ are characterized by radiogenic Nd isotope signatures (εNd=-2). Surface waters in the northernmost part of the study area are even more radiogenic (εNd=+3), most likely due to release of Nd from volcanogenic material. Deep and bottom waters at the southernmost offshore station (14°S) are clearly controlled by advection of water masses with less radiogenic signatures (εNd=-7) originating from the Southern Ocean. Towards the equator, however, the deep waters show a clear trend towards more radiogenic values of up to εNd=-2. The northernmost station located in the Panama basin shows highly radiogenic Nd isotope signatures in the entire water column, which indicates that particle scavenging, downward transport and release processes play an important role. This is supported by relatively low Nd concentrations in deep waters (3000-6000 m) in the EEP (20 pmol/kg) compared to locations in the Northern and Central Pacific

  11. An efficient horizontal advection scheme for the modeling of global transport of constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Hundsdorfer, W.; Spee, E.J.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper the authors consider a dimensional-splitting scheme for horizontal advection on a sphere with a uniform longitude-latitude grid. The 1D subprocesses that arise within the splitting are solved with an explicit finite-volume type scheme, which is made unconditionally stable by allowing the stencil to vary with the Courant numbers. The scheme is made positive by flux limiting. For the inaccuracies at the poles some special measures are discussed. Numerical tests show that the scheme is almost shape preserving and conservative, and it gives accurate results at low computational costs. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Temporal signatures of advective versus diffusive radon transport at a geothermal zone in Central Nepal.

    PubMed

    Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Girault, Frédéric; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2011-02-01

    Temporal variation of radon-222 concentration was studied at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located on the Main Central Thrust zone in Central Nepal. This site is characterized by several carbon dioxide discharges having maximum fluxes larger than 10 kg m(-2) d(-1). Radon concentration was monitored with autonomous Barasol™ probes between January 2008 and November 2009 in two small natural cavities with high CO(2) concentration and at six locations in the soil: four points having a high flux, and two background reference points. At the reference points, dominated by radon diffusion, radon concentration was stable from January to May, with mean values of 22 ± 6.9 and 37 ± 5.5 kBq m(-3), but was affected by a large increase, of about a factor of 2 and 1.6, respectively, during the monsoon season from June to September. At the points dominated by CO(2) advection, by contrast, radon concentration showed higher mean values 39.0 ± 2.6 to 78 ± 1.4 kBq m(-3), remarkably stable throughout the year with small long-term variation, including a possible modulation of period around 6 months. A significant difference between the diffusion dominated reference points and the advection-dominated points also emerged when studying the diurnal S(1) and semi-diurnal S(2) periodic components. At the advection-dominated points, radon concentration did not exhibit S(1) or S(2) components. At the reference points, however, the S(2) component, associated with barometric tide, could be identified during the dry season, but only when the probe was installed at shallow depth. The S(1) component, associated with thermal and possibly barometric diurnal forcing, was systematically observed, especially during monsoon season. The remarkable short-term and long-term temporal stability of the radon concentration at the advection-dominated points, which suggests a strong pressure source at depth, may be an important asset to detect possible temporal variations associated with the

  13. Advective heat transport associated to regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Chiarabba, Claudio; Frondini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The main springs of central Italy Apennines were investigated, in order to compute the amount of heat transported by groundwaters and to compute the fraction of heat due to the geothermal heat flux. The 46 investigated springs represent a significant portion of the permeable structures of the Apennine being characterised by a cumulative flow rate of 130 m3/s, i.e. ~ 50% of the water discharged in this sector of the Apennines. The groundwaters are characterised by relatively low temperatures, but the occurrence of an heat anomaly is evident when the differences between the temperatures of springs and recharge waters are compared with the corresponding altitude difference. A total amount of heat of ~ 2.1 × 109 J/s has been estimated to be transported by these groundwaters. Most of this heat (57%) is given by geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. The computed geothermal warming implies very high heat flux, with values higher than 300 mW/m2, in a large sector of the Apennines which was considered to date be characterised by normal to low conductive heat flux. The same area is affected by high fluxes of CO2 from a deep source and the strict correlation between the geothermal warming and the input of deep CO2-rich fluids is testified by the fact that all the thermally anomalous groundwaters are also affected by the input of deeply derived CO2 contrary to those not thermally anomalous which display any input of deeply derived CO2. This correspondence reasonably suggest the geothermal heat is transported from depth by CO2 rich fluids, which enter the aquifers and mix with infiltrating waters. The amount of geothermal heat transported by central Apennine cold groundwaters is in absolute very high. It results the double than the hydrothermal heat discharge of the US Cascade Range (~1×103 MW) and is about the half of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone, one of the largest hydrothermal system of the world (5-6

  14. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  15. Advective heat transport associated with regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Frondini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we show that the main springs of the central Apennine transport a total amount of heat of ˜2.2×109 J s-1. Most of this heat (57%) is the result of geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. This result indicates that a large area of the central Apennines is very hot with heat flux values >300 mW m-2. These values are higher than those measured in the magmatic and famously geothermal provinces of Tuscany and Latium and about 1/3 of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone. This finding is surprising because the central Apennines have been thought to be a relatively cold area. Translated by CO2 rich fluids, this heat anomaly suggests the existence of a thermal source such as a large magmatic intrusion at depth. Recent tomographic images of the area support the presence of such an intrusion visible as a broad negative velocity anomaly in seismic waves. Our results indicate that the thermal regime of tectonically active areas of the Earth, where meteoric waters infiltrate and deeply circulate, should be revised on the basis of mass and energy balances of the groundwater systems.

  16. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  17. Urban Mass Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervine, K. E.

    This bibliography is part of a series of Environmental Resource Packets prepared under a grant from EXXON Education Foundation. The most authoritative and accessible references in the urban transportation field are reviewed. The authors, publisher, point of view, level, and summary are given for each reference. The references are categorized…

  18. Mass transport contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the effects of outgassing and waste dumping on the contamination field around an orbiting spacecraft. The spacecraft was assumed to be spherical in shape with the mass flow emitting uniformly from the spherical surface at a constant rate and in a D'Lambertian spatial distribution. The outflow of gases were assumed to be neutrally charged and of a single species with a molecular weight characteristic of a composite of the actual species involved in the mass flow. The theoretical analysis showed that, for outgassing only, less than 1.5 percent of the outgas products will return to the Skylab spacecraft as a result of intermolecular collisions. When the total mass flow from the spacecraft, including waste dumps and reaction control motor firings, was considered, it was estimated that about 30 percent will return to the spacecraft.

  19. Modeling Solute Transport in Soil Columns Using Advective-Dispersive Equation with Fractional Spatial Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been reported that this model cannot take into account several important features of solute movement through soil. Recently, a new model has been suggested that results in a solute transport equation with fractional spatial derivatives, or FADE. We have assembled a database on published solu...

  20. Improved rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection described by simple models of bounded systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Bae; Krommes, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The work of Krommes and Smith on rigorous upper bounds for the turbulent transport of a passively advected scalar (/ital Ann. Phys./ 177:246 (1987)) is extended in two directions: (1) For their ''reference model,'' improved upper bounds are obtained by utilizing more sophisticated two-time constraints which include the effects of cross-correlations up to fourth order. Numerical solutions of the model stochastic differential equation are also obtained; they show that the new bounds compare quite favorably with the exact results, even at large Reynolds and Kubo numbers. (2) The theory is extended to take account of a finite spatial autocorrelation length L/sub c/. As a reasonably generic example, the problem of particle transport due to statistically specified stochastic magnetic fields in a collisionless turbulent plasma is revisited. A bound is obtained which reduces for small L/sub c/ to the quasilinear limit and for large L/sub c/ to the strong turbulence limit, and which provides a reasonable and rigorous interpolation for intermediate values of L/sub c/. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  1. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  2. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  3. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  4. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  5. The effects of temperature and motility on the advective transport of a deep subsurface bacteria through saturated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    Replicate column experiments were done to quantify the effects of temperature and bacterial motility on advective transport through repacked, but otherwise unaltered, natural aquifer sediment. The bacteria used in this study, A0500, was a flagellated, spore-forming rod isolated from the deep subsurface at DOE`s Savannah River Laboratory. Motility was controlled by turning on flagellar metabolism at 18{degrees}C but off at 40{degrees}C. Microspheres were used to independently quantify the effects of temperature on the sticking efficiency ({alpha}), estimated using a steady-state filtration model. The observed greater microsphere removal at the higher temperature agreed with the physical-chemical model, but bacteria removal at 18{degrees}C was only half that at 4{degrees}C. The sticking efficiency for non-motile A0500 (4{degrees}C) was over three times that of the motile A0500 (18{degrees}C), 0.073 versus 0.022 respectively. Analysis of complete breakthrough curves using a non-steady, kinetically limited, transport model to estimate the time scales of attachment and detachment suggested that motile A 0500 bacteria traveled twice as far as non-motile A 0500 bacteria before becoming attached. Once attached, non-motile colloids detached on the time scale of 9 to 17 days. The time scale for detachment of motile A0500 bacteria was shorter, 4 to 5 days. Results indicate that bacterial attachment was reversible and detachment was enhanced by bacterial motifity. The kinetic energy of bacterial motility changed the attachment-detachment kinetics in favor of the detached state. The chemical factors responsible for the enhanced transport are not known. However, motility may have caused weakly held bacteria to detach from the secondary minimum, and possibly from the primary minimum, as described by DLVO theory.

  6. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (<50 μm). Experimental conditions were selected using a mathematical procedure based on the Fisher Information Matrix to increase the reliability of experimental data and minimize confidence intervals of estimated mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity

  7. Analysis of steady-state flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of ground-water flow directions and traveltimes for advective flow were developed for the regional aquifer system of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The work included: (1) descriptions of compartments in the aquifer that function as intermediate and regional flow systems, (2) descriptions of pathlines for flow originating at or near the water table, and (3) quantitative estimates of traveltimes for advective transport originating at or near the water table. A particle-tracking postprocessing program was used to compute pathlines on the basis of output from an existing three-dimensional steady-state flow model. The flow model uses 1980 conditions to approximate average annual conditions for 1950-80. The advective transport model required additional information about the nature of flow across model boundaries, aquifer thickness, and porosity. Porosity of two types of basalt strata has been reported for more than 1,500 individual cores from test holes, wells, and outcrops near the south side of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The central 80 percent of samples had porosities of 0.08 to 0.25, the central 50 percent of samples, O. 11 to 0.21. Calibration of the model involved choosing a value for porosity that yielded the best solution. Two radiologic contaminants, iodine-129 and tritium, both introduced to the flow system about 40 years ago, are relatively conservative tracers. Iodine- 129 was considered to be more useful because of a lower analytical detection limit, longer half-life, and longer flow path. The calibration value for porosity was 0.21. Most flow in the aquifer is contained within a regional-scale compartment and follows paths that discharge to the Snake River downstream from Milner Dam. Two intermediate-scale compartments exist along the southeast side of the aquifer and near Mud Lake.One intermediate-scale compartment along the southeast side of the aquifer discharges to the Snake River near American Fails

  8. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  9. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated. PMID:26605833

  10. Thermally-driven advections of aerosol-rich air masses to an Alpine valley: Theoretical considerations and experimental evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diémoz, Henri; Magri, Tiziana; Pession, Giordano; Zublena, Manuela; Campanelli, Monica; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Barnaba, Francesca; Di Liberto, Luca; Dionisi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    A CHM-15k laser radar (lidar) was installed in April 2015 at the solar observatory of the Environmental Protection Agency (ARPA) of the Aosta Valley (Northern Italy, 45.74N, 7.36E, 560 m a.s.l.). The instrument operates at 1064 nm, is capable of mapping the vertical profile of aerosols and clouds up to the tropopause and is part of the Alice-net ceilometers network (www.alice-net.eu). The site is in a large Alpine valley floor, in a semi-rural context. Among the most interesting cases observed in the first months of operation, several days characterised by weak synoptic circulation and well-developed, thermally-driven up-valley winds are accompanied by the appearance of a thick aerosol layer in the afternoon. The phenomenon is frequent in Spring and Summer and is likely to be related to easterly airmass advections from polluted sites (e.g., the Po basin) rather than to local emissions. To test this hypothesis, the following method was adopted. First, some case studies were selected and the respective meteorological fields were analysed based on both observations at ground and the high-resolution output of the nonhydrostatic limited-area atmospheric prediction model maintained by the COnsortium for Small-scale MOdelling (COSMO) over the complex orography of the domain. Then, to evaluate the dynamics of the aerosol diffusion in the valley, the chemical transport 2D/3D eulerian Flexible Air quality Regional Model (FARM) was run. Finally, the three-dimensional output of the model was compared to the vertically-resolved aerosol field derived from the lidar-ceilometer soundings. The effects of up-slope winds, and the resulting subsidence along the main axis of the valley, is hypothesised to break up the aerosol layer close to the ground in the middle of the day and to drag the residual layer down into the mixing layer. The measurements by a co-located sun/sky photometer operating in the framework of the EuroSkyRad (ESR) network were additionally analysed to detect any

  11. MODFLOW-2000 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--documentation of the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the advective component of contaminant transport in steady-state flow fields can provide important information for the calibration of ground-water flow models. This report documents the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package, version 2, which allows advective-transport observations to be used in the three-dimensional ground-water flow parameter-estimation model MODFLOW-2000. The ADV2 Package is compatible with some of the features in the Layer-Property Flow and Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow Packages, but is not compatible with the Block-Centered Flow or Generalized Finite-Difference Packages. The particle-tracking routine used in the ADV2 Package duplicates the semi-analytical method of MODPATH, as shown in a sample problem. Particles can be tracked in a forward or backward direction, and effects such as retardation can be simulated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity. Particles can be discharged at cells that are considered to be weak sinks, in which the sink applied does not capture all the water flowing into the cell, using one of two criteria: (1) if there is any outflow to a boundary condition such as a well or surface-water feature, or (2) if the outflow exceeds a user specified fraction of the cell budget. Although effective porosity could be included as a parameter in the regression, this capability is not included in this package. The weighted sum-of-squares objective function, which is minimized in the Parameter-Estimation Process, was augmented to include the square of the weighted x-, y-, and z-components of the differences between the simulated and observed advective-front locations at defined times, thereby including the direction of travel as well as the overall travel distance in the calibration process. The sensitivities of the particle movement to the parameters needed to minimize the objective function are calculated for any particle location using the exact sensitivity

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Ely, D.M.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G.M.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2001-08-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS). The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 underground Test Area (UGTA) sites. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work.

  13. A mesh-adaptive collocation technique for the simulation of advection-dominated single- and multiphase transport phenomena in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new mesh-adaptive 1D collocation technique has been developed to efficiently solve transient advection-dominated transport problems in porous media that are governed by a hyperbolic/parabolic (singularly perturbed) PDE. After spatial discretization a singularly perturbed ODE is obtained which is solved by a modification of the COLNEW ODE-collocation code. The latter also contains an adaptive mesh procedure that has been enhanced here to resolve linear and nonlinear transport flow problems with steep fronts where regular FD and FE methods often fail. An implicit first-order backward Euler and a third-order Taylor-Donea technique are employed for the time integration. Numerical simulations on a variety of high Peclet-number transport phenomena as they occur in realistic porous media flow situations are presented. Examples include classical linear advection-diffusion, nonlinear adsorption, two-phase Buckley-Leverett flow without and with capillary forces (Rapoport-Leas equation) and Burgers` equation for inviscid fluid flow. In most of these examples sharp fronts and/or shocks develop which are resolved in an oscillation-free manner by the present adaptive collocation method. The backward Euler method has some amount of numerical dissipation is observed when the time-steps are too large. The third-order Taylor-Donea technique is less dissipative but is more prone to numerical oscillations. The simulations show that for the efficient solution of nonlinear singularly perturbed PDE`s governing flow transport a careful balance must be struck between the optimal mesh adaptation, the nonlinear iteration method and the time-stepping procedure. More theoretical research is needed with this regard.

  14. Mass partitioning effects in diffusion transport.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Wu, Suhong; Blanco, Elvin; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2015-08-28

    Frequent mass exchange takes place in a heterogeneous environment among several phases, where mass partitioning may occur at the interface of phases. Analytical and computational methods for diffusion do not usually incorporate molecule partitioning masking the true picture of mass transport. Here we present a computational finite element methodology to calculate diffusion mass transport with a partitioning phenomenon included and the analysis of the effects of partitioning. Our numerical results showed that partitioning controls equilibrated mass distribution as expected from analytical solutions. The experimental validation of mass release from drug-loaded nanoparticles showed that partitioning might even dominate in some cases with respect to diffusion itself. The analysis of diffusion kinetics in the parameter space of partitioning and diffusivity showed that partitioning is an extremely important parameter in systems, where mass diffusivity is fast and that the concentration of nanoparticles can control payload retention inside nanoparticles. The computational and experimental results suggest that partitioning and physiochemical properties of phases play an important, if not crucial, role in diffusion transport and should be included in the studies of mass transport processes. PMID:26204522

  15. Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, tides, hydrological water redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. With only a few exceptions on the Earth surface, the temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have the capability of monitoring certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. These techniques include the very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler tracking, and the Global Positioning System, all entail global observational networks. While considerable advances have been made in observing and understanding of the dynamics of Earth's rotation, only the lowest-degree gravitational variations have been observed and limited knowledge of geocenter motion obtained. New space missions, projects and initiatives promise to further improve the measurements and hence our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding and modeling capability of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as the solid Earth's response to such changes in constraining the modeling of Earth's mechanical properties.

  16. STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING TRANSPORT PARAMETERS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS TO ONE-DOMENSIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Brian J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation nonlinear multiple-regression methodology for estimating parameters that characterize the transport of contaminants is developed and demonstrated. Finite difference containment transport simulation is combined with a nonlinear weighted least squares multiple-regression procedure. The technique provides optimal parameter estimates and gives statistics for assessing the reliability of these estimates under certain general assumptions about the distributions of the random measurement errors. Monte Carlo analysis is used to estimate parameter reliability for a hypothetical homogeneous soil column for which concentration data contain large random measurement errors. The value of data collected spatially versus data collected temporally was investigated for estimation of velocity, dispersion coefficient, effective porosity, first-order decay rate, and zero-order production. The use of spatial data gave estimates that were 2-3 times more reliable than estimates based on temporal data for all parameters except velocity. (Estimated author abstract) Refs.

  17. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  18. Upscaling transport with mass transfer models: Mean behavior and propagation of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernã Ndez-Garcia, D.; Llerar-Meza, G.; Gómez-HernáNdez, J. Jaime

    2009-10-01

    The choice of an adequate large-scale conceptual transport model constitutes a major challenge associated with the upscaling of solute transport. Among the different alternatives to the classical advection-dispersion model, the (multirate) mass transfer model has been proposed as a valuable and convenient alternative to model the large-scale behavior of solute transport. This paper evaluates the use of mass transfer models as a constitutive equation for upscaling solute transport. To achieve this, we compare Monte Carlo simulations of solute transport at two different support scales. Transport simulations performed at the smallest scale represent a set of reference transport solutions described at a high resolution, which are contrasted against transport simulations obtained using an upscaled model (low resolution). Several formulations of the multirate mass transfer model, which differ in the type of memory function (single rate, double rate, and truncated power law), are used as a constitutive transport equation. The large-scale scenario represents a simplified model obtained by partially homogenizing the reference solution. Results show that the double-rate and the truncated power law mass transfer models are capable of properly describing the ensemble average behavior of the main features associated with the integrated breakthrough curves. However, the uncertainty associated with the upscaled mass transfer models was substantially smaller than that attributed to the reference solution. Importantly, the cumulative distribution function of concentrations associated with the upscaled model follows a distribution similar to the reference solution but with smaller statistical dispersion. The reason is that while appropriate memory functions can be used to preserve the residence time distribution of mass particles during upscaling, the lack of memory in space prevents the model from reproducing mass fluxes in all directions. Specifically, the reproduction of mass

  19. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  20. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation. PMID:25035491

  1. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering. PMID:27176431

  3. Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin; Sun, Yu; Riva, Ricardo; Ran, Jiangjun

    2013-04-01

    Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has enormously extended our knowledge of the Earth's system by allowing natural mass transport of various origin to be quantified. This concerns, in particular, the depletion and replenishment of continental water stocks; shrinking of polar ice sheets; deformation of the Earth's crust triggered by large earthquakes, and isostatic adjustment processes. A number of research centers compute models of temporal gravity field variations and mass transport, using GRACE data as input. One of such models - Delft Mass Transport model - is being produced at the Delft University of Technology in collaboration with the GNSS Research Center of Wuhan University. A new release of this model, DMT-2, has been produced on the basis of a new (second) release of GRACE level-1b data. This model consists of a time-series of monthly solutions spanning a time interval of more than 8 years, starting from Feb. 2003. Each solution consists of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 120. Both unconstrained and optimally filtered solutions are obtained. The most essential improvements of the DMT-2 model, as compared to its predecessors (DMT-1 and DMT-1b), are as follows: (i) improved estimation and elimination of low-frequency noise in GRACE data, so that strong mass transport signals are not damped; (ii) computation of accurate stochastic models of data noise for each month individually with a subsequent application of frequency-dependent data weighting, which allows statistically optimal solutions to be compiled even if data noise is colored and gradually changes in time; (iii) optimized estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters; (iv) incorporation of degree 1 coefficients estimated with independent techniques; (v) usage of state-of-the-art background models to de-alias GRACE data from rapid mass transport signals (this includes the EOT11a model of ocean tides and the latest release of the AOD1B product describing

  4. Modelling coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Croisé, J.; Altmann, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemico-osmosis is a recognized phenomenon taking place in clay mineral-rich sedimentary formations and a number of questions have been raised concerning its potential effects on pressure fields in and around underground radioactive waste repositories installed in such formations. Certain radioactive waste packages contain large quantities of nitrate salts whose release might result in the presence of highly concentrated salt solutions in the disposal cells, during their resaturation after closure of the facility. This would lead to large solute concentration gradients within the formation's porewater which could then potentially induce significant chemico-osmotic fluxes. In this paper, we assess the impact of chemico-osmotic fluxes on the water pressure during the post-closure period of a typical disposal cell for intermediate-level, long-lived bituminised radioactive waste in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay formation. A numerical model of chemico-osmotic water flow and solute transport has been developed based on the work of Bader and Kooi (2005) [5], and including Bresler's dependence of osmotic efficiency on concentration and compaction state [9]. Model validity has been extended to highly concentrated solutions by incorporating a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, based on the Pitzer's equations. Results show that due to the strong dependence of the osmotic coefficient on concentration, the impact of chemico-osmosis on water flow and on the pressure field around the disposal cell is relatively low. A maximum overpressure of the order of 1 MPa was obtained. No difference in the simulation results were noticed for disposal cell solutions having concentrations higher than 1 M NaNO3. Differences between simulations were found to be almost entirely due to Bresler's relationship i.e., the model of the dependence between osmotic efficiency and concentration, and only slightly on the activity coefficient correction. Questions remain regarding the appropriate

  5. Designing for chaos: applications of chaotic advection at the microscale: One contribution of 11 to a Theme 'Transport and mixing at the microscale'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremler, Mark A.; Haselton, F. R.; Aref, Hassan

    2004-05-01

    Chaotic advection can play an important role in efficient microfluidic mixers. We discuss a design paradigm that exploits chaotic advection and illustrate by two recent examples, namely enhancing gene expression profiling and constructing an in-line microfluidic mixing channel, how application of this paradigm has led to successful micromixers. We suggest that 'designing for chaos', that is, basing practical mixer design on chaotic advection analysis, is a promising approach to adopt in this developing field which otherwise has little to guide it and is constrained by issues of scale and manufacturability.

  6. Photoinduced mass transport in azo compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klismeta, K.; Teteris, J.; Aleksejeva, J.

    2013-12-01

    The photoinduced changes of optical properties in azobenzene containing compound thin films were studied under influence of polarized and non-polarized 532 nm laser light. Under influence of light azo compounds experience trans-cis isomerisation process, that can be observed in the absorbance spectrum of the sample. If the light is linearly polarized, molecules align perpendicularly to the electric field vector and as a result photoinduced dichroism and birefringence is obtained. If a known lateral polarization modulation of the light beam is present, mass transport of the azobenzene containing compound occurs. By measuring the surface relief with a profilometer the direction of mass transport can be determined. The studies of this work show that direct holographic recording of surface relief gratings can be used in optoelectronics, telecommunications and data storage.

  7. A Study on the Effect of Fracture Aperture Variability on Advective Transport in aFractured Shale using Discrete Fracture Network Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Gable, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    's Manual: A Massively Parallel Reactive Flow andTransport Model for describing Surface and Subsurface Processes, 2014. [3] Makedonska N., Painter S.L., Karra S., and Gable C.W., NumericalExperiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional DFNs,Abstract H53A-1398 ,2013, AGU, San-Francisco, CA, 9-13 Dec.

  8. Advection, diffusion, and delivery over a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Luke L. M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-08-01

    Many biological, geophysical, and technological systems involve the transport of a resource over a network. In this paper, we present an efficient method for calculating the exact quantity of the resource in each part of an arbitrary network, where the resource is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. The key conceptual step is to partition the resource into material that does or does not reach a node over a given time step. As an example application, we consider resource allocation within fungal networks, and analyze the spatial distribution of the resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, and such growth necessarily involves the movement of fluid. We develop a model of delivery in growing fungal networks, and find good empirical agreement between our model and experimental data gathered using radio-labeled tracers. Our results lead us to suggest that in foraging fungi, growth-induced mass flow is sufficient to account for long-distance transport, if the system is well insulated. We conclude that active transport mechanisms may only be required at the very end of the transport pathway, near the growing tips.

  9. Energy and mass transport in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Spencer, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    Examples illustrating the effects of large scale energy and mass transport in the thermosphere discussed include: (1) The seasonal variations reveal temperature, composition, and ionospheric anomalies involving energy exchange between the thermosphere and mesosphere. (2) The midnight temperature maximum in the thermosphere is interpreted as a signature of tidal waves emanating from the mesosphere and momentum coupling associated with ion drag. (3) The ionospheric storm in the F region illustrates the intricate effects of large scale atmospheric winds driven by magnetospheric energization processes. (4) Atmospheric signatures of Joule heating and electric field momentum coupling are markedly different.

  10. Lagrangian analysis of mixing and transport of water masses in the marine bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Ponomarev, V. I.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.; Fayman, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Lagrangian approach to studying the mixing and transport of a passive admixture in marine bays and gulfs based on the methods of a theory of dynamic systems is developed. This approach is employed to investigate the lateral mixing and transport of waters in the Peter the Great Bay, Japan Sea, using a velocity field of the predictive numerical hydrodynamic circulation model of a synoptic scale. It is shown that the Lagrangian characteristics, such as the maximum accumulated Lyapunov exponent, the time of particle stay in the bay, particle relative displacements, and the number of cyclonic and anticyclonic rotations, allow us to describe the movement of water masses, the character of mixing, and chaos in the Bay. In integrating the advection equations forward and backward in time, maps showing a number of particle arrivals to different regions of the Bay make it possible to establish corridors through which particles leave and enter the Bay.

  11. Modeling Arteriolar Flow and Mass Transport Using the Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, Kayne M.; Moore, Leon C.; Peskin, Charles S.; Pitman, E. Bruce; Layton, H. E.

    1998-12-01

    Flow in arterioles is determined by a number of interacting factors, including perfusion pressure, neural stimulation, vasoactive substances, the intrinsic contractility of arteriolar walls, and wall shear stress. We have developed a two-dimensional model of arteriolar fluid flow and mass transport. The model includes a phenomenological representation of the myogenic response of the arteriolar wall, in which an increase in perfusion pressure stimulates vasoconstriction. The model also includes the release, advection, diffusion, degradation, and dilatory action of nitric oxide (NO), a potent, but short-lived, vasodilatory agent. Parameters for the model were taken primarily from the experimental literature of the rat renal afferent arteriole. Solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were approximated by means of a splitting that used upwind differencing for the inertial term and a spectral method for the viscous term and incompressibility condition. The immersed boundary method was used to include the forces arising from the arteriolar walls. The advection of NO was computed by means of a high-order flux-corrected transport scheme; the diffusion of NO was computed by a spectral solver. Simulations demonstrated the efficacy of the numerical methods employed, and grid refinement studies confirmed anticipated first-order temporal convergence and demonstrated second-order spatial convergence in key quantities. By providing information about the effective width of the immersed boundary and sheer stress magnitude near that boundary, the grid refinement studies indicate the degree of spatial refinement required for quantitatively reliable simulations. Owing to the dominating effect of NO advection, relative to degradation and diffusion, simulations indicate that NO has the capacity to produce dilation along the entire length of the arteriole.

  12. VAC: Versatile Advection Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; Keppens, Rony

    2012-07-01

    The Versatile Advection Code (VAC) is a freely available general hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulation software that works in 1, 2 or 3 dimensions on Cartesian and logically Cartesian grids. VAC runs on any Unix/Linux system with a Fortran 90 (or 77) compiler and Perl interpreter. VAC can run on parallel machines using either the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library or a High Performance Fortran (HPF) compiler.

  13. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  14. The relationship between seasonal variations of total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus in rainfall and air mass advection paths in Matsue, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Katsuhiro; Kamiya, Hiroshi; Kano, Yoshihiro; Saki, Yukiko; Yamamuro, Masumi; Ishitobi, Yu

    We collected rainwater samples from every rainfall in Matsue, Japan in order to study variations of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations over time. The seasonal average concentration by magnitude order of Total Nitrogen (here after T-N) was highest in winter, then in spring, fall, and summer and that of Total Phosphorus (here after T-P) was highest in spring, then in winter, fall, and summer. These seasonal variations were examined in relation to the transportation paths of arrived air masses by using a backward trajectory and rainfall patterns from a surface synoptic weather chart. In winter, continental air masses frequently flow from China or Siberia and the resultant winter rainfall is on many occasions of a continental type. In summer, maritime air masses frequently arrive from the Pacific Ocean and this resultant rainfall therefore was often of maritime type. Looking at average concentrations of T-N and T-P for each rainfall type, continental types were high range and maritime types were low. It was therefore concluded that the monthly average concentration of T-N was affected by continental air masses from northern China in winter and by maritime ones from the Pacific Ocean in summer. The maximum deposition of T-N was caused by this concentration in winter and rainfall depth in summer. Seasonal variation of T-P showed a different fluctuation tendency from T-N, with a maximum concentration in spring, and minimum in summer and fall. T-P was susceptible to the yellow sand phenomenon which maximised T-P deposition in spring.

  15. Laser speckle contrast imaging is sensitive to advective flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-07-01

    Unlike laser Doppler flowmetry, there has yet to be presented a clear description of the physical variables that laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is sensitive to. Herein, we present a theoretical basis for demonstrating that LSCI is sensitive to total flux and, in particular, the summation of diffusive flux and advective flux. We view LSCI from the perspective of mass transport and briefly derive the diffusion with drift equation in terms of an LSCI experiment. This equation reveals the relative sensitivity of LSCI to both diffusive flux and advective flux and, thereby, to both concentration and the ordered velocity of the scattering particles. We demonstrate this dependence through a short series of flow experiments that yield relationships between the calculated speckle contrast and the concentration of the scatterers (manifesting as changes in scattering coefficient), between speckle contrast and the velocity of the scattering fluid, and ultimately between speckle contrast and advective flux. Finally, we argue that the diffusion with drift equation can be used to support both Lorentzian and Gaussian correlation models that relate observed contrast to the movement of the scattering particles and that a weighted linear combination of these two models is likely the most appropriate model for relating speckle contrast to particle motion.

  16. Metamorphism during temperature gradient with undersaturated advective airflow in a snow sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography is applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Cold saturated air at the inlet was blown into the snow samples and warmed up while flowing across the sample with a temperature gradient of around 50 K m-1. Changes of the porous ice structure were observed at mid-height of the snow sample. Sublimation occurred due to the slight undersaturation of the incoming air into the warmer ice matrix. Diffusion of water vapor opposite to the direction of the temperature gradient counteracted the mass transport of advection. Therefore, the total net ice change was negligible leading to a constant porosity profile. However, the strong recrystallization of water molecules in snow may impact its isotopic or chemical content.

  17. Steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport, Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Daniel J.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Rattray, Gordon W.; Fisher, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The steady-state and transient flow models cover an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the 890 square miles of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Model results can be used in numerical simulations to evaluate the movement of contaminants in the aquifer. Saturated flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer was simulated using the MODFLOW-2000 groundwater flow model. Steady-state flow was simulated to represent conditions in 1980 with average streamflow infiltration from 1966-80 for the Big Lost River, the major variable inflow to the system. The transient flow model simulates groundwater flow between 1980 and 1995, a period that included a 5-year wet cycle (1982-86) followed by an 8-year dry cycle (1987-94). Specified flows into or out of the active model grid define the conditions on all boundaries except the southwest (outflow) boundary, which is simulated with head-dependent flow. In the transient flow model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress, and was variable in time and location. The models were calibrated by adjusting aquifer hydraulic properties to match simulated and observed heads or head differences using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. Various summary, regression, and inferential statistics, in addition to comparisons of model properties and simulated head to measured properties and head, were used to evaluate the model calibration. Model parameters estimated for the steady-state calibration included hydraulic conductivity for seven of nine hydrogeologic zones and a global value of vertical anisotropy. Parameters

  18. Coprecipitation in the barite isostructural family: 2. Numerical simulations of reactions and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen

    2004-08-01

    Coprecipitation of barite with trace constituents was simulated with consideration of aqueous speciation and complexation, mixing properties for the binary solid solutions (Zhu, this issue), precipitation and dissolution kinetics, and advective-dispersive transport. Speciation-solubility modeling was used to reproduce BaSO 4-RaSO 4 coprecipitation experimental results, and to calculate CrO 42- aqueous concentrations in equilibrium with a Ba(SO 4,CrO 4) solid solution. Kinetic reaction path modeling was used to simulate the coprecipitation of barite with RaSO 4 to form an onion-like chemically zoned solid upon the cooling of oil field brine. A one-dimensional coupled reactive mass transport model shows a strikingly different transport pattern for the tracer Ra 2+, when the dominant attenuation reaction is with solid solution (Ba, Ra) SO 4 as compared to the case when it is controlled by pure RaSO 4 and barite solids under local equilibrium conditions. A self-enrichment of Ra 2+ in the groundwater and aquifer solid matrix—higher concentrations of Ra 2+ downstream from the reaction front—results from the coprecipitation reaction and advective-dispersive transport. This self-enrichment process generates a secondary tracer source, which has tracer concentrations higher than that of the original source. On the other hand, coprecipitation reactions can reduce Ra 2+ concentrations in groundwater to a much lower level (below ppb) than that of pure RaSO 4(c) solubility (near ppm), which has been used to establish the Ra 2+ concentration limits in groundwater, soil, and nuclear waste repositories.

  19. Antidiffusive velocities for multipass donor cell advection

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.; Smolarkiewicz, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    Multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA) is an iterative process for approximating the advection equation, which uses a donor cell approximation to compensate for the truncation error of the originally specified donor cell scheme. This step may be repeated an arbitrary number of times, leading to successfully more accurate solutions to the advection equation. In this paper, the authors show how to sum the successive approximations analytically to find a single antidiffusive velocity that represents the effects of an arbitrary number of passes. The analysis is first done in one dimension to illustrate the method and then is repeated in two dimensions. The existence of cross terms in the truncation analysis of the two-dimensional equations introduces an extra complication into the calculation. The authors discuss the implementation of the antidiffusive velocities and provide some examples of applications, including a third-order accurate scheme.

  20. How to Find a Bug in Ten Thousand Lines Transport Solver? Outline of Experiences from AN Advection-Diffusion Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, K.; Bombardelli, F.

    2011-12-01

    Almost all natural phenomena on Earth are highly nonlinear. Even simplifications to the equations describing nature usually end up being nonlinear partial differential equations. Transport (ADR) equation is a pivotal equation in atmospheric sciences and water quality. This nonlinear equation needs to be solved numerically for practical purposes so academicians and engineers thoroughly rely on the assistance of numerical codes. Thus, numerical codes require verification before they are utilized for multiple applications in science and engineering. Model verification is a mathematical procedure whereby a numerical code is checked to assure the governing equation is properly solved as it is described in the design document. CFD verification is not a straightforward and well-defined course. Only a complete test suite can uncover all the limitations and bugs. Results are needed to be assessed to make a distinction between bug-induced-defect and innate limitation of a numerical scheme. As Roache (2009) said, numerical verification is a state-of-the-art procedure. Sometimes novel tricks work out. This study conveys the synopsis of the experiences we gained during a comprehensive verification process which was done for a transport solver. A test suite was designed including unit tests and algorithmic tests. Tests were layered in complexity in several dimensions from simple to complex. Acceptance criteria defined for the desirable capabilities of the transport code such as order of accuracy, mass conservation, handling stiff source term, spurious oscillation, and initial shape preservation. At the begining, mesh convergence study which is the main craft of the verification is performed. To that end, analytical solution of ADR equation gathered. Also a new solution was derived. In the more general cases, lack of analytical solution could be overcome through Richardson Extrapolation and Manufactured Solution. Then, two bugs which were concealed during the mesh convergence

  1. Stability and accuracy of a semi-implicit Godunov scheme for mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott F.

    2004-06-01

    Semi-implicit, Godunov-type models are adapted for solving the two-dimensional, time-dependent, mass transport equation on a geophysical scale. The method uses Van Leer's MUSCL reconstruction in conjunction with an explicit, predictor-corrector method to discretize and integrate the advection and lateral diffusion portions of the governing equation to second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. Three classical schemes are investigated for computing advection: Lax-Wendroff, Warming-Beam, and Fromm. The proposed method uses second order, centred finite differences to spatially discretize the diffusion terms. In order to improve model stability and efficiency, vertical diffusion is implicitly integrated with the Crank-Nicolson method and implicit treatment of vertical diffusion in the predictor is also examined. Semi-discrete and Von Neumann analyses are utilized to compare the stability as well as the amplitude and phase accuracy of the proposed method with other explicit and semi-implicit schemes. Some linear, two-dimensional examples are solved and predictions are compared with the analytical solutions. Computational effort is also examined to illustrate the improved efficiency of the proposed model.

  2. Construction of the SILAM Eulerian atmospheric dispersion model based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofiev, M.; Vira, J.; Kouznetsov, R.; Prank, M.; Soares, J.; Genikhovich, E.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the transport module of the System for Integrated modeLling of Atmospheric coMposition SILAM v.5 based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin. This advection routine, so far weakly presented in the international literature, is positively defined, stable at any Courant number, and efficient computationally. We present the rigorous description of its original version, along with several updates that improve its monotonicity and shape preservation, allowing for applications to long-living species in conditions of complex atmospheric flows. The scheme is connected with other parts of the model in a way that preserves the sub-grid mass distribution information that is a cornerstone of the advection algorithm. The other parts include the previously developed vertical diffusion algorithm combined with dry deposition, a meteorological pre-processor, and chemical transformation modules. The quality of the advection routine is evaluated using a large set of tests. The original approach has been previously compared with several classic algorithms widely used in operational dispersion models. The basic tests were repeated for the updated scheme and extended with real-wind simulations and demanding global 2-D tests recently suggested in the literature, which allowed one to position the scheme with regard to sophisticated state-of-the-art approaches. The advection scheme performance was fully comparable with other algorithms, with a modest computational cost. This work was the last project of Dr. Sci. Michael Galperin, who passed away on 18 March 2008.

  3. Non-Fickian transport and multiple-rate mass transfer in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Emmanuel, Simon; Scher, Harvey

    2008-03-01

    Non-Fickian behavior is due to a broad spectrum of rates limiting the solute transport. There are two generic mechanisms that can generate these spectra: the complex flow field of a highly heterogeneous medium and the mass exchange between a mobile phase and a distribution of immobile states. We have developed a physical model that incorporates both of these mechanisms into the continuous time random walk (CTRW) framework. We study their interacting dynamics as a function of the spectra of advective-diffusive transition times and exchange times and the relative separation of their respective time domains. Examples of interacting transport in a dispersive medium with immobile states include tracer migration in a random fracture network with matrix diffusion and transport in a porous medium with adsorption/desorption sites. To date, non-Fickian transport has been quantified effectively using the CTRW in a wide variety of porous and fractured geological formations. The basis of the CTRW framework is the portrayal of transport as a sequence of transition rates (e.g., between pore spaces, fracture intersections) and the incorporation of the full spectrum of these rates into the transport equations. The emphasis herein is on systems in which the time domains of the two different types of spectra are distinguishable, so that a more complete characterization of the transport can be obtained (i.e., rather than lumping all the rates together). Experimental data are analyzed from two of these systems: (1) tracer transport in a fractured shear zone and (2) sorbing species transported through a heterogeneous porous domain. The CTRW framework is found to produce excellent fits to and predictions from the experimental data.

  4. GROUNDWATER MASS TRANSPORT AND EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR MULTICOMPONENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass transport model, TRANQL, for a multicomponent solution system has been developed. The equilibrium interaction chemistry is posed independently of the mass transport equations which leads to a set of algebraic equations for the chemistry coupled to a set of differential equ...

  5. Concentration through large advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleja, D.; López-Gómez, J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we extend the elegant results of Chen, Lam and Lou [6, Section 2], where a concentration phenomenon was established as the advection blows up, to a general class of adventive-diffusive generalized logistic equations of degenerate type. Our improvements are really sharp as we allow the carrying capacity of the species to vanish in some subdomain with non-empty interior. The main technical devices used in the derivation of the concentration phenomenon are Proposition 3.2 of Cano-Casanova and López-Gómez [5], Theorem 2.4 of Amann and López-Gómez [1] and the classical Harnack inequality. By the relevance of these results in spatial ecology, complete technical details seem imperative, because the proof of Theorem 2.2 of [6] contains some gaps originated by an “optimistic” use of Proposition 3.2 of [5]. Some of the general assumptions of [6] are substantially relaxed.

  6. Modeling the adsorption of Cr(III) from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass: study of the advective and dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Romero-González, J; Walton, J C; Peralta-Videa, J R; Rodríguez, E; Romero, J; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2009-01-15

    The biosorption of Cr(III) onto packed columns of Agave lechuguilla was analyzed using an advective-dispersive (AD) model and its analytical solution. Characteristic parameters such as axial dispersion coefficients, retardation factors, and distribution coefficients were predicted as functions of inlet ion metal concentration, time, flow rate, bed density, cross-sectional column area, and bed length. The root-mean-square-error (RMSE) values 0.122, 0.232, and 0.285 corresponding to the flow rates of 1, 2, and 3 (10(-3))dm3min(-1), respectively, indicated that the AD model provides an excellent approximation of the simulation of lumped breakthrough curves for the adsorption of Cr(III) by lechuguilla biomass. Therefore, the model can be used for design purposes to predict the effect of varying operational conditions. PMID:18462882

  7. Application of Paramagnetically Tagged Molecules for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Biofilm Mass Transport Processes▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, B.; Holmes, W. M.; Sloan, W. T.; Phoenix, V. R.

    2010-01-01

    Molecules become readily visible by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when labeled with a paramagnetic tag. Consequently, MRI can be used to image their transport through porous media. In this study, we demonstrated that this method could be applied to image mass transport processes in biofilms. The transport of a complex of gadolinium and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), a commercially available paramagnetic molecule, was imaged both in agar (as a homogeneous test system) and in a phototrophic biofilm. The images collected were T1 weighted, where T1 is an MRI property of the biofilm and is dependent on Gd-DTPA concentration. A calibration protocol was applied to convert T1 parameter maps into concentration maps, thus revealing the spatially resolved concentrations of this tracer at different time intervals. Comparing the data obtained from the agar experiment with data from a one-dimensional diffusion model revealed that transport of Gd-DTPA in agar was purely via diffusion, with a diffusion coefficient of 7.2 × 10−10 m2 s−1. In contrast, comparison of data from the phototrophic biofilm experiment with data from a two-dimensional diffusion model revealed that transport of Gd-DTPA inside the biofilm was by both diffusion and advection, equivalent to a diffusion coefficient of 1.04 × 10−9 m2 s−1. This technology can be used to further explore mass transport processes in biofilms, either by using the wide range of commercially available paramagnetically tagged molecules and nanoparticles or by using bespoke tagged molecules. PMID:20435773

  8. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  9. Mass-conservative reconstruction of Galerkin velocity fields for transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudeler, C.; Putti, M.; Paniconi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate calculation of mass-conservative velocity fields from numerical solutions of Richards' equation is central to reliable surface-subsurface flow and transport modeling, for example in long-term tracer simulations to determine catchment residence time distributions. In this study we assess the performance of a local Larson-Niklasson (LN) post-processing procedure for reconstructing mass-conservative velocities from a linear (P1) Galerkin finite element solution of Richards' equation. This approach, originally proposed for a-posteriori error estimation, modifies the standard finite element velocities by imposing local conservation on element patches. The resulting reconstructed flow field is characterized by continuous fluxes on element edges that can be efficiently used to drive a second order finite volume advective transport model. Through a series of tests of increasing complexity that compare results from the LN scheme to those using velocity fields derived directly from the P1 Galerkin solution, we show that a locally mass-conservative velocity field is necessary to obtain accurate transport results. We also show that the accuracy of the LN reconstruction procedure is comparable to that of the inherently conservative mixed finite element approach, taken as a reference solution, but that the LN scheme has much lower computational costs. The numerical tests examine steady and unsteady, saturated and variably saturated, and homogeneous and heterogeneous cases along with initial and boundary conditions that include dry soil infiltration, alternating solute and water injection, and seepage face outflow. Typical problems that arise with velocities derived from P1 Galerkin solutions include outgoing solute flux from no-flow boundaries, solute entrapment in zones of low hydraulic conductivity, and occurrences of anomalous sources and sinks. In addition to inducing significant mass balance errors, such manifestations often lead to oscillations in concentration

  10. LAYER DEPENDENT ADVECTION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advection methods used in CMAQ require that the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition be satisfied for numerical stability and accuracy. In CMAQ prior to version 4.3, the ADVSTEP algorithm established CFL-safe synchronization and advection timesteps that were uniform throu...

  11. Electric current induced forward and anomalous backward mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somaiah, Nalla; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Multilayered test samples were fabricated in form of standard Blech structure, where W was used as the interlayer between SiO2 substrate and Cu film. Electromigration test was performed at 250 °C by passing an electric current with a nominal density of 3.9  ×  1010 A m‑2. In addition to the regular electromigration induced mass transport ensuing from the cathode towards the anode, we also observed anomalous mass transport from the anode to the cathode, depleting Cu from the anode as well. We propose an electromigration-thermomigration coupling based reasoning to explain the observed mass transport.

  12. Mass balance model of source apportionment, transport and fate of PAHs in Lac Saint Louis, Quebec.

    PubMed

    Mackay, D; Hickie, B

    2000-09-01

    A mass balance model has been developed and calibrated to describe the sources, transport and fate of seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, chrysene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) in the water and sediments of, and atmosphere over Lac Saint Louis, Quebec. The model uses specified input rates from background advective flows and emissions from the Alcan aluminum smelting facility at Beauharnois to deduce atmospheric concentrations and rates of wet and dry deposition to the three segment lake. Concentrations in water and sediment as well as relevant mass fluxes and residence times are computed and compared satisfactorily with monitoring data for five of the seven PAHs. Underestimation of concentrations for anthracene and phenanthrene is attributed to unquantified additional sources. The sources of the PAH burden in the lake are apportioned, and the implications of these results are discussed including likely response times to changes in loadings. It is suggested that this mass balance approach is more widely applicable to situations in which water bodies are impacted by a variety of contaminant sources. PMID:10834368

  13. Mass transport by mode-2 internal solitary-like waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepwell, David; Stastna, Marek

    2016-05-01

    We present the first three-dimensional numerical simulations of the mass transport capabilities of mode-2 waves formed by a lock-release mechanism with both single and double pycnocline stratifications. Single pycnoclines and double pycnoclines with a small spacing between the pycnocline centres were found to exhibit large Lee instabilities which formed during the collapse of the intermediate density region. These instabilities led to the generation of vorticity dipoles across the mid-depth, and thereby contributed to the reduction in the mass transported by the wave. A double pycnocline with a separation of approximately 12% of the depth between the two pycnocline centres was found to transport a passive tracer optimally for the longest time-period. Increasing Schmidt number correlated with increasing mass transport, while decreasing the tracer diffusivity led to increasing mass transport, but only when a trapped core existed. Contrasted two-dimensional simulations reveal that in certain cases, most noticeably the optimal transport case, the mass transport is significantly different from the corresponding three-dimensional simulation.

  14. MODELLING SEDIMENT TRANSPORT FOR THE LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sediment transport model is one component of the overall ensemble of models being developed for the Lake Michigan Mass Balance. The SEDZL model is being applied to simulate the fine-grained sediment transport in Lake Michigan for the 1982-1983 and 1994-1995 periods. Model perf...

  15. Mass Transportation Operators' Beliefs about Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Pamela A.

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated 171 mass transit operators' beliefs about blindness and the factors that may influence their beliefs. There were statistically significant differences among transit operators' beliefs on the basis of the operators' ethnicity. White participants had significantly fewer irrational beliefs about blindness than Hispanic and…

  16. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D advection model towards large-scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2015-02-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric advection model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach for advection was chosen to ensure mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to reduce the memory footprint and enable effective parallel performances. In addition, a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the advection scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on algebraic test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred cores.

  17. Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress Due to Interdisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, Jürgen; Klemann, Volker; Sneeuw, Nico

    2014-11-01

    This Special Issue on "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress due to Interdisciplinary Research" reports a number of findings resulting from a collaborative effort run from 2006 until 2013, in the framework of the DFG Priority Program 1257 "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System". Contributions have been arranged along five lines, i.e. (1) improvements in geodesy: satellite mass monitoring through gravimetry and altimetry, (2) applications in large-scale hydrology, (3) applications in solid Earth research, (4) applications in cryospheric research, (5) applications in ocean sciences.

  18. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  19. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack C.; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  20. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  1. Advection, diffusion and delivery over a network

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Luke L.M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological, geophysical and technological systems involve the transport of resource over a network. In this paper we present an algorithm for calculating the exact concentration of resource at any point in space or time, given that the resource in the network is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. We consider the implications of advection, diffusion and delivery for simple models of glucose delivery through a vascular network, and conclude that in certain circumstances, increasing the volume of blood and the number of glucose transporters can actually decrease the total rate of glucose delivery. We also consider the case of empirically determined fungal networks, and analyze the distribution of resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, which necessarily involves the movement of fluid. In three empirically determined fungal networks we found that the minimum currents consistent with the observed growth would effectively transport resource throughout the network over the time-scale of growth. This suggests that in foraging fungi, the active transport mechanisms observed in the growing tips may not be required for long range transport. PMID:23005783

  2. Understanding of relationship between the average mass transport rate and the moments of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Niibori, Y.; Tochiyama, O.; Chida, T.

    1999-07-01

    To estimate the transport rate of radionuclides in the geosphere, one must consider the spatial variability of permeability. However, the borehole data of permeability are limited and one can not determine the type of probability density function, though the measurement data reflect the most significant hydraulic properties about geologic media including innumerable cracks or fast flow paths. While the recent models describing radioactive nuclide transport in near/far-field have assumed a certain probability density function (typically a lognormal distribution) as a permeability distribution, one cannot always obtain sufficient measurement data to define the function. However, the available data of permeability at give one the moments such as the arithmetic mean, the standard deviation and the skewness for the distribution. The purpose of this paper is to get an understanding of the general relationship between the average mass transport rates and the moments. Using various types of probability density functions and pseudo random-numbers, hypothetical permeability distributions are generated. With these distributions, this paper obtains the average transport rates described as the numerical impulse-response based on the advection-dispersion model for a two-dimensional region. The calculated results show that, for the dimensionless standard deviation up to around 1, the three moments are enough to characterize the permeability distribution for the purposes of the nuclide transport prediction. In this work, for five specified probability density functions, the upper and lower bounds of skewness are derived as a function of the dimensionless arithmetic mean and standard deviation. The obtained upper and lower bounds explicitly show that the Bernoulli trials (a discrete probability density function) yield the widest range in the skewness against the standard deviation. since the response has lower peak and longer tail as the skewness goes to the lower bound value, the

  3. Mass-Transport Properties In Growth Of Crystals From Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1992-01-01

    Brief report summarizes results of experimental and theoretical studies of mass-transport properties of GeSe/Gel4 and Hg0.8Cd0.2Te systems in connection with growth of crystals in closed ampoules. Primary emphasis in studies was on thermochemical analyses, on development of mathematical models to predict diffusion-limited mass transport, and on comparison of theoretically predicted with experimental fluxes. Results applied to design, preparation, performance, and analysis of crystal-growth experiments of semiconducting materials on Earth and in outer space. Model extended to predict mass flux and overall composition of transport products of Hg0.8Cd0.2Te transport system.

  4. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  5. Lithium mass transport in ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, P.E.; Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this activity is to measure the lithium vaporization from lithium oxide breeder material under differing temperature and moisture partial pressure conditions. Lithium ceramics are being investigated for use as tritium breeding materials. The lithium is readily converted to tritium after reacting with a neutron. With the addition of 1000 ppM H{sub 2} to the He purge gas, the bred tritium is readily recovered from the blanket as HT and HTO above 400{degree}C. Within the solid, tritium may also be found as LiOT which may transport lithium to cooler parts of the blanket. The pressure of LiOT(g), HTO(g), or T{sub 2}O(g) above Li{sub 2}O(s) is the same as that for reactions involving hydrogen. In our experiments we were limited to the use of hydrogen. The purpose of this work is to investigate the transport of LiOH(g) from the blanket material. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. NATURAL GRADIENT EXPERIMENT ON SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A SAND AQUIFER. 2. SPATIAL MOMENTS AND THE ADVECTION AND DISPERSION OF NONREACTIVE TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three-dimensional movement of a tracer plume containing bromide and chloride is investigated using the data base from a large-scale natural gradient field experiment on groundwater solute transport. The analysis focuses on the zeroth-, first-, and second-order spatial moments...

  7. Mass transport limitation in implantable defibrillator batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Tam, G.; Scott, E.; Norton, J.; Chen, K.

    Using cells with lithium reference electrodes, the power-limiting behavior in the lithium-SVO cell was shown to be due to a rapid voltage transition at the anode. A novel test cell was developed to explore the influence of current density, bulk LiAsF 6 concentration, separator type and separator proximity to the anode on the time to onset ( τ) of the anode polarization. The results were found to follow a relationship, iτ1/2∝ Cbulk, consistent with the Sand equation. This relationship also predicts that the critical concentration of LiAsF 6, at which onset of the anode polarization occurs, is near the solubility limit of LiAsF 6 in our system (around 3.5-4.0 M). This general phenomenon was found to be quantitatively similar for two dissimilar separator types, and the anode polarization could also be induced in the absence of separator at high concentration and current density. However, it appears that τ decreases with closer proximity of the separator to the anode surface (i.e. cell stack pressure), suggesting that the effect of separator is to inhibit convective transport to and from the Li surface.

  8. Frontiers in Cancer Nanomedicine: Directing Mass Transport through Biological Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The physics of mass transport within body compartments and across biological barriers differentiates cancers from healthy tissues. Variants of nanoparticles can be manufactured in combinatorially large sets, varying only one transport-affecting design parameter at a time. Nanoparticles can also be used as building blocks for systems that perform sequences of coordinated actions, in accordance to a prescribed logic. These are referred to as Logic-Embedded Vectors “(LEV)” in the following. Nanoparticles and LEVs are ideal probes for the determination of mass transport laws in tumors, acting as imaging contrast enhancers, and can be employed for the lesion-selective delivery of therapy. Their size, shape, density and surface chemistry dominate convective transport in the blood stream, margination, cell adhesion, selective cellular uptake, as well as sub-cellular trafficking and localization. As argued here, the understanding of transport differentials in cancer, termed ‘transport oncophysics’ unveils a new promising frontier in oncology: the development of lesion-specific delivery particulates that exploit mass transport differentials to deploy treatment of greater efficacy and reduced side effects. PMID:20079548

  9. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  10. Advection and diffusion in shoreline change prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Frazer, L. N.

    2010-12-01

    We added longshore advection and diffusion to the simple cross-shore rate calculation method, as used widely by the USGS and others, to model historic shorelines and to predict future shoreline positions; and applied this to Hawaiian Island beach data. Aerial photographs, sporadically taken throughout the past century, yield usable, albeit limited, historic shoreline data. These photographs provide excellent spatial coverage, but poor temporal resolution, of the shoreline. Due to the sparse historic shoreline data, and the many natural and anthropogenic events influencing coastlines, we constructed a simplistic shoreline change model that can identify long-term behavior of a beach. Our new, two-dimensional model combines the simple rate method to accommodate for cross-shore sediment transport with the classic Pelnard-Considère model for diffusion, as well as a longshore advection speed term. Inverse methods identify cross-shore rate, longshore advection speed, and longshore diffusivity down a sandy coastline. A spatial averaging technique then identifies shoreline segments where one parameter can reasonably account for the cross-shore and longshore transport rates in that area. This produces model results with spatial resolution more appropriate to the temporal spacing of the data. Because changes in historic data can be accounted for by varying degrees of cross-shore and longshore sediment transport - for example, beach erosion can equally be explained by sand moving either off-shore or laterally - we tested several different model scenarios on the data: allowing only cross-shore sediment movement, only longshore movement, and a combination of the two. We used statistical information criteria to determine both the optimal spatial resolution and best-fitting scenario. Finally, we employed a voting method predicting the relaxed shoreline position over time.

  11. Diffusion mass transport in liquid phase epitaxial growth of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, S.; Qin, Z.; Kimura, M.

    1996-12-01

    A numerical simulation model for the mass transport occurring during the liquid phase epitaxial growth of AlGaAs is presented. The mass transport equations in the liquid and solid phases, and the relationships between concentrations and temperature obtained from the phase diagram constitute the governing equations. These equations together with appropriate interface and boundary conditions were solved numerically by the Finite Element Method. Numerical results show the importance of diffusion into the solid phase, affecting the composition of grown layers. Simulation results agree with experiments.

  12. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments with Confined Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Flow visualization studies showed four major shear regions occurring; a wake region immediately downstream of the inlet jet inlet duct; a shear region further downstream between the inner and annular jets; a recirculation zone; and a reattachment zone. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two color laser velocimeter (LV) system. Axial, radial and azimuthal velocities and turbulent momentum transport rate measurements in the r-z and r-theta planes were used to determine the mean value, second central moment (or rms fluctuation from mean), skewness and kurtosis for each data set probability density function (p.d.f.). A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained system. Velocity and mass transport in all three directions as well as concentration distributions were used to obtain the mean, second central moments, skewness and kurtosis for each p.d.f. These LV/LIF measurements also exposed the existence of a large region of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport in the region where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid.

  13. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  14. Degree-1 Surface Mass Transport and Geocenter Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The longest-wavelength and hemisphere asymmetric surface mass transport is characterized by three degree-one spherical harmonic components. Such mass transport modes cause geocenter motion between the center-of-mass of the total Earth system (CM) and the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface (CF), and deforms the solid Earth. GRACE's K-band ranging data system is not sensitive to these three variation modes. For a complete spherical harmonic spectral coverage of mass transport, degree-1 surface mass changes estimated through geocenter motion or degree-1 mass/deformation signatures from other space geodetic techniques should be combined with GRACE's time-variable gravity data. The degree-1 coefficients are critically important for mass variation assessments over large regions. For example, 1 mm error in geocenter motion can result in an error of 190 gigatons of global oceanic water mass change or, equivalently, an error of 0.5 mm of global mean sea level change when the geocenter motion is converted to degree-1 mass and combined with GRACE data. Yet, several different methods of geocenter motion estimation differ in results by more than 1 mm in annual amplitude. These differences have to be resolved after 13 years of successful GRACE operation. Recently, the difference between results from direct satellite laser ranging (SLR) determination and from a global inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) deformation measurements, GRACE, and an ocean bottom pressure (OBP) model has been largely reconciled as due to SLR's sparse station distribution. This result and our current efforts to examine possible systematic errors in GNSS data and the OBP model will be discussed along with a future perspective.

  15. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  16. A deterministic Lagrangian particle separation-based method for advective-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ken T. M.; Lee, Joseph H. W.; Choi, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    A simple and robust Lagrangian particle scheme is proposed to solve the advective-diffusion transport problem. The scheme is based on relative diffusion concepts and simulates diffusion by regulating particle separation. This new approach generates a deterministic result and requires far less number of particles than the random walk method. For the advection process, particles are simply moved according to their velocity. The general scheme is mass conservative and is free from numerical diffusion. It can be applied to a wide variety of advective-diffusion problems, but is particularly suited for ecological and water quality modelling when definition of particle attributes (e.g., cell status for modelling algal blooms or red tides) is a necessity. The basic derivation, numerical stability and practical implementation of the NEighborhood Separation Technique (NEST) are presented. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated through a series of test cases which embrace realistic features of coastal environmental transport problems. Two field application examples on the tidal flushing of a fish farm and the dynamics of vertically migrating marine algae are also presented.

  17. Numerical simulation of mass transport in internal solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salloum, Maher; Knio, Omar M.; Brandt, Alan

    2012-01-01

    A computational study of mass transport by large-amplitude, mode-2 internal solitary waves propagating on a pycnocline between two layers of different densities was conducted. The numerical model is based on the simulation of a vorticity-based formulation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq limit. Numerical experiments are conducted of the collapse of an initially mixed region, which leads to the generation of a train of internal solitary waves. The peak wave amplitude, a, is achieved by the leading wave, which encloses an intrusional bulge. The wave amplitude decays as it moves away from the collapsing mixing region. When the amplitude drops below a critical value, the wave is no longer able to transport mass and sharp-nosed intrusion is left behind. Mass transport by the leading wave, and by the trailing wave train and intrusion, is analyzed by tracking the motion of Lagrangian particles initially concentrated in the mixed region. Results indicate that for moderate wave amplitudes, a gradual decay in the wave amplitude occurs as the wave propagates, but the structure of the bulge is essentially maintained during this process. In contrast, for large-amplitude waves, the motion around the bulge is substantially more complex, exhibiting periodic shedding of vortex structures in the wake of the bulge and entrainment of external fluid into its core. It is shown that these motions have substantial impact on mass transport by the wave train, which is quantified through detailed analysis of the Lagrangian particle distributions.

  18. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  19. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  20. Mass transport by buoyant bubbles in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Edward C. D.; Babul, Arif; Pavlovski, Georgi; Bower, Richard G.; Dotter, Aaron

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the effect of three important processes by which active galactic nuclei (AGN)-blown bubbles transport material: drift, wake transport and entrainment. The first of these, drift, occurs because a buoyant bubble pushes aside the adjacent material, giving rise to a net upward displacement of the fluid behind the bubble. For a spherical bubble, the mass of upwardly displaced material is roughly equal to half the mass displaced by the bubble and should be ~ 107-9 Msolar depending on the local intracluster medium (ICM) and bubble parameters. We show that in classical cool-core clusters, the upward displacement by drift may be a key process in explaining the presence of filaments behind bubbles. A bubble also carries a parcel of material in a region at its rear, known as the wake. The mass of the wake is comparable to the drift mass and increases the average density of the bubble, trapping it closer to the cluster centre and reducing the amount of heating it can do during its ascent. Moreover, material dropping out of the wake will also contribute to the trailing filaments. Mass transport by the bubble wake can effectively prevent the buildup of cool material in the central galaxy, even if AGN heating does not balance ICM cooling. Finally, we consider entrainment, the process by which ambient material is incorporated into the bubble. Studies of observed bubbles show that they subtend an opening angle much larger than predicted by simple adiabatic expansion. We show that bubbles that entrain ambient material as they rise will expand faster than the adiabatic prediction; however, the entrainment rate required to explain the observed opening angle is large enough that the density contrast between the bubble and its surroundings would disappear rapidly. We therefore conclude that entrainment is unlikely to be a dominant mass transport process. Additionally, this also suggests that the bubble surface is much more stable against instabilities that promote

  1. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction.

  2. Characterizing saturated mass transport in fractured cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Alireza

    Concrete, when designed and constructed properly, is a durable material. However in aggressive environments concrete is prone to gradual deterioration which is due to penetration of water and aggressive agents (e.g., chloride ions) into concrete. As such, the rate of mass transport is the primary factor, controlling the durability of cementitious materials. Some level of cracking is inevitable in concrete due to brittle nature of the material. While mass transport can occur through concrete’s porous matrix, cracks can significantly accelerate the rate of mass transport and effectively influence the service life of concrete structures. To allow concrete service life prediction models to correctly account for the effect of cracks on concrete durability, mass transport thru cracks must be characterized. In this study, transport properties of cracks are measured to quantify the saturated hydraulic permeability and diffusion coefficient of cracks as a function of crack geometry (i.e.; crack width, crack tortuosity and crack wall roughness). Saturated permeability and diffusion coefficient of cracks are measured by constant head permeability test, electrical migration test, and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Plain and fiber reinforced cement paste and mortar as well as simulated crack samples are tested. The results of permeability test showed that the permeability of a crack is a function of crack width squared and can be predicted using Louis formula when crack tortuosity and surface roughness of the crack walls are accounted for. The results of the migration and impedance tests showed that the diffusion coefficient of the crack is not dependent on the crack width, but is primarily a function of volume fraction of cracks. The only parameter that is changing with the crack width is the crack connectivity. Crack connectivity was found to be linearly dependent on crack width for small crack and constant for large cracks (i.e.; approximately larger than 80 µm). The

  3. The role of mass transport in protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Otálora, Fermín; García-Caballero, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Mass transport takes place within the mesoscopic to macroscopic scale range and plays a key role in crystal growth that may affect the result of the crystallization experiment. The influence of mass transport is different depending on the crystallization technique employed, essentially because each technique reaches supersaturation in its own unique way. In the case of batch experiments, there are some complex phenomena that take place at the interface between solutions upon mixing. These transport instabilities may drastically affect the reproducibility of crystallization experiments, and different outcomes may be obtained depending on whether or not the drop is homogenized. In diffusion experiments with aqueous solutions, evaporation leads to fascinating transport phenomena. When a drop starts to evaporate, there is an increase in concentration near the interface between the drop and the air until a nucleation event eventually takes place. Upon growth, the weight of the floating crystal overcomes the surface tension and the crystal falls to the bottom of the drop. The very growth of the crystal then triggers convective flow and inhomogeneities in supersaturation values in the drop owing to buoyancy of the lighter concentration-depleted solution surrounding the crystal. Finally, the counter-diffusion technique works if, and only if, diffusive mass transport is assured. The technique relies on the propagation of a supersaturation wave that moves across the elongated protein chamber and is the result of the coupling of reaction (crystallization) and diffusion. The goal of this review is to convince protein crystal growers that in spite of the small volume of the typical protein crystallization setup, transport plays a key role in the crystal quality, size and phase in both screening and optimization experiments. PMID:26841759

  4. BUOYANT ADVECTION OF GASES IN UNSATURATED SOIL

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Gregory E.; Falta, Ronald W.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    In unsaturated soil, methane and volatile organic compounds can significantly alter the density of soil gas and induce buoyant gas flow. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a two-dimensional, homogeneous sand pack with gas permeabilities ranging from 110 to 3,000 darcy. Pure methane gas was injected horizontally into the sand and steady-state methane profiles were measured. Experimental results are in close agreement with a numerical model that represents the advective and diffusive components of methane transport. Comparison of simulations with and without gravitational acceleration permits identification of conditions where buoyancy dominates methane transport. Significant buoyant flow requires a Rayleigh number greater than 10 and an injected gas velocity sufficient to overcome dilution by molecular diffusion near the source. These criteria allow the extension of laboratory results to idealized field conditions for methane as well as denser-than-air vapors produced by volatilizing nonaqueous phase liquids trapped in unsaturated soil. PMID:20396624

  5. The negative role of turbulence in estuarine mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes Vaz, Richard A.; Lennon, Geoffrey W.; de Silva Samarasinghe, Jayantha R.

    1989-04-01

    It is competition between the various stratifying and mixing influences which determines the character of stratification in an estuary. Borrowing concepts which have been successfully applied to the discussion of stratification in shelf seas, a quantitative basis for determining the potential energy associated with vertical structure in estuaries is derived. The formulation, along similar lines to that of Bowden (1981), provides a simple but comprehensive method of incorporating many relevant stratifying and mixing influences in a given problem, and is also shown to be capable of rearrangement into forms akin to the estuarine Richardson number which is commonly found in discussions of estuarine statification. The paper argues, based on a survey of the literature, that in wide, relatively well-mixed estuaries, the greatest longitudinal mass flux occurs at times when stratification is most developed, that is, when the turbulent kinetic energy in the water column is at a minimum. Modulation of turbulence, principally at various tidal frequencies, causes a pulsing of the mass flux in which the contribution of each pulse increases non-linearly as the period of the modulation increases. Some, possibly significant, changes to the state of stratification and to the corresponding mass transport may occur in association with slack water periods. However, the spring-neap cycle is proposed to have a far greater influence on stratification, mass transport and the long-term mass balance in estuaries, and recent observational studies lend support to this position.

  6. Advective Mechanisms in Tree Island Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S.

    2002-05-01

    Tree islands are important landscape features in the Florida Everglades. Tres islands are formed of peat deposited on the shallow limestone bedrock, and have been stressed as the system has changed in response to anthropogenic activities due to the sensitivity of organic soils to hydrologic cycles. The plume shape aligned with flow direction for typical tree islands is characteristic of advective transport, despite the rather low flow velocities in the system. Hypothesized mechanisms for the plume shape include sediment transport downstream from the head of the island (often anchored by a bedrock rise), or nutrient transport downstream allowing plants to produce more sediments in situ. Understanding mechanisms controlling tree island shape will aid in understanding the response of tree islands to hydrologic management. An integrated system of field, laboratory, and modeling studies is underway, with the first effort aimed at bounding the importance of the simpler sediment transport processes before tackling more-complex nutrient transport processes. The numerical model integrating the field and laboratory efforts is a 3D finite volume model considering water flow in the shallow groundwater/surface-water system together with sediment transport. The model can account for variable vegetative resistance through the flow column, including the important case where a dense mat forms at the surface. Model components specific for this system and associated data requirements are presented.

  7. Coping with model uncertainty in data assimilation using optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, L.; Carli, F. P.; Ebtehaj, M.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Georgiou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Most data assimilation methods address the problem of optimally combining model predictions with observations in the presence of zero-mean Gaussian random errors. However, in many hydro-meteorological applications uncertainty in model parameters and/or model structure often result in systematic errors (bias). Examples include the prediction of precipitation or land surface fluxes at the wrong location and/or timing due to a drift in the model, unknown initial conditions, or non-additive error amplification. Existing bias-aware data assimilation methods require characterization of the bias in terms of a well-defined set of parameters or removal of bias, which is not always feasible. Here we present a new variational data assimilation framework to cope with model bias in a non-parametric fashion via an appropriate 'regularization' of the state evolution dynamics. In the context of weak-constraint 4D-VAR, our method can be seen as enforcing a minimum nonlinear distance (regularization or correction) in the evolution of the state so as to reconcile measurements with errors in the model dynamics. While a quadratic functional is typically sufficient to quantify errors in measurements, errors in state evolution is most naturally quantified by a transportation metric (Wasserstein metric) originating in the theory of Optimal Mass Transport (OMT). The proposed framework allows the use of additional regularization functionals, such as the L1-norm regularization of the state in an appropriately chosen domain, as recently introduced by the authors for states that exhibit sparsity and non-Gaussian priors, such as precipitation and soil moisture. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed method using as an example the 1-D and 2-D advection diffusion equation with systematic errors in the velocity and diffusivity parameters. Extension to real world data assimilation settings is currently under way.

  8. Mass transfer model of nanoparticle-facilitated contaminant transport in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Johari, Wan Lutfi Wan; Diamessis, Peter J; Lion, Leonard W

    2010-02-01

    A one-dimensional model has been evaluated for transport of hydrophobic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, facilitated by synthetic amphiphilic polyurethane (APU) nanoparticles in porous media. APU particles synthesized from poly(ethylene glycol)-modified urethane acrylate (PMUA) precursor chains have been shown to enhance the desorption rate and mobility of phenanthrene (PHEN) in soil. A reversible process governed by attachment and detachment rates was considered to describe the PMUA binding in soil in addition to PMUA transport through advection and dispersion. Ultimately, an irreversible second-order PMUA attachment rate in which the fractional soil saturation capacity with PMUA was a rate control was found to be adequate to describe the retention of PMUA particles. A gamma-distributed site model (GS) was used to describe the spectrum of physical/chemical constraints for PHEN transfer from solid to aqueous phases. Instantaneous equilibrium was assumed for PMUA-PHEN interactions. The coupled model for PMUA and PHEN behavior successfully described the enhanced elution profile of PHEN by PMUA. Sensitivity analysis was performed to analyze the significance of model parameters on model predictions. The adjustable parameter alpha in the gamma-distribution shapes the contaminant desorption distribution profile as well as elution and breakthrough curves. Model simulations show the use of PMUA can be also expected to improve the release rate of PHEN in soils with higher organic carbon content. The percentage removal of PHEN mass over time is shown to be influenced by the concentration of PMUA added and this information can be used to optimize cost and time require to accomplish a desired remediation goal. PMID:19406449

  9. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications.

  10. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  11. Miocene mass-transport sediments, Troodos Massif, Cyprus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lord, A.R.; Harrison, R.W.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Stone, B.D.; Varol, O.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment mass-transport layers of submarine origin on the northern and southern flanks of the Troodos ophiolitic massif are dated biostratigraphically as early Miocene and late Miocene, respectively and therefore represent different seismogenic events in the uplift and erosional history of the Troodos terrane. Analysis of such events has potential for documenting Miocene seismic and uplift events regionally in the context of changing stress field directions and plate vectors through time. ?? 2009 The Geologists' Association.

  12. Rotational hydrodynamic diffusion system to study mass transport across boundaries.

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Sai Sree; Meas, Bo; Farhat, Tarek R

    2008-11-01

    The design and operation of a new mass transport technique is presented. Rotational hydrodynamic diffusion system (RHDS) is a method that can be adapted for analytical laboratory analysis as well as industrial-scale separation and purification. Although RHDS is not an electrochemical technique, its concept is derived from hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode voltammetry. A diffusion advantage gained using the RHDS is higher flux of probe molecules across the boundary (e.g., membrane or porous media) with increased rotation rate compared to the static two-half-cell (THC) method. The separation concept of RHDS differs from pressurized, agitated, electrodialysis, and reversed osmosis systems in design and theory. The detection mechanism of the RHDS opens the possibility to study mass transport properties of a large variety of molecules using different types of ultrathin membranes. Therefore, the RHDS is a potential alternative to classical mass transport detection methods such as THC, impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. Theoretical analysis on the rotational hydrodynamic flux is derived and compared to experimental flux measured using HCl, KCl, KNO 3, Ni(NO 3) 2, LiCl, camphor sulfonic acid, and K 3Fe(CN) 6 ionic solutions. Values of effective diffusion coefficients of salts across Nucleopore membranes of thickness 6.0 and 10 mum with pore size 0.1 and 0.2 mum, respectively, are presented and discussed. PMID:18844370

  13. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Debaillon-Vesque, François P.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1–2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs. PMID:25192936

  14. Consistency problem with tracer advection in the Atmospheric Model GAMIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen

    2008-03-01

    The radon transport test, which is a widely used test case for atmospheric transport models, is carried out to evaluate the tracer advection schemes in the Grid-Point Atmospheric Model of IAP-LASG (GAMIL). Two of the three available schemes in the model are found to be associated with significant biases in the polar regions and in the upper part of the atmosphere, which implies potentially large errors in the simulation of ozone-like tracers. Theoretical analyses show that inconsistency exists between the advection schemes and the discrete continuity equation in the dynamical core of GAMIL and consequently leads to spurious sources and sinks in the tracer transport equation. The impact of this type of inconsistency is demonstrated by idealized tests and identified as the cause of the aforementioned biases. Other potential effects of this inconsistency are also discussed. Results of this study provide some hints for choosing suitable advection schemes in the GAMIL model. At least for the polar-region-concentrated atmospheric components and the closely correlated chemical species, the Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian advection scheme produces more reasonable simulations of the large-scale transport processes without significantly increasing the computational expense.

  15. ADVECTION INFLUENCES ON EVAPOTRANSPIRATION OF ALFALFA IN A SEMIARID ENVIRONMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advective enhancement of crop evapotranspiration (ET) occurs when drier, hotter air is transported into the crop by wind and can be an important factor in the water balance of irrigated crops in a semiarid climate. Thirteen days of moderate to extremely high ET rates of irrigated alfalfa (Medicago ...

  16. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  17. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  18. Modulated point-vortex pairs on a rotating sphere: Dynamics and chaotic advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drótos, Gábor; Tél, Tamás; Kovács, Gergely

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of modulated point-vortex pairs is investigated on a rotating sphere, where modulation is chosen to reflect the conservation of angular momentum (potential vorticity). For sufficiently close vortices (dipoles) the trajectories of their center-of-mass are shown to correspond to those of a point particle moving freely on a rotating sphere. For finite size vortex pairs, a qualitative similarity to the geodesic dynamics is found. The advection dynamics generated by vortex pairs on a rotating sphere is found to be chaotic. In the short time dynamics we point out a transition from closed to open chaotic advection, which implies that the transport properties of the flow might drastically be altered by changing the initial conditions of the pair on the sphere. Due to spherical topology, for long times, even the open advection patterns are found to gradually cross over to that corresponding to a homogeneous closed mixing. This pattern extends along a zonal band, whereas short term closed mixing remains always bounded to the moving pair.

  19. Modulated point-vortex pairs on a rotating sphere: dynamics and chaotic advection.

    PubMed

    Drótos, Gábor; Tél, Tamás; Kovács, Gergely

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of modulated point-vortex pairs is investigated on a rotating sphere, where modulation is chosen to reflect the conservation of angular momentum (potential vorticity). For sufficiently close vortices (dipoles) the trajectories of their center-of-mass are shown to correspond to those of a point particle moving freely on a rotating sphere. For finite size vortex pairs, a qualitative similarity to the geodesic dynamics is found. The advection dynamics generated by vortex pairs on a rotating sphere is found to be chaotic. In the short time dynamics we point out a transition from closed to open chaotic advection, which implies that the transport properties of the flow might drastically be altered by changing the initial conditions of the pair on the sphere. Due to spherical topology, for long times, even the open advection patterns are found to gradually cross over to that corresponding to a homogeneous closed mixing. This pattern extends along a zonal band, whereas short term closed mixing remains always bounded to the moving pair. PMID:23848782

  20. A global assessment of accelerations in surface mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Heflin, Michael B.

    2015-08-01

    Water mass transport in the Earth's dynamic surface layer of atmosphere, cryosphere, and hydrosphere driven by various global change processes has complex spatiotemporal patterns. Here we determine global patterns and regional mean values of accelerations in surface mass variations during the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission's data span from 2002.2 to 2015.0. GRACE gravity data are supplemented by surface deformation from 607 Global Navigation Satellite System stations, an ocean bottom pressure model, satellite laser ranging, and loose a priori knowledge on mass variation regimes incorporating high-resolution geographic boundaries. While Greenland and West Antarctica have strong negative accelerations, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean show significant positive accelerations. In addition, the accelerations are not constant in time with some regions showing considerable variability due to irregular interannual changes. No evidence of significant nonsteric mean sea level acceleration has been found, but the uncertainty is quite large.

  1. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  2. Modeling the spatial variability of dispersivity to deal with anomalous mass transport in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilla, J. E.; Sanchez Fuster, I.; Sanchez Barrero, L.

    2012-12-01

    The limitations of the classical Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) approach to model mass transport remain a subject of research. The term anomalous transport is usually applied when the ADE fails to reproduce real field or lab experiments tracer tests data. Some authors address this limitation using high-resolution heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) fields. Besides, the non-Fickian behavior of transport is another issue addressed. However, the effects of the spatial variability of dispersivity, and the influence of the model support scale on this property, have been rarely studied. The lack of experimental knowledge on the dispersivity behavior leads to model this basic parameter as an averaged calibrated parameter highly dependent on the model discretization size. In order to study the local behavior of the dispersivity a porous medium tank was designed and built at the Technical University of Valencia (Spain). This paper presents new results and conclusions obtained from the experiments conducted in this lab prototype. The steady flow through the porous medium tank lab is quasi-2D, and the K field imitates the patterns of spatial variability found in a real and highly heterogeneous formation (MADE2 site). The tracer tests are run using a conservative dye tracer and the tank is monitored by a grid of pressure transducers and taking digital images that are processed to map the evolution of solute concentrations in the tank. The set of exhaustive head and concentration data is used to compute detail local information of the effective dispersivity field at different time steps, and at different support scales. The analysis of results shows that the dispersivity field displays patterns of spatial variability related with the physical nature of the local material and also with the local evolution of concentrations at every grid block. We have found that the anomalous transport behavior observed in the lab tank can be accurately modeled using the classical ADE

  3. Updated Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2: computation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Ditmar, Pavel; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Guo, Jing; Guo, Xiang; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Didova, Olga; Ran, Jiangjun; Sun, Yu; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Ricardo; Steele-Dunne, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A number of research centers compute models of mass transport in the Earth's system using primarily K-Band Ranging (KBR) data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. These models typically consist of a time series of monthly solutions, each of which is defined in terms of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 60-120. One of such models, the Delft Mass Transport, release 2 (DMT-2), is computed at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in collaboration with Wuhan University. An updated variant of this model has been produced recently. A unique feature of the computational scheme designed to compute DMT-2 is the preparation of an accurate stochastic description of data noise in the frequency domain using an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) model, which is derived for each particular month. The benefits of such an approach are a proper frequency-dependent data weighting in the data inversion and an accurate variance-covariance matrix of noise in the estimated spherical harmonic coefficients. Furthermore, the data prior to the inversion are subject to an advanced high-pass filtering, which makes use of a spatially-dependent weighting scheme, so that noise is primarily estimated on the basis of data collected over areas with minor mass transport signals (e.g., oceans). On the one hand, this procedure efficiently suppresses noise, which are caused by inaccuracies in satellite orbits and, on the other hand, preserves mass transport signals in the data. Finally, the unconstrained monthly solutions are filtered using a Wiener filter, which is based on estimates of the signal and noise variance-covariance matrices. In combination with a proper data weighting, this noticeably improves the spatial resolution of the monthly gravity models and the associated mass transport models.. For instance, the computed solutions allow long-term negative trends to be clearly seen in sufficiently small regions notorious

  4. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  5. Reactive Transport in Porous Media: Pore-scale Mass Exchange between Aqueous Phase and Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanizadeh, S.; Qin, C.

    2013-12-01

    In the presence of water and necessary nutrients, biofilms can grow on soil grain surfaces. They occupy void pore spaces blocking water flow. As a result, some hydrodynamic properties of porous media like porosity and permeability will be reduced. This ultimately leads to a condition known as bioclogging. Also, biofilms can degrade certain compounds. So, the features of bioclogging and biodegradation in porous media with biofilms have given rise to a broad range of environmental and engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biobarriers, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and protection of steel corrosion. To date, a number of macroscale and pore-scale models for describing biodegradation in porous media with biofilms are available in the literature. At the macro scale, to simplify numerical implementation, a ';one-equation' model is normally preferred. In this approach, only the solute concentration in aqueous phase is modeled associated with the consumption of solute in biofilms. Because the solute concentration in biofilms is different from that in aqueous phase, an effectiveness factor may be used in Monod kinetics for relating reaction rate within biofilms to the solute concentration in aqueous phase. Notice that this approach has its validity domains like local equilibrium and reaction-rate limited consumption. Another approach to modeling biodegradation is referred to as a ';two-equation' model, in which one needs to simultaneously track the solute concentrations in both aqueous phase and biofilms. In addition, the two concentrations may be related by a first-order kinetic mass exchange model. This first-rate exchange model is normally represented by a constant mas exchange coefficient multiplied by the concentration difference in the two domains. Here, one may question if complex advection-diffusion-reaction processes can be represented just by a constant mass exchange coefficient. In addition, the kinetic model of mass exchange between aqueous phase

  6. Angular momentum transport within evolved low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Mankovich, Christopher; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2014-06-10

    Asteroseismology of 1.0-2.0 M {sub ☉} red giants by the Kepler satellite has enabled the first definitive measurements of interior rotation in both first ascent red giant branch (RGB) stars and those on the helium burning clump. The inferred rotation rates are 10-30 days for the ≈0.2 M {sub ☉} He degenerate cores on the RGB and 30-100 days for the He burning core in a clump star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Evolution code, we calculate state-of-the-art stellar evolution models of low mass rotating stars from the zero-age main sequence to the cooling white dwarf (WD) stage. We include transport of angular momentum due to rotationally induced instabilities and circulations, as well as magnetic fields in radiative zones (generated by the Tayler-Spruit dynamo). We find that all models fail to predict core rotation as slow as observed on the RGB and during core He burning, implying that an unmodeled angular momentum transport process must be operating on the early RGB of low mass stars. Later evolution of the star from the He burning clump to the cooling WD phase appears to be at nearly constant core angular momentum. We also incorporate the adiabatic pulsation code, ADIPLS, to explicitly highlight this shortfall when applied to a specific Kepler asteroseismic target, KIC8366239.

  7. Mass Flux of ZnSe by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sha, Yi-Gao; Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Brebrick, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Mass fluxes of ZnSe by physical vapor transport (PVT) were measured in the temperature range of 1050 to 1160 C using an in-situ dynamic technique. The starting materials were either baked out or distilled under vacuum to obtain near-congruently subliming compositions. Using an optical absorption technique Zn and Se, were found to be the dominant vapor species. Partial pressures of Zn and Se, over the starting materials at temperatures between 960 and 1140 C were obtained by measuring the optical densities of the vapor phase at the wavelengths of 2138, 3405, 3508, 3613, and 3792 A. The amount and composition of the residual gas inside the experimental ampoules were measured after the run using a total pressure gauge. For the first time, the experimentally determined partial pressures of Zn and Se, and the amount and composition of the residual gas were used in a one-dimensional diffusion limited analysis of the mass transport rates for a PVT system. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was observed.

  8. Experimental Studies on Mass Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies on mass transport of ternary compound, Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te by physical vapor transport (PVT) for source compositions up to X = 0.21 are presented. The effect of thermochemical (temperatures, vapor composition) and other factors (preparation of the source, crystal growth rate, temperature gradient) on composition and composition profiles of the grown crystals were investigated. A steep decrease in the mass flux with an increase in X(crystal) for X less than 0.1, and a difference in composition between the source and the deposited material have been observed. The composition profiles of the crystals were found to depend on the density and pretreatment of the source, and on the temperature gradient in the source zone. The homogeneity of the crystals improves at low undercoolings and/or when an appropriate excess of metal constituents is present in the vapor phase. The experimental results are in good agreement with our thermochemical model of this system.

  9. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  10. EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. uch characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. eneralization of characteristic...

  11. Dusty air masses transport between Amazon Basin and Caribbean Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euphrasie-Clotilde, Lovely; Molinie, Jack; Prospero, Joseph; Feuillard, Tony; Brute, Francenor; Jeannot, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Depend on the month, African desert dust affect different parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. From December to April, Saharan dust outbreaks are often reported over the amazon basin and from May to November over the Caribbean islands and the southern regions of USA. This annual oscillation of Saharan dust presence, related to the ITCZ position, is perturbed some time, during March. Indeed, over Guadeloupe, the air quality network observed between 2007 and 2012 several dust events during March. In this paper, using HISPLIT back trajectories, we analyzed air masses trajectories for March dust events observed in Guadeloupe, from 2007 to 2012.We observed that the high pressure positions over the Atlantic Ocean allow the transport of dusty air masses from southern region of West Africa to the Caribbean Sea with a path crossing close to coastal region of French Guyana. Complementary investigations including the relationship between PM10 concentrations recorded in two sites Pointe-a-Pitre in the Caribbean, and Cayenne in French Guyana, have been done. Moreover we focus on the mean delay observed between the times arrival. All the results show a link between pathway of dusty air masses present over amazon basin and over the Caribbean region during several event of March. The next step will be the comparison of mineral dust composition for this particular month.

  12. Moving beyond the limits of mass transport in liquid absorbent microfilms through the implementation of surface-induced vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, S; Yu, DZ; Chugh, D; Moghaddam, S

    2014-02-01

    The slow diffusion of an absorbate molecule into an absorbent often makes the absorption process a rate-limiting step in many applications. In cases involving an absorbate with a high heat of phase change, such as water absorption into a LiBr (lithium bromide) solution, the absorption rate is further slowed due to significant heating of the absorbent. Recently, it has been demonstrated that constraining a LiBr solution film by a hydrophobic porous structure enables manipulation of the solution flow thermohydraulic characteristics. Here, it is shown that mass transport mode in a constrained laminar solution flow can be changed from diffusive to advective. This change in mode is accomplished through stretching and folding the laminar streamlines within the solution film via the implementation of micro-scale features on the flow channel surface. The process induces vortices within the solution film, which continuously bring concentrated solution from the bottom and middle of the solution channel to its interface with the vapor phase, thus leading to a significant enhancement in the absorption rate. The detailed physics of the involved transport processes is elucidated using the LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. On achieving element-wise species balance and enforcing non-negative constraint for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudunuru, M. K.; Nakshatrala, K.

    2012-12-01

    Advection-Diffusion-Reaction (ADR) equations naturally arises in many physical phenomena, which include seepage of contaminants in heterogeneous porous media, transport of injected tracers due to the flow of oil in a petroleum reservoir, and degradation of a deformable solid due to diffusing chemical species. Vast literature exists on how to solve this equation in the cases when the medium is isotropic, velocity field being divergence free, and for advection-dominated problems. However, it is well know that many popular finite element formulations (e.g., the standard Galerkin formulation, stabilized methods, variational multi-scale methods, subgrid-scale methods, and primitive least-squares formulations) do not satisfy element-by-element mass/species balance and do not produce non-negative solutions on general computational grids. Various post-processing based methods were developed in order to recover some properties of computed numerical solutions. Most of these post-processing techniques are ad hoc, and are not variationally consistent. In this poster, we shall present a novel numerical methodology for ADR equations that satisfy discrete maximum principles, the non-negative constraint, and element-by-element mass/species balance. The methodology can handle general computational grids, no additional restrictions on time-step, and for heterogeneous anisotropic media. Several numerical results pertinent to advection-dominated ADR problems will be presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed numerical formulation.

  14. An evaluation and intercomparison of four new advection schemes for use in global chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Arthur C.; Spee, Edwin J.; van Dop, Han; Hundsdorfer, Willem

    1998-08-01

    The need to use a higher spatial resolution and to include more chemical species in global atmospheric chemistry models has led to a demand for efficient advection schemes with high accuracy. We test four newly developed three-dimensional advection schemes named Mol-rg, Split-u, Split-us, and Split-rg. We compare the new schemes with the existing schemes Slopes and Second Moments, both implemented on a uniform grid. Mol-rg and Split-rg make use of a reduced grid. Split-us is an unconditionally stable scheme on a uniform grid. Two tests are performed with all schemes: a solid-body rotation test and a radon transport test. The radon transport test is performed with the off-line global tracer model TM2. The solid-body rotation test shows that none of the new schemes generates undershoot and overshoot and that all of them are mass conservative. Slopes and Second Moments both generate small undershoot and overshoot at all resolutions. The accuracy of the new and old schemes for rotation of a smooth profile is similar for the horizontal resolutions studied. Since the new schemes are slightly more diffusive than the old schemes, they perform worse for rotation of a cone. The radon test shows that the errors related to the numerical schemes are much smaller than other model errors. The main advantage of the new schemes is that they use 75% and 90% less memory than Slopes and Second Moments, respectively. At horizontal resolutions higher than 5° × 5° Split-us and Split-rg are the most efficient of the schemes in terms of cpu time. The new advection schemes are available through Internet.

  15. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  16. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  17. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Dorado, Boris; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-06-26

    In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models

  18. Dynamic typology of hydrothermal systems: competing effects of advection, dispersion and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejs, David

    2016-04-01

    Genetic interpretation hydrothermal systems relies on recognition of (i) hydrothermal fluid source, (ii) fluid migration pathways, and (iii) deposition site identified by hydrothermal alteration and/or mineralization. Frequently, only the last object is of interest or accessible to direct observation, but constraints on the fluid source (volume) and pathways can be obtained from evaluation of the time-integrated fluid flux during hydrothermal event. Successful interpretation of the petrological record, that is, progress of alteration reactions, relies on identification of individual contributions arising from solute advection (to the deposition site), its lateral dispersion, and reaction efficiency. Although these terms are all applicable in a mass-conservation relationship within the framework of the transport theory, they are rarely considered simultaneously and their relative magnitudes evaluated. These phenomena operate on variable length and time scales, and may in turn provide insight into the system dynamics such as flow, diffusion and reaction rates, or continuous vs. episodic behavior of hydrothermal events. In addition, here we demonstrate that they also affect estimate of the net fluid flux, frequently by several orders of magnitude. The extent of alteration and mineralization reactions between the hydrothermal fluid and the host environment is determined by: (i) temperature, pressure or any other gradients across the mineralization site, (ii) magnitude of disequilibrium at inflow to the mineralization site, which is related to physico-chemical gradient between the fluid source and the mineralization site, and (iii) chemical redistribution (dispersion) within the mineralization site. We introduce quantitative mass-transport descriptors - Péclet and Damköhler II numbers - to introduce division into dispersion-dominated, advection-dominated and reaction-constrained systems. Dispersive systems are characterized by lateral solute redistribution, driven by

  19. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Dara V.

    Transport in nanostructured materials is of great interest for scientists in various fields, including molecular sequestration, catalysis, artificial photosynthesis and energy storage. This thesis will present work on the transport of molecular and ionic species in mesoporous materials (materials with pore sizes between 2 and 50 nm). Initially, discussion will focus on the synthesis of mesoporous ZnS nanorattles and the size selected mass transport of small molecules through the mesopores. Discussion will then shift of exploration of cation exchange and electroless plating of metals to alter the mesoporous hollow sphere (MHS) materials and properties. The focus of discussion will then shift to the transport of ions into and out of a hierarchically structured gold electrode. Finally, a model gamma-bactiophage was developed to study the electromigration of charged molecules into and out of a confined geometry. A catalytically active biomolecular species was encapsulated within the central cavity of ZnS MHS. Both the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and the size-selective transport through the wall of the MHS were verified through the use of a common fluorogen, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium azide. Additionally, the protection of the enzyme was shown through size-selected blocking of a protease. The mesoporous hollow sphere system introduces size-selectivity to catalyzed chemical reactions; future work may include variations in pore sizes, and pore wall chemical functionalization. The pore size in ZnS mesoporous hollow spheres is controlled between 2.5 and 4.1 nm through swelling of the lyotropic liquid crystal template. The incorporation of a swelling agent is shown to linearly vary the hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase, which templates the mesopores, while allowing the high fidelity synthesis of mesoporous hollow spheres. Fluorescnently labeled ssDNA was utilized as a probe to explore the change in mesopore permeability afforded by the swollen template

  20. Scalar Transport and Dispersion in Complex Terrain within a High Resolution Mass-Consistent Wind Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Edburg, S. L.; Lamb, B.; Forthofer, J.

    2012-12-01

    In areas of complex terrain, fine-scale changes in topography or vegetation substantially alter the flow field, and in turn, the transport and dispersion of air pollutants, pheromones, or other scalars. Thus, accurate modeling of scalar transport in complex topography requires accurate prediction of the flow field at a high spatial resolution. Mesoscale weather models typically operate on horizontal grids of 4 km or larger and are not capable of handling the effects of sub-grid complex terrain, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and enhanced surface roughness from vegetation. In this paper we describe a scalar transport algorithm (advection and turbulent diffusion) used with WindNinja, a high-resolution mass-consistent wind model. WindNinja operates on a terrain-following coordinate system with a hexahedral cell mesh that grows in vertical size with height above the ground. A variational calculus approach is used in WindNinja that results in fast run times on the order of one minute for a 50 km x 50 km domain and 100 m horizontal resolution. The advection-diffusion algorithm uses a first order closure scheme for turbulent diffusion, where diffusivities are parameterized based on mixing length theory and modified as a function of atmospheric stability. We initialize WindNinja simulations with output from mesoscale weather forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to capture the large-scale atmospheric flows and stability conditions. Model performance is evaluated against field data collected under a range of conditions at different locations including a multi-day continuous tracer gas dispersion experiment in an orchard located on rolling terrain in eastern Washington and a post-wildfire PM10 monitoring campaign in SE Idaho. The combination of fast run times, low computational demands, and explicit treatment of terrain and vegetation at a high spatial resolution are expected

  1. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  2. Anomalous diffusion of a tracer advected by wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2001-02-01

    We consider the advection of a passive tracer when the velocity field is a superposition of random waves. Green's function for the turbulent transport (turbulent diffusion and turbulent drift) is derived. This Green's function is shown to imply sub-diffusive or super-diffusive behavior of the tracer. For the analysis we introduce the statistical near-identity transformation. The results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  3. A Quasi-Conservative Adaptive Semi-Lagrangian Advection-Diffusion Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Many processes in atmospheric or oceanic tracer transport are conveniently represented by advection-diffusion type equations. Depending on the magnitudes of both components, the mathematical representation and consequently the discretization is a non-trivial problem. We will focus on advection-dominated situations and will introduce a semi-Lagrangian scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for high local resolution. This scheme is well suited for pollutant transport from point sources, or transport processes featuring fine filamentation with corresponding local concentration maxima. In order to achieve stability, accuracy and conservation, we combine an adaptive mesh refinement quasi-conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme, based on an integral formulation of the underlying advective conservation law (Behrens, 2006), with an advection diffusion scheme as described by Spiegelman and Katz (2006). The resulting scheme proves to be conservative and stable, while maintaining high computational efficiency and accuracy.

  4. Mass transport and element mobilisation during large-scale metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, C. V.; Austrheim, H.; Jamtveit, B.; Engvik, A. K.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Replacement textures commonly occur in relation to fluid-driven large scale metasomatism and metamorphism and these processes are often related to mineralisation. For example, the albitisation of gabbroic rocks in the Bamble District, southern Norway is associated with ore deposits. Similar albitised rocks are also characteristic of the Curnamona Province, Australia, which includes large areas of mineralisation such as the Pb, Zn, Ag of the Broken Hill deposits as well as Cu, Au and U deposits. The main question addressed here is the mechanism of mass transport and hence element mobilisation. An indication of the former presence of fluids within a rock can be seen in mineral textures, such as porosity, replacement rims, replacement induced fracturing and crystallographic continuity across sharp compositional boundaries. Such textural observations from natural rocks as well as experimental products show that during mineral-fluid interaction, the crystallographic relations between parent and product phases control the nucleation of the product, and hence a coupling between dissolution and reprecipitation. If the rate of nucleation and growth of the product equals the dissolution rate, a pseudomorphic replacement takes place. The degree of epitaxy (or lattice misfit) at the interface, the relative solubility of parent and product phases and the molar volume changes control the microstructure of the product phase. The key observation is that these factors control the generation of porosity as well as reaction induced fracturing ahead of the main reaction interface. Porosity is generated whenever the amount of parent dissolved is greater than the amount of product reprecipitated, irrespective of the molar volume changes of the solid reactants and products. This porosity is occupied by the fluid phase during the reaction, and provides a mechanism of mass transport and fluid movement between reaction interface and the surrounding phases. The reaction-induced fracturing

  5. Turbulence and mass-transports in stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Virendra P.

    Boundary layer (BL) stratocumulus clouds are an important factor in the earth's radiation budget due to their high albedo and low cloud top heights. Continental BL stratocumulus clouds are closely coupled to the diurnal cycle and the turbulence in the BL affecting the surface energy and moisture budgets. In this study the turbulence and mass-transport structures in continental BL stratocumulus clouds are studied using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM)'s Southern Great Plains (SGP) observing facility located at Lamont, Oklahoma. High temporal (4 sec) and spatial (45 m) resolution observations from a vertically pointing 35 GHz cloud Doppler radar were used to obtain the in-cloud vertical velocity probability density function (pdf) in the absence of precipitation size hydrometeors. A total of 70 hours of radar data were analyzed to report half-hourly statistics of vertical velocity variance, skewness, updraft fraction, downdraft and velocity binned mass-flux at five cloud depth normalized levels. The variance showed a general decrease with increase in height in the cloud layer while the skewness is weakly positive in the cloud layer and negative near cloud top. The updraft fraction decreases with height with the decrease mainly occurring in the upper half of the cloud layer. The downdraft fraction increases with decrease in height with the increase being almost linear. The velocity of eddies responsible for maximum mass-transport decreases from of 0.4 ms-1 near cloud base to 0.2 ms-1 near cloud top. The half-hour periods were then classified based on the surface buoyancy flux as stable or unstable and it was found that the variance near cloud top is higher during the stable periods as compared to the unstable periods. Classification was also made based on the cloud depth to BL depth ratio (CBR) being greater or less than 0.3. The variance profile was similar for the classification while the skewness was almost zero during periods with CBR less 0

  6. Mass transport analysis in the near field of geologic repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Doo-Hyun

    A two-dimensional model for the groundwater flow and the contaminant transport has been developed. A water-saturated, deep geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) is considered. The region containing a waste canister, a backfill material around the canister, and the near-field rock (NFR) surrounding the backfill is considered. Discrete-Fracture Network (DFN) is generated in the NFR based on distribution functions of the fracture geometry parameters by random sampling. Flow-bearing fracture network is identified, and is transformed into an equivalent continuous porous medium in two different ways without calculating flow rates through individual fractures. The first transformation is applied locally, generating a heterogeneous porous medium. The second transformation is applied for the entire NFR, resulting in a homogeneous porous medium. While the heterogeneous porous medium is considered to represent characteristics of water flow in DFN better than the homogeneous porous medium, the homogeneous porous medium was often used in previous performance assessment studies for its simplicity. After these transformations, the spatial distribution of groundwater flow rate is calculated by a finite element method. The numerical results for the total discharge at the outer boundary of the homogenized NFR after the second transformation are benchmarked by analytical solutions with a relative difference smaller than 0.55%. The contaminant transport is simulated by a random-walk particle-tracking method, based on the obtained flow-rate distribution. Previous study for a step equation that determines the movement of contaminant particles has been critically reviewed. Numerical results obtained by the first and second transformations have been compared. The second transformation gives smaller mean values of the residence time of particles in the NFR and greater mean values of the mass absorption rate at the outer boundary of NFR than the first one does. Thus

  7. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  8. Ballistic transport in Saturn's rings - an analytic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ejecta from impacts of micrometeoroids on Saturn's ring particles will, in most cases, remain in orbit about Saturn and eventually be reaccreted by the rings, possibly at a different radial location. The resulting mass transport has been suggested as the cause of some of the features observed in Saturn's rings. Previous attempts to model this transport have used numerical simulations which have not included the effects of the angular momentum transport coincident with mass transport. An analytical model for ballistic mass transport in Saturn's rings is developed. The model includes the effects of angular momentum advection and shows that the net material movement due to angular momentum advection is comparable to that caused by direct ballistic mass transport.

  9. A Mercury Transport and Fate Model for Mass Budget Assessment of Mercury Cycling in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mercury mass balance model was developed to describe and evaluate the fate, transport, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. Coupling with total suspendable solids (TSS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the mercury transport and fate model simulates...

  10. A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Test results demonstrate that the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) outperforms standard finite-difference methods for solute transport problems that are dominated by advection. FVELLAM systematically conserves mass globally with all types of boundary conditions. Integrated finite differences, instead of finite elements, are used to approximate the governing equation. This approach, in conjunction with a forward tracking scheme, greatly facilitates mass conservation. The mass storage integral is numerically evaluated at the current time level, and quadrature points are then tracked forward in time to the next level. Forward tracking permits straightforward treatment of inflow boundaries, thus avoiding the inherent problem in backtracking of characteristic lines intersecting inflow boundaries. FVELLAM extends previous results by obtaining mass conservation locally on Lagrangian space-time elements. -from Authors

  11. Mass transport, faceting and behavior of dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, S.; Kashima, T.; Kariya, M.; Yukawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2000-07-01

    The behavior of threading dislocations during mass transport of GaN was investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy. Mass transport occurred at the surface. Therefore, growing species are supplied from the in-plane direction. The behavior of threading dislocations was found to be strongly affected by the mass transport process as well as the high crystallographic anisotropy of the surface energy of the facets particular to GaN.

  12. The latent fingerprint in mass transport of polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2016-02-01

    Herein, a systematic investigation was carried out to reach a rational understanding and to provide information concerning the possible causes for a significant influence of pressure variation in the underlying processes of mass transport in polycrystalline materials. The authors focused their research in solid-state diffusion, a part of the subject "Mass Transport in Solids". Theories on diffusion are the subject by itself which exists as a latent fingerprint in every text of higher learning in interdisciplinary science. In this research, authors prepared sandwich samples of titanium alloy and stainless steel using nickel as an intermediate metal. The samples were processed at three different levels of bonding pressure (3, 4 and 5 MPa) while bonding temperature and bonding time was maintained at 750 °C and 1 h, respectively, throughout the experiments. It was observed that the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into Ti-alloy at TiA/Ni interface increased by ~63 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but decreased by ~40 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. At the same time, the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into stainless steel at Ni/SS interface increased by ~19 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but increased by ~17 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. Here authors showed that the pressure variations have different effects at the TiA/Ni interface and Ni/SS interface, and tried to explain the explicit mechanisms operating behind them. In general for sandwich samples processed irrespective of bonding pressure chosen, the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused into SS is greater than that of the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused in Ti-alloy matrix by four orders of magnitude. The calculated diffusivity of Ni-atoms into Ti-alloy reaches its highest value of ~5.083 × 10-19 m2/s for the sandwich sample processed using 4-MPa bonding-pressure, whereas the diffusivity of Ni

  13. Impact of internal transport on the convective mass transfer from a droplet into a submerging falling film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, Julien R.; Thomas, Amalia; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the convective mass transfer of dilute passive tracers contained in small viscous drops into a submerging falling film. This problem has applications in industrial cleaning, domestic dishwashers, and decontamination of hazardous material. The film Peclet number is very high, whereas the drop Peclet number varies from 0.1 to 1. The characteristic transport time in the drop is much larger than in the film. We model the mass transfer using an analogy with Newton's law of cooling. This empirical model is supported by an analytical model solving the quasi-steady two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation in the film that is coupled with a time-dependent one-dimensional diffusion equation in the drop. We find excellent agreement between our experimental data and the two models, which predict an exponential decrease in time of the drop concentration. The transport characteristic time is related to the drop diffusion time scale, as diffusion within the drop is the limiting process. Our theoretical model not only predicts the well-known relationship between the Sherwood number and the external Reynolds number in the case of a well-mixed drop Sh ~ Re1/3, it also predicts a correction in the case of a non-uniform drop concentration. The correction depends on Re, the film Schmidt number, the drop aspect ratio and the diffusivity ratio between the two phases. This prediction is in good agreement with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  14. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties and simulated advective transport of contaminated ground water in a fractured rock aquifer at the Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Brown, Jean C.; Carleton, Glen B.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, predominantly trichloroethylene and its degradation products, have been detected in ground water at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. An air-stripping pump-and-treat system has been in operation at the NAWC since 1998. An existing ground-water-flow model was used to evaluate the effect of a change in the configuration of the network of recovery wells in the pump-and-treat system on flow paths of contaminated ground water. The NAWC is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer composed of dipping layers of sedimentary rocks of the Lockatong and Stockton Formations. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties of the part of the aquifer composed of the Lockatong Formation were measured using aquifer tests and tracer tests. The heterogeneity of the rocks causes a wide range of values of each parameter measured. Transmissivity ranges from 95 to 1,300 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient ranges from 9 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3; and the effective porosity ranges from 0.0003 to 0.002. The average linear velocity of contaminated ground water was determined for ambient conditions (when no wells at the site are pumped) using an existing ground-water-flow model, particle-tracking techniques, and the porosity values determined in this study. The average linear velocity of flow paths beginning at each contaminated well and ending at the streams where the flow paths terminate ranges from 0.08 to 130 feet per day. As a result of a change in the pump-and-treat system (adding a 165-foot-deep well pumped at 5 gallons per minute and reducing the pumping rate at a nearby 41-foot-deep well by the same amount), water in the vicinity of three 100- to 165-foot-deep wells flows to the deep well rather than the shallower well.

  15. Mass and Momentum Transport in Microcavities for Diffusion-Dominant Cell Culture Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Pinero, Daniel; Hsieh, Adam H.; Atencia, Javier

    2012-01-01

    For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically-driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the spatial transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs to travel from the microchannel to a given depth into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, physiologically-based culture conditions with low fluid shear stress.

  16. Chaotic advection in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schelin, A B; Károlyi, Gy; de Moura, A P S; Booth, N A; Grebogi, C

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we argue that the effects of irregular chaotic motion of particles transported by blood can play a major role in the development of serious circulatory diseases. Vessel wall irregularities modify the flow field, changing in a nontrivial way the transport and activation of biochemically active particles. We argue that blood particle transport is often chaotic in realistic physiological conditions. We also argue that this chaotic behavior of the flow has crucial consequences for the dynamics of important processes in the blood, such as the activation of platelets which are involved in the thrombus formation. PMID:19658798

  17. Analytical solutions to the fractional advection-diffusion equation with time-dependent pulses on the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbab, Qammar; Mirza, Itrat Abbas; Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar

    2016-07-01

    The time-fractional advection-diffusion equation with Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives (fractional derivatives without singular kernel) is considered under the time-dependent emissions on the boundary and the first order chemical reaction. The non-dimensional problem is formulated by using suitable dimensionless variables and the fundamental solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the fractional advection-diffusion equation are determined using the integral transforms technique. The fundamental solutions for the ordinary advection-diffusion equation, fractional and ordinary diffusion equation are obtained as limiting cases of the previous model. Using Duhamel's principle, the analytical solutions to the Dirichlet problem with time-dependent boundary pulses have been obtained. The influence of the fractional parameter and of the drift parameter on the solute concentration in various spatial positions was analyzed by numerical calculations. It is found that the variation of the fractional parameter has a significant effect on the solute concentration, namely, the memory effects lead to the retardation of the mass transport.

  18. Characterization of physical mass transport through oil sands fluid fine tailings in an end pit lake: a multi-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Dompierre, Kathryn A; Barbour, S Lee

    2016-06-01

    Soft tailings pose substantial challenges for mine reclamation due to their high void ratios and low shear strengths, particularly for conventional terrestrial reclamation practices. Oil sands mine operators have proposed the development of end pit lakes to contain the soft tailings, called fluid fine tailings (FFT), generated when bitumen is removed from oil sands ore. End pit lakes would be constructed within mined-out pits with FFT placed below the lake water. However, the feasibility of isolating the underlying FFT has yet to be fully evaluated. Chemical constituents of interest may move from the FFT into the lake water via two key processes: (1) advective-diffusive mass transport with upward pore water flow caused by settling of the FFT; and (2) mixing created by wind events or unstable density profiles through the lake water and upper portion of the FFT. In 2013 and 2014, temperature and stable isotopes of water profiles were measured through the FFT and lake water in the first end pit lake developed by Syncrude Canada Ltd. Numerical modelling was undertaken to simulate these profiles to identify the key mechanisms controlling conservative mass transport in the FFT. Shallow mixing of the upper 1.1 m of FFT with lake water was required to explain the observed temperature and isotopic profiles. Following mixing, the re-establishment of both the temperature and isotope profiles required an upward advective flux of approximately 1.5 m/year, consistent with average FFT settling rates measured at the study site. These findings provide important insight on the ability to sequester soft tailings in an end pit lake, and offer a foundation for future research on the development of end pit lakes as an oil sands reclamation strategy. PMID:27061245

  19. Characterization of physical mass transport through oil sands fluid fine tailings in an end pit lake: a multi-tracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Soft tailings pose substantial challenges for mine reclamation due to their high void ratios and low shear strengths, particularly for conventional terrestrial reclamation practices. Oil sands mine operators have proposed the development of end pit lakes to contain the soft tailings, called fluid fine tailings (FFT), generated when bitumen is removed from oil sands ore. End pit lakes would be constructed within mined-out pits with FFT placed below the lake water. However, the feasibility of isolating the underlying FFT has yet to be fully evaluated. Chemical constituents of interest may move from the FFT into the lake water via two key processes: (1) advective-diffusive mass transport with upward pore water flow caused by settling of the FFT; and (2) mixing created by wind events or unstable density profiles through the lake water and upper portion of the FFT. In 2013 and 2014, temperature and stable isotopes of water profiles were measured through the FFT and lake water in the first end pit lake developed by Syncrude Canada Ltd. Numerical modelling was undertaken to simulate these profiles to identify the key mechanisms controlling conservative mass transport in the FFT. Shallow mixing of the upper 1.1 m of FFT with lake water was required to explain the observed temperature and isotopic profiles. Following mixing, the re-establishment of both the temperature and isotope profiles required an upward advective flux of approximately 1.5 m/year, consistent with average FFT settling rates measured at the study site. These findings provide important insight on the ability to sequester soft tailings in an end pit lake, and offer a foundation for future research on the development of end pit lakes as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  20. Theoretical monochromatic-wave-induced currents in intermediate water with viscosity and nonzero mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wave-induced mass-transport current theories with both zero and nonzero net mass (or volume) transport of the water column are reviewed. A relationship based on the Longuet-Higgens theory is derived for wave-induced, nonzero mass-transport currents in intermediate water depths for a viscous fluid. The relationship is in a form useful for experimental applications; therefore, some design criteria for experimental wave-tank tests are also presented. Sample parametric cases for typical wave-tank conditions and a typical ocean swell were assessed by using the relation in conjunction with an equation developed by Unluata and Mei for the maximum wave-induced volume transport. Calculations indicate that substantial changes in the wave-induced mass-transport current profiles may exist dependent upon the assumed net volume transport. A maximum volume transport, corresponding to an infinite channel or idealized ocean condition, produces the largest wave-induced mass-transport currents. These calculations suggest that wave-induced mass-transport currents may have considerable effects on pollution and suspended-sediments transport as well as buoy drift, the surface and midlayer water-column currents caused by waves increasing with increasing net volume transports. Some of these effects are discussed.

  1. An improved second moment method for solution of pure advection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Abdolreza; Sobouti, Farhad; Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    2000-04-01

    The second moment numerical method (SMM) of Egan and Mahoney [Numerical modeling of advection and diffusion of urban area source pollutant. Journal of Applied Meteorology 1972; 11: 312-322] is adapted to solve for the pure advection transport equation in a variety of flow fields. SMM eliminates numerical diffusion by employing a procedure that takes into account the first and second moments of mass distribution in each grid element. For pure translational flow fields, the method is conservative, positive definite and shape-preserving. In rotational and/or shear flows, the accuracy of SMM is significantly reduced. Two improvements are presented to make the SMM applicable to a wider range of flow problems. It is shown that the improved SMM (ISMM) is less diffusive and more shape-preserving than the SMM in rotational and/or deformational flows. The ISMM can also be used to solve for a color function in compressible flow fields. The computational efficiency of this method is compared with that of other methods and, for a given accuracy, it is shown that ISMM is a cost-effective, non-diffusive and shape-preserving method. Copyright

  2. Transport dynamics of mass failures along weakly cohesive clinoform foresets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2012-12-01

    The initiation mechanisms of sediment gravity flows are poorly understood. Previous studies have created sediment gravity flows by releasing dense water-sediment mixtures into ambient water. One limitation to these studies is that the slurries are premixed and are injected into the water column such that the initial properties of the flow - density, composition and momentum flux - are predetermined. This precludes observation of the processes that initiate the flows and set these initial conditions. As a result, there is a gap in our understanding of how submarine gravity flows initiate and what sets their initial conditions. Here we use a new experimental method that allows a range of gravity flows to self-generate. Building a clinoform using a cohesive mixture of walnut-shell sand and kaolinte, allows the foreset to build up and fail episodically, generating spontaneous sediment gravity flows. Slopes undergo a series of morphological changes prior to failure. The slope develops a concave shape that becomes exaggerated as deposition continues. This morphology leaves the slope in a metastable state. Either of two mechanisms triggers destabilization of the slope: slumping or bed-load transport. Once the slope is destabilized, failure is initiated. We also investigated the influence of clinoform progradation rates on failure size and frequency. We conducted experiments over a range of water and sediment discharge rates (0.007 to 0.036 liters of water per second, 0.50 to 1.28 g/s sediment). Neither failure size nor failure frequency changes with discharge rate; instead, increases in sediment supply are taken up by changes in the partitioning of sediment between the steep upper foreset and the more gradual delta-front apron below. Sediment is delivered to the delta-front apron by a form of semi-continuous slow creep along the foreset. This slow creep is a failure mode that has been under-appreciated in the submarine mass-flow literature. The independence of failure

  3. Mass transport of contaminated soil released into surface water by landslides (Göta River, SW Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göransson, G.; Larson, M.; Bendz, D.; Åkesson, M.

    2012-07-01

    Landslides of contaminated soil into surface water represent an overlooked exposure pathway that has not been addressed properly in existing risk analysis for landslide hazard, contaminated land, or river basin management. A landslide of contaminated soil into surface water implies an instantaneous exposure of the water to the soil, dramatically changing the prerequisites for the mobilisation and transport of pollutants. In this study, an analytical approach is taken to simulate the transport of suspended matter released in connection with landslides into rivers. Different analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) were tested against the measured data from the shallow rotational, retrogressive landslide in clayey sediments that took place in 1993 on the Göta River, SW Sweden. The landslide encompassed three distinct events, namely an initial submerged slide, followed by a main slide, and a retrogressive slide. These slides generated three distinct and non-Gaussian peaks in the online turbidity recordings at the freshwater intake downstream the slide area. To our knowledge, this registration of the impact on a river of the sediment release from a landslide is one of few of its kind in the world and unique for Sweden. Considering the low frequency of such events, the data from this landslide are highly useful for evaluating how appropriate the ADE is to describe the effects of landslides into surface water. The results yielded realistic predictions of the measured variation in suspended particle matter (SPM) concentration, after proper calibration. For the three individual slides it was estimated that a total of about 0.6% of the total landslide mass went into suspension and was transported downstream. This release corresponds to about 1 to 2% of the annual suspended sediment transport for that river stretch. The studied landslide partly involved an industrial area, and by applying the analytical solution to estimate the transport of metals in

  4. Advective hydrogel membrane chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Brower, Mark; Pollard, David; Kanani, Dharmesh; Jacquemart, Renaud; Kachuik, Bradley; Stout, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is widely employed for the capture and purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because of the high cost of protein A resins, there is a significant economic driving force to seek new downstream processing strategies. Membrane chromatography has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional resin based column chromatography. However, to date, the application has been limited to mostly ion exchange flow through (FT) mode. Recently, significant advances in Natrix hydrogel membrane has resulted in increased dynamic binding capacities for proteins, which makes membrane chromatography much more attractive for bind/elute operations. The dominantly advective mass transport property of the hydrogel membrane has also enabled Natrix membrane to be run at faster volumetric flow rates with high dynamic binding capacities. In this work, the potential of using Natrix weak cation exchange membrane as a mAb capture step is assessed. A series of cycle studies was also performed in the pilot scale device (> 30 cycles) with good reproducibility in terms of yield and product purities, suggesting potential for improved manufacturing flexibility and productivity. In addition, anion exchange (AEX) hydrogel membranes were also evaluated with multiple mAb programs in FT mode. Significantly higher binding capacity for impurities (support mAb loads up to 10Kg/L) and 40X faster processing speed were observed compared with traditional AEX column chromatography. A proposed protein A free mAb purification process platform could meet the demand of a downstream purification process with high purity, yield, and throughput. PMID:26018631

  5. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  6. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, and minerals. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain large-scale, long-distance solids advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a generalized mechanism for advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, enabling a simulated continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  7. MASS TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF NITROBENZENE REDUCTION BY IRON METAL. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the importance of external mass transport on the overall rates of
    contaminant reduction by iron metal (Fe0), we have compared measured
    rates of surface reaction for nitrobenzene (ArNO2) to estimated rates
    of external mass transport...

  8. Use of the time fractional advection dispersion equation for push-pull tests at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, A. M.; Benson, D. A.; Major, E.

    2010-12-01

    By adding a fractional-in-time term to the traditional advection dispersion equation, a model is able to simulate a late-time heavy-tailed contaminant breakthrough curve. This heavy-tailed breakthrough curve is observed in data collected during a conservative tracer “push-pull” test at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site. A time fractional advection dispersion equation (fADE) is able to predict power law tailing of conservative solutes by accounting for solutes transferring between the mobile and relatively immobile phases. Solutes can become trapped in a low permeability zone where the transport is controlled by diffusion instead of advection. It has been observed that the late-time heavy-tailed breakthrough curve may follow a power law due to the movement into these low flow zones. By solving the time fADE in a particle tracking program (SLIM-FAST) the model accounts for mass transfer between various phases and produces the same power law tail as observed in field data. For the implementation of the time fADE, in SLIM-FAST, the particles move based on a random-walk motion but have the ability to transition into a relatively immobile phase after (exponentially) random mobile times. Following a period in the immobile phase, the particle re-enters the mobile phase to be moved by advection and Fickian dispersion. To test the fADE approach, a recent single-well push-pull tracer test at the MADE site is reproduced using a groundwater flow code (ParFlow) and a particle tracking code (SLIM-FAST) using various immobile residence-time distributions.

  9. Integrated mass transportation system study/definition/implementation program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Deptula, D. A.; Yorke, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Specific actions needed to plan and effect transportation system improvements are identified within the constraints of limited financial, energy and land use resources, and diverse community requirements. A specific program is described which would develop the necessary generalized methodology for devising improved transportation systems and evaluate them against specific criteria for intermodal and intramodal optimization. A consistent, generalized method is provided for study and evaluation of transportation system improvements.

  10. Super-diffusion versus competitive advection: a simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, D.; Giannattasio, F.; Berrilli, F.; Consolini, G.; Lepreti, F.; Gošić, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Magnetic element tracking is often used to study the transport and diffusion of the magnetic field on the solar photosphere. From the analysis of the displacement spectrum of these tracers, it has recently been agreed that a regime of super-diffusivity dominates the solar surface. Quite habitually this result is discussed in the framework of fully developed turbulence. Aims: However, the debate whether the super-diffusivity is generated by a turbulent dispersion process, by the advection due to the convective pattern, or even by another process is still open, as is the question of the amount of diffusivity at the scales relevant to the local dynamo process. Methods: To understand how such peculiar diffusion in the solar atmosphere takes place, we compared the results from two different data sets (ground-based and space-borne) and developed a simulation of passive tracers advection by the deformation of a Voronoi network. Results: The displacement spectra of the magnetic elements obtained by the data sets are consistent in retrieving a super-diffusive regime for the solar photosphere, but the simulation also shows a super-diffusive displacement spectrum: its competitive advection process can reproduce the signature of super-diffusion. Conclusions: Therefore, it is not necessary to hypothesize a totally developed turbulence regime to explain the motion of the magnetic elements on the solar surface.

  11. Mass transport of contaminated soil released into surface water by landslides (Göta River, SW Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göransson, G.; Larson, M.; Bendz, D.; Åkesson, M.

    2011-12-01

    Landslides of contaminated soil into surface water represent an overlooked exposure pathway that has not been addressed properly in existing risk analysis for landslide hazard, contaminated land, or river basin management. A landslide of contaminated soil into surface water implies an instantaneous exposure of the water to the contaminated soil, dramatically changing the prerequisites for the mobilisation and transport of pollutants. In this study, an analytical approach is taken to simulate the transport of suspended matter released in connection with landslides into rivers. Different analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) were tested against the measured data from the shallow rotational, retrogressive landslide in clayey sediments that took place in 1993 on the Göta River, SW Sweden. The landslide encompassed three distinct events, namely an initial submerged slide, followed by a main slide, and a retrogressive slide. These slides generated three distinct and non-Gaussian peaks in the online turbidity recordings at the freshwater intake downstream the slide area. To our knowledge, this registration of the impact in a river of the sediment release from a landslide is one of the few of its kind in the world, and unique for Sweden considering the low frequency of landslide events, making it highly useful for evaluating how appropriate the ADE is to describe a landslide into surface water. The results yielded realistic predictions of the measured concentration variation, after proper calibration. For the three individual slides it was estimated that a total of about 0.6% (515 000 kg) of the total landslide mass went into suspension/was suspended and was transported downstream. This release corresponds to about 1 to 2% of the annual suspended sediment delivery for that river stretch. The studied landslide partly involved an industrial area and by applying the analytical solution for the transport of metals in the sediments it was found that

  12. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation by a finite-volume eulerian-lagrangian local adjoint method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian local adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation is developed and discussed. The method is mass conservative and can solve advection-dominated ground-water solute-transport problems accurately and efficiently. An integrated finite-difference approach is used in the method. A key component of the method is that the integral representing the mass-storage term is evaluated numerically at the current time level. Integration points, and the mass associated with these points, are then forward tracked up to the next time level. The number of integration points required to reach a specified level of accuracy is problem dependent and increases as the sharpness of the simulated solute front increases. Integration points are generally equally spaced within each grid cell. For problems involving variable coefficients it has been found to be advantageous to include additional integration points at strategic locations in each well. These locations are determined by backtracking. Forward tracking of boundary fluxes by the method alleviates problems that are encountered in the backtracking approaches of most characteristic methods. A test problem is used to illustrate that the new method offers substantial advantages over other numerical methods for a wide range of problems.

  13. Modeling solute advection coupled with sorption kinetics in heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    1992-05-01

    A method for coupling sorption kinetics and solute advection in particle-tracking models is proposed; this method is efficient for the case where sorption rate coefficients can be assumed constant field scale parameters. A simulation example of reactive solute advection in two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is presented. The effect of sorption kinetics on solute advection is investigated. Nonequilibrium effects are exhibited as enhanced tailing in the solute breakthrough. Because high variability in the hydraulic conductivity also yields enhanced tailing, the nonequilibrium effect is more pronounced for the case of low variability. Moreover, it may be difficult to distinguish cases of low variability with nonequilibrium sorption from cases of high variability with equilibrium sorption. A comparison of Monte Carlo ensemble results is made with an analytical model for the mass arrival of kinetically sorbing solute in heterogeneous porous media obtained using first-order perturbation. The comparison indicates that the analytical model provides reasonable approximations of the expected solute breakthrough if the variance of the natural logarithm of the hydraulic conductivity is smaller than 1.

  14. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  15. Distinguishing resuspension and advection signals in a hypertidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, David; Souza, Alex; Jago, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial material is supplied to an estuary system by the river, while marine material is supplied by the sea. Whether the estuary acts as a trap or a bypass zone for SPM (suspended particulate matter) depends upon the properties and dynamics of both the estuary, including the tidal and residual behaviour of the currents, and the SPM, including particle sizes and settling velocities and concentration gradients, which together control the dynamics, such as the trapping efficiency, of the estuary. Whether an SPM signal is regarded as being one of resuspension or advection depends upon the area of interest, and therefore distinguishing between resuspension and advection can be complex. Material that is resuspended within the area of study is regarded as resuspension, while that which is resuspended outside, but passes through, the area of interest, is regarded as advection. The results of a measurement campaign undertaken in a hypertidal UK estuary during the pre-spring bloom February-March and post-spring bloom May-June are presented utilising a combination of acoustic and optical instruments, moorings, and CTD stations. A characteristic asymmetric "twin peak" signal is present during both time periods, implying the presence of both resuspension and advection. This is confirmed through the use of harmonic analysis. A seasonal variation in the relative importance of the resuspension and advection components is seen between the two observation periods, with the small (<122µm) and large (>122µm) particles displaying different behaviours and providing a strong indication of the presence of flocculation. Approximate point flux calculations showed a reduction in the horizontal gradient of concentration, and subsequently the flood dominance of sediment transport, between May-June and February-March. This has been attributed to changes in biological activity and atmospheric forcing between the two observational periods. Ebb-dominant concentrations brought about by the

  16. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  17. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  18. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  19. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  20. Specifications for the development of a fully three-dimensional numerical groundwater model for regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Prickett, T.A.

    1980-04-01

    Specifications are given which are necessary to develop a three-dimensional numerical model capable of simulating regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository. The model to be developed will include all of the significant mass transport processes including flow, chemical, and thermal advection, mechanical dispersion, molecular diffusion, ion exchange reactions, and radioactive decay. The model specifications also include that density and viscosity fluid properties be functions of pressure, temperature, and concentration and take into account fluid and geologic heterogenieties by allowing possible assignment of individual values to every block of the model. The model specifications furthermore include the repository shape, input/output information, boundary conditions, and the need for documentation and a user's manual. Model code validation can be accomplished with the included known analytical or laboratory solutions. It is recommended that an existing finite-difference model (developed by INTERCOMP and INTERA, Inc.) be used as a starting point either as an acceptable basic code for modification or as a pattern for the development of a completely different numerical scheme. A ten-step plan is given to outline the general procedure for development of the code.

  1. A boundary element-Random walk model of mass transport in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemblowski, M.

    1986-01-01

    A boundary element solution to the convective mass transport in groundwater is presented. This solution produces a continuous velocity field and reduces the amount of data preparation time and bookkeeping. By combining this solution and the random walk procedure, a convective-dispersive mass transport model is obtained. This model may be easily used to simulate groundwater contamination problems. The accuracy of the boundary element model has been verified by reproducing the analytical solution to a two-dimensional convective mass transport problem. The method was also used to simulate a convective-dispersive problem. ?? 1986.

  2. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  3. Advection fog formation in a polluted atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, R.J.; Liaw, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ have been detected in highly industrialized areas. The major portions of aerosol products are the results of energy related fuel combustion. Both microphysical and macrophysical processes are considered in investigating the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with both polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results show that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog with condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere for monodisperse distribution.

  4. MAGNETIC ADVECTION DUE TO DIFFUSIVITY GRADIENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    We derive and discuss an important source of advection of magnetic fields in plasmas, for a completely general case. Magnetic diffusivity is proportional to electrical resistivity: where the value this parameter is high, it is well known that magnetic fields can leak (or diffuse) rapidly into (or out) of the plasma. Magnetohydrodynamic lore has it that where gradients, or changes in space, of the value of the diffusivity are high, magnetic fields can have enhanced flow (or advection). We derive this phenomenon rigorously, compare our results to other work in the literature, and discuss its implications, especially for kinematic dynamos. As an extra mathematical bonus, we find that the magnetic advection due to diffusivity gradients can be expressed in terms of a diffusion equation within the induction equation, making its computational implementation especially simple.

  5. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-04-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description--Darcy's law--fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media.

  6. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description—Darcy's law—fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media. PMID:25901931

  7. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media.

    PubMed

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description--Darcy's law--fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media. PMID:25901931

  8. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachand, P.A.M.; S. Bachand; Fleck, Jacob A.; Anderson, Frank E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2014-01-01

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flowrates and tracer concentrations atwetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactormodel solutions, a continuous flowstirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these nonideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a fluxmodel, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment–water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemicalmechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition,our understanding of internal

  9. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone.

    PubMed

    Bachand, P A M; Bachand, S; Fleck, J; Anderson, F; Windham-Myers, L

    2014-06-15

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flow rates and tracer concentrations at wetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactor model solutions, a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these non-ideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a flux model, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment-water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemical mechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition, our understanding of

  10. Effect of dissolved organic carbon on the transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and carboxylate-modified microspheres advected through temperate humic and tropical volcanic agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Metge, David W; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-02-21

    Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and microspheres in two disparate (a clay- and Fe-rich, volcanic and a temperate, humic) agricultural soils were studied in the presence and absence of 100 mg L(-1) of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 5.0-6.0. Transport of carboxylate-modified, 1.8 μm microspheres in soil columns was highly sensitive to the nature of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas oocysts transport was more affected by soil mineralogy. SDBS increased transport of microspheres from 48% to 87% through the tropical soil and from 43% to 93% in temperate soil. In contrast, SRHA reduced transport of microspheres from 48% to 28% in tropical soil and from 43% to 16% in temperate soil. SDBS also increased oocysts transport through the temperate soil 5-fold, whereas no oocyst transport was detected in tropical soil. SRHA had only a nominal effect in increasing oocysts transport in tropical soil, but caused a 6-fold increase in transport through the temperate soil. Amendments of only 4 mg L(-1) SRHA and SDBS decreased oocyst hydrophobicity from 66% to 20% and from 66% to 5%, respectively. However, SDBS increased microsphere hydrophobicity from 16% to 33%. Soil fines, which includes clays, and SRHA, both caused the oocysts zeta potential (ζ) to become more negative, but caused the highly hydrophilic microspheres to become less negatively charged. The disparate behaviors of the two colloids in the presence of an ionic surfactant and natural organic matter suggest that microspheres may not be suitable surrogates for oocysts in certain types of soils. These results indicate that whether or not DOC inhibits or promotes transport of oocysts and microspheres in agricultural soils and by how much, depends not only on the surface characteristics of the colloid, but the nature of the DOC and the soil mineralogy. PMID:21711011

  11. Measurements of the transport efficiency of the fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive calculations of the transport of reaction products were carried out during the design phase of the instrument using the computer code GIOS. These show that the energy acceptance depends strongly on the angular deviation from the optical axis of the instrument. In order to reliably measure cross sections using this instrument it is therefore necessary to verify these calculations empirically.

  12. Cable Connected Spinning Spacecraft, 1. the Canonical Equations, 2. Urban Mass Transportation, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitchin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Work on the dynamics of cable-connected spinning spacecraft was completed by formulating the equations of motion by both the canonical equations and Lagrange's equations and programming them for numerical solution on a digital computer. These energy-based formulations will permit future addition of the effect of cable mass. Comparative runs indicate that the canonical formulation requires less computer time. Available literature on urban mass transportation was surveyed. Areas of the private rapid transit concept of urban transportation are also studied.

  13. Mass transport in salt repositories: Steady-state transport through interbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-03-01

    Salt has long been a candidate for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Because salt is extremely soluble in water, the existence of rock salt in the ground atest to the long-term stability of the salt. Both bedded salt and salt domes have been considered for nuclear waste disposal in the United States and Europe. While the salt is known to be quite pure in salt domes, bedded salt is interlaced with beds of sediments. Traditionally rock salt has not been considered water-conducting, but sediments layers would be classical porous media, capable of conducting water. Therefore there is interest in determining whether interbeds in bedded salt constitute pathway for radionuclide migration. In this report we consider steady-state migration of radionuclides from a single waste cylinder into a single interbed. Two approaches are used. In 1982 Neretnieks proposed an approach for calculating the steady-state transport of oxidants to a copper container. We have adapted that approach for calculating steady-state radionuclide migration away from the waste package, as a first approximation. We have also analyzed the problem of time-dependent radionuclide diffusion from a container through a backfill layer into a fracture, and we used the steady-state solution from that problem for comparison. Section 2 gives a brief summary of the geology of interbeds in bedded salt. Section 3 presents the mass transfer resistances approach of Neretnieks, summarizing the formulation and giving numerical illustrations of the steady-state two-dimensional diffusion analysis. Section 4 gives a brief statement of the steady-state result from a related analysis. Conclusions are stated in Section 5. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  15. Structural design of a double-layered porous hydrogel for effective mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Hwang, Hyung Ju; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Mass transport in porous materials is universal in nature, and its worth attracts great attention in many engineering applications. Plant leaves, which work as natural hydraulic pumps for water uptake, have evolved to have the morphological structure for fast water transport to compensate large water loss by leaf transpiration. In this study, we tried to deduce the advantageous structural features of plant leaves for practical applications. Inspired by the tissue organization of the hydraulic pathways in plant leaves, analogous double-layered porous models were fabricated using agarose hydrogel. Solute transport through the hydrogel models with different thickness ratios of the two layers was experimentally observed. In addition, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were carried out with varying porosity and thickness ratio to investigate the effect of structural factors on mass transport ability. A simple parametric study was also conducted to examine unveiled relations between structural factors. As a result, the porosity and thickness ratio of the two layers are found to govern the mass transport ability in double-layered porous materials. The hydrogel models with widely dispersed pores at a fixed porosity, i.e., close to a homogeneously porous structure, are mostly turned out to exhibit fast mass transport. The present results would provide a new framework for fundamental design of various porous structures for effective mass transport. PMID:25825619

  16. Quasi-synoptic transport, budgets and water mass transformation in the Azores-Gibraltar Strait region during summer 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo Segade, Lidia Isabel; Gilcoto, Miguel; Mercier, Herlé; Pérez, Fiz Fernández

    2015-01-01

    We describe the circulation patterns in the Azores-Gibraltar Strait region (North-Eastern Atlantic) during the 2009 CAIBOX cruise on the basis of hydrographic and direct current velocity measurements. This study offers new data for a region where importation of central waters (subpolar and subtropical modes of Eastern North Atlantic Central Water) and exports of Mediterranean Water are strongly related to large-scale dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean (Azores Current-Mediterranean Water system). The description is backed up quantitatively by the results of a box inverse model, which was used to obtain absolute water mass transport values consistent with thermal wind equations and with conservation of volume, salt and heat. The contributions of water masses were determined in an extended Optimum Multiparameter Analysis from a quasi-synoptic point of view, providing detail in addition to volume, salt and heat transport. The surface-subsurface large-scale current system in the region consists of the Azores Current (13.1 ± 2.5 Sverdrup [Sv], 1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), the Azores Counter-Current (5.2 ± 2.1 Sv), the Portugal Current (4.5 ± 1.4 Sv) and the Canary Current (7.1 ± 1.1 Sv). Broadly speaking, central waters are imported into the CAIBOX region at a rate of 1.6 ± 0.9 Sv, and Mediterranean Water is exported at a rate of 1.5 ± 0.4 Sv. The downwelling of central waters west of Gibraltar Strait was quantified at 1.1 Sv. Not all this volume participates in MW formation, but 0.8 Sv of entrained central waters; of which 0.5 Sv are from central waters of subpolar origin and 0.3 Sv from subtropical central waters. Of the 4.9 Sv of subtropical central waters advected by the Azores Current, about 0.7 Sv would reach the Gulf of Cadiz region either to take part in central water entrainment or to flow across the Gibraltar Strait as part of the Atlantic inflow to the Mediterranean Sea.

  17. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  18. Dynamics of heat and mass transport in a quantum insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    The real-time evolution of two pieces of quantum insulators, initially at different temperatures, is studied when they are glued together. Specifically, each subsystem is taken as a Bose-Hubbard model in a Mott insulator state. The process of temperature equilibration via heat transfer is simulated in real time using the minimally entangled typical thermal states algorithm. The analytic theory based on quasiparticle transport is also given.

  19. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing

  20. Advection of methane in the hydrate zone: model, analysis and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peszynska, Malgorzata; Showalter, Ralph E.; Webster, Justin T.

    2015-12-01

    A two-phase two-component model is formulated for the advective-diffusive transport of methane in liquid phase through sediment with the accompanying formation and dissolution of methane hydrate. This free-boundary problem has a unique generalized solution in $L^1$; the proof combines analysis of the stationary semilinear elliptic Dirichlet problem with the nonlinear semigroup theory in Banach space for an m-accretive multi-valued operator. Additional estimates of maximum principle type are obtained, and these permit appropriate maximal extensions of the phase-change relations. An example with pure advection indicates the limitations of these estimates and of the model developed here. We also consider and analyze the coupled pressure equation that determines the advective flux in the transport model.

  1. Power law breakthrough curve tailing in a fracture: The role of advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, Aldo; Becker, Matthew W.

    2015-06-01

    We offer an explanation of the strongly tailed solute breakthrough curve typically observed when a tracer test is conducted in fractured bedrock. In this example, we limit the model to a single planar fracture of varying aperture. Flow heterogeneity derives from variable fracture aperture, which implies variable transmissivity (T). The analysis employs a physically based model well-suited to strong heterogeneity and relies only upon advective transport. The purely advective model is able to explain a power-law trend of magnitude -2 to -3 in the breakthrough curve tail; a range that has been found in field tracer experiments. The principle cause of this trend is the comparatively slow transport in zones of small transmissivity (tight aperture). Slow advection occurs when either heterogeneity (variance of lnT) is strong or when the assumed heterogeneity distribution is non-Gaussian. Thus, we link breakthrough tailing to the statistical parameters for the transmissivity field.

  2. Mass spectrometer. [On Space Transportation System 2 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) operates in the range from 2 to 150 amu. It is pointed out that the Mass Spectrometer on STS-2 performed very well. It was found that the column density of H2O effluent from the Shuttle reached a maximum of 1 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm at 7 hr, 30 min and decreased by a factor of 7.5 during the subsequent 40 hrs. The count rate response of H2O could be correlated with mission-related events, taking into account the dumping of supply water, the operation of the Flash Evaporator System, and the firing of a primary reaction control system engine.

  3. Radial reactive solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanrong; Zhan, Hongbin

    2013-11-01

    Radial reactive transport is investigated in an aquifer-aquitard system considering the important processes such as advection, radial and vertical dispersions for the aquifer, vertical advection and dispersion for the aquitards, and first-order biodegradation or radioactive decay. We solved the coupled governing equations of transport in the aquifer and the aquitards by honoring the continuity of concentration and mass flux across the aquifer-aquitard interfaces and recognizing the concentration variation along the aquifer thickness. This effort improved the averaged-approximation (AA) model, which dealt with radial dispersion in an aquifer-aquitard system by excluding the aquitard advection. To compare with our new solution, we expanded the AA model by including the aquitard advection. The expanded AA model considerably overestimated the mass in the upper aquitard when an upward advection existed there. The rates of mass change in the upper aquitard from the new solution and the AA model solution increased with time following sub-linear fashions. The times corresponding to the peak values of the residence time distributions for the AA model, the expanded AA model, and the new model were almost the same. The residence time distributions seemed to follow the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution closely when plotting the time in logarithmic scale. In addition, we developed a finite-element COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the problem, and found that the COMSOL solution agreed with the new solution well.

  4. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last nine years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification due to the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass-spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet. PMID:24658804

  5. Nocturnal Respiration: Can we use the Temporal Dynamics of Advection to Derive an Alternative to the u*-Threshold Filtering Technique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gorsel, E.; Leuning, R.; Delpierre, N.; Haverd, V.; Davy, R.; Cleugh, H.

    2007-12-01

    Even moderately complex topography can lead to significant horizontal and vertical advection and a consequent underestimation of nocturnal CO2 fluxes derived from eddy covariance measurements on a single tower. The presence of advective transport is identified using the time series of CO2 concentrations. Given a continuous input of carbon (soil-, wood- and leaf respiration) into a control volume (CV) we expect concentrations in that control volume to increase through time if there is no flux through the upper lid and no advective transport. Time series measurements usually show a strong increase in carbon concentration once the atmosphere is stably stratified, but after this initially strong increase the temporal build-up of concentrations is slower and may even remain relatively constant. As this steady-state situation is not associated with fluxes through the top of the CV we can assume that advection is draining CO2 away. We have analysed data from 24 Fluxnet sites where turbulent flux (Fc) and change of storage (Sc) of CO2 are routinely measured. Analysis of Sc confirms the observation by Aubinet et al. [1] that a common feature in canopy flows is that a maximum rate of change of CO2 occurs in the early evening. This suggests that after this maximum, the advection terms in the mass balance become non negligible. Based on this observation we have developed an alternative to the u*-threshold filtering technique [2]. We have shown that applying this alternative approach leads to good agreement between eddy covariance derived estimates of respiration and independent chamber measurements on a study site in a medium dense Eucalyptus forest in south-east Australia. In this contribution we discuss the applicability of this approach for several sites ranging from the tropics to subpolar latitudes and located in terrain that varies from almost ideally flat to very complex. We compare results from three different estimates of respiration and discuss differences between

  6. Modeling of diagenesis in relation to coupled mass and heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrak, R.

    1996-12-31

    Pore fluid flow is an important factor influencing the diagenetic evolution of rocks, as has been shown by various diagenetic studies, especially in connection with fluid inclusion measurements. A 3D- computer model is presented, which allows to simulate coupled mass and heat transport in porous rocks. The model is used to study the interaction of heat and mass transport with respect to the temporal and spatial evolution of sandstones. Mineral dissolution or precipitation change the mineralogical composition of rocks, and modify the physical properties at the same time. Altering the permeability of the rock affects the fluid flow system in the rock which determines the mass transport of the entire system. In addition to mass transport, fluid flow transports thermal energy, which may modify the temperature evolution of the rock. The model will be used to examine the effect of convective heat and mass transport on temperature and diagenetic evolution of clastic rocks. Although the model cannot claim to simulate nature, it can be used to study the effect of different mechanisms, and their interaction within the coupled system. For practical applications, the model may be used to determine possible flow rates, which are necessary to explain the observed diagenetic and thermal history of sandstones.

  7. Spatial correlations, additivity, and fluctuations in conserved-mass transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arghya; Chatterjee, Sayani; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-06-01

    We exactly calculate two-point spatial correlation functions in steady state in a broad class of conserved-mass transport processes, which are governed by chipping, diffusion, and coalescence of masses. We find that the spatial correlations are in general short-ranged and, consequently, on a large scale, these transport processes possess a remarkable thermodynamic structure in the steady state. That is, the processes have an equilibrium-like additivity property and, consequently, a fluctuation-response relation, which help us to obtain subsystem mass distributions in the limit of subsystem size large.

  8. On the optimum fields and bounds for heat and mass transport in two turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay

    2011-12-01

    The optimum theory of turbulence is one of the few tools for obtaining analytical results for transport of heat, mass or momentum by turbulent flows. This is achieved by asymptotic theory which is valid for large values of the characteristic numbers of the investigated fluid system. For small and intermediate values of the Reynolds, Rayleigh or Taylor numbers we have to solve numerically the Euler-Lagrange equations of the corresponding variational problems. Below we discuss numerical results from the application of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence to two problems: convective heat transport in non-rotating and rotating fluid layer and mass transport in pipe flow. We obtain profiles of the optimum fields and discuss the evolution of the thickness of the boundary layers as well as present our first results about the lower bound on the mass transport in a pipe flow.

  9. A Global Assessment of Accelerations in Mass Transport of Surface Geophysical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transport in the Earth's surface geophysical fluid layer has complex spatiotemporal patterns. The GRACE gravity mission provides an unprecedented global capability to monitor this important process with high accuracy and resolution. Accurate assessments of global mass transport patterns and budget also depend critically on changes in degree-1 coefficients (geocenter motion) and in Earth's dynamic oblateness coefficient J2. We combine GRACE measurements, time series of GNSS data, JPL's ECCO ocean bottom pressure model, and high-resolution loose a priori models of mass variation regimes to derive complete spherical harmonic spectra of detrended mass variations up to degree and order 180. Mass accelerations are estimated along with linear, annual, semiannual, and the 161-day tidal aliasing components from coefficient time series. The appropriateness of a priori information and estimate uncertainties are further evaluated by variance component estimation and residual statistics of fitting the time series. During the GRACE data period of 2002.2-2015.0, accelerations in mass transport are geographically uneven with significant positive or negative accelerations in various parts of the world. While Greenland and West Antarctica show strong accelerated mass losses, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean have significant positive accelerations with reversals of earlier mass loss trends. No evidence of non-Arctic global mean sea level acceleration due to mass has been found. Depending on region, some estimated accelerations are also not steady over time due to large irregular and interannual variations.

  10. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation in two dimensions by a finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    We extend the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) for solution of the advection-dispersion equation to two dimensions. The method can conserve mass globally and is not limited by restrictions on the size of the grid Peclet or Courant number. Therefore, it is well suited for solution of advection-dominated ground-water solute transport problems. In test problem comparisons with standard finite differences, FVELLAM is able to attain accurate solutions on much coarser space and time grids. On fine grids, the accuracy of the two methods is comparable. A critical aspect of FVELLAM (and all other ELLAMs) is evaluation of the mass storage integral from the preceding time level. In FVELLAM this may be accomplished with either a forward or backtracking approach. The forward tracking approach conserves mass globally and is the preferred approach. The backtracking approach is less computationally intensive, but not globally mass conservative. Boundary terms are systematically represented as integrals in space and time which are evaluated by a common integration scheme in conjunction with forward tracking through time. Unlike the one-dimensional case, local mass conservation cannot be guaranteed, so slight oscillations in concentration can develop, particularly in the vicinity of inflow or outflow boundaries. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Transport of magnetic flux and mass in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Wei, H. Y.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    It is well accepted that cold plasma sourced by Enceladus is ultimately lost to the solar wind, while the magnetic flux convecting outward with the plasma must return to the inner magnetosphere. However, whether the interchange or reconnection, or a combination of the two processes is the dominant mechanism in returning the magnetic flux is still under debate. Initial Cassini observations have shown that the magnetic flux returns in the form of flux tubes in the inner magnetosphere. Here we investigate those events with 10 year Cassini magnetometer data and confirm that their magnetic signatures are determined by the background plasma environments: inside (outside) the plasma disk, the returning magnetic field is enhanced (depressed) in strength. The distribution, temporal variation, shape, and transportation rate of the flux tubes are also characterized. The flux tubes break into smaller ones as they convect in. The shape of their cross section is closer to circular than fingerlike as produced in the simulations based on the interchange mechanism. In addition, no sudden changes in any flux tube properties can be found at the "boundary" which has been claimed to separate the reconnection and interchange-dominant regions. On the other hand, reasonable cold plasma loss rate and outflow velocity can be obtained if the transport rate of the magnetic flux matches the reconnection rate, which supports reconnection alone as the dominant mechanism in unloading the cold plasma from the inner magnetosphere and returning the magnetic flux from the tail.

  12. Analytical solution of two-dimensional solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hongbin; Wen, Zhang; Huang, Guanhua; Sun, Dongmin

    2009-07-21

    This study deals with two-dimensional solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system by maintaining rigorous mass conservation at the aquifer-aquitard interface. Advection, longitudinal dispersion, and transverse vertical dispersion are considered in the aquifer. Vertical advection and diffusion are considered in the aquitards. The first-type and the third-type boundary conditions are considered in the aquifer. This study differs from the commonly used averaged approximation (AA) method that treats the mass flux between the aquifer and aquitard as an averaged volumetric source/sink term in the governing equation of transport in the aquifer. Analytical solutions of concentrations in the aquitards and aquifer and mass transported between the aquifer and upper or lower aquitard are obtained in the Laplace domain, and are subsequently inverted numerically to yield results in the real time domain (the Zhan method). The breakthrough curves (BTCs) and distribution profiles in the aquifer obtained in this study are drastically different from those obtained using the AA method. Comparison of the numerical simulation using the model MT3DMS and the Zhan method indicates that the numerical result differs from that of the Zhan method for an asymmetric case when aquitard advections are at the same direction. The AA method overestimates the mass transported into the upper aquitard when an upward advection exists in the upper aquitard. The mass transported between the aquifer and the aquitard is sensitive to the aquitard Peclet number, but less sensitive to the aquitard diffusion coefficient. PMID:19477033

  13. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  14. Evolution of Advection Upstream Splitting Method Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of advection upstream splitting method(AUSM) schemes. The main ingredients that have led to the development of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been reviewed, thus the ideas behind AUSM. First and foremost is the concept of upwinding. Second, the use of Riemann problem in constructing the numerical flux in the finite-volume setting. Third, the necessity of including all physical processes, as characterised by the linear (convection) and nonlinear (acoustic) fields. Fourth, the realisation of separating the flux into convection and pressure fluxes. The rest of this review briefly outlines the technical evolution of AUSM and more details can be found in the cited references. Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics methods, hyperbolic systems, advection upstream splitting method, conservation laws, upwinding, CFD

  15. Passive advection in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekar, Anjor; Schekochihin, Alexander; Hammett, Greg; Dorland, William; Loureiro, Nuno

    2014-10-01

    We consider a simple kinetic model for the evolution of the particle distribution function in a magnetized turbulent plasma that includes both phase mixing (Landau damping) and advection by a stochastic velocity field: a ``kinetic passive scalar'' in the Batchelor regime. The advection due to stochastic velocity field allows for a stochastic version of the plasma echo by coupling the ``phase-mixing'' and the ``un-phase-mixing'' components of the free energy. We have developed a new analytical framework to diagnose the efficiency of such coupling. We have also developed a new GPU code named Gandalf that solves this kinetic model numerically. In this poster, we shall present numerical and analytical results related to this work.

  16. Antidiffusive velocities for multipass donor cell advection

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.G. ); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Smolarkiewicz describes an iterative process for approximating the advection equation. Basically, he uses a donor cell approximation to correct for the truncation error of the originally specified donor cell scheme. This step may be repeated an arbitrary number of times leading to successively more accurate solutions to the advection equation. In this report, we show how to sum the successive approximations analytically to find a single antidiffusive velocity that represents the effects of an arbitrary number of passes. The analysis is first done dimension to illustrate the method. The analysis is then repeated in two dimensions. The existence of cross terms in the truncation analysis of the two-dimensional equations introduces an extra complication into the calculation. We discuss the implementation of our new antidiffusive velocities and provide some examples of applications. 6 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  19. ADVECTION, EDGE, AND OASIS EFFECTS ON SPATIAL MOISTURE AND FLUX FIELDS FROM LIDAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively narrow forest stands such as the riparian Tamarisk bordering the Rio Grande are subject to dry air advection from the adjacent semi-desert environment. The transport of warm dry air into the canopy has a profound effect upon the spatial properties of the moisture field and associated lat...

  20. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  1. Tomography-based characterization of ice-air interface dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Andreoli, Christian; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. A functional understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on regional and global climate to assessing avalanche formation. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Experiments specifically analyzed sublimation and deposition of water vapor on the ice structure. In addition, an analysis of the ice-air interface dynamics was carried out using a macroscopic equivalent model of heat and water vapor transport through a snow layer. The results indicate that sublimation of the ice matrix dominated for flow rates < 10-6 m3 s-1 while during increased mass flow rates the water vapor deposition supplied by the advective flow counteracted sublimation. A flow rate dependence of water vapor deposition at the ice interface was observed, asymptotically approaching an average estimated maximum deposition rate on the whole sample of 1.05 · 10-4 kg m-3 s-1. The growth of microsized whisker-like crystals on larger ice crystals was detected on microscope photographs, leading to an increase of the specific surface area and thus suggest a change of the physical and optical properties of the snow. The estimated values of the curvature effect of the ice crystals and the interface kinetic coefficient are in good agreement with previously published values.

  2. Heat advection processes leading to El Niño events as depicted by an ensemble of ocean assimilation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Joan; Bordoni, Simona; Petrova, Desislava; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    The oscillatory nature of El Niño-Southern Oscillation results from an intricate superposition of near-equilibrium balances and out-of-phase disequilibrium processes between the ocean and the atmosphere. The main objective of the present work is to perform an exhaustive spatiotemporal analysis of the upper ocean heat budget in an ensemble of state-of-the-art ocean assimilation products. We put specific emphasis on the ocean heat advection mechanisms, and their representation in individual ensemble members and in the different stages of the ENSO oscillation leading to EN events. Our analyses consistently show that the initial subsurface warming in the western equatorial Pacific is advected to the central Pacific by the equatorial undercurrent, which, together with the equatorward advection associated with anomalies in both the meridional temperature gradient and circulation at the level of the thermocline, explains the heat buildup in the central Pacific during the recharge phase. We also find that the recharge phase is characterized by an increase of meridional tilting of the thermocline, as well as a southward upper-ocean cross-equatorial mass transport resulting from Ekman-induced anomalous vertical motion in the off-equatorial regions. Although differences between data sets are generally small, and anomalies tend to have the same sign, the differences in the magnitude of the meridional term are seen to be key for explaining the different propagation speed of the subsurface warming tendency along the thermocline. The only exception is GECCO, which does not produce the patterns of meridional surface Ekman divergence (subsurface Sverdrup convergence) in the western and central equatorial Pacific.

  3. Mass-height profile and total mass transport of wind eroded aeolian sediments from rangelands of the Indian Thar Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertia, R. S.; Santra, Priyabrata; Kandpal, B. K.; Prasad, R.

    2010-11-01

    Wind erosion is an active land degradation process in the Indian Thar Desert and severe dust storm events during hot summer months in the region are very common. Assessment of soil loss due to dust storm events from major land use systems of the Indian Thar Desert is highly essential for proper environmental planning. Characterization of the mass-height profile of wind eroded aeolian sediment is an important step to compute soil loss/mass transport but was not previously studied in the region. In the present study, aeolian mass fluxes (kg m -2) at different heights from soil surface were measured at two major rangelands in the Indian Thar Desert: Overgrazing rangeland at Jaisalmer (26°55'N and 70°57'E), and controlled grazing rangeland at Chandan (27°01'N and 71°01'E). Evaluation of several mass-height profile models revealed that a power decay function [ q( z) = az-b, where q( z) is the measured mass flux at an height of z (m) from soil surface; a and b are parameters of the equation] was best to characterize the mass-height relationship of aeolian sediments from the Indian Thar Desert. The average mass transport rate (kg m -1 day -1) or the total soil loss during hot summer months was significantly higher at the overgrazed rangeland site than at the controlled grazing rangeland site. Therefore, protection of existing rangelands, which comprise about 80% geographical area of the Indian Thar Desert may check the land degradation process due to wind erosion.

  4. Mass Transport in Nanocomposite Materials for Membrane Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizia, Michele; Puccini, Ilaria; Messori, Massimo; Grazia De Angelis, Maria; Sarti, Giulio C.

    2010-06-01

    The vapor transport properties of nanocomposite materials obtained with different techniques and based on a high free volume glassy polymer suitable for membrane separations, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] (PTMSP), have been determined and modeled. The simple mixing in solution of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles with PTMSP leads to mixed matrix membranes, which show higher free volume and higher values of diffusivity and permeability than the pure polymeric material. If a sol-gel route is followed, with PTMSP and Tetraethoxysylane (TEOS) as precursor of the silica phase, one obtains hybrid matrices characterized by lower vapor diffusion and sorption values with respect to the pure polymer. Although the trends observed are very regular functions of the silica content in the composite, none of the behavior observed obeys traditional models for composites permeability, such as the Maxwell's one. Both types of behaviors were modeled considering the variation of polymer fractional free volume induced by the inorganic phase: in the mixed matrices the poor interactions between silica and polymer chains favor the formation of nanovoids at the interface, increasing the free volume and the vapor diffusivity, while in the more interconnected hybrid matrices the inorganic domains act as constraints, reducing the volume occupied by the polymeric phase, which is naturally endowed with a very high excess free volume.

  5. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K{sub d} model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  6. Backward fractional advection dispersion model for contaminant source prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2016-04-01

    The forward Fractional Advection Dispersion Equation (FADE) provides a useful model for non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous porous media. The space FADE captures the long leading tail, skewness, and fast spreading typically seen in concentration profiles from field data. This paper develops the corresponding backward FADE model, to identify source location and release time. The backward method is developed from the theory of inverse problems, and then explained from a stochastic point of view. The resultant backward FADE differs significantly from the traditional backward Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) because the fractional derivative is not self-adjoint and the probability density function for backward locations is highly skewed. Finally, the method is validated using tracer data from a well-known field experiment, where the peak of the backward FADE curve predicts source release time, while the median or a range of percentiles can be used to determine the most likely source location for the observed plume. The backward ADE cannot reliably identify the source in this application, since the forward ADE does not provide an adequate fit to the concentration data.

  7. Fram Strait and Greenland Sea transports, water masses, and water mass transformations 1999-2010 (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnela, Marika; Rudels, Bert; Goszczko, Ilona; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    The exchanges between the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean are important for the ocean circulation and climate. Transports are here estimated using summer hydrographic data from the Greenland Sea and the Fram Strait. Geostrophic transports are computed from hydrographic sections at 75°N in the Greenland Sea and at about 79°N in the Fram Strait. Geostrophic velocities are adjusted with summer velocities derived from Argo floats, and four conservation constraints are applied to a box closed by the two sections. The estimated net volume transports are 0.8 ± 1.5 Sv southward. Net freshwater transports through the Greenland Sea section are estimated at 54 ± 20 mSv and through the Fram Strait section at 66 ± 9 mSv. Heat loss in the area between the two sections is estimated at 9 ± 12 TW. Convection depths in the Greenland Sea are estimated from observations and vary between about 200 and 2000 dbar showing no trend. Water mass properties in the Greenland Sea are affected both by convection and lateral mixing. Vertical mixing is estimated from hydrography and based on it about 1 Sv of diluted Arctic Ocean waters are estimated to enter the Greenland Sea. The properties of Atlantic, intermediate, and deep waters are studied. Deep water properties are defined using water mass triangles and are subject to decadal changes.

  8. Temporal variability of mass transport across Canary Islands Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; José Machín, Francisco; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The equatorward flowing Canary Current (CC) is the main feature of the circulation in the Canary Islands region. The CC flow perturbation by the Canary Islands originate the Canary Eddy Corridor which is the major pathway for long lived eddies in the subtropical North Atlantic (Sangrà et al., 2009, DSR). Therefore the variability of the CC passing through the Canary Archipelago will have both local and regional importance. Past studies on the CC variability trough the Canary Islands point out a clearly seasonal variability (Fraile-Nuez et al, 2010 (JGR); Hernández-Guerra et al, 2002 (DSR)). However those studies where focused on the eastern islands channels missing the variability through the western island channels which are the main source of long lived eddies. In order to fill this gap from November 2012 until September 2013 we conducted trimonthly surveys crossing the whole islands channels using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). XBT and XCTD where launched along the cross channels transects. Additionally a closed box circling the Archipelago was performed on October 2013 as part of the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) using also XBT and XCTD. Dynamical variables where derived inferring salinity from S(T,p) analytical relationships for the region updated with new XCTD data. High resolution, vertical sections of temperature, potential density, geostrophic velocity and transport where obtained. Our preliminary results suggest that the CC suffer a noticeable acceleration in those islands channels where eddy shedding is more frequent. They also indicate a clearly seasonal variability of the flows passing the islands channels. With this regard we observed significant differences on the obtained seasonal variability with respect the cited past studies on the eastern islands channel (Lanzarote / Fuerteventura - Africa coast). This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092) and the European Union (FEDER).

  9. Influence of porewater advection on denitrification in carbonate sands: Evidence from repacked sediment column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2012-11-01

    Porewater flow enhances mineralization rates in organic-poor permeable sands. Here, a series of sediment column experiments were undertaken to assess the potential effect of advective porewater transport on denitrification in permeable carbonate sands collected from Heron Island (Great Barrier Reef). Experimental conditions (flow path length, advection rate, and temperature) were manipulated to represent conditions similar to near shore tropical environments. HgCl2-poisoned controls were used to assess whether reactions were microbially mediated. Overall, significant correlations were found between oxygen consumption and N2 production. The N:O2 slope of 0.114 implied that about 75% of all the nitrogen mineralized was denitrified. A 4-fold increase in sediment column length (from 10 to 40 cm) resulted in an overall increase in oxygen consumption (1.6-fold), TCO2 production (1.8-fold), and denitrification (1.9-fold). Oxic respiration increased quickly until advection reached 80 L m-2 h-1 and then plateaued at higher advection rates. Interestingly, denitrification peaked (up to 336 μmol N2 m-2 h-1) at intermediate advection rates (30-80 L m-2 h-1). We speculate that intermediate advection rates enhance the development of microniches (i.e., steep oxygen gradients) within porous carbonate sands, perhaps providing optimum conditions for denitrification. The denitrification peak fell within the broad range of advection rates (often on scales of 1-100 L m-2 h-1) typically found on continental shelves implying that carbonate sands may play a major, but as yet unquantified, role in oceanic nitrogen budgets.

  10. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications. PMID:26797529

  11. Mass transport at infinite regular arrays of microband electrodes submitted to natural convection: theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Pebay, Cécile; Sella, Catherine; Thouin, Laurent; Amatore, Christian

    2013-12-17

    Mass transport at infinite regular arrays of microband electrodes was investigated theoretically and experimentally in unstirred solutions. Even in the absence of forced hydrodynamics, natural convection limits the convection-free domain up to which diffusion layers may expand. Hence, several regimes of mass transport may take place according to the electrode size, gap between electrodes, time scale of the experiment, and amplitude of natural convection. They were identified through simulation by establishing zone diagrams that allowed all relative contributions to mass transport to be delineated. Dynamic and steady-state regimes were compared to those achieved at single microband electrodes. These results were validated experimentally by monitoring the chronoamperometric responses of arrays with different ratios of electrode width to gap distance and by mapping steady-state concentration profiles above their surface through scanning electrochemical microscopy. PMID:24283775

  12. A PERFECT MATCH CONDITION FOR POINT-SET MATCHING PROBLEMS USING THE OPTIMAL MASS TRANSPORT APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, PENGWEN; LIN, CHING-LONG; CHERN, I-LIANG

    2013-01-01

    We study the performance of optimal mass transport-based methods applied to point-set matching problems. The present study, which is based on the L2 mass transport cost, states that perfect matches always occur when the product of the point-set cardinality and the norm of the curl of the non-rigid deformation field does not exceed some constant. This analytic result is justified by a numerical study of matching two sets of pulmonary vascular tree branch points whose displacement is caused by the lung volume changes in the same human subject. The nearly perfect match performance verifies the effectiveness of this mass transport-based approach. PMID:23687536

  13. Purely Lagrangian Simulation of Advection, Dispersion, Precipitation, and Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D.; Zhang, Y.; Reeves, D. M.

    2008-05-01

    We extend the advantages of Lagrangian random walk particle tracking (RWPT) methods that have long been used to simulate advection and dispersion in highly heterogeneous media. By formulating dissolution as a random, independent decay process, the classical continuum rate law is recovered. Formulating the random precipitation process requires a consideration of the probability that two nearby particles will coincide in a given time period. This depends on local mixing (as by diffusion) and the total domain particle number density, which are fixed and therefore easy to calculate. The result is that the classical law of mass action for equilibrium reactions can be reproduced in an ensemble sense. The same number of parameters for A+B ⇌ C are needed in a probabilistic versus continuum reaction simulation-- —one each for forward and backward probabilities that correspond to rates. The random nature of the simulations allows for significant disequilibrium in any given region at any time that is independent of the numerical details such as time stepping or particle density. This is exemplified by nearby or intermingled groups of reactants and little or no product--—a result that is often noted in the field that is difficult to reconcile with continuum methods or coarse-grained Eulerian models. Our results support recent results of perturbed advection-dispersion-reaction continuum models (Luo et al., WRR 44, 2008), and suggest that many different kinds of reactions can be easily added to existing RWPT codes.

  14. Concentration and mass dependence of transport coefficients and correlation functions in binary mixtures with high mass asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Fenz, W; Mryglod, I M; Prytula, O; Folk, R

    2009-08-01

    Correlation functions and transport coefficients of self-diffusion and shear viscosity of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture with components differing only in their particle mass are studied up to high values of the mass ratio mu, including the limiting case mu = infinity, for different mole fractions x. Within a large range of x and mu the product of the diffusion coefficient of the heavy species D(2) and the total shear viscosity of the mixture eta(m) is found to remain constant, obeying a generalized Stokes-Einstein relation. At high liquid density, large mass ratios lead to a pronounced cage effect that is observable in the mean square displacement, the velocity autocorrelation function, and the van Hove correlation function. PMID:19792112

  15. Concentration and mass dependence of transport coefficients and correlation functions in binary mixtures with high mass asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenz, W.; Mryglod, I. M.; Prytula, O.; Folk, R.

    2009-08-01

    Correlation functions and transport coefficients of self-diffusion and shear viscosity of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture with components differing only in their particle mass are studied up to high values of the mass ratio μ , including the limiting case μ=∞ , for different mole fractions x . Within a large range of x and μ the product of the diffusion coefficient of the heavy species D2 and the total shear viscosity of the mixture ηm is found to remain constant, obeying a generalized Stokes-Einstein relation. At high liquid density, large mass ratios lead to a pronounced cage effect that is observable in the mean square displacement, the velocity autocorrelation function, and the van Hove correlation function.

  16. Aerosols in polluted versus nonpolluted air masses Long-range transport and effects on clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Van Valin, C. C.; Castillo, R. C.; Kadlecek, J. A.; Ganor, E.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United States, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of cloud water were measured on Whiteface Mountain, NY, during the summers of 1981 and 1982. In several case studies, the data were cross-correlated with different air mass types - background continental, polluted continental, and maritime - that were advected to the sampling site. The results are the following: (1) Anthropogenic sources hundreds of kilometers upwind cause the small-particle (accumulation) mode number to increase from hundreds of thousands per cubic centimeter and the mass loading to increase from a few to several tens of micrograms per cubic meter, mostly in the form of sulfur aerosols. (2) A significant fraction of anthropogenic sulfur appears to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to affect the cloud drop concentration. (3) Clouds in Atlantic maritime air masses have cloud drop spectra that are markedly different from those measured in continental clouds. The drop concentration is significantly lower, and the drop size spectra are heavily skewed toward large drops. (4) Effects of anthropogenic pollutants on cloud water ionic composition are an increase of nitrate by a factor of 50, an increase of sulfate by more than one order of magnitude, and an increase of ammonium ion by a factor of 7. The net effect of the changes in ionic concentrations is an increase in cloud water acidity. An anion deficit even in maritime clouds suggests an unknown, possibly biogenic, source that could be responsible for a pH below neutral, which is frequently observed in nonpolluted clouds.

  17. Pore Water PAH Transport in Amended Sediment Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidley, P. T.; Kwon, S.; Ghosh, U.

    2009-05-01

    Capping is a common remediation strategy for contaminated sediments that creates a physical barrier between contaminated sediments and the water column. Diffusive flux of contaminants through a sediment cap is small. However, under certain hydrodynamic conditions such as groundwater potential and tidal pumping, groundwater advection can accelerate contaminant transport. Hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be transported through the cap under advective conditions. To better understand PAH migration under these conditions, physical models of sediment caps were evaluated in the laboratory through direct measurement of pore water using solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Contaminated sediment and capping material was obtained from an existing Superfund site that was capped at Eagle Harbor, Washington. A PAH dissolution model linked to an advection-dispersion equation with retardation using published organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) was compared to measured PAHs in the sediment and cap porewater of the physical model.

  18. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya’an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  19. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  20. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Koay, Eugene J; Baio, Flavio E; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R; Tamm, Eric P; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N; Rozner, Marc A; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L; Wolff, Robert A; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Fleming, Jason B

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  1. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Forbes, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  2. Geomorphological characteristics and variability of Holocene mass-transport complexes, St. Lawrence River Estuary, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas; Brake, Virginia; Campbell, Calvin; Duchesne, Mathieu J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently acquired multibeam bathymetry data are used to investigate seafloor instability features along a 310 km-long segment of the St. Lawrence River Estuary. The analysis of this dataset indicates that submarine slides occur over a much larger area than previously recognized and that Holocene sediments are reworked by mass-transport along significant portions of both the northwest and southeast margins of the Laurentian Channel. In the surveyed area, 96 individual mass-transport complexes (MTCs) were identified representing 13% of the seabed. MTCs vary in area from less than 1 km2 to more than 40 km2 and exhibit various geomorphological signatures. Qualitative observation reveals an apparent disparity between MTCs that remain coherent and those that disintegrate during downslope transport evolving into a blocky morphological signature. For all MTCs, morphological parameters have been measured (area, length, and height) or calculated (slope and roughness). This quantitative analysis provides a unique opportunity to study these parameters in a statistically significant and homogeneous dataset located in a relatively small area that experienced a similar Quaternary history. In many cases, mass transport events appear to initiate in the vicinity of steep bedrock walls located along some segments of the estuary. The timing of mass-transport events was not constrained during this study. However, the fact that the region hosts the Charlevoix seismic zone, the most tectonically active area in eastern Canada, strongly suggests that earthquakes acted as a trigger for submarine landsliding.

  3. Pesticide Transport with Runoff from Creeping Bentgrass Turf: Relationship of Pesticide Properties to Mass Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The off-site transport of pesticides with runoff is both an agronomic and environmental concern resulting from reduced control of target pests in the area of application and contamination of surrounding ecosystems. Experiments were designed to measure the quantity of pesticides in runoff from creepi...

  4. Mass and momentum turbulent transport experiments with confined swirling coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Johnson, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Swirling coaxial jets mixing downstream, discharging into an expanded duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the combustion community. A combination of laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques was employed to obtain mean and fluctuating velocity and concentration distributions which were used to derive mass and momentum turbulent transport parameters currently incorporated into various combustor flow models. Flow visualization techniques were also employed to determine qualitatively the time dependent characteristics of the flow and the scale of turbulence. The results of these measurements indicated that the largest momentum turbulent transport was in the r-z plane. Peak momentum turbulent transport rates were approximately the same as those for the nonswirling flow condition. The mass turbulent transport process for swirling flow was complicated. Mixing occurred in several steps of axial and radial mass transport and was coupled with a large radial mean convective flux. Mixing for swirling flow was completed in one-third the length required for nonswirling flow.

  5. A Study of the Physical Processes of an Advection Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duan Yang; Yan, Wen Lian; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei Juan; Niu, Sheng Jie; Li, Zi Hua

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of advection fog appeared in the Yangtze River delta region between 1 and 2 December 2009. Here, we detail the fog formation and dissipation processes and the background weather conditions. The fog boundary layer and its formation and dissipation mechanisms have also been analyzed using field data recorded in a northern suburb of Nanjing. The results showed the following: (1) This advection fog was generated by interaction between advection of a north-east cold ground layer and a south-east warm upper layer. The double-inversion structure generated by this interaction between the cold and warm advections and steady south-east vapour transport was the main cause of this long-lasting fog. The double-inversion structure provided good thermal conditions for the thick fog, and the south-east vapour transport was not only conducive to maintaining the thickness of the fog but also sustained its long duration. (2) The fog-top altitude was over 600 m for most of the time, and the fog reduced visibility to less than 100 m for approximately 12 h. (3) The low-level jet near the lower inversion layer also played a role in maintaining the thick fog system by promoting heat, momentum and south-east vapour transport.

  6. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  7. Modeling of Convective-Stratiform Precipitation Processes: Sensitivity to Partitioning Methods and Numerical Advection Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Steve; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Ferrier, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Six different convective-stratiform separation techniques, including a new technique that utilizes the ratio of vertical and terminal velocities, are compared and evaluated using two-dimensional numerical simulations of a tropical [Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE)] and midlatitude continental [Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRESTORM)] squall line. The simulations are made using two different numerical advection schemes: 4th order and positive definite advection. Comparisons are made in terms of rainfall, cloud coverage, mass fluxes, apparent heating and moistening, mean hydrometeor profiles, CFADs (Contoured Frequency with Altitude Diagrams), microphysics, and latent heating retrieval. Overall, it was found that the different separation techniques produced results that qualitatively agreed. However, the quantitative differences were significant. Observational comparisons were unable to conclusively evaluate the performance of the techniques. Latent heating retrieval was shown to be sensitive to the use of separation technique mainly due to the stratiform region for methods that found very little stratiform rain. The midlatitude PRESTORM simulation was found to be nearly invariant with respect to advection type for most quantities while for TOGA COARE fourth order advection produced numerous shallow convective cores and positive definite advection fewer cells that were both broader and deeper penetrating above the freezing level.

  8. Determination of O₂ Mass Transport at the Pt | PFSA Ionomer Interface under Reduced Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Novitski, David; Holdcroft, Steven

    2015-12-16

    Oxygen mass transport resistance through the ionomer component in the cathode catalyst layer is considered to contribute overpotential losses in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Whereas it is known that water uptake, water transport, and proton conductivity are reduced upon reducing relative humidity, the effect on oxygen mass transport remains unknown. We report a two-electrode approach to determine mass transport coefficients for the oxygen reduction reaction in air at the Pt/perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer membrane interface between 90 and 30% RH at 70 °C using a Pt microdisk in a solid state electrochemical cell. Potential-step chronoamperometry was performed at specific mass-transport limiting potentials to allow for the elucidation of the oxygen diffusion coefficient (D(bO2)) and oxygen concentration (c(bO2)). In our efforts, novel approaches in data acquisition, as well as analysis, were examined because of the dynamic nature of the membrane under lowered hydration conditions. Linear regression analysis reveals a decrease in oxygen permeability (D(bO2c(bO2)) by a factor of 1.7 and 3.4 from 90 to 30% RH for Nafion 211 membrane and membranes cast from Nafion DE2020 ionomer solutions, respectively. Additionally, nonlinear curve fitting by way of the Shoup-Szabo equation is employed to analyze the entire current transient during potential step controlled ORR. We also report on the presence of an RH dependence of our previously reported time-dependency measurements for O2 mass transport coefficients. PMID:26583742

  9. Mass transport and alloying during InN growth on GaN by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xie, M.H.; Wu, H.S.; Tong, S.Y.

    2006-05-29

    During Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth of InN on GaN by molecular-beam epitaxy, a mass transport is noted from the two-dimensional wetting layer and/or the surface excess metal adlayers to the SK islands when the excess nitrogen flux is used for deposition. The extent of mass transport depends on the material coverage. For growth under the excess indium flux condition, no such mass transport is observed.

  10. Coupled ensemble flow line advection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Yuan, Xiaoru; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Xiaomin

    2013-12-01

    Ensemble run simulations are becoming increasingly widespread. In this work, we couple particle advection with pathline analysis to visualize and reveal the differences among the flow fields of ensemble runs. Our method first constructs a variation field using a Lagrangian-based distance metric. The variation field characterizes the variation between vector fields of the ensemble runs, by extracting and visualizing the variation of pathlines within ensemble. Parallelism in a MapReduce style is leveraged to handle data processing and computing at scale. Using our prototype system, we demonstrate how scientists can effectively explore and investigate differences within ensemble simulations. PMID:24051840

  11. Experiments in Advective and Turbulent Hyporheic Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccluskey, A. H.; Grant, S.; Stewardson, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange (HE) is the mixing of stream and subsurface waters beneath the sediment-water interface (SWI). At the patch and reach scales, HE is dominated by periodic upwelling and downwelling zones, induced by pressure variation and processes within the turbulent boundary layer (TBL). This can be caused by (1) the geometry of the stream, imposing a stationary wave at the SWI or (2) by a travelling wave associated with the propagation of turbulent pressure waves generated from the TBL. Case (1) has generally been the favoured model of hyporheic exchange and has been referred to as hyporheic 'pumping' by Elliott and Brooks, and subsequently others. Case (2) can be termed turbulent pumping, and has been proposed as a mechanism to model the combined effects of turbulent dispersion alongside steady-state advection. While this has been represented numerically and analytically, conjecture remains about the physical representation of these combined processes. We present initial results from experiments undertaken to classify the spatial and temporal characteristics of pressure variation at and beneath the SWI, with a periodic sinusoidal geometry of wavelength 0.28m and height 0.02m. As an initial characterisation, the advective flow profile has been examined using time-lapse photography of dyes released across the span of a periodic downwelling zone. These tracer tests confirmed delineation of isolated upwelling and downwelling cells as noted by previous authors in modelling studies. However, their distribution deviates from the typical pumping pattern with increased discharge and stream gradient. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of high frequency (250Hz) pressure measurements, sampled at an array along the centroid of the flume underneath one wavelength gave further insight into the spatial distribution of turbulent signatures arising from roughness-generated turbulence. A turbulent frequency of 6-10Hz dominates, however the penetration depth appears to

  12. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  13. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory`s site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone {sup 14}C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  14. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  15. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  16. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β} -plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  17. Momentum and mass transport over a superhydrophobic bubble mattress: the influence of interface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Haase, A. Sander; Karatay, Elif; Lammertink, Rob; Soft Matter, Fluidics; Interfaces Group Team

    2013-11-01

    We numerically investigate the influence of interface geometry on momentum and mass transport on a partially slippery bubble mattress. The bubble mattress, forming a superhydrophobic substrate, consists of an array of slippery (shear-free) gas bubbles with (no-slip) solids walls in between. We consider steady pressure-driven laminar flow over the bubble mattress, with a solute being supplied from the gas bubbles. The results show that solute transport can be enhanced significantly due to effective slippage, compared to a fully saturated no-slip wall. The enhancement depends on the interface geometry of the bubble mattress, i.e. on the bubble size, protrusion angle, and surface porosity. In addition, we demonstrate that the mass transfer enhancement disappears below a critical bubble size. The effective slip vanishes for very small bubbles, whereby interfacial transport becomes diffusion dominated. For large bubbles, solute transport near the interface is greatly enhanced by convection. The results provide insight into the optimal design of ultra-hydrophobic bubble mattresses to enhance both momentum and mass transport.

  18. Waves, advection, and cloud patterns on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Smith, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The stable layers adjacent to the nearly neutral layer within the Venus clouds are found to be capable of supporting vertically trapped, horizontally propagating waves with horizontal wavelengths of about 10 km and speeds of a few meters per second relative to the mean wind in the neutral layer. These waves may possibly be excited by turbulence within the neutral layer. Here, the properties of the waves, and the patterns which they might produce within the visible clouds if excited near the subsolar point are examined. The patterns can be in agreement with many features in images. The waves are capable of transferring momentum latitudinally to help maintain the general atmospheric spin, but at present we are not able to evaluate wave amplitudes. We also examine an alternative possibility that the cloud patterns are produced by advection and shearing by the mean zonal and meridional flow of blobs formed near the equator. It is concluded that advection and shearing by the mean flow is the most likely explanation for the general pattern of small scale striations.

  19. Bilayer mass transport model for determining swelling and diffusion in coated, ultrathin membranes.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole K; Chan, Edwin P; Stafford, Christopher M

    2015-02-18

    Water transport and swelling properties of an ultrathin, selective polyamide layer with a hydrophilic polymer coating, i.e., a polymer bilayer, are studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Specifically, QCM-D is used to measure the dynamic and equilibrium change in mass in a series of differential sorption experiments to determine the dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient and equilibrium swelling of the bilayer as a function of the water vapor activity. To determine transport properties specific to the polyamide layer, sorption kinetics of the bilayer was modeled with a bilayer mass transport model. The swelling and water diffusion coefficients are interpreted according to the Painter-Shenoy polymer network swelling model and the solution-diffusion model, respectively. PMID:25597964

  20. Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

    2013-11-01

    A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

  1. Focused transport of energetic particles along magnetic field lines draped around a coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Lee, M. A.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence is presented for focused transport of energetic particles along magnetic field lines draped around a coronal mass ejection. This evidence was obtained with the University of Maryland/Max-Planck-Institute experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft during the decay phase of the June 6, 1979, solar particle event. During the early portion of the decay phase of this event, interplanetary magnetic field lines were apparently draped around a coronal mass ejection, leading to a small focusing length on the western flank where ISEE 3 was located. A period of very slow decrease of particle intensity was observed, along with large sunward anisotropy in the solar wind frame, which is inconsistent with predictions of the standard Fokker-Planck equation models for diffusive transport. It was found possible to fit the observations, assuming that focused transport dominates and that the particle pitch angle scattering is isotropic.

  2. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  3. Advection and resulting CO2 exchange uncertainty in a tall forest in central Germany.

    PubMed

    Kutsch, Werner L; Kolle, Olaf; Rebmann, Corinna; Knohl, Alexander; Ziegler, Waldemar; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2008-09-01

    Potential losses by advection were estimated at Hainich Forest, Thuringia, Germany, where the tower is located at a gentle slope. Three approaches were used: (1) comparing nighttime eddy covariance fluxes to an independent value of total ecosystem respiration by bottom-up modeling of the underlying processes, (2) direct measurements of a horizontal CO2 gradient and horizontal wind speed at 2 m height in order to calculate horizontal advection, and (3) direct measurements of a vertical CO2 gradient and a three-dimensional wind profile in order to calculate vertical advection. In the first approach, nighttime eddy covariance measurements were compared to independent values of total ecosystem respiration by means of bottom-up modeling of the underlying biological processes. Turbulent fluxes and storage term were normalized to the fluxes calculated by the bottom-up model. Below a u(*) threshold of 0.6 m/s the normalized turbulent fluxes decreased with decreasing u(*), but the flux to the storage increased only up to values less than 20% of the modeled flux at low turbulence. Horizontal advection was measured by a horizontal CO2 gradient over a distance of 130 m combined with horizontal wind speed measurements. Horizontal advection occurred at most of the evenings independently of friction velocity above the canopy. Nevertheless, horizontal advection was higher when u(*) was low. The peaks of horizontal advection correlated with changes in temperature. A full mass balance including turbulent fluxes, storage, and horizontal and vertical advection resulted in an increase of spikes and scatter but seemed to generally improve the results from the flux measurements. The comparison of flux data with independent bottom-up modeling results as well as the direct measurements resulted in strong indications that katabatic flows along the hill slope during evening and night reduces the measured apparent ecosystem respiration rate. In addition, anabatic flows may occur during the

  4. Multiscale mass transport in z ˜6 galactic discs: fuelling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    By using Adaptive Mesh Refinement cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, with the RAMSES code, we studied the mass transport processes on to galactic nuclei from high redshift up to z ˜6. Due to the large dynamical range of the simulations, we were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from ˜50 kpc to ˜few 1 pc. We studied the black hole (BH) growth on to the Galactic Centre in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds stress and the gravitational stress on the disc. Such methodology allowed us to identify the main mass transport process as a function of the scales of the problem. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and supernovae feedback, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting ≈ 0.5 throughout its evolution. The α parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, αR, with αR ≫ 1. The gravitational part of the α parameter, αG, has an increasing trend towards the Galactic Centre at higher redshifts, with values αG ˜1 at radii ≲ few 101 pc contributing to the BH fuelling. In terms of torques, we also found that gravity has an increasing contribution towards the Galactic Centre at earlier epochs with a mixed contribution above ˜100 pc. This complementary work between pressure gradients and gravitational potential gradients allows an efficient mass transport on the disc with average mass accretion rates of the order of ˜few 1 M⊙ yr-1. These levels of SMBH accretion rates found in our cosmological simulations are needed in all models of SMBH growth that attempt to explain the formation of redshift 6-7 quasars.

  5. Multiscale mass transport inz ˜6 galactic discs: fuelling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    By using AMR cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, with the RAMSES code, we studied the mass transport processes onto galactic nuclei from high redshift up to $z\\sim6$. Due to the large dynamical range of the simulations we were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from $\\sim50[kpc]$ to $\\sim$ few $1[pc]$. We studied the BH growth on to the galactic center in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds stress and the gravitational stress on the disc. Such methodology allowed us to identify the main mass transport process as a function of the scales of the problem. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and SNe feedback, the SMBH grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting $\\langle f_{EDD}\\rangle\\approx 0.5$ throughout its evolution. The $\\alpha$ parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, $\\alpha_R$, with $\\alpha_R\\gg 1$. The gravitational part of the $\\alpha$ parameter, $\\alpha_G$, has an increasing trend toward the galactic center at higher redshifts, with values $\\alpha_G\\sim 1$ at radii <$\\sim$ few $ 10^1[pc]$ contributing to the BH fueling. In terms of torques, we also found that gravity has an increasing contribution toward the galactic center at earlier epochs with a mixed contribution above $\\sim 100 [pc]$. This complementary work between pressure gradients and gravitational potential gradients allows an efficient mass transport on the disc with average mass accretion rates of the order $\\sim$ few $1 [M_{\\odot}/yr]$. These level of SMBH accretion rates found in our cosmological simulations are needed in all models of SMBH growth that attempt to explain the formation of redshift $6-7$ quasars.

  6. Multiscale mass transport in z˜6 galactic discs: fueling black holes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés

    2016-05-01

    By using AMR cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, with the RAMSES code, we studied the mass transport processes onto galactic nuclei from high redshift up to z ˜ 6. Due to the large dynamical range of the simulations we were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from ˜50[kpc] to ˜ few 1[pc]. We studied the BH growth on to the galactic center in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds stress and the gravitational stress on the disc. Such methodology allowed us to identify the main mass transport process as a function of the scales of the problem. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and SNe feedback, the SMBH grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting ≈ 0.5 throughout its evolution. The α parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, αR, with αR ≫ 1. The gravitational part of the α parameter, αG, has an increasing trend toward the galactic center at higher redshifts, with values αG ˜ 1 at radii ≲ few 101[pc] contributing to the BH fueling. In terms of torques, we also found that gravity has an increasing contribution toward the galactic center at earlier epochs with a mixed contribution above ˜100[pc]. This complementary work between pressure gradients and gravitational potential gradients allows an efficient mass transport on the disc with average mass accretion rates of the order ˜ few 1[M⊙/yr]. These level of SMBH accretion rates found in our cosmological simulations are needed in all models of SMBH growth that attempt to explain the formation of redshift 6 - 7 quasars.

  7. Converted charter plane for mass transport of patients after a tsunami.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, Hjalti Már; Kristjánsson, Már; Möller, Alma D

    2008-01-01

    After a tsunami in the Indian Ocean in December 2004, thousands of injured tourists were stranded far away from home. To transport injured Scandinavians and their relatives back to Sweden, a standard Icelandic charter plane was altered for the mission in 2 days. Orthopedic injuries and aspirations were the predominant injuries among patients transported, but all had received advanced care in Thailand. The transport to Sweden was uneventful. The possibility of including charter planes in plans for mass transport of injured patients in disaster preparedness is stressed. For a given incident, a detailed checklist can facilitate gathering vital information to ensure adequate equipment and patient care. The lessons from the preparation of the plane and the mission are reported. PMID:18992689

  8. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  9. On the potential importance of transient air flow in advective radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Holman, H.Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have investigated, using a mathematical model, the temporal variations of air flux within the soil mass surrounding a basement in the presence of time dependent periodic variations of barometric pressure and a persistent under-pressure at the basement. The results of transient air flow show that for a homogeneous soil medium, the effects of barometric fluctuations are most significant in the cases where soil permeability to air is low and the fluctuation frequency is high. In these cases, the barometric fluctuation can greatly enhance the magnitude of fluxes as well as introduce flow direction reversals from surrounding soil into the basement. These large fluxes with direction reversals have strong implications in regard to advective transport of radon. The results suggest that the transient oscillations have to be accounted for in quantifying radon entry into buildings. In the actual field set up, the transient behavior will be further influenced by soil permeability heterogeneity, by soil moisture variations, and by the effects of multiple periodic components in the barometric pressure fluctuations.

  10. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients.more » The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.« less

  11. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. The percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  12. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M. Sinan; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors

  13. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  14. Laboratory experiments of fine-scale mixing and mass transport within a coral canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2007-07-01

    Laboratory experiments obtained fine scale measurements of turbulent shear stresses and rates of mixing and mass transfer over a nonliving bed of the coral, Porites compressa, the dominant species found in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A reef canopy was placed in a recirculating wave-current flume and flow was generated that simulated the flow characteristics of the reef flat of Kaneohe Bay. Turbulence and velocity structure under both unidirectional and wave-dominated currents were measured using a two-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer. Mass transport measurements were made using a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique in which the scalar transport of Rhodamine 6G dye, fluxed from the surfaces of the coral, was quantified. Results show that the action of surface waves, interacting with the structure of the reef, can increase instantaneous shear and mixing up to six times compared to that of unidirectional currents. Maximum shear and mass transport events coincided with flow separation within the wave-current boundary layer and the ejection of vortices into the flow. Wave action also acted to increase the vertical flux of water from within the coral structure. The combined effects of increased turbulent stress and fluid exchange from the interior of the canopy increased mass flux due to wave action 2.3±0.5 times that measured for comparable unidirectional currents.

  15. Multicomponent mass transport model: a model for simulating migration of radionuclides in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, J.F.; Kaszeta, F.E.; Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of the development of a one-dimensional radionuclide transport code, MMT2D (Multicomponent Mass Transport), for the AEGIS Program. Multicomponent Mass Transport is a numerical solution technique that uses the discrete-parcel-random-wald (DPRW) method to directly simulate the migration of radionuclides. MMT1D accounts for: convection;dispersion; sorption-desorption; first-order radioactive decay; and n-membered radioactive decay chains. Comparisons between MMT1D and an analytical solution for a similar problem show that: MMT1D agrees very closely with the analytical solution; MMT1D has no cumulative numerical dispersion like that associated with solution techniques such as finite differences and finite elements; for current AEGIS applications, relatively few parcels are required to produce adequate results; and the power of MMT1D is the flexibility of the code in being able to handle complex problems for which analytical solution cannot be obtained. Multicomponent Mass Transport (MMT1D) codes were developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. All MMT models require ground-water flow patterns that have been previously generated by a hydrologic model. This report documents the computer code and operating procedures of a third generation of the MMT series: the MMT differs from previous versions by simulating the mass transport processes in systems with radionuclide decay chains. Although MMT is a one-dimensional code, the user is referred to the documentation of the theoretical and numerical procedures of the three-dimensional MMT-DPRW code for discussion of expediency, verification, and error-sensitivity analysis.

  16. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  17. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  18. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. Lastly, the presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  19. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose-Einstein condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose-Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  20. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  1. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.C. )

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration.

  2. An overview of polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer for hydrogen production: Modeling and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdol Rahim, A. H.; Tijani, Alhassan Salami; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hanapi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer (PEME) is a candidate for advanced engineering technology. There are many polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) models that have been reported, but none regarding PEME. This paper presents state of the art mass transport models applied to PEME, a detailed literature review of these models and associate methods have been conducted. PEME models are typically developed using analytical, semi empirical and mechanistic techniques that are based on their state and spatial dimensions. Methods for developing the PEME models are introduced and briefly explained. Furthermore the model cell voltage of PEME, which consists of Nernst voltage, ohmic over potential, activation over potential, and diffusion over potential is discussed with focus on mass transport modeling. This paper also presents current issues encountered with PEME model.

  3. Heat and mass transport resistances in vacuum membrane distillation per drop

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Sarti, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is a separation process based on the use of microporous hydrophobic membranes. The membrane is located between an aqueous phase and a permeate, which is kept under vacuum at pressure values below the equilibrium vapor pressure of the feed. The liquid stream vaporizes at one side of the membrane, and the vapors diffuse through the gas phase inside the membrane pores. The process rate and performance are affected highly by the transport phenomena both in the liquid phase and through the membrane. Heat- and mass-transfer resistance in the liquid phase, as well as mass-transfer resistance through the membrane, play an important role in determining the process performance. Based on VMD experimental data for several binary aqueous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds, a simple criterion to investigate the role of each transport resistance on the separation efficiency is discussed.

  4. A finite element method for transient analysis of concurrent large deformation and mass transport in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaping; Zhao, Xuanhe; Suo, Zhigang; Jiang, Hanqing

    2009-05-01

    A gel is an aggregate of polymers and solvent molecules. The polymers crosslink into a three-dimensional network by strong chemical bonds and enable the gel to retain its shape after a large deformation. The solvent molecules, however, interact among themselves and with the network by weak physical bonds and enable the gel to be a conduit of mass transport. The time-dependent concurrent process of large deformation and mass transport is studied by developing a finite element method. We combine the kinematics of large deformation, the conservation of the solvent molecules, the conditions of local equilibrium, and the kinetics of migration to evolve simultaneously two fields: the displacement of the network and the chemical potential of the solvent. The finite element method is demonstrated by analyzing several phenomena, such as swelling, draining and buckling. This work builds a platform to study diverse phenomena in gels with spatial and temporal complexity.

  5. Mass-transport models to predict toxicity of inhaled gases in the upper respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hubal, E.A.C.; Fedkiw, P.S.; Kimbell, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    Mass-transport (the movement of a chemical species) plays an important role in determining toxic responses of the upper respiratory tract (URT) to inhaled chemicals. Mathematical dosimetry models incorporate physical characteristics of mass transport and are used to predict quantitative uptake (absorption rate) and distribution of inhaled gases and vapors in the respiratory tract. Because knowledge of dose is an essential component of quantitative risk assessment, dosimetry modeling plays an important role in extrapolation of animal study results to humans. A survey of existing mathematical dosimetry models for the URT is presented, limitations of current models are discussed, and adaptations of existing models to produce a generally applicable model are suggested. Reviewed URT dosimetry models are categorized as early, lumped-parameter, and distributed-parameter models. Specific examples of other relevant modeling work are also presented. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Upscaling momentum and mass transport under Knudsen and binary diffusion gas slip conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Parada, F. J.; Lasseux, D.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling of gas phase flow in porous media is relevant as it is present in a wide variety of applications ranging from nanofluidic systems to subsurface contaminant transport. In this work, we derive a macroscopic model to study slightly compressible gas flow in porous media for conditions in which the tangential fluid velocity undergoes a slip at the solid interface due to Knudsen effects and to mass diffusion in binary conditions. To this end, we use the method of volume averaging to derive the governing equations at the Darcy scale for both mass and momentum transport. The momentum transport model consists on a modification to Darcy's law due to mass dispersion and to total density gradients. For mass transport, the resulting model is the conventional convection-dispersion equation with two correction terms, one affecting convective transport and the second one affecting mass dispersion due to gas compressibility. The macroscopic model reduces to the one reported by Altevogt et al. (2003) for the case in which gas slip is only due to a concentration gradient and to the one by Lasseux et al. (2014) under Knudsen slip conditions. The model is written in terms of effective-medium coefficients that can be predicted from solving the associated closure problems in representative unit cells. For conditions in which the Péclet number is much greater than one and when the Knudsen number is not exceedingly small compared to the unity, our computations show that the predictions of the longitudinal dispersion may reach an error as high as 60% compared to the predictions obtained by ignoring gas slip. Altevogt A.S., Rolston D.E., Whitaker S. New equations for binary gas transport in porous media, Part 1: equation development. Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 26, 695-715, 2003. Lasseux D., Valdés-Parada F.J., Ochoa-Tapia J.A., Goyeau B. A macroscopic model for slightly compressible gas slip-flow in homogeneous porous media. Physics of Fluids, Vol. 26, 053102, 2014.

  7. Final Report - Ion Production and Transport in Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2014-05-14

    This document is the final report on a project that focused in the general theme of atmospheric-pressure ion production and transport for mass spectrometry. Within that general theme there were two main projects: the fundamental study of the transport of elemental ions through the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), and fundamental studies of the ionization mechanisms in ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources for molecular mass spectrometry. In both cases the goal was to generate fundamental understanding of key instrumental processes that would lead to the development of instruments that were more sensitive and more consistent in their performance. The emphasis on consistency derives from the need for instruments that have the same sensitivity, regardless of sample type. In the jargon of analytical chemistry, such instruments are said to be free from matrix effects. In the ICPMS work each stage of ion production and of ion transport from the atmospheric pressure to the high-vacuum mass analyzer was studied. Factors controlling ion transport efficiency and consistency were identified at each stage of pressure reduction. In the ADI work the interactions between an electrospray plume and a fluorescent sample on a surface were examined microscopically. A new mechanism for analyte ion production in desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was proposed. Optical spectroscopy was used to track the production of reactive species in plasmas used as ADI sources. Experiments with mixed-gas plasmas demonstrated that the addition of a small amount of hydrogen to a helium ADI plasma could boost the sensitivity for some analytes by over an order of magnitude.

  8. CDF Solutions of Advection-Reaction equations with uncertain parameters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boso, F.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flow and transport models are affected by parametric uncertainty. Quantitative forecasting of such processes in natural porous media are especially prone to uncertainty because of the inaccessibility and multi-scale nature of the subsurface. We consider a reduced-complexity stochastic transport system which takes into account advection and nonlinear reactions in advection-reaction equations (AREs) with uncertain (random) velocity and reaction parameters. We derive a deterministic equation that governs the evolution of cumulative distribution function (CDF) of a solution of the underlying ARE. Although requiring closure, this differential equation benefits from uniquely defined boundary and initial conditions and can be solved with classic techniques. Here we analyze the accuracy and robustness of the large-eddy-diffusivity closure by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations for different correlation structures and parameters.

  9. Mixing it up: Corals take an active role in mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Vicente; Shapiro, Orr; Brumley, Douglas; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey; Kramarski-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    The growth and health of reef-building corals are limited by corals' ability to exchange nutrients and oxygen with the surrounding, sometimes quiescent, seawater. Mass transport in coral systems has long been considered to occur passively as a result of molecular diffusion and the ambient fluid flow over the coral. Through a combination of microscale visualization experiments and numerical modeling, we demonstrate instead that motile cilia densely covering the coral surface - previously thought to serve cleaning and feeding purposes- actively stir the coral boundary layer by generating persistent vortices above the coral surface. This active mixing was observed over a variety of corals with differing surface geometries. We have quantified the contribution of ciliary surface vortices to mass transport, finding oxygen flux enhancements of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude under environmentally relevant ambient flow conditions. These results reveal a new, active role of the coral animal in regulating its mass transport by engineering its local hydrodynamic environment, an ability that may have an important role in the evolutionary success of reef corals.

  10. Measurement of mass transport and reaction parameters in bulk solution using photobleaching. Reaction limited binding regime.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E N; Jain, R K

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) has been used previously to investigate the kinetics of binding to biological surfaces. The present study adapts and further develops this technique for the quantification of mass transport and reaction parameters in bulk media. The technique's ability to obtain the bulk diffusion coefficient, concentration of binding sites, and equilibrium binding constant for ligand/receptor interactions in the reaction limited binding regime is assessed using the B72.3/TAG-72 monoclonal antibody/tumor associated antigen interaction as a model in vitro system. Measurements were independently verified using fluorometry. The bulk diffusion coefficient, concentration of binding sites and equilibrium binding constant for the system investigated were 6.1 +/- 1.1 x 10(-7) cm2/s, 4.4 +/- 0.6 x 10(-7) M, and 2.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(7) M-1, respectively. Model robustness and the applicability of the technique for in vivo quantification of mass transport and reaction parameters are addressed. With a suitable animal model, it is believed that this technique is capable of quantifying mass transport and reaction parameters in vivo. PMID:1932550

  11. Nonlinear Advection Algorithms Applied to Inter-related Tracers: Errors and Implications for Modeling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-02-01

    Monotonicity constraints and gradient preserving flux corrections employed by many advection algorithms used in atmospheric models make these algorithms non-linear. Consequently, any relations among model variables transported separately are not necessarily preserved in such models. These errors cannot be revealed by traditional algorithm testing based on advection of a single tracer. New type of tests are developed and conducted to evaluate the preservation of a sum of several number mixing ratios advected independently of each other, as is the case, for example, in models using bin or sectional representation of aerosol or cloud particle size distribution. The tests show that when three tracers are advected in 1D uniform constant velocity flow, local errors in the sum can be on the order of 10%. When cloud-like interactions are allowed among the tracers, errors in total sum of three mixing ratios can reach up to 30%. Several approaches to eliminate the error are suggested, all based on advecting the sum as a separate variable and then normalizing mixing ratios for individual tracers to match the total sum. A simple scalar normalization preserves the total number mixing ratio and positive definiteness of the variables but the monotonicity constraint for individual tracers is no longer maintained. More involved flux normalization procedures are developed for the flux based advection algorithms to maintain the monotonicity for individual scalars and their sum.

  12. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  13. Hourly and daily evapotranspiration of alfalfa under regional advection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional advection often affects the evapotranspiration rates of irrigated crops in the Southern High Plains. In 1998, during a 10-day period (13-22 June) of unusually strong advection, high evapotranspiration (ET) rates for unstressed, irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were measured with two prec...

  14. Local mass transport coefficients and local wall shear stresses at flow disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, G.; Gudde, T.

    1995-10-01

    Electrochemical measurements were performed with micro and ultramicro electrode arrays to evaluate local mass transfer rates with high lateral resolution in order to explain extreme corrosion rates during flow induced localized corrosion at leading edges of small flow disturbances. It was found that the mass transport coefficient close to the leading edge of a rectangular cavity in the wall of a rectangular flow channel is higher by a factor of 4--7 than at the plain channel wall. A parabolic correlation was found between wall shear stress and mass transfer rate at the plain channel wall. Assuming the validity of this correlation also in the high turbulent areas at leading edges of cavities enhancement factors in the order of 200 were assessed for the wall shear stress at the cavity compared to the plain channel wall.

  15. Estimation of water table level and nitrate pollution based on geostatistical and multiple mass transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Varouhakis, Emmanouil A.; Papadopoulou, Maria P.

    2015-04-01

    As the sustainable use of groundwater resources is a great challenge for many countries in the world, groundwater modeling has become a very useful and well established tool for studying groundwater management problems. Based on various methods used to numerically solve algebraic equations representing groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport, numerical models are mainly divided into Finite Difference-based and Finite Element-based models. The present study aims at evaluating the performance of a finite difference-based (MODFLOW-MT3DMS), a finite element-based (FEFLOW) and a hybrid finite element and finite difference (Princeton Transport Code-PTC) groundwater numerical models simulating groundwater flow and nitrate mass transport in the alluvial aquifer of Trizina region in NE Peloponnese, Greece. The calibration of groundwater flow in all models was performed using groundwater hydraulic head data from seven stress periods and the validation was based on a series of hydraulic head data for two stress periods in sufficient numbers of observation locations. The same periods were used for the calibration of nitrate mass transport. The calibration and validation of the three models revealed that the simulated values of hydraulic heads and nitrate mass concentrations coincide well with the observed ones. The models' performance was assessed by performing a statistical analysis of these different types of numerical algorithms. A number of metrics, such as Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Bias, Nash Sutcliffe Model Efficiency (NSE) and Reliability Index (RI) were used allowing the direct comparison of models' performance. Spatiotemporal Kriging (STRK) was also applied using separable and non-separable spatiotemporal variograms to predict water table level and nitrate concentration at each sampling station for two selected hydrological stress periods. The predictions were validated using the respective measured values. Maps of water table

  16. Advective pore water input of nutrients to the Satilla River Estuary, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, R. A.; Alexander, C. R.; Kostka, J. E.

    2003-03-01

    In situ benthic flux measurements, pore water nutrient profiles, water column nutrient distributions, sediment grain size distributions and side-scan sonar observations suggest that advective transport of pore waters may be a major input pathway of nutrients into the Satilla River Estuary (coastal Georgia, USA). In situ benthic chamber incubations demonstrate the occurrence of highly variable, but occasionally very large sea floor fluxes of silicate, phosphate, and ammonium. Locally occurring benthic microbial mineralization of organic matter, as estimated by S 35-sulphate reduction rate measurements, is insufficient to support these large fluxes. We hypothesize that the observed interlayering of permeable, sandy sediments with fine-grained, organic-rich sediments in the estuary provides conduits for advective transport of pore water constituents out of the sediments. Because permeable layers may extend significant distances beneath the salt marsh, the large fluxes observed may be supported by remineralization occurring over large areas adjacent to the estuary. Advective transport may be induced by pressure gradients generated by a variety of processes, including landward recharge by meteoric or rain waters if sand layers extend far enough into the maritime coastal lands. Alternatively, tidal variations across the salt marsh sediment surface may hydraulically pump water through the sediment system. Because these fluxes appear to be concentrated into small layers, this source may be a significant input of nutrients to the estuary even if permeable, sandy layers comprise a very small proportion of the seabed.

  17. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  18. A micro-mapping strategy to investigate mechanical and chemical mass transport in migmatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Riel, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Migmatites are fantastic objects to study both mechanical and chemical mass transport occurring at mm to cm-scale. However, migmatitic outcrops are the result of complex space and time interactions between (i) melt producing reactions, (ii) melt gain/loss and (iii) retrograde reactions. This succession of events is recorded in the minerals and microstructures of migmatites, and accounts for their apparent complexity. In order to explore the controlling parameters of these chemico-mechanical mass transport, it is thus necessary to characterize in great details the compositional changes between the different migmatitic domains, such as between leucosome and residuum. In this contribution we show how suitable local effective bulk (LEB) compositions can be derived by means of standardized microprobe X-ray images, using the program XMapTools. For chemically heterogeneous samples, such as migmatites, these LEB allow to forward model the stable mineral assemblages for each domain. Those thermodynamic models are used to investigate the conditions of leucosome-residuum separation. The studied sample is a metapelite embedded within a metasedimentary xenolith in the Marcabeli pluton, El Oro Complex, Ecuador. The sample exhibits complex mineral patterns due to local melt redistribution (at mm to cm-scale). Such physical mass transport involves major changes that affect the local chemical composition observed today. At the same time gradients in chemical potential can be established between adjacent domains such as residuum and leucosome, thus triggering chemical interaction. Diffusive transport between domains aims to reduce such chemical potential gradients. Along a modelled P-T path the chemical and mineralogical evolution of micro-domains can be reconstructed for (at least the reactive parts of) the crystallization history.

  19. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    PubMed

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials. PMID:21428686

  20. 1. Transport of Mass, Momentum and Energy in Planetary Magnetodisc Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, Nicholas; André, Nicolas; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Brandt, Pontus C.; Delamere, Peter A.; Winglee, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The rapid rotation of the gas giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, leads to the formation of magnetodisc regions in their magnetospheric environments. In these regions, relatively cold plasma is confined towards the equatorial regions, and the magnetic field generated by the azimuthal (ring) current adds to the planetary dipole, forming radially distended field lines near the equatorial plane. The ensuing force balance in the equatorial magnetodisc is strongly influenced by centrifugal stress and by the thermal pressure of hot ion populations, whose thermal energy is large compared to the magnitude of their centrifugal potential energy. The sources of plasma for the Jovian and Kronian magnetospheres are the respective satellites Io (a volcanic moon) and Enceladus (an icy moon). The plasma produced by these sources is globally transported outwards through the respective magnetosphere, and ultimately lost from the system. One of the most studied mechanisms for this transport is flux tube interchange, a plasma instability which displaces mass but does not displace magnetic flux—an important observational constraint for any transport process. Pressure anisotropy is likely to play a role in the loss of plasma from these magnetospheres. This is especially the case for the Jovian system, which can harbour strong parallel pressures at the equatorial segments of rotating, expanding flux tubes, leading to these regions becoming unstable, blowing open and releasing their plasma. Plasma mass loss is also associated with magnetic reconnection events in the magnetotail regions. In this overview, we summarise some important observational and theoretical concepts associated with the production and transport of plasma in giant planet magnetodiscs. We begin by considering aspects of force balance in these systems, and their coupling with the ionospheres of their parent planets. We then describe the role of the interaction between neutral and ionized species, and how it determines

  1. Origin of the mass splitting of elliptic anisotropy in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanlin; He, Liang; Lin, Zi-Wei; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The mass splitting of elliptic anisotropy (v2) at low transverse momentum is considered as a hallmark of hydrodynamic collective flow. We investigate a multiphase transport (AMPT) model where the v2 is mainly generated by an anisotropic escape mechanism, not of the hydrodynamic flow nature, and where mass splitting is also observed. We demonstrate that the v2 mass splitting in AMPT is small right after hadronization (especially when resonance decays are included); the mass splitting mainly comes from hadronic rescatterings, even though their contribution to the overall charged hadron v2 is small. These findings are qualitatively the same as those from hybrid models that combine hydrodynamics with a hadron cascade. We further show that there is no qualitative difference between heavy ion collisions and small system collisions. Our results indicate that the v2 mass splitting is not a unique signature of hydrodynamic collective flow and thus cannot distinguish whether the elliptic flow is generated mainly from hydrodynamics or the anisotropic parton escape.

  2. Modelling mass transport through a porous partition: Effect of pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayet, Mohamed; Velázquez, Armando; Mengual, Juan I.

    2004-09-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation process has been studied using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene and polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. The membranes were characterized in terms of their non-wettability, pore size distribution and porosity. The mean pore sizes and pore size distributions were obtained by means of wet/dry flow method. The mean pore size and the effective porosity of the membranes were also determined from the gas permeation test. A theoretical model that considers the pore size distribution together with the gas transport mechanisms through the membrane pores was developed for this process. The contribution of each mass transport mechanism was analyzed. It was found that both membranes have pore size distributions in the Knudsen region and in the transition between Knudsen and ordinary diffusion region. The transition region was the major contribution to mass transport. The predicted water vapor permeability of the membranes were compared with the experimental ones. The effect of considering pore size distribution instead of mean pore size to predict the water vapor permeability of the membranes was investigated.

  3. Pore-Scale Investigation of Mass Transport and Electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Grew, Kyle N.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2009-10-31

    The development and validation of a model for the study of pore-scale transport phenomena and electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode are presented in this work. This model couples mass transport processes with a detailed reaction mechanism, which is used to model the electrochemical oxidation kinetics. Detailed electrochemical oxidation reaction kinetics, which is known to occur in the vicinity of the three-phase boundary (TPB) interfaces, is discretely considered in this work. The TPB regions connect percolating regions of electronic and ionic conducting phases of the anode, nickel (Ni) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), respectively; with porous regions supporting mass transport of the fuel and product. A two-dimensional (2D), multi-species lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to describe the diffusion process in complex pore structures that are representative of the SOFC anode. This diffusion model is discretely coupled to a kinetic electrochemical oxidation mechanism using localized flux boundary conditions. The details of the oxidation kinetics are prescribed as a function of applied activation overpotential and the localized hydrogen and water mole fractions. This development effort is aimed at understanding the effects of the anode microstructure within TPB regions. This work describes the methods used so that future studies can consider the details of SOFC anode microstructure.

  4. Analysis of hemodynamic fluid phase mass transport in a separated flow region.

    PubMed

    Lutostansky, Elizabeth M; Karner, Gerhard; Rappitsch, Gerhard; Ku, David N; Perktold, Karl

    2003-04-01

    The mass transfer behavior in the recirculation region downstream of an axisymmetric sudden expansion was examined. The Reynolds number, 500, and Schmidt number, 3200, were selected to model the mass transfer of molecules, such as ADP, in the arterial system. In a first step the transient mass transport applying zero diffusive flux at the wall was analyzed using experiments and two computational codes. The two codes were FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume method, and FTSP, a finite element code developed at Graz University of Technology. The comparison of the transient wall concentration values determined by the three methods was excellent and provides a measure of confidence for computational mass transfer calculations in convection dominated, separated flows. In a second step the effect of the flow separation on the stationary mass transport applying a permeability boundary condition at the water-permeable wall was analyzed using the finite element code FTSP. The results show an increase of luminal ADP surface concentration in the upstream and in the downstream tube of the sudden expansion geometry in the range of six and twelve percent of the bulk flow concentration. The effect of flow separation in the downstream tube on the wall concentration is a decrease of about ten percent of the difference between wall concentration and bulk concentration occurring at nearly fully developed flow at the downstream region at a distance of 66 downstream tube diameters from the expansion. The decrease of ADP flux into the wall is in the range of three percent of the flux at the downstream region. PMID:12751280

  5. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  6. Particulate export vs lateral advection in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Capotondi, L.; Giglio, F.

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of our study was to describe and quantify the influence of lateral advection relative to the vertical export in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean). In areas where lateral advection of particulate material is significant, budgets of bioactive elements can be inaccurate if fluxes through the water column and to the seabed are exclusively interpreted as passive sinking of particles. However, detailed information on the influence of lateral advection in the water column in the southern ocean is lacking. With this in mind, our study focused between the twilight zone (i.e. mesopelagic) and the benthic nepheloid layer to understand the relative importance of lateral flux with increasing water depth. Measurements were performed south of the Antarctic Polar Front for 1 year (January 10th 1999-January 3rd 2000) at 900, 1300, 2400, and 3700 m from the sea surface. The study was carried out using a 3.5 km long mooring line instrumented with sediment traps, current meters and sensors of temperature and conductivity. Sediment trap samples were characterized via several parameters including total mass flux, elemental composition (organic carbon, total nitrogen, biogenic silica, and calcium carbonate), concentration of metals (aluminum, iron, barium, and manganese), 210Pb activity, and foraminifera taxonomy. High fluxes of biogenic particles were observed in both summer 1999 and 2000 as a result of seasonal algal blooms associated with sea ice retreat and water column stratification. During no-productive periods, several high energy events occurred and resulted in advecting resuspended biogenic particles from flat-topped summits of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. Whereas the distance between seabed and uppermost sediment traps was sufficient to avoid lateral advection processes, resuspension was significant in the lowermost sediment traps accounting for ~60 and ~90% of the material caught at 2400 and 3700 m, respectively. Samples collected during

  7. Horizontal Advection and Mixing of Pollutants in the Urban Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, S. P.; Entekhabi, D.; Britter, R.; Norford, L.; Fernando, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    Although urban air quality and its impacts on the public health have long been studied, the increasing urbanization is raising concerns on how to better control and mitigate these health impacts. A necessary element in predicting exposure levels is fundamental understanding of flow and dispersion in urban canyons. The complex topology of building structures and roads requires the resolution of turbulence phenomena within urban canyons. The use of dense and low porosity construction material can lead to rapid heating in response to direct solar exposure due to large thermal mass. Hence thermal and buoyancy effects may be as important as mechanically-forced or shear-induced flows. In this study, the transport of pollutants within the urban environment, as well as the thermal and advection effects, are investigated. The focus is on the horizontal transport or the advection effects within the urban environment. With increased urbanization and larger and more spread cities, concern about how the upstream air quality situation can affect downstream areas. The study also examines the release and the dispersion of hazardous material. Due to the variety and complexity of urban areas around the world, the urban environment is simplified into adjacent two-dimensional urban street canyons. Pollutants are released inside each canyon. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are applied to evaluate and quantify the flow rate out of each canyon and also the exchange of pollutants between the canyons. Imagine a row of ten adjacent urban street canyons of aspect ratio 1 with horizontal flow perpendicular to it as shown in the attached figure. C is the concentration of pollutants. The first digit indicates in what canyon the pollutant is released and the second digit indicates the location of that pollutant. For example, C3,4 is the concentration of pollutant released inside canyon 3 measured in canyon 4. The same amount of pollution is released inside the ten street canyons

  8. Oscillatory Mass Transport in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Sapphire Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang Ho; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Kauffmann, Yaron; Kaplan, Wayne D.; Luo, Weidong; Rühle, Manfred; Scheu, Christina

    2010-10-01

    In vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, the liquid phase plays a pivotal role in mediating mass transport from the vapor source to the growth front of a nanowire. Such transport often takes place through the liquid phase. However, we observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy a different behavior for self-catalytic VLS growth of sapphire nanowires. The growth occurs in a layer-by-layer fashion and is accomplished by interfacial diffusion of oxygen through the ordered liquid aluminum atoms. Oscillatory growth and dissolution reactions at the top rim of the nanowires occur and supply the oxygen required to grow a new (0006) sapphire layer. A periodic modulation of the VLS triple-junction configuration accompanies these oscillatory reactions.

  9. Oscillatory Mass Transport in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Sapphire Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sang Ho; Chisholm, Matthew F; Kauffmann, Yaron; Kaplan, Prof. Wayne D.; Luo, Weidong; Ruhle, M.; Scheu, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, the liquid phase plays a pivotal role in mediating mass transport from the vapor source to the growth front of a nanowire. Such transport often takes place through the liquid phase. However, we observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy a different behavior for self-catalytic VLS growth of sapphire nanowires. The growth occurs in a layer-by-layer fashion and is accomplished by interfacial diffusion of oxygen through the ordered liquid aluminum atoms. Oscillatory growth and dissolution reactions at the top rim of the nanowires occur and supply the oxygen required to grow a new (0006) sapphire layer. A periodic modulation of the VLS triple-junction configuration accompanies these oscillatory reactions.

  10. Anomalous reaction-transport processes: The dynamics beyond the law of mass action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Fedotov, Sergei; Méndez, Vicenç

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we reconsider the mass action law (MAL) for the anomalous reversible reaction A⇄B with diffusion. We provide a mesoscopic description of this reaction when the transitions between two states A and B are governed by anomalous (heavy-tailed) waiting-time distributions. We derive the set of mesoscopic integro-differential equations for the mean densities of reacting and diffusing particles in both states. We show that the effective reaction rate memory kernels in these equations and the uniform asymptotic states depend on transport characteristics such as jumping rates. This is in contradiction with the classical picture of MAL. We find that transport can even induce an extinction of the particles such that the density of particles A or B tends asymptotically to zero. We verify analytical results by Monte Carlo simulations and show that the mesoscopic densities exhibit a transient growth before decay.

  11. Analysis of mass transport in an atmospheric pressure remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, R. P.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.; Gries, T.; Tixhon, E.

    2010-01-15

    In remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes operated at atmospheric pressure, high deposition rates are associated with the localization of precursors on the treated surface. We show that mass transport can be advantageously ensured by convection for the heavier precursor, the lighter being driven by turbulent diffusion toward the surface. Transport by laminar diffusion is negligible. The use of high flow rates is mandatory to have a good mixing of species. The use of an injection nozzle with micrometer-sized hole enables us to define accurately the reaction area between the reactive species. The localization of the flow leads to high deposition rates by confining the reactive species over a small area, the deposition yield being therefore very high. Increasing the temperature modifies nonlinearly the deposition rates and the coating properties.

  12. Characteristics, generation and mass transport of nonlinear internal waves on the Washington continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Alford, Matthew H.; Mickett, John B.

    2015-02-01

    As a step toward better understanding the generation of nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) on continental shelves and the factors determining their morphology, amplitude and propagation, we analyze more than 1500 NLIWs detected on the Washington (WA) continental shelf using four summer/fall time series of temperature and velocity measurements from a surface mooring deployed in 100 m of water. Propagating onshore toward the northeast, these NLIWs take a variety of forms, including internal solitary waves, solitary wave trains and bores. Nearly all are mode-1 depression waves that arrive semidiurnally along with the internal tide. The NLIW energy flux is correlated with the internal tide energy flux but not the local barotropic forcing, implying that the observed NLIWs arise primarily from shoaling remotely generated internal tides rather than local generation. Estimated onshore transport by the waves can equal or exceed offshore Ekman transport, suggesting the waves may play an important role in the mass balance on the continental shelf.

  13. Comparison of Flamelet Models with the Transported Mass Fraction Approach for Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenhai; Alabi, Ken; Ladeinde, Foluso

    2015-11-01

    In this study, two fully compressible RANS, LES, and combined RANS/LES flow solvers - AEROFLO and VULCAN, both of which were originally developed by the United States Department of Defense but have since been significantly enhanced and commercialized by our organization, are used to investigate the accuracy of flamelet-based approach when employed to model supersonic combustion. The flamelet results from both codes are assessed relative to solutions obtained by solving the transport equations for the mass fractions - which is also supported by one of the codes, and making familiar assumptions about the closure of the reaction rate. The studies are carried out in the flamelet regime, and the numerical procedures are based on high-order schemes, which are also used to solve the level-set and mixture fraction transport equations used to study, respectively, premixed and non-premixed combustion. The effects of supersonic Mach numbers on the results are discussed.

  14. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  15. Mass transport and crystal growth of the mixed ZrS2-ZrSe2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, Heribert; Goldman, Howard

    1986-01-01

    The solid solubility of the ZrS2-ZrSe2 system was reinvestigated by annealing techniques to establish the relationship between composition and lattice parameters. Mixed crystals of ZrS(2x)Se2(1-x) for selected compositions of the source material were grown by chemical vapor transport and characterized by X-ray diffraction and microscopic methods. The mass transport rates and crystal growth of ZrSSe were investigated and compared with those of other compositions. The mass fluxes of the mixed system showed an increase with increasing selenium content. The transport products were richer in ZrSe2 than the residual source materials when the ZrSe2 content of the starting materials was greater than 50 mol.-pct. The mass transport rates revealed an increasing mass flux with pressure.

  16. Evaluation and optimization of mass transport of redox species in silicon microwire-array photoelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Meng, Andrew C.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical integration of a Ag electrical contact internally into a metal/substrate/microstructured Si wire array/oxide/Ag/electrolyte photoelectrochemical solar cell has produced structures that display relatively low ohmic resistance losses, as well as highly efficient mass transport of redox species in the absence of forced convection. Even with front-side illumination, such wire-array based photoelectrochemical solar cells do not require a transparent conducting oxide top contact. In contact with a test electrolyte that contained 50 mM/5.0 mM of the cobaltocenium+/0 redox species in CH3CN–1.0 M LiClO4, when the counterelectrode was placed in the solution and separated from the photoelectrode, mass transport restrictions of redox species in the internal volume of the Si wire array photoelectrode produced low fill factors and limited the obtainable current densities to 17.6 mA cm-2 even under high illumination. In contrast, when the physically integrated internal Ag film served as the counter electrode, the redox couple species were regenerated inside the internal volume of the photoelectrode, especially in regions where depletion of the redox species due to mass transport limitations would have otherwise occurred. This behavior allowed the integrated assembly to operate as a two-terminal, stand-alone, photoelectrochemical solar cell. The current density vs. voltage behavior of the integrated photoelectrochemical solar cell produced short-circuit current densities in excess of 80 mA cm-2 at high light intensities, and resulted in relatively low losses due to concentration overpotentials at 1 Sun illumination. The integrated wire array-based device architecture also provides design guidance for tandem photoelectrochemical cells for solar-driven water splitting. PMID:22904185

  17. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  18. Angular momentum transport efficiency in post-main sequence low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, F.; Gellert, M.; Arlt, R.; Deheuvels, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Using asteroseismic techniques, it has recently become possible to probe the internal rotation profile of low-mass (≈1.1-1.5 M⊙) subgiant and red giant stars. Under the assumption of local angular momentum conservation, the core contraction and envelope expansion occurring at the end of the main sequence would result in a much larger internal differential rotation than observed. This suggests that angular momentum redistribution must be taking place in the interior of these stars. Aims: We investigate the physical nature of the angular momentum redistribution mechanisms operating in stellar interiors by constraining the efficiency of post-main sequence rotational coupling. Methods: We model the rotational evolution of a 1.25M⊙ star using the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code. Our models take into account the magnetic wind braking occurring at the surface of the star and the angular momentum transport in the interior, with an efficiency dependent on the degree of internal differential rotation. Results: We find that models including a dependence of the angular momentum transport efficiency on the radial rotational shear reproduce very well the observations. The best fit of the data is obtained with an angular momentum transport coefficient scaling with the ratio of the rotation rate of the radiative interior over that of the convective envelope of the star as a power law of exponent ≈3. This scaling is consistent with the predictions of recent numerical simulations of the Azimuthal Magneto-Rotational Instability. Conclusions: We show that an angular momentum transport process whose efficiency varies during the stellar evolution through a dependence on the level of internal differential rotation is required to explain the observed post-main sequence rotational evolution of low-mass stars.

  19. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-01

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration. PMID:26322369

  20. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-06-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  1. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the Southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and Southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  2. A First Principles Study of Mass Transport in the Dehydrogenation of Lithium Amides and Lithium Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolih, Biljana

    The pursuit of competitive alternatives to energy derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, has led to a great variety of new technologies. Exceptional develop- ments in electrochemical storage and production promise to lead to clean burning passenger vehicles. The high chemical density of a hydrogen fuel cell enables it to meet current standards for driving range and weight required of vehicles, making it an excellent candidate for universal application in the automotive industry. One of the biggest obstacles the fuel cell industry has yet to overcome is the means of practical hydrogen storage. Solid state metal hydrides are a class of materials that show potential for both economic and practical hydrogen storage. The search for the ideal metal hydride is defined by thermodynamic and kinetic constraints, since the requirements for a viable system are a rapid release of hydrogen in the temperature range of -40°C, to 80°C. First-principles density functional theory is an excellent method for gaining insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of metal hydride solid state reactions. In the work presented here, density functional theory is used to explore formation energies, concentrations and migration barriers of metal hydrides. In particular, the following systems were analyzed: • Li - N - H It is well known that the reactive hydride composite LiNH 2 + LiH reversibly releases a large amount of hydrogen gas, with more favorable thermodynamics than LiNH2 alone. Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of LiNH2 + LiH are investigated. A model is developed for determining activation energies of native defects in bulk crystals. In order to establish whether mass transport is the rate-limiting step in the dehydrogenation reaction, results are compared to experimental values. • Li - Al - H Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of the metal hydride LiAlH2 are investigated. It is known that LiAlH4 endothermically decomposes via a two

  3. Clarke Stations and mercurian mass-drivers: energy for large-scale transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three-week voyages across 1 AU could be made in large sailing craft propelled by microwaves generated at power stations operating at 0.1 AU from the sun. The power stations could be built of mercurian materials launched by mass driver to building sites in solar orbit. A Clarke Station 28 km in radius could generate 64 TW of microwaves and support the operation of a 1000-tonne, 1000-passenger vessel. The ability to build near-sun power stations of mercurian materials would not only support high-speed transport but solar system development in general.

  4. Chaotic advection, diffusion, and reactions in open flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tel, Tamas; Karolyi, Gyoergy; Pentek, Aron; Scheuring, Istvan; Toroczkai, Zoltan; Grebogi, Celso; Kadtke, James

    2000-03-01

    We review and generalize recent results on advection of particles in open time-periodic hydrodynamical flows. First, the problem of passive advection is considered, and its fractal and chaotic nature is pointed out. Next, we study the effect of weak molecular diffusion or randomness of the flow. Finally, we investigate the influence of passive advection on chemical or biological activity superimposed on open flows. The nondiffusive approach is shown to carry some features of a weak diffusion, due to the finiteness of the reaction range or reaction velocity. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Periodic solutions for a 1D-model with nonlocal velocity via mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Lucas C. F.; Valencia-Guevara, Julio C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns periodic solutions for a 1D-model with nonlocal velocity given by the periodic Hilbert transform. There is a rich literature showing, via numerics and rigorous analysis, that this model presents singular behavior of solutions. For instance, they can blow up by forming mass-concentration. We develop a global well-posedness theory for periodic measure initial data that allows, in particular, to analyze how the model evolves from those singularities. Our results are based on periodic mass transport theory and the abstract gradient flow theory in metric spaces developed by Ambrosio et al. (2005). A viscous version of the model is also analyzed and inviscid limit properties are obtained.

  6. The cause of advective slowdown of tracer pebbles in rivers: Implementation of Exner-Based Master Equation for coevolving streamwise and vertical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, A.; Schumer, R.; Parker, G.; Ferguson, R. I.

    2016-03-01

    Tracer pebbles are often used to study bed load transport processes in gravel bed rivers. Models have been proposed for their downstream dispersion, and also for vertical dispersion, but not for the combined effects of downstream and vertical movement. Here we use the Exner-Based Master Equation to characterize the transient coevolution of streamwise and vertical advection-diffusion of tracer pebbles under equilibrium transport conditions (no net aggradation or degradation). The coevolution of streamwise and vertical dispersion gives rise to behavior that can differ markedly from that associated with purely streamwise processes with no vertical exchange. One example is streamwise advective slowdown. Particles that are advected downward into zones where the probability of reentrainment becomes asymptotically small are essentially trapped and can no longer participate in streamwise advection. As a result, the mean streamwise velocity of the tracer plume declines in time. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons with two field experiments show encouraging agreement despite the simplified boundary conditions in the model.

  7. MAST solution of advection problems in irrotational flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2007-03-01

    A new numerical-analytical Eulerian procedure is proposed for the solution of convection-dominated problems in the case of existing scalar potential of the flow field. The methodology is based on the conservation inside each computational elements of the 0th and 1st order effective spatial moments of the advected variable. This leads to a set of small ODE systems solved sequentially, one element after the other over all the computational domain, according to a MArching in Space and Time technique. The proposed procedure shows the following advantages: (1) it guarantees the local and global mass balance; (2) it is unconditionally stable with respect to the Courant number, (3) the solution in each cell needs information only from the upstream cells and does not require wider and wider stencils as in most of the recently proposed higher-order methods; (4) it provides a monotone solution. Several 1D and 2D numerical test have been performed and results have been compared with analytical solutions, as well as with results provided by other recent numerical methods.

  8. Submarine Landslides and Mass-Transport Deposition in the Nankai fore-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, M.; Henry, P.; Kanamatsu, T.; Moe, K.; Moore, G. F.; IODP Expedition 333 Scientists

    2011-12-01

    Multiple lines of evidence exist for a range of sediment mass movement processes within the shallow megasplay fault zone (MSFZ) area and the adjacent slope basin in the outer fore-arc of the Nankai subduction zone, Japan. Diagnostic features observed in 3-D reflection seismic data and in cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 316 document a complex mass movement history spanning at least ˜2.87 million years. Various modes and scales of sediment remobilization can be related to the different morphotectonic settings in which they occurred and allow integration of knowledge on the spatial and temporal distribution of submarine landslides into a holistic reconstruction of the tectonostratigraphic evolution. New data from the most-recent Nankai IODP Expedition 333, which drilled and cored a Pleistocene-to-Holocene succession of the slope-basin seaward of the MSFZ, provides unprecedented details on submarine landslide processes occurring over the last Million year. The slope-basin represents the depocentre for downslope sediment transport and is characterized in 3-D reflection seismic data by several mass-transport deposits (MTDs), including an up to 180 m thick MTD. Here we present D/V Chikyu shipboard results and first post cruise results from Site C0018, including litho- bio- magneto- tephra- and stable isotope-stratigraphy, X-ray computed tomography analysis and physical properties data. Six MTDs were identified from visual core description and X-ray CT-scans. The thickest MTD is also the oldest (emplaced between 0.85 and 1.05 Ma) and it coincides with a lithological transition between a sandy turbidite sequence below, and ash-bearing hemipelagites comprising several MTDs above. Deformation styles within the MTD are heterogeneous: intervals of disturbed sediments are interbedded within intervals inferred to retain original, coherent bedding. In three occurrences the base of the MTD is defined by a shear zone within fine-grained sediments

  9. Ballistic thermal transport in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: Role of atomic mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Li, Wu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the ballistic thermal transport of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which is crucial for the thermal management of their potential applications in nanoelectronics. We find the thermal conductance is mainly affected by the atomic masses of TMDs. As a consequence, the temperature dependences of thermal conductances of different TMDs cross: At low temperatures below ˜50 K, the thermal conductance increases with the atomic mass, while it exhibits the opposite trend at high temperatures. The crossing behavior of temperature dependent thermal conductance is characteristic of the atomic mass effect, and TMDs provide a model system demonstrating that the thermal conductance can be effectively manipulated via the atomic mass by selecting appropriate atom. In addition, we clarify that in any two dimensional system such as monolayer TMDs and graphene, due to quadratic dispersion of the out-of-plane modes, the thermal conductance and specific heat in the low temperature limit are proportional to T3/2 and T, respectively. Mainly because of much smaller group velocities of in-plane acoustic phonons, the high temperature thermal conductances of monolayer TMDs are much smaller than graphene. However, due to comparable group velocities of out-of-plane acoustic phonons, below 100 K thermal conductances of monolayer TMDs are rather comparable to graphene if taking the same layer thickness for comparison.

  10. A finite-volume ELLAM for three-dimensional solute-transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, T.F.; Heberton, C.I.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume ELLAM method has been developed, tested, and successfully implemented as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) MODFLOW-2000 ground water modeling package. It is included as a solver option for the Ground Water Transport process. The FVELLAM uses space-time finite volumes oriented along the streamlines of the flow field to solve an integral form of the solute-transport equation, thus combining local and global mass conservation with the advantages of Eulerian-Lagrangian characteristic methods. The USGS FVELLAM code simulates solute transport in flowing ground water for a single dissolved solute constituent and represents the processes of advective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, mixing from fluid sources, retardation, and decay. Implicit time discretization of the dispersive and source/sink terms is combined with a Lagrangian treatment of advection, in which forward tracking moves mass to the new time level, distributing mass among destination cells using approximate indicator functions. This allows the use of large transport time increments (large Courant numbers) with accurate results, even for advection-dominated systems (large Peclet numbers). Four test cases, including comparisons with analytical solutions and benchmarking against other numerical codes, are presented that indicate that the FVELLAM can usually yield excellent results, even if relatively few transport time steps are used, although the quality of the results is problem-dependent.

  11. Mass transport at the interface between a highly permeable porous medium and an open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, C.; Pokrajac, D.

    2012-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange has been extensively studied in the literature. The majority of papers present the results of field studies and the associated engineering simulation models. The number of laboratory studies is smaller. Most of them are focused on the bulk scale effects, since the measurements within the bed at the grain scale are difficult and therefore rare. Measurement within the pores of a permeable bed becomes possible for some idealized pore configurations. Pokrajac and Manes (2009) and Manes et al. (2009) use constant diameter spheres packed in a cubic pattern, which form straight pores (with variable cross-sectional area) in three orthogonal directions. Their results include detailed velocity measurements and the characteristics of turbulence at the fluid/porous interface, but not the mass transport. The experimental study reported here uses the same porous medium and extends this work by including grain-scale mass transport measurements. The results presented involve the hydrodynamics and the mass transport at the fluid/pore interface and within the first pore under the surface of the medium. The experiments are carried out in a 11m long and 40cm wide tilting flume. The porous medium, placed on the flume bed, is composed of 5 layers of 12mm diameter plastic spheres packed in a cubic pattern. This arrangement was chosen in order to have a regular matrix, thereby allowing measurements of the velocities and solute concentration within a pore. The measurement window covers a central section of a longitudinal pore which is visible through a lateral pore. The velocity field is measured by means of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and the concentration field is measured using the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). These two techniques allow simultaneous non-intrusive measurements within a single pore. The experiments involved uniform, fully developed turbulent flow. The experimental conditions were: bed slope = 0.01, water depth = 45mm, depth

  12. Determination of the mass-transport properties of vanadium ions through the porous electrodes of vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Zhao, T S

    2013-07-14

    This work is concerned with the determination of two critical constitutive properties for mass transport of ions through porous electrodes saturated with a liquid electrolyte solution. One is the effective diffusivity that is required to model the mass transport at the representative element volume (REV) level of porous electrodes in the framework of Darcy's law, while the other is the pore-level mass-transfer coefficient for modeling the mass transport from the REV level to the solid surfaces of pores induced by redox reactions. Based on the theoretical framework of mass transport through the electrodes of vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs), unique experimental setups for electrochemically determining the two transport properties by measuring limiting current densities are devised. The effective diffusivity and the pore-level mass-transfer coefficient through the porous electrode made of graphite felt, a typical material for VRFB electrodes, are measured at different electrolyte flow rates. The correlation equations, respectively, for the effective diffusivity and the pore-level mass-transfer coefficient are finally proposed based on the experimental data. PMID:23698744

  13. Scyphozoa in the Bornholm Basin (central Baltic Sea) The role of advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Kristina; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Hirche, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    The usual absence of ephyrae and late appearance of medusae of the Scyphozoa Aurelia aurita and Cyanea capillata in the Bornholm Basin (BB; central Baltic Sea) indicate that these species are not strobilating in the region and their presence depends on advection. To study their potential origin we compared drift from historically known strobilation areas derived from a circulation model with spatial distributions observed during 19 cruises in the BB during 2002 and 2003. The model results are in good accordance with the field observations. According to the model results inter-annual differences in the timing of first appearance and life stage at appearance of A. aurita were clearly related to differences in the hydrodynamic regime during the investigation periods. During the stagnation regime in 2002 young medusae occurred first in June in the BB. In contrast, in 2003 fast transport due to several inflow events advected ephyrae released between January and March in the western Baltic already in April to the BB. Although the Gullmar Fjord (western Sweden) is the nearest known strobilation area for C. capillata, the model did not support advection from there in numbers explaining the occurrence of this species in the BB in 2002 and 2003. If the model works adequately in this regions we have to assume that the Gullmar Fjord is not a main source region of C. capillata in the BB, but other strobilation areas in the Kattegat or the North Sea appear more important. Our results imply that advection and inflow events are critical for the occurrence and distribution of early stages of jellyfish in the central Baltic Sea. They demonstrate the potential of circulation models as tools to study the effect of long-range transport on the spatial composition of these organisms.

  14. Burgers turbulence and passive random advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav Anatolievich

    1999-10-01

    , and the diffusivity is neglected. These considerations illustrate that even with simple statistics of the velocity field, the statistics of advected quantities are nontrivial due to nonlinear interactions of different spatial directions. The last Chapter 5 summarizes the results and discusses future directions of research.

  15. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  16. Reactive transport in 3D models of irregularly fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesner, T.; Mindel, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive transport through irregularly fractured rock masses is a key phenomenon in ore-forming hydrothermal systems, geothermal systems, and many other geological processes and will affect the mechanical properties and hydraulic apertures of fractures. Realistic representations of such systems have so far been hampered by technical limitations of most hydrothermal reactive transport codes, namely the ability to represent discrete fracture networks in a porous rock matrix. We present the first three-dimensional simulation results obtained from coupling a combined finite element - finite volume scheme of the revised CSMP++ flow simulation platform (1) with the GEMIPM3K (2) chemical equilibration code. In these, we represented fracture zones as thin, porous zones of higher permeability. The simulations demonstrate the effects of fracture zone orientation relative to the pressure field and fracture zone intersections on the differential advance of reaction fronts. We outline our numerical approaches for testing and comparing the effect of various ways of representing fractures and fracture zones in irregular meshes, namely the possibility of using layers of prism elements to represent fractures of finite thickness with internally varying properties and the possibility to represent thin fractures as lower dimensional (=2D) elements. We intend to make use of the "split node" capabilities of CSMP++ (3) to maintain sharp interfaces at material boundaries in order to be able to study the transient influence of reactive flow on fracture and matrix permeability in irregularly fractured rock masses.

  17. How does the mass transport in disk galaxy models influence the character of orbits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    We explore the regular or chaotic nature of orbits of stars moving in the meridional (R,z) plane of an axially symmetric time-dependent disk galaxy model with a central, spherically symmetric nucleus. In particular, mass is linearly transported from the disk to the galactic nucleus, in order to mimic, in a way, the case of self-consistent interactions of an actual N-body simulation. We thus try to unveil the influence of this mass transportation on the different families of orbits of stars by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families, evolve as the galaxy develops a dense and massive nucleus in its core. The SALI method is applied to samples of orbits in order to distinguish safely between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics is used for identifying the various families of regular orbits and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our computations strongly suggest that the amount of the observed chaos is substantially increased as the nucleus becomes more massive. Furthermore, extensive numerical calculations indicate that there are orbits which change their nature from regular to chaotic and vice versa and also orbits which maintain their orbital character during the galactic evolution. The present outcomes are compared to earlier related work.

  18. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  19. Technologies Involved in Configuring an Advanced Earth-to-Orbit Transport for Low Structural Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacConochie, Ian O.; Klich, Phillip J.

    1980-01-01

    The current space shuttle is expected to adequately meet Government and industry needs for the transport of cargo to and from orbit well into the 1990's. However, continual study of potential follow-on shuttle systems is necessary and desirable in order to complement ongoing research in materials, structures, propulsion, aerodynamics, and other related areas. By studying alternate systems well in advance, it will be possible to explore the various technologies and develop those for which there is the greatest apparent payoff. In this paper a single-stage Earth-to-orbit transport designed for delivery of approximately 29,500 kg (65,000 lb) payload will be described. The vehicle, which takes off vertically and lands horizontally, is 60 m (197 feet) long and weighs approximately 1.8 Gg (4 M lb) at liftoff. In the interest of weight reduction, a simple body of revolution is utilized for the main body shell. In this design the main propulsion tanks serve as a primary load-carrying structure. Further, in order to minimize structural mass, the cargo bay is located between two of the main propellant tanks. The cargo volume, at 396 cu m (14,000 cu feet), exceeds that provided by the shuttle; but the bay itself is nonconforming in shape - being approximately 10 m (32 feet) in diameter by 5 m (17 feet) long. Dual-fuel propulsion is employed, since a number of studies have shown that (though lowering performance) the operation of hydrocarbon (RP) engines in parallel with LOX/LH2 engines results in a net reduction in the vehicle's physical size and structural mass. Other weight-saving features entail the extensive use of honeycomb sandwiches, advanced materials, and advanced fabrication techniques. The vehicle presented is utilized only as a means to study and identify various technologies needed in order to develop a low mass Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the future. The conclusion of this study is that vehicle geometry and structural/materials technology are

  20. Mass transport in gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Michael J.

    This dissertation describes fundamental properties of gas diffusion media (GDM) and their relationship to the mass transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). First, the accuracy of solving the multi-component equations for PEMFC by using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is examined. This technique uses an approximated multi-component (AMC) model with a correction term that guarantees the overall mass balance. Accuracy is assessed by comparing the species concentrations computed with the Maxwell-Stefan and the AMC model. This comparison is important because the structure of some CFD programs does not permit the direct use of the Maxwell-Stefan equations. Here, it is shown that the maximum error between the two models is less than 5%. Second, the ratio of tortuosity to porosity, known as the MacMullin number, is reported for different carbon cloth and carbon paper GDM. This analysis show that only carbon cloths GDM follow the commonly accepted Bruggeman equation and that carbon paper GDM have a different relationship between the tortuosity and the porosity. These differences are discussed in terms of path length created by the orientation of fibers of each GDM. Third, data for the hydrophilic and hydrophobic pore size distributions (PSD) are presented for two types of GDM used in PEMFCs. The data were obtained by using two common measurement methods, intrusion porosimetry (IP) and the method of standard porosimetry (MSP). The use of multiple working fluids to access hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores is discussed as well as the limitations associated with structural changes of the GDM during the tests. The differences in interpretations of the data between the two methods for both GDM have significant implications relative to the distribution of hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores that control liquid water transport. Finally, a two-phase mass-transport-only model (MTOM) that incorporates the tortuosity and the PSD data described above is

  1. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model.

    PubMed

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M Sinan; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif

    2011-11-01

    One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m3) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10+0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L(e) = 0.20 m, k(e) = 1 × 10(-8) m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10+0.10 m of CCL, L(e) = 0.20 m, k(e) = 1 × 10(-8) m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10+0.10 m CCL, L(e) = 0.22 m, k(e) = 1 × 10(-8) m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10+0.10 m CCL, L(e) = 0.22 m, k(e) = 4.24 × 10(-7) m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77×10(-10) to 10.67 × 10(-10)m2/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors, dispersion coefficients of Cu, ranging from 3.47 × 10(-6) m(2)/s to 5.37 × 10(-2) m2/s, was determined to be higher than others obtained for Zn and Fe. Average molecular diffusion coefficients of phenolic compounds were estimated to be about 5.64 × 10(-10) m2/s, 5.37 × 10(-10) m2/s, 2.69 × 10(-10) m2/s and 3.29 × 10(-10) m2/s for R1, R2, R3 and R4 systems, respectively. The findings of this study clearly indicated that about 35-50% of transport of phenolic compounds to the groundwater

  2. Adaptive domain decomposition methods for advection-diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Carlenzoli, C.; Quarteroni, A.

    1995-12-31

    Domain decomposition methods can perform poorly on advection-diffusion equations if diffusion is dominated by advection. Indeed, the hyperpolic part of the equations could affect the behavior of iterative schemes among subdomains slowing down dramatically their rate of convergence. Taking into account the direction of the characteristic lines we introduce suitable adaptive algorithms which are stable with respect to the magnitude of the convective field in the equations and very effective on bear boundary value problems.

  3. Solvent-Induced Crystallization in Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) during Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao

    2001-03-01

    The solvent transport in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and related phase transformation were investigated. The data of mass sorption were analyzed according to Harmon¡¦s model for Case I (Fickian), Case II (swelling) and anomalous transport. This transport process in PET is accompanied by the induced crystallization of the original amorphous state. The transformation was studied by wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), density gradient column, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). During this process, the matrix is under a compressive strain that causes different kinetic path of crystallization as compared to that by thermal annealing. This state of strain will assist the development of the solvent-induced crystallization. It also can be explained in terms of the principle of Le Chatelier if the local equilibrium is assumed. The model regarding the crystallization was proposed in terms of the study of long period L, the crystal thickness lc and the thickness of amorphous layer la, obtained from the linear correlation function and interface distribution function.

  4. A heuristic simulation model of Lake Ontario circulation and mass balance transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, J.E., Jr.; Chalupnicki, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The redistribution of suspended organisms and materials by large-scale currents is part of natural ecological processes in large aquatic systems but can contribute to ecosystem disruption when exotic elements are introduced into the system. Toxic compounds and planktonic organisms spend various lengths of time in suspension before settling to the bottom or otherwise being removed. We constructed a simple physical simulation model, including the influence of major tributaries, to qualitatively examine circulation patterns in Lake Ontario. We used a simple mass balance approach to estimate the relative water input to and export from each of 10 depth regime-specific compartments (nearshore vs. offshore) comprising Lake Ontario. Despite its simplicity, our model produced circulation patterns similar to those reported by more complex studies in the literature. A three-gyre pattern, with the classic large counterclockwise central lake circulation, and a simpler two-gyre system were both observed. These qualitative simulations indicate little offshore transport along the south shore, except near the mouths of the Niagara River and Oswego River. Complex flow structure was evident, particularly near the Niagara River mouth and in offshore waters of the eastern basin. Average Lake Ontario residence time is 8 years, but the fastest model pathway indicated potential transport of plankton through the lake in as little as 60 days. This simulation illustrates potential invasion pathways and provides rough estimates of planktonic larval dispersal or chemical transport among nearshore and offshore areas of Lake Ontario. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  5. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  6. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  7. A spatial SIS model in advective heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Renhao; Lou, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    We study the effects of diffusion and advection for a susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic reaction-diffusion model in heterogeneous environments. The definition of the basic reproduction number R0 is given. If R0 < 1, the unique disease-free equilibrium (DFE) is globally asymptotically stable. Asymptotic behaviors of R0 for advection rate and mobility of the infected individuals (denoted by dI) are established, and the existence of the endemic equilibrium when R0 > 1 is studied. The effects of diffusion and advection rates on the stability of the DFE are further investigated. Among other things, we find that if the habitat is a low-risk domain, there may exist one critical value for the advection rate, under which the DFE changes its stability at least twice as dI varies from zero to infinity, while the DFE is unstable for any dI when the advection rate is larger than the critical value. These results are in strong contrast with the case of no advection, where the DFE changes its stability at most once as dI varies from zero to infinity.

  8. Model development and verification for mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondzo, Miki; Al-Homoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical studies imply that fluid motion does not significantly increase the molecular diffusive mass flux toward and away from microscopic organisms. This study presents experimental and theoretical evidence that small-scale turbulence modulates enhanced mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow. Using the technique of inner region and outer region expansions, a model for dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake by E. coli was developed. The mass transport to the E. coli was modeled by the Sherwood (Sh)-Péclet (Pe) number relationship with redefined characteristic length and velocity scales. The model Sh = (1 + Pe1/2 + Pe) agreed with the laboratory measurements well. The Péclet number that quantifies the role and function of small-scale turbulence on E. coli metabolism is defined by Pe = (?) where Ezz is the root mean square of fluid extension in the direction of local vorticity, ηK is the Kolmogorov length scale, Lc is the length scale of E. coli, and D is the molecular diffusion coefficient. An alternative formulation for the redefined Pe is given by Pe = (?) where ? = 0.5(ɛν)1/4 is the Kolmogorov velocity averaged over the Kolmogorov length scale, ɛ is dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of fluid. The dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy was estimated directly from measured velocity gradients and was within the reported range in engineered and natural aquatic ecosytems. The specific growth of E. coli was up to 5 times larger in a turbulent flow in comparison to the still water controls. Dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake were enhanced with increased ɛ in the turbulent flow.

  9. Arabian Night and Sea Story - Biomarkers from a Giant Mass Transport Deposit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratenkov, Sophia; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Clift, Peter D.; George, Simon C.

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass transport deposits (MTDs) is an important field of research due to the potential insights into catastrophic events in the past and modern geohazard threats (e.g. tsunamis). Submarine mass movements are very significant processes in sculpturing the structure of continental margins, particularly in their extent and magnitude that have consequences both in the modern day, as well as in the geological past. An understanding of the complex stratigraphy of a submarine mass transport deposit (MTD) might help in reconstructing the provenance and transport pathways of sedimentary material and thus give important insights into sedimentary dynamics and processes triggering specific events. Drilling operations during International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355 Arabian Sea Monsoon, which took place during April and May, 2015 cored two sites in Laxmi Basin. Site U1456 was cored to 1109.4 m below seafloor (mbsf), with the oldest recovered rock dated to ~13.5-17.7 Ma. Site U1457 was cored to 1108.6 mbsf, with the oldest rock dated to ~62 Ma. At each site, we cored through ~330 m and ~190 m of MTD material. The MTD layers mainly consist of interbedded lithologies of dark grey claystone, light greenish calcarenite and calcilutite, and conglomerate/breccia, with ages based on calcareous nannofossil and foraminifer biostratigraphy ranging from the Eocene to early Miocene (Pandey et al., 2015). This MTD, known as Nataraja Slide, is the third largest MTD known from the geological record and the second largest on a passive margin. Calvés et al. (2015) identified a potential source area offshore Sourashstra on the Indian continental margin and invoked the single step mass movement model to explain the mechanism of emplacement. Initial shipboard work demonstrated the high variability in total organic carbon and total nitrogen levels in different layers within the MTD, which raises a number of questions related to the source and composition of the organic

  10. Mass transport of deposited particles by surface-to-surface contact.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, A; Sextro, R G; Byrne, M A

    2012-08-15

    The spread of particle-borne contamination by surface-to-surface contact and its implications for exposures within the indoor environment have been observed - largely qualitatively. The present study was conducted with the aim of quantifying the mass transfer efficiency (TE) of deposited aerosol particles when selected soft and hard surfaces come in contact. The surfaces used were 100% cotton, synthetic fleece, plastic laminate and brass. Contact transfer efficiencies ranging from 2 to 45% were observed; these are very significant numbers in terms of hazardous aerosol transport in the environment. Other observations include an increase in the mass transferred with increased surface roughness. An increase in the applied pressure between the two surfaces in contact leads to a step change in transfer efficiency, so that two pressure regimes can be identified, with a transition pressure between them that depends on surface type. Time of contact appears to have little to no effect on the mass transfer efficiency for the surfaces studied, while contaminant loading has some effect that is not systematic. PMID:22683108

  11. Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Evaluation of an advective- dispersive formulation and the dusty-gas model including comparison to data for binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.

    1996-05-01

    Two models for gas-phase diffusion and advection in porous media, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-Gas Model (DGM), are reviewed. The ADM, which is more widely used, is based on a linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy`s Law and ordinary diffusion using Fick`s Law. Knudsen diffusion is often included through the use of a Klinkenberg factor for advection, while the effect of a porous medium on the diffusion process is through a porosity-tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier. Another, more comprehensive approach for gas-phase transport in porous media has been formulated by Evans and Mason, and is referred to as the Dusty- Gas Model (DGM). This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or ``dust``) to develop an approach for combined transport due to ordinary and Knudsen diffusion and advection including porous medium effects. While these two models both consider advection and diffusion, the formulations are considerably different, especially for ordinary diffusion. The various components of flow (advection and diffusion) are compared for both models. Results from these two models are compared to isothermal experimental data for He-Ar gas diffusion in a low-permeability graphite. Air-water vapor comparisons have also been performed, although data are not available, for the low-permeability graphite system used for the helium-argon data. Radial and linear air-water heat pipes involving heat, advection, capillary transport, and diffusion under nonisothermal conditions have also been considered.

  12. Coupled effects of temperature and mass transport on the isotope fractionation of zinc during electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; John, Seth G.; Kavner, Abby

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of zinc metal electrodeposited on a rotating disc electrode from a Zn-citrate aqueous solution was investigated as a function of overpotential (electrochemical driving force), temperature, and rotation rate. Zn metal was measured to be isotopically light with respect to Zn+2 in solution, with observed fractionations varying from Δ66/64Znmetal-aqueous = -1.0‰ to -3.9‰. Fractionation varies continuously as a function of a dimensionless parameter described by the ratio of observed deposition rate to calculated mass-transport limiting rate, where larger fractionations are observed at lower deposition rates, lower temperature, and at faster electrode rotation rates. Thus, the large fractionation and its rate dependence is interpreted as a competition between the two kinetic processes with different effective activation energies: mass-transport-limited (diffusion limited) kinetics with a large activation energy, which creates small fractionations close to the predicted diffusive fractionation; and electrochemical deposition kinetics, with a smaller effective activation energy, which creates large fractionations at low deposition rates and high hydrodynamic fluxes of solute to the electrode. The results provide a framework for predicting isotope fractionation in processes controlled by two competing reactions with different kinetic isotope effects. Light isotopes are electroplated. In all cases light stable isotopes of the metals are preferentially electroplated, with mass-dependent behavior evident where three or more isotopes are measured. Fractionation is time-independent, meaning that the fractionation factor does not vary with the extent of reaction. In most of our experiments, we have controlled the extent of reaction such that only a small amount of metal is deposited from the stock solution, thus avoiding significant evolution of the reservoir composition. In such experiments, the observed isotope fractionation is constant as a

  13. VOC Composition of Air Masses Transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, B.; Parrish, D.; Holloway, J.; Huebler, G.; Fehsenfeld, F.

    2002-12-01

    Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) operated onboard a NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiment in 2002. Enhancements of acetone (CH3COCH3), methanol (CH3OH), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and in some cases benzene were observed in air masses that were impacted by outflow from Asia. The enhancement ratios with respect to carbon monoxide are compared to emission factors for fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, which gives some insight into the sources responsible for the pollution. The observed mixing ratios for acetone, methanol and in particular acetonitrile were generally reduced in the marine boundary layer, suggesting the presence of an ocean uptake sink. The ocean uptake of acetonitrile was found to be particularly efficient in a zone with upwelling water off of the U.S. west coast. Reduced mixing ratios of acetone and methanol were observed in a stratospheric intrusion. This observation gives some information about the lifetime of these VOCs in the stratosphere. Enhanced concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed in air masses that were impacted by urban sources in California. The ratio between the concentrations of benzene, toluene and higher aromatics indicated the degree of photochemical oxidation. PTR-MS only gives information about the mass of the ions produced by proton-transfer reactions between H3O+ and VOCs in the instrument. The identification of VOCs was confirmed by coupling a gas-chromatographic (GC) column to the instrument and post-flight GC-PTR-MS analyses of canister samples collected during the flights.

  14. Nitrogen transport and transformations in a shallow aquifer receiving wastewater discharge: A mass balance approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, L.A.; Howes, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen transport and transformations were followed over the initial 3 years of development of a plume of wastewater-contaminated groundwater in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Ammonification and nitrification in the unsaturated zone and ammonium sorption in the saturated zone were predominant, while loss of fixed nitrogen through denitrification was minor. The major effect of transport was the oxidation of discharged organic and inorganic forms to nitrate, which was the dominant nitrogen form in transit to receiving systems. Ammonification and nitrification in the unsaturated zone transformed 16-19% and 50-70%, respectively, of the total nitrogen mass discharged to the land surface during the study but did not attenuate the nitrogen loading. Nitrification in the unsaturated zone also contributed to a pH decrease of 2 standard units and to an N2O increase (46-660 ??g N/L in the plume). Other processes in the unsaturated zone had little net effect: Ammonium sorption removed <1% of the total discharged nitrogen mass; filtering of particulate organic nitrogen was less than 3%; ammonium and nitrate assimilation was less than 6%; and ammonia volatilization was less than 0.25%. In the saturated zone a central zone of anoxic groundwater (DO ??? 0.05 mg/L) was first detected 17 months after effluent discharge to the aquifer began, which expanded at about the groundwater-flow velocity. Although nitrate was dominant at the water table, the low, carbon-limited rates of denitrification in the anoxic zone (3.0-9.6 (ng N/cm3)/d) reduced only about 2% of the recharged nitrogen mass to N2. In contrast, ammonium sorption in the saturated zone removed about 16% of the recharged nitrogen mass from the groundwater. Ammonium sorption was primarily limited to anoxic zone, where nitrification was prevented, and was best described by a Langmuir isotherm in which effluent ionic concentrations were simulated. The initial nitrogen load discharged from the groundwater system may depend largely on

  15. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches.

  16. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  17. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  18. TiN surface dynamics: role of surface and bulk mass transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bareno, J.; Swiech, W.; Petrova, V.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Kodambaka, S.; Khare, S. V.

    2007-02-09

    Transition-metal nitrides, such as TiN, have a wide variety of applications as hard, wear-resistant coatings, as diffusion barriers, and as scratch-resistant and anti-reflective coatings in optics. Understanding the surface morphological and microstructural evolution of these materials is crucial for improving the performance of devices. Studies of surface step dynamics enable determination of the rate-limiting mechanisms, corresponding surface mass transport parameters, and step energies. However, most models describing these phenomena are limited in application to simple elemental metal and semiconductor surfaces. Here, we summarize recent progress toward elucidating the interplay of surface and bulk diffusion processes on morphological evolution of compound surfaces. Specifically, we analyze the coarsening/decay kinetics of two- and three-dimensional TiN(111) islands and the effect of surface-terminated dislocations on TiN(111) steps.

  19. Mass transport, corrosion, plugging, and their reduction in solar dish/Stirling heat pipe receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Goods, S.H.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar dish/Stirling systems using sodium heat pipe receivers are being developed by industry and government laboratories here and abroad. The unique demands of this application lead to heat pipe wicks with very large surface areas and complex three-dimensional flow patterns. These characteristics can enhance the mass transport and concentration of constituents of the wick material, resulting in wick corrosion and plugging. As the test times for heat pipe receivers lengthen, we are beginning to see these effects both indirectly, as they affect performance, and directly in post-test examinations. We are also beginning to develop corrective measures. In this paper, we report on our test experiences, our post-test examinations, and on our initial effort to ameliorate various problems.

  20. A biphasic hyperelastic model for the analysis of fluid and mass transport in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Smith, Joshua H

    2009-02-01

    A biphasic hyperelastic finite element model is proposed for the description of the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The model takes into account finite deformations through an Ogden-type hyperelastic compressible function and a hydraulic conductivity dependent on deformation. The biphasic equations, implemented here for spherical symmetry using an updated Lagrangian algorithm, yielded radial coordinates and fluid velocities that were used with the convective-diffusive equation in order to predict mass transport in the brain. Results of the model were equal to those of a closed-form solution under infinitesimal deformations, however, for a wide range of material parameters, the model predicted important increments in the infusion sphere, reductions of the fluid velocities, and changes in the species content distribution. In addition, high localized deformation and stresses were obtained at the infusion sphere. Differences with the infinitesimal solution may be mainly attributed to geometrical nonlinearities related to the increment of the infusion sphere and not to material nonlinearities. PMID:19058008

  1. Contribution of di-SIA to mass transport in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.; Pechenkin, V. A.; Molodtsov, V. L.; Terentyev, D.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the diffusion characteristics of di-self interstitial atom (di-SIA) in BCC Fe-Cr alloys and corresponding mass transport of Fe and Cratoms in the temperature range 600-1000 K in the alloys with Cr content 5-25 at%, which is relevant for ferritic/martensitic steels. An original treatment is proposed in this work to account for a mixed migration mode composed of the diffusion of the cluster itself and break-up into a pair of independent SIAs. The ratio of self-diffusion coefficients of Cr and Fe is found to exceed unity in Fe-5Cr and Fe-10Cr alloys, which implies that under cascade-producing damage, 3D-migrating small SIA clusters will effectively contribute to the segregation of Cr to neutral and SIA-preferential sinks, eventually causing radiation induced segregation.

  2. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast. PMID:21654050

  3. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene.

    PubMed

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K(+) ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches. PMID:27506380

  4. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical–chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches. PMID:27506380

  5. Decay Characteristics of Surface Mounds with Contrasting Interlayer Mass Transport Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Wendelken, J. F.; Liu, Bang-Gui; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  6. A generalized mass transfer law unifying various particle transport mechanisms in dilute dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit

    2008-09-01

    A generalized mass transfer law for dilute dispersion of particles (or droplets) of any sizes suspended in a fluid has been described, which can be applied to turbulent or laminar flow. The generalized law reduces to the Fick’s law of diffusion in the limit of very small particles. Thus the study shows how the well-known and much-used Fick’s law of diffusion fits into the broader context of particle transport. The general expression for particle flux comprises a diffusive flux due to Brownian motion and turbulent fluctuation, a diffusive flux due to temperature gradient (thermophoresis plus stressphoresis) and a convective flux that arises primarily due to the interaction of particle inertia and the inhomogeneity of the fluid turbulence field (turbophoresis). Shear-induced lift force, electrical force, gravity, etc. also contribute to the convective flux. The present study includes the effects of surface roughness, and the calculations show that the presence of small surface roughness even in the hydraulically smooth regime significantly enhances deposition especially of small particles. Thermophoresis can have equally strong effects, even with a modest temperature difference between the wall and the bulk fluid. For particles of the intermediate size range, turbophoresis, thermophoresis and roughness are all important contributors to the overall deposition rate. The paper includes a parametric study of the effects of electrostatic forces due to mirror charging. The present work provides a unified framework to determine the combined effect of various particle transport mechanisms on mass transfer rate and the inclusion of other mechanisms not considered in this paper is possible.

  7. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  8. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  9. The effects of advection solvers on the performance of air quality models

    SciTech Connect

    Tanrikulu, S.; Odman, M.T.

    1996-12-31

    The available numerical solvers for the advection term in the chemical species conservation equation have different properties, and consequently introduce different types of errors. These errors can affect the performance of air quality models and lead to biases in model results. In this study, a large number of advection solvers have been studied and six of them were identified as having potential for use in photochemical models. The identified solvers were evaluated extensively using various numerical tests that are relevant to air quality simulations. Among the solvers evaluated, three of them showed better performance in terms of accuracy and some other characteristics such as conservation of mass and positivity. They are the solvers by Bott, Yuamartino, and Dabdub and Seinfeld. These three solvers were incorporated into the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) and the August 3-6, 1990 ozone episode in the San Joaquin Valley of California was simulated with each. A model performance analysis was conducted for each simulation using the rich air quality database of the 1990 San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study. The results of the simulations were compared with each other and the effects of advection solvers on the performance of the model are discussed.

  10. Advective Removal of Intraparticle Uranium from Contaminated Vadose Zone Sediments, Hanford, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, D. A.; Zachara, John M.

    2008-03-01

    A column study on U contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford Site, WA, was performed in order to aid the development of a model for predicting U(VI) release rates under a dynamic flow regime and for variable geochemical conditions. The sediments of interest are adjacent to and below tank BX-102, part of the BX tank farm that contained high level liquid radioactive waste. Two sediments, with different U(VI) loadings and intraparticle large fracture vs. smaller fracture ratios, were reacted with three different solutions. The primary reservoir for U(VI) appears to be a micron-sized nanocrystalline Na-U-Si phase, possibly Na-boltwoodite, that nucleated and grew on plagioclase grains that line fractures within sand-sized granitic clasts. The solutions were all calcite saturated and in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2, where one solution was simply DI-water, the second was a synthetic ground water (SGW) with elevated Na, and the third was the same SGW but with both elevated Na and Si. The latter two solutions were employed, in part, to test the effect of saturation state on U(VI) release. For both sediments and all three electrolytes, there was an initial rapid release of U(VI) to the advecting solution followed by a plateau of low U(VI) concentration. U(VI) effluent concentration increased during subsequent stop flow (SF) events. The electrolytes with elevated Na and Si appreciably depressed U(VI) concentrations relative to DI water. The effluent data for both sediments and all three electrolytes was simulated reasonably well by a three domain model (the advecting fluid, fractures, and matrix) that coupled U(VI) dissolution rates, intraparticle U(VI) diffusion, and interparticle advective transport of U(VI); where key transport and dissolution processes had been parameterized in previous batch studies. For the calcite-saturated DI-water, U(VI) concentrations in the effluent remained far below saturation with respect to Na-boltwoodite and release of U(VI) to

  11. Lattice Boltzmann modeling for fluid flow and heat and mass transport applied to geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Sussumu Komori, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Lattice Boltzmann Modelling (LBM) techniques attract many scientists in various fields of research. This work shows the capability for LBM to simulate the fluid flow and solute transport in porous and fracture media, additionally, how to study behavior of nanofluids submitted to a temperature gradient, which it is an important process in natural aquatic environments, water treatment, and other water related technologies. LBSim is used in this work as Lattice Boltzmann Model simulator software. In this article, a series of cases using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented, showing the capability of the method in simulating phenomena with fluid flow and heat transfer in porous media. Results show that the lattice Boltzmann method delivers reliable and helpful simulations for the analyses of processes in water related technologies. Thus, LBSim is a recommended tool for simulating fluid flow at laminar and turbulent condition, and heat and mass transport under complex geometry and boundary condition. parameter values. Keywords: Lattice Boltzmann Model, LBSim, Fractures Media, Porous Media, nanofluids

  12. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  13. Molecular and system parameters governing mass and charge transport in polar liquids and electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Matt; Fleshman, Allison; Ismail, Mohd; Glatzhofer, Daniel T; Bopege, Dharshani N; Frech, Roger

    2012-08-23

    Onsager's model of the dielectric constant is used to provide a molecular-level picture of how the dielectric constant affects mass and charge transport in organic liquids and organic liquid electrolytes. Specifically, the molecular and system parameters governing transport are the molecular dipole moment μ and the solvent dipole density N. The compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF) writes the temperature-dependent ionic conductivity or diffusion coefficient as an Arrhenius-like expression that also includes a static dielectric constant (ε(s)) dependence in the exponential prefactor. The temperature dependence of ε(s) and therefore the temperature dependence of the exponential prefactor is due to the quantity N/T, where T is the temperature. Using the procedure described in the CAF, values of the activation energy can be obtained by scaling out the N/T dependence instead of the ε(s) dependence. It has been previously shown that a plot of the prefactors versus ε(s) results in a master curve, and here it is shown that a master curve also results by plotting the prefactors against N/T. Therefore, the CAF can be applied by using temperature-dependent density data instead of temperature-dependent dielectric constant data. This application is demonstrated for diffusion data of n-nitriles, n-thiols, n-acetates, and 2-ketones, as well as conductivity data for dilute tetrabutylammonium triflate-nitrile electrolytes. PMID:22838847

  14. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  15. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Tauseef; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  16. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  17. Energy and Mass Transport of Magnetospheric Plasmas during the November 2003 Magnetic Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Chging; Moore, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Intensive energy and mass transport from the solar wind across the magnetosphere boundary is a trigger of magnetic storms. The storm on 20-21 November 2003 was elicited by a high-speed solar wind and strong southward component of interplanetary magnetic field. This storm attained a minimum Dst of -422 nT. During the storm, some of the solar wind particles enter the magnetosphere and eventually become part of the ring current. At the same time, the fierce solar wind powers strong outflow of H+ and O+ from the ionosphere, as well as from the plasmasphere. We examine the contribution of plasmas from the solar wind, ionosphere and plasmasphere to the storm-time ring current. Our simulation shows, for this particular storm, ionospheric O+ and solar wind ions are the major sources of the ring current particles. The polar wind and plasmaspheric H+ have only minor impacts. In the storm main phase, the strong penetration of solar wind electric field pushes ions from the geosynchronous orbit to L shells of 2 and below. Ring current is greatly intensified during the earthward transport and produces a large magnetic depression in the surface field. When the convection subsides, the deep penetrating ions experience strong charge exchange loss, causing rapid decay of the ring current and fast initial storm recovery. Our simulation reproduces very well the storm development indicated by the Dst index.

  18. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  19. Subsurface mass transport affects the radioxenon signatures that are used to identify clandestine nuclear tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests produce anthropogenic isotopes that provide the only definitive means by which to determine whether a nuclear explosion has taken place. Verification of a suspected test under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty often relies on ratios of radioxenon isotopes. Gas samples are gathered either on-site or off-site with certain ranges of xenon isotope ratios considered to be a signature of a weapons test. It is well established that below ground transport can affect the rate at which Noble gasses will reach the surface. However, the relative abundance of anthropogenic isotopes is has long been assumed to rely solely on fission yield and decay rate. By including in subsurface transport models the effects of mass dependent diffusion, and a time dependent source term for the decay of radioiodine precursors, we show here that this assumption is not true. In fact, certain combinations of geology and atmospheric conditions can alter xenon isotope ratios sufficiently for a weapons test going unconfirmed under the current standards.

  20. Application of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy to Heat and Mass Transport Modeling in Porous Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jochen; Milos, Frank; Fredrich, Joanne; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) has been used to obtain digital images of the complicated 3-D (three-dimensional) microstructures of rigid, fibrous thermal protection system (TPS) materials. These orthotropic materials are comprised of refractory ceramic fibers with diameters in the range of 1 to 10 microns and have open porosities of 0.8 or more. Algorithms are being constructed to extract quantitative microstructural information from the digital data so that it may be applied to specific heat and mass transport modeling efforts; such information includes, for example, the solid and pore volume fractions, the internal surface area per volume, fiber diameter distributions, and fiber orientation distributions. This type of information is difficult to obtain in general, yet it is directly relevant to many computational efforts which seek to model macroscopic thermophysical phenomena in terms of microscopic mechanisms or interactions. Two such computational efforts for fibrous TPS materials are: i) the calculation of radiative transport properties; ii) the modeling of gas permeabilities.

  1. Constraints on the Magnitude of Vertical and Lateral Mass Transport on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.

    1997-01-01

    The role of vertical and lateral mass transport of crustal materials on the observed patterns of lunar surface composition, and the effects on our understanding of the geologic evolution of the planet, have been the subject of much debate in the lunar science community. The primary consensus that emerged from analyses of these processes in the 1970's and 1980's was that vertical and lateral mixing through impact gardening was a relatively inefficient process, and not likely to have contributed significantly to compositional units and variations on the Moon. The supporting evidence for this view is that unit boundaries (e.g. mare-highland contacts, contacts between mare color units) are still apparently quite distinct and sharp despite several aeons of impact activity, and cores from the Apollo landing sites did not show any evidence of widespread homogenization of the surface composition, nor distinct compositional gradients across geologic boundaries. In addition, modeling of vertical and lateral transport generally showed that the effects on composition should be confined to horizontal scales of about a kilometer and vertical scales of a meter. The problem with this consensus is that there is ample contradictory evidence. The fundamental discovery of Wood et al. (1970) was made possible by significant horizontal transport of highland material to the center of Mare Tranquillitatis. The continuous and discontinuous ejecta from the crater Copernicus has clearly influenced the surface composition of a large area of the lunar maria, while rays and ejecta from many highland craters are easily recognized in and around the nearside maria. Despite this contrary evidence, there have been few detailed studies to quantify the amount and rate of material redistribution through impact processes (a notable exception is reported in the paper by Pieters et al, 1985), largely because data adequate to critically analyze this process were lacking. However, the multispectral images

  2. Numerical analysis of the diffusive mass transport in brain tissues with applications to optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculae, Adrian P.; Otte, Andreas; Curticapean, Dan

    2013-03-01

    In the brain-cell microenvironment, diffusion plays an important role: apart from delivering glucose and oxygen from the vascular system to brain cells, it also moves informational substances between cells. The brain is an extremely complex structure of interwoven, intercommunicating cells, but recent theoretical and experimental works showed that the classical laws of diffusion, cast in the framework of porous media theory, can deliver an accurate quantitative description of the way molecules are transported through this tissue. The mathematical modeling and the numerical simulations are successfully applied in the investigation of diffusion processes in tissues, replacing the costly laboratory investigations. Nevertheless, modeling must rely on highly accurate information regarding the main parameters (tortuosity, volume fraction) which characterize the tissue, obtained by structural and functional imaging. The usual techniques to measure the diffusion mechanism in brain tissue are the radiotracer method, the real time iontophoretic method and integrative optical imaging using fluorescence microscopy. A promising technique for obtaining the values for characteristic parameters of the transport equation is the direct optical investigation using optical fibers. The analysis of these parameters also reveals how the local geometry of the brain changes with time or under pathological conditions. This paper presents a set of computations concerning the mass transport inside the brain tissue, for different types of cells. By measuring the time evolution of the concentration profile of an injected substance and using suitable fitting procedures, the main parameters characterizing the tissue can be determined. This type of analysis could be an important tool in understanding the functional mechanisms of effective drug delivery in complex structures such as the brain tissue. It also offers possibilities to realize optical imaging methods for in vitro and in vivo

  3. Passive mass transport for direct and quantitative SERS detection using purified silica encapsulated metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Binaya Kumar

    This thesis focuses on understanding implications of nanomaterial quality control and mass transport through internally etched silica coated nanoparticles for direct and quantitative molecular detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Prior to use, bare nanoparticles (partially or uncoated with silica) are removal using column chromatography to improve the quality of these nanomaterials and their SERS reproducibility. Separation of silica coated nanoparticles with two different diameters is achieved using Surfactant-free size exclusion chromatography with modest fractionation. Next, selective molecular transport is modeled and monitored using SERS and evaluated as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and polarity. Molecular detection is achieved when the analytes first partition through the silica membrane then interact with the metal surface at short distances (i.e., less than 2 nm). The SERS intensities of unique molecular vibrational modes for a given molecule increases as the number of molecules that bind to the metal surface increases and are enhanced via both chemical and electromagnetic enhancement mechanisms as long as the vibrational mode has a component of polarizability tensor along the surface normal. SERS signals increase linearly with molecular concentration until the three-dimensional SERS-active volume is saturated with molecules. Implications of molecular orientation as well as surface selection rules on SERS intensities of molecular vibrational modes are studied to improve quantitative and reproducible SERS detection using internally etched Ag Au SiO2 nanoparticles. Using the unique vibrational modes, SERS intensities for p-aminothiophenol as a function of metal core compositions and plasmonics are studied. By understanding molecular transport mechanisms through internally etched silica matrices coated on metal nanoparticles, important experimental and materials design parameters are learned, which can be subsequently applied

  4. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Mass Transport, Dynamics, and Stirring in Isolated Thermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, William H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant differences exist between isotopic signatures of typical mid-ocean ridge basalts and those associated with many ocean islands, with ocean island basalts (OIB) generally exhibiting more variability in trace element concentrations and a bias towards enrichment in more primitive isotopes in sonic cases. Such observations coupled with other geophysical evidence have been used to suggest that. OIB's are surface manifestations of upwellings originating in the deep interior near the core-mantle boundary that interact with distinct geochemical reservoirs as material is transported from the Earth's interior to the surface. Although many have studied the chemistry and dynamics of these mantle plumes, fundamental questions remain. Lagrangian coherent structures and elements of dynamical systems theory are used to extract key material lines and surfaces in isolated laminar plumes. These structures are shown to provide a taxonomic picture of plumes operating in different regimes, to govern how the plume interacts with the ambient during its ascent, and to have a pronounced effect on the origin of mass transported by the plume. A metric is developed to provide a means of predicting the morphology of mass transported by a general flow, and the rise velocity of the starting plume is used to investigate time scales for liftoff. All investigations are conducted using a series of experiments and numerical models where laminar, thermal plumes are generated in a high Prandtl number fluid having strongly temperature dependent viscosity. Experimental data are acquired using a custom-built stereoscopic particle image velocimetry with thermochromic liquid crystals to measure the 3D flow and temperature fields within the tank. A hybrid particle image particle tracking velocimetry scheme is presented which provides improved robustness to particle pattern deformation when using PIV techniques. In agreement with others, we find starting plumes rise with an essentially constant

  6. Variability of Sub-Canopy Flow, Temperature, and Horizontal Advection in Moderately Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christoph K.

    2011-04-01

    We examine the space-time structure of the wind and temperature fields, as well as that of the resulting spatial temperature gradients and horizontal advection of sensible heat, in the sub-canopy of a forest with a dense overstorey in moderately complex terrain. Data were collected from a sensor network consisting of ten stations and subject to orthogonal decomposition using the multiresolution basis set and stochastic analyses including two-point correlations, dimensional structure functions, and various other bulk measures for space and time variability. Despite some similarities, fundamental differences were found in the space-time structure of the motions dominating the variability of the sub-canopy wind and temperature fields. The dominating motions occupy similar spatial, but different temporal, scales. A conceptual space-time diagram was constructed based on the stochastic analysis that includes the important end members of the spatial and temporal scales of the observed motions of both variables. Short-lived and small-scale motions govern the variability of the wind, while the diurnal temperature oscillation driven by the surface radiative transfer is the main determinant of the variability in the temperature signal, which occupies much larger time scales. This scale mismatch renders Taylor's hypothesis for sub-canopy flow invalid and aggravates the computation of meaningful estimates of horizontal advective fluxes without dense spatial information. It may further explain the ambiguous and inconclusive results reported in numerous energy and mass balance and advection studies evaluating the hypothesis that accounting for budget components other than the change in storage term and the vertical turbulent flux improves the budget closure when turbulent diffusion is suppressed in plant canopies. Estimates of spatial temperature gradients and advective fluxes were sensitive to the network geometry and the spatial interpolation method. The assumption of linear

  7. Mass Transport Deposits in the Santaren Channel: Distribution, Characteristics, and Potential Triggering Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnyder, J.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East U.S. coast. A possible source are the large slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Numerical models simulate tsunami generation and propagation through the Straits of Florida, caused by these Pleistocene mass wasting events. In order to estimate the likelihood and extent of future landslides, distribution, characteristics, and possible triggering mechanisms of previous failures and their associated mass transport deposits (MTD) have to be investigated. In 2013, the University of Hamburg acquired 2D high-resolution multichannel seismic data, multibeam data, and subbottom profiles inside the Santaren Channel, along the slopes of western GBB and Cay Sal Bank (CSB). The two platforms are different in two ways. CSB is part of the Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt while GBB is situated in a tectonically quiet zone. In addition, the slopes of western GBB are on the leeward side of the bank, while the eastern slopes of CSB are in a windward position. Differences in nature and size of mass wasting events between the Cay Sal side and the western GBB side of the dataset show how influential the tectonically active Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt is to the generation of large MTDs in this area. In the study area, the slope failures can be divided in two categories; small-scale in situ failures with high frequencies on the slopes, dominant on the western GBB side, and large landslides with a lower frequency, but higher volumes and transport distances on the toe of the slope and in the basin, dominant on the Cay Sal side. The distribution of in situ failures, such as slump and debris flow alternation, shows the interplay between high and low inner strength of the sediment, respectively. On the other hand, large MTDs caused by submarine landslides suggest movement in an unconfined manner. Internal sediment preconditions derived from sea level oscillations are suggested as triggering mechanisms

  8. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Kretzschmar, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies.

  9. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  10. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  11. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  12. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  13. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  14. The role of advection and diffusion in waste disposal by sea urchin embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Aaron; Licata, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    We determine the first passage probability for the absorption of waste molecules released from the microvilli of sea urchin embryos. We calculate a perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation for a linear shear profile similar to the fluid environment which the embryos inhabit. Rapid rotation of the embryo results in a concentration boundary layer of comparable thickness to the length of the microvilli. A comparison of the results to the regime of diffusion limited transport indicates that fluid flow is advantageous for efficient waste disposal.

  15. Coupled effects of temperature and mass transport on the isotope fractionation of zinc during electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; John, Seth G.; Kavner, Abby

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of zinc metal electrodeposited on a rotating disc electrode from a Zn-citrate aqueous solution was investigated as a function of overpotential (electrochemical driving force), temperature, and rotation rate. Zn metal was measured to be isotopically light with respect to Zn+2 in solution, with observed fractionations varying from Δ66/64Znmetal-aqueous = -1.0‰ to -3.9‰. Fractionation varies continuously as a function of a dimensionless parameter described by the ratio of observed deposition rate to calculated mass-transport limiting rate, where larger fractionations are observed at lower deposition rates, lower temperature, and at faster electrode rotation rates. Thus, the large fractionation and its rate dependence is interpreted as a competition between the two kinetic processes with different effective activation energies: mass-transport-limited (diffusion limited) kinetics with a large activation energy, which creates small fractionations close to the predicted diffusive fractionation; and electrochemical deposition kinetics, with a smaller effective activation energy, which creates large fractionations at low deposition rates and high hydrodynamic fluxes of solute to the electrode. The results provide a framework for predicting isotope fractionation in processes controlled by two competing reactions with different kinetic isotope effects. Light isotopes are electroplated. In all cases light stable isotopes of the metals are preferentially electroplated, with mass-dependent behavior evident where three or more isotopes are measured. Fractionation is time-independent, meaning that the fractionation factor does not vary with the extent of reaction. In most of our experiments, we have controlled the extent of reaction such that only a small amount of metal is deposited from the stock solution, thus avoiding significant evolution of the reservoir composition. In such experiments, the observed isotope fractionation is constant as a

  16. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  17. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  18. A family of Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for multi-dimensional advection-reaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Man, S.; Ewing, R.E.; Qin, G.; Lyons, S.L.; Al-Lawatia, M.

    1999-06-10

    Many difficult problems arise in the numerical simulation of fluid flow processes within porous media in petroleum reservoir simulation and in subsurface contaminant transport and remediation. The authors develop a family of Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for the solution of the initial-boundary value problems for first-order advection-reaction equations on general multi-dimensional domains. Different tracking algorithms, including the Euler and Runge-Kutta algorithms, are used. The derived schemes, which are full mass conservative, naturally incorporate inflow boundary conditions into their formulations and do not need any artificial outflow boundary conditions. Moreover, they have regularly structured, well-conditioned, symmetric, and positive-definite coefficient matrices, which can be efficiently solved by the conjugate gradient method in an optimal order number of iterations without any preconditioning needed. Numerical results are presented to compare the performance of the ELLAM schemes with many well studied and widely used methods, including the upwind finite difference method, the Galerkin and the Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods with backward-Euler or Crank-Nicolson temporal discretization, the streamline diffusion finite element methods, the monotonic upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL), and the Minmod scheme.

  19. Mass Conservation in a Chemical Transport Model and its Effect on CO2 and SF6 Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Z.; Weaver, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Chemical transport models (CTMs) must conserve mass to be useful for applications involving assessment of the effect of various pollutants on the troposphere and stratosphere. Furthermore, calculations of the evolution of constituents such as SF6 are used to evaluate overall model transport, and interpretation of such simulations is clouded if mass conservation is not assured. For realistic simulations or predictions, it is crucial that constituents are not produced or lost by transport or other processes in the CTMs. Analysis of CO2 and SF6 experiments using a CTM shows that problems with mass conservation can seriously degrade the simulations. Failure to conserve mass results from inconsistency of the surface pressure tendency and the divergence of horizontal mass flux when the model is forced by assimilated meteorological data. We have developed an effective method to eliminate the inconsistency by modifying the divergent part of the wind field. The changes in the wind fields are quite small but the impact on mass conservation is large. Parameterizations of physical processes such as convection or turbulent transport can also affect mass conservation. The lack of conservation is small but accumulates when integrations are lengthy such as required for SF6. This lack of conservation is found using winds from either a GCM or from an assimilation system. A simple adjustment removes much of the inaccuracy in the convective parameterization. A CO2 simulation using assimilated winds from the most recent version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System will be used to illustrate the impact of these transport improvements.

  20. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND FATE MASS BALANCE CALIBRATION MODEL FOR LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE PROJECT (LMMBP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project (LMMBP) was initiated to directly support the development of a lakewide management plan (LaMP) for Lake Michigan. A mass balance modeling approach is proposed for the project to addrss the realtionship between sources of toxic chemicals and thei...

  2. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Du, Shiyu; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Nerikar, Pankaj; Stanek, Christopher R.; Tonks, Michael; Millet, Paul; Biner, Bulent

    2012-06-04

    In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain

  3. A Microscopic View of Mass Transport in Silicate Melts by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Kargl, Florian; Horbach, Jürgen

    The application of quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation to the study of mass transport in silicate melts is outlined. It is shown how the knowledge of atomic dynamics and structure reveals the mechanisms of mass transport. Peculiar properties of atomic diffusion and viscous flow behaviour as a function of melt composition are discussed in terms of the formation of alkali diffusion channels in the static structure. This non-homogeneous distribution of alkali ions in a disrupted tetrahedral Si-O network is investigated in binary lithium, sodium and potassium silicate melts and in ternary sodium aluminosilicates and sodium ironsilicates representing the main compositions of natural volcanic rocks.

  4. The effect of volume phase changes, mass transport, sunlight penetration, and densification on the thermal regime of icy regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, Fraser P.; Salvail, James R.; Matson, Dennis L.; Brown, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    The present quantitative modeling of convective, condensational, and sublimational effects on porous ice crust volumes subjected to solar radiation encompasses the effect of such insolation's penetration of visible bandpass-translucent light, but opaque to the IR bandpass. Quasi-steady-state temperatures, H2O mass fluxes, and ice mass-density change rates are computed as functions of time of day and ice depth. When the effects of latent heat and mass transport are included in the model, the enhancement of near-surface temperature due to the 'solid-state greenhouse effect' is substantially diminished. When latent heat, mass transport, and densification effects are considered, however, a significant solid-state greenhouse effect is shown to be compatible with both morphological evidence for high crust strengths and icy shell decoupling from the lithosphere.

  5. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  6. An Examination of the Transport and Emplacement of Long Run-Out Debris Masses Associated with Modified Domes on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmer, M. H.

    1996-03-01

    Evidence for slope failures exists on Mars, the Moon, Earth and Venus, but the processes involved in the transport and emplacement of large mass movements (> 10^6 m^3) remain poorly understood. The majority of models proposed to explain the long travel distances and low coefficients of friction of large mass movements are based on the concept that debris were fluidized either by internally or externally derived processes. The mass movements G1 and G2 with the longest run-outs on Venus are of particular interest since they are large and appear to have been highly mobile, tending to travel further for a given vertical drop than mass movements on Earth, Mars and the Moon. This mobility may be explained if a fluidizing agent or lubricant enhanced the locomotion of the debris, but in the absence of water on Venus another medium must be postulated. Likely influences and controls on the transport and emplacement of debris masses on Venus can be divided into those resulting from the geological and geomorphological conditions and those that result form environmental conditions. Having examined the geological and geomorphological influences on the transport and emplacement of debris masses on Venus it appears that neither the nature of the rock mass, the site of the slope failures, nor its traveled path can adequately account for the tendency for mass movements on Venus to travel further for a given vertical drop than mass movements on the other terrestrial planets. The effects of atmospheric conditions on Venus seem likely to be the important factor in explaining the apparent mobility of large rock masses over the surface of the planet.

  7. Microstructural analysis of mass transport phenomena in gas diffusion media for high current density operation in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-04-01

    Cost reduction is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). High current density operation is a solution pathway. In order to realize high current density operation, it is necessary to reduce mass transport resistance in the gas diffusion media commonly consisted of gas diffusion layer (GDL) and micro porous layer (MPL). However, fundamental understanding of the underlying mass transport phenomena in the porous components is not only critical but also not fully understood yet due to the inherent microstructural complexity. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of electron and oxygen transport in the GDL and MPL is conducted experimentally and numerically with three-dimensional (3D) microstructural data to reveal the structure-transport relationship. The results reveal that the mass transport in the GDL is strongly dependent on the local microstructural variations, such as local pore/solid volume fractions and connectivity. However, especially in the case of the electrical conductivity of MPL, the contact resistance between carbon particles is the dominant factor. This suggests that reducing the contact resistance between carbon particles and/or the number of contact points along the transport pathway can improve the electrical conductivity of MPL.

  8. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  9. The Sensitivity of Model Ozone to Advective and Photochemical Processes in the High Latitude Winter Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.; Kawa, S. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three dimensional chemistry and transport models (CTMs) contain a set of coupled continuity equations which describe the evolution of constituents such as ozone and other minor species which affect ozone. Both advection and photochemical processes contribute to constituent evolution, and a CTM provides a means to evaluate these contributions separately. Such evaluation is particularly useful when both terms are important to the modeled tendency. An example is the ozone tendency in the high latitude winter lower stratosphere, where advection tends to increase ozone, and catalytic processes involving chlorine radicals tend to decrease ozone. The Goddard three dimensional chemistry and transport model uses meteorological fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, thus the modeled ozone evolution may reproduce the observed evolution and provide a test of the model representation of photochemical processes if the transport is shown to be modeled appropriately. We have investigated the model advection further using diabatic trajectory calculations. For long lived constituents such as N2O, the model field for a particular time on a potential temperature surface is compared with a field produced by calculating 15 day back trajectories for a fixed latitude longitude grid, and mapping model N2O at the terminus of the back trajectories onto the initial grid. This provides a quantitative means to evaluate two aspects of the CTM transport: one, the model horizontal gradient between middle latitudes and the polar vortex is compared with the gradient produced using the non-diffusive trajectory calculation; two, the model vertical advection, which is produced by the divergence of the horizontal winds, is compared with the vertical transport expected from diabatic cooling.

  10. Hygroscopic chemicals and the formation of advection warm fog: A numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of advection fog is closely associated with the characteristics of the aerosol particles, including the chemical composition, mass of the nuclei, particle size, and concentration. Both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution.

  11. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. The linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was calibrated by use of a depth profile obtained at steady low flow and unsteady flow data obtained in March 1976. During the calibration period, the model was generally able to reproduce observed stages to within 0.15 m and discharges at less than 100 m 3 /s, to within 5 percent. Peak discharges of about 200 m 3 /s were under-estimated by about 20 percent. During the verification period, October 1975, the flow model reproduced observed stage changes to within about 0.15 m, and its timing and over-all performance was considered to be very good. Dye was added to the upstream end of the river reach at a constant rate while the river flow was highly unsteady. The numerical solution of either the conservative or nonconservative form of the mass-transport equation did an excellent job of simulating the observed concentrations of dye in the river. The temperature model was capable of predicting temperature changes through this reach of as large as 5.8?C with a RMS (root-mean-square) error of 0.32?C in October 1975 and 0.20?C in March 1976. Hydropulsation has a significant effect on the water temperature below Buford Dam. These effects are very complicated because they are quite dependent on the timing of the release with respect to both the time of day and past releases.

  12. Mass Influx of Cosmic Dust Estimated From Vertical Transport of Meteoric Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang; Gardner, Chester S.

    2016-04-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles in the lower thermosphere and upper mesosphere. The vaporized atoms and ions are transported downward by waves and turbulence to chemical sinks below 85 km, where they form stable compounds. These compounds condense onto meteoric smoke particles and are then transported to the winter pole where they eventually settle onto the surface. The downward fluxes of the metal atoms are directly related to their meteoric influxes and chemical loss rates. In this paper we use Doppler lidar measurements of Na and Fe fluxes made by the University of Illinois and University of Colorado groups, and a chemical ablation model (CABMOD) developed at the University of Leeds, to constrain the velocity/mass distribution of the meteoroids entering the atmosphere and to derive an improved estimate for the global influx of cosmic dust. We find that the particles responsible for injecting a large fraction of the ablated material into the Earth's upper atmosphere, enter at relatively slow speeds and originate primarily from the Jupiter Family of Comets. The global mean Na influx is 21,500±1,100 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 372±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor and 186±24 t/d for the global influx of cosmic dust. The global mean Fe influx is 131,000±36,000 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 5.5±1.5 t/d for the global input of Na vapor.

  13. Fate, mass balance, and transport of phosphorus in the septic system drainfields.

    PubMed

    Mechtensimer, Sara; Toor, Gurpal S

    2016-09-01

    Septic systems can be a potential source of phosphorus (P) in shallow groundwater. Our objective was to investigate the fate, mass balance, and transport of P in the drainfield of a drip-dispersal septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (152.4 cm long, 91.4 cm wide, and 91.4 cm high). Leachate and effluent samples were collected over 67 events (n = 15 daily; n = 52 weekly flow-weighted) and analyzed for total P (TP), orthophosphate (PO4P), and other P (TP - PO4P). Mean TP was 15 mg L(-1) (84% PO4P; 16% other P) in the effluent and 0.16 mg L(-1) (47% PO4P, 53% other P) in the leachate. After one year, 46.8 g of TP was added with effluent and rainfall to each drainfield, of which, <1% leached, 3.8% was taken up by St. Augustine grass, leaving >95% in the drainfield. Effluent dispersal increased water extractable P (WEP) in the drainfield from <5 to >10 mg kg(-1). Using the P sorption maxima of sand (118 mg kg(-1)) and soil (260 mg kg(-1)), we estimated that ∼18% of the drainfield P sorption capacity was saturated after one year of effluent dispersal. We conclude that despite the low leaching potential of P dispersed with effluent in the first year of drainfield operation, a growing WEP pool in the drainfield and low P sorption capacity of Florida's sandy soils may have the potential to transport P to shallow groundwater in long-running septic systems. PMID:27288645

  14. Performance Analysis of high-order remap-type advection scheme on icosahedral-hexagonal grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rashmi; Dubey, Sarvesh; Saxena, Vaibhav; Meurdesoif, Yann

    2014-05-01

    A comparative performance analysis on computational cost of second order advection schemes FF-CSLAM (Flux form conservative semi-Lagrangian multi-tracer transport scheme) and it's two simplifications on Icosahedral grid has been presented. Tracer transport is one of the main building blocks in atmospheric models and hence their performance greatly determines the overall performance of the model. FF-CSLAM falls in the category of arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) scheme. It exploits the finite volume formulation and therefore it is inherently conservative. Flux-area through edges are approximated with great circle arcs in an upwind fashion. Bi-quadratic sub-grid scale reconstructions using weighted least-squares method is employed to approximate trace field. Area integrals on the overlapped region of flux-area and static Eulerian meshes are evaluated via line-integrals. A brief description of implementation of FF-CSLAM on icosahedral -hexagonal meshes along with and its numerical accuracy in terms of standard test cases will be presented. A comparative analysis of the computational overhead is necessary to assess the suitability of FF-CSLAM for massively parallel and multi-threading computer architectures in comparison to other advection schemes implemented on icosahedral grids. The main focus of this work is to present the implementation of the shared memory parallelization and to describe the memory access pattern of the numerical scheme. FF-CSLAM is a remap-type advection scheme, thus extra calculation are done in comparison to the other advection schemes. The additional computations are associated with the search required to find the overlap area between the area swept through the edge and the underlining grid. But the experiments shows that the associated computational overhead is minimal for multi-tracer transport. It will be shown that for the Courant Number less than one, FF-CSLAM, the computations are not expensive. Since the grid cells are arranged in

  15. A New 2D-Advection-Diffusion Model Simulating Trace Gas Distributions in the Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Peter, T.; Wirth, V.; Fischer, H.; Hoor, P.

    2004-12-01

    Tracer distributions in the lowermost stratosphere are affected by both, transport (advective and non-advective) and in situ sources and sinks. They influence ozone photochemistry, radiative forcing, and heating budgets. In-situ measurements of long-lived species during eight measurement campaigns revealed relatively simple behavior of the tracers in the lowermost stratosphere when represented in an equivalent-latitude versus potential temperature framework. We here present a new 2D-advection-diffusion model that simulates the main transport pathways influencing the tracer distributions in the lowermost stratosphere. The model includes slow diabatic descent of aged stratospheric air and vertical and/or horizontal diffusion across the tropopause and within the lowermost stratosphere. The diffusion coefficients used in the model represent the combined effects of different processes with the potential of mixing tropospheric air into the lowermost stratosphere such as breaking Rossby and gravity waves, deep convection penetrating the tropopause, turbulent diffusion, radiatively driven upwelling etc. They were specified by matching model simulations to observed distributions of long-lived trace gases such as CO and N2O obtained during the project SPURT. The seasonally conducted campaigns allow us to study the seasonal dependency of the diffusion coefficients. Despite its simplicity the model yields a surprisingly good description of the small scale features of the measurements and in particular of the observed tracer gradients at the tropopause. The correlation coefficients between modeled and measured trace gas distributions were up to 0.95. Moreover, mixing across isentropes appears to be more important than mixing across surfaces of constant equivalent latitude (or PV). With the aid of the model, the distribution of the fraction of tropospheric air in the lowermost stratosphere can be determined.

  16. IODP Expedition 333: Return to Nankai Trough Subduction Inputs Sites and Coring of Mass Transport Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, P.; Kanamatsu, T.; Moe, K. T.; Strasser, M.; IODP Expedition 333 Scientific Party, the

    2012-09-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 333 returned to two sites drilled during IODP Expedition 322 on the ocean side of the Nankai Trough to pursue the characterization of the inputs to the Nankai subduction and seismogenic zone, as part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) multi-expedition project. Site C0011 is located at the seaward edge of the trench and Site C0012 on a basement high, Kashinozaki Knoll (Fig. 1). The main objectives of drilling again at these sites were to fill coring gaps in the upper part (<350 m) of the sedimentary sequence, to measure heat flow, and to core the oceanic basement to a greater depth on the Knoll. New results include the observation of a diagenetic boundary within the Shikoku Basin sediments that may be compared to one documented further west by ODP Legs 131, 190 and 196 but occurs here at a lower temperature. Borehole heat flow measurements confirm spatial variations in the Shikoku Basin that were indicated by short probe surveys. Heat flow variations between topographic highs and lows may be related to fluid convection within the basement. This expedition also included the objectives of the Nankai Trough Submarine LandSLIDE history (NanTroSLIDE) Ancillary Project Letter (APL) and cored at Site C0018 a pile of mass transport deposits on the footwall of the megasplay fault, a major out of sequence thrust that presumably slips coseismically during large subduction earthquakes. This brought new insight on the timing of these mass wasting events and on the deformation within the sliding slope sediments. doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.14.01.2012

  17. Lunar Surface Charging and Dust Transport during the Passage of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Collier, M. R.; Glenar, D. A.; Halekas, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of the Moon is directly exposed to the surrounding space plasma and energetic particle (> 10 keV) populations, as well as solar ultraviolet and soft X-ray radiation on the dayside, which result in it becoming electrically charged. Under certain conditions it is possible that the resulting near-surface electric fields could have a significant influence on the transport of charged lunar dust (< ~10 microns in radius). These processes are anticipated to be most extreme at various periods during the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME). Such an event is studied here using solar wind observations from April/May 1998 as part of the Solar Storm-Lunar Atmosphere Modeling (SSLAM) Lunar Extreme Workshop (LEW) to investigate the entire lunar surface-exosphere-space plasma system during a space weather event at the Moon. This workshop was organized by the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) Dynamic Response of the Environment At the Moon (DREAM) team. In this study, surface charging models are used to predict surface potentials and electric fields during the April/May 1998 CME event, as well as assess the importance of the different current sources and the implications for electrostatic dust transport. As expected, at the subsolar point it is found that surface charging is dominated by photoemission currents, although secondary electron emission due to plasma electrons can often have a noticeable influence. Meanwhile at the terminator, surface charging is dominated by plasma electrons and the associated secondary electron emission. At certain times the secondary electron emission is predicted to be sufficiently intense to be able to charge the shadowed surface positive. In addition, it is found that intervals with high fluxes of particles with energies > 10 keV could be very important when their current contribution exceeds that of the plasma ions. The location of the transition from positive to negative surface charging on the lunar dayside, also referred to

  18. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water. PMID:25686488

  19. DEVELOPMENT, CALIBRATION AND APPLICATION OF A CONTAINMENT TRANSPORT AND FATE MASS BALANCE MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN, LM2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project (LMMBP) was initiated to support the development of a Lake Wide Management Plan (LaMP) for Lake Michigan. As one of the models in the LMMBP modeling framework, the Level 2 Lake Michigan containment transport and fate (LM2) model has been dev...

  20. Topology preserving advection of implicit interfaces on Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhipeng; Delaney, Keegan; Riaz, Amir; Balaras, Elias

    2015-06-01

    Accurate representation of implicit interface topology is important for the numerical computation of two phase flow on Cartesian grids. A new method is proposed for the construction of signed distance function by geometrically projecting interface topology onto the Cartesian grid using a multi-level projection framework. The method involves a stepwise improvement in the approximation to the signed distance function based on pointwise, piecewise and locally smooth reconstructions of the interface. We show that this approach provides accurate representation of the projected interface and its topology on the Cartesian grid, including the distance from the interface and the interface normal and curvature. The projected interface can be in the form of either a connected set of marker particles that evolve with Lagrangian advection, or a discrete set of points associated with an implicit interface that evolves with the advection of a scalar function. The signed distance function obtained with geometric projection is independent of the details of the scaler field, in contrast to the conventional approach where advection and reinitialization cannot be decoupled. As a result, errors introduced by reinitialization do not amplify advection errors, which leads to substantial improvement in both volume conservation and topology representation.