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Sample records for advective transport model

  1. Advective transport in heterogeneous aquifers: Are proxy models predictive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, A.; Zarlenga, A.; Gotovac, H.; Jankovic, I.; Volpi, E.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dagan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the prediction capability of two approximate models (Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) and Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW)) of non-Fickian transport, by comparison with accurate 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations. Both nonlocal in time approaches circumvent the need to solve the flow and transport equations by using proxy models to advection, providing the breakthrough curves (BTC) at control planes at any x, depending on a vector of five unknown parameters. Although underlain by different mechanisms, the two models have an identical structure in the Laplace Transform domain and have the Markovian property of independent transitions. We show that also the numerical BTCs enjoy the Markovian property. Following the procedure recommended in the literature, along a practitioner perspective, we first calibrate the parameters values by a best fit with the numerical BTC at a control plane at x1, close to the injection plane, and subsequently use it for prediction at further control planes for a few values of σY2≤8. Due to a similar structure and Markovian property, the two methods perform equally well in matching the numerical BTC. The identified parameters are generally not unique, making their identification somewhat arbitrary. The inverse Gaussian model and the recently developed Multi-Indicator Model (MIM), which does not require any fitting as it relates the BTC to the permeability structure, are also discussed. The application of the proxy models for prediction requires carrying out transport field tests of large plumes for a long duration.

  2. Fractional Advective-Dispersive Equation as a Model of Solute Transport in Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and modeling transport of solutes in porous media is a critical issue in the environmental protection. The common model is the advective-dispersive equation (ADE) describing the superposition of the advective transport and the Brownian motion in water-filled pore space. Deviations from...

  3. The nature and role of advection in advection-diffusion equations used for modelling bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, Christophe; Bohorquez, Patricio; Heyman, Joris

    2016-04-01

    The advection-diffusion equation arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Stochastic models can also be used to derive this equation, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. Stochastic models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. We develop an approach based on birth-death Markov processes, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received little attention. We show that particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due to velocity fluctuations), with the important consequence that local measurements depend on both the intrinsic properties of particle displacement and the dimensions of the measurement system.

  4. Analytical Advection-Dispersion Model for Transport and Plant Uptake of Solutes in the Root Zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We develop an advective-dispersive solute transport equation that includes plant uptake of water and solute, and present an analytical solution. Assumptions underlying the transport model include linear solute sorption, first-order plant uptake, and a uniform soil water content. We examine the lat...

  5. Numerical advection algorithms and their role in atmospheric transport and chemistry models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    During the last 35 years, well over 100 algorithms for modeling advection processes have been described and tested. This review summarizes the development and improvements that have taken place. The nature of the errors caused by numerical approximation to the advection equation are highlighted. Then the particular devices that have been proposed to remedy these errors are discussed. The extensive literature comparing transport algorithms is reviewed. Although there is no clear cut 'best' algorithm, several conclusions can be made. Spectral and pseudospectral techniques consistently provide the highest degree of accuracy, but expense and difficulties assuring positive mixing ratios are serious drawbacks. Schemes which consider fluid slabs bounded by grid points (volume schemes), rather than the simple specification of constituent values at the grid points, provide accurate positive definite results.

  6. Numerical advection algorithms and their role in atmospheric transport and chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, Richard B.

    1987-02-01

    During the last 35 years, well over 100 algorithms for modeling advection processes have been described and tested. This review summarizes the development and improvements that have taken place. The nature of the errors caused by numerical approximation to the advection equation are highlighted. Then the particular devices that have been proposed to remedy these errors are discussed. The extensive literature comparing transport algorithms is reviewed. Although there is no clear cut 'best' algorithm, several conclusions can be made. Spectral and pseudospectral techniques consistently provide the highest degree of accuracy, but expense and difficulties assuring positive mixing ratios are serious drawbacks. Schemes which consider fluid slabs bounded by grid points (volume schemes), rather than the simple specification of constituent values at the grid points, provide accurate positive definite results.

  7. Universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations: The ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    A fresh approach is taken to the embarrassingly difficult problem of adequately modeling simple pure advection. An explicit conservative control-volume formation makes use of a universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations. This ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme is applied to unsteady, one-dimensional scalar pure advection at constant velocity, using three critical test profiles: an isolated sine-squared wave, a discontinuous step, and a semi-ellipse. The goal, of course, is to devise a single robust scheme which achieves sharp monotonic resolution of the step without corrupting the other profiles. The semi-ellipse is particularly challenging because of its combination of sudden and gradual changes in gradient. The ULTIMATE strategy can be applied to explicit conservation schemes of any order of accuracy. Second-order schemes are unsatisfactory, showing steepening and clipping typical of currently popular so-called high resolution shock-capturing of TVD schemes. The ULTIMATE third-order upwind scheme is highly satisfactory for most flows of practical importance. Higher order methods give predictably better step resolution, although even-order schemes generate a (monotonic) waviness in the difficult semi-ellipse simulation. Little is to be gained above ULTIMATE fifth-order upwinding which gives results close to the ultimate for which one might hope.

  8. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  9. Modeling of advection-diffusion-reaction processes using transport dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-11-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. In particular, the transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of Lagrangian particles. To validate the proposed tDPD model and the boundary conditions, three benchmark simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions are performed, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. Also, two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems are performed and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, an application of tDPD to the spatio-temporal dynamics of blood coagulation involving twenty-five reacting species is performed to demonstrate the promising biological applications of the tDPD model. Supported by the DOE Center on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and an INCITE grant.

  10. A subordinated advection model for uniform bed load transport from local to regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Martin, Raleigh L.; Chen, Dong; Baeumer, Boris; Sun, Hongguang; Chen, Li

    2014-12-01

    Sediment tracers moving as bed load can exhibit anomalous dispersion behavior deviating from Fickian diffusion. The presence of heavy-tailed resting time distributions and thin-tailed step length distributions motivate adoption of fractional-derivative models (FDMs) to describe sediment dispersion, but these models require many parameters that are difficult to quantify. Here we propose a considerably simplified FDM for anomalous transport of uniformly sized grains along straight channels, the subordinated advection equation (SAE), which is based on the concept of time subordination. Unlike previous FDM models with time index γ between 0 and 1, our SAE model adopts a value of γ between 1 and 2. This γ describes random velocities deviating significantly from the mean velocity and models both long resting periods and relatively fast displacements. We show that the model quantifies the dynamics of four bed load transport experiments recorded in the literature. In addition to γ, SAE model parameters—velocity and capacity coefficient—are related to the mean and variance of particle velocities, respectively. Successful application of the SAE model also implies a universal probability density for the heavy-tailed waiting time distribution (with finite mean) and a relatively lighter tailed step length distribution for uniform bed load transport from local to regional scales.

  11. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  12. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  13. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  14. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  15. Transport and Recruitment of Blue Crab Larvae:a Model with Advection and Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Epifanio, C. E.; Epifanio, C. C.; Wong, K.-C.

    1997-07-01

    The present paper develops a mathematical model for the transport and recruitment of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae, and applies it to the inner continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight near Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Blue crab larvae develop through seven or eight planktonic zoeal stages to a megalopa stage suitable for recruitment to adult populations of east coast estuaries. The larvae are concentrated near the surface, and the currents are primarily forced by alongshelf winds and river discharge through major estuaries. Model currents are prescribed based on a realistic synthesis of their observed relationship to wind and river discharge. Besides the resulting advection, particle diffusion and biological mortality are added to determine the fate of larvae released from their parent estuary. Groups of particles were released across the source region of the outflowing buoyancy-driven current in the model estuary mouth. Most larvae were swept alongshelf to the south with the buoyancy-driven coastal current, and thus were lost as recruits to the population of their parent estuary. However, some larvae released close to the seaward edge of the emerging coastal current were able to cross the coastal current front and move seaward into inner shelf water during upwelling-favorable (northward) wind events. Some of these, in turn, were suitably placed near the parent estuary mouth so that they could be advected landward as megalopae into the estuary during a subsequent downwelling-favorable (southward) wind event and thus join the adult population. The model results for megalopae returns were computed from consecutive daily release of 1000 particles, and were compared with 4 years of blue crab megalopa settlement data for Delaware Bay. The model results for 1989 and 1990 matched the observed data remarkably well, with both years showing dominance by a single return event of a few days duration. For 1991 and 1992, the observed results showed multiple return events

  16. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  17. The predictability of advection-dominated flux-transport solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Sabrina; Fournier, Alexandre; Aubert, Julien

    2014-01-20

    Space weather is a matter of practical importance in our modern society. Predictions of forecoming solar cycles mean amplitude and duration are currently being made based on flux-transport numerical models of the solar dynamo. Interested in the forecast horizon of such studies, we quantify the predictability window of a representative, advection-dominated, flux-transport dynamo model by investigating its sensitivity to initial conditions and control parameters through a perturbation analysis. We measure the rate associated with the exponential growth of an initial perturbation of the model trajectory, which yields a characteristic timescale known as the e-folding time τ {sub e}. The e-folding time is shown to decrease with the strength of the α-effect, and to increase with the magnitude of the imposed meridional circulation. Comparing the e-folding time with the solar cycle periodicity, we obtain an average estimate for τ {sub e} equal to 2.76 solar cycle durations. From a practical point of view, the perturbations analyzed in this work can be interpreted as uncertainties affecting either the observations or the physical model itself. After reviewing these, we discuss their implications for solar cycle prediction.

  18. Exploring a semimechanistic episodic Langevin model for bed load transport: Emergence of normal and anomalous advection and diffusion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Niannian; Singh, Arvind; Guala, Michele; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Wu, Baosheng

    2016-04-01

    Bed load transport is a highly stochastic, multiscale process, where particle advection and diffusion regimes are governed by the dynamics of each sediment grain during its motion and resting states. Having a quantitative understanding of the macroscale behavior emerging from the microscale interactions is important for proper model selection in the absence of individual grain-scale observations. Here we develop a semimechanistic sediment transport model based on individual particle dynamics, which incorporates the episodic movement (steps separated by rests) of sediment particles and study their macroscale behavior. By incorporating different types of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of particle resting times Tr, under the assumption of thin-tailed PDF of particle velocities, we study the emergent behavior of particle advection and diffusion regimes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For exponential PDFs of resting times Tr, we observe normal advection and diffusion at long time scales. For a power-law PDF of resting times (i.e., f>(Tr>)˜Tr-ν), the tail thickness parameter ν is observed to affect the advection regimes (both sub and normal advective), and the diffusion regimes (both subdiffusive and superdiffusive). By comparing our semimechanistic model with two random walk models in the literature, we further suggest that in order to reproduce accurately the emerging diffusive regimes, the resting time model has to be coupled with a particle motion model able to produce finite particle velocities during steps, as the episodic model discussed here.

  19. Correcting transport errors during advection of aerosol and cloud moment sequences in eulerian models

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw R.

    2012-03-01

    Moment methods are finding increasing usage for simulations of particle population balance in box models and in more complex flows including two-phase flows. These highly efficient methods have nevertheless had little impact to date for multi-moment representation of aerosols and clouds in atmospheric models. There are evidently two reasons for this: First, atmospheric models, especially if the goal is to simulate climate, tend to be extremely complex and take many man-years to develop. Thus there is considerable inertia to the implementation of novel approaches. Second, and more fundamental, the nonlinear transport algorithms designed to reduce numerical diffusion during advection of various species (tracers) from cell to cell, in the typically coarse grid arrays of these models, can and occasionally do fail to preserve correlations between the moments. Other correlated tracers such as isotopic abundances, composition of aerosol mixtures, hydrometeor phase, etc., are subject to this same fate. In the case of moments, this loss of correlation can and occasionally does give rise to unphysical moment sets. When this happens the simulation can come to a halt. Following a brief description and review of moment methods, the goal of this paper is to present two new approaches that both test moment sequences for validity and correct them when they fail. The new approaches work on individual grid cells without requiring stored information from previous time-steps or neighboring cells.

  20. The advective-dispersive equation with spatial fractional derivatives as a model for tracer transport in structured soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical model to describe solute transport in soil is based on the advective-dispersive equation where Fick’s law is used to explain dispersion. From the microscopic point of view this is equivalent to consider that the motion of the particles of solute may be simulated by the Brownian motion....

  1. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  2. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model: numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shia, R L; Ha, Y L; Wen, J S; Yung, Y L

    1990-05-20

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme, proposed by Prather (1986), has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. We generalize the original scheme to include higher-order moments. In addition, we show how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  3. Modelling transport in media with heterogeneous advection properties and mass transfer with a Continuous Time Random Walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Moussey, Charlie; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in groundwater systems are strongly affected by the presence of heterogeneity. The heterogeneity leads to non-Fickian features, that manifest themselves in the heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, as well as in the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement and in the non-Gaussian plumes of solute particles. The causes of non-Fickian transport can be the heterogeneity in the flow fields and the processes of mass exchange between mobile and immobile phases, such as sorption/desorption reactions and diffusive mass transfer. Here, we present a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model that describes the transport of solutes in d-dimensional systems by taking into account both heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile mass transfer. In order to account for these processes in the CTRW, the heterogeneities are mapped onto a distribution of transition times, which can be decomposed into advective transition times and trapping times, the latter being treated as a compound Poisson process. While advective transition times are related to the Eulerian flow velocities and, thus, to the conductivity distribution, trapping times depend on the sorption/desorption time scale, in case of reactive problems, or on the distribution of diffusion times in the immobile zones. Since the trapping time scale is typically much larger than the advective time scale, we observe the existence of two temporal regimes. The pre-asymptotic regime is defined by a characteristic time scale at which the properties of transport are fully determined by the heterogeneity of the advective field. On the other hand, in the asymptotic regime both the heterogeneity and the mass exchange processes play a role in conditioning the behaviour of transport. We consider different scenarios to discuss the relative importance of the advective heterogeneity and the mass transfer for the occurrence of non-Fickian transport. For each case we calculate analytically the scalings of the breakthrough

  4. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  5. HEMP advection model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R.W. Jr.; Barton, R.T.

    1981-01-21

    A continuous rezoning procedure has been implemented in the computational cycle of a version of the HEMP two-dimensional, Lagrange, fluid dynamics code. The rezoning problem is divided into two steps. The first step requires the solving of ordinary Lagrange equations of motion; the second step consists of adding equipotential grid relaxation along with an advective remapping scheme.

  6. Advective turbulent transport in the fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2013-10-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model (HWM) has been employed in pedagogical analyses of the physics behind the behavior of the tokamak plasmas. In addition to the geometric simplicity HWM has an appealing feature of sustaining autonomous quasi-steady state, unstable modes providing the power that is being transported by the nonlinear interactions and is eventually dissipated by the collisional damping at small scales. Emergence of the zonal flow out of the turbulence is a main candidate to cause the transition from the low plasma confinement to the high mode. In the study of such LH transition with the HWM, the adiabaticity parameter has been shown to play an important role in forcing the zonal flow that results in the regulation of the drift-wave turbulence. Instead of concentrating on the physics of the feedback loop between the turbulence and the zonal flow the present study focuses on the presence of the advective transport of the energy. Numerical simulations of HWM are performed and the connections between the advective transport and the zonal flow will be presented. This work was supported by the Supercpmputing Center/Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information with supercomputing resources including technical support (KSC-2013-C1-009).

  7. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-10-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms.

  8. Modeling Three-Dimensional Groundwater Flow and Advective Contaminant Transport at a Heterogeneous Mountainous Site in Support of Remediation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Javandel, Iraj; Jordan, Preston D.

    2004-01-14

    A calibrated groundwater flow model for a contaminated site can provide substantial information for assessing and improving hydraulic measures implemented for remediation. A three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model was developed for a contaminated mountainous site, at which interim corrective measures were initiated to limit further spreading of contaminants. This flow model accounts for complex geologic units that vary considerably in thickness, slope, and hydrogeologic properties, as well as large seasonal fluctuations of the groundwater table and flow rates. Other significant factors are local recharge from leaking underground storm drains and recharge from steep uphill areas. The zonation method was employed to account for the clustering of high and low hydraulic conductivities measured in a geologic unit. A composite model was used to represent the bulk effect of thin layers of relatively high hydraulic conductivity found within bedrock of otherwise low conductivity. The inverse simulator ITOUGH2 was used to calibrate the model for the distribution of rock properties. The model was initially calibrated using data collected between 1994 and 1996. To check the validity of the model, it was subsequently applied to predicting groundwater level fluctuation and groundwater flux between 1996 and 1998. Comparison of simulated and measured data demonstrated that the model is capable of predicting the complex flow reasonably well. Advective transport was approximated using pathways of particles originating from source areas of the plumes. The advective transport approximation was in good agreement with the trend of contaminant plumes observed over the years. The validated model was then refined to focus on a subsection of the large system. The refined model was subsequently used to assess the efficiency of hydraulic measures implemented for remediation.

  9. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  10. Improved rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection described by simple models of bounded systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Bae; Krommes, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The work of Krommes and Smith on rigorous upper bounds for the turbulent transport of a passively advected scalar (/ital Ann. Phys./ 177:246 (1987)) is extended in two directions: (1) For their ''reference model,'' improved upper bounds are obtained by utilizing more sophisticated two-time constraints which include the effects of cross-correlations up to fourth order. Numerical solutions of the model stochastic differential equation are also obtained; they show that the new bounds compare quite favorably with the exact results, even at large Reynolds and Kubo numbers. (2) The theory is extended to take account of a finite spatial autocorrelation length L/sub c/. As a reasonably generic example, the problem of particle transport due to statistically specified stochastic magnetic fields in a collisionless turbulent plasma is revisited. A bound is obtained which reduces for small L/sub c/ to the quasilinear limit and for large L/sub c/ to the strong turbulence limit, and which provides a reasonable and rigorous interpolation for intermediate values of L/sub c/. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  12. Analytical solution for one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mathematical models describing contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media are often formulated as an advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent transport coefficients. In this work, a general analytical solution is presented for the linear, one-dimensional advection-di...

  13. MODFLOW-2000 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--documentation of the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the advective component of contaminant transport in steady-state flow fields can provide important information for the calibration of ground-water flow models. This report documents the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package, version 2, which allows advective-transport observations to be used in the three-dimensional ground-water flow parameter-estimation model MODFLOW-2000. The ADV2 Package is compatible with some of the features in the Layer-Property Flow and Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow Packages, but is not compatible with the Block-Centered Flow or Generalized Finite-Difference Packages. The particle-tracking routine used in the ADV2 Package duplicates the semi-analytical method of MODPATH, as shown in a sample problem. Particles can be tracked in a forward or backward direction, and effects such as retardation can be simulated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity. Particles can be discharged at cells that are considered to be weak sinks, in which the sink applied does not capture all the water flowing into the cell, using one of two criteria: (1) if there is any outflow to a boundary condition such as a well or surface-water feature, or (2) if the outflow exceeds a user specified fraction of the cell budget. Although effective porosity could be included as a parameter in the regression, this capability is not included in this package. The weighted sum-of-squares objective function, which is minimized in the Parameter-Estimation Process, was augmented to include the square of the weighted x-, y-, and z-components of the differences between the simulated and observed advective-front locations at defined times, thereby including the direction of travel as well as the overall travel distance in the calibration process. The sensitivities of the particle movement to the parameters needed to minimize the objective function are calculated for any particle location using the exact sensitivity

  14. Utilizing Kernelized Advection Schemes in Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeh, N.; Balaji, V.

    2008-12-01

    There has been a recent effort in the ocean model community to use a set of generic FORTRAN library routines for advection of scalar tracers in the ocean. In a collaborative project called Hybrid Ocean Model Environement (HOME), vastly different advection schemes (space-differencing schemes for advection equation) become available to modelers in the form of subroutine calls (kernels). In this talk we explore the possibility of utilizing ESMF data structures in wrapping these kernels so that they can be readily used in ESMF gridded components.

  15. Advective and diffusive cosmic ray transport in galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesen, Volker; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Stein, Yelena

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D cosmic ray transport models, numerically solving equations of pure advection and diffusion for the electrons and calculating synchrotron emission spectra. We find that for exponential halo magnetic field distributions advection leads to approximately exponential radio continuum intensity profiles, whereas diffusion leads to profiles that can be better approximated by a Gaussian function. Accordingly, the vertical radio spectral profiles for advection are approximately linear, whereas for diffusion they are of `parabolic' shape. We compare our models with deep Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of two edge-on galaxies, NGC 7090 and 7462, at λλ 22 and 6 cm. Our result is that the cosmic ray transport in NGC 7090 is advection dominated with V=150^{+80}_{-30} km s^{-1}, and that the one in NGC 7462 is diffusion dominated with D=3.0± 1.0 × 10^{28}E_GeV^{0.5} cm^2 s^{-1}. NGC 7090 has both a thin and thick radio disc with respective magnetic field scale heights of hB1 = 0.8 ± 0.1 kpc and hB2 = 4.7 ± 1.0 kpc. NGC 7462 has only a thick radio disc with hB2 = 3.8 ± 1.0 kpc. In both galaxies, the magnetic field scale heights are significantly smaller than what estimates from energy equipartition would suggest. A non-negligible fraction of cosmic ray electrons can escape from NGC 7090, so that this galaxy is not an electron calorimeter.

  16. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  17. Anomalous transport and chaotic advection in homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G; Trefry, M G

    2014-12-01

    The topological complexity inherent to all porous media imparts persistent chaotic advection under steady flow conditions, which, in concert with the no-slip boundary condition, generates anomalous transport. We explore the impact of this mechanism upon longitudinal dispersion via a model random porous network and develop a continuous-time random walk that predicts both preasymptotic and asymptotic transport. In the absence of diffusion, the ergodicity of chaotic fluid orbits acts to suppress longitudinal dispersion from ballistic to superdiffusive transport, with asymptotic variance scaling as σ(L)(2)(t)∼t(2)/(ln t)(3). These results demonstrate that anomalous transport is inherent to homogeneous porous media and has significant implications for macrodispersion.

  18. Anomalous transport and chaotic advection in homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G; Trefry, M G

    2014-12-01

    The topological complexity inherent to all porous media imparts persistent chaotic advection under steady flow conditions, which, in concert with the no-slip boundary condition, generates anomalous transport. We explore the impact of this mechanism upon longitudinal dispersion via a model random porous network and develop a continuous-time random walk that predicts both preasymptotic and asymptotic transport. In the absence of diffusion, the ergodicity of chaotic fluid orbits acts to suppress longitudinal dispersion from ballistic to superdiffusive transport, with asymptotic variance scaling as σ(L)(2)(t)∼t(2)/(ln t)(3). These results demonstrate that anomalous transport is inherent to homogeneous porous media and has significant implications for macrodispersion. PMID:25615192

  19. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  20. Comment on "Advective transport in heterogeneous aquifers: Are proxy models predictive?" by A. Fiori, A. Zarlenga, H. Gotovac, I. Jankovic, E. Volpi, V. Cvetkovic, and G. Dagan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2016-07-01

    Fiori et al. (2015) examine the predictive capabilities of (among others) two "proxy" non-Fickian transport models, MRMT (Multi-Rate Mass Transfer) and CTRW (Continuous-Time Random Walk). In particular, they compare proxy model predictions of mean breakthrough curves (BTCs) at a sequence of control planes with near-ergodic BTCs generated through two- and three-dimensional simulations of nonreactive, mean-uniform advective transport in single realizations of stationary, randomly heterogeneous porous media. The authors find fitted proxy model parameters to be nonunique and devoid of clear physical meaning. This notwithstanding, they conclude optimistically that "i. Fitting the proxy models to match the BTC at [one control plane] automatically ensures prediction at downstream control planes [and thus] ii. … the measured BTC can be used directly for prediction, with no need to use models underlain by fitting." I show that (a) the authors' findings follow directly from (and thus confirm) theoretical considerations discussed earlier by Neuman and Tartakovsky (2009), which (b) additionally demonstrate that proxy models will lack similar predictive capabilities under more realistic, non-Markovian flow and transport conditions that prevail under flow through nonstationary (e.g., multiscale) media in the presence of boundaries and/or nonuniformly distributed sources, and/or when flow/transport are conditioned on measurements.

  1. Coupling of active motion and advection shapes intracellular cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Khuc Trong, Philipp; Guck, Jochen; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2012-07-13

    Intracellular cargo transport can arise from passive diffusion, active motor-driven transport along cytoskeletal filament networks, and passive advection by fluid flows entrained by such cargo-motor motion. Active and advective transport are thus intrinsically coupled as related, yet different representations of the same underlying network structure. A reaction-advection-diffusion system is used here to show that this coupling affects the transport and localization of a passive tracer in a confined geometry. For sufficiently low diffusion, cargo localization to a target zone is optimized either by low reaction kinetics and decoupling of bound and unbound states, or by a mostly disordered cytoskeletal network with only weak directional bias. These generic results may help to rationalize subtle features of cytoskeletal networks, for example as observed for microtubules in fly oocytes.

  2. Modelling coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Croisé, J.; Altmann, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemico-osmosis is a recognized phenomenon taking place in clay mineral-rich sedimentary formations and a number of questions have been raised concerning its potential effects on pressure fields in and around underground radioactive waste repositories installed in such formations. Certain radioactive waste packages contain large quantities of nitrate salts whose release might result in the presence of highly concentrated salt solutions in the disposal cells, during their resaturation after closure of the facility. This would lead to large solute concentration gradients within the formation's porewater which could then potentially induce significant chemico-osmotic fluxes. In this paper, we assess the impact of chemico-osmotic fluxes on the water pressure during the post-closure period of a typical disposal cell for intermediate-level, long-lived bituminised radioactive waste in the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay formation. A numerical model of chemico-osmotic water flow and solute transport has been developed based on the work of Bader and Kooi (2005) [5], and including Bresler's dependence of osmotic efficiency on concentration and compaction state [9]. Model validity has been extended to highly concentrated solutions by incorporating a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, based on the Pitzer's equations. Results show that due to the strong dependence of the osmotic coefficient on concentration, the impact of chemico-osmosis on water flow and on the pressure field around the disposal cell is relatively low. A maximum overpressure of the order of 1 MPa was obtained. No difference in the simulation results were noticed for disposal cell solutions having concentrations higher than 1 M NaNO3. Differences between simulations were found to be almost entirely due to Bresler's relationship i.e., the model of the dependence between osmotic efficiency and concentration, and only slightly on the activity coefficient correction. Questions remain regarding the appropriate

  3. Theory of advection-driven long range biotic transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple mechanistic model to examine the effects of advective flow on the spread of fungal diseases spread by wind-blown spores. The model is defined by a set of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for spore densities. One equation describes the long-distance advectiv...

  4. Two-Dimensional Advective Transport in Ground-Water Flow Parameter Estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, E.R.; Hill, M.C.; Poeter, E.P.

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear regression is useful in ground-water flow parameter estimation, but problems of parameter insensitivity and correlation often exist given commonly available hydraulic-head and head-dependent flow (for example, stream and lake gain or loss) observations. To address this problem, advective-transport observations are added to the ground-water flow, parameter-estimation model MODFLOWP using particle-tracking methods. The resulting model is used to investigate the importance of advective-transport observations relative to head-dependent flow observations when either or both are used in conjunction with hydraulic-head observations in a simulation of the sewage-discharge plume at Otis Air Force Base, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. The analysis procedure for evaluating the probable effect of new observations on the regression results consists of two steps: (1) parameter sensitivities and correlations calculated at initial parameter values are used to assess the model parameterization and expected relative contributions of different types of observations to the regression; and (2) optimal parameter values are estimated by nonlinear regression and evaluated. In the Cape Cod parameter-estimation model, advective-transport observations did not significantly increase the overall parameter sensitivity; however: (1) inclusion of advective-transport observations decreased parameter correlation enough for more unique parameter values to be estimated by the regression; (2) realistic uncertainties in advective-transport observations had a small effect on parameter estimates relative to the precision with which the parameters were estimated; and (3) the regression results and sensitivity analysis provided insight into the dynamics of the ground-water flow system, especially the importance of accurate boundary conditions. In this work, advective-transport observations improved the calibration of the model and the estimation of ground-water flow parameters, and use of

  5. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  6. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  7. Steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport, Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Daniel J.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Rattray, Gordon W.; Fisher, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The steady-state and transient flow models cover an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the 890 square miles of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Model results can be used in numerical simulations to evaluate the movement of contaminants in the aquifer. Saturated flow in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer was simulated using the MODFLOW-2000 groundwater flow model. Steady-state flow was simulated to represent conditions in 1980 with average streamflow infiltration from 1966-80 for the Big Lost River, the major variable inflow to the system. The transient flow model simulates groundwater flow between 1980 and 1995, a period that included a 5-year wet cycle (1982-86) followed by an 8-year dry cycle (1987-94). Specified flows into or out of the active model grid define the conditions on all boundaries except the southwest (outflow) boundary, which is simulated with head-dependent flow. In the transient flow model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress, and was variable in time and location. The models were calibrated by adjusting aquifer hydraulic properties to match simulated and observed heads or head differences using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. Various summary, regression, and inferential statistics, in addition to comparisons of model properties and simulated head to measured properties and head, were used to evaluate the model calibration. Model parameters estimated for the steady-state calibration included hydraulic conductivity for seven of nine hydrogeologic zones and a global value of vertical anisotropy. Parameters

  8. Modeling the adsorption of Cr(III) from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass: study of the advective and dispersive transport.

    PubMed

    Romero-González, J; Walton, J C; Peralta-Videa, J R; Rodríguez, E; Romero, J; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2009-01-15

    The biosorption of Cr(III) onto packed columns of Agave lechuguilla was analyzed using an advective-dispersive (AD) model and its analytical solution. Characteristic parameters such as axial dispersion coefficients, retardation factors, and distribution coefficients were predicted as functions of inlet ion metal concentration, time, flow rate, bed density, cross-sectional column area, and bed length. The root-mean-square-error (RMSE) values 0.122, 0.232, and 0.285 corresponding to the flow rates of 1, 2, and 3 (10(-3))dm3min(-1), respectively, indicated that the AD model provides an excellent approximation of the simulation of lumped breakthrough curves for the adsorption of Cr(III) by lechuguilla biomass. Therefore, the model can be used for design purposes to predict the effect of varying operational conditions. PMID:18462882

  9. Numerical modeling of DNA-chip hybridization with chaotic advection

    PubMed Central

    Raynal, Florence; Beuf, Aurélien; Carrière, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of DNA-chip hybridization, both in the “static” and “dynamical” cases. In the static case, transport of free targets is limited by molecular diffusion; in the dynamical case, an efficient mixing is achieved by chaotic advection, with a periodic protocol using pumps in a rectangular chamber. This protocol has been shown to achieve rapid and homogeneous mixing. We suppose in our model that all free targets are identical; the chip has different spots on which the probes are fixed, also all identical, and complementary to the targets. The reaction model is an infinite sink potential of width dh, i.e., a target is captured as soon as it comes close enough to a probe, at a distance lower than dh. Our results prove that mixing with chaotic advection enables much more rapid hybridization than the static case. We show and explain why the potential width dh does not play an important role in the final results, and we discuss the role of molecular diffusion. We also recover realistic reaction rates in the static case. PMID:24404027

  10. Backward fractional advection dispersion model for contaminant source prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2016-04-01

    The forward Fractional Advection Dispersion Equation (FADE) provides a useful model for non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous porous media. The space FADE captures the long leading tail, skewness, and fast spreading typically seen in concentration profiles from field data. This paper develops the corresponding backward FADE model, to identify source location and release time. The backward method is developed from the theory of inverse problems, and then explained from a stochastic point of view. The resultant backward FADE differs significantly from the traditional backward Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) because the fractional derivative is not self-adjoint and the probability density function for backward locations is highly skewed. Finally, the method is validated using tracer data from a well-known field experiment, where the peak of the backward FADE curve predicts source release time, while the median or a range of percentiles can be used to determine the most likely source location for the observed plume. The backward ADE cannot reliably identify the source in this application, since the forward ADE does not provide an adequate fit to the concentration data.

  11. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  12. Thermally driven advection for radioxenon transport from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-05-01

    Barometric pumping is a ubiquitous process resulting in migration of gases in the subsurface that has been studied as the primary mechanism for noble gas transport from an underground nuclear explosion (UNE). However, at early times following a UNE, advection driven by explosion residual heat is relevant to noble gas transport. A rigorous measure is needed for demonstrating how, when, and where advection is important. In this paper three physical processes of uncertain magnitude (oscillatory advection, matrix diffusion, and thermally driven advection) are parameterized by using boundary conditions, system properties, and source term strength. Sobol' sensitivity analysis is conducted to evaluate the importance of all physical processes influencing the xenon signals. This study indicates that thermally driven advection plays a more important role in producing xenon signals than oscillatory advection and matrix diffusion at early times following a UNE, and xenon isotopic ratios are observed to have both time and spatial dependence.

  13. A spatial SIS model in advective heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Renhao; Lou, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    We study the effects of diffusion and advection for a susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic reaction-diffusion model in heterogeneous environments. The definition of the basic reproduction number R0 is given. If R0 < 1, the unique disease-free equilibrium (DFE) is globally asymptotically stable. Asymptotic behaviors of R0 for advection rate and mobility of the infected individuals (denoted by dI) are established, and the existence of the endemic equilibrium when R0 > 1 is studied. The effects of diffusion and advection rates on the stability of the DFE are further investigated. Among other things, we find that if the habitat is a low-risk domain, there may exist one critical value for the advection rate, under which the DFE changes its stability at least twice as dI varies from zero to infinity, while the DFE is unstable for any dI when the advection rate is larger than the critical value. These results are in strong contrast with the case of no advection, where the DFE changes its stability at most once as dI varies from zero to infinity.

  14. Stochastic interpretation of the advection-diffusion equation and its relevance to bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.; Bohorquez, P.; Heyman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The advection-diffusion equation is one of the most widespread equations in physics. It arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Phenomenological laws are usually sufficient to derive this equation and interpret its terms. Stochastic models can also be used to derive it, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. These models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. Among these stochastic models, the most common approach consists of random walk models. For instance, they have been used to model the random displacement of tracers in rivers. Here we explore an alternative approach, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. Birth-death Markov processes are well suited to this objective. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received no attention. We therefore look into the possibility of deriving the advection-diffusion equation (with a source term) within the framework of birth-death Markov processes. We show that in the continuum limit (when the cell size becomes vanishingly small), we can derive an advection-diffusion equation for particle activity. Yet while this derivation is formally valid in the continuum limit, it runs into difficulty in practical applications involving cells or meshes of finite length. Indeed, within our stochastic framework, particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due

  15. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  16. AN EXACT PEAK CAPTURING AND OSCILLATION-FREE SCHEME TO SOLVE ADVECTION-DISPERSION TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exact peak capturing and essentially oscillation-free (EPCOF) algorithm, consisting of advection-dispersion decoupling, backward method of characteristics, forward node tracking, and adaptive local grid refinement, is developed to solve transport equations. This algorithm repr...

  17. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  18. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  19. Really TVD advection schemes for the depth-integrated transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Ch.; Delhez, E. J. M.

    This paper explores the use of TVD advection schemes to solve the depth-integrated transport equation for tracers in finite volume marine models. Numerical experiments show that the blind application of the usual TVD schemes and associated flux limiters can lead to non-TVD solutions when applied in complex geometries. Spatial and/or temporal variations of the local bathymetry can indeed break the TVD property of the usual schemes. Really TVD schemes can be recovered by taking into account the local depth and its variations in the formulation of the flux limiters. Using this approach, a generalized superbee limiter is introduced and validated.

  20. Simulation of the advective methane transport and AOM in Shenhu area, the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wu, N.

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) occurs in the transition zone between the presence of sulfate and methane. This reaction is an important process for methane and the global carbon cycle. Methane gas hydrates bearing sediments were recovered in Shenhu Area, the Northern South China Sea, and methane advective transport was detected in this area as well. A one dimension numerical simulation tool was implemented to study the AOM process combined with the advective methane transport in Shenhu Area according to the local drilling data and geochemical information. The modeled results suggest that local methane flux will be consumed in the sediment column via dissolution, sorption and AOM reaction. A portion of methane will enter water column and possibly atmosphere if the methane flux was one order of magnitude higher than current level. Furthermore, the calculated rates of AOM in Shenhu area range similar to that of gas hydrate mounds in Mexico Golf. However, AOM is ability to consume more methane than that in Golf of Mexico due to the lower permeable sediment associated with a deeper sulfate methane transition layer.

  1. Exact PDF equations and closure approximations for advective-reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, D.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical models of advection–reaction phenomena rely on advective flow velocity and (bio) chemical reaction rates that are notoriously random. By using functional integral methods, we derive exact evolution equations for the probability density function (PDF) of the state variables of the advection–reaction system in the presence of random transport velocity and random reaction rates with rather arbitrary distributions. These PDF equations are solved analytically for transport with deterministic flow velocity and a linear reaction rate represented mathematically by a heterog eneous and strongly-correlated random field. Our analytical solution is then used to investigate the accuracy and robustness of the recently proposed large-eddy diffusivity (LED) closure approximation [1]. We find that the solution to the LED-based PDF equation, which is exact for uncorrelated reaction rates, is accurate even in the presence of strong correlations and it provides an upper bound of predictive uncertainty.

  2. Local- and field-scale stochastic-advective vertical solute transport in horizontally heterogeneous unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Richa; Prakash, A.; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2014-08-01

    Description of field-scale solute transport in unsaturated soils is essential for assessing the degree of contamination, estimating fluxes past a control plane and for designing remedial measures. The flow field is usually described by numerical solution of the Richards equation followed by numerical solution of the advection-dispersion equation to describe contaminant movement. These numerical solutions are highly complex, and do not provide the insights that are possible from simpler analytical representations. In this study, analytical solutions at the local scale are developed to describe purely advective vertical transport of a conservative solute along the principle characteristic of the flow field. Local-scale model development is simplified by using a sharp-front approximation for water movement. These local solutions are then upscaled to field-scale solute transport by adopting a lognormally distributed horizontal hydraulic conductivity field to represent the natural heterogeneity observed in field soils. Analytical expressions are developed for the mean behavior of solute transport at the field scale. Comparisons with experimental observations find that trends of field-scale solute behavior are reasonably reproduced by the model. The accuracy of the proposed solution improves with increasing spatial variability in the hydraulic conductivity as revealed by further comparisons with numerical results of the Richards equation-based field-scale solute movement. In some cases, the sharp-front approximation may lead to anomalous field-scale behavior depending on the role of pre and postponded conditions in the field, and this limitation is discussed. The proposed method shows promise for describing field-scale solute movement in loamy sand and sandy loam soils.

  3. Curves to determine the relative importance of advection and dispersion for solute and vapor transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garges, J.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of advection and dispersion for both solute and vapor transport can be determined from type curves or concentration, flux, or cumulative flux. The dimensionless form of the type curves provides a means to directly evaluate the importance of mass transport by advection relative to that of mass transport by diffusion and dispersion. Type curves based on an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation are plotted in terms of dimensionless time and Peclet number. Flux and cumulative flux type curves provide additional rationale for transport regime determination in addition to the traditional concentration type curves. The extension of type curves to include vapor transport with phase partitioning in the unsaturated zone is a new development. Type curves for negative Peclet numbers also are presented. A negative Peclet number characterizes a problem in which one direction of flow is toward the contamination source, and thereby diffusion and advection can act in opposite directions. Examples are the diffusion of solutes away from the downgradient edge of a pump-and-treat capture zone, the upward diffusion of vapors through the unsaturated zone with recharge, and the diffusion of solutes through a low hydraulic conductivity cutoff wall with an inward advective gradient.

  4. Contour advection with surgery: A technique for investigating finescale structure in tracer transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Plumb, R. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We present a trajectory technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), for tracing the evolution of material contours in a specified (including observed) evolving flow. CAS uses the algorithms developed by Dritschel for contour dynamics/surgery to trace the evolution of specified contours. The contours are represented by a series of particles, which are advected by a specified, gridded, wind distribution. The resolution of the contours is preserved by continually adjusting the number of particles, and finescale features are produced that are not present in the input data (and cannot easily be generated using standard trajectory techniques). The reliability, and dependence on the spatial and temporal resolution of the wind field, of the CAS procedure is examined by comparisons with high-resolution numerical data (from contour dynamics calculations and from a general circulation model), and with routine stratospheric analyses. These comparisons show that the large-scale motions dominate the deformation field and that CAS can accurately reproduce small scales from low-resolution wind fields. The CAS technique therefore enables examination of atmospheric tracer transport at previously unattainable resolution.

  5. Gaining a Better Understanding of Surface-Subsurface Reactive Transport using a High-Order Advection Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J., III; Maxwell, R. M.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between physical, geochemical, and biological processes in the shallow subsurface is prerequisite to the development of effective contamination remediation techniques, or the accurate quantification of nutrient fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. Here we present recent developments to the massively parallel reactive transport code ParCrunchFlow. This model, previously applicable only to steady-state, saturated subsurface flows, has been extended to transient, surface-subsurface systems. Proof-of-concept simulations detailing reactive transport processes in hillslope and floodplain settings will be presented. In order to reduce the numerical dispersion inherent in grid based advection schemes, which can lead to an over prediction of reaction rates, a weighted, essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) advection scheme has been implemented, providing formal fifth-order spatial and third-order temporal accuracy. We use a mass-conservative, positivity-preserving flux limiter while advecting solute concentrations to prevent non-physical solutions. The effects of advection schemes and their associated numerical dispersion on reaction rates are evaluated by comparing our scheme to a monotonic lower order scheme in a transverse mixing scenario. The work presented here allows a better understanding of nutrient cycling dynamics in watershed systems.

  6. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-01

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration.

  7. Sensitivity of advective transfer times across the North Atlantic Ocean to the temporal and spatial resolution of model velocity data: Implication for European eel larval transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Bruno; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Grima, Nicolas; Drillet, Yann

    2012-05-01

    European eel (Anguilla anguilla) larvae achieve one of the longest larval migrations of the marine realm, i.e., more than 6000 km from their spawning grounds in the Sargasso Sea to European continental shelves. The duration of this migration remains debated, between 7 months and 3 years. This information is, however, crucial since it determines the period over which larvae are affected by environmental conditions and hence the subsequent recruitment success. We investigate the pathways and duration of trans-Atlantic connections using 3 years of high-resolution (daily, 1/12°) velocity fields available from a Mercator-Océan model configuration without data assimilation. We study specifically the effect of spatial and temporal resolutions on our estimates by applying various filters in time (from daily to 12-day averages) and space (from 1/12° to 1° gridcell aggregation) to the nominal model outputs. Numerical particles are released in the presumed European eel spawning area and considered as passive tracers at three specific depths (around 0, 50, and 200 m). We diagnose particularly the intensity of the water transfer between suitable control sections that encompass the eel larva distribution. Transit ages are also investigated, with a particular focus on the pathways that minimize the connection times between the western and eastern North Atlantic. We show that small-scale structures (eddies and filaments) contribute to faster connections though they also correspond to additional complexity in trajectories. The shortest pathways mostly follow the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Drift, whereas interior connections require longer transfers that prove less compatible with biological observations.

  8. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture. PMID:26232976

  9. Dense-gas dispersion advection-diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Ermak, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    A dense-gas version of the ADPIC particle-in-cell, advection- diffusion model was developed to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of denser-than-air releases. In developing the model, it was assumed that the dense-gas effects could be described in terms of the vertically-averaged thermodynamic properties and the local height of the cloud. The dense-gas effects were treated as a perturbation to the ambient thermodynamic properties (density and temperature), ground level heat flux, turbulence level (diffusivity), and windfield (gravity flow) within the local region of the dense-gas cloud. These perturbations were calculated from conservation of energy and conservation of momentum principles along with the ideal gas law equation of state for a mixture of gases. ADPIC, which is generally run in conjunction with a mass-conserving wind flow model to provide the advection field, contains all the dense-gas modifications within it. This feature provides the versatility of coupling the new dense-gas ADPIC with alternative wind flow models. The new dense-gas ADPIC has been used to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of ground-level, colder-than-ambient, denser-than-air releases and has compared favorably with the results of field-scale experiments.

  10. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  11. Removing volatile contaminants from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Hoag, G.E.; Marley, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Organic liquids inadvertently spilled and then distributed in the unsaturated zone can pose a long-term threat to ground water. Many of these substances have significant volatility, and thereby establish a premise for contaminant removal from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport with wells screened in the unsaturated zone. In order to focus attention on the rates of mass transfer from liquid to vapour phases, sand columns were partially saturated with gasoline and vented under steady air-flow conditions. The ability of an equilibrium-based transport model to predict the hydrocarbon vapor flux from the columns implies an efficient rate of local phase transfer for reasonably high air-phase velocities. Thus the success of venting remediations will depend primarily on the ability to induce an air-flow field in a heterogeneous unsaturated zone that will intersect the distributed contaminant. To analyze this aspect of the technique, a mathematical model was developed to predict radially symmetric air flow induced by venting from a single well. This model allows for in-situ determinations of air-phase permeability, which is the fundamental design parameter, and for the analysis of the limitations of a single well design. A successful application of the technique at a site once contaminated by gasoline supports the optimism derived from the experimental and modeliing phases of this study, and illustrates the well construction and field methods used to document the volatile contaminant recovery. ?? 1989.

  12. Numerical simulation of advective-dispersive multisolute transport with sorption, ion exchange and equilibrium chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed that can simulate the effect of certain chemical and sorption reactions simultaneously among solutes involved in advective-dispersive transport through porous media. The model is based on a methodology that utilizes physical-chemical relationships in the development of the basic solute mass-balance equations; however, the form of these equations allows their solution to be obtained by methods that do not depend on the chemical processes. The chemical environment is governed by the condition of local chemical equilibrium, and may be defined either by the linear sorption of a single species and two soluble complexation reactions which also involve that species, or binary ion exchange and one complexation reaction involving a common ion. Partial differential equations that describe solute mass balance entirely in the liquid phase are developed for each tenad (a chemical entity whose total mass is independent of the reaction process) in terms of their total dissolved concentration. These equations are solved numerically in two dimensions through the modification of an existing groundwater flow/transport computer code. (Author 's abstract)

  13. THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN GEOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AND ADVECTION-DISPERSION IN CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AT A URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface are controlled by complex processes including advection, dispersion-diffusion, and chemical reactions. However, the interplay between the physical transport processes and chemical reactions, and their...

  14. Relative effects of advection, sorption and diffusion on transport and tailing of chlorinated solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M.; Jankovic, I.; Rabideau, A. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    Effects of three key transport mechanisms (advection, diffusion and sorption) on transport and contaminant tailing of chlorinated solvents have been investigated using a numerical model. Thousands of model simulations have been conducted for various combinations of transport parameters that govern three key mechanisms in order to quantify tailing and relative importance of each mechanism. Hydraulic conductivity model contains a single inclusion of constant conductivity K embedded in a homogeneous anisotropic background of conductivity Kh,Kv. The inclusion is shaped as an oblate ellipsoid and subject to uniform flow. The background represents "average" conductivity of a heterogeneous formation while inclusion is used to represent geologic units that are more or less conductive than the background. The ratio of long to short semi-axis of the inclusion (a/b) models the ratio of horizontal to vertical integral scales (Ih/Iv) of different geologic units, where integral scales can be obtained, for example, using indicator variograms. The flow solution for present problem is obtained analytically as a closed form solution with exact expressions for Darcy velocity valid both inside and outside the inclusion. Sorption is modeled as an equilibrium process governed by a linear isotherm. The effects on transport and tailing are accounted for using retardation factors. Sorption heterogeneity is created by allowing different values of retardation factor for the interior (Ri) and the exterior of the inclusion (Rb). Diffusive displacements have been added to retarded advective displacements using random walk method. Peclet number, defined as Pe=U Ih/D (U is the groundwater velocity, D is the molecular diffusion coefficient for chlorinated solvents), is used to quantify the diffusion process. Very large numbers of particles (hundreds of thousands) have been tracked using very small time steps (as small as a/10,000) to provide sufficient resolution to breakthrough curves and to

  15. Nonlinear Advection Algorithms Applied to Inter-related Tracers: Errors and Implications for Modeling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-02-01

    Monotonicity constraints and gradient preserving flux corrections employed by many advection algorithms used in atmospheric models make these algorithms non-linear. Consequently, any relations among model variables transported separately are not necessarily preserved in such models. These errors cannot be revealed by traditional algorithm testing based on advection of a single tracer. New type of tests are developed and conducted to evaluate the preservation of a sum of several number mixing ratios advected independently of each other, as is the case, for example, in models using bin or sectional representation of aerosol or cloud particle size distribution. The tests show that when three tracers are advected in 1D uniform constant velocity flow, local errors in the sum can be on the order of 10%. When cloud-like interactions are allowed among the tracers, errors in total sum of three mixing ratios can reach up to 30%. Several approaches to eliminate the error are suggested, all based on advecting the sum as a separate variable and then normalizing mixing ratios for individual tracers to match the total sum. A simple scalar normalization preserves the total number mixing ratio and positive definiteness of the variables but the monotonicity constraint for individual tracers is no longer maintained. More involved flux normalization procedures are developed for the flux based advection algorithms to maintain the monotonicity for individual scalars and their sum.

  16. Analytical solution of the advection-diffusion transport equation using a change-of-variable and integral transform technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a formal exact solution of the linear advection-diffusion transport equation with constant coefficients for both transient and steady-state regimes. A classical mathematical substitution transforms the original advection-diffusion equation into an exclusively diffusive equation. ...

  17. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  18. The impact of advective transport by the South Indian Ocean Countercurrent on the Madagascar plankton bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Beron-Vera, F. J.

    2012-03-01

    Based on ten years (1998-2007) of satellite ocean color data we analyze the spatiotemporal patterns in the seasonal Madagascar plankton bloom with respect to the advection of the recently discovered Southern Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC). In maps of Finite-time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) and Finite-Time Zonal Drift (FTZD) computed from altimetry derived velocities we observe a narrow zonal jet that starts at ˜25°S at the southern tip of Madagascar, an important upwelling region, and extends to the east further than the largest plankton blooms (˜2500 km). In bloom years, the jet coincides with large parts of the northern boundary of the plankton bloom, acting as a barrier to meridional transport. Our findings suggest that advection is an important and so far underestimated mechanism for the eastward propagation and the extent of the plankton bloom. This supports the hypothesis of a single nutrient source south of Madagascar.

  19. Development of the FMT chemical transport simulator: Advective transport sensitivity to aqueous density and mineral volume fraction coupled to phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.

    1993-12-31

    The Fracture-Matrix Transport (FMT) code couples saturated porous media advection and diffusion with mechanistic chemical models for speciation and interphase reactions. FMT is being developed to support actinide solubility and retardation studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), USDOE facility for demonstrating safe disposal of transuranic waste. Hydrologic studies of water-bearing units above the WIPP indicate double-porosity transport behavior in some locations, with groundwater concentrations ranging which potable to highly concentrated. Previously, FMT simulated such systems in two-dimensions on the continuum from advection- to diffusion-dominated, with a user-specified velocity field that allows double-porosity transport. However, aqueous density was assumed constant, and reactive minerals were assumed to occupy negligible volume. Both of these assumptions can be considered poor for evaporite systems, where large changes in porosity and aqueous density can result from high mineral solubilities. Therefore, further development of FMT has relaxed these restrictions, allowing aqueous density to vary with phase composition, and allowing void volume to change as minerals dissolve and precipitate. This paper describes the additional mathematical complexity required to simulate such systems. The sensitivity of advection-dominated transport to these variables is explored through an extended example.

  20. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D advection model towards large-scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2015-02-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric advection model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach for advection was chosen to ensure mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to reduce the memory footprint and enable effective parallel performances. In addition, a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the advection scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on algebraic test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred cores.

  1. Characterization of the role of heterogeneous advection and diffusion on transport in weathered and fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Marechal, J.; Nigon, B.; Wajiddudin, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of transport in weathered and fractured rocks is critical as it represents the primary control of contaminant transfer from the subsurface in many parts of the world. This is the case in Southern India, where the subsurface is composed mainly of weathered and fractured granite and where the overexploitation of the groundwater resource since the 70's has led to high water table depletion and strong groundwater quality deterioration. One key issue for modelling transport in such systems is to quantify the respective role of advective heterogeneities and matrix diffusion, which can both lead to strongly non Fickian transport properties. We investigate this question by analysing tracer test experiments performed under different flow configurations at a fractured granite experimental site located in Andhra Pradesh (India). We performed both convergent and push-pull tracer tests within the same fracture and at different scales. Three convergent tracer tests were performed with a solution of fluorescein for different pumping rate and for different distances between injection and pumping boreholes: 6, 30 and 41 meters. To evaluate diffusive process, we performed two long-duration push-pull tests (push time of 3 hours) with a solution of two conservative tracers of different diffusion coefficient (fluorescein and sodium chloride). We performed also six others push-pull tests with only fluorescein but for a variable push times of 14 min and 55 min with or without resting time of about 60 min. The late-time behaviour on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained for all convergent tracer tests showed a power-law slope of -2. Two of them showed an inflexion in the BTCs suggesting the existence of two independent flow paths and thus a highly channelized flow. The long-duration push-pull tests showed similar late-time behaviour with a power-law slope of -2.2 for both tracers. The six others push-pull tests showed a variation of power-law exponent from -3 to -2

  2. Advective transport observations with MODPATH-OBS--documentation of the MODPATH observation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Kauffman, L.K.; Hill, M.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.

    2013-01-01

    The MODPATH-OBS computer program described in this report is designed to calculate simulated equivalents for observations related to advective groundwater transport that can be represented in a quantitative way by using simulated particle-tracking data. The simulated equivalents supported by MODPATH-OBS are (1) distance from a source location at a defined time, or proximity to an observed location; (2) time of travel from an initial location to defined locations, areas, or volumes of the simulated system; (3) concentrations used to simulate groundwater age; and (4) percentages of water derived from contributing source areas. Although particle tracking only simulates the advective component of conservative transport, effects of non-conservative processes such as retardation can be approximated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity based on the properties of selected conservative tracers. This program can also account for simple decay or production, but it cannot account for diffusion. Dispersion can be represented through direct simulation of subsurface heterogeneity and the use of many particles. MODPATH-OBS acts as a postprocessor to MODPATH, so that the sequence of model runs generally required is MODFLOW, MODPATH, and MODPATH-OBS. The version of MODFLOW and MODPATH that support the version of MODPATH-OBS presented in this report are MODFLOW-2005 or MODFLOW-LGR, and MODPATH-LGR. MODFLOW-LGR is derived from MODFLOW-2005, MODPATH 5, and MODPATH 6 and supports local grid refinement. MODPATH-LGR is derived from MODPATH 5. It supports the forward and backward tracking of particles through locally refined grids and provides the output needed for MODPATH_OBS. For a single grid and no observations, MODPATH-LGR results are equivalent to MODPATH 5. MODPATH-LGR and MODPATH-OBS simulations can use nearly all of the capabilities of MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-LGR; for example, simulations may be steady-state, transient, or a combination

  3. Advective transport and decomposition of chain-forming planktonic diatoms in permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Huettel, Markus

    2004-09-01

    In laboratory chamber experiments we demonstrate that permeable sediments (>7×10 -12 m 2) exposed to boundary flows filter chain-forming coastal bloom diatoms ( Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira rotula) from the water column, causing rapid transfer of fresh organic particulate matter into sediment layers as deep as 5 cm within 72 h. The penetration depth of the diatoms depends on the permeability of the bed and the length of the chains. Long chains were not transported as deep into the sediment as short chains or single cells. The fast advective transfer of phytoplankton cells into sandy sediments may be an important process facilitating organic matter uptake and preventing resuspension of deposited organic material in high-energy coastal environments. High advective flushing rates in medium- and coarse-grained sandy sediments enhanced the mineralisation of the trapped diatoms (2300 to 3200 μmol C m -2 d -1), stimulated benthic oxygen consumption (2300 to 3000 μmol O 2 m -2 d -1), as well as nitrification (up to 20 μmol NO 3- m -2 d -1), relative to sediment where diffusion dominated the solute exchange. Advective solute exchange rates that increase with increasing permeability prevent the accumulation of Si(OH) 4 near the dissolving frustules and in the pore water, leading to an effective recycling of dissolved silica to the production process in the water column (95 to 101 μmol Si(OH) 4 m -2 d -1). This process may also enhance dissolution rates of the deposited opal in coarse-grained sands by maintaining higher degrees of undersaturation than in fine-grained sediments. Our results suggest that advective filtration of planktonic diatoms into permeable sediments increases mineralisation and recycling of Si(OH) 4 and organic matter in high energetic shelf areas.

  4. Rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection by inhomogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    A variational procedure, due originally to Howard and explored by Busse and others for self-consistent turbulence problems, is employed to determine rigorous upper bounds for the advection of a passive scalar through an inhomogeneous turbulent slab with arbitrary generalized Reynolds number R and Kubo number K. In the basic version of the method, the steady-state energy balance is used as a constraint; the resulting bound, though rigorous, is independent of K. A pedagogical reference model (one dimension, K = infinity) is described in detail; the bound compares favorably with the exact solution. The direct-interaction approximation is also worked out for this model; it is somewhat more accurate than the bound, but requires considerably more labor to solve. For the basic bound, a general formalism is presented for several dimensions, finite correlation length, and reasonably general boundary conditions. Part of the general method, in which a Green's function technique is employed, applies to self-consistent as well as to passive problems, and thereby generalizes previous results in the fluid literature. The formalism is extended for the first time to include time-dependent constraints, and a bound is deduced which explicitly depends on K and has the correct physical scalings in all regimes of R and K. Two applications from the theory of turbulent plasmas ae described: flux in velocity space, and test particle transport in stochastic magnetic fields. For the velocity space problem the simplest bound reproduces Dupree's original scaling for the strong turbulence diffusion coefficient. For the case of stochastic magnetic fields, the scaling of the bounds is described for the magnetic diffusion coefficient as well as for the particle diffusion coefficient in the so-called collisionless, fluid, and double-streaming regimes.

  5. A study of turbulent transport of an advective nature in a fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2014-08-01

    The advective nature of the electrostatic turbulent flux of plasma energy in Fourier space is studied numerically in a nearly adiabatic state. Such a state is represented by the Hasegawa-Mima equation, which is driven by a noise that may model the destabilization due to the phase mismatch of the plasma density and the electric potential. The noise is assumed to be Gaussian and not to be invariant under reflection along a direction ŝ. The flux density induced by such noise is found to be anisotropic: While it is random along ŝ, it is not along the perpendicular direction ŝ ⊥, and the flux is not diffusive. The renormalized response may be approximated as advective, with the velocity being proportional to ( kρ s )2, in the Fourier space.

  6. Modeling velocity in gradient flows with coupled-map lattices with advection.

    PubMed

    Lind, Pedro G; Corte-Real, João; Gallas, Jason A C

    2002-07-01

    We introduce a simple model to investigate large scale behavior of gradient flows based on a lattice of coupled maps which, in addition to the usual diffusive term, incorporates advection, as an asymmetry in the coupling between nearest neighbors. This diffusive-advective model predicts traveling patterns to have velocities obeying the same scaling as wind velocities in the atmosphere, regarding the advective parameter as a sort of geostrophic wind. In addition, the velocity and wavelength of traveling wave solutions are studied. In general, due to the presence of advection, two regimes are identified: for strong diffusion the velocity varies linearly with advection, while for weak diffusion a power law is found with a characteristic exponent proportional to the diffusion.

  7. Renormalization group estimates of transport coefficients in the advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George

    1993-01-01

    The advection of a passive scalar by incompressible turbulence is considered using recursive renormalization group procedures in the differential sub grid shell thickness limit. It is shown explicitly that the higher order nonlinearities induced by the recursive renormalization group procedure preserve Galilean invariance. Differential equations, valid for the entire resolvable wave number k range, are determined for the eddy viscosity and eddy diffusivity coefficients, and it is shown that higher order nonlinearities do not contribute as k goes to 0, but have an essential role as k goes to k(sub c) the cutoff wave number separating the resolvable scales from the sub grid scales. The recursive renormalization transport coefficients and the associated eddy Prandtl number are in good agreement with the k-dependent transport coefficients derived from closure theories and experiments.

  8. Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Evaluation of an advective- dispersive formulation and the dusty-gas model including comparison to data for binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.

    1996-05-01

    Two models for gas-phase diffusion and advection in porous media, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-Gas Model (DGM), are reviewed. The ADM, which is more widely used, is based on a linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy`s Law and ordinary diffusion using Fick`s Law. Knudsen diffusion is often included through the use of a Klinkenberg factor for advection, while the effect of a porous medium on the diffusion process is through a porosity-tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier. Another, more comprehensive approach for gas-phase transport in porous media has been formulated by Evans and Mason, and is referred to as the Dusty- Gas Model (DGM). This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or ``dust``) to develop an approach for combined transport due to ordinary and Knudsen diffusion and advection including porous medium effects. While these two models both consider advection and diffusion, the formulations are considerably different, especially for ordinary diffusion. The various components of flow (advection and diffusion) are compared for both models. Results from these two models are compared to isothermal experimental data for He-Ar gas diffusion in a low-permeability graphite. Air-water vapor comparisons have also been performed, although data are not available, for the low-permeability graphite system used for the helium-argon data. Radial and linear air-water heat pipes involving heat, advection, capillary transport, and diffusion under nonisothermal conditions have also been considered.

  9. Single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme for advection-diffusion problems with large diffusion-coefficient heterogeneities and high-advection transport.

    PubMed

    Perko, Janez; Patel, Ravi A

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an approach that extends the flexibility of the standard lattice Boltzmann single relaxation time scheme in terms of spatial variation of dissipative terms (e.g., diffusion coefficient) and stability for high Péclet mass transfer problems. Spatial variability of diffusion coefficient in SRT is typically accommodated through the variation of relaxation time during the collision step. This method is effective but cannot deal with large diffusion coefficient variations, which can span over several orders of magnitude in some natural systems. The approach explores an alternative way of dealing with large diffusion coefficient variations in advection-diffusion transport systems by introducing so-called diffusion velocity. The diffusion velocity is essentially an additional convective term that replaces variations in diffusion coefficients vis-à-vis a chosen reference diffusion coefficient which defines the simulation time step. Special attention is paid to the main idea behind the diffusion velocity formulation and its implementation into the lattice Boltzmann framework. Finally, the performance, stability, and accuracy of the diffusion velocity formulation are discussed via several advection-diffusion transport benchmark examples. These examples demonstrate improved stability and flexibility of the proposed scheme with marginal consequences on the numerical performance.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Convection: Advection and Diffusion Schemes for Marker Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's deep mantle can be studied by modeling vigorous convection in a chemically heterogeneous fluid. Numerical modeling of such a system poses several computational challenges. Dominance of heat advection over the diffusive heat transport, and a negligible amount of chemical diffusion results in sharp gradients of thermal and chemical fields. The exponential dependence of the viscosity of mantle materials on temperature also leads to high gradients of the velocity field. The accuracy of many numerical advection schemes degrades quickly with increasing gradient of the solution, while the computational effort, in terms of the scheme complexity and required resolution, grows. Additional numerical challenges arise due to a large range of length-scales characteristic of a thermochemical convection system with highly variable viscosity. To examplify, the thickness of the stem of a rising thermal plume may be a few percent of the mantle thickness. An even thinner filament of an anomalous material that is entrained by that plume may consitute less than a tenth of a percent of the mantle thickness. We have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermochemical convection in a hollow cylinder domain, with a depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity representative of the mantle (Steinberger and Calderwood, 2006). We use marker-in-cell method for advection of chemical and thermal fields. The main advantage of perfoming advection using markers is absence of numerical diffusion during the advection step, as opposed to the more diffusive field-methods. However, in the common implementation of the marker-methods, the solution of the momentum and energy equations takes place on a computational grid, and nodes do not generally coincide with the positions of the markers. Transferring velocity-, temperature-, and chemistry- information between nodes and markers introduces errors inherent to inter- and extrapolation. In the numerical scheme

  11. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  12. Offshore advection of particles within the Cape Blanc filament, Mauritania: Results from observational and modelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G.; Reuter, C.; Karakas, G.; Nowald, N.; Wefer, G.

    2009-12-01

    This article will review major features of the ‘giant’ Cape Blanc filament off Mauritania with regard to the transport of chlorophyll and organic carbon from the shelf to the open ocean. Within the filament, chlorophyll is transported about 400 km offshore. Modelled particle distributions along a zonal transect at 21°N showed that particles with a sinking velocity of 5 m d -1 are advected offshore by up to 600 km in subsurface particle clouds generally located between 400 m and 800 m water depth, forming an Intermediate Nepheloid Layer (INL). It corresponds to the depth of the oxygen minimum zone. Heavier particles with a sinking velocity of 30 m d -1 are transported from the shelf within the Bottom Layer (BL) of more than 1000 m thickness, largely following the topography of the bottom slope. The particles advected within the BL contribute to the enhanced winter-spring mass fluxes collected at the open-ocean mesotrophic sediment trap site CB-13 (∼200 nm offshore), due to a long distance advection in deeper waters. The lateral contribution to the deep sediment trap in winter-spring is estimated to be 63% and 72% for organic carbon and total mass, respectively, whereas the lateral input for both components on an annual basis is estimated to be in the order of 15%. Biogenic opal increases almost fivefold from the upper to the lower mesotrophic CB-13 trap, also pointing to an additional source for biogenic silica from eutrophic coastal waters. Blooms obviously sink in smaller, probably mesoscale-sized patches with variable settling rates, depending on the type of aggregated particles and their ballast content. Generally, particle sinking rates are exceptionally high off NW Africa. Very high chlorophyll values and a large size of the Cape Blanc filament in 1998-1999 are also documented in enhanced total mass and organic carbon fluxes. An increasing trend in satellite chlorophyll concentrations and the size of the Cape Blanc filament between 1997 and 2008 as

  13. Testing metrics of mixing using a chaotic advection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grahn, J.; McDonald, A. J.

    2012-04-01

    This study describes an evaluation of different dynamical measures and their ability to diagnose horizontal transport and mixing in atmospheric flows. This quantification can then be used to select optimal measures which can be applied to satellite and re-analyses data to identify likely regions where the indirect effect of Energetic Particle Precipitation (EPP) is important. As a "test bench" for mixing measures a two dimensional idealized atmospheric model has been developed (Pierrehumbert et al, 1992 , Shuckburgh et al 2003). It is completely defined by a set of only five parameters. Although it is an oversimplification of real atmospheric flows, it exhibits the main dynamical characteristics of the stratosphere near the polar vortex. At the same time, it's simplicity gives us the opportunity to make detailed investigations on the quality of the mixing measures. By using this analytical model with a Lagrangian trajectory model we can examine the impact of the flow on the distribution of any trace gas. We have chosen to examine two mixing measures, namely finite time Lyaponov exponents (FTLE) and the Renyi entropy (RE). The former is a numerical realization of the Lyapunov exponent (Wolf et al, 1984), a measure of the amount of separation of nearby trajectories of a dynamical system. The FTLE has been used in studies before as a measure of mixing (i.e. Pierrehumbert et al, 1992; Shuckburgh et al 2003; Garny et al, 2007). The Renyi entropy is a measure originating from information theory and has also been studied before in the context of atmospheric mixing (Krützmann et al, 2008). Initial analysis seems to show a relatively strong anti-correlation between these mixing measures. In particular, high FTLE (which relate to strongly divergent regions) identify mixing barriers and are generally linked to low values of RE. Results from an analysis of a range of model realizations with varying amounts of prescribed mixing will be performed to robustly quantify the

  14. User's guide to PHREEQC, a computer program for speciation, reaction-path, advective-transport, and inverse geochemical calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is a computer program written in the C pwgranuning language that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC is based on an ion-association aqueous model and has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations, (2) reaction-path and advective-transport calculations involving specified irreversible reactions, mixing of solutions, mineral and gas equilibria surface-complex-ation reactions, and ion-exchange reactions, and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for composition differences between waters, within specified compositional uncertainties. PHREEQC is derived from the Fortran program PHREEQE, but it has been completely rewritten in C with the addition many new capabilities. New features include the capabilities to use redox couples to distribute redox elements among their valence states in speciation calculations; to model ion-exchange and surface-compiexation reactions; to model reactions with a fixed-pressure, multicomponent gas phase (that is, a gas bubble); to calculate the mass of water in the aqueous phase during reaction and transport calculations; to keep track of the moles of minerals present in the solid phases and determine antomaticaHy the thermodynamically stable phase assemblage; to simulate advective transport in combination with PHREEQC's reaction-modeling capability; and to make inverse modeling calculations that allow for uncertainties in the analytical data. The user interface is improved through the use of a simplified approach to redox reactions, which includes explicit mole-balance equations for hydrogen and oxygen; the use of a revised input that is modular and completely free format; and the use of mineral names and standard chemical symbolism rather than index numbers. The use of (2 eliminates nearly all limitations on army sizes, including numbers of elements, aqueous species, solutions, phases, and lengths of character

  15. Modelling of terrain-induced advective flow in Tibet: Implications for assessment of crustal heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, M.P.; Yang Zhongke

    1992-01-01

    In steep terrain the effect of advective flow can be significant, as it can distort the temperature field in the upper brittle crust. The effect was studied by modeling advective flow across a large valley system in Tibet which is associated with several geothermal hot spring systems, the Yanbajing Valley. It was found that, in this setting, all near-surface temperature gradients are significantly disturbed, attaining values differing by up to half an order of magnitude from those resulting from conductive heat transfer. Allowing for advective effects, it was found that the crustal heat flux within the Himalayan Geothermal Belt lies within the range of 60 to 90 mW/m{sup 2} in the Lhasa-Yanbajing area.

  16. The effects of temperature and motility on the advective transport of a deep subsurface bacteria through saturated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    Replicate column experiments were done to quantify the effects of temperature and bacterial motility on advective transport through repacked, but otherwise unaltered, natural aquifer sediment. The bacteria used in this study, A0500, was a flagellated, spore-forming rod isolated from the deep subsurface at DOE`s Savannah River Laboratory. Motility was controlled by turning on flagellar metabolism at 18{degrees}C but off at 40{degrees}C. Microspheres were used to independently quantify the effects of temperature on the sticking efficiency ({alpha}), estimated using a steady-state filtration model. The observed greater microsphere removal at the higher temperature agreed with the physical-chemical model, but bacteria removal at 18{degrees}C was only half that at 4{degrees}C. The sticking efficiency for non-motile A0500 (4{degrees}C) was over three times that of the motile A0500 (18{degrees}C), 0.073 versus 0.022 respectively. Analysis of complete breakthrough curves using a non-steady, kinetically limited, transport model to estimate the time scales of attachment and detachment suggested that motile A 0500 bacteria traveled twice as far as non-motile A 0500 bacteria before becoming attached. Once attached, non-motile colloids detached on the time scale of 9 to 17 days. The time scale for detachment of motile A0500 bacteria was shorter, 4 to 5 days. Results indicate that bacterial attachment was reversible and detachment was enhanced by bacterial motifity. The kinetic energy of bacterial motility changed the attachment-detachment kinetics in favor of the detached state. The chemical factors responsible for the enhanced transport are not known. However, motility may have caused weakly held bacteria to detach from the secondary minimum, and possibly from the primary minimum, as described by DLVO theory.

  17. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  18. High-resolution stochastic downscaling of climate models: simulating wind advection, cloud cover and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    A new stochastic approach to generate wind advection, cloud cover and precipitation fields is presented with the aim of formulating a space-time weather generator characterized by fields with high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g., 1 km x 1 km and 5 min). Its use is suitable for stochastic downscaling of climate scenarios in the context of hydrological, ecological and geomorphological applications. The approach is based on concepts from the Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.), the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation model (STREAP) introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), and the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator (HiReS-WG) presented by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.). Advection fields are generated on the basis of the 500 hPa u and v wind direction variables derived from global or regional climate models. The advection velocity and direction are parameterized using Kappa and von Mises distributions respectively. A random Gaussian fields is generated using a fast Fourier transform to preserve the spatial correlation of advection. The cloud cover area, total precipitation area and mean advection of the field are coupled using a multi-autoregressive model. The approach is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and, in the context of climate change, allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climate in a fast and efficient way. A preliminary test of the approach is presented with reference to a case study in a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  19. Analysis of steady-state flow and advective transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of ground-water flow directions and traveltimes for advective flow were developed for the regional aquifer system of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The work included: (1) descriptions of compartments in the aquifer that function as intermediate and regional flow systems, (2) descriptions of pathlines for flow originating at or near the water table, and (3) quantitative estimates of traveltimes for advective transport originating at or near the water table. A particle-tracking postprocessing program was used to compute pathlines on the basis of output from an existing three-dimensional steady-state flow model. The flow model uses 1980 conditions to approximate average annual conditions for 1950-80. The advective transport model required additional information about the nature of flow across model boundaries, aquifer thickness, and porosity. Porosity of two types of basalt strata has been reported for more than 1,500 individual cores from test holes, wells, and outcrops near the south side of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The central 80 percent of samples had porosities of 0.08 to 0.25, the central 50 percent of samples, O. 11 to 0.21. Calibration of the model involved choosing a value for porosity that yielded the best solution. Two radiologic contaminants, iodine-129 and tritium, both introduced to the flow system about 40 years ago, are relatively conservative tracers. Iodine- 129 was considered to be more useful because of a lower analytical detection limit, longer half-life, and longer flow path. The calibration value for porosity was 0.21. Most flow in the aquifer is contained within a regional-scale compartment and follows paths that discharge to the Snake River downstream from Milner Dam. Two intermediate-scale compartments exist along the southeast side of the aquifer and near Mud Lake.One intermediate-scale compartment along the southeast side of the aquifer discharges to the Snake River near American Fails

  20. Modeling pollutant transport using a meshless-lagrangian particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, D. B.; Pepper, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    A combined meshless-Lagrangian particle transport model is used to predict pollutant transport over irregular terrain. The numerical model for initializing the velocity field is based on a meshless approach utilizing multiquadrics established by Kansa. The Lagrangian particle transport technique uses a random walk procedure to depict the advection and dispersion of pollutants over any type of surface, including street and city canyons

  1. The effects of advection solvers on the performance of air quality models

    SciTech Connect

    Tanrikulu, S.; Odman, M.T.

    1996-12-31

    The available numerical solvers for the advection term in the chemical species conservation equation have different properties, and consequently introduce different types of errors. These errors can affect the performance of air quality models and lead to biases in model results. In this study, a large number of advection solvers have been studied and six of them were identified as having potential for use in photochemical models. The identified solvers were evaluated extensively using various numerical tests that are relevant to air quality simulations. Among the solvers evaluated, three of them showed better performance in terms of accuracy and some other characteristics such as conservation of mass and positivity. They are the solvers by Bott, Yuamartino, and Dabdub and Seinfeld. These three solvers were incorporated into the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) and the August 3-6, 1990 ozone episode in the San Joaquin Valley of California was simulated with each. A model performance analysis was conducted for each simulation using the rich air quality database of the 1990 San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study. The results of the simulations were compared with each other and the effects of advection solvers on the performance of the model are discussed.

  2. Investigation of density-dependent gas advection of trichloroethylene: Experiment and a model validation exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhard, R. J.; Oostrom, M.; Simmons, C. S.; White, M. D.

    1995-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate whether vapor-density effects are significant in transporting volatile organic compounds (VOC's) with high vapor pressure and molecular mass through the subsurface. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was chosen for the investigation because it is a common VOC contaminant with high vapor pressure and molecular mass. For the investigation, a 2-m-long by 1-m-high by 7.5-cm-thick flow cell was constructed with a network of sampling ports. The flow cell was packed with sand, and a water table was established near the lower boundary. Liquid TCE was placed near the upper boundary of the flow cell in a chamber from which vapors could enter and migrate through the sand. TCE concentrations in the gas phase were measured by extracting 25-μl gas samples with an air-tight syringe and analyzing them with a gas chromatograph. The evolution of the TCE gas plume in the sand was investigated by examining plots of TCE concentrations over the domain for specific times and for particular locations as a function of time. To help in this analysis, a numerical model was developed that can predict the simultaneous movements of a gas, a nonaqueous liquid and water in porous media. The model also considers interphase mass transfer by employing the phase equilibrium assumption. The model was tested with one- and two-dimensional analytical solutions of fluid flow before it was used to simulate the experiment. Comparisons between experimental data and simulation results when vapor-density effects are considered were very good. When vapor-density effects were ignored, agreement was poor. These analyses suggest that vapor-density effects should be considered and that density-driven vapor advection may be an important mechanism for moving VOC's with high vapor pressures and molecular mass through the subsurface.

  3. Capture and release zones of permeable reactive barriers under the influence of advective-dispersive transport in the aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk; Mohamed, Mohamed M.; Perminova, Irina V.; Perlmutter, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The problem of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) capture and release behavior is investigated by means of an approximate analytical approach exploring the invariance of steady-state solutions of the advection-dispersion equation to conformal mapping. PRB configurations considered are doubly-symmetric funnel-and-gate as well as less frequent drain-and-gate systems. The effect of aquifer heterogeneity on contaminant plume spreading is hereby incorporated through an effective transverse macro-dispersion coefficient, which has to be known. Results are normalized and graphically represented in terms of a relative capture efficiency M of contaminant mass or groundwater passing a control plane (transect) at a sufficient distance up-stream of a PRB as to comply with underlying assumptions. Factors of safety FS are given as the ratios of required capture width under advective-dispersive and purely advective transport for achieving equal capture efficiency M. It is found that M also applies to the release behavior down-stream of a PRB, i.e., it describes the spreading and dilution of PRB treated groundwater possibly containing incompletely remediated contamination and/or remediation reaction products. Hypothetical examples are given to demonstrate results.

  4. Role of advection in Arctic Ocean lower trophic dynamics: A modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. E.; Yool, A.; Aksenov, Y.; Coward, A. C.

    2013-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean (AO) is an oligotrophic system with a pronounced subsurface Chl-a maximum dominating productivity over the majority of the basin. Strong haline stratification of the AO and substantial ice cover suppress vertical mixing and restrict the vertical supply of nutrients to the photic zone. In such a vertically stratified oligotrophic system, the horizontal supply of nutrients by advection plays an important role in sustaining primary production. In this paper, we attempt to characterize the role of nutrient advection in the maintenance of the subsurface Chl-a maximum, using timescales to determine the connectivity between the photic zone of the deep AO, nutrient-rich Pacific and Atlantic inflow waters, and bottom waters of the wide continental shelves of the AO. Our study uses output from a general circulation model, Nucleus for European Modeling of the Ocean, coupled to a model of ocean biogeochemistry, Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, carbon Utilization, Sequestration, and Acidification. A Lagrangian particle tracking approach is used to back-track water from where it forms subsurface Chl-a maxima to the points of entry into the AO and to analyze nutrient transformation along the route. Our experiments show that advective timescales linking subsurface layers of the central AO with the nutrient-rich Pacific and Atlantic waters do not exceed 15-20 years and that the advective supply of shelf nutrients to the deep AO occurs on the timescale of about 5 years. We show substantial role of the continental shelf pump in sustaining up to 20% of total AO primary production.

  5. Time-Lapse Micro-Tomography Measurements and Determination of Effective Transport Properties of Snow Metamorphism Under Advective Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Grimm, S.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2014-12-01

    The metamorphism of snow under advective air flow, with and without temperature gradient, was never experimentally investigated. We developed a new sample holder where metamorphism under advective conditions can be observed and measured using time-lapse micro-tomography [1]. Long-term experiments were performed and direct pore-level simulation (DPLS) [2,3] was directly applied on the extracted 3D digital geometry of the snow to calculate the effective transport properties by solving the governing fluid flow equations. The results showed no effect of isothermal advection, compared to rates typical for isothermal metamorphism. Appling a temperature gradient, the results showed increased snow metamorphism compared to rates typical for temperature gradient metamorphism. However, for both cases a change in the isotopic composition in the air as well as in the snow sample could be observed. These measurements could be influential to better understand snow-air exchange processes relevant for atmospheric chemistry and isotopic composition. REFERENCES[1] Ebner P. P., Grimm S., Schneebeli M., and Steinfeld A.: An instrumented sample holder for time-lapse micro-tomography measurements of snow under advective airflow. Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems 4(2014), 353-373. [2] Zermatten E., Haussener S., Schneebeli M., and Steinfeld A.: Tomography-based determination of permeability and Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient of characteristic snow samples. Journal of Glaciology 57(2011), 811-816. [3] Zermatten E., Schneebeli M., Arakawa H., and Steinfeld A.: Tomography-based determination of porosity, specific area and permeability of snow and comparison with measurements. Cold Regions Science and Technology 97 (2014), 33-40. Fig. 1: 3-D surface rendering of a refrozen wet snow sample with fluid flow streamline.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Ely, D.M.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G.M.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2001-08-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS). The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 underground Test Area (UGTA) sites. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work.

  7. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  8. Temporal signatures of advective versus diffusive radon transport at a geothermal zone in Central Nepal.

    PubMed

    Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Girault, Frédéric; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2011-02-01

    Temporal variation of radon-222 concentration was studied at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located on the Main Central Thrust zone in Central Nepal. This site is characterized by several carbon dioxide discharges having maximum fluxes larger than 10 kg m(-2) d(-1). Radon concentration was monitored with autonomous Barasol™ probes between January 2008 and November 2009 in two small natural cavities with high CO(2) concentration and at six locations in the soil: four points having a high flux, and two background reference points. At the reference points, dominated by radon diffusion, radon concentration was stable from January to May, with mean values of 22 ± 6.9 and 37 ± 5.5 kBq m(-3), but was affected by a large increase, of about a factor of 2 and 1.6, respectively, during the monsoon season from June to September. At the points dominated by CO(2) advection, by contrast, radon concentration showed higher mean values 39.0 ± 2.6 to 78 ± 1.4 kBq m(-3), remarkably stable throughout the year with small long-term variation, including a possible modulation of period around 6 months. A significant difference between the diffusion dominated reference points and the advection-dominated points also emerged when studying the diurnal S(1) and semi-diurnal S(2) periodic components. At the advection-dominated points, radon concentration did not exhibit S(1) or S(2) components. At the reference points, however, the S(2) component, associated with barometric tide, could be identified during the dry season, but only when the probe was installed at shallow depth. The S(1) component, associated with thermal and possibly barometric diurnal forcing, was systematically observed, especially during monsoon season. The remarkable short-term and long-term temporal stability of the radon concentration at the advection-dominated points, which suggests a strong pressure source at depth, may be an important asset to detect possible temporal variations associated with the

  9. Advection dispersion mass transport associated with a non-aqueous-phase liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyrillas, Marios M.

    2000-06-01

    The two-dimensional problem of advection dispersion associated with a non-aqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) pool is addressed using the boundary element method. The problem is appropriately posed with an inhomogeneous boundary condition taking into consideration the presence of the pool and the impermeable layer. We derive a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind for the concentration gradient along the pool location and compute the average mass transfer coefficient numerically using the boundary-element method. Numerical results are in agreement with asymptotic analytical solutions obtained for the cases of small and large Péclet number (Pex). The asymptotic solution for small Pex, which is obtained by applying a novel perturbation technique to the integral equation, is used to de-singularize the integral equation. Results predicted by this analysis are in good agreement with experimentally determined overall mass transfer coefficients.

  10. Advective excess Ba transport as shown from sediment and trap geochemical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fagel, N.; Andre, L.; Dehairs, F.

    1999-08-01

    The authors report the results of a geochemical study of sediment and trap material. Major and trace elements (Zr, Ba, rare earth elements, and Th) were analyzed on bulk sedimentary material collected along the NE Atlantic margin. The aim is to test the widespread use of Ba-barite as a proxy for paleoproductivity in a continental margin area. This environment is of great interest because atmospheric-oceanic exchanges are important. In sediments, the geochemical signatures remain close to an upper crust reference, with flat shale-normalized rare earth elements patterns and constant elementary ratios. The calculated biogenic fraction of Ba or excess Ba (20--45%) remains lower than the excess Ba record in trap material (80--99%). The evolution of the geochemical signature along the margin reflects variable dilution of a detrital Post Archean Australian Shale-like component by a biogenic carbonaceous seawater-derived component. The trap material displays a wide range of variation in its trace element content (e.g., Ba {approximately}150--3,000 ppm, Zr {approximately}2--100 ppm), except for the abyssal site, which is characterized by constant signature. In the two other sites, all of the trace element contents increase with water depth and present pronounced seasonal changes at each sampled water depth. The amount of excess Ba also increases in the deepest traps, and its evolution throughout the year mimics the change of the other analyzed trace elements. In contrast, its relationships with particulate organic carbon are not obvious. In terms of fluxes, two periods of enhanced excess Ba fluxes are observed: (1) excess Ba flux increases with the detrital-like elements like Th especially during winter, and (2) excess Ba flux is enhanced without any change for the other trace elements during spring. To explain the first case, a supply through lateral advection is proposed. Such transient input of significant excess Ba flux will have a great impact on the yearly averaged

  11. Modelling of Thermal Advective Reactive Flow in Hydrothermal Mineral Systems Using an Implicit Time-stepped Finite Element Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding chemical and thermal processes taking place in hydrothermal mineral deposition systems could well be a key to unlocking new mineral reserves through improved targeting of exploration efforts. To aid in this understanding it is very helpful to be able to model such processes with sufficient fidelity to test process hypotheses. To gain understanding, it is often sufficient to obtain semi-quantitative results that model the broad aspects of the complex set of thermal and chemical effects taking place in hydrothermal systems. For example, it is often sufficient to gain an understanding of where thermal, geometric and chemical factors converge to precipitate gold (say) without being perfectly precise about how much gold is precipitated. The traditional approach is to use incompressible Darcy flow together with the Boussinesq approximation. From the flow field, the heat equation is used to advect-conduct the heat. The flow field is also used to transport solutes by solving an advection-dispersion-diffusion equation. The reactions in the fluid and between fluid and rock act as source terms for these advection-dispersion equations. Many existing modelling systems that are used for simulating such systems use explicit time marching schemes and finite differences. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to work on rectilinear grids and the number of time steps required by the Courant condition in the solute transport step. The second factor can be particularly significant if the chemical system is complex, requiring (at a minimum) an equilibrium calculation at each grid point at each time step. In the approach we describe, we use finite elements rather than finite differences, and the pressure, heat and advection-dispersion equations are solved implicitly. The general idea is to put unconditional numerical stability of the time integration first, and let accuracy assume a secondary role. It is in this sense that the method is semi-quantiative. However

  12. Advective-diffusive/dispersive transport of chemically reacting species in hydrothermal systems. Final report, FY83-85

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1986-06-20

    A general formulation of multi-phase fluid flow coupled to chemical reactions was developed based on a continuum description of porous media. A preliminary version of the computer code MCCTM was constructed which implemented the general equations for a single phase fluid. The computer code MCCTM incorporates mass transport by advection-diffusion/dispersion in a one-dimensional porous medium coupled to reversible and irreversible, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions. These reactions include aqueous complexing, oxidation/reduction reactions, ion exchange, and hydrolysis reactions of stoichiometric minerals. The code MCCTM uses a fully implicit finite difference algorithm. The code was tested against analytical calculations. Applications of the code included investigation of the propagation of sharp chemical reaction fronts, metasomatic alteration of microcline at elevated temperatures and pressures, and ion-exchange in a porous column. Finally numerical calculations describing fluid flow in crystalline rock in the presence of a temperature gradient were compared with experimental results for quartzite.

  13. A practical Lagrangian transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1980-01-01

    An unconditionally stable and practical transport model for use in upland streams and rivers has been developed and verified. Basing the model on the Lagrangian, rather than the Eulerian, reference frame greatly reduces the numerical problems associated with solving the advective terms of the convective-diffusion equation. The model contains almost no numerical dispersion, is conceptually simple, and is relatively easy to code. Model results closely simulated dye concentrations measured in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Ga. under highly unsteady flow conditions. (USGS)

  14. Bounce-averaged advection and diffusion coefficients for monochromatic electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave: Comparison between test-particle and quasi-linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2012-09-01

    The electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave has long been suggested to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons. The test-particle simulations are performed to calculate the bounce-averaged pitch angle advection and diffusion coefficients for parallel-propagating monochromatic EMIC waves. The comparison between test-particle (TP) and quasi-linear (QL) transport coefficients is further made to quantify the influence of nonlinear processes. For typical EMIC waves, four nonlinear physical processes, i.e., the boundary reflection effect, finite perturbation effect, phase bunching and phase trapping, are found to occur sequentially from small to large equatorial pitch angles. The pitch angle averaged finite perturbation effect yields slight differences between the transport coefficients of TP and QL models. The boundary reflection effect and phase bunching produce an average reduction of >80% in the diffusion coefficients but a small change in the corresponding average advection coefficients, tending to lower the loss rate predicted by QL theory. In contrast, the phase trapping causes continuous negative advection toward the loss cone and a minor change in the corresponding diffusion coefficients, tending to increase the loss rate predicted by QL theory. For small amplitude EMIC waves, the transport coefficients grow linearly with the square of wave amplitude. As the amplitude increases, the boundary reflection effect, phase bunching and phase trapping start to occur. Consequently, the TP advection coefficients deviate from the linear growth with the square of wave amplitude, and the TP diffusion coefficients become saturated with the amplitude approaching 1 nT or above. The current results suggest that these nonlinear processes can cause significant deviation of transport coefficients from the prediction of QL theory, which should be taken into account in the future simulations of radiation belt dynamics driven by the EMIC waves.

  15. Bounce-averaged advection and diffusion coefficients for monochromatic electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave: Comparison between test-particle and quasi-linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Zhu, H.; Xiao, F.; Zheng, H.; Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Wang, S.

    2012-12-01

    The electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave has been long suggested to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons. The test-particle simulations are performed to calculate the bounce-averaged pitch-angle advection and diffusion coefficients for parallel-propagating monochromatic EMIC waves. The comparison between test-particle (TP) and quasi-linear (QL) transport coefficients is further made to quantify the influence of nonlinear processes. For typical EMIC waves, four nonlinear physical processes, i.e., the boundary reflection effect, finite perturbation effect, phase bunching and phase trapping, are found to occur sequentially from small to large equatorial pitch angles. The pitch-angle averaged finite perturbation effect yields slight differences between the transport coefficients of TP and QL models. The boundary reflection effect and phase bunching produce an average reduction of >80% in the diffusion coefficients but a small change in the corresponding average advection coefficients, tending to lower the loss rate predicted by QL theory. In contrast, the phase trapping causes continuous negative advection toward the loss cone and a minor change in the corresponding diffusion coefficients, tending to increase the loss rate predicted by QL theory. For small amplitude EMIC waves, the transport coefficients grow linearly with the square of wave amplitude. As the amplitude increases, the boundary reflection effect, phase bunching and phase trapping start to occur. Consequently, the TP advection coefficients deviate from the linear growth with the square of wave amplitude, and the TP diffusion coefficients become saturated with the amplitude approaching 1nT or above. The current results suggest that these nonlinear processes can cause significant deviation of transport coefficients from the prediction of QL theory, which should be taken into account in the future simulations of radiation belt dynamics driven by the EMIC waves.

  16. Advective-reflective conceptual model for the oscillatory nature of the ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    Picaut, J.; Masia, F.; Penhoat, Y. du

    1997-08-01

    Recent findings about zonal displacements of the Pacific warm pool required a notable modification of the delayed action oscillator theory, the current leading theory for the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Simulations with a linearized coupled ocean-atmosphere model resulted in 3- to 6-year ENSO-like oscillations, with many of the variable model parameters found to be very close to their observed values. This simple model suggests that ocean processes that are ignored or underestimated in the delayed action oscillator theory, such as zonal current convergence, zonal advection of sea surface temperature, and equatorial wave reflection from the eastern ocean boundary, are fundamental to the development of the ENSO, in particular to its manifestations in the central equatorial Pacific.

  17. The prediction of sea-surface temperature variations by means of an advective mixed-layer ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An advective mixed layer ocean model was developed by eliminating the assumption of horizontal homogeneity in an already existing mixed layer model, and then superimposing a mean and anomalous wind driven current field. This model is based on the principle of conservation of heat and mechanical energy and utilizes a box grid for the advective part of the calculation. Three phases of experiments were conducted: evaluation of the model's ability to account for climatological sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the cooling and heating seasons, sensitivity tests in which the effect of hypothetical anomalous winds was evaluated, and a thirty-day synoptic calculation using the model. For the case studied, the accuracy of the predictions was improved by the inclusion of advection, although nonadvective effects appear to have dominated.

  18. A reaction-diffusion-advection model of harmful algae growth with toxin degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Hsu, Sze-Bi; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a reaction-diffusion-advection system modeling the dynamics of a single nutrient, harmful algae and algal toxin in a flowing water habitat with a hydraulic storage zone. We introduce the basic reproduction ratio R0 for algae and show that R0 serves as a threshold value for persistence and extinction of the algae. More precisely, we prove that the washout steady state is globally attractive if R0 < 1, while there exists a positive steady state and the algae is uniformly persistent if R0 > 1. With an additional assumption, we obtain the uniqueness and global attractivity of the positive steady state in the case where R0 > 1.

  19. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called “giant fluctuations” of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power −4 of the wavenumber—except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber—except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  1. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber-except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  2. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully-coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations are found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for the coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study the formation of the so-called giant fluctuations of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lays on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field is in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity the the power spectra decays as the power -4 of the wave number except for small wave numbers which diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations resulting in the much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wave number. Finally the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  3. Construction of an Eulerian atmospheric dispersion model based on the advection algorithm of M. Galperin: dynamic cores v.4 and 5 of SILAM v.5.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofiev, M.; Vira, J.; Kouznetsov, R.; Prank, M.; Soares, J.; Genikhovich, E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents dynamic cores v.4 and v.5 of the System for Integrated modeLling of Atmospheric coMposition SILAM v.5.5 based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin. This advection routine, so far weakly presented in international literature, is non-diffusive, positively defined, stable with regard to Courant number significantly above one, and very efficient computationally. For the first time, we present a rigorous description of its original version, along with several updates that improve its monotonicity and allow applications to long-living species in conditions of complex atmospheric flows. The other extension allows the scheme application to dynamics of aerosol spectra. The scheme is accompanied with the previously developed vertical diffusion algorithm, which encapsulates the dry deposition process as a boundary condition. Connection to chemical transformation modules is outlined, accounting for the specifics of transport scheme. Quality of the advection routine is evaluated using a large set of tests. The original approach has been previously compared with several classic algorithms widely used in operational models. The basic tests were repeated for the updated scheme, along with demanding global 2-D tests recently suggested in literature, which allowed positioning the scheme with regard to sophisticated state-of-the-art approaches. The model performance appeared close to the top of the list with very modest computational costs.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Mary C.; Ely, D. Matthew; Tiedeman, Claire R.; O'Brien, Grady M.; D'Agnese, Frank A.; Faunt, Claudia C.

    2001-01-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system. The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 Underground Test Areas. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work. The methods presented in this report are used in three ways. (1) The ratings for individual observations are obtained by manipulating the measures of prediction uncertainty, and do not involve recalibrating the model. In this analysis, observation locations are each omitted individually and the resulting increase in uncertainty in the predictions is calculated. The uncertainty is quantified as standard deviations on the simulated advective transport. The increase in uncertainty is quantified as the percent increase in the standard deviations caused by omitting the one observation location from the calculation of standard deviations. In general, observation locations associated with larger increases are rated as more important. (2) Ratings for largely geographically based groups are obtained using a straightforward extension of the method used for

  5. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  6. Evaluation of realtime spray drift using RTDrift Gaussian advection-diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Frédéric; Verstraete, Arnaud; Schiffers, Bruno; Destain, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    A spray drift model was developed to deliver real time information to the pesticide applicator. The sprayer is equipped with sensors to deliver real time measurement of operational parameters as spray pressure, boom height, horizontal boom movements and geolocalization. The spray droplet size spectrum as a function of pressure was characterized using PDI measurements. Wind speed and direction were measured using a sprayer mounted 2-D ultrasonic anemometer. For each successive boom position, a diffusion-advection Gaussian tilting plume model is used to compute the spray drift deposits downwind. Drift is computed independently for each droplet classes and each nozzle based on the operating parameters. Field trials were performed on a test plot in various wind conditions. The ground drift was measured for different drift distances using fluorimetry analysis. Results show that drift deposits are mainly affected by wind speed and direction what was correctly accounted for by the model. Short distance drift deposits values were overestimated by the model while long distance drift was underestimated. It appears that this most probably origins from embarked wind speed measurements and diffusion parameter. It is concluded that a treatment of embarked wind speed and diffusion measurement should be used to minimize these errors. PMID:20218507

  7. The role of phase dynamics in a stochastic model of a passively advected scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Collective synchronous motion of the phases is introduced in a model for the stochastic passive advection-diffusion of a scalar with external forcing. The model for the phase coupling dynamics follows the well known Kuramoto model paradigm of limit-cycle oscillators. The natural frequencies in the Kuramoto model are assumed to obey a given scale dependence through a dispersion relation of the drift-wave form -βk/1 +k2 , where β is a constant representing the typical strength of the gradient. The present aim is to study the importance of collective phase dynamics on the characteristic time evolution of the fluctuation energy and the formation of coherent structures. Our results show that the assumption of a fully stochastic phase state of turbulence is more relevant for high values of β, where we find that the energy spectrum follows a k-7 /2 scaling. Whereas for lower β there is a significant difference between a-synchronised and synchronised phase states, one could expect the formation of coherent modulations in the latter case.

  8. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  9. Melt production by viscous dissipation: Role of heat advection by Magma transport

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenson, M.D.; Spera, F.J.

    1980-02-01

    An energy conservation equation is formulated that balances the heat generated by viscous dissipation in a peridotite simultaneously undergoing partial fusion and penetrative constant shear stress deformation with the heat removed by mobilization and ascent of basaltic magma from the region undergoing deformation. The solution of this parameterized energy equation gives the volume fraction of melt (theta) as a function of time (t) after the initiation of deformation. A stability analysis of the conservation equation shows that stable (theta<100%) or unstable (theta..-->..infinity) solutions exist depending on the magnitude of two dimensionless parameters K/sub 1//K/sub 2/ and K/sub 3/. For geologically reasonable values of K/sub 2//K/sub 2/ and K/sub 3/, the analysis indicates that peridotitic thermo-mechanical systems undergoing penetrative deformation at constant shear stress show a two-stage history. An early stage of growth where theta increases monotonically on a 2 to 3 m.y. time scale eventually is replaced by a steady s ate regime (constant theta). Typical values of theta lie in the range 3 to 5 volume percent; melting of peridotite to the extent of 20--30% appears to be precluded by this model.

  10. A simple advection-dispersion model for the salt distribution in linearly tapered estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Peter S.; O'Donnell, James

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple advection-dispersion model for the subtidal salt distribution in estuaries with linearly varying cross-sectional area and a nonzero net salt flux. A novel analytic solution allows investigation of the dependence of the curvature and gradient of the longitudinal salinity distribution on runoff, dispersion coefficient, and channel contraction or expansion. The model predicts that in estuarine segments that contract toward the fresher boundary, the salinity gradient is stronger than in a prismatic channel. When the dispersion coefficient is large compared to the salinity intrusion lengthscale, ? (the product of segment length and net volume flux divided by cross-sectional area at the ocean boundary), the curvature of the salt concentration may be negative, a characteristic not possible in uniform channel models. The main effect of up-estuary salt flux is to strengthen the salinity gradient. The model can be extended to multiple segments in order to simulate geometrically complicated estuaries. The model is employed to estimate an effective dispersion coefficient and to describe the salinity variation in the western 53 km of Long Island Sound where the cross section of the basin varies linearly. Using 8 years of monthly observations at seven stations we find that, since the curvature of the vertically averaged salinity is negative, the model and data are consistent only if the net volume flux and salt flux are toward the fresher boundary, the East River. Combining prior estimates of the magnitudes of the fluxes and their uncertainties with the model and salinity observations using a least squares approach, we estimate the dispersion coefficient for the Western Sound as 580 m2/s.

  11. Reactive Transport Modeling of Vadose Zone Contamination: Feedback between Reactions and Gas-Phase Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.

    2007-05-01

    The unsaturated zone acts as a buffer zone for contaminants on their way to the water table but can also attenuate the emission of contaminants leaving the subsurface environment through the gas phase. A reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport has been developed to investigate the processes that contribute to the generation and attenuation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. In particular, the model is suitable to study the feedback processes between advective-diffusive gas transport and geochemical reactions. The model is also able to estimate diffusive and advective contributions to gas transport in multicomponent systems. Two model applications are presented that investigate gas transport and reactions in mine tailings and at a site with organic contamination. In mine tailings, atmospheric oxygen transported into the sediment column is consumed in the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Gas volume loss caused by the consumption of atmospheric oxygen drives advective fluxes. In the absence of carbonate minerals, the advective component accounts for 16 % of the net oxygen flux into the column, while, in a carbonate-rich system, advection accounts for 10 % of the net oxygen flux. Dissolution of carbonate minerals has a moderating effect on advective gas transport since carbon dioxide can partially compensate for the depletion of oxygen. At an oil spill site, volatilization and degradation of organic contaminants cause advective and diffusive fluxes of organic vapors away from the source zone. At early stages, volatilization dominates and oxidation of these organic vapors attenuates the emission of contaminants to the atmosphere. The contribution of advection to organic vapor fluxes is significant initially but decreases with time. At later stages, the oil source becomes depleted of its most volatile fraction, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and heavier n-alkanes results in the production of methane. Up to 15 % of methane

  12. Modeling of Convective-Stratiform Precipitation Processes: Sensitivity to Partitioning Methods and Numerical Advection Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Steve; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Ferrier, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Six different convective-stratiform separation techniques, including a new technique that utilizes the ratio of vertical and terminal velocities, are compared and evaluated using two-dimensional numerical simulations of a tropical [Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE)] and midlatitude continental [Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRESTORM)] squall line. The simulations are made using two different numerical advection schemes: 4th order and positive definite advection. Comparisons are made in terms of rainfall, cloud coverage, mass fluxes, apparent heating and moistening, mean hydrometeor profiles, CFADs (Contoured Frequency with Altitude Diagrams), microphysics, and latent heating retrieval. Overall, it was found that the different separation techniques produced results that qualitatively agreed. However, the quantitative differences were significant. Observational comparisons were unable to conclusively evaluate the performance of the techniques. Latent heating retrieval was shown to be sensitive to the use of separation technique mainly due to the stratiform region for methods that found very little stratiform rain. The midlatitude PRESTORM simulation was found to be nearly invariant with respect to advection type for most quantities while for TOGA COARE fourth order advection produced numerous shallow convective cores and positive definite advection fewer cells that were both broader and deeper penetrating above the freezing level.

  13. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated.

  14. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated. PMID:26605833

  15. Shutdown and recovery of the AMOC in a coupled global climate model: The role of the advective feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L. C.

    2013-03-01

    The fresh water advection into the Atlantic ocean by the overturning circulation (Fov) has been suggested as an indicator of the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) through an advective feedback. This feedback is explored in transient simulations with a global climate model with and without flux adjustments. Flux adjustments are shown to alter the model near surface salinity, changing Fov from a net importer, to a net exporter of fresh water, mainly through correcting an Atlantic saline bias. The AMOC recovers in strength from a collapsed state, however, that in the experiment with flux adjustments recovers much later and more slowly than that without flux adjustments. This difference is traced back to the sign of Fov, confirming the indicator's importance for the AMOC and suggesting that model biases affecting Fov need to be addressed in order to assess the likelihood of irreversible changes in the AMOC.

  16. Project Fog Drops 5. Task 1: A numerical model of advection fog. Task 2: Recommendations for simplified individual zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. W.; Eadie, W. J.; Katz, U.; Kocmond, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model was used to investigate the formation of marine advection fog. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, horizontal wind, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical cross section of the atmosphere as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection, as well as radiative cooling and drop sedimentation. The model is designed to simulate the formation, development, or dissipation of advection fog in response to transfer of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and the surface as driven by advection over horizontal discontinuities in the surface temperature. Results from numerical simulations of advection fog formation are discussed with reference to observations of marine fog. A survey of candidate fog or cloud microphysics experiments which might be performed in the low gravity environment of a shuttle-type spacecraft in presented. Recommendations are given for relatively simple experiments which are relevent to fog modification problems.

  17. A SIS reaction-diffusion-advection model in a low-risk and high-risk domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jing; Kim, Kwang Ik; Lin, Zhigui; Zhu, Huaiping

    2015-11-01

    A simplified SIS model is proposed and investigated to understand the impact of spatial heterogeneity of environment and advection on the persistence and eradication of an infectious disease. The free boundary is introduced to model the spreading front of the disease. The basic reproduction number associated with the diseases in the spatial setting is introduced. Sufficient conditions for the disease to be eradicated or to spread are given. Our result shows that if the spreading domain is high-risk at some time, the disease will continue to spread till the whole area is infected; while if the spreading domain is low-risk, the disease may be vanishing or keep spreading depending on the expanding capability and the initial number of the infective individuals. The spreading speeds are also given when spreading happens, numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the impacts of the advection and the expanding capability on the spreading fronts.

  18. Escarpment evolution on high-elevation rifted margins: Insights derived from a surface processes model that combines diffusion, advection and reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Experiments with a surface processes model of large-scale (1-1000 km) long-term (1-100 m.y.) erosional denudation are used to establish the controls on the evolution of a model escarpment that is related to the rifting of a continent. The mdoel describes changes in topographic form as a result of sumultaneous short- and long-range mass transport representing hillslope (diffusive) processes and fluvial transport (advection), repsectively. Fluvial entrainment is modeled as a first-order kinetic reaction which reflects the erodibility of the substrate, and therefore the fluvial system is not necessarily carrying at capacity. One dimensional and planform models demonstrate that the principal controls on the evolution of an initially steep model escarpment are (1) antecedent topography/drainage; (2) the timesale (or equivalently a length scale) in the fluvial entrainment reaction; (3) the flexural response of the lithosphere to denudation; and (4) the relative efficiencies of the short- and long-range transport processes. When rainfall and substrate lithology are uniform, a significant amount of discharge draining over the escarpment top causes it to degrade. Only when the top of the model escarpment coincides with a drainage divide can escarpment retreat occur for these conditions. An additional requirement for retreat of a model escarpment without decline is a long reaction time scale for fluvial entrainment. This corresponds to a substrate that is hard to detach by flucial erosion, and therefore to fluvial erosion that is not transport limited. Coninuous backtilting of an escarpment due ot flexural isostatic uplift in response to denudational unloading helps maintain the scarp top as a divide. It is essntial if the escarpment gradient is to be preserved during retreat in a uniform lithology. Low flexural rigidieties propote steep and slowly retreating escarpments. For given rainfall and substrate conditions, the morphology of a retraeating model escarpment is

  19. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  20. Modeling transportation of efavirenz: inference on possibility of mixed modes of transportation and kinetic solubility

    PubMed Central

    Nemaura, Tafireyi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding drug transportation mechanisms in the human body is of paramount importance in modeling Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic relationships. This work gives a novel general model of efavirenz transportation projections based on concentrations simulated from patients on a dose of 600 mg. The work puts forward a proposition that transportation can wholly be modeled by concentration and time in a uniform volumetric space. Furthermore, movement entities are used to inform the state of “kinetic solubility” of a solution. There is use of Ricker's model, and forms of the Hill's equation in modeling transportation. Characterization on the movement rates of solution particle are suggested in relation to advection rate of solution particle. At turning points on the transportation rate of solution particle vs. concentration curve, a suggestion of possibly change of dominance in the mode of transportation and saturation is made. There are four movement rates postulated at primary micro-level transportation, that are attributed to convection, diffusion [passive transportation (EI)] and energy dependent system transportation (ED) in relation to advection. Furthermore, a new parameter is introduced which is defined as an advection rate constant of solution particle. It is postulated to be dependent on two rate constants of solution particle, that is a convection rate constant of solution particle and a saturable transportation rate constant of solution particle. At secondary micro-level transportation, the results show convection as sum of advection and saturable transportation. The kinetics of dissolution of efavirenz in the solution space is postulated. Relatively, a good level of kinetics of dissolution is projected in the concentration region 0 − 32.82 μg/ml. PMID:26106329

  1. A Nonlinear Multigrid Solver for an Atmospheric General Circulation Model Based on Semi-Implicit Semi-Lagrangian Advection of Potential Vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, S.; Ruge, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This work represents a part of a project to develop an atmospheric general circulation model based on the semi-Lagrangian advection of potential vorticity (PC) with divergence as the companion prognostic variable.

  2. Global warming in a coupled climate model including oceanic eddy-induced advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Anthony C.; Gordon, Hal B.; O'Farrell, Siobhan P.

    The Gent and McWilliams (GM) parameterization for large-scale water transport caused by mesoscale oceanic eddies is introduced into the oceanic component of a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Parallel simulations with and without the GM scheme are performed to examine the effect of this parameterization on model behavior under constant atmospheric CO2 and on the model response to increasing CO2. The control (constant CO2) runs show substantial differences in the oceanic stratification and extent of convection, similar to differences found previously using uncoupled ocean models. The transient (increasing CO2) runs show moderate differences in the rate of oceanic heat sequestration (less in the GM case), as expected based on passive tracer uptake studies. However, the surface warming is weaker in the GM case, especially over the Southern Ocean, which is contrary to some recent supposition. Reasons for the reduced warming in the GM case are discussed.

  3. Modeling the MJO rain rates using parameterized large scale dynamics: vertical structure, radiation, and horizontal advection of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Sobel, A. H.; Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) events were observed during October and November 2011 in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign. Precipitation rates and large-scale vertical motion profiles derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array are simulated in a small-domain cloud-resolving model using parameterized large-scale dynamics. Three parameterizations of large-scale dynamics --- the conventional weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation, vertical mode based spectral WTG (SWTG), and damped gravity wave coupling (DGW) --- are employed. The target temperature profiles and radiative heating rates are taken from a control simulation in which the large-scale vertical motion is imposed (rather than directly from observations), and the model itself is significantly modified from that used in previous work. These methodological changes lead to significant improvement in the results.Simulations using all three methods, with imposed time -dependent radiation and horizontal moisture advection, capture the time variations in precipitation associated with the two MJO events well. The three methods produce significant differences in the large-scale vertical motion profile, however. WTG produces the most top-heavy and noisy profiles, while DGW's is smoother with a peak in midlevels. SWTG produces a smooth profile, somewhere between WTG and DGW, and in better agreement with observations than either of the others. Numerical experiments without horizontal advection of moisture suggest that that process significantly reduces the precipitation and suppresses the top-heaviness of large-scale vertical motion during the MJO active phases, while experiments in which the effect of cloud on radiation are disabled indicate that cloud-radiative interaction significantly amplifies the MJO. Experiments in which interactive radiation is used produce poorer agreement with observation than those with imposed time-varying radiative heating. Our results highlight the

  4. Mantle viscosity - A comparison of models from postglacial rebound and from the geoid, plate driving forces, and advected heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1991-01-01

    Models of the radial variation of effective viscosity inferred from the earth's response to surface loads associated with Pleistocene deglaciation are compared to structures inferred from models of geodynamic phenomena associated with convection: the geoid, plate-driving forces, and advected heat flux. While observations of the earth's response to surface loads do not have sufficient resolution to justify more than two viscous layers, adequately matching the observed long-wavelength geoid anomalies associated with density contrasts in the lower mantle (inferred from seismic tomography) and in the upper mantle (inferred from a model of subducted slabs) requires more structure. It is possible to explain the geoid, observed plate velocities, the advected heat flux in the lower mantle, and relative sea-level variations in oceanic regions, all with a mantle with a high-viscosity/elastic lid, an asthenospheric channel of 2 x 10 exp 19 Pa s from 100 to 400-km depth, a 6 x 10 exp 20 Pa s transition zone, and a lower mantle of 6 x 10 exp 21 Pa s. The uplift history of Australia, Fennoscandia, and Laurentia can be explained with an asthenospheric viscosity less than a factor of 10 higher. Lateral variations in lower mantle viscosity are not required. Transient creep appears to be unimportant for the recent response-to-surface loads from Pleistocene deglaciation.

  5. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction.

  6. Concentration polarization, surface currents, and bulk advection in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christoffer P; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of salt transport and overlimiting currents in a microchannel during concentration polarization. We have carried out full numerical simulations of the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes problem governing the transport and rationalized the behavior of the system. A remarkable outcome of the investigations is the discovery of strong couplings between bulk advection and the surface current; without a surface current, bulk advection is strongly suppressed. The numerical simulations are supplemented by analytical models valid in the long channel limit as well as in the limit of negligible surface charge. By including the effects of diffusion and advection in the diffuse part of the electric double layers, we extend a recently published analytical model of overlimiting current due to surface conduction. PMID:25375606

  7. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  8. Advection and diffusion in shoreline change prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Frazer, L. N.

    2010-12-01

    We added longshore advection and diffusion to the simple cross-shore rate calculation method, as used widely by the USGS and others, to model historic shorelines and to predict future shoreline positions; and applied this to Hawaiian Island beach data. Aerial photographs, sporadically taken throughout the past century, yield usable, albeit limited, historic shoreline data. These photographs provide excellent spatial coverage, but poor temporal resolution, of the shoreline. Due to the sparse historic shoreline data, and the many natural and anthropogenic events influencing coastlines, we constructed a simplistic shoreline change model that can identify long-term behavior of a beach. Our new, two-dimensional model combines the simple rate method to accommodate for cross-shore sediment transport with the classic Pelnard-Considère model for diffusion, as well as a longshore advection speed term. Inverse methods identify cross-shore rate, longshore advection speed, and longshore diffusivity down a sandy coastline. A spatial averaging technique then identifies shoreline segments where one parameter can reasonably account for the cross-shore and longshore transport rates in that area. This produces model results with spatial resolution more appropriate to the temporal spacing of the data. Because changes in historic data can be accounted for by varying degrees of cross-shore and longshore sediment transport - for example, beach erosion can equally be explained by sand moving either off-shore or laterally - we tested several different model scenarios on the data: allowing only cross-shore sediment movement, only longshore movement, and a combination of the two. We used statistical information criteria to determine both the optimal spatial resolution and best-fitting scenario. Finally, we employed a voting method predicting the relaxed shoreline position over time.

  9. 3D numerical modeling of subduction dynamics: plate stagnation and segmentation, and crustal advection in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Tajima, F.

    2012-04-01

    Water content in the mantle transition zone (MTZ) has been broadly debated in the Earth science community as a key issue for plate dynamics [e.g., Bercovici and Karato, 2003]. In this study, a systematic series of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation are performed in an attempt to verify two hypotheses for plate subduction with effects of deep water transport: (1) the small-scale behavior of subducted oceanic plate in the MTZ; and (2) the role of subducted crust in the MTZ. These hypotheses are postulated based on the seismic observations characterized by large-scale flattened high velocity anomalies (i.e., stagnant slabs) in the MTZ and discontinuity depth variations. The proposed model states that under wet conditions the subducted plate main body of peridotite (olivine rich) is abutted by subducted crustal materials (majorite rich) at the base of the MTZ. The computational domain of mantle convection is confined to 3D regional spherical-shell geometry with a thickness of 1000 km and a lateral extent of 10° × 30° in the latitudinal and longitudinal directions. A semi-dynamic model of subduction zone [Morishige et al., 2010] is applied to let the highly viscous, cold oceanic plate subduct. Weak (low-viscosity) fault zones (WFZs), which presumably correspond to the fault boundaries of large subduction earthquakes, are imposed on the top part of subducting plates. The phase transitions of olivine to wadsleyite and ringwoodite to perovskite+magnesiowüstite with Clapeyron slopes under both "dry" and "wet" conditions are considered based on recent high pressure experiments [e.g., Ohtani and Litasov, 2006]. Another recent experiment provides new evidence for lower-viscosity (weaker strength) of garnet-rich zones than the olivine dominant mantle under wet conditions [Katayama and Karato, 2008]. According to this, the effect of viscosity reduction of oceanic crust is considered under wet condition in the MTZ. Results show that there is a substantial difference

  10. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  11. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  12. Modeling Multi-process Transport of Pathogens in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    The transport behavior of microorganisms in porous media is of interest with regard to the fate of pathogens associated with wastewater recharge, riverbank filtration, and land application of biosolids. This interest has fomented research on the transport of pathogens in the subsurface environment. The factors influencing pathogen transport within the subsurface environment include advection, dispersion, filtration, and inactivation. The filtration process, which mediates the magnitude and rate of pathogen retention, comprises several mechanisms such as attachment to porous-medium surfaces, straining, and sedimentation. We present a mathematical model wherein individual filtration mechanisms are explicitly incorporated along with advection, dispersion, and inactivation. The performance of the model is evaluated by applying it to several data sets obtained from miscible-displacement experiments conducted using various pathogens. Input parameters are obtained to the extent possible from independent means.

  13. STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING TRANSPORT PARAMETERS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS TO ONE-DOMENSIONAL ADVECTIVE-DISPERSIVE SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Brian J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation nonlinear multiple-regression methodology for estimating parameters that characterize the transport of contaminants is developed and demonstrated. Finite difference containment transport simulation is combined with a nonlinear weighted least squares multiple-regression procedure. The technique provides optimal parameter estimates and gives statistics for assessing the reliability of these estimates under certain general assumptions about the distributions of the random measurement errors. Monte Carlo analysis is used to estimate parameter reliability for a hypothetical homogeneous soil column for which concentration data contain large random measurement errors. The value of data collected spatially versus data collected temporally was investigated for estimation of velocity, dispersion coefficient, effective porosity, first-order decay rate, and zero-order production. The use of spatial data gave estimates that were 2-3 times more reliable than estimates based on temporal data for all parameters except velocity. (Estimated author abstract) Refs.

  14. Characterization of GX 339-4 outburst of 2010-11: analysis by XSPEC using two component advective flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-02-01

    We study spectral properties of GX 339-4 during its 2010-11 outburst with two component advective flow (TCAF) model after its inclusion in XSPEC as a table model. We compare results fitted by TCAF model with combined disc blackbody and power-law model. For a spectral fit, we use 2.5-25 keV spectral data of the Proportional Counter Array instrument onboard RXTE satellite. From our fit, accretion flow parameters such as Keplerian (disc) rate, sub-Keplerian (halo) rate, location and strength of shock are extracted. We quantify how the disc and the halo rates vary during the entire outburst. We study how the halo to disc accretion rate ratio (ARR), quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), shock locations and its strength vary when the system passes through hard, hard-intermediate, soft-intermediate and soft states. We find pieces of evidence of monotonically increasing and decreasing nature of QPO frequencies depending on the variation of ARR during rising and declining phases. Interestingly, on days of transition from hard state to hard-intermediate spectral state (during the rising phase) or vice-versa (during decline phase), ARR is observed to be locally maximum. Non-constancy of ARR while obtaining reasonable fits points to the presence of two independent components in the flow.

  15. Aspects of numerical and representational methods related to the finite-difference simulation of advective and dispersive transport of freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of the transport of injected freshwater in a thin brackish aquifer, overlain and underlain by confining layers containing more saline water, is shown to be influenced by the choice of the finite-difference approximation method, the algorithm for representing vertical advective and dispersive fluxes, and the values assigned to parametric coefficients that specify the degree of vertical dispersion and molecular diffusion that occurs. Computed potable water recovery efficiencies will differ depending upon the choice of algorithm and approximation method, as will dispersion coefficients estimated based on the calibration of simulations to match measured data. A comparison of centered and backward finite-difference approximation methods shows that substantially different transition zones between injected and native waters are depicted by the different methods, and computed recovery efficiencies vary greatly. Standard and experimental algorithms and a variety of values for molecular diffusivity, transverse dispersivity, and vertical scaling factor were compared in simulations of freshwater storage in a thin brackish aquifer. Computed recovery efficiencies vary considerably, and appreciable differences are observed in the distribution of injected freshwater in the various cases tested. The results demonstrate both a qualitatively different description of transport using the experimental algorithms and the interrelated influences of molecular diffusion and transverse dispersion on simulated recovery efficiency. When simulating natural aquifer flow in cross-section, flushing of the aquifer occurred for all tested coefficient choices using both standard and experimental algorithms. ?? 1993.

  16. Corrected mean-field models for spatially dependent advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2011-05-01

    In the exclusion-process literature, mean-field models are often derived by assuming that the occupancy status of lattice sites is independent. Although this assumption is questionable, it is the foundation of many mean-field models. In this work we develop methods to relax the independence assumption for a range of discrete exclusion-process-based mechanisms motivated by applications from cell biology. Previous investigations that focused on relaxing the independence assumption have been limited to studying initially uniform populations and ignored any spatial variations. By ignoring spatial variations these previous studies were greatly simplified due to translational invariance of the lattice. These previous corrected mean-field models could not be applied to many important problems in cell biology such as invasion waves of cells that are characterized by moving fronts. Here we propose generalized methods that relax the independence assumption for spatially inhomogeneous problems, leading to corrected mean-field descriptions of a range of exclusion-process-based models that incorporate (i) unbiased motility, (ii) biased motility, and (iii) unbiased motility with agent birth and death processes. The corrected mean-field models derived here are applicable to spatially variable processes including invasion wave-type problems. We show that there can be large deviations between simulation data and traditional mean-field models based on invoking the independence assumption. Furthermore, we show that the corrected mean-field models give an improved match to the simulation data in all cases considered.

  17. A BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL WITH MULTI-CELLULAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION IN ADVECTION- AND DIFFUSION-DOMINATED REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgács-Dajka, Emese; Dikpati, Mausumi E-mail: dikpati@ucar.edu

    2015-06-20

    Babcock–Leighton type-solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock–Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that the presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in the butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of the butterfly wing to an antisolar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from the middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in latitude behaves distinctly differently in the two regimes, producing solar-like butterfly diagrams with fast cycles in the higher diffusivity regime, and complex branches in butterfly diagrams in the lower diffusivity regime. We also find that dynamo solutions for a four-celled pattern, two in radius and two in latitude, prefer to quickly relax to quadrupolar parity if the bottom flow speed is strong enough, of similar order of magnitude as the surface flow speed.

  18. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  19. Advection in geologic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moltyaner, G. L.

    1993-10-01

    In situ sensing technology, used in a series of natural-gradient tracer tests at the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, leads to the introduction of a conceptually new approach to the study of groundwater motion in porous media. As opposed to the conventional approach, based on the consideration of a fictitious fluid continuum with fluid properties distributed over both voids and solids, in the new approach the actual groundwater motion in the void space of a porous medium is considered and described at the local scale by the statistical characterization of the propagation of gamma-radiation energy associated with the moving water as a tracer. The essential feature of the new approach is that the mean free path of a gamma-energy photon instead of the porosity is used as a scaling factor in transferring information associated with pore-scale fluid motion to the local scale. This scaling factor is employed for reintroducing the familiar particle model of fluid motion but at the local scale. It is shown that when the local-scale dispersion is neglected, the evolution of local-scale fluid particles making up the tracer plume can be described by the advection equation; its equation of characteristics describes trajectories of local-scale particles. A simple analytical solution to the advection equation is then used to produce three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of local-scale particles observed in the Twin Lake test. It is also shown that the spatial averaging procedure with regard to the weighting function for a spherical averaging volume of one mean free path radius may be used to introduce the three-dimensional field of local-scale concentration. The averaging procedure is then used to illustrate that the concept of the three-dimensional field of plume-scale concentration does not make physical sense and only the one-dimensional plume-scale concentration field may be introduced in shallow aquifers.

  20. Derivation of a Multiparameter Gamma Model for Analyzing the Residence-Time Distribution Function for Nonideal Flow Systems as an Alternative to the Advection-Dispersion Equation

    DOE PAGES

    Embry, Irucka; Roland, Victor; Agbaje, Oluropo; Watson, Valetta; Martin, Marquan; Painter, Roger; Byl, Tom; Sharpe, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    A new residence-time distribution (RTD) function has been developed and applied to quantitative dye studies as an alternative to the traditional advection-dispersion equation (AdDE). The new method is based on a jointly combined four-parameter gamma probability density function (PDF). The gamma residence-time distribution (RTD) function and its first and second moments are derived from the individual two-parameter gamma distributions of randomly distributed variables, tracer travel distance, and linear velocity, which are based on their relationship with time. The gamma RTD function was used on a steady-state, nonideal system modeled as a plug-flow reactor (PFR) in the laboratory to validate themore » effectiveness of the model. The normalized forms of the gamma RTD and the advection-dispersion equation RTD were compared with the normalized tracer RTD. The normalized gamma RTD had a lower mean-absolute deviation (MAD) (0.16) than the normalized form of the advection-dispersion equation (0.26) when compared to the normalized tracer RTD. The gamma RTD function is tied back to the actual physical site due to its randomly distributed variables. The results validate using the gamma RTD as a suitable alternative to the advection-dispersion equation for quantitative tracer studies of non-ideal flow systems.« less

  1. Modeling the MJO in a cloud-resolving model with parameterized large-scale dynamics: Vertical structure, radiation, and horizontal advection of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Nie, Ji

    2016-03-01

    Two Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) events, observed during October and November 2011 in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign, are simulated in a limited-area cloud-resolving model using parameterized large-scale dynamics. Three parameterizations of large-scale dynamics—the conventional weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation, vertical mode-based spectral WTG (SWTG), and damped gravity wave coupling (DGW)—are employed. A number of changes to the implementation of the large-scale parameterizations, as well as the model itself, are made and lead to improvements in the results. Simulations using all three methods, with imposed time-dependent radiation and horizontal moisture advection, capture the time variations in precipitation associated with the two MJO events well. The three methods produce significant differences in the large-scale vertical motion profile, however. WTG produces the most top-heavy profile, while DGW's is less so, and SWTG produces a profile between the two, and in better agreement with observations. Numerical experiments without horizontal advection of moisture suggest that that process significantly reduces the precipitation and suppresses the top-heaviness of large-scale vertical motion during the MJO active phases. Experiments in which a temporally constant radiative heating profile is used indicate that radiative feedbacks significantly amplify the MJO. Experiments in which interactive radiation is used produce agreement with observations that is much better than that achieved in previous work, though not as good as that with imposed time-varying radiative heating. Our results highlight the importance of both horizontal advection of moisture and radiative feedbacks to the dynamics of the MJO.

  2. APPLICATION OF A FULLY DISTRIBUTED WASHOFF AND TRANSPORT MODEL FOR A GULF COAST WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in hydrologic modeling have been shown to improve the accuracy of rainfall runoff simulation and prediction. Building on the capabilities of distributed hydrologic modeling, a water quality model was developed to simulate buildup, washoff, and advective transport of a co...

  3. Sensitivity study of advection and diffusion coefficients in a two-dimensional stratospheric model using excess carbon 14 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Yung, Yuk L.; Allen, Mark; Zurek, Richard W.; Crisp, David

    1989-01-01

    The time evolution of excess C-14 in the stratosphere and the troposphere from October 1963 to December 1966 is investigated using the Caltech/JPL two-dimensioanal transport model, with transport coefficients taken from Yang and Tung (1989). It is found that the model successfully accounts for observations reported previously. It is calculated that excess C-14 is removed from the atmosphere with surface deposition velocities of 0.003 cm/sec in the Southern Hemisphere and 0.005 cm/sec in the Northern Hemisphere. This result is contrary to the current understanding that the oceans are the dominant sink for excess C-14.

  4. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  5. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  6. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  7. Modeling multispecies reactive transport in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Sun, Y.; Hooker, B.S.; Petersen, J.N.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, the details of RT3D, a general purpose, multispecies, reactive transport code, are presented. The code uses MODFLOW to simulate flow and several MT3D sub-programs to simulate advection and dispersion. A set of reaction modules were developed and incorporated into RT3D to simulate various types of multispecies reactive transport. This new computer model can be used for analyzing different types of subsurface contaminant reactions, microbial metabolisms, and microbial transport kinetics. Details of the model and numerical solution procedure are presented. The numerical formulation of the code is general enough to allow description of any type of reaction with any number of mobile/immobile species. Several example problems are presented to test the performance of the code, and to illustrate its features. The presented numerical model is shown to be a useful tool for analyzing different types of subsurface bioremediation systems. Prediction based on this model can be used for screening remediation alternatives including natural attenuation and/or for forecasting contaminant exposure levels and environmental risks at sensitive, downgradient receptors.

  8. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  9. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  10. An upscaled approach for transport in media with extended tailing due to back-diffusion using analytical and numerical solutions of the advection dispersion equation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Kim, Ungtae

    2015-11-01

    The mono-continuum advection-dispersion equation (mADE) is commonly regarded as unsuitable for application to media that exhibit rapid breakthrough and extended tailing associated with diffusion between high and low permeability regions. This paper demonstrates that the mADE can be successfully used to model such conditions if certain issues are addressed. First, since hydrodynamic dispersion, unlike molecular diffusion, cannot occur upstream of the contaminant source, models must be formulated to prevent "back-dispersion." Second, large variations in aquifer permeability will result in differences between volume-weighted average concentration (resident concentration) and flow-weighted average concentration (flux concentration). Water samples taken from wells may be regarded as flux concentrations, while soil samples may be analyzed to determine resident concentrations. While the mADE is usually derived in terms of resident concentration, it is known that a mADE of the same mathematical form may be written in terms of flux concentration. However, when solving the latter, the mathematical transformation of a flux boundary condition applied to the resident mADE becomes a concentration type boundary condition for the flux mADE. Initial conditions must also be consistent with the form of the mADE that is to be solved. Thus, careful attention must be given to the type of concentration data that is available, whether resident or flux concentrations are to be simulated, and to boundary and initial conditions. We present 3-D analytical solutions for resident and flux concentrations, discuss methods of solving numerical models to obtain resident and flux concentrations, and compare results for hypothetical problems. We also present an upscaling method for computing "effective" dispersivities and other mADE model parameters in terms of physically meaningful parameters in a diffusion-limited mobile-immobile model. Application of the latter to previously published studies of

  11. Modelling transport of decay chains by particle displacement along random trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Painter, S.; Frampton, A.

    2005-12-01

    The streamtube/trajectory approach to modelling solute transport in the subsurface is widely used in applications, from numerical simulations (method of characteristics) to analytical models (Dagan). The trajectory approach has a solid foundation in chemical engineering and hydrodynamics. However, its main limitation is that the (semi)analytical solutions for incorporating retention processes, as proposed by Dagan and Cvetkovic among others, are applicable only to a single species partitioned into mobile and immobile phases. We propose a new methodology for simulating transport of multiple species (exemplified by decay chains) subject to random advection and retention in heterogeneous porous media. The method is based on displacing dynamically inert particles along random trajectories. We first demonstrate the accuracy of the method for a two-component chain with linear equilibrium sorption and hydrodynamic transport governed by the advection-dispersion equation, where an analytical solution is available. We then test the applicability of the method by considering a three- component decay chain in a two-dimensional fractured porous medium, where highly non-Gaussian advective transport has been simulated using a discrete fracture network model, and the retention processes are controlled by Fickian diffusion into the rock matrix. These tests in combination demonstrate that the proposed methodology is efficient and accurate, thus opening possibilities for studying transport of interacting species subject to more complex chemical reactions, where random advection and retention (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) can be fully incorporated into the modelling.

  12. Advection, diffusion, and delivery over a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Luke L. M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-08-01

    Many biological, geophysical, and technological systems involve the transport of a resource over a network. In this paper, we present an efficient method for calculating the exact quantity of the resource in each part of an arbitrary network, where the resource is lost or delivered out of the network at a given rate, while being subject to advection and diffusion. The key conceptual step is to partition the resource into material that does or does not reach a node over a given time step. As an example application, we consider resource allocation within fungal networks, and analyze the spatial distribution of the resource that emerges as such networks grow over time. Fungal growth involves the expansion of fluid filled vessels, and such growth necessarily involves the movement of fluid. We develop a model of delivery in growing fungal networks, and find good empirical agreement between our model and experimental data gathered using radio-labeled tracers. Our results lead us to suggest that in foraging fungi, growth-induced mass flow is sufficient to account for long-distance transport, if the system is well insulated. We conclude that active transport mechanisms may only be required at the very end of the transport pathway, near the growing tips.

  13. Modeling of radon transport in unsaturated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.; Green, R.

    1995-08-10

    This study applies a recently developed model, LEACHV, to simulate transport of radon through unsaturated soil and compares calculated soil radon activities against field-measured values. For volatile and gas phase transport, LEACHV is modified from LEACHP, a pesticide version of LEACHM, as well-documented one-dimensional model for water and chemical movement through unsaturated soil. LEACHV adds consideration of air temperature changes and air flow driven by barometric pressure change to the other soil variables currently used in LEACHP. It applies diurnal barometric pressure and air temperature changes to reflect more accurately the typical field conditions, Sensitivity analysis and simulated results have clearly demonstrated the relative importance of barometric pressure change, rainfall events, changes in water content, gas advection, and radon source term in radon transport process. Comparisons among simulated results illustrated that the importance of barometric pressure change and its pumping phenomenon produces both fluctuation in soil gas radon activities and an elevation of the long-term average radon activity in shallow soils of an equal magnitude to the disturbed source parameter. Comparisons between measured and simulated soil radon activities showed that LEACHV can provide realistic estimates of radon activity concentration in the soil profile. 41 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. On vertical advection truncation errors in terrain-following numerical models: Comparison to a laboratory model for upwelling over submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. E.; Dinniman, M. S.; Klinck, J. M.; Gorby, D. D.; Hewett, A. J.; Hickey, B. M.

    2003-01-01

    Submarine canyons which indent the continental shelf are frequently regions of steep (up to 45°), three-dimensional topography. Recent observations have delineated the flow over several submarine canyons during 2-4 day long upwelling episodes. Thus upwelling episodes over submarine canyons provide an excellent flow regime for evaluating numerical and physical models. Here we compare a physical and numerical model simulation of an upwelling event over a simplified submarine canyon. The numerical model being evaluated is a version of the S-Coordinate Rutgers University Model (SCRUM). Careful matching between the models is necessary for a stringent comparison. Results show a poor comparison for the homogeneous case due to nonhydrostatic effects in the laboratory model. Results for the stratified case are better but show a systematic difference between the numerical results and laboratory results. This difference is shown not to be due to nonhydrostatic effects. Rather, the difference is due to truncation errors in the calculation of the vertical advection of density in the numerical model. The calculation is inaccurate due to the terrain-following coordinates combined with a strong vertical gradient in density, vertical shear in the horizontal velocity and topography with strong curvature.

  15. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  16. Multi-scale analysis of collective behavior in 2D self-propelled particle models of swarms: An Advection-Diffusion with Memory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    2. The long-time behavior of the msd of the centroid walk scales linearly with time for naïve groups (diffusion), but shows a sharp transition to quadratic scaling (advection) for informed ones. These observations suggest that the mesoscopic variables of interest are the magnitude of the drift, the diffusion coefficient and the time-scales at which the anomalous and the asymptotic behavior respectively dominate transport, the latter being linked to the time scale at which the group reaches a decision. In order to estimate these summary statistics from the msd, we assumed that the configuration centroid follows an uncoupled Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) with smooth jump and waiting time pdf's. The mesoscopic transport equation for this type of random walk corresponds to an Advection-Diffusion Equation with Memory (ADEM). The introduction of the memory, and thus non-Markovian effects, is necessary in order to correctly account for the two time scales present. Although we were not able to calculate the memory directly from the individual-level rules, we show that it can estimated from a single, relatively short, simulation run using a Mittag-Leffler function as template. With this function it is possible to predict accurately the behavior of the msd, as well as the full pdf for the position of the centroid. The resulting ADEM is self-consistent in the sense that transport parameters estimated from the memory via a Kubo relationship coincide with those estimated from the moments of the jump size pdf of the associated CTRW for a large number of group sizes, proportions of informed individuals, and degrees of bias along the preferred direction. We also discuss the phase diagrams for the transport coefficients estimated from this method, where we notice velocity-precision trade-offs, where precision is a measure of the deviation of realized group orientations with respect to the informed direction. We also note that the time scale to collective decision is invariant

  17. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  18. One-Dimensional Transport with Equilibrium Chemistry (OTEQ) - A Reactive Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    OTEQ is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of waterborne solutes in streams and rivers. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel. The solute transport model is based on OTIS, a model that considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage. The equilibrium submodel is based on MINTEQ, a model that considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, acid-base reactions, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption. Within OTEQ, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (waterborne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach. The model's ability to simulate pH, precipitation/dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between instream chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale. This report details the development and application of OTEQ. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, model applications, and installation instructions. OTEQ may be obtained over the Internet at http://water.usgs.gov/software/OTEQ.

  19. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  20. MOZART, a global chemical transport model for ozone and related chemical tracers: 1. Model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, G. P.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Walters, S.; Rasch, P. J.; Müller, J.-F.; Granier, C.; Tie, X. X.

    1998-11-01

    We present a new global three-dimensional chemical-transport model (called MOZART) developed in the framework of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) and aimed at studying the distribution and budget of tropospheric ozone and its precursors. The model, developed with a horizontal resolution of 2.8° in longitude and latitude, includes 25 levels in the vertical between the Earth's surface and an upper boundary located at approximately 35 km altitude. In its present configuration the model calculates the global distribution of 56 chemical constituents with a timestep of 20 min, and accounts for surface emission and deposition, large-scale advective transport, subscale convective and boundary layer exchanges, chemical and photochemical transformations, as well as wet scavenging. Transport is simulated "off line" from CCM with dynamical variables provided every 3 hours from preestablished history tapes. Advection is calculated using the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme [Rasch and Williamson, 1990] developed for the MATCH model of Rasch et al. [1997]. Convective and boundary layer transports are expressed according to Hack [1994] and Holtslag and Boville [1993], respectively. A detailed evaluation of the model results is provided in a companion paper [Hauglustaine et al., this issue]. An analysis of the spatial and temporal variability in the chemical fields predicted by the model suggests that regional events such as summertime ozone episodes in polluted areas can be simulated by MOZART.

  1. An advection-diffusion-reaction size-structured fish population dynamics model combined with a statistical parameter estimation procedure: application to the Indian ocean skipjack tuna fishery.

    PubMed

    Faugeras, Blaise; Maury, Olivier

    2005-10-01

    We develop an advection-diffusion size-structured fish population dynamics model and apply it to simulate the skipjack tuna population in the Indian Ocean. The model is fully spatialized, and movements are parameterized with oceanographical and biological data; thus it naturally reacts to environment changes. We first formulate an initial-boundary value problem and prove existence of a unique positive solution. We then discuss the numerical scheme chosen for the integration of the simulation model. In a second step we address the parameter estimation problem for such a model. With the help of automatic differentiation, we derive the adjoint code which is used to compute the exact gradient of a Bayesian cost function measuring the distance between the outputs of the model and catch and length frequency data. A sensitivity analysis shows that not all parameters can be estimated from the data. Finally twin experiments in which pertubated parameters are recovered from simulated data are successfully conducted.

  2. Laser speckle contrast imaging is sensitive to advective flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-07-01

    Unlike laser Doppler flowmetry, there has yet to be presented a clear description of the physical variables that laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is sensitive to. Herein, we present a theoretical basis for demonstrating that LSCI is sensitive to total flux and, in particular, the summation of diffusive flux and advective flux. We view LSCI from the perspective of mass transport and briefly derive the diffusion with drift equation in terms of an LSCI experiment. This equation reveals the relative sensitivity of LSCI to both diffusive flux and advective flux and, thereby, to both concentration and the ordered velocity of the scattering particles. We demonstrate this dependence through a short series of flow experiments that yield relationships between the calculated speckle contrast and the concentration of the scatterers (manifesting as changes in scattering coefficient), between speckle contrast and the velocity of the scattering fluid, and ultimately between speckle contrast and advective flux. Finally, we argue that the diffusion with drift equation can be used to support both Lorentzian and Gaussian correlation models that relate observed contrast to the movement of the scattering particles and that a weighted linear combination of these two models is likely the most appropriate model for relating speckle contrast to particle motion.

  3. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  4. Applications of a thermal-based two-source energy balance model using Priestley-Taylor approach for surface temperature partitioning under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lisheng; Kustas, William P.; Liu, Shaomin; Colaizzi, Paul D.; Nieto, Hector; Xu, Ziwei; Ma, Yanfei; Li, Mingsong; Xu, Tongren; Agam, Nurit; Tolk, Judy A.; Evett, Steven R.

    2016-09-01

    In this study ground measured soil and vegetation component temperatures and composite temperature from a high spatial resolution thermal camera and a network of thermal-IR sensors collected in an irrigated maize field and in an irrigated cotton field are used to assess and refine the component temperature partitioning approach in the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model. A refinement to TSEB using a non-iterative approach based on the application of the Priestley-Taylor formulation for surface temperature partitioning and estimating soil evaporation from soil moisture observations under advective conditions (TSEB-A) was developed. This modified TSEB formulation improved the agreement between observed and modeled soil and vegetation temperatures. In addition, the TSEB-A model output of evapotranspiration (ET) and the components evaporation (E), transpiration (T) when compared to ground observations using the stable isotopic method and eddy covariance (EC) technique from the HiWATER experiment and with microlysimeters and a large monolithic weighing lysimeter from the BEAREX08 experiment showed good agreement. Difference between the modeled and measured ET measurements were less than 10% and 20% on a daytime basis for HiWATER and BEAREX08 data sets, respectively. The TSEB-A model was found to accurately reproduce the temporal dynamics of E, T and ET over a full growing season under the advective conditions existing for these irrigated crops located in arid/semi-arid climates. With satellite data this TSEB-A modeling framework could potentially be used as a tool for improving water use efficiency and conservation practices in water limited regions. However, TSEB-A requires soil moisture information which is not currently available routinely from satellite at the field scale.

  5. Fractal continuum model for tracer transport in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Hernández, E C; Coronado, M; Hernández-Coronado, H

    2013-12-01

    A model based on the fractal continuum approach is proposed to describe tracer transport in fractal porous media. The original approach has been extended to treat tracer transport and to include systems with radial and uniform flow, which are cases of interest in geoscience. The models involve advection due to the fluid motion in the fractal continuum and dispersion whose mathematical expression is taken from percolation theory. The resulting advective-dispersive equations are numerically solved for continuous and for pulse tracer injection. The tracer profile and the tracer breakthrough curve are evaluated and analyzed in terms of the fractal parameters. It has been found in this work that anomalous transport frequently appears, and a condition on the fractal parameter values to predict when sub- or superdiffusion might be expected has been obtained. The fingerprints of fractality on the tracer breakthrough curve in the explored parameter window consist of an early tracer breakthrough and long tail curves for the spherical and uniform flow cases, and symmetric short tailed curves for the radial flow case.

  6. How to Find a Bug in Ten Thousand Lines Transport Solver? Outline of Experiences from AN Advection-Diffusion Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, K.; Bombardelli, F.

    2011-12-01

    Almost all natural phenomena on Earth are highly nonlinear. Even simplifications to the equations describing nature usually end up being nonlinear partial differential equations. Transport (ADR) equation is a pivotal equation in atmospheric sciences and water quality. This nonlinear equation needs to be solved numerically for practical purposes so academicians and engineers thoroughly rely on the assistance of numerical codes. Thus, numerical codes require verification before they are utilized for multiple applications in science and engineering. Model verification is a mathematical procedure whereby a numerical code is checked to assure the governing equation is properly solved as it is described in the design document. CFD verification is not a straightforward and well-defined course. Only a complete test suite can uncover all the limitations and bugs. Results are needed to be assessed to make a distinction between bug-induced-defect and innate limitation of a numerical scheme. As Roache (2009) said, numerical verification is a state-of-the-art procedure. Sometimes novel tricks work out. This study conveys the synopsis of the experiences we gained during a comprehensive verification process which was done for a transport solver. A test suite was designed including unit tests and algorithmic tests. Tests were layered in complexity in several dimensions from simple to complex. Acceptance criteria defined for the desirable capabilities of the transport code such as order of accuracy, mass conservation, handling stiff source term, spurious oscillation, and initial shape preservation. At the begining, mesh convergence study which is the main craft of the verification is performed. To that end, analytical solution of ADR equation gathered. Also a new solution was derived. In the more general cases, lack of analytical solution could be overcome through Richardson Extrapolation and Manufactured Solution. Then, two bugs which were concealed during the mesh convergence

  7. Minority Transportation Expenditure Allocation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Anant D.; Santini, Danilo J.; Marik, Sheri K.

    1993-04-12

    MITRAM (Minority TRansportation expenditure Allocation Model) can project various transportation related attributes of minority (Black and Hispanic) and majority (white) populations. The model projects vehicle ownership, vehicle miles of travel, workers, new car and on-road fleet fuel economy, amount and share of household income spent on gasoline, and household expenditures on public transportation and taxis. MITRAM predicts reactions to sustained fuel price changes for up to 10 years after the change.

  8. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  9. LAYER DEPENDENT ADVECTION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advection methods used in CMAQ require that the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition be satisfied for numerical stability and accuracy. In CMAQ prior to version 4.3, the ADVSTEP algorithm established CFL-safe synchronization and advection timesteps that were uniform throu...

  10. Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.

    1999-12-17

    An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.

  11. A finite-volume ELLAM for three-dimensional solute-transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, T.F.; Heberton, C.I.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume ELLAM method has been developed, tested, and successfully implemented as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) MODFLOW-2000 ground water modeling package. It is included as a solver option for the Ground Water Transport process. The FVELLAM uses space-time finite volumes oriented along the streamlines of the flow field to solve an integral form of the solute-transport equation, thus combining local and global mass conservation with the advantages of Eulerian-Lagrangian characteristic methods. The USGS FVELLAM code simulates solute transport in flowing ground water for a single dissolved solute constituent and represents the processes of advective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, mixing from fluid sources, retardation, and decay. Implicit time discretization of the dispersive and source/sink terms is combined with a Lagrangian treatment of advection, in which forward tracking moves mass to the new time level, distributing mass among destination cells using approximate indicator functions. This allows the use of large transport time increments (large Courant numbers) with accurate results, even for advection-dominated systems (large Peclet numbers). Four test cases, including comparisons with analytical solutions and benchmarking against other numerical codes, are presented that indicate that the FVELLAM can usually yield excellent results, even if relatively few transport time steps are used, although the quality of the results is problem-dependent.

  12. A mathematical model for the transport of a solute through a porous-walled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Ian; Shipley, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of cross-flow filtration devices. Here we use Taylor-dispersion theory to derive a radially averaged model for solute transport in a tube with porous walls, where the wall Darcy permeability may vary both spatially and in time. Crucially, this model includes solute advection via both radial and axial flow components, as well as diffusion, and the advection, diffusion and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The model is used to explore the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor for tissue engineering applications - here membrane fouling and cell population expansion mean that the effective membrane permeability is intrinsically coupled to both fluid flow and nutrient transport. We conclude by presenting design considerations that promote spatially uniform cell population growth.

  13. Forest Canopy Processes in a Regional Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makar, Paul; Staebler, Ralf; Akingunola, Ayodeji; Zhang, Junhua; McLinden, Chris; Kharol, Shailesh; Moran, Michael; Robichaud, Alain; Zhang, Leiming; Stroud, Craig; Pabla, Balbir; Cheung, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Forest canopies have typically been absent or highly parameterized in regional chemical transport models. Some forest-related processes are often considered - for example, biogenic emissions from the forests are included as a flux lower boundary condition on vertical diffusion, as is deposition to vegetation. However, real forest canopies comprise a much more complicated set of processes, at scales below the "transport model-resolved scale" of vertical levels usually employed in regional transport models. Advective and diffusive transport within the forest canopy typically scale with the height of the canopy, and the former process tends to dominate over the latter. Emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons arise from the foliage, which may be located tens of metres above the surface, while emissions of biogenic nitric oxide from decaying plant matter are located at the surface - in contrast to the surface flux boundary condition usually employed in chemical transport models. Deposition, similarly, is usually parameterized as a flux boundary condition, but may be differentiated between fluxes to vegetation and fluxes to the surface when the canopy scale is considered. The chemical environment also changes within forest canopies: shading, temperature, and relativity humidity changes with height within the canopy may influence chemical reaction rates. These processes have been observed in a host of measurement studies, and have been simulated using site-specific one-dimensional forest canopy models. Their influence on regional scale chemistry has been unknown, until now. In this work, we describe the results of the first attempt to include complex canopy processes within a regional chemical transport model (GEM-MACH). The original model core was subdivided into "canopy" and "non-canopy" subdomains. In the former, three additional near-surface layers based on spatially and seasonally varying satellite-derived canopy height and leaf area index were added to the original model

  14. On the tensorial nature of advective porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2005-02-01

    Field tracer tests indicate that advective porosity, the quantity relating advective velocity to Darcy flux, may exhibit directional dependence. Hydraulic anisotropy explains some but not all of the reported directional results. The present paper shows mathematically that directional variations in advective porosity may arise simply from incomplete mixing of an inert tracer between directional flow channels within a sampling (or support) volume ω of soil or rock that may be hydraulically isotropic or anisotropic. In the traditional fully homogenized case, our theory yields trivially a scalar advective porosity equal to the interconnected porosity ϕ, thus explaining neither the observed directional effects nor the widely reported experimental finding that advective porosity is generally smaller than ϕ. We consider incomplete mixing under conditions in which the characteristic time tD of longitudinal diffusion along channels across ω is much shorter than the characteristic time tH required for homogenization through transverse diffusion between channels. This may happen where flow takes place preferentially through relatively conductive channels and/or fractures of variable orientation separated by material that forms a partial barrier to diffusive transport. Our solution is valid for arbitrary channel Peclet numbers on a correspondingly wide range of time scales tD ⩽ t ≪ tH. It shows that the tracer center of mass is advected at a macroscopic velocity which is generally not collinear with the macroscopic Darcy flux and exceeds it in magnitude. These two vectors are related through a second-rank symmetric advective dispersivity tensor Φ. If the permeability k of ω is a symmetric positive-definite tensor, so is Φ. However, the principal directions and values of these two tensors are generally not the same; whereas those of k are a fixed property of the medium and the length-scale of ω, those of Φ depend additionally on the direction and magnitude of the

  15. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  16. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  17. The Global Modeling Initiative Assessment Model: Model Description, Integration and Testing of the Transport Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Tannahill, J.R.; Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.; Bergmann, D.; Proctor, D.; Rodriquez, J.M.; Lin, S.J.; Rood, R.B.; Prather, M.J.; Rasch, P.J.; Considine, D.B.; Ramaroson, R.; Kawa, S.R.

    2000-04-25

    We describe the three dimensional global stratospheric chemistry model developed under the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) to assess the possible environmental consequences from the emissions of a fleet of proposed high speed civil transport aircraft. This model was developed through a unique collaboration of the members of the GMI team. Team members provided computational modules representing various physical and chemical processes, and analysis of simulation results through extensive comparison to observation. The team members' modules were integrated within a computational framework that allowed transportability and simulations on massively parallel computers. A unique aspect of this model framework is the ability to interchange and intercompare different submodules to assess the sensitivity of numerical algorithms and model assumptions to simulation results. In this paper, we discuss the important attributes of the GMI effort, describe the GMI model computational framework and the numerical modules representing physical and chemical processes. As an application of the concept, we illustrate an analysis of the impact of advection algorithms on the dispersion of a NO{sub y}-like source in the stratosphere which mimics that of a fleet of commercial supersonic transports (High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)) flying between 17 and 20 kilometers.

  18. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  19. Groundwater flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Mercer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic, distributed-parameter, numerical simulation models for analyzing groundwater flow and transport problems have come to be used almost routinely during the past decade. A review of the theoretical basis and practical use of groundwater flow and solute transport models is used to illustrate the state-of-the-art. Because of errors and uncertainty in defining model parameters, models must be calibrated to obtain a best estimate of the parameters. For flow modeling, data generally are sufficient to allow calibration. For solute-transport modeling, lack of data not only limits calibration, but also causes uncertainty in process description. Where data are available, model reliability should be assessed on the basis of sensitivity tests and measures of goodness-of-fit. Some of these concepts are demonstrated by using two case histories. ?? 1988.

  20. Illuminating reactive microbial transport in saturated porous media: Demonstration of a visualization method and conceptual transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Peter M.; Castenson, Catherine; Harvey, Charles F.; Polz, Martin; Culligan, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate a method to study reactive microbial transport in saturated translucent porous media using the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL genetically engineered to carry a plasmid with bioluminescence genes inducible by salicylate. Induced bacteria were injected into a cryolite grain filled chamber saturated with a sterile non-growth-promoting (phosphorus limited) chemical mixture containing salicylate as an aromatic hydrocarbon analogue. The amount of light produced by the bacteria serves as an estimator of the relative efficiency of aerobic biodegradation since bioluminescence is dependent on both salicylate and oxygen but only consumes oxygen. Bioluminescence was captured with a digital camera and analyzed to study the evolving spatial pattern of the bulk oxygen consuming reactions. As fluid flow transported the bacteria through the chamber, bioluminescence was observed to initially increase until an oxygen depletion zone developed behind the advective front. Bacterial transport was modeled with the advection dispersion equation and oxygen concentration was modeled assuming bacterial consumption via Monod kinetics with consideration of additional effects of rate-limited mass transfer from residual gas bubbles. Consistent with previous measurements, bioluminescence was considered proportional to oxygen consumed. Using the observed bioluminescence, model parameters were fit that were consistent with literature values and produced results in good agreement with the experimental data. These findings demonstrate potential for using this method to investigate the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of reactive microbial transport in saturated porous media.

  1. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Morrow, Liam C.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems. PMID:26064648

  2. Dynamics of Two Picophytoplankton Groups in Mediterranean Sea: Analysis of the Deep Chlorophyll Maximum by a Stochastic Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Denaro, Giovanni; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Basilone, Gualtiero; Mazzola, Salvatore; Zgozi, Salem W.; Aronica, Salvatore; Bonanno, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic advection-reaction-diffusion model with terms of multiplicative white Gaussian noise, valid for weakly mixed waters, is studied to obtain the vertical stationary spatial distributions of two groups of picophytoplankton, i.e., picoeukaryotes and Prochlorococcus, which account about for 60% of total chlorophyll on average in Mediterranean Sea. By numerically solving the equations of the model, we analyze the one-dimensional spatio-temporal dynamics of the total picophytoplankton biomass and nutrient concentration along the water column at different depths. In particular, we integrate the equations over a time interval long enough, obtaining the steady spatial distributions for the cell concentrations of the two picophytoplankton groups. The results are converted into chlorophyll a and divinil chlorophyll a concentrations and compared with experimental data collected in two different sites of the Sicily Channel (southern Mediterranean Sea). The comparison shows that real distributions are well reproduced by theoretical profiles. Specifically, position, shape and magnitude of the theoretical deep chlorophyll maximum exhibit a good agreement with the experimental values. PMID:23826130

  3. Validation of Travel-Time based Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport Models under Flow and Transport Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Prat, A.; Lu, C.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Travel-time based models are presented as an alternative to traditional spatially explicit models to solve nonlinear reactive-transport problems. The main advantage of the travel-time approach is that it does not require multi-dimensional characterization of physical and chemical parameters, and transport is one-dimensional. Spatial dimensions are replaced by groundwater travel time, defined as the time required by a water particle to reach an observation point or the outflow boundary, respectively. The fundamental hypothesis is that locations of the same groundwater age exhibit the same reactive-species concentrations. This is true in strictly advective-reactive transport in steady-state flows if the coefficients of reactions are uniform and the concentration is uniform over the inflow boundary. We hypothesize that the assumption still holds when adding some dispersion in coupled flow and transport dynamics. We compare a two-dimensional, spatially explicit, bioreactive, advective-dispersive transport model, considered as "virtual truth", with three 1-D travel-time based models which differ by the conceptualization of longitudinal dispersion: (i) neglecting dispersive mixing altogether, (ii) introducing a local-scale longitudinal dispersivity constant in time and space, and (iii) using an effective longitudinal dispersivity that increases linearly with distance. We consider biodegradation of organic matter catalyzed by non-competitive inhibitive microbial populations. The simulated inflow contains oxygen, nitrate, and DOC. The domain contains growing aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, the latter being inhibited by oxygen. This system is computed in 1-D, and in 2-D heterogeneous domains. We conclude that the conceptualization of nonlinear bioreactive transport in complex multi-dimensional domains by quasi 1-D travel-time models is valid for steady-state flow if the reactants are introduced over a wide cross-section, flow is at quasi-steady state, and dispersive

  4. Advective-diffusive mass transfer in fractured porous media with variable rock matrix block size.

    PubMed

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2012-05-15

    Traditional dual porosity models do not take into account the effect of matrix block size distribution on the mass transfer between matrix and fracture. In this study, we introduce the matrix block size distributions into an advective-diffusive solute transport model of a divergent radial system to evaluate the mass transfer shape factor, which is considered as a first-order exchange coefficient between the fracture and matrix. The results obtained lead to a better understanding of the advective-diffusive mass transport in fractured porous media by identifying two early and late time periods of mass transfer. Results show that fractured rock matrix block size distribution has a great impact on mass transfer during early time period. In addition, two dimensionless shape factors are obtained for the late time, which depend on the injection flow rate and the distance of the rock matrix from the injection point.

  5. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    PubMed

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  6. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    PubMed

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  7. Modeling Reactive Transport in Coupled Groundwater-Conduit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiessl, S. M.; Sauter, M.; Zheng, C.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling reactive transport in coupled groundwater-conduit systems requires consideration of two transport time scales in the flow and transport models. Consider for example a subsurface mine consisting of a network of highly conductive shafts, drifts or ventilation raises (i.e., conduits) within the considerably less permeable ore material (i.e., matrix). In the conduits, potential contaminants can travel much more rapidly than in the background aquifer (matrix). Since conduits cannot necessarily be regarded as a continuum, double continuum models are only of limited use for simulation of contaminant transport in such coupled groundwater-conduit systems. This study utilizes a "hybrid" flow and transport model in which contaminants can in essence be transported at a slower time scale in the matrix and at a faster time scale in the conduits. The hybrid flow model uses an approach developed by Clemens et al. (1996), which is based on the modelling of flow in a discrete pipe network, coupled to a continuum representing the low-permeability inter-conduit matrix blocks. Laminar or turbulent flow can be simulated in the different pipes depending on the flow conditions in the model domain. The three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW (Harbaugh and McDonald, 1996) is used to simulate flow in the continuum. Contaminant transport within the matrix is simulated with a continuum approach using the three-dimensional multi-species solute transport model MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999), while that in the conduit system is simulated with a one-dimensional advective transport model. As a first step for reactive transport modeling in such systems, only equilibrium reactions among multiple species are considered by coupling the hybrid transport model to a geochemical speciation package. An idealized mine network developed by Viswanathan and Sauter (2001) is used as a test problem in this study. The numerical experiment is based on reference date collected from

  8. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  9. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  10. Methods for testing transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-11-14

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data.

  11. A Data-Driven Approach for Upscaling Solute Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    . GP was provided with depth-averaged solute flux data as well as other depth-averaged plume characteristics (e.g. local and non-local concentration gradients) calculated from a high-resolution numerical model of the system. GP performed a symbolic regression of this data, and the resulting models were analyzed for quality of fit, as well as physical meaning. This analysis resulted in an upscaled model that expressed the transport of solute by unresolved sub-grid velocity variations, which can be expressed entirely in terms of vertically-averaged parameters. The strong evidence of a sub-grid advective component of the upscaled solute transport found by GP was surprising, and this result has led to the creation of new upscaled models that incorporate a sub-grid advection term for modeling the solute transport. For the perfectly stratified aquifer, these new upscaled transport models are able to capture features of the solute plume that are relevant to environmental and hydrological problems that the Fickian model alone cannot predict. This result has far-reaching implications for management models as the new upscaled solute transport models can make higher quality predictions of the solute distribution, without any significant additional computational expense. It is suspected that with further work, the methodology presented here may be applicable to other upscaling problems, such as those encountered in turbulent flow or atmospheric modeling.

  12. Numerical experiments for advection equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen-Yih )

    1993-10-01

    We propose to combine the Crowley fourth-order scheme and the Gadd scheme for solving the linear advection equation. Two new schemes will be presented: the first is to integrate the Crowley scheme and the Gadd scheme alternately (referred to as New1); the second is to integrate the Crowley scheme twice before we apply the Gadd scheme once (referred to as New2). The new schemes are designed such that no additional restriction is placed on the CFL criterion in an integration. The performance of the new schemes is better than that of the original Crowley or Gadd schemes. It is noted that the amplitude obtained from New2 is more accurate than that from New1 for long waves, but less accurate for short waves. The phase speed calculated from New2 is very close to the real phase speed in most cases tested here, but the phase speed of New 1 is faster than the real phase speed. Hence, New2 is a better choice, especially for a model that includes horizontal smoothing to dampen the short waves. 9 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  14. Modeling tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media by nonlocal moment equations: Anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Lezama-Campos, J. L.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling tracer transport in geologic porous media suffers from the corrupt characterization of the spatial distribution of hydrogeologic properties of the system and the incomplete knowledge of processes governing transport at multiple scales. Representations of transport dynamics based on a Fickian model of the kind considered in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fail to capture (a) the temporal variation associated with the rate of spreading of a tracer, and (b) the distribution of early and late arrival times which are often observed in field and/or laboratory scenarios and are considered as the signature of anomalous transport. Elsewhere we have presented exact stochastic moment equations to model tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. We have also developed a closure scheme which enables one to provide numerical solutions of such moment equations at different orders of approximations. The resulting (ensemble) average and variance of concentration fields were found to display a good agreement against Monte Carlo - based simulation results for mildly heterogeneous (or well-conditioned strongly heterogeneous) media. Here we explore the ability of the moment equations approach to describe the distribution of early arrival times and late time tailing effects which can be observed in Monte-Carlo based breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the (ensemble) mean concentration. We show that BTCs of mean resident concentration calculated at a fixed space location through higher-order approximations of moment equations display long tailing features of the kind which is typically associated with anomalous transport behavior and are not represented by an ADE model with constant dispersive parameter, such as the zero-order approximation.

  15. Mathematical modeling of kidney transport.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T

    2013-01-01

    In addition to metabolic waste and toxin excretion, the kidney also plays an indispensable role in regulating the balance of water, electrolytes, nitrogen, and acid-base. In this review, we describe representative mathematical models that have been developed to better understand kidney physiology and pathophysiology, including the regulation of glomerular filtration, the regulation of renal blood flow by means of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanisms and of the myogenic mechanism, the urine concentrating mechanism, epithelial transport, and regulation of renal oxygen transport. We discuss the extent to which these modeling efforts have expanded our understanding of renal function in both health and disease.

  16. Volcanic ash forecast transport and dispersion (VAFTAD) model

    SciTech Connect

    Heffter, J.L.; Stunder, B.J.B.

    1993-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. The model is run on a workstation at ARL. Meteorological input for the model is automatically downloaded from the NOAA National Meteorological Center (NMC) twice-daily forecast model runs to ARL. Additional input for VAFTAD ragarding the volcanic eruption is supplied by the user guided by monitor prompts. The model calculates transport and dispersion of volcanic ash from an initial ash cloud that has reached its maximum height within 3 h of eruption time. The model assumes that spherical ash particles of diameters ranging from 0.3 to 30 micrometers are distributed throughout the initial cloud with a particle number distribution based on Mount St. Helens and Redoubt Volcano eruptions. Particles are advected horizontally and vertically by the winds and fall according to Stoke`s law with a slip correction. A bivariate-normal distribution is used for horizontally diffusing the cloud and determining ash concentrations. Model output gives maps with symbols representing relative concentrations in three flight layers, and throughout the entire ash cloud, for sequential 6- and 12-h time intervals. A verification program for VAFTAD has been started. Results subjectively comparing model ash cloud forecasts with satellite imagery for three separate 1992 eruptions of Mount Spurr in Alaska have been most encouraging.

  17. Relative importance of gas-phase diffusive and advective tichloroethene (TCE) fluxes in the unsaturated zone under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee-Won; Tillman, Fred D; Smith, James A

    2002-07-15

    It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure changes can induce gas flow in the unsaturated zone to such an extent that the advective flux of organic vapors in unsaturated-zone soil gas can be significant relative to the gas-phase diffusion flux of these organic vapors. To test this hypothesis, a series of field measurements and computer simulations were conducted to simulate and compare diffusion and advection fluxes at a trichloroethene-contaminated field site at Picatinny Arsenal in north-central New Jersey. Moisture content temperature, and soil-gas pressure were measured at multiple depths (including at land surface) and times for three distinct sampling events in August 1996, October 1996, and August 1998. Gas pressures in the unsaturated zone changed significantly over time and followed changes measured in the atmosphere. Gas permeability of the unsaturated zone was estimated using data from a variety of sources, including laboratory gas permeability measurements made on intact soil cores from the site, a field air pump test, and calibration of a gas-flow model to the transient, one-dimensional gas pressure data. The final gas-flow model reproduced small pressure gradients as observed in the field during the three distinct sampling events. The velocities calculated from the gas-flow model were used in transient, one-dimensional transport simulations to quantify advective and diffusive fluxes of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere as a function of time for each sampling event. Effective diffusion coefficients used for these simulations were determined from independent laboratory measurements made on intact soil cores collected from the field site. For two of the three sampling events (August 1996 and August 1998), the TCE gas-phase diffusion flux at land surface was significantly greater than the advection flux over the entire sampling period. For the second sampling event (October 1996), the advection flux was frequently larger than the

  18. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  19. WASP TRANSPORT MODELING AND WASP ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on excercises will be used to introduce pollutant transport modeling with the U.S. EPA's general water quality model, WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program). WASP features include a user-friendly Windows-based interfa...

  20. Predicting salt advection in groundwater from saline aquaculture ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrall, D. P.; Read, W. W.; Narayan, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    SummaryThis paper predicts saltwater advection in groundwater from leaky aquaculture ponds. A closed form solution for the potential function, stream function and velocity field is derived via the series solutions method. Numerically integrating along different streamlines gives the location (or advection front) of saltwater throughout the domain for any predefined upper time limit. Extending this process produces a function which predicts advection front location against time. The models considered in this paper are easily modified given knowledge of the required physical parameters.

  1. A physical model for metal extraction and transport in shallow magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis; Dufek, Josef; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The highest concentrations of metals (e.g., Cu, Au, Ag, Mo) in the Earth's crust are found in porphyry-type deposits. The metals are ultimately sourced from magmas, and appear to be concentrated hundred to thousand-fold from typical magmatic contents (ppm-ppb) in the exsolved volatile phase. To better quantify the purging and transport of metals, we develop a physical model of volatile evolution in an incrementally built upper crustal magma reservoirs that considers (1) partitioning of metals from the melt to an exsolved volatile phase, and (2) advection of the buoyant volatile phase using a single dimensionless parameter, the Péclet number (Pe; ratio of advection rate over diffusion rate). We propose that metal extraction and segregation from magmas can occur in 3 stages with different Pe: (1) during exsolution of the magmatic volatile phase in shallow, crystal-poor magma bodies (slow volatile advection; Pe ≪ 1), (2) during the growth of volatile channels that develop in the reservoir as crystallinity increases (Pe < 1), and (3) during advection in connected channels (rapid volatile advection, high Pe ≥ 1). For each stage, a metal enrichment factor can be calculated, allowing insight into the optimal conditions to maximize metal mass flux into the overlying hydrothermal system. The model predicts that the most efficient purging of metals occurs for magmas with intermediate volatile contents and is enhanced during late-stage magmatic activity, as the reservoirs reach high crystallinity and are not disturbed by volcanic venting, in agreement with natural observations suggesting that ore formation post-dates volcanic activity.

  2. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests. PMID:18384599

  3. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  4. Modeling anomalous radial transport in kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, K.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2009-11-01

    Anomalous transport is typically the dominant component of the radial transport in magnetically confined plasmas, where the physical origin of this transport is believed to be plasma turbulence. A model is presented for anomalous transport that can be used in continuum kinetic edge codes like TEMPEST, NEO and the next-generation code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory. The model can also be adapted to particle-based codes. It is demonstrated that the model with a velocity-dependent diffusion and convection terms can match a diagonal gradient-driven transport matrix as found in contemporary fluid codes, but can also include off-diagonal effects. The anomalous transport model is also combined with particle drifts and a particle/energy-conserving Krook collision operator to study possible synergistic effects with neoclassical transport. For the latter study, a velocity-independent anomalous diffusion coefficient is used to mimic the effect of long-wavelength ExB turbulence.

  5. Simulating Sediment Transport Processes in San Francisco Bay Using Coupled Hydrodynamic, Wave, and Sediment Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bever, A. J.; MacWilliams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Under the conceptual model of sediment transport in San Pablo Bay, a sub-embayment of San Francisco Bay, proposed by Krone (1979), sediment typically enters San Pablo Bay during large winter and spring flows and is redistributed during summer conditions through wind wave resuspension and transport by tidal currents. A detailed understanding of how the waves and tides redistribute sediment within San Francisco Bay is critical for predicting how future sea level rise and a reduction in the sediment supply to the Bay will impact existing marsh and mudflat habitat, tidal marsh restoration projects, and ongoing maintenance dredging of the navigation channels. The three-dimensional UnTRIM San Francisco Bay-Delta Model was coupled with the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model and the SediMorph morphological model, to develop a three-dimensional hydrodynamic, wind wave, and sediment transport model of the San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Numerical simulations of sediment resuspension due to tidal currents and wind waves and the subsequent transport of this sediment by tidal currents are used to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of sediment fluxes on the extensive shoals in San Pablo Bay under a range of tidal and wind conditions. The results demonstrate that suspended sediment concentration and sediment fluxes within San Pablo Bay are a complex product of tides and waves interacting spatially throughout the Bay, with concentrations responding to local resuspension and sediment advection. Sediment fluxes between the San Pablo Bay shoals and the deeper channel are highest during spring tides, and are elevated for up to a week following wave events, even though the greatest influence of the wave event occurs abruptly.

  6. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  7. Modeling hydrogen transport by dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Martin, May L.; Nagao, Akihide; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental studies of the microstructure beneath fracture surfaces of specimens fractured in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen suggest that the dislocation structure and hydrogen transported by mobile dislocations play important roles in establishing the local conditions that promote failure. The experiments demonstrate that hydrogen is responsible for the copious plasticity in large volumes of material before the onset of fracture and further afield from a crack tip. A revised model for hydrogen transport that accounts for hydrogen carried by dislocations along with stress driven diffusion and trapping at other microstructural defects is proposed. With the use of this new model, numerical simulation results for transient hydrogen profiles in the neighborhood of a crack tip are presented. Based on hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and density, the results indicate that dislocation transport can contribute to the elevation of the local hydrogen concentrations ahead of the crack to levels above those predicted by the classical diffusion model and to distributions that extend farther afield.

  8. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  9. A deterministic Lagrangian particle separation-based method for advective-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ken T. M.; Lee, Joseph H. W.; Choi, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    A simple and robust Lagrangian particle scheme is proposed to solve the advective-diffusion transport problem. The scheme is based on relative diffusion concepts and simulates diffusion by regulating particle separation. This new approach generates a deterministic result and requires far less number of particles than the random walk method. For the advection process, particles are simply moved according to their velocity. The general scheme is mass conservative and is free from numerical diffusion. It can be applied to a wide variety of advective-diffusion problems, but is particularly suited for ecological and water quality modelling when definition of particle attributes (e.g., cell status for modelling algal blooms or red tides) is a necessity. The basic derivation, numerical stability and practical implementation of the NEighborhood Separation Technique (NEST) are presented. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated through a series of test cases which embrace realistic features of coastal environmental transport problems. Two field application examples on the tidal flushing of a fish farm and the dynamics of vertically migrating marine algae are also presented.

  10. Modeling the coupling between flow and transport developed by chemical reactions and density differences using TOUGHREACT.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongkon; Scwartz, Franklin W.; Shi, Jianyou; Xu, Tianfu

    2003-04-01

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change the physical properties of a medium, such as permeability and pore geometry. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impact the composition of dissolved constituents and solid-phase, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of difference in density, dissolution/precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  11. Coupled transport in rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, S.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.; Politi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Steady nonequilibrium states are investigated in a one-dimensional setup in the presence of two thermodynamic currents. Two paradigmatic nonlinear oscillators models are investigated: an XY chain and the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Their distinctive feature is that the relevant variable is an angle in both cases. We point out the importance of clearly distinguishing between energy and heat flux. In fact, even in the presence of a vanishing Seebeck coefficient, a coupling between (angular) momentum and energy arises, mediated by the unavoidable presence of a coherent energy flux. Such a contribution is the result of the ‘advection’ induced by the position-dependent angular velocity. As a result, in the XY model, the knowledge of the two diagonal elements of the Onsager matrix suffices to reconstruct its transport properties. The analysis of the nonequilibrium steady states finally allows to strengthen the connection between the two models.

  12. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  13. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.; Bastein, L.; Price, P.N.

    2010-02-19

    This review examines current approximations and approaches that underlie the evaluation of transport properties for combustion modeling applications. Discussed in the review are: the intermolecular potential and its descriptive molecular parameters; various approaches to evaluating collision integrals; supporting data required for the evaluation of transport properties; commonly used computer programs for predicting transport properties; the quality of experimental measurements and their importance for validating or rejecting approximations to property estimation; the interpretation of corresponding states; combination rules that yield pair molecular potential parameters for unlike species from like species parameters; and mixture approximations. The insensitivity of transport properties to intermolecular forces is noted, especially the non-uniqueness of the supporting potential parameters. Viscosity experiments of pure substances and binary mixtures measured post 1970 are used to evaluate a number of approximations; the intermediate temperature range 1 < T* < 10, where T* is kT/{var_epsilon}, is emphasized since this is where rich data sets are available. When suitable potential parameters are used, errors in transport property predictions for pure substances and binary mixtures are less than 5 %, when they are calculated using the approaches of Kee et al.; Mason, Kestin, and Uribe; Paul and Warnatz; or Ern and Giovangigli. Recommendations stemming from the review include (1) revisiting the supporting data required by the various computational approaches, and updating the data sets with accurate potential parameters, dipole moments, and polarizabilities; (2) characterizing the range of parameter space over which the fit to experimental data is good, rather than the current practice of reporting only the parameter set that best fits the data; (3) looking for improved combining rules, since existing rules were found to under-predict the viscosity in most cases; (4

  14. Computational modeling of 137Cs contaminant transfer associated with sediment transport in Abukuma River.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Nabi, M; Shimizu, Y; Kimura, I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model capable of simulating the transfer of (137)Cs in rivers associated with transport of fine sediment is presented. The accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) released radionuclides into the atmosphere, and after fallout several radionuclides in them, such as radiocesium ((134)Cs, (137)Cs) and radioiodine ((131)I) were adsorbed on surface soil particles around FDNPP and transported by surface water. To understand the transport and deposition of the radioactive contaminant along with surface soil particles and its flux to the ocean, we modeled the transport of the (137)Cs contaminant by computing the water flow and the associated washload and suspended load transport. We have developed a two-dimensional model to simulate the plane flow structure, sediment transport and associated (137)Cs contaminant transport in rivers by combining a shallow water flow model and an advection-diffusion equation for the transport of sediment. The proposed model has been applied to the lower reach of Abukuma River, which is the main river in the highly contaminated area around FDNPP. The numerical results indicate that most (137)Cs supplied from the upstream river reach with washload would directly reach to Pacific Ocean. In contrast, washload-oriented (137)Cs supplied from the upstream river basin has a limited role in the radioactive contamination in the river. The results also suggest that the proposed framework of computational model can be a potential tool for understanding the sediment-oriented (137)Cs behavior in rivers. PMID:24909793

  15. Computational modeling of 137Cs contaminant transfer associated with sediment transport in Abukuma River.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Nabi, M; Shimizu, Y; Kimura, I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model capable of simulating the transfer of (137)Cs in rivers associated with transport of fine sediment is presented. The accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) released radionuclides into the atmosphere, and after fallout several radionuclides in them, such as radiocesium ((134)Cs, (137)Cs) and radioiodine ((131)I) were adsorbed on surface soil particles around FDNPP and transported by surface water. To understand the transport and deposition of the radioactive contaminant along with surface soil particles and its flux to the ocean, we modeled the transport of the (137)Cs contaminant by computing the water flow and the associated washload and suspended load transport. We have developed a two-dimensional model to simulate the plane flow structure, sediment transport and associated (137)Cs contaminant transport in rivers by combining a shallow water flow model and an advection-diffusion equation for the transport of sediment. The proposed model has been applied to the lower reach of Abukuma River, which is the main river in the highly contaminated area around FDNPP. The numerical results indicate that most (137)Cs supplied from the upstream river reach with washload would directly reach to Pacific Ocean. In contrast, washload-oriented (137)Cs supplied from the upstream river basin has a limited role in the radioactive contamination in the river. The results also suggest that the proposed framework of computational model can be a potential tool for understanding the sediment-oriented (137)Cs behavior in rivers.

  16. Process-based modeling of tsunami inundation and sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, A.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Jaffe, B.

    2011-01-01

    The infrequent and unpredictable nature of tsunamis precludes the use of field experiments to measure the hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes that occur. Instead, these processes are often approximated from laboratory, numerical, and theoretical studies or inferred from observations of the resultant sediment deposits. Here Delft3D, a three-dimensional numerical model, is used to simulate the inundation and sediment transport of a tsunami similar in magnitude to the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami over one measured and three idealized morphologies. The model is first shown to match well the observations taken at Kuala Meurisi, Sumatra, and then used to examine in detail the processes that occur during the tsunami. The model predicts that at a given cross-shore location the onshore flow accelerates rapidly to a maximum as the wavefront passes, and then gradually decelerates before reversing direction and flowing offshore. The onshore flow does not tend to zero everywhere at maximum inundation, but instead flow reversal occurs near the shoreline even as the wavefront continues to inundate landward. While some sediment is eroded by the passing wavefront, the suspension of sandy sediment is dominated by the long-duration, high-velocity backwash that occurs along the beach face and offshore of the shoreline. Some of the sediment suspended during backwash is advected shoreward by the subsequent wave, creating large spatial gradients in the suspended sediment concentrations, which may not be in equilibrium with the local hydrodynamics. The inundation and transport of sediment during a tsunami can be affected by complexities in the morphological profile and interactions between multiple waves, and many of the hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes predicted here are similar to analogous processes previously observed in the swash zone. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Experiments in Advective and Turbulent Hyporheic Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccluskey, A. H.; Grant, S.; Stewardson, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange (HE) is the mixing of stream and subsurface waters beneath the sediment-water interface (SWI). At the patch and reach scales, HE is dominated by periodic upwelling and downwelling zones, induced by pressure variation and processes within the turbulent boundary layer (TBL). This can be caused by (1) the geometry of the stream, imposing a stationary wave at the SWI or (2) by a travelling wave associated with the propagation of turbulent pressure waves generated from the TBL. Case (1) has generally been the favoured model of hyporheic exchange and has been referred to as hyporheic 'pumping' by Elliott and Brooks, and subsequently others. Case (2) can be termed turbulent pumping, and has been proposed as a mechanism to model the combined effects of turbulent dispersion alongside steady-state advection. While this has been represented numerically and analytically, conjecture remains about the physical representation of these combined processes. We present initial results from experiments undertaken to classify the spatial and temporal characteristics of pressure variation at and beneath the SWI, with a periodic sinusoidal geometry of wavelength 0.28m and height 0.02m. As an initial characterisation, the advective flow profile has been examined using time-lapse photography of dyes released across the span of a periodic downwelling zone. These tracer tests confirmed delineation of isolated upwelling and downwelling cells as noted by previous authors in modelling studies. However, their distribution deviates from the typical pumping pattern with increased discharge and stream gradient. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of high frequency (250Hz) pressure measurements, sampled at an array along the centroid of the flume underneath one wavelength gave further insight into the spatial distribution of turbulent signatures arising from roughness-generated turbulence. A turbulent frequency of 6-10Hz dominates, however the penetration depth appears to

  18. Calculation of a residual mean meridional circulation for a zonal-mean tracer transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W.K.; Rotman, D.A.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    Because of their computational advantages, zonally-averaged chemical-radiative-transport models are widely used to investigate the distribution of chemical species and their change due to the anthropogenic chemicals in the lower and middle atmosphere. In general, the Lagrangian-mean formulation would be ideal to treat transport due to the zonal mean circulation and eddies. However, the Lagrangian formulation is difficult to use in practical applications. The most widely-used formulation for treating global atmospheric dynamics in two-dimensional models is the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) equations. The residual mean meridional circulation (RMMC) in the TEM system is used to advect tracers. In this study, the authors describe possible solution techniques for obtaining the RMMC in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model. In the first section, the formulation will be described. In sections 3 and 4, possible solution procedures will be described for a diagnostic and prognostic case, respectively.

  19. Pore scale modeling of reactive transport involved in geologic CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qinjin; Lichtner, Peter C; Viswanathan, Hari S; Abdel-fattah, Amr I

    2009-01-01

    We apply a multi-component reactive transport lattice Boltzmann model developed in previolls studies to modeling the injection of a C02 saturated brine into various porous media structures at temperature T=25 and 80 C. The porous media are originally consisted of calcite. A chemical system consisting of Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, CO2(aq), and CI-is considered. The fluid flow, advection and diHusion of aqueous species, homogeneous reactions occurring in the bulk fluid, as weB as the dissolution of calcite and precipitation of dolomite are simulated at the pore scale. The effects of porous media structure on reactive transport are investigated. The results are compared with continuum scale modeling and the agreement and discrepancy are discussed. This work may shed some light on the fundamental physics occurring at the pore scale for reactive transport involved in geologic C02 sequestration.

  20. Modeling the effects of wave skewness and beach cusps on littoral sand transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, K.A.; Check, L.A.; Hanes, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A process-based numerical modeling system is utilized for predicting littoral sand transport. The intent is to examine conditions slightly more complex than linear waves impinging upon a plane beach. Two factors that we examine are wave skewness and longshore varying bathymetry. An empirical model is used for calculating the skewed bottom wave orbital velocity. The advection of sediment due to the skewed wave velocity is larger and in the direction of the waves, opposite to the results with sinusoidal wave velocities, due to the increase in the bottom shear stress under the wave crests. The model system is also applied to bathymetry containing beach cusps. When the wave field has relatively weak longshore wave power, the currents and the littoral transport exhibit significant longshore variability, thereby altering the overall mean littoral transport.

  1. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties and simulated advective transport of contaminated ground water in a fractured rock aquifer at the Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Brown, Jean C.; Carleton, Glen B.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, predominantly trichloroethylene and its degradation products, have been detected in ground water at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. An air-stripping pump-and-treat system has been in operation at the NAWC since 1998. An existing ground-water-flow model was used to evaluate the effect of a change in the configuration of the network of recovery wells in the pump-and-treat system on flow paths of contaminated ground water. The NAWC is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer composed of dipping layers of sedimentary rocks of the Lockatong and Stockton Formations. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties of the part of the aquifer composed of the Lockatong Formation were measured using aquifer tests and tracer tests. The heterogeneity of the rocks causes a wide range of values of each parameter measured. Transmissivity ranges from 95 to 1,300 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient ranges from 9 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3; and the effective porosity ranges from 0.0003 to 0.002. The average linear velocity of contaminated ground water was determined for ambient conditions (when no wells at the site are pumped) using an existing ground-water-flow model, particle-tracking techniques, and the porosity values determined in this study. The average linear velocity of flow paths beginning at each contaminated well and ending at the streams where the flow paths terminate ranges from 0.08 to 130 feet per day. As a result of a change in the pump-and-treat system (adding a 165-foot-deep well pumped at 5 gallons per minute and reducing the pumping rate at a nearby 41-foot-deep well by the same amount), water in the vicinity of three 100- to 165-foot-deep wells flows to the deep well rather than the shallower well.

  2. A positive finite-difference advection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Hundsdorfer, W.; Koren, B.; Loon, M. van

    1995-03-01

    This paper examines a class of explicit finite-difference advection schemes derived along the method of lines. An important application field is large-scale atmospheric transport. The paper therefore focuses on the demand of positivity. For the spatial discretization, attention is confined to conservative schemes using five points per direction. The fourth-order central scheme and the family of {kappa}-schemes, comprising the second-order central, the second-order upwind, and the third-order upwind biased, are studied. Positivity is enforced through flux limiting. It is concluded that the limited third-order upwind discretization is the best candidate from the four examined. For the time integration attention is confined to a number of explicit Runge-Kutta methods of orders two to four. With regard to the demand of positivity, these integration methods turn out to behave almost equally and no best method could be identified. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Bayesian methods for model choice and propagation of model uncertainty in groundwater transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, B. S.; Draper, D.

    2008-12-01

    The issue of model uncertainty and model choice is central in any groundwater modeling effort [Neuman and Wierenga, 2003]; among the several approaches to the problem we favour using Bayesian statistics because it is a method that integrates in a natural way uncertainties (arising from any source) and experimental data. In this work, we experiment with several Bayesian approaches to model choice, focusing primarily on demonstrating the usefulness of the Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) simulation method [Green, 1995]; this is an extension of the now- common MCMC methods. Standard MCMC techniques approximate posterior distributions for quantities of interest, often by creating a random walk in parameter space; RJMCMC allows the random walk to take place between parameter spaces with different dimensionalities. This fact allows us to explore state spaces that are associated with different deterministic models for experimental data. Our work is exploratory in nature; we restrict our study to comparing two simple transport models applied to a data set gathered to estimate the breakthrough curve for a tracer compound in groundwater. One model has a mean surface based on a simple advection dispersion differential equation; the second model's mean surface is also governed by a differential equation but in two dimensions. We focus on artificial data sets (in which truth is known) to see if model identification is done correctly, but we also address the issues of over and under-paramerization, and we compare RJMCMC's performance with other traditional methods for model selection and propagation of model uncertainty, including Bayesian model averaging, BIC and DIC.References Neuman and Wierenga (2003). A Comprehensive Strategy of Hydrogeologic Modeling and Uncertainty Analysis for Nuclear Facilities and Sites. NUREG/CR-6805, Division of Systems Analysis and Regulatory Effectiveness Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  4. Lagrangian coherent structures, transport and chaotic mixing in simple kinematic ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.; Prants, S. V.

    2007-02-01

    Methods of dynamical system's theory are used for numerical study of transport and mixing of passive particles (water masses, temperature, salinity, pollutants, etc.) in simple kinematic ocean models composed with the main Eulerian coherent structures in a randomly fluctuating ocean—a jet-like current and an eddy. Advection of passive tracers in a periodically-driven flow consisting of a background stream and an eddy (the model inspired by the phenomenon of topographic eddies over mountains in the ocean and atmosphere) is analyzed as an example of chaotic particle's scattering and transport. A numerical analysis reveals a non-attracting chaotic invariant set Λ that determines scattering and trapping of particles from the incoming flow. It is shown that both the trapping time for particles in the mixing region and the number of times their trajectories wind around the vortex have hierarchical fractal structure as functions of the initial particle's coordinates. Scattering functions are singular on a Cantor set of initial conditions, and this property should manifest itself by strong fluctuations of quantities measured in experiments. The Lagrangian structures in our numerical experiments are shown to be similar to those found in a recent laboratory dye experiment at Woods Hole. Transport and mixing of passive particles is studied in the kinematic model inspired by the interaction of a current (like the Gulf Stream or the Kuroshio) with an eddy in a noisy environment. We demonstrate a non-trivial phenomenon of noise-induced clustering of passive particles and propose a method to find such clusters in numerical experiments. These clusters are patches of advected particles which can move together in a random velocity field for comparatively long time. The clusters appear due to existence of regions of stability in the phase space which is the physical space in the advection problem.

  5. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: I. Model development and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Scholtz, M. Trevor; Yang, Fuquan; Sloan, James J.

    2011-07-01

    We have combined the US EPA MM5/MCIP/SMOKE/CMAQ modeling system with a dynamic soil model, the pesticide emission model (PEM), to create a multimedia chemical transport model capable of describing the important physical and chemical processes involving pesticides in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on the surface of vegetation. These processes include: agricultural practices (e.g. soil tilling and pesticide application mode); advection and diffusion of pesticides, moisture, and heat in the soil; partitioning of pesticides between soil organic carbon and interstitial water and air; emissions from the soil to the atmosphere; gas-particle partitioning and transport in the atmosphere; and atmospheric chemistry and dry and wet deposition of pesticides to terrestrial and water surfaces. The modeling system was tested by simulating toxaphene in a domain that covers most of North America for the period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2000. The results show obvious transport of the pesticide from the heavily contaminated soils in the southern United States and Mexico to water bodies including the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes, leading to significant dry and wet deposition into these ecosystems. The spatial distributions of dry and wet depositions differ because of their different physical mechanisms; the former follows the distribution of air concentrations whereas the latter is more biased to the North East due to the effect of precipitation.

  6. Model prediction uncertainty of bromide and pesticides transport in laboratory column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal; Snehota, Michal; Sobotkova, Martina; Ray, Chittaranjan; Vogel, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of transport parameters of reactive solutes such as pesticides is a prerequisite for reliable predictions of their fate and transport in soil porous systems. Water flow and transport of bromide tracer and five pesticides (atrazine, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl, S-metolachlor, and imidacloprid) through an undisturbed soil column of tropical Oxisol were analyzed using a one-dimensional numerical model. Laboratory column leaching experiment with three flow interruptions was conducted. The applied numerical model is based on Richards' equation for solving water flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solving solute transport. A global optimization method was used to evaluate the model's sensitivity to transport parameters and the uncertainty of model predictions. Within the Monte Carlo modeling framework, multiple forward simulations searching through the parametric space, were executed to describe the observed breakthrough curves. All pesticides were found to be relatively mobile. Experimental data indicated significant non-conservative behavior of bromide tracer. All pesticides, with the exception of imidacloprid, were found less persistent. Three of the five pesticides (atrazine, sulfometuron methyl, and S-metolachlor) were better described by the linear kinetic sorption model, while the breakthrough curves of imazaquin and imidacloprid were more appropriately approximated using nonlinear instantaneous sorption. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the model is most sensitive to sorption distribution coefficient. The prediction limits contained most of the measured points of the experimental breakthrough curves, indicating adequate model concept and model structure for the description of transport processes in the soil column under study.

  7. A stochastic model for colloid transport and deposition.

    PubMed

    Bradford, S A; Toride, N

    2007-01-01

    Profiles of retained colloids in porous media have frequently been observed to be hyper-exponential or non-monotonic with transport depth under unfavorable attachment conditions, whereas filtration theory predicts an exponential profile. In this work we present a stochastic model for colloid transport and deposition that allows various hypotheses for such deviations to be tested. The model is based on the conventional advective dispersion equation that accounts for first-order kinetic deposition and release of colloids. One or two stochastic parameters can be considered in this model, including the deposition coefficient, the release coefficient, and the average pore water velocity. In the case of one stochastic parameter, the probability density function (PDF) is characterized using log-normal, bimodal log-normal, or a simple two species/region formulation. When two stochastic parameters are considered, then a joint log-normal PDF is employed. Simulation results indicated that variations in the deposition coefficient and the average pore water velocity can both produce hyper-exponential deposition profiles. Bimodal formulations for the PDF were also able to produce hyper-exponential profiles, but with much lower variances in the deposition coefficient. The shape of the deposition profile was found to be very sensitive to the correlation of deposition and release coefficients, and to the correlation of pore water velocity and deposition coefficient. Application of the developed stochastic model to a particular set of colloid transport and deposition data indicated that chemical heterogeneity of the colloid population could not fully explain the observed behavior. Alternative interpretations were therefore proposed based on variability of the pore size and the water velocity distributions.

  8. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  9. A Hybrid Micro-Scale Model for Transport in Connected Macro-Pores in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-07-13

    This paper presents a multi-scale approach for modeling the transport of species in fractured porous media. The multi-scale approach consists of a hybrid model and a pore-scale model that is used to parameterize the hybrid model. The hybrid model explicitly models the advection and diffusion of species in the fracture and treats the porous matrix as a continuum with effective transport properties. The pore-scale model is used to calculate the effective transport properties of the hybrid model. This approach negates the need to calibrate the hybrid model against experimental data, which is common for continuum-scale models of porous media, and allows an arbitrary microstructure to be considered. The paper presents the multi-scale modeling approach along with the details of the hybrid and pore-scale models. Validation of the model is also presented along with several case studies investigating the applicability of the multi-scale modeling approach to different geometries and transport conditions. The case studies show that the multi-scale modeling approach is accurate for various fracture geometries given that the matrix porosity is sufficiently small. The accuracy of the hybrid model decreases with increasing porosity of the matrix.

  10. MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of contaminant transport through soil to groundwater to a receptor requires that consideration be given to the many processes which control the transport and fate of chemical constituents in the subsurface environment. These processes include volatilization, degradation,...

  11. Cholesterol transport in model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Sumit; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Physiological processes distribute cholesterol unevenly within the cell. The levels of cholesterol are maintained by intracellular transport and a disruption in the cell's ability to keep these normal levels will lead to disease. Exchange rates of cholesterol are generally studied in model systems using labeled lipid vesicles. Initially donor vesicles have all the cholesterol and acceptor vesicles are devoid of it. They are mixed and after some time the vesicles are separated and cholesterol is traced in each vesicle. The studies performed up to date have significant scatter indicating that the methodologies are not consistent. The present work shows in-situ Time-Resolved SANS studies of cholesterol exchange rates in unsaturated PC lipid vesicles. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to investigate the energetic and kinetic behavior of cholesterol in this system. This synergistic approach will provide insight into our efforts to understand cholesterol traffic.

  12. Examination of the evolution of radiation and advection fogs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A literature study was done on radiation and advection fog evolution. For radiation fog, six stages of fog evolution have been identified -- (1) precursor, (2) sunset, (3) conditioning, (4) mature, (5) sunrise, and (6) dissipation. The evolution of advection fog models has been in parallel with radiation fog models, but no identified stages in the evolution of advection fog have been proposed: (1) precursor, (2) initiation, (3) mature, and (4) dissipation. Radiation and advection fog models will require greater sophistication in order to study fog spatial and temporal variability. Physical aspects that require further study are discussed.

  13. Modeling of multiphase transport of multicomponent organic contaminants and heat in the subsurface: Numerical model formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenekan, A. E.; Patzek, T. W.; Pruess, K.

    1993-11-01

    A numerical compositional simulator (Multiphase Multicomponent Nonisothermal Organics Transport Simulator (M2NOTS)) has been developed for modeling transient, three-dimensional, nonisothermal, and multiphase transport of multicomponent organic contaminants in the subsurface. The governing equations include (1) advection of all three phases in response to pressure, capillary, and gravity forces; (2) interphase mass transfer that allows every component to partition into each phase present; (3) diffusion; and (4) transport of sensible and latent heat energy. Two other features distinguish M2NOTS from other simulators reported in the groundwater literature: (1) the simulator allows for any number of chemical components and every component is allowed to partition into all fluid phases present, and (2) each phase is allowed to completely disappear from, or appear in, any region of the domain during a simulation. These features are required to model realistic field problems involving transport of mixtures of nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants, and to quantify performance of existing and emerging remediation methods such as vacuum extraction and steam injection.

  14. Transport of nitrogen oxides through the winter mesopause in HAMMONIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraner, Katharina; Schmidt, Hauke

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the importance of individual transport processes for the winter polar downward transport of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from the thermosphere to the mesosphere. The downward transport of NOx produced by energetic particle precipitation induces chemical alterations in the middle atmosphere and influences ozone chemistry. However, it remains unclear how much each transport process contributes to the downward transport. We use simulations of the atmospheric general circulation and chemistry model HAMMONIA (Hamburg Model of Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere) for the extended winter 2008/2009 with a passive tracer. The model enables us to separate the contributions of advection, eddy and molecular diffusion on the total transport by switching off processes. The results show that molecular diffusion and resolved vertical mixing due to advection effectively transport NOx to the mesosphere. While the impact of molecular diffusion on the transport rapidly decreases below 0.001 hPa, the impact of advection increases. Around the central date of the sudden stratospheric warming in January 2009, advection is strongly enhanced in the thermosphere and mesosphere and the downward transport through the mesopause region is almost entirely driven by advection. Eddy diffusion has limited impact on the transport in the upper mesosphere and negligible impact on the transport in the thermosphere. If eddy diffusion is enhanced as suggested by observations, it can potentially have a larger impact on transport through the mesopause than was previously assumed.

  15. A semi-Lagrangian model incorporating a spectral method for pollutant transport and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.N.

    1994-12-31

    To improve the semi-Lagrangian model, a spectral method was incorporated in the numerical calculations. This spectral method for solving nonperiodic boundary problems was based on a technique of decomposing a variable (i.e. pollutant concentration) into a polynomial and a periodic Fourier residual. A fifth-order polynomial was proposed. When performing the semi-Lagrangian calculation, the spectral intrapolation for estimating the transport of material between grid points was used. From this, a method for removing small negative masses without lossing mass conservation was developed. The numerical tests of the semi-Lagrangian scheme with the spectral interpolation on the advective transport of a mass under nonuniform and uniform winds in a limited computational domain were performed previously and published. In this study, the scheme was applied to solve the two-dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion equation describing the transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. The calculations demonstrated the efficiency and accuracy of the numerical solutions in a limited region by using this semi-Lagrangian technique incorporated with the spectral method. The main objective of this present study was to develop an advanced numerical modelling technique for air pollution studies on a regional scale.

  16. TREX: spatially distributed model to assess watershed contaminant transport and fate.

    PubMed

    Velleux, Mark L; England, John F; Julien, Pierre Y

    2008-10-01

    Contaminant releases from upland areas can have adverse water quality and stream ecology impacts. TREX (Two-dimensional, Runoff, Erosion, and Export) is a spatially distributed, physically-based model to simulate chemical transport and fate at the watershed scale. TREX combines surface hydrology and sediment transport features from the CASC2D watershed model with chemical transport features from the WASP/IPX series of water quality models. In addition to surface runoff and sediment transport, TREX simulates: (1) chemical erosion, advection, and deposition; (2) chemical partitioning and phase distribution; and (3) chemical infiltration and redistribution. Floodplain interactions for water, sediment, and chemicals are also simulated. To demonstrate the potential for using TREX to simulate chemical transport at the watershed scale, a screening-level application was developed for the California Gulch watershed mine-waste site in Colorado. Runoff, sediment transport, and metals (Cu, Cd, Zn) transport were simulated for a calibration event and a validation event. The model reproduced measured peak flows, and times to peak at the watershed outlet and three internal locations. Simulated flow volumes were within approximately 10% of measured conditions. Model results were also generally within measured ranges of total suspended solid and metal concentrations. TREX is an appropriate tool for investigating multimedia environmental problems that involve water, soils, and chemical interactions in a spatially distributed manner within a watershed. PMID:18649925

  17. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  18. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  19. Modeling Fate and Transport of Rotavirus in Surface Flow by Integrating WEPP and a Pathogen Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P. K.; Davidson, P. C.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    More than 3.5 million people die each year from a water related diseases in this world. Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related illness. Even in a developed country like the United States, there have been at least 1870 outbreaks associated with drinking water during the period of 1920 to 2002, causing 883,806 illnesses. Most of these outbreaks are resulted due to the presence of microbial pathogens in drinking water. Rotavirus infection has been recognized as the most common cause of diarrhea in young children throughout the world. Laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Illinois have demonstrated that recovery of rotavirus has been significantly affected by climatic and soil-surface conditions like slope, soil types, and ground cover. The objective of this study is to simulate the fate and transport of Rotavirus in overland and near-surface flow using a process-based model. In order to capture the dynamics of sediment-bound pathogens, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is coupled with the pathogen transport model. Transport of pathogens in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the pathogens in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay and silt). Advection, adsorption, and decay processes are considered. The mass balance equations are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in pathogen concentrations in two phases. Outputs from WEPP simulations (flow velocity, depth, saturated conductivity and the soil particle fraction exiting in flow) are transferred as input for the pathogen transport model. Three soil types and three different surface cover conditions have been used in the experimental investigations. Results from these conditions have been used in calibrating and validating the simulation results. Bare surface conditions have produced very good agreement between

  20. SEBAL-A: A remote sensing ET algorithm that accounts for advection with limited data. Part II: Test for transferability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) tends to underestimate ET under conditions of advection, the model was modified by incorporating an advection component as part of the energy usable for crop evapotranspiration (ET). The modification involved the estimation of advected en...

  1. Advective coalescence in chaotic flows.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Toroczkai, Z; Grebogi, C

    2001-07-16

    We investigate the reaction kinetics of small spherical particles with inertia, obeying coalescence type of reaction, B+B-->B, and being advected by hydrodynamical flows with time-periodic forcing. In contrast to passive tracers, the particle dynamics is governed by the strongly nonlinear Maxey-Riley equations, which typically create chaos in the spatial component of the particle dynamics, appearing as filamental structures in the distribution of the reactants. Defining a stochastic description supported on the natural measure of the attractor, we show that, in the limit of slow reaction, the reaction kinetics assumes a universal behavior exhibiting a t(-1) decay in the amount of reagents, which become distributed on a subset of dimension D2, where D2 is the correlation dimension of the chaotic flow. PMID:11461595

  2. Chaotic advection of immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmayr-Lee, Benjamin; Beller, Daniel; Yasuda, Sohei

    2012-02-01

    We consider a system of two immiscible fluids advected by a chaotic flow field. A nonequilibrium steady state arises from the competition between the coarsening of the immiscible fluids and the domain bursting caused by the chaotic flow. It has been established that the average domain size in this steady state scales as a inverse power of the Lyapunov exponent. We examine the issue of local structure and look for correlations between the local domain size and the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. For a variety of chaotic flows, we consistently find the domains to be smallest in regions where the FTLE field is maximal. This raises the possibility of making universal predictions of steady-state characteristics based on Lyapunov analysis of the flow field.

  3. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  4. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-02-01

    Time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. Diffusion and advection across the snow pores were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective transport properties. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Diffusion originating in the Kelvin effect between snow structures dominates and is the main transport process in isothermal snow packs.

  5. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  6. Automated calibration of a stream solute transport model: Implications for interpretation of biogeochemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Gooseff, M.N.; Bencala, K.E.; Runkel, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrologic processes of advection, dispersion, and transient storage are the primary physical mechanisms affecting solute transport in streams. The estimation of parameters for a conservative solute transport model is an essential step to characterize transient storage and other physical features that cannot be directly measured, and often is a preliminary step in the study of reactive solutes. Our study used inverse modeling to estimate parameters of the transient storage model OTIS (One dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage). Observations from a tracer injection experiment performed on Uvas Creek, California, USA, are used to illustrate the application of automated solute transport model calibration to conservative and nonconservative stream solute transport. A computer code for universal inverse modeling (UCODE) is used for the calibrations. Results of this procedure are compared with a previous study that used a trial-and-error parameter estimation approach. The results demonstrated 1) importance of the proper estimation of discharge and lateral inflow within the stream system; 2) that although the fit of the observations is not much better when transient storage is invoked, a more randomly distributed set of residuals resulted (suggesting non-systematic error), indicating that transient storage is occurring; 3) that inclusion of transient storage for a reactive solute (Sr2+) provided a better fit to the observations, highlighting the importance of robust model parameterization; and 4) that applying an automated calibration inverse modeling estimation approach resulted in a comprehensive understanding of the model results and the limitation of input data.

  7. Implementation of a Semi-Lagrangian scheme for water vapour and tracer advection in RegCM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefera Diro, Gulilat; Tompkins, Adrian; Giorgi, Filippo; Bonaventura, Luca

    2013-04-01

    A semi-Lagrangian approach is introduced in the latest version of the ICTP regional climate model (RegCM4) for water vapor and tracer advection. A 'quasi' cubic interpolation and McGregor's third order accurate trajectory calculation are used in the advection scheme. The modified scheme is evaluated on idealized as well as realistic case studies and its results are compared against those of the Eulerian scheme originally employed in RegCM4. In the idealized test cases the semi-Lagrangian scheme appears to be superior to the Eulerian scheme in terms of the dissipative and dispersive errors, especially when large gradients are present in the advected quantity. Two realistic cases of meso-scale phenomena over the European domain were also tested in a short range mode for specific humidity transport. In both cases, the semi-Lagrangian scheme has captured better the detailed structure and improved the overall pattern of the vertically integrated humidity field. In the present preliminary implementation, the scheme is more expensive than the Eulerian one. This is because the same time step is used for tracer advection as the explicit time discretization employed by the dynamical core. However, greater computational gains are expected as the number of tracers considered increases, for instance when the gas phase chemistry is switched on.

  8. Modeling underwater transport of oil spilled from deepwater area in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haibo; An, Wei; You, Yunxiang; Lei, Fanghui; Zhao, Yupeng; Li, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Based on a Lagrangian integral technique and Lagrangian particle-tracking technique, a numerical model was developed to simulate the underwater transport of oil from a deepwater spill. This model comprises two submodels: a plume dynamics model and an advection-diffusion model. The former is used to simulate the stages dominated by the initial jet momentum and plume buoyancy of the spilled oil, while the latter is used to simulate the stage dominated by the ambient current and turbulence. The model validity was verified through comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data from several laboratory flume experiments and a field experiment. To demonstrate the capability of the model further, it was applied to the simulation of a hypothetical oil spill occurring at the seabed of a deepwater oil/gas field in the South China Sea. The results of the simulation would be useful for contingency planning with regard to the emergency response to an underwater oil spill.

  9. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  10. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R; Mäder, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  11. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  12. Sorption kinetics during macropore transport of organic contaminants in soils: Laboratory experiments and analytical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Mokhlesur; Liedl, Rudolf; Grathwohl, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Preferential solute transport coupled with diffusion into the surrounding matrix region has been examined in a silty loam soil by conducting macropore column experiments for various hydrophobic organic compounds (phenanthrene, 1, 2-DCB, TCE, carbofuran) representing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorobenzenes, chlorinated solvents, and pesticides. A new and ready-to-use analytical solution was developed for this setting to model the breakthrough curves. The model accounts for advection in the macropore region, diffusion into the matrix region, and linear sorption in both regions. In this setting, hydrodynamic dispersion is negligible as proved by a comparison of an advection-dispersion model of finite pulse input. Conservative tracer experiments were predicted very well with independently determined transport parameters except for the tortuosity factor, which was used as a fitting parameter for the pore diffusion coefficient in the matrix. In case of sorbing solutes the sorption coefficient (Kd) was used as additional fitting parameter. The fitted Kd was 65% smaller for less sorbing compounds, e.g., carbofuran, and 80% less for strongly sorbing compounds, e.g., phenanthrene compared to the independently determined Kd from batch experiments. This indicates that sorption equilibrium was not obtained completely during the matrix diffusion at the timescale of the macropore flow experiment.

  13. Morphological changes due to tsunami impact: Numerical modelling of sediments transport and deposit at Tangier - Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, Inês; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana; El Moussaoui, Said; Najib Zaghloul, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Coastal areas in the North of Morocco are at risk of tsunami inundation. Overland tsunami propagation leads to widespread and dramatic changes in coastal morphology due to sediments erosion, transport and deposition processes. Tsunami sediments transport and morphological changes must take into consideration bed-load and suspended load transport of non-cohesive sediments and suspended load of cohesive sediments. Numerical calculation of suspended sediment transport/deposition is performed by solving the advection-diffusion equations for the suspended sediment, where the velocities are obtained from the hydrodynamic modelling. In this study, we assess the morphological changes under tsunami impact at the Bay of Tangier-Morocco. We use a coupled hydrodynamic and morpho-dynamic numerical code, based on two open sources codes: COMCOT and Xbeach, to simulate the tsunami impact and the associated sediments transport and deposition. COMCOT solves the shallow water equations to calculate the inundation characteristics (flow depth and velocity), while Xbeach allows solving the advection-diffusion equations to determine the amount of sediments eroded, transported and deposed. The results of this study are presented in terms of maps displaying the amount of sediments eroded, transported and deposed at the bay of Tangier following a tsunami similar to the 1755 Lisbon event. We find that the bay of Tangier is vulnerable to morphological changes under tsunami threat coming from SW Iberia margin. This work is supported by the EU project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe, Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013,6.4-3).

  14. Modeling in-situ transport of uranine and colloids in the fracture network in KURT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Baik, Min-Hoon; Jeong, Jongtae

    2015-02-01

    An in-situ dipole migration experiment was conducted using the conservative tracer uranine and latex colloids in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The location and dimensions of the fractures between the two boreholes were estimated using the results of a borehole image processing system (BIPS) investigation, and the connectivity of the fractures was evaluated by a packer test. To investigate the flow and transport of uranine and colloids through an in-situ fracture network, a fracture network transport model was newly developed. The model consists of a series of one-dimensional advection-dispersion-matrix diffusion equations for each channel of the fracture network. Using the fracture network transport model, the most probable representation and the hydrologic parameters of the fracture network can be estimated by fitting the breakthrough of uranine. While the fracture network might not be unique, the representation chosen was adequate to describe the breakthrough of uranine and it represents a reasonable approach to modeling transport in the fracture network. An additional evaluation showed that the colloid transport in this study was influenced by filtration on the fracture surface rather than the enhancement of the colloid velocity. Overall, the model can explain successfully the in-situ experimental results of uranine and colloid transports through the fracture network.

  15. Reactive solute transport in streams. 1. Development of an equilibrium- based model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Broshears, R.E.; Chapra, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    An equilibrium-based solute transport model is developed for the simulation of trace metal fate and transport in streams. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel based on MINTEQ. The solute transport model considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage, while the equilibrium submodel considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. Within the model, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (water-borne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach.

  16. Modeling in-situ transport of uranine and colloids in the fracture network in KURT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Baik, Min-Hoon; Jeong, Jongtae

    2015-02-01

    An in-situ dipole migration experiment was conducted using the conservative tracer uranine and latex colloids in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The location and dimensions of the fractures between the two boreholes were estimated using the results of a borehole image processing system (BIPS) investigation, and the connectivity of the fractures was evaluated by a packer test. To investigate the flow and transport of uranine and colloids through an in-situ fracture network, a fracture network transport model was newly developed. The model consists of a series of one-dimensional advection-dispersion-matrix diffusion equations for each channel of the fracture network. Using the fracture network transport model, the most probable representation and the hydrologic parameters of the fracture network can be estimated by fitting the breakthrough of uranine. While the fracture network might not be unique, the representation chosen was adequate to describe the breakthrough of uranine and it represents a reasonable approach to modeling transport in the fracture network. An additional evaluation showed that the colloid transport in this study was influenced by filtration on the fracture surface rather than the enhancement of the colloid velocity. Overall, the model can explain successfully the in-situ experimental results of uranine and colloid transports through the fracture network. PMID:25543462

  17. Modeling in-situ transport of uranine and colloids in the fracture network in KURT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Baik, Min-Hoon; Jeong, Jongtae

    2015-02-01

    An in-situ dipole migration experiment was conducted using the conservative tracer uranine and latex colloids in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The location and dimensions of the fractures between the two boreholes were estimated using the results of a borehole image processing system (BIPS) investigation, and the connectivity of the fractures was evaluated by a packer test. To investigate the flow and transport of uranine and colloids through an in-situ fracture network, a fracture network transport model was newly developed. The model consists of a series of one-dimensional advection-dispersion-matrix diffusion equations for each channel of the fracture network. Using the fracture network transport model, the most probable representation and the hydrologic parameters of the fracture network can be estimated by fitting the breakthrough of uranine. While the fracture network might not be unique, the representation chosen was adequate to describe the breakthrough of uranine and it represents a reasonable approach to modeling transport in the fracture network. An additional evaluation showed that the colloid transport in this study was influenced by filtration on the fracture surface rather than the enhancement of the colloid velocity. Overall, the model can explain successfully the in-situ experimental results of uranine and colloid transports through the fracture network.

  18. A model for fast axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Blum, J J; Reed, M C

    1985-01-01

    A model for fast axonal transport is developed in which the essential features are that organelles may interact with mechanochemical cross-bridges that in turn interact with microtubules, forming an organelle-engine-microtubule complex which is transported along the microtubules. Computer analysis of the equations derived to describe such a system show that most of the experimental observations on fast axonal transport can be simulated by the model, indicating that the model is useful for the interpretation and design of experiments aimed at clarifying the mechanism of fast axonal transport. PMID:2416456

  19. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L. Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  20. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  1. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  2. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ωeτe effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  3. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  4. Black Hole Advective Accretion Disks with Optical Depth Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Artemove, Y.V.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Novikov, I.D.

    2006-02-01

    We have constructed numerically global solutions of advective accretion disks around black holes that describe a continuous transition between the effectively optically thick outer and optically thin inner disk regions. We have concentrated on models of accretion flows with large mass accretion rates, and we have employed a bridging formula for radiative losses at high and low effective optical depths.

  5. Uncertainty in tsunami sediment transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Goto, Kazuhisa; Sugawara, Daisuke; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; La Selle, SeanPaul M.

    2016-01-01

    Erosion and deposition from tsunamis record information about tsunami hydrodynamics and size that can be interpreted to improve tsunami hazard assessment. We explore sources and methods for quantifying uncertainty in tsunami sediment transport modeling. Uncertainty varies with tsunami, study site, available input data, sediment grain size, and model. Although uncertainty has the potential to be large, published case studies indicate that both forward and inverse tsunami sediment transport models perform well enough to be useful for deciphering tsunami characteristics, including size, from deposits. New techniques for quantifying uncertainty, such as Ensemble Kalman Filtering inversion, and more rigorous reporting of uncertainties will advance the science of tsunami sediment transport modeling. Uncertainty may be decreased with additional laboratory studies that increase our understanding of the semi-empirical parameters and physics of tsunami sediment transport, standardized benchmark tests to assess model performance, and development of hybrid modeling approaches to exploit the strengths of forward and inverse models.

  6. Oxygen isotopic transport and exchange during fluid flow: One-dimensional models and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.R. ); Willett, S.D. ); Cook, S.J. Environ Corp., Houston, TX )

    1994-01-01

    In this work the authors investigate the consequences of fluid flow and fluid-rock interaction to the isotopic evolution of fluids and rock with one-dimensional transport models of fluid flow and oxygen isotope exchange. Transport models dealing with stable isotopes are well established in recent geochemical literature. The authors extend previous treatments by presenting the derivation of both analytical and numerical solutions to the transport equations incorporating simultaneously advection, diffusion and hydrodynamic dispersion, and kinetics of isotopic exchange. The increased generality of numerical solutions allows the incorporation of other effects which control the spatial patterns of [delta][sup 18]O values developed in rocks and fluids including multiple reactive species and temperature gradients. The authors discuss the effects of flow parameters, conditions of isotopic exchange, and temperature gradients on the spatial patterns of isotopic shifts produced in rock sequences subjected to fluid flow, and on conventionally calculated W/R ratios for these rock sequences. Finally, the authors examine the implications of oxygen isotope transport for two natural systems where isotopic shifts or gradients could be interpreted in terms of unidirectional fluid infiltration. Solutions of one-dimensional transport equations including the mechanisms of advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, and non-equilibrium exchange between water and rock indicate that the time-space evolution of oxygen isotopic compositions of rock and infiltrating fluid is dependent on (1) the rate of fluid infiltration, (2) the diffusive and dispersive properties of the rock matrix, (3) the rate of isotopic exchange, and (4) the rock-water mass oxygen ratio in a unit volume of water-saturated, porous rock. 56 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Modeling solute transport through saturated zone ground water at 10 km scale: example from the Yucca Mountain license application.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Sharad; Ding, Mei; Chu, Shaoping; Robinson, Bruce A; Arnold, Bill; Meijer, Arend; Eddebbarh, Al-Aziz

    2010-09-20

    This paper presents a study of solute transport through ground water in the saturated zone and the resulting breakthrough curves (BTCs), using a field-scale numerical model that incorporates the processes of advection, dispersion, matrix diffusion in fractured volcanic formations, sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport. Such BTCs at compliance boundaries are often used as performance measures for a site. The example considered here is that of the saturated zone study prepared for the Yucca Mountain license application. The saturated zone at this site occurs partly in volcanic, fractured rock formations and partly in alluvial formations. This paper presents a description of the site and the ground water flow model, the development of the conceptual model of transport, model uncertainties, model validation, and the influence of uncertainty in input parameters on the downstream BTCs at the Yucca Mountain site.

  8. Modeling solute transport through saturated zone ground water at 10 km scale: example from the Yucca Mountain license application.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Sharad; Ding, Mei; Chu, Shaoping; Robinson, Bruce A; Arnold, Bill; Meijer, Arend; Eddebbarh, Al-Aziz

    2010-09-20

    This paper presents a study of solute transport through ground water in the saturated zone and the resulting breakthrough curves (BTCs), using a field-scale numerical model that incorporates the processes of advection, dispersion, matrix diffusion in fractured volcanic formations, sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport. Such BTCs at compliance boundaries are often used as performance measures for a site. The example considered here is that of the saturated zone study prepared for the Yucca Mountain license application. The saturated zone at this site occurs partly in volcanic, fractured rock formations and partly in alluvial formations. This paper presents a description of the site and the ground water flow model, the development of the conceptual model of transport, model uncertainties, model validation, and the influence of uncertainty in input parameters on the downstream BTCs at the Yucca Mountain site. PMID:20633953

  9. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. G.; Haygarth, P. M.; Withers, P. J. A.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Falloon, P. D.; Beven, K. J.; Ockenden, M. C.; Forber, K. J.; Hollaway, M. J.; Evans, R.; Collins, A. L.; Hiscock, K. M.; Wearing, C.; Kahana, R.; Villamizar Velez, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β , the fractional order α , and the single relaxation time τ , the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann method for the fractional advection-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M; Withers, P J A; Macleod, C J A; Falloon, P D; Beven, K J; Ockenden, M C; Forber, K J; Hollaway, M J; Evans, R; Collins, A L; Hiscock, K M; Wearing, C; Kahana, R; Villamizar Velez, M L

    2016-04-01

    Mass transport, such as movement of phosphorus in soils and solutes in rivers, is a natural phenomenon and its study plays an important role in science and engineering. It is found that there are numerous practical diffusion phenomena that do not obey the classical advection-diffusion equation (ADE). Such diffusion is called abnormal or superdiffusion, and it is well described using a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE). The FADE finds a wide range of applications in various areas with great potential for studying complex mass transport in real hydrological systems. However, solution to the FADE is difficult, and the existing numerical methods are complicated and inefficient. In this study, a fresh lattice Boltzmann method is developed for solving the fractional advection-diffusion equation (LabFADE). The FADE is transformed into an equation similar to an advection-diffusion equation and solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The LabFADE has all the advantages of the conventional lattice Boltzmann method and avoids a complex solution procedure, unlike other existing numerical methods. The method has been validated through simulations of several benchmark tests: a point-source diffusion, a boundary-value problem of steady diffusion, and an initial-boundary-value problem of unsteady diffusion with the coexistence of source and sink terms. In addition, by including the effects of the skewness β, the fractional order α, and the single relaxation time τ, the accuracy and convergence of the method have been assessed. The numerical predictions are compared with the analytical solutions, and they indicate that the method is second-order accurate. The method presented will allow the FADE to be more widely applied to complex mass transport problems in science and engineering. PMID:27176431

  12. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling in Fractured Media Under Deep Geological Environment - 12211

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Jivkov, A.P.

    2012-07-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is gaining increasing support in many countries, where suitable low permeability geological formation in combination with engineered barriers are used to provide long term waste contaminant and minimise the impacts to the environment and risk to the biosphere. This modelling study examines the solute transport in fractured media under low flow velocities that are relevant to a deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes. The effects of water velocity in the fracture, matrix porosity and diffusion on solute transport are investigated and discussed. Some illustrative modelled results are presented to demonstrate the use of the model to examine the effects of media degradation on solute transport, under the influences of hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and microbially mediated chemical processes. The challenges facing the prediction of long term degradation such as cracks evolution, interaction and coalescence are highlighted. The potential of a novel microstructure informed modelling approach to account for these effects is discussed, particularly with respect to investigating multiple phenomena impact on material performance. The GRM code is used to examine the effects of media degradation for a geological waste disposal package, under the combined hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and chemical effects in low groundwater flow conditions that are typical of deep geological disposal systems. An illustrative reactive transport modelling application demonstrates the use of the code to examine the interplay of kinetic controlled biogeochemical reactive processes with advective and diffusive transport, under the influence of media degradation. The initial model results are encouraging which show the

  13. Performance Analysis of high-order remap-type advection scheme on icosahedral-hexagonal grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rashmi; Dubey, Sarvesh; Saxena, Vaibhav; Meurdesoif, Yann

    2014-05-01

    A comparative performance analysis on computational cost of second order advection schemes FF-CSLAM (Flux form conservative semi-Lagrangian multi-tracer transport scheme) and it's two simplifications on Icosahedral grid has been presented. Tracer transport is one of the main building blocks in atmospheric models and hence their performance greatly determines the overall performance of the model. FF-CSLAM falls in the category of arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) scheme. It exploits the finite volume formulation and therefore it is inherently conservative. Flux-area through edges are approximated with great circle arcs in an upwind fashion. Bi-quadratic sub-grid scale reconstructions using weighted least-squares method is employed to approximate trace field. Area integrals on the overlapped region of flux-area and static Eulerian meshes are evaluated via line-integrals. A brief description of implementation of FF-CSLAM on icosahedral -hexagonal meshes along with and its numerical accuracy in terms of standard test cases will be presented. A comparative analysis of the computational overhead is necessary to assess the suitability of FF-CSLAM for massively parallel and multi-threading computer architectures in comparison to other advection schemes implemented on icosahedral grids. The main focus of this work is to present the implementation of the shared memory parallelization and to describe the memory access pattern of the numerical scheme. FF-CSLAM is a remap-type advection scheme, thus extra calculation are done in comparison to the other advection schemes. The additional computations are associated with the search required to find the overlap area between the area swept through the edge and the underlining grid. But the experiments shows that the associated computational overhead is minimal for multi-tracer transport. It will be shown that for the Courant Number less than one, FF-CSLAM, the computations are not expensive. Since the grid cells are arranged in

  14. An operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Liaqat Ali; Liu, Philip L.-F.

    1998-09-01

    Operator splitting algorithms are frequently used for solving the advection-diffusion equation, especially to deal with advection dominated transport problems. In this paper an operator splitting algorithm for the three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation is presented. The algorithm represents a second-order-accurate adaptation of the Holly and Preissmann scheme for three-dimensional problems. The governing equation is split into an advection equation and a diffusion equation, and they are solved by a backward method of characteristics and a finite element method, respectively. The Hermite interpolation function is used for interpolation of concentration in the advection step. The spatial gradients of concentration in the Hermite interpolation are obtained by solving equations for concentration gradients in the advection step. To make the composite algorithm efficient, only three equations for first-order concentration derivatives are solved in the diffusion step of computation. The higher-order spatial concentration gradients, necessary to advance the solution in a computational cycle, are obtained by numerical differentiations based on the available information. The simulation characteristics and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several advection dominated transport problems.

  15. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN A FISSURED BOCK: VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmuson, A.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-04-01

    Numerical models for simulating chemical transport in fissured rocks constitute powerful tools for evaluating the acceptability of geological nuclear waste repositories. Due to the very long-term, high toxicity of some nuclear waste products, the models are required to predict, in certain cases, the spatial and temporal distribution of chemical concentration less than 0.001% of the concentration released from the repository. Whether numerical models can provide such accuracies is a major question addressed in the present work. To this end, we have verified a numerical model, TRUMP, which solves the advective diffusion equation in general three dimensions with or without decay and source terms. The method is based on an integrated finite-difference approach. The model was verified against known analytic solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion problem as well as the problem of advection-diffusion in a system of parallel fractures separated by spherical particles. The studies show that as long as the magnitude of advectance is equal to or less than that of conductance for the closed surface bounding any volume element in the region (that is, numerical Peclet number <2), the numerical method can indeed match the analytic solution within errors of ±10{sup -3} % or less. The realistic input parameters used in the sample calculations suggest that such a range of Peclet numbers is indeed likely to characterize deep groundwater systems in granitic and ancient argillaceous systems. Thus TRUMP in its present form does provide a viable tool for use in nuclear waste evaluation studies. A sensitivity analysis based on the analytic solution suggests that the errors in prediction introduced due to uncertainties in input parameters is likely to be larger than the computational inaccuracies introduced by the numerical model. Currently, a disadvantage in the TRUMP model is that the iterative method of solving the set of simultaneous equations is rather slow when time

  16. Chemical Transport in a Fissured Rock: Verification of a Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmuson, A.; Narasimhan, T. N.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-10-01

    Numerical models for simulating chemical transport in fissured rocks constitute powerful tools for evaluating the acceptability of geological nuclear waste repositories. Due to the very long-term, high toxicity of some nuclear waste products, the models are required to predict, in certain cases, the spatial and temporal distribution of chemical concentration less than 0.001% of the concentration released from the repository. Whether numerical models can provide such accuracies is a major question addressed in the present work. To this end we have verified a numerical model, TRUMP, which solves the advective diffusion equation in general three dimensions, with or without decay and source terms. The method is based on an integrated finite difference approach. The model was verified against known analytic solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion problem, as well as the problem of advection-diffusion in a system of parallel fractures separated by spherical particles. The studies show that as long as the magnitude of advectance is equal to or less than that of conductance for the closed surface bounding any volume element in the region (that is, numerical Peclet number <2), the numerical method can indeed match the analytic solution within errors of ±10-3% or less. The realistic input parameters used in the sample calculations suggest that such a range of Peclet numbers is indeed likely to characterize deep groundwater systems in granitic and ancient argillaceous systems. Thus TRUMP in its present form does provide a viable tool for use in nuclear waste evaluation studies. A sensitivity analysis based on the analytic solution suggests that the errors in prediction introduced due to uncertainties in input parameters are likely to be larger than the computational inaccuracies introduced by the numerical model. Currently, a disadvantage in the TRUMP model is that the iterative method of solving the set of simultaneous equations is rather slow when time

  17. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  18. Analytically-derived sensitivities in one-dimensional models of solute transport in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Analytically-derived sensitivities are presented for parameters in one-dimensional models of solute transport in porous media. Sensitivities were derived by direct differentiation of closed form solutions for each of the odel, and by a time integral method for two of the models. Models are based on the advection-dispersion equation and include adsorption and first-order chemical decay. Boundary conditions considered are: a constant step input of solute, constant flux input of solute, and exponentially decaying input of solute at the upstream boundary. A zero flux is assumed at the downstream boundary. Initial conditions include a constant and spatially varying distribution of solute. One model simulates the mixing of solute in an observation well from individual layers in a multilayer aquifer system. Computer programs produce output files compatible with graphics software in which sensitivities are plotted as a function of either time or space. (USGS)

  19. Toxic Alexandrium blooms in the western Gulf of Maine: The plume advection hypothesis revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.M.; Keafer, B.A.; Geyer, W.R.; Signell, R.P.; Loder, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    The plume advection hypothesis links blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense in the western Gulf of Maine (GOM) to a buoyant plume derived from river outflows. This hypothesis was examined with cruise and moored-instrument observations in 1993 when levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins were high, and in 1994 when toxicity was low. A coupled physical-biological model simulated hydrography and A. fundyense distributions. Initial A. fundyense populations were restricted to low-salinity nearshore waters near Casco Bay, but also occurred in higher salinity waters along the plume boundary. This suggests two sources of cells - those from shallow-water cyst populations and those transported to shore from offshore blooms in the eastern segment of the Maine coastal current (EMCC). Observations confirm the role of the plume in A. fundyense transport and growth. Downwelling-favorable winds in 1993 transported the plume and its cells rapidly alongshore, enhancing toxicity and propagating PSP to the south. In 1994, sustained upwelling moved the plume offshore, resulting in low toxicity in intertidal shellfish. A. fundyense blooms were likely nutrient limited, leading to low growth rates and moderate cell abundances. These observations and mechanisms were reproduced by coupled physical-biological model simulations. The plume advection hypothesis provides a viable explanation for outbreaks of PSP in the western GOM, but should be refined to include two sources for cells that populate the plume and two major pathways for transport: one within the low-salinity plume and another where A. fundyense cells originating in the EMCC are transported along the outer boundary of the plume front with the western segment of the Maine coastal current.

  20. Modeling Np and Pu transport with a surface complexation model and spatially variant sorption capacities: Implications for reactive transport modeling and performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) geochemical transport modeling is used to demonstrate the effects of speciation and sorption reactions on the ground-water transport of Np and Pu, two redox-sensitive elements. Earlier 1D simulations (Reardon, 1981) considered the kinetically limited dissolution of calcite and its effect on ion-exchange reactions (involving 90Sr, Ca, Na, Mg and K), and documented the spatial variation of a 90Sr partition coefficient under both transient and steady-state chemical conditions. In contrast, the simulations presented here assume local equilibrium for all reactions, and consider sorption on constant potential, rather than constant charge, surfaces. Reardon's (1981) seminal findings on the spatial and temporal variability of partitioning (of 90Sr) are reexamined and found partially caused by his assumption of a kinetically limited reaction. In the present work, sorption is assumed the predominant retardation process controlling Pu and Np transport, and is simulated using a diffuse-double-layer-surface-complexation (DDLSC) model. Transport simulations consider the infiltration of Np- and Pu-contaminated waters into an initially uncontaminated environment, followed by the cleanup of the resultant contamination with uncontaminated water. Simulations are conducted using different spatial distributions of sorption capacities (with the same total potential sorption capacity, but with different variances and spatial correlation structures). Results obtained differ markedly from those that would be obtained in transport simulations using constant Kd, Langmuir or Freundlich sorption models. When possible, simulation results (breakthrough curves) are fitted to a constant K d advection-dispersion transport model and compared. Functional differences often are great enough that they prevent a meaningful fit of the simulation results with a constant K d (or even a Langmuir or Freundlich) model, even in the case of Np, a weakly sorbed radionuclide under the

  1. An Explicit 3-Dimensional Model for Reactive Transport of Nitrogen in Tile Drained Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. J.; Valocchi, A. J.; Hudson, R. J.

    2001-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in nitrate contamination of groundwater in the Midwest because of its link to surface water eutrophication, especially in the Gulf of Mexico. The vast majority of this nitrate is the product of biologically mediated transformation of fertilizers containing ammonia in the vadose zone of agricultural fields. For this reason, it is imperative that mathematical models, which can serve as useful tools to evaluate both the impact of agricultural fertilizer applications and nutrient-reducing management practices, are able to specifically address transport in the vadose zone. The development of a 3-dimensional explicit numerical model to simulate the movement and transformation of nitrogen species through the subsurface on the scale of an individual farm plot will be presented. At this scale, nitrogen fate and transport is controlled by a complex coupling among hydrologic, agricultural and biogeochemical processes. The nitrogen model is a component of a larger modeling effort that focuses upon conditions typical of those found in agricultural fields in Illinois. These conditions include non-uniform, multi-dimensional, transient flow in both saturated and unsaturated zones, geometrically complex networks of tile drains, coupled surface-subsurface-tile flow, and dynamic levels of dissolved oxygen in the soil profile. The advection-dispersion-reaction equation is solved using an operator-splitting approach, which is a flexible and straightforward strategy. Advection is modeled using a total variation diminishing scheme, dispersion is modeled using an alternating direction explicit method, and reactions are modeled using rate law equations. The model's stability and accuracy will be discussed, and test problems will be presented.

  2. Highway and interline transportation routing models

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

    1994-06-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important issues to shippers, carriers, and the general public. Since transportation routes are a central characteristic in most of these issues, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward the resolution of these issues. In addition, US Department of Transportation requirements (HM-164) mandate specific routes for shipments of highway controlled quantities of radioactive materials. In response to these needs, two routing models have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These models have been designated by DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Transportation Management Division (DOE/EM) as the official DOE routing models. Both models, HIGHWAY and INTERLINE, are described.

  3. Vertical transport and sources in flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical transport in flux models in examined and shown to reproduce expected limits for densities and fluxes. Disparities with catalog distributions are derived and inverted to find the sources required to rectify them.

  4. Effect of improved subgrid scale transport of tracers on uptake of bomb radiocarbon in the GFDL Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, P. B.; Eltgroth, P.; Bourgeois, A. J.; Caldeira, K.

    1995-05-01

    We show that the Gent-McWilliams tracer transport parameterization greatly improves the ability of the GFDL ocean general circulation model to simulate vertical profiles of both temperature and bomb radiocarbon with a single set of model parameter values. This parameterization, which includes new advection terms as well as isopycnal mixing, has previously been shown to greatly improve simulated temperature fields. Here, we show that it does not markedly affect the already good simulation of oceanic absorption of bomb radiocarbon, and discuss the reasons for this result.

  5. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  6. An assembly model for simulation of large-scale ground water flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junqi; Christ, John A; Goltz, Mark N

    2008-01-01

    When managing large-scale ground water contamination problems, it is often necessary to model flow and transport using finely discretized domains--for instance (1) to simulate flow and transport near a contamination source area or in the area where a remediation technology is being implemented; (2) to account for small-scale heterogeneities; (3) to represent ground water-surface water interactions; or (4) some combination of these scenarios. A model with a large domain and fine-grid resolution will need extensive computing resources. In this work, a domain decomposition-based assembly model implemented in a parallel computing environment is developed, which will allow efficient simulation of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems using domain-wide grid refinement. The method employs common ground water flow (MODFLOW) and transport (RT3D) simulators, enabling the solution of almost all commonly encountered ground water flow and transport problems. The basic approach partitions a large model domain into any number of subdomains. Parallel processors are used to solve the model equations within each subdomain. Schwarz iteration is applied to match the flow solution at the subdomain boundaries. For the transport model, an extended numerical array is implemented to permit the exchange of dispersive and advective flux information across subdomain boundaries. The model is verified using a conventional single-domain model. Model simulations demonstrate that the proposed model operated in a parallel computing environment can result in considerable savings in computer run times (between 50% and 80%) compared with conventional modeling approaches and may be used to simulate grid discretizations that were formerly intractable.

  7. Simulation of advective flow under steady-state and transient recharge conditions, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.; Masterson, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed several ground-water models in support of an investigation of ground-water contamination being conducted by the Army National Guard Bureau at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation on western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Regional and subregional steady-state models and regional transient models were used to (1) improve understanding of the hydrologic system, (2) simulate advective transport of contaminants, (3) delineate recharge areas to municipal wells, and (4) evaluate how model discretization and time-varying recharge affect simulation results. A water-table mound dominates ground-water-flow patterns. Near the top of the mound, which is within Camp Edwards, hydraulic gradients are nearly vertically downward and horizontal gradients are small. In downgradient areas that are further from the top of the water-table mound, the ratio of horizontal to vertical gradients is larger and horizontal flow predominates. The steady-state regional model adequately simulates advective transport in some areas of the aquifer; however, simulation of ground-water flow in areas with local hydrologic boundaries, such as ponds, requires more finely discretized subregional models. Subregional models also are needed to delineate recharge areas to municipal wells that are inadequately represented in the regional model or are near other pumped wells. Long-term changes in recharge rates affect hydraulic heads in the aquifer and shift the position of the top of the water-table mound. Hydraulic-gradient directions do not change over time in downgradient areas, whereas they do change substantially with temporal changes in recharge near the top of the water-table mound. The assumption of steady-state hydraulic conditions is valid in downgradient area, where advective transport paths change little over time. In areas closer to the top of the water-table mound, advective transport paths change as a function of time, transient and steady-state paths

  8. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-12-31

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%.

  9. One-Dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage (OTIS): A Solute Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    OTIS is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of water-borne solutes in streams and rivers. The governing equation underlying the model is the advection-dispersion equation with additional terms to account for transient storage, lateral inflow, first-order decay, and sorption. This equation and the associated equations describing transient storage and sorption are solved using a Crank-Nicolson finite-difference solution. OTIS may be used in conjunction with data from field-scale tracer experiments to quantify the hydrologic parameters affecting solute transport. This application typically involves a trial-and-error approach wherein parameter estimates are adjusted to obtain an acceptable match between simulated and observed tracer concentrations. Additional applications include analyses of nonconservative solutes that are subject to sorption processes or first-order decay. OTIS-P, a modified version of OTIS, couples the solution of the governing equation with a nonlinear regression package. OTIS-P determines an optimal set of parameter estimates that minimize the squared differences between the simulated and observed concentrations, thereby automating the parameter estimation process. This report details the development and application of OTIS and OTIS-P. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, sample applications, and installation instructions.

  10. BRYNTRN: A baryon transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Chun, Sang Y.; Hong, B. S.; Buck, Warren W.; Lamkin, S. L.; Ganapol, Barry D.; Khan, Ferdous; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an interaction data base and a numerical solution to the transport of baryons through an arbitrary shield material based on a straight ahead approximation of the Boltzmann equation are described. The code is most accurate for continuous energy boundary values, but gives reasonable results for discrete spectra at the boundary using even a relatively coarse energy grid (30 points) and large spatial increments (1 cm in H2O). The resulting computer code is self-contained, efficient and ready to use. The code requires only a very small fraction of the computer resources required for Monte Carlo codes.

  11. Invasions in heterogeneous habitats in the presence of advection.

    PubMed

    Vergni, Davide; Iannaccone, Sandro; Berti, Stefano; Cencini, Massimo

    2012-05-21

    We investigate invasions from a biological reservoir to an initially empty, heterogeneous habitat in the presence of advection. The habitat consists of a periodic alternation of favorable and unfavorable patches. In the latter the population dies at fixed rate. In the former it grows either with the logistic or with an Allee effect type dynamics, where the population has to overcome a threshold to grow. We study the conditions for successful invasions and the speed of the invasion process, which is numerically and analytically investigated in several limits. Generically advection enhances the downstream invasion speed but decreases the population size of the invading species, and can even inhibit the invasion process. Remarkably, however, the rate of population increase, which quantifies the invasion efficiency, is maximized by an optimal advection velocity. In models with Allee effect, differently from the logistic case, above a critical unfavorable patch size the population localizes in a favorable patch, being unable to invade the habitat. However, we show that advection, when intense enough, may activate the invasion process.

  12. Computational modeling of electrokinetic transport in random networks of micro-pores and nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    A reduced order model has been developed to study the nonlinear electrokinetic behaviors emerging in the transport of ionic species through micro-scale and nano-scale porous media. In this approach a porous structure is modeled as a network of long and thin pores. By assuming transport equilibrium in the thin dimensions for each pore, a 1D transport equation is developed in the longitudinal direction covering a wide range of conditions including extreme limits of thick and thin electric double layers. This 1D model includes transport via diffusion, electromigration and wide range of advection mechanisms including pressure driven flow, electroosmosis, and diffusion osmosis. The area-averaged equations governing the axial transport from different pores are coupled at the pore intersections using the proper conservation laws. Moreover, an asymptotic treatment has been included in order to remove singularities in the limit of small concentration. The proposed method provides an efficient framework for insightful simulations of porous electrokinetic systems with applications in water desalination and energy storage. PhD student in Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University. She received her Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford at 2013. Her research interests include CFD, high performance computing, and optimization.

  13. Relative importance of geostatistical and transport models in describing heavily tailed breakthrough curves at the Lauswiesen site.

    PubMed

    Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ptak, Thomas

    2008-10-23

    We analyze the relative importance of the selection of (1) the geostatistical model depicting the structural heterogeneity of an aquifer, and (2) the basic processes to be included in the conceptual model, to describe the main aspects of solute transport at an experimental site. We focus on the results of a forced-gradient tracer test performed at the "Lauswiesen" experimental site, near Tübingen, Germany. In the experiment, NaBr is injected into a well located 52 m from a pumping well. Multilevel breakthrough curves (BTCs) are measured in the latter. We conceptualize the aquifer as a three-dimensional, doubly stochastic composite medium, where distributions of geomaterials and attributes, e.g., hydraulic conductivity (K) and porosity (phi), can be uncertain. Several alternative transport processes are considered: advection, advection-dispersion and/or mass-transfer between mobile and immobile regions. Flow and transport are tackled within a stochastic Monte Carlo framework to describe key features of the experimental BTCs, such as temporal moments, peak time, and pronounced tailing. We find that, regardless the complexity of the conceptual transport model adopted, an adequate description of heterogeneity is crucial for generating alternative equally likely realizations of the system that are consistent with (a) the statistical description of the heterogeneous system, as inferred from the data, and (b) salient features of the depth-averaged breakthrough curve, including preferential paths, slow release of mass particles, and anomalous spreading. While the available geostatistical characterization of heterogeneity can explain most of the integrated behavior of transport (depth-averaged breakthrough curve), not all multilevel BTCs are described with equal success. This suggests that transport models simply based on integrated measurements may not ensure an accurate representation of many of the important features required in three-dimensional transport models. PMID

  14. Calculation of a residual mean meridional circulation for a zonal-mean tracer transport model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W.K.; Rotman, D.A.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Because of their computational advantages, zonally-averaged chemical-radiative-transport models are widely used to investigate the distribution of chemical species and their change due to the anthropogenic chemicals in the lower and middle atmosphere. In general, the Lagrangian-mean formulation would be ideal to treat transport due to the zonal mean circulation and eddies. However, the Lagrangian formulation is difficult to use in practical applications. The most widely-used formulation for treating global atmospheric dynamics in two-dimensional models is the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) equations. The residual mean meridional circulation (RMMC) in the TEM system is used to advect tracers. In this study, we describe possible solution techniques for obtaining the RMMC in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model. In the next section, the formulation will be described. In sections 3 and 4, possible solution procedures will be described for a diagnostic and prognostic case, respectively.

  15. Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.H.; Saiers, J.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Noe, G.B.; Mylon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of particulate matter within wetland surface waters affects nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility, and the evolution of the wetland landscape. Despite the importance of particle transport in influencing wetland form and function, there are few data sets that illuminate, in a quantitative way, the transport behavior of particulate matter within surface waters containing emergent vegetation. We report observations from experiments on the transport of 1 ??m latex microspheres at a wetland field site located in Water Conservation Area 3A of the Florida Everglades. The experiments involved line source injections of particles inside two 4.8-m-long surface water flumes constructed within a transition zone between an Eleocharis slough and Cladium jamaicense ridge and within a Cladium jamaicense ridge. We compared the measurements of particle transport to calculations of two-dimensional advection-dispersion model that accounted for a linear increase in water velocities with elevation above the ground surface. The results of this analysis revealed that particle spreading by longitudinal and vertical dispersion was substantially greater in the ridge than within the transition zone and that particle capture by aquatic vegetation lowered surface water particle concentrations and, at least for the timescale of our experiments, could be represented as an irreversible, first-order kinetics process. We found generally good agreement between our field-based estimates of particle dispersion and water velocity and estimates determined from published theory, suggesting that the advective-dispersive transport of particulate matter within complex wetland environments can be approximated on the basis of measurable properties of the flow and aquatic vegetation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media with conduits to estimate macroscopic continuous time random walk model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Anwar, S.; Cortis, A.; Sukop, M.

    2008-10-20

    Lattice Boltzmann models simulate solute transport in porous media traversed by conduits. Resulting solute breakthrough curves are fitted with Continuous Time Random Walk models. Porous media are simulated by damping flow inertia and, when the damping is large enough, a Darcy's Law solution instead of the Navier-Stokes solution normally provided by the lattice Boltzmann model is obtained. Anisotropic dispersion is incorporated using a direction-dependent relaxation time. Our particular interest is to simulate transport processes outside the applicability of the standard Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) including eddy mixing in conduits. The ADE fails to adequately fit any of these breakthrough curves.

  17. Transportation energy: data, forecasting, policy, and models

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.; Talvitie, A.; Hartgen, D.T.; Erlbaum, N.S.; Lee, M.E.H.

    1980-01-01

    The 16 papers in this report deal with the following areas: assessment of energy and petroleum consumption of different transportation modes in the Buffalo area; long-range forecasts of transportation energy consumption in New York state; use of disaggregate data to evaluate gasoline conservation policies: smaller cars and carpooling; how much fuel does vanpooling really save; evaluating the costs and benefits of plans to reduce gasoline queues; queuing and search delays due to gasoline station closings: simple equilibrium framework; demand for travel and the gasoline crisis; simple analytical model for understanding gasoline station lines; review of analytical models of gasoline demand during an energy emergency; direct energy accounts for urban transportation planning; transportation energy effects on urban growth: results of simulations; effect of urban development patterns on transportation energy use; travel demand and estimation of energy consumption by a constrained model; assessment of the Wharton EFA automobile demand model; forecasting equilibrium motor vehicle holdings by means of disaggregate models; and transportation system management actions - a study of the energy costs.

  18. Model aids cuttings transport prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Gavignet, A.A. ); Sobey, I.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Drilling of highly deviated wells can be complicated by the formation of a thick bed of cuttings at low flow rates. The model proposed in this paper shows what mechanisms control the thickness of such a bed, and the model predictions are compared with experimental results.

  19. Dynamic typology of hydrothermal systems: competing effects of advection, dispersion and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejs, David

    2016-04-01

    internal gradients and reactions in these systems are largely insensitive to the dynamics of the fluid flow. The time-intergrated fluid flux cannot be estimated from the petrological record and, in the limiting case, the net fluid flux can be zero (stagnant system in a porosity trap). This mechanism may be characteristic for Alpine-style vein assemblages and segregations in metamorphic terrains, where dissolution-reprecipitation is most likely assisted by transient gradients in stress field. Advection-dominated systems are characterized by a limited extent of chemical transport by dispersion with respect to interconnected size of the system. Progress of the alteration reactions in these systems is controlled independently by internal gradient(s) as the fluid moves through the mineralization site and magnitude of disequilibrium between the fluid and the host rock at the inflow. When the fluid flow rates remain low (e.g., dispersed metamorphic devolatilization), steady gradients along the fluid flow path exert the principal control, as commonly incorporated in the transport theory (Dolejš and Manning 2010, Ague 2014). When the fluid flow is rapid, the disequilibrium between the fluid and the host rock dictates the reaction efficiency, and the transport theory based on local equilibrium tends to significantly overestimate the net fluid flux. Advection-dominated systems with variable flow rates comprise a wide range of porosity- and fracture-controlled hydrothermal systems in intrusive and volcanic settings. With furter increase in the fluid flow rate, the advection-dominated systems evolved into reaction-constrained behavior. The mineral reaction progress is generally smaller, and the time-integrated fluid fluxes were likely much larger than petrologically estimated. These model examples illustrate that a functional description and classification of hydrothermal systems can address the causal relationships between length scales of solute (metal) sources and accumulations

  20. A high order characteristic discontinuous Galerkin scheme for advection on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Lowrie, R.; Petersen, M.; Ringler, T.; Hecht, M.

    2016-11-01

    A new characteristic discontinuous Galerkin (CDG) advection scheme is presented. In contrast to standard discontinuous Galerkin schemes, the test functions themselves follow characteristics in order to ensure conservation and the edges of each element are also traced backwards along characteristics in order to create a swept region, which is integrated in order to determine the mass flux across the edge. Both the accuracy and performance of the scheme are greatly improved by the use of large Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers for a shear flow test case and the scheme is shown to scale sublinearly with the number of tracers being advected, outperforming a standard flux corrected transport scheme for 10 or more tracers with a linear basis. Moreover the CDG scheme may be run to arbitrarily high order spatial accuracy and on unstructured grids, and is shown to give the correct order of error convergence for piecewise linear and quadratic bases on regular quadrilateral and hexahedral planar grids. Using a modal Taylor series basis, the scheme may be made monotone while preserving conservation with the use of a standard slope limiter, although this reduces the formal accuracy of the scheme to first order. The second order scheme is roughly as accurate as the incremental remap scheme with nonlocal gradient reconstruction at half the horizontal resolution. The scheme is being developed for implementation within the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) Ocean model, an unstructured grid finite volume ocean model.

  1. Numerical implementation of a crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, Jason R.; Mourad, Hashem M.; Luscher, Darby J.; Hunter, Abigail; Kenamond, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper details a numerical implementation of a single crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications. Our primary motivation for developing the model is to study the influence of dislocation transport and conservation on the mesoscale response of metallic crystals under extreme thermo-mechanical loading conditions (e.g. shocks). To this end we have developed a single crystal plasticity theory (Luscher et al (2015)) that incorporates finite deformation kinematics, internal stress fields caused by the presence of geometrically necessary dislocation gradients, advection equations to model dislocation density transport and conservation, and constitutive equations appropriate for shock loading (equation of state, drag-limited dislocation velocity, etc). In the following, we outline a coupled finite element–finite volume framework for implementing the model physics, and demonstrate its capabilities in simulating the response of a [1 0 0] copper single crystal during a plate impact test. Additionally, we explore the effect of varying certain model parameters (e.g. mesh density, finite volume update scheme) on the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that the model performs as intended and establishes a baseline of understanding that can be leveraged as we extend the model to incorporate additional and/or refined physics and move toward a multi-dimensional implementation.

  2. Inverse Reactive Transport Simulator (Inverts): An Inverse Model for Contaminant Transport with Nonlinear Adsorption and Source Terms

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter

    2001-10-31

    A numerically based simulator was developed to assist in the interpretation of complex laboratory experiments examining transport processes of chemical and biological contaminants subject to nonlinear adsorption and/or source terms. The inversion is performed with any of three nonlinear regression methods, Marquardt-Levenberg, conjugate gradient, or quasi-Newton. The governing equations for the problem are solved by the method of finite-differences including any combination of three boundary conditions: (1) Dirichlet, (2) Neumann, and (3) Cauchy. The dispersive terms in the transport equations were solved using the second-order accurate in time and space Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advective terms were handled using a third-order in time and space, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme that damps spurious oscillations around sharp concentration fronts. The numerical algorithms were implemented in the computer code INVERTS, which runs on any standard personal computer. Apart from a comprehensive set of test problems, INVERTS was also used to model the elution of a nonradioactive tracer, {sup 185}Re, in a pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) experiment with a simulated waste glass for low-activity waste immobilization. Interpretation of the elution profile was best described with a nonlinear kinetic model for adsorption.

  3. A Generalized Model for Transport of Contaminants in Soil by Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Garcia, Juan M.; Baek, Kitae; Alshawabkeh, Iyad D.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized model applicable to soils contaminated with multiple species under enhanced boundary conditions during treatment by electric fields is presented. The partial differential equations describing species transport are developed by applying the law of mass conservation to their fluxes. Transport, due to migration, advection and diffusion, of each aqueous component and complex species are combined to produce one partial differential equation hat describes transport of the total analytical concentrations of component species which are the primary dependent variables. This transport couples with geochemical reactions such as aqueous equilibrium, sorption, precipitation and dissolution. The enhanced model is used to simulate electrokinetic cleanup of lead and copper contaminants at an Army Firing Range. Acid enhancement is achieved by the use of adipic acid to neutralize the basic front produced for the cathode electrochemical reaction. The model is able to simulate enhanced application of the process by modifying the boundary conditions. The model showed that kinetics of geochemical reactions, such as metals dissolution/leaching and redox reactions might be significant for realistic prediction of enhanced electrokinetic extraction of metals in real world applications. PMID:22242884

  4. A generalized model for transport of contaminants in soil by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Baek, Kitae; Alshawabkeh, Iyad D; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-01-01

    A generalized model applicable to soils contaminated with multiple species under enhanced boundary conditions during treatment by electric fields is presented. The partial differential equations describing species transport are developed by applying the law of mass conservation to their fluxes. Transport, due to migration, advection and diffusion, of each aqueous component and complex species are combined to produce one partial differential equation that describes transport of the total analytical concentrations of component species which are the primary dependent variables. This transport couples with geochemical reactions such as aqueous equilibrium, sorption, precipitation and dissolution. The enhanced model is used to simulate electrokinetic cleanup of lead and copper contaminants at an Army Firing Range. Acid enhancement is achieved by the use of adipic acid to neutralize the basic front produced for the cathode electrochemical reaction. The model is able to simulate enhanced application of the process by modifying the boundary conditions. The model showed that kinetics of geochemical reactions, such as metals dissolution/leaching and redox reactions, may be significant for realistic prediction of enhanced electrokinetic extraction of metals in real-world applications.

  5. Upscaling of Transport Parameters in Reacting Porous Media; Pore-Scale Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, Amir; Nick, Hamidreza M.; Hassanizadeh, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Pore scale modelling provides a tool for upscaling of flow and transport parameters in porous media. We use PoreFlow, a pore-network modelling tool capable of simulating fluid flow and multi-component reactive and adsorptive transport under saturated and variably saturated conditions. Simulations include: pore network generator, drainage simulator, calculation of pressure and velocity distributions, and modelling of reactive solute transport accounting for advection and diffusion. The pore space is represented using a multi-directional pore-network capable of capturing the random structure of a given porous media with user-defined directional connectivities for anisotropic pore structures. The chemical reactions can occur within the liquid phase, as well as between the liquid and solid phases which may result in an evolution of porosity and permeability. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO2, affecting the reservoir rock transport properties as well as influencing the wellbore integrity, and acid-gas injection during enhanced oil recovery. Other examples will be provided, showing use of pore-scale information to determine macro-scale properties such as permeability-porosity changes, solute dispersivity, adsorption reaction coefficients, effective diffusion and tortuosity. Such information can be used as constitutive relations within continuum scale governing equations to model physical and chemical processes more accurately at the larger scales.

  6. A generalized model for transport of contaminants in soil by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Baek, Kitae; Alshawabkeh, Iyad D; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-01-01

    A generalized model applicable to soils contaminated with multiple species under enhanced boundary conditions during treatment by electric fields is presented. The partial differential equations describing species transport are developed by applying the law of mass conservation to their fluxes. Transport, due to migration, advection and diffusion, of each aqueous component and complex species are combined to produce one partial differential equation that describes transport of the total analytical concentrations of component species which are the primary dependent variables. This transport couples with geochemical reactions such as aqueous equilibrium, sorption, precipitation and dissolution. The enhanced model is used to simulate electrokinetic cleanup of lead and copper contaminants at an Army Firing Range. Acid enhancement is achieved by the use of adipic acid to neutralize the basic front produced for the cathode electrochemical reaction. The model is able to simulate enhanced application of the process by modifying the boundary conditions. The model showed that kinetics of geochemical reactions, such as metals dissolution/leaching and redox reactions, may be significant for realistic prediction of enhanced electrokinetic extraction of metals in real-world applications. PMID:22242884

  7. Drift by drift: effective population size is limited by advection

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic estimates of effective population size often generate surprising results, including dramatically low ratios of effective population size to census size. This is particularly true for many marine species, and this effect has been associated with hypotheses of "sweepstakes" reproduction and selective hitchhiking. Results Here we show that in advective environments such as oceans and rivers, the mean asymmetric transport of passively dispersed reproductive propagules will act to limit the effective population size in species with a drifting developmental stage. As advection increases, effective population size becomes decoupled from census size as the persistence of novel genetic lineages is restricted to those that arise in a small upstream portion of the species domain. Conclusion This result leads to predictions about the maintenance of diversity in advective systems, and complements the "sweepstakes" hypothesis and other hypotheses proposed to explain cases of low allelic diversity in species with high fecundity. We describe the spatial extent of the species domain in which novel allelic diversity will be retained, thus determining how large an appropriately placed marine reserve must be to allow the persistence of endemic allelic diversity. PMID:18710549

  8. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 1, Basic physics and mathematics

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  9. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2001-12-20

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada.

  10. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  11. A Model for the Transport of Sea-Spray Aerosols in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzola, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Demoisson, A.

    2015-05-01

    We study the dynamics of sea-spray particles in the coastal region of La Reunion Island on the basis of numerical simulations using the transport aerosol model MACMod (Marine Aerosol Concentration Model) and a survey of the aerosol size distributions measured at four locations at two different heights in the north-west part of the island. This allows evaluation of the performance of our model in case of pure marine air masses with implementation of accurate boundary conditions. First of all, an estimate of the aerosol concentration at 10-m height at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain is obtained using a revisited version of the MEDEX (Mediterranean Extinction) model. Estimates of the vertical profile of aerosol concentrations are then provided using aerosol data obtained at two different heights at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain. A parametrization of the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations for maritime environment is proposed. The results are then compared to the vertical profiles of 0.532 m aerosol particle extinction coefficient obtained from lidar data provided by the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and also to the data provided by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This allows validation of the complete vertical profiles in the mixed layer and shows the validity of satellite data for determination of the vertical profiles. Two kinds of simulation were made: one without a particle advection flux at the upwind boundary of the numerical domain, whereas the second simulation was made with a particle advection flux. In the first case, the influence of the distance to the shoreline on the local sea-spray dynamics is investigated. In the second set of simulation, the particles issued from the local production in the surf zone near the shoreline are mixed with aerosols advected from the remote ocean. A good agreement between the model calculations using our boundary conditions and the data was found. The

  12. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling In Deep Repository Under The Effect of Emplacement Media Degradation - 13285

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Jivkov, A.P.

    2013-07-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is being actively considered and pursued in many countries, where low permeability geological formations are used to provide long term waste contaminant with minimum impact to the environment and risk to the biosphere. A multi-barrier approach that makes use of both engineered and natural barriers (i.e. geological formations) is often used to further enhance the containment performance of the repository. As the deep repository system subjects to a variety of thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) effects over its long 'operational' lifespan (e.g. 0.1 to 1.0 million years, the integrity of the barrier system will decrease over time (e.g. fracturing in rock or clay)). This is broadly referred as media degradation in the present study. This modelling study examines the effects of media degradation on diffusion dominant solute transport in fractured media that are typical of deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes, while the effects of degradation is studied using a pore network model that considers the media diffusivity and network changes. Model results are presented to demonstrate the use of a 3D pore-network model, using a novel architecture, to calculate macroscopic properties of the medium such as diffusivity, subject to pore space changes as the media degrade. Results from a reactive transport model of a representative geological waste disposal package are also presented to demonstrate the effect of media property change on the solute migration behaviour, illustrating the complex interplay between kinetic biogeochemical processes and diffusion dominant transport. The initial modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of a coupled modelling approach (using pore-network model and reactive

  13. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  14. Distinguishing resuspension and advection signals in a hypertidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, David; Souza, Alex; Jago, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial material is supplied to an estuary system by the river, while marine material is supplied by the sea. Whether the estuary acts as a trap or a bypass zone for SPM (suspended particulate matter) depends upon the properties and dynamics of both the estuary, including the tidal and residual behaviour of the currents, and the SPM, including particle sizes and settling velocities and concentration gradients, which together control the dynamics, such as the trapping efficiency, of the estuary. Whether an SPM signal is regarded as being one of resuspension or advection depends upon the area of interest, and therefore distinguishing between resuspension and advection can be complex. Material that is resuspended within the area of study is regarded as resuspension, while that which is resuspended outside, but passes through, the area of interest, is regarded as advection. The results of a measurement campaign undertaken in a hypertidal UK estuary during the pre-spring bloom February-March and post-spring bloom May-June are presented utilising a combination of acoustic and optical instruments, moorings, and CTD stations. A characteristic asymmetric "twin peak" signal is present during both time periods, implying the presence of both resuspension and advection. This is confirmed through the use of harmonic analysis. A seasonal variation in the relative importance of the resuspension and advection components is seen between the two observation periods, with the small (<122µm) and large (>122µm) particles displaying different behaviours and providing a strong indication of the presence of flocculation. Approximate point flux calculations showed a reduction in the horizontal gradient of concentration, and subsequently the flood dominance of sediment transport, between May-June and February-March. This has been attributed to changes in biological activity and atmospheric forcing between the two observational periods. Ebb-dominant concentrations brought about by the

  15. An improved dual porosity model for chemical transport in macroporous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Chittaranjan; Ellsworth, Timothy R.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Boast, Charles W.

    1997-06-01

    The often observed processes involved in preferential water flow and chemical transport in porous media appear to be realistically described using a dual-continuum (dual-porosity) approach. In this approach, the porous medium is conceptualized as two coexistent continua, one representing the bulk matrix and the other the macropore region. Fluid and solute mass transfer between the two regions in the conceptual model occurs under pressure and concentration gradients. However, oscillatory behavior (overshoot problems in the macropore region) of the transport equation was observed for high values of the advective solute flux relative to the diffusive solute flux between the two regions. To circumvent this oscillatory behavior, the fluid coupling term in the transport equations was treated as an element-averaged, rather than a nodal property. The model was extended to two space dimensions for evaluating the impact of agricultural practices on solute leaching. A linear kinetic sorption module in the transport equations and a simple plant root extraction routine in the flow equations were also added. Although the simulation results show promise, additional work will be needed to determine realistic model parameter values.

  16. A lithofacies approach for modeling non-Fickian solute transport in a heterogeneous alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic realizations of lithofacies assemblage based on lithological data from a relatively small number of boreholes were used to simulate solute transport at the well-known Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi (USA). With sharp vertical contrasts and lateral connectivity explicitly accounted for in the corresponding hydraulic conductivity fields, experimental results from a large-scale tracer experiment were adequately reproduced with a relatively simple model based on advection and local dispersion. The geologically based model of physical heterogeneity shows that one well-interconnected lithofacies, with a significantly higher hydraulic conductivity and accounting for 12% of the total aquifer volume, may be responsible for the observed non-Fickian transport behavior indicated by the asymmetric shape of the plumes and by variations of the dispersion rate in both space and time. This analysis provides a lithological basis to the hypothesis that transport at MADE site is controlled by a network of high-conductivity sediments embedded in a less permeable matrix. It also explains the calibrated value of the ratio of mobile to total porosities used in previous modeling studies based on the dual-domain mass transfer approach. The results of this study underscore the importance of geologically plausible conceptualizations of the subsurface for making accurate predictions of the fate and transport of contaminants in highly heterogeneous aquifers. These conceptualizations may be developed through integration of raw geological data with expert knowledge, interpretation, and appropriate geostatistical methods.

  17. Applications of a thermal-based two-source energy balance model using Priestley-Taylor approach for surface temperature partitioning (TSEB_PTT) under advective conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operational application of the two source energy balance model (TSEB) which can estimate evaportranspiration (ET) and the components evaporation (E), transpiration (T) of the land surface in different climates is very useful for many applications in hydrology and agriculture. The TSEB model uses an ...

  18. Modeling Transport of Viruses in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, B. E.; Mondal, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are frequently used for water supply for human consumption. In many instances the fractured rock aquifers are vulnerable to contamination by pathogens, including viruses, due to co-location of on-site septic systems, wastewater discharges, biosolids and agricultural activities. Approximately half of the illnesses associated with groundwater consumption in the Unites States have been attributed to viral contamination. A number of these cases have been related to transport of viruses from septic systems to drinking water wells. Despite the potential for rapid transport of viruses through rock fractures to drinking water wells, the understanding of virus transport in fractured rock is limited. In particular, the impacts of virus size, fracture aperture variability and roughness, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and geochemical conditions have not been well studied. In this study, a multidimensional model for virus transport in variable aperture fractures is presented. The model is applied to laboratory experiments on transport of virus-sized latex microspheres (0.02 and 0.2 microns) and bacteriophages (MS2 and PR772) in artificially fractured dolomite rocks. In these experiments significant impacts of particle size, fracture characteristics, groundwater velocity, and geochemistry were observed. Given the variability in aperture distribution and associated spatial variation in groundwater flow field, one-dimensional models were not suitable for a comprehensive evaluation of the mechanisms governing the microsphere and bacteriophage transport. Various relationships for virus retention (attachment and detachment) are evaluated to provide insight into the governing processes in virus transport in fractured rock. In addition, the role of virus size, fracture aperture variability, fracture roughness, fracture surface charge, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and ionic strength in virus transport are evaluated. Scale-up to the field is

  19. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  20. GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, J.; Molod, A.; Nielsen, J. E.; Auer, B.; Putman, W.; Clune, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) General Circulation Model (GCM) makes use of the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) to enable model configurations with many functions. One of the options of the GEOS-5 GCM is the GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model (GEOS-5 CTM), which is an offline simulation of chemistry and constituent transport driven by a specified meteorology and other model output fields. This document describes the basic components of the GEOS-5 CTM, and is a user's guide on to how to obtain and run simulations on the NCCS Discover platform. In addition, we provide information on how to change the model configuration input files to meet users' needs.

  1. Modeling Fate and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Overland and Near- surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a manure-borne protozoan parasite which is common in the environment. It has been recognized as an important microbial contaminant of water and can cause infection and diarrhea in many mammalian hosts, including humans. The laboratory experiments carried out have demonstrated that recovery of C. parvum oocysts was significantly affected by climatic and surface conditions like slope, rainfall and surface cover. The objective of this study is to develop a model for simulating transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland and near-surface flow. Modeling can help understanding oocysts transport pathways. Accordingly, best management practices (BMP) can be developed. Transport of oocysts in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the oocysts in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay). Oocysts adsorption, advection and decay processes are considered. These processes are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in oocyst concentrations in solid and liquid phases. The model results are compared with experimental data to validate the model outcome. The model output reproduced observed recovery kinetics for 1.5% slope but not for higher slopes (3.0% and 4.5%).

  2. Modeling variably saturated subsurface solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and MT3DMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Langevin, Christian D.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Healy, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    The MT3DMS groundwater solute transport model was modified to simulate solute transport in the unsaturated zone by incorporating the unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package developed for MODFLOW. The modified MT3DMS code uses a volume-averaged approach in which Lagrangian-based UZF1 fluid fluxes and storage changes are mapped onto a fixed grid. Referred to as UZF-MT3DMS, the linked model was tested against published benchmarks solved analytically as well as against other published codes, most frequently the U.S. Geological Survey's Variably-Saturated Two-Dimensional Flow and Transport Model. Results from a suite of test cases demonstrate that the modified code accurately simulates solute advection, dispersion, and reaction in the unsaturated zone. Two- and three-dimensional simulations also were investigated to ensure unsaturated-saturated zone interaction was simulated correctly. Because the UZF1 solution is analytical, large-scale flow and transport investigations can be performed free from the computational and data burdens required by numerical solutions to Richards' equation. Results demonstrate that significant simulation runtime savings can be achieved with UZF-MT3DMS, an important development when hundreds or thousands of model runs are required during parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations revealed UZF-MT3DMS to have runtimes that are less than one tenth of the time required by models that rely on Richards' equation. Given its accuracy and efficiency, and the wide-spread use of both MODFLOW and MT3DMS, the added capability of unsaturated-zone transport in this familiar modeling framework stands to benefit a broad user-ship.

  3. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  4. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  5. Modelling physical-biological interactions in the Southeast Brazil Bight: transport patterns of Brazilian Sardine larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggiani Dias, D.; Gherardi, D. F.; Pezzi, L. P.

    2013-05-01

    The advection of Brazilian Sardine (Sardinella brasiliensis) eggs and larvae in the SBB was modeled using an individual-based model (Ichthyop) and a hydrodynamic model (Regional Ocean Modeling System, ROMS) to test for differences in larval retention for five spawning areas with high probability of egg occurrence: i) two areas north of the domain - Cape Frio and Rio de Janeiro, ii) one in the middle in Sao Sebastiao, and iii) two in the South in Paranagua. According to previous studies, this encompasses the known spawning habitat. Advective processes and physical characteristics, such as water temperature and salinity, were considered to determine larvae transport and survival. The hydrodynamic model grid has a horizontal resolution of 1/12o. Results of monthly mean Sea Surface Temperature (MSST) and Sea Surface Height (MSSH) indicate there isn't warming or cooling trend over the years, and the seasonal cycle well represented. These results were compared with satellite-derived data from the AVHRR sensor and AVISO project. Model results accurately represent the position and shape of the main surface structures observed in the satellite data. Monthly MSST maps for the experiment period indicate that the model tends to underestimate temperatures in upwelling areas and overestimate in the Brazil Current region, with differences mostly around ±1oC. For MSSH, although the model represents well the main surface ocean structures, it tends to underestimate along the domain. Temperature-salinity diagrams plotted in a coastal area for December of four years (1985, 1986, 1987 and 1988), near Ubatuba region, are consistent with field collected data, suggesting that the main water masses in SBB are reliably represented. The IBM experiments were carried out during the summer of six years (1980, 1981, 1988, 1991, 1992 and 1993). For each year, 20000 eggs were released, distributed in the five areas, and tracked for 45 days. At the end of simulation, the mortality due to

  6. Development of a three-dimensional, regional, coupled wave, current, and sediment-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Signell, R.P.; Harris, C.K.; Arango, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional numerical model that implements algorithms for sediment transport and evolution of bottom morphology in the coastal-circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v3.0), and provides a two-way link between ROMS and the wave model Simulating Waves in the Nearshore (SWAN) via the Model-Coupling Toolkit. The coupled model is applicable for fluvial, estuarine, shelf, and nearshore (surfzone) environments. Three-dimensional radiation-stress terms have been included in the momentum equations, along with effects of a surface wave roller model. The sediment-transport algorithms are implemented for an unlimited number of user-defined non-cohesive sediment classes. Each class has attributes of grain diameter, density, settling velocity, critical stress threshold for erosion, and erodibility constant. Suspended-sediment transport in the water column is computed with the same advection-diffusion algorithm used for all passive tracers and an additional algorithm for vertical settling that is not limited by the CFL criterion. Erosion and deposition are based on flux formulations. A multi-level bed framework tracks the distribution of every size class in each layer and stores bulk properties including layer thickness, porosity, and mass, allowing computation of bed morphology and stratigraphy. Also tracked are bed-surface properties including active-layer thickness, ripple geometry, and bed roughness. Bedload transport is calculated for mobile sediment classes in the top layer. Bottom-boundary layer submodels parameterize wave-current interactions that enhance bottom stresses and thereby facilitate sediment transport and increase bottom drag, creating a feedback to the circulation. The model is demonstrated in a series of simple test cases and a realistic application in Massachusetts Bay. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a three-dimensional, regional, coupled wave, current, and sediment-transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John C.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Harris, Courtney K.; Arango, Hernan G.

    2008-10-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional numerical model that implements algorithms for sediment transport and evolution of bottom morphology in the coastal-circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v3.0), and provides a two-way link between ROMS and the wave model Simulating Waves in the Nearshore (SWAN) via the Model-Coupling Toolkit. The coupled model is applicable for fluvial, estuarine, shelf, and nearshore (surfzone) environments. Three-dimensional radiation-stress terms have been included in the momentum equations, along with effects of a surface wave roller model. The sediment-transport algorithms are implemented for an unlimited number of user-defined non-cohesive sediment classes. Each class has attributes of grain diameter, density, settling velocity, critical stress threshold for erosion, and erodibility constant. Suspended-sediment transport in the water column is computed with the same advection-diffusion algorithm used for all passive tracers and an additional algorithm for vertical settling that is not limited by the CFL criterion. Erosion and deposition are based on flux formulations. A multi-level bed framework tracks the distribution of every size class in each layer and stores bulk properties including layer thickness, porosity, and mass, allowing computation of bed morphology and stratigraphy. Also tracked are bed-surface properties including active-layer thickness, ripple geometry, and bed roughness. Bedload transport is calculated for mobile sediment classes in the top layer. Bottom-boundary layer submodels parameterize wave-current interactions that enhance bottom stresses and thereby facilitate sediment transport and increase bottom drag, creating a feedback to the circulation. The model is demonstrated in a series of simple test cases and a realistic application in Massachusetts Bay.

  8. Finite element modeling of contaminant transport in soils including the effect of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Javadi, A A; Al-Najjar, M M

    2007-05-17

    The movement of chemicals through soils to the groundwater is a major cause of degradation of water resources. In many cases, serious human and stock health implications are associated with this form of pollution. Recent studies have shown that the current models and methods are not able to adequately describe the leaching of nutrients through soils, often underestimating the risk of groundwater contamination by surface-applied chemicals, and overestimating the concentration of resident solutes. Furthermore, the effect of chemical reactions on the fate and transport of contaminants is not included in many of the existing numerical models for contaminant transport. In this paper a numerical model is presented for simulation of the flow of water and air and contaminant transport through unsaturated soils with the main focus being on the effects of chemical reactions. The governing equations of miscible contaminant transport including advection, dispersion-diffusion and adsorption effects together with the effect of chemical reactions are presented. The mathematical framework and the numerical implementation of the model are described in detail. The model is validated by application to a number of test cases from the literature and is then applied to the simulation of a physical model test involving transport of contaminants in a block of soil with particular reference to the effects of chemical reactions. Comparison of the results of the numerical model with the experimental results shows that the model is capable of predicting the effects of chemical reactions with very high accuracy. The importance of consideration of the effects of chemical reactions is highlighted.

  9. Analytical solutions to the fractional advection-diffusion equation with time-dependent pulses on the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbab, Qammar; Mirza, Itrat Abbas; Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar

    2016-07-01

    The time-fractional advection-diffusion equation with Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives (fractional derivatives without singular kernel) is considered under the time-dependent emissions on the boundary and the first order chemical reaction. The non-dimensional problem is formulated by using suitable dimensionless variables and the fundamental solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the fractional advection-diffusion equation are determined using the integral transforms technique. The fundamental solutions for the ordinary advection-diffusion equation, fractional and ordinary diffusion equation are obtained as limiting cases of the previous model. Using Duhamel's principle, the analytical solutions to the Dirichlet problem with time-dependent boundary pulses have been obtained. The influence of the fractional parameter and of the drift parameter on the solute concentration in various spatial positions was analyzed by numerical calculations. It is found that the variation of the fractional parameter has a significant effect on the solute concentration, namely, the memory effects lead to the retardation of the mass transport.

  10. Investigating the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi, using a three-dimensional inverse flow and transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlebo, Heidi Christiansen; Hill, Mary C.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2004-04-01

    Flowmeter-measured hydraulic conductivities from the heterogeneous MADE site have been used predictively in advection-dispersion models. Resulting simulated concentrations failed to reproduce even major plume characteristics and some have concluded that other mechanisms, such as dual porosity, are important. Here an alternative possibility is investigated: that the small-scale flowmeter measurements are too noisy and possibly too biased to use so directly in site-scale models and that the hydraulic head and transport data are more suitable for site-scale characterization. Using a calibrated finite element model of the site and a new framework to evaluate random and systematic model and measurement errors, the following conclusions are derived. (1) If variations in subsurface fluid velocities like those simulated in this work (0.1 and 2.0 m per day along parallel and reasonably close flow paths) exist, it is likely that classical advection-dispersion processes can explain the measured plume characteristics. (2) The flowmeter measurements are possibly systematically lower than site-scale values when the measurements are considered individually and using common averaging methods and display variability that obscures abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivities that are well supported by changes in hydraulic gradients and are important to the simulation of transport.

  11. Investigating the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi, using a three-dimensional inverse flow and transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlebo, H.C.; Hill, M.C.; Rosbjerg, D.

    2004-01-01

    Flowmeter-measured hydraulic conductivities from the heterogeneous MADE site have been used predictively in advection-dispersion models. Resulting simulated concentrations failed to reproduce even major plume characteristics and some have concluded that other mechanisms, such as dual porosity, are important. Here an alternative possibility is investigated: that the small-scale flowmeter measurements are too noisy and possibly too biased to use so directly in site-scale models and that the hydraulic head and transport data are more suitable for site-scale characterization. Using a calibrated finite element model of the site and a new framework to evaluate random and systematic model and measurement errors, the following conclusions are derived. (1) If variations in subsurface fluid velocities like those simulated in this work (0.1 and 2.0 m per day along parallel and reasonably close flow paths) exist, it is likely that classical advection-dispersion processes can explain the measured plume characteristics. (2) The flowmeter measurements are possibly systematically lower than site-scale values when the measurements are considered individually and using common averaging methods and display variability that obscures abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivities that are well supported by changes in hydraulic gradients and are important to the simulation of transport.

  12. Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

    2013-06-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

  13. Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: the effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties.

    PubMed

    Apul, Defne S; Gardner, Kevin H; Eighmy, T Taylor

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m(3)/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils. PMID:17521900

  14. Modeling the transport and fate of radioactive noble gases in very dry desert alluvium: Realistic scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1992-12-31

    US DOE Order 5820.2A (1988) requires that a performance assessment of all new and existing low-level radioactive waste management sites be made. An integral part of every performance assessment is the mathematical modeling of the transport and fate of noble gas radionuclides in the gas phase. Current in depth site characterization of the high desert alluvium in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is showing that the alluvium is very very dry all the way to the water table (240 meters below land surface). The potential for radioactive noble gas (e.g. Rn-220 and Rn-222) transport to the atmosphere from shallow land burial of Thorium and Uranium waste is very high. Objectives of this modeling effort include: Construct a physics based sits specific noble gas transport model; Include induced advection due to barometric pressure changes at the atmospheric boundary layer (thin) - dry desert alluvium interface; User selected option for use of NOAA barometric pressure or a ``home brewed`` barometric pressure wave made up of up to 15 sinusoids and cosinusoids; Use the model to help make engineering decisions on the design of the burial pits and associated closure caps.

  15. Microscale-based modeling of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon transport and biodegradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, I.S.; Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L.

    1996-07-05

    A mathematical model to describe polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) desorption, transport, and biodegradation in saturated soil was constructed by describing kinetics at a microscopic level and incorporating this description into macroscale transport equations. This approach is novel in that the macroscale predictions are made independently from a knowledge of microscale kinetics and macroscopic fluid dynamics and no adjustable parameters are used to fit the macroscopic response. It was assumed that soil organic matter, the principal site of PAH sorption, was composed of a continuum of compartments with a gamma distribution of desorption rate coefficients. The mass transport of substrates and microorganisms in a mesopore was described by diffusion and that in a macropore by one-dimensional advection and dispersion. Naphthalene was considered as a test PAH compound for initial model simulations. Three mechanisms of naphthalene biodegradation were considered: growth-associated degradation as a carbon and energy source for microbial growth; degradation for maintenance energy; and growth-independent degradation. The Haldane modification of the Monod equation was used to describe microbial growth rates and to account for possible growth inhibition by naphthalene. Multisubstrate interactions were considered and described with a noninteractive model for specific growth rates. The sensitivity of selected model parameters was analyzed under conditions when naphthalene was the sole growth-rate-limiting substrate.

  16. Analytical models of the impact of two-phase sorption on subsurface transport of volatile chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, C.A.; Culver, T.B.; Lion, L.W.; Peterson, M.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Unsaturated zone models incorporating the impact of vapor-phase sorption on transport of volatile organic compounds are presented with closed from solutions for one-and two-dimensional cases. In addition to vapor-phase sorption the models incorporate liquid-phase sorption, liquid advection, gaseous diffusion, and volatilization into soil air spaces and to the atmosphere. The motivation for incorporation of vapor-phase sorption arises from recent experimental results by the authors indicating that vapor-phase sorption may be orders of magnitude higher than liquid-phase sorption under certain soil conditions. The sensitivity analysis suggests that there is considerable interaction among the physical and chemical processes involved in transport of volatile organic compounds. Pollutant concentrations are most affected by the Henry's law constant and gaseous diffusion; the speed of movement of the material depends most upon the pore water velocity and vapor-phase sorption. The incorporation of vapor-phase sorption can significantly reduce model predictions of the transport speed and amount of volatile chemical reaching the groundwater under dry soil conditions. This result is of considerable practical significance since models currently used for remediation and regulation do not include vapor-phase sorption.

  17. Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: the effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties.

    PubMed

    Apul, Defne S; Gardner, Kevin H; Eighmy, T Taylor

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m(3)/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils.

  18. Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: The effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties

    SciTech Connect

    Apul, Defne S. Gardner, Kevin H. Eighmy, T. Taylor

    2007-07-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m{sup 3}/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils.

  19. Kinetic Relaxation Models for Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Markowich, Peter; Takata, Shigeru

    2007-04-01

    Kinetic equations with relaxation collision kernels are considered under the basic assumption of two collision invariants, namely mass and energy. The collision kernels are of BGK-type with a general local Gibbs state, which may be quite different from the Gaussian. By the use of the diffusive length/time scales, energy transport systems consisting of two parabolic equations with the position density and the energy density as unknowns are derived on a formal level. The H theorem for the kinetic model is presented, and the entropy for the energy transport systems, which is inherited from the kinetic model, is derived. The energy transport systems for specific examples of the global Gibbs state, such as a power law with negative exponent, a cut-off power law with positive exponent, the Maxwellian, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions, arepresented.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of phonon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2016-06-01

    A novel lattice Boltzmann scheme is proposed for phonon transport based on the phonon Boltzmann equation. Through the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the phonon lattice Boltzmann equation under the gray relaxation time approximation recovers the classical Fourier's law in the diffusive limit. The numerical parameters in the lattice Boltzmann model are therefore rigorously correlated to the bulk material properties. The new scheme does not only eliminate the fictitious phonon speed in the diagonal direction of a square lattice system in the previous lattice Boltzmann models, but also displays very robust performances in predicting both temperature and heat flux distributions consistent with analytical solutions for diverse numerical cases, including steady-state and transient, macroscale and microscale, one-dimensional and multi-dimensional phonon heat transport. This method may provide a powerful numerical tool for deep studies of nonlinear and nonlocal heat transports in nanosystems.

  1. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  2. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  3. Effect of natural particles on the transport of lindane in saturated porous media: Laboratory experiments and model-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K.; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal particles can act as carriers for adsorbing pollutants, such as hydrophobic organic pollutants, and enhance their mobility in the subsurface. In this study, we investigate the influence of colloidal particles on the transport of pesticides through saturated porous media by column experiments. We also investigate the effect of particle size on this transport. The model pesticide is lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane), a representative hydrophobic insecticide which has been banned in 2009 but is still used in many developing countries. The breakthrough curves are analyzed with the help of numerical modeling, in which we examine the minimum model complexity needed to simulate such transport. The transport of lindane without particles can be described by advective-dispersive transport coupled to linear three-site sorption, one site being in local equilibrium and the others undergoing first-order kinetic sorption. In the presence of mobile particles, the total concentration of mobile lindane is increased, that is, lindane is transported not only in aqueous solution but also sorbed onto the smallest, mobile particles. The models developed to simulate separate and associated transport of lindane and the particles reproduced the measurements very well and showed that the adsorption/desorption of lindane to the particles could be expressed by a common first-order rate law, regardless whether the particles are mobile, attached, or strained.

  4. Tracer transport in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Y.; Richardson, M. I.; Newman, C. E.; Lee, C.; Toigo, A. D.; Campin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Transport is crucial to understanding and reproducing the Martian dust and water cycles, and to interpreting putative methane and other trace gas (e.g. Argon) observations. However, as quantified by comparing model predictions with Argon measurements made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer [e.g. Sprague et al., 2004, 2007], current Mars general circulation models (GCM's) appear to do a poor job at tracer transport [e.g. Nelli et al., 2007]. This invalidates a core assumption of GCM modeling in the last decade - that transport is sufficiently well treated in models that we need focus only on improving physical parameterizations, and that differences between results from different GCM's stem purely from their treatment of physical processes. If instead it is the simulated dynamical processes that need better treatment we need to move towards higher-quality numerics, e.g. based on the finite volume formulation, and introduce a more sophisticated approach to advection following work done for terrestrial chemical transport modeling. Here we present the results of non-condensable tracer transport simulations using our newly developed Mars MITgcm, which has both of the aforementioned desirable attributes: a finite volume core and access to a range of sophisticated advection schemes. Our results are encouraging in that we are able to reproduce the observed peak polar Argon enhancement factor of six (about double that attainable with most other Mars GCMs). Our diagnostics show that the time-averaged zonal-mean advection produces net increases of Argon at the winter poles, while stationary and transient eddies transport Argon away from the poles. Using less diffusive nonlinear advection schemes with flux limiters tends to produce more advective fluxes of tracers into the southern winter pole than the more diffusive linear advection schemes, resulting in a greater net increase of polar Argon abundance. We further utilize a more realistic k-distribution radiative transfer model, an

  5. Improved numerical modeling of groundwater flow and transport at the MADE-2 site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.D.; Rucker, D.F.

    1995-02-01

    Public domain computer programs were used to attempt an improved model of the tritium plume observed during Macrodispersion Experiment 2 (MADE-2), a field scale natural gradient experiment conducted at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. The finite difference program MODFLOW was used to simulate the flow of groundwater through a 330 m x 105 m computational domain. Solutions for the 468 day experiment were obtained using a Sun Sparcstation 2 for several choices of convergence and storage parameters. The simulations had small mass balance errors and were consistent with continuous head observations. Tritium plume simulations used the mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian finite difference program MT3D to solve the contaminant transport equation using the MODFLOW-predicted flow field. Thirteen runs were made using various advection algorithms and dispersivities, but none was successful.

  6. Glucose transport machinery reconstituted in cell models.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper S; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R; Malmstadt, Noah; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2015-02-11

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it. PMID:25562394

  7. Glucose Transport Machinery Reconstituted in Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R.; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it. PMID:25562394

  8. Cumulus parameterizations in chemical transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahowald, Natalie M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1995-12-01

    Global three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs) are valuable tools for studying processes controlling the distribution of trace constituents in the atmosphere. A major uncertainty in these models is the subgrid-scale parametrization of transport by cumulus convection. This study seeks to define the range of behavior of moist convective schemes and point toward more reliable formulations for inclusion in chemical transport models. The emphasis is on deriving convective transport from meteorological data sets (such as those from the forecast centers) which do not routinely include convective mass fluxes. Seven moist convective parameterizations are compared in a column model to examine the sensitivity of the vertical profile of trace gases to the parameterization used in a global chemical transport model. The moist convective schemes examined are the Emanuel scheme [Emanuel, 1991], the Feichter-Crutzen scheme [Feichter and Crutzen, 1990], the inverse thermodynamic scheme (described in this paper), two versions of a scheme suggested by Hack [Hack, 1994], and two versions of a scheme suggested by Tiedtke (one following the formulation used in the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) and ECHAM3 (European Centre and Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut) models [Tiedtke, 1989], and one formulated as in the TM2 (Transport Model-2) model (M. Heimann, personal communication, 1992). These convective schemes vary in the closure used to derive the mass fluxes, as well as the cloud model formulation, giving a broad range of results. In addition, two boundary layer schemes are compared: a state-of-the-art nonlocal boundary layer scheme [Holtslag and Boville, 1993] and a simple adiabatic mixing scheme described in this paper. Three tests are used to compare the moist convective schemes against observations. Although the tests conducted here cannot conclusively show that one parameterization is better than the others, the tests are a good measure of the

  9. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone.

    PubMed

    Bachand, P A M; Bachand, S; Fleck, J; Anderson, F; Windham-Myers, L

    2014-06-15

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flow rates and tracer concentrations at wetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactor model solutions, a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these non-ideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a flux model, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment-water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemical mechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition, our understanding of

  10. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: model development and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Seetha, N; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe=0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high if

  11. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: Model development and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetha, N.; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe = 0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100 nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high

  12. Transport and modeling of estrogenic hormones in a dairy farm effluent through undisturbed soil lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Laure D; Bidwell, Vincent J; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Northcott, Grant L

    2010-04-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including estrone (E1) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), in surface waters has been associated with physiological dysfunction in a number of aquatic organisms. One source of surface and groundwater contamination with E1 and E2 is the land application of animal wastes. The processes involved in the transport of these hormones in the soil, when applied with animal wastes, are still unclear. Therefore, a field-transport experiment was carried out, where a dairy farm effluent spiked with E1 and E2 was applied on large (50 cm diameter and 70 cm depth) undisturbed soil lysimeters. The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the leachate were monitored over a 3-month period, during which irrigation was applied. The experimental data suggest that E1 and E2 were transported through preferential/macropore flow pathways. The data from the experiment also show that E1 and E2 are leached earlier than the inert tracer (bromide). This observation can be explained either by the presence of antecedent concentrations in the soil or by an enhanced transport of E1 and E2 through the soil. A state-space mixing-cell model was further developed in order to describe the transport of E1 and E2 by three transport processes in parallel. The inverse modeling of the leaching data did not support the hypothesis that antecedent concentrations of estrogens could be responsible for the observed breakthrough curves but confirmed that estrogens were transported mainly via preferential/macropore flow and also via an enhanced transport. The parameter values that characterized this enhanced transport strongly suggest that this enhanced transport is mediated by colloids. For the first time, the simultaneous transport of E1 and E2 was modeled under transient conditions, taking into account the advection-dispersion, preferential/macropore flow, and colloidal-enhanced transport processes as well as E1 and E2 dissipation in the soil. These findings have major implications in

  13. Transport and modeling of estrogenic hormones in a dairy farm effluent through undisturbed soil lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Laure D; Bidwell, Vincent J; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Northcott, Grant L

    2010-04-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including estrone (E1) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), in surface waters has been associated with physiological dysfunction in a number of aquatic organisms. One source of surface and groundwater contamination with E1 and E2 is the land application of animal wastes. The processes involved in the transport of these hormones in the soil, when applied with animal wastes, are still unclear. Therefore, a field-transport experiment was carried out, where a dairy farm effluent spiked with E1 and E2 was applied on large (50 cm diameter and 70 cm depth) undisturbed soil lysimeters. The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the leachate were monitored over a 3-month period, during which irrigation was applied. The experimental data suggest that E1 and E2 were transported through preferential/macropore flow pathways. The data from the experiment also show that E1 and E2 are leached earlier than the inert tracer (bromide). This observation can be explained either by the presence of antecedent concentrations in the soil or by an enhanced transport of E1 and E2 through the soil. A state-space mixing-cell model was further developed in order to describe the transport of E1 and E2 by three transport processes in parallel. The inverse modeling of the leaching data did not support the hypothesis that antecedent concentrations of estrogens could be responsible for the observed breakthrough curves but confirmed that estrogens were transported mainly via preferential/macropore flow and also via an enhanced transport. The parameter values that characterized this enhanced transport strongly suggest that this enhanced transport is mediated by colloids. For the first time, the simultaneous transport of E1 and E2 was modeled under transient conditions, taking into account the advection-dispersion, preferential/macropore flow, and colloidal-enhanced transport processes as well as E1 and E2 dissipation in the soil. These findings have major implications in

  14. A four-dimensional variational chemistry data assimilation scheme for Eulerian chemistry transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibern, Hendrik; Schmidt, Hauke

    1999-08-01

    The inverse problem of data assimilation of tropospheric trace gas observations into an Eulerian chemistry transport model has been solved by the four-dimensional variational technique including chemical reactions, transport, and diffusion. The University of Cologne European Air Pollution Dispersion Chemistry Transport Model 2 with the Regional Acid Deposition Model 2 gas phase mechanism is taken as the basis for developing a full four-dimensional variational data assimilation package, on the basis of the adjoint model version, which includes the adjoint operators of horizontal and vertical advection, implicit vertical diffusion, and the adjoint gas phase mechanism. To assess the potential and limitations of the technique without degrading the impact of nonperfect meteorological analyses and statistically not established error covariance estimates, artificial meteorological data and observations are used. The results are presented on the basis of a suite of experiments, where reduced records of artificial "observations" are provided to the assimilation procedure, while other "data" is retained for performance control of the analysis. The paper demonstrates that the four-dimensional variational technique is applicable for a comprehensive chemistry transport model in terms of computational and storage requirements on advanced parallel platforms. It is further shown that observed species can generally be analyzed, even if the "measurements" have unbiased random errors. More challenging experiments are presented, aiming to tax the skill of the method (1) by restricting available observations mostly to surface ozone observations for a limited assimilation interval of 6 hours and (2) by starting with poorly chosen first guess values. In this first such application to a three-dimensional chemistry transport model, success was also achieved in analyzing not only observed but also chemically closely related unobserved constituents.

  15. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  16. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  17. Correlated signals and causal transport in ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a framework for interpreting the time-lagged correlation of oceanographic data in terms of physical transport mechanisms. Previous studies have inferred aspects of ocean circulation by correlating fluctuations in temperature and salinity measurements at distant stations. Typically, the time-lag of greatest correlation is interpreted as an advective transit time and hence the advective speed of the current. In this paper we relate correlation functions directly to the underlying equations of fluid transport. This is accomplished by expressing the correlation functions in terms of the Green's function of the transport equation. Two types of correlation functions are distinguished: field-forcing correlation and field-field correlation. Their unique relationships to the Green's function are illustrated in two idealized models of geophysical transport: a leaky pipe model and an advective-diffusive model. Both models show that the field-forcing correlation function converges to the Green's function as the characteristic (time or length) scale of forcing autocorrelation decreases. The leaky pipe model provides an explanation for why advective speeds inferred from time-lagged correlations are often less than the speed of the main current. The advective-diffusive model reveals a structural bias in the field-field correlation function when used to estimate transit times.

  18. Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin; Sun, Yu; Riva, Ricardo; Ran, Jiangjun

    2013-04-01

    Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has enormously extended our knowledge of the Earth's system by allowing natural mass transport of various origin to be quantified. This concerns, in particular, the depletion and replenishment of continental water stocks; shrinking of polar ice sheets; deformation of the Earth's crust triggered by large earthquakes, and isostatic adjustment processes. A number of research centers compute models of temporal gravity field variations and mass transport, using GRACE data as input. One of such models - Delft Mass Transport model - is being produced at the Delft University of Technology in collaboration with the GNSS Research Center of Wuhan University. A new release of this model, DMT-2, has been produced on the basis of a new (second) release of GRACE level-1b data. This model consists of a time-series of monthly solutions spanning a time interval of more than 8 years, starting from Feb. 2003. Each solution consists of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 120. Both unconstrained and optimally filtered solutions are obtained. The most essential improvements of the DMT-2 model, as compared to its predecessors (DMT-1 and DMT-1b), are as follows: (i) improved estimation and elimination of low-frequency noise in GRACE data, so that strong mass transport signals are not damped; (ii) computation of accurate stochastic models of data noise for each month individually with a subsequent application of frequency-dependent data weighting, which allows statistically optimal solutions to be compiled even if data noise is colored and gradually changes in time; (iii) optimized estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters; (iv) incorporation of degree 1 coefficients estimated with independent techniques; (v) usage of state-of-the-art background models to de-alias GRACE data from rapid mass transport signals (this includes the EOT11a model of ocean tides and the latest release of the AOD1B product describing

  19. A model of axonal transport drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper a model of targeted drug delivery by means of active (motor-driven) axonal transport is developed. The model is motivated by recent experimental research by Filler et al. (A.G. Filler, G.T. Whiteside, M. Bacon, M. Frederickson, F.A. Howe, M.D. Rabinowitz, A.J. Sokoloff, T.W. Deacon, C. Abell, R. Munglani, J.R. Griffiths, B.A. Bell, A.M.L. Lever, Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect, Bmc Neuroscience 11 (2010) 8) that reported synthesis and pharmacological efficiency tests of a tri-partite complex designed for axonal transport drug delivery. The developed model accounts for two populations of pharmaceutical agent complexes (PACs): PACs that are transported retrogradely by dynein motors and PACs that are accumulated in the axon at the Nodes of Ranvier. The transitions between these two populations of PACs are described by first-order reactions. An analytical solution of the coupled system of transient equations describing conservations of these two populations of PACs is obtained by using Laplace transform. Numerical results for various combinations of parameter values are presented and their physical significance is discussed.

  20. Influence of karst evolution on solute transport evaluated by process-based numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    Karst waters are of major interest in water resources management. Because of their inherent properties karst systems show great vulnerability with regard to contaminants. Karst systems include highly permeable solution conduit networks formed by chemical aggressive water embedded in a fissured matrix. Small initial voids are widened and thus act as preferential passages, where flow is rapid and often turbulent. Water discharging at karst spring originates from different pathways with different residence times. Contaminant transport through conduit pathways is very rapid, whereas flow through the fissured porous matrix is much slower. Thus, on the one hand, pollutants may be rapidly transported and reach high concentrations at the karst spring shortly after their release; on the other hand, the existence of slow flow components may cause the pollution to last for long times. In this work, solute transport properties of karst aquifers are investigated using generic conduit networks of hydraulically connected proto-conduits with initially log-normally distributed apertures in the millimetre range and below. Conduit evolution is modelled by coupling flow, transport, and dissolution processes, whereby single conduits are widened up to the metre range. Thus, different stages of karst evolution can be distinguished. The resulting flow systems provide the basis for modelling advective-dispersive transport of non-reactive solutes through the network of more or less widened (proto-)conduits. The general transport characteristics in karst systems as well as the influence of heterogeneities and structures on solute transport are illustrated for cases of direct injection into the conduit systems at different evolutionary stages. The resulting breakthrough curves typically show several distinct, chronologically shifted peaks with long tailings, which appears to be similar to data from field tracer experiments.

  1. Advection by polytropic compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeinde, F.; O'Brien, E. E.; Cai, X.; Liu, W.

    1995-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to examine scalar correlation in low Mach number, polytropic, homogeneous, two-dimensional turbulence (Ms≤0.7) for which the initial conditions, Reynolds, and Mach numbers have been chosen to produce three types of flow suggested by theory: (a) nearly incompressible flow dominated by vorticity, (b) nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and (c) nearly statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Turbulent flows typical of each of these cases have been generated and a passive scalar field imbedded in them. The results show that a finite-difference based computer program is capable of producing results that are in reasonable agreement with pseudospectral calculations. Scalar correlations have been calculated from the DNS results and the relative magnitudes of terms in low-order scalar moment equations determined. It is shown that the scalar equation terms with explicit compressibility are negligible on a long time-averaged basis. A physical-space EDQNM model has been adapted to provide another estimate of scalar correlation evolution in these same two-dimensional, compressible cases. The use of the solenoidal component of turbulence energy, rather than total turbulence energy, in the EDQNM model gives results closer to those from DNS in all cases.

  2. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  3. Public transport networks: empirical analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ferber, C.; Holovatch, T.; Holovatch, Yu.; Palchykov, V.

    2009-03-01

    Public transport networks of fourteen cities of so far unexplored network size are analyzed in standardized graph representations: the simple graph of the network map, the bipartite graph of routes and stations, and both one mode projections of the latter. Special attention is paid to the inter-relations and spatial embedding of transport routes. This systematic approach reveals rich behavior beyond that of the ubiquitous scale-free complex network. We find strong evidence for structures in PTNs that are counter-intuitive and need to be explained, among these a pronounced diversity in the expression of typical network characteristics within the present sample of cities, a surprising geometrical behavior with respect to the two-dimensional geographical embedding and an unexpected attraction between transport routes. A simple model based on these observations reproduces many of the identified PTN properties by growing networks of attractive self-avoiding walks.

  4. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  5. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for ({sup 3}H)NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections.

  6. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  7. Mesoscopic Modeling of Reactive Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Q.; Chen, L.; Deng, H.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive transport processes involving precipitation and/or dissolution are pervasive in geochemical, biological and engineered systems. Typical examples include self-assembled patterns such as Liesegang rings or bands, cones of stalactites in limestones caves, biofilm growth in aqueous environment, formation of mineral deposits in boilers and heat exchangers, uptake of toxic metal ions from polluted water by calcium carbonate, and mineral trapping of CO2. Compared to experimental studies, a numerical approach enables a systematic study of the reaction kinetics, mass transport, and mechanisms of nucleation and crystal growth, and hence provides a detailed description of reactive transport processes. In this study, we enhance a previously developed lattice Boltzmann pore-scale model by taking into account the nucleation process, and develop a mesoscopic approach to simulate reactive transport processes involving precipitation and/or dissolution of solid phases. The model is then used to simulate the formation of Liesegang precipitation patterns and investigate the effects of gel on the morphology of the precipitates. It is shown that this model can capture the porous structures of the precipitates and can account for the effects of the gel concentration and material. A wide range of precipitation patterns is predicted under different gel concentrations, including regular bands, treelike patterns, and for the first time with numerical models, transition patterns from regular bands to treelike patterns. The model is also applied to study the effect of secondary precipitate on the dissolution of primary mineral. Several types of dissolution and precipitation processes are identified based on the morphology and structures of the precipitates and on the extent to which the precipitates affect the dissolution of the primary mineral. Finally the model is applied to study the formation of pseudomorph. It is demonstrated for the first time by numerical simulation that a

  8. A Dual Regime Reactive Transport Model for Simulation of High Level Waste Tank Closure Scenarios - 13375

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Sohini; Kosson, David S.; Brown, Kevin; Garrabrants, Andrew C.; Meeussen, Hans; Van der Sloot, Hans

    2013-07-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented in this paper for estimating evolution of pH and release of major species from grout within high-level waste tanks after closure. This model was developed as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The reactive transport model consists of two parts - (1) transport of species, and (2) chemical reactions. The closure grout can be assumed to have varying extents of cracking and composition for performance assessment purposes. The partially or completely degraded grouted tank is idealized as a dual regime system comprising of a mobile region having solid materials with cracks and macro-pores, and an immobile/stagnant region having solid matrix with micropores. The transport profiles of the species are calculated by incorporating advection of species through the mobile region, diffusion of species through the immobile/stagnant region, and exchange of species between the mobile and immobile regions. A geochemical speciation code in conjunction with the pH dependent test data for a grout material is used to obtain a mineral set that best describes the trends in the test data of the major species. The dual regime reactive transport model predictions are compared with the release data from an up-flow column percolation test. The coupled model is then used to assess effects of crack state of the structure, rate and composition of the infiltrating water on the pH evolution at the grout-waste interface. The coupled reactive transport model developed in this work can be used as part of the performance assessment process for evaluating potential risks from leaching of a cracked tank containing elements of human health and environmental concern. (authors)

  9. A two-dimensional, time-dependent model of suspended sediment transport and bed reworking for continental shelves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, C.K.; Wiberg, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the transport equation is formulated to account for advection and diffusion of sediment suspended in the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves. This model utilizes a semi-implicit, upwind-differencing scheme to solve the advection-diffusion equation across a two-dimensional transect that is configured so that one dimension is the vertical, and the other is a horizontal dimension usually aligned perpendicular to shelf bathymetry. The model calculates suspended sediment concentration and flux; and requires as input wave properties, current velocities, sediment size distributions, and hydrodynamic sediment properties. From the calculated two-dimensional suspended sediment fluxes, we quantify the redistribution of shelf sediment, bed erosion, and deposition for several sediment sizes during resuspension events. The two-dimensional, time-dependent approach directly accounts for cross-shelf gradients in bed shear stress and sediment properties, as well as transport that occurs before steady-state suspended sediment concentrations have been attained. By including the vertical dimension in the calculations, we avoid depth-averaging suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes, and directly account for differences in transport rates and directions for fine and coarse sediment in the bottom boundary layer. A flux condition is used as the bottom boundary condition for the transport equation in order to capture time-dependence of the suspended sediment field. Model calculations demonstrate the significance of both time-dependent and spatial terms on transport and depositional patterns on continental shelves. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MODELING TRANSPORT IN THE DOWN GRADIENT PORTION OF THE 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    MEHTA S; ALY AH; MILLER CW; MAYENNA A

    2009-12-03

    Remedial Investigations are underway for the 200-PO-l Operable Unit (OU) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. To support the baseline risk assessment and evaluation of remedial alternatives, fate and transport modeling is being conducted to predict the future concentration of contaminants of potential concern in the 200-PO-1 OU. This study focuses on modeling the 'down gradient' transport of those contaminants that migrate beyond the 3-D model domain selected for performing detailed 'source area' modeling within the 200-PO-1 OU. The down gradient portion is defined as that region of the 200-PO-1 OU that is generally outside the 200 Area (considered 'source area') of the Hanford Site. A 1-D transport model is developed for performing down gradient contaminant fate and transport modeling. The 1-D transport model is deemed adequate based on the inferred transport pathway of tritium in the past and the observation that most of the contaminant mass remains at or near the water table within the unconfined aquifer of the Hanford Formation and the Cold-Creek/Pre-Missoula Gravel unit. The Pipe Pathway feature of the GoldSim software is used to perform the calculations. The Pipe Pathway uses a Laplace transform approach to provide analytical solutions to a broad range of advection-dominated mass transport systems involving one-dimensional advection, longitudinal dispersion, retardation, decay and ingrowth, and exchanges with immobile storage zones. Based on the historical concentration distribution data for the extensive tritium plume in this area, three Pipe Pathways are deemed adequate for modeling transport of contaminants. Each of these three Pipe Pathways is discretized into several zones, based on the saturated thickness variation in the unconfined aquifer and the location of monitoring wells used for risk assessment calculation. The mass fluxes of contaminants predicted to exit the source area model domain are used as an input to the

  11. Atmospheric water vapor transport: Estimation of continental precipitation recycling and parameterization of a simple climate model. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The advective transport of atmospheric water vapor and its role in global hydrology and the water balance of continental regions are discussed and explored. The data set consists of ten years of global wind and humidity observations interpolated onto a regular grid by objective analysis. Atmospheric water vapor fluxes across the boundaries of selected continental regions are displayed graphically. The water vapor flux data are used to investigate the sources of continental precipitation. The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from surrounding areas external to the region; and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. In a separate, but related, study estimates of ocean to land water vapor transport are used to parameterize an existing simple climate model, containing both land and ocean surfaces, that is intended to mimic the dynamics of continental climates.

  12. Comparative assessment of continuum-scale models of bimolecular reactive transport in porous media under pre-asymptotic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porta, G. M.; Ceriotti, G.; Thovert, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    We compare the ability of various continuum-scale models to reproduce the key features of a transport setting associated with a bimolecular reaction taking place in the fluid phase and numerically simulated at the pore-scale level in a disordered porous medium. We start by considering a continuum-scale formulation which results from formal upscaling of this reactive transport process by means of volume averaging. The resulting (upscaled) continuum-scale system of equations includes nonlocal integro-differential terms and the effective parameters embedded in the model are quantified directly through computed pore-scale fluid velocity and pore space geometry attributes. The results obtained through this predictive model formulation are then compared against those provided by available effective continuum models which require calibration through parameter estimation. Our analysis considers two models recently proposed in the literature which are designed to embed incomplete mixing arising from the presence of fast reactions under advection-dominated transport conditions. We show that best estimates of the parameters of these two models heavily depend on the type of data employed for model calibration. Our upscaled nonlocal formulation enables us to reproduce most of the critical features observed through pore-scale simulation without any model calibration. As such, our results clearly show that embedding into a continuum-scale model the information content associated with pore-scale geometrical features and fluid velocity yields improved interpretation of typically available continuum-scale transport observations.

  13. Turbulent transport models for scramjet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindir, M. M.; Harsha, P. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulence modeling approaches were examined from the standpoint of their capability to predict the complex flowfield features observed in scramjet combustions. Thus, for example, the accuracy of each turbulence model, with respect to the prediction of recirculating flows, was examined. It was observed that for large diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansion flows, a choice of turbulence model was not critical because of the domination of their flowfields by pressure forces. For low diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansions and planar backward-facing steps flows, where turbulent shear stresses are of greater significance, the algebraic Reynolds stress approach, modified to increase its sensitivity to streamline curvature, was found to provide the best results. Results of the study also showed that strongly swirling flows provide a stringent test of turbulence model assumptions. Thus, although flows with very high swirl are not of great practical interest, they are useful for turbulence model development. Finally, it was also noted that numerical flowfields solution techniques have a strong interrelation with turbulence models, particularly with the turbulent transport models which involve source-dominated transport equations.

  14. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  15. Environmental fate and transport of chemical signatures from buried landmines -- Screening model formulation and initial simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Webb, S.W.

    1997-06-01

    The fate and transport of chemical signature molecules that emanate from buried landmines is strongly influenced by physical chemical properties and by environmental conditions of the specific chemical compounds. Published data have been evaluated as the input parameters that are used in the simulation of the fate and transport processes. A one-dimensional model developed for screening agricultural pesticides was modified and used to simulate the appearance of a surface flux above a buried landmine, estimate the subsurface total concentration, and show the phase specific concentrations at the ground surface. The physical chemical properties of TNT cause a majority of the mass released to the soil system to be bound to the solid phase soil particles. The majority of the transport occurs in the liquid phase with diffusion and evaporation driven advection of soil water as the primary mechanisms for the flux to the ground surface. The simulations provided herein should only be used for initial conceptual designs of chemical pre-concentration subsystems or complete detection systems. The physical processes modeled required necessary simplifying assumptions to allow for analytical solutions. Emerging numerical simulation tools will soon be available that should provide more realistic estimates that can be used to predict the success of landmine chemical detection surveys based on knowledge of the chemical and soil properties, and environmental conditions where the mines are buried. Additional measurements of the chemical properties in soils are also needed before a fully predictive approach can be confidently applied.

  16. Variational multiscale models for charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei; Zheng, Qiong; Chen, Zhan; Xia, Kelin

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a few variational multiscale models for charge transport in complex physical, chemical and biological systems and engineering devices, such as fuel cells, solar cells, battery cells, nanofluidics, transistors and ion channels. An essential ingredient of the present models, introduced in an earlier paper (Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 72, 1562-1622, 2010), is the use of differential geometry theory of surfaces as a natural means to geometrically separate the macroscopic domain from the microscopic domain, meanwhile, dynamically couple discrete and continuum descriptions. Our main strategy is to construct the total energy functional of a charge transport system to encompass the polar and nonpolar free energies of solvation, and chemical potential related energy. By using the Euler-Lagrange variation, coupled Laplace-Beltrami and Poisson-Nernst-Planck (LB-PNP) equations are derived. The solution of the LB-PNP equations leads to the minimization of the total free energy, and explicit profiles of electrostatic potential and densities of charge species. To further reduce the computational complexity, the Boltzmann distribution obtained from the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is utilized to represent the densities of certain charge species so as to avoid the computationally expensive solution of some Nernst-Planck (NP) equations. Consequently, the coupled Laplace-Beltrami and Poisson-Boltzmann-Nernst-Planck (LB-PBNP) equations are proposed for charge transport in heterogeneous systems. A major emphasis of the present formulation is the consistency between equilibrium LB-PB theory and non-equilibrium LB-PNP theory at equilibrium. Another major emphasis is the capability of the reduced LB-PBNP model to fully recover the prediction of the LB-PNP model at non-equilibrium settings. To account for the fluid impact on the charge transport, we derive coupled Laplace-Beltrami, Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations from the variational principle

  17. Resistive Plate Chambers: electron transport and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjaković, D.; Petrović, Z. Lj; Dujko, S.

    2014-12-01

    We study the electron transport in gas mixtures used by Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in high energy physics experiments at CERN. Calculations are performed using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation. We identify the effects induced by non-conservative nature of electron attachment, including attachment heating of electrons and negative differential conductivity (NDC). NDC was observed only in the bulk component of drift velocity. Using our Monte Carlo technique, we calculate the spatially resolved transport properties in order to investigate the origin of these effects. We also present our microscopic approach to modeling of RPCs which is based on Monte Carlo method. Calculated results for a timing RPC show good agreement with an analytical model and experimental data. Different cross section sets for electron scattering in C2H2F4 are used for comparison and analysis.

  18. Dual-permeability model for water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Gerke, Horst; Comegna, Alessandro; Basile, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    A dual-permeability approach was extended to describe preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils. In the approach, the soil is treated as a dual-permeability bulk porous medium consisting of dynamic interacting matrix and fractures pore domains. Water flow and solute transport in both the domains are described by the Richards' equation and advection-dispersion equation, respectively. In the model the contributions of the two regions to water flow and solute transport is changed dynamically according to the shrinkage characteristic exhibited under soil drying. Aggregate deformation during wetting/drying cycles is assumed to change only the relative proportions of voids in the fractures and in the aggregates, while the total volume of pores (and thus the layer thickness) remains unchanged. Thus, the partial contributions of the fracture and aggregate domains, are now a function of the water content (or the pressure head h), while their sum, the bulk porosity, is assumed to be constant. Any change in the aggregate contribution to total porosity is directly converted into a proportional change in the fracture porosity. This means that bulk volume change during shrinkage is mainly determined by change in crack volume rather than by change in layer thickness. This simplified approach allows dealing with an expansive soil as with a macroscopically rigid soil. The model was already tested by investigating whether and how well hydraulic characteristics obtained under the assumption of "dynamic" dual-permeability hydraulic parameterizations, or, alternatively, assuming the rigidity of the porous medium, reproduced measured soil water contents in a shrinking soil. Here we will discuss theoretical implications of the model in terms of relative importance of the parameters involved. The relative importance will be evaluated for different flow and transport processes and for different initial and top boundary conditions. Key words: Preferential flow and

  19. Modelling sediment clasts transport during landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretier, Sébastien; Martinod, Pierre; Reich, Martin; Godderis, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Over thousands to millions of years, the landscape evolution is predicted by models based on fluxes of eroded, transported and deposited material. The laws describing these fluxes, corresponding to averages over many years, are difficult to prove with the available data. On the other hand, sediment dynamics are often tackled by studying the distribution of certain grain properties in the field (e.g. heavy metals, detrital zircons, 10Be in gravel, magnetic tracers). There is a gap between landscape evolution models based on fluxes and these field data on individual clasts, which prevent the latter from being used to calibrate the former. Here we propose an algorithm coupling the landscape evolution with mobile clasts. Our landscape evolution model predicts local erosion, deposition and transfer fluxes resulting from hillslope and river processes. Clasts of any size are initially spread in the basement and are detached, moved and deposited according to probabilities using these fluxes. Several river and hillslope laws are studied. Although the resulting mean transport rate of the clasts does not depend on the time step or the model cell size, our approach is limited by the fact that their scattering rate is cell-size-dependent. Nevertheless, both their mean transport rate and the shape of the scattering-time curves fit the predictions. Different erosion-transport laws generate different clast movements. These differences show that studying the tracers in the field may provide a way to establish these laws on the hillslopes and in the rivers. Possible applications include the interpretation of cosmogenic nuclides in individual gravel deposits, provenance analyses, placers, sediment coarsening or fining, the relationship between magnetic tracers in rivers and the river planform, and the tracing of weathered sediment.

  20. Simulation of Field-Scale Non-Fickian Plumes With Spatiotemporal Fractional Advection- Dispersion Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Conservative solute transport through natural media is typically "anomalous" or non-Fickian. The anomalous transport may be characterized by faster than linear growth of the centered second moment, or non-Gaussian leading or trailing edges of a plume emanating from a point source. These characteristics develop because of non-local dependence on either past (time) or far upstream (space) concentrations. Non-local equations developed to describe anomalous dispersion usually focus on constant transport parameters and/or independence of the transport on space dimension. These simplifications have been useful for fitting simple transport processes, such as laboratory column tests or 1-D projections of field data. However, they may be insufficient for real field settings, where direction-dependent depositional processes and nonstationary heterogeneity can occur. We develop a generalized, multi-dimensional, spatiotemporal fractional advection- dispersion equation (fADE) with variable parameters to characterize regional-scale anomalous dispersion processes including trapping in immobile zones and/or super-Fickian rapid transport. A Lagrangian numerical model of the space-time fractional transport equation is developed in which solute particles can disperse in both space and time, depending on the medium heterogeneity properties, such as the connectivity and statistical distributions of high versus low-permeability deposits. In the generalized fADE, the range of the order of fractional time derivative is (0 2], representing a wide range of possible trapping behavior. The extension of the order to the range (1 2] is novel to transport theory. We apply the numerical model in 1-D and 2-D to the MADE site tritium plumes, and results indicate that this method can capture the main behaviors of realistic plumes, including local variations of spreading, direction-dependent scaling rates, and arbitrary rapid transport along preferential flow paths. Since the governing equation

  1. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachand, P.A.M.; S. Bachand,; Fleck, Jacob A.; Anderson, Frank E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2014-01-01

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flowrates and tracer concentrations atwetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactormodel solutions, a continuous flowstirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these nonideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a fluxmodel, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment–water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemicalmechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition,our understanding of internal

  2. Abstracts of the symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    Abstract titles are: Recent developments in modeling variably saturated flow and transport; Unsaturated flow modeling as applied to field problems; Coupled heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils; Influence of climatic parameters on movement of radionuclides in a multilayered saturated-unsaturated media; Modeling water and solute transport in soil containing roots; Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials; modeling of water and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields; Fluid dynamics and mass transfer in variably-saturated porous media; Solute transport through soils; One-dimensional analytical transport modeling; Convective transport of ideal tracers in unsaturated soils; Chemical transport in macropore-mesopore media under partially saturated conditions; Influence of the tension-saturated zone on contaminant migration in shallow water regimes; Influence of the spatial distribution of velocities in porous media on the form of solute transport; Stochastic vs deterministic models for solute movement in the field; and Stochastic analysis of flow and solute transport. (DMC)

  3. Modifying SEBAL ET Algorithm to account for advection by using daily averages of weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhwanazi, M. M.; Chavez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The use of Remote Sensing (RS) in crop evapotranspiration (ET) estimation is aimed at improving agricultural water management. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) is one of several methods that have been developed for this purpose. This has been a preferred model as it requires minimal climate data. However, it has a noted downside of underestimating ET under advective conditions. This is primarily due to the use of evaporative fraction (EF) to extrapolate instantaneous ET to daily values, with the assumption that EF is constant throughout the day. A modified SEBAL model was used in this study, which requires daily averages of weather data to estimate advection which is then introduced into the 24-hour ET sub-model of SEBAL. The study was carried out in southeastern Colorado, a semi-arid area where afternoon advection is a common feature. ET estimated using the original and modified SEBAL was compared to the lysimeter-measured ET. Results showed that the modified SEBAL algorithm performed better in estimating daily ET in overall, but especially on days when there was advection. On non-advective days, the original SEBAL was more accurate. It is therefore recommended that the modified SEBAL be used only on advective days, and guidelines to help identify such days were proposed.

  4. Differential patterns of divergence in ocean drifters: Implications for larval flatfish advection and recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderbuer, Thomas; Duffy-Anderson, Janet T.; Stabeno, Phyllis; Hermann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    effect on horizontal eddy diffusion, increasing its value by a factor of five in the case of fixed-depth floats, as compared with a factor of two in the case of neutrally buoyant floats. Further, the incorporation of diurnal vertical behavior in phase with favorable (on shelf) tides transported the "larvae" ~ 400 km within 40 days of their release date. Empirical drifter data coupled with model evidence suggest that semi-diurnal tidal forcing is the primary mechanism of eastward advection over the Bering Sea shelf, and larval observational data suggest that northern rock sole larvae can maximize their eastward transport to nursery grounds by synchronizing their vertical movements to tidal periodicity during the postflexion stage.

  5. Moving from Batch to Field Using the RT3D Reactive Transport Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, T. P.; Gautam, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The public domain reactive transport code RT3D (Clement, 1997) is a general-purpose numerical code for solving coupled, multi-species reactive transport in saturated groundwater systems. The code uses MODFLOW to simulate flow and several modules of MT3DMS to simulate the advection and dispersion processes. RT3D employs the operator-split strategy which allows the code solve the coupled reactive transport problem in a modular fashion. The coupling between reaction and transport is defined through a separate module where the reaction equations are specified. The code supports a versatile user-defined reaction option that allows users to define their own reaction system through a Fortran-90 subroutine, known as the RT3D-reaction package. Further a utility code, known as BATCHRXN, allows the users to independently test and debug their reaction package. To analyze a new reaction system at a batch scale, users should first run BATCHRXN to test the ability of their reaction package to model the batch data. After testing, the reaction package can simply be ported to the RT3D environment to study the model response under 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional transport conditions. This paper presents example problems that demonstrate the methods for moving from batch to field-scale simulations using BATCHRXN and RT3D codes. The first example describes a simple first-order reaction system for simulating the sequential degradation of Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products. The second example uses a relatively complex reaction system for describing the multiple degradation pathways of Tetrachloroethane (PCA) and its daughter products. References 1) Clement, T.P, RT3D - A modular computer code for simulating reactive multi-species transport in 3-Dimensional groundwater aquifers, Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Research Report, PNNL-SA-28967, September, 1997. Available at: http://bioprocess.pnl.gov/rt3d.htm.

  6. Modeling the impact of restoration efforts on phosphorus loading and transport through Everglades National Park, FL, USA.

    PubMed

    Long, Stephanie A; Tachiev, Georgio I; Fennema, Robert; Cook, Amy M; Sukop, Michael C; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Ecosystems of Florida Everglades are highly sensitive to phosphorus loading. Future restoration efforts, which focus on restoring Everglades water flows, may pose a threat to the health of these ecosystems. To determine the fate and transport of total phosphorus and evaluate proposed Everglades restoration, a water quality model has been developed using the hydrodynamic results from the M3ENP (Mike Marsh Model of Everglades National Park)--a physically-based hydrological numerical model which uses MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 software. Using advection-dispersion with reactive transport for the model, parameters were optimized and phosphorus loading in the overland water column was modeled with good accuracy (60%). The calibrated M3ENP-AD model was then modified to include future bridge construction and canal water level changes, which have shown to increase flows into ENP. These bridge additions increased total dissolved phosphorus (TP) load downstream in Shark Slough and decreased TP load in downstream Taylor Slough. However, there was a general decrease in TP concentration and TP mass per area over the entire model domain. The M3ENP-AD model has determined the mechanisms for TP transport and quantified the impacts of ENP restoration efforts on the spatial-temporal distribution of phosphorus transport. This tool can be used to guide future Everglades restoration decisions.

  7. Dual Transport Process for Targeted Delivery in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, W.; Fan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The targeted delivery in porous media is a promising technology to encapsulate the solute (i.e., the cargo) in colloid-like microcapsules (i.e., the carriers), transport the microcapsules in the targeted location in porous media, and then release the solute. While extensive literatures and applications about the drug delivery in human and animal bodies exist, the targeted delivery using similar delivery carriers in subsurface porous media is not well understood. The dual transport process study is an explorative study for the targeted delivery in porous media. While the colloid transport is dominated by the advection process and the solute transport is dominated by the advection-dispersion, the dual transport process is the process with the first step of carrier transport, which is dominated by advection, and then after the release of cargo, the transport of cargo is dominated by advection-dispersion. By applying the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) approach, we investigate how the carriers transport in porous media and how the cargo release mechanisms affect the cargo distribution for the targeted delivery in various patterns of porous media. The RWPT numerical model will be verified against the experimental results of dual transport process in packed-disk 2D micromodels. The understanding of the mechanism of dual transport process is crucial to achieve the potential applications of targeted delivery in improved oil and gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, environmental remediation, and soil biomediation.

  8. Anomalous diffusion for bed load transport with a physically-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, N.; Singh, A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Wu, B.

    2013-12-01

    Diffusion of bed load particles shows both normal and anomalous behavior for different spatial-temporal scales. Understanding and quantifying these different types of diffusion is important not only for the development of theoretical models of particle transport but also for practical purposes, e.g., river management. Here we extend a recently proposed physically-based model of particle transport by Fan et al. [2013] to further develop an Episodic Langevin equation (ELE) for individual particle motion which reproduces the episodic movement (start and stop) of sediment particles. Using the proposed ELE we simulate particle movements for a large number of uniform size particles, incorporating different probability distribution functions (PDFs) of particle waiting time. For exponential PDFs of waiting times, particles reveal ballistic motion in short time scales and turn to normal diffusion at long time scales. The PDF of simulated particle travel distances also shows a change in its shape from exponential to Gamma to Gaussian with a change in timescale implying different diffusion scaling regimes. For power-law PDF (with power - μ) of waiting times, the asymptotic behavior of particles at long time scales reveals both super-diffusion and sub-diffusion, however, only very heavy tailed waiting times (i.e. 1.0 < μ < 1.5) could result in sub-diffusion. We suggest that the contrast between our results and previous studies (for e.g., studies based on fractional advection-diffusion models of thin/heavy tailed particle hops and waiting times) results could be due the assumption in those studies that the hops are achieved instantaneously, but in reality, particles achieve their hops within finite times (as we simulate here) instead of instantaneously, even if the hop times are much shorter than waiting times. In summary, this study stresses on the need to rethink the alternative models to the previous models, such as, fractional advection-diffusion equations, for studying

  9. Predicting the sun's polar magnetic fields with a surface flux transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H. E-mail: lar0009@uah.edu

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are directly related to solar cycle variability. The strength of the polar fields at the start (minimum) of a cycle determine the subsequent amplitude of that cycle. In addition, the polar field reversals at cycle maximum alter the propagation of galactic cosmic rays throughout the heliosphere in fundamental ways. We describe a surface magnetic flux transport model that advects the magnetic flux emerging in active regions (sunspots) using detailed observations of the near-surface flows that transport the magnetic elements. These flows include the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric cellular convective flows (supergranules), all of which vary in time in the model as indicated by direct observations. We use this model with data assimilated from full-disk magnetograms to produce full surface maps of the Sun's magnetic field at 15 minute intervals from 1996 May to 2013 July (all of sunspot cycle 23 and the rise to maximum of cycle 24). We tested the predictability of this model using these maps as initial conditions, but with daily sunspot area data used to give the sources of new magnetic flux. We find that the strength of the polar fields at cycle minimum and the polar field reversals at cycle maximum can be reliably predicted up to 3 yr in advance. We include a prediction for the cycle 24 polar field reversal.

  10. A composite numerical model for assessing subsurface transport of oily wastes and chemical constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Huyakorn, P. S.; Wade, S. C.; Saleem, Z. A.

    1997-02-01

    Subsurface fate and transport models are utilized to predict concentrations of chemicals leaching from wastes into downgradient receptor wells. The contaminant concentrations in groundwater provide a measure of the risk to human health and the environment. The level of potential risk is currently used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to determine whether management of the wastes should conform to hazardous waste management standards. It is important that the transport and fate of contaminants is simulated realistically. Most models in common use are inappropriate for simulating the migration of wastes containing significant fractions of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs). The migration of NAPL and its dissolved constituents may not be reliably predicted using conventional aqueous-phase transport simulations. To overcome this deficiency, an efficient and robust regulatory assessment model incorporating multiphase flow and transport in the unsaturated and saturated zones of the subsurface environment has been developed. The proposed composite model takes into account all of the major transport processes including infiltration and ambient flow of NAPL, entrapment of residual NAPL, adsorption, volatilization, degradation, dissolution of chemical constituents, and transport by advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Conceptually, the subsurface is treated as a composite unsaturated zone-saturated zone system. The composite simulator consists of three major interconnected computational modules representing the following components of the migration pathway: (1) vertical multiphase flow and transport in the unsaturated zone; (2) areal movement of the free-product lens in the saturated zone with vertical equilibrium; and (3) three-dimensional aqueous-phase transport of dissolved chemicals in ambient groundwater. Such a composite model configuration promotes computational efficiency and robustness (desirable for regulatory assessment applications). Two examples are

  11. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  12. Discrete element modelling of bedload transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyer, A.; Frey, P.

    2011-12-01

    Discrete element modelling (DEM) has been widely used in solid mechanics and in granular physics. In this type of modelling, each individual particle is taken into account and intergranular interactions are modelled with simple laws (e.g. Coulomb friction). Gravity and contact forces permit to solve the dynamical behaviour of the system. DEM is interesting to model configurations and access to parameters not directly available in laboratory experimentation, hence the term "numerical experimentations" sometimes used to describe DEM. DEM was used to model bedload transport experiments performed at the particle scale with spherical glass beads in a steep and narrow flume. Bedload is the larger material that is transported on the bed on stream channels. It has a great geomorphic impact. Physical processes ruling bedload transport and more generally coarse-particle/fluid systems are poorly known, arguably because granular interactions have been somewhat neglected. An existing DEM code (PFC3D) already computing granular interactions was used. We implemented basic hydrodynamic forces to model the fluid interactions (buoyancy, drag, lift). The idea was to use the minimum number of ingredients to match the experimental results. Experiments were performed with one-size and two-size mixtures of coarse spherical glass beads entrained by a shallow turbulent and supercritical water flow down a steep channel with a mobile bed. The particle diameters were 4 and 6mm, the channel width 6.5mm (about the same width as the coarser particles) and the channel inclination was typically 10%. The water flow rate and the particle rate were kept constant at the upstream entrance and adjusted to obtain bedload transport equilibrium. Flows were filmed from the side by a high-speed camera. Using image processing algorithms made it possible to determine the position, velocity and trajectory of both smaller and coarser particles. Modelled and experimental particle velocity and concentration depth

  13. Meeting in Korea: WASP Transport Modeling and WASP Ecological Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on excercises will be used to introduce pollutant transport modeling with the U.S. EPA's general water quality model, WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program). WASP features include a user-friendly Windows-based interfa...

  14. Meeting in Turkey: WASP Transport Modeling and WASP Ecological Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on excercises will be used to introduce pollutant transport modeling with the U.S. EPA's general water quality model, WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program). WASP features include a user-friendly Windows-based interfa...

  15. Generic reactive transport codes as flexible tools to integrate soil organic matter degradation models with water, transport and geochemistry in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Gérard, Fréderic; Mayer, Uli; Simunek, Jirka; Leterme, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    A large number of organic matter degradation, CO2 transport and dissolved organic matter models have been developed during the last decades. However, organic matter degradation models are in many cases strictly hard-coded in terms of organic pools, degradation kinetics and dependency on environmental variables. The scientific input of the model user is typically limited to the adjustment of input parameters. In addition, the coupling with geochemical soil processes including aqueous speciation, pH-dependent sorption and colloid-facilitated transport are not incorporated in many of these models, strongly limiting the scope of their application. Furthermore, the most comprehensive organic matter degradation models are combined with simplified representations of flow and transport processes in the soil system. We illustrate the capability of generic reactive transport codes to overcome these shortcomings. The formulations of reactive transport codes include a physics-based continuum representation of flow and transport processes, while biogeochemical reactions can be described as equilibrium processes constrained by thermodynamic principles and/or kinetic reaction networks. The flexibility of these type of codes allows for straight-forward extension of reaction networks, permits the inclusion of new model components (e.g.: organic matter pools, rate equations, parameter dependency on environmental conditions) and in such a way facilitates an application-tailored implementation of organic matter degradation models and related processes. A numerical benchmark involving two reactive transport codes (HPx and MIN3P) demonstrates how the process-based simulation of transient variably saturated water flow (Richards equation), solute transport (advection-dispersion equation), heat transfer and diffusion in the gas phase can be combined with a flexible implementation of a soil organic matter degradation model. The benchmark includes the production of leachable organic matter

  16. Thermal Transport Model for Heat Sink Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Brown, Ari D.; Smith, Stephen J.; Kilbourne, Caroline a.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the development of a finite element model for describing thermal transport through microcalorimeter arrays in order to assist in heat-sinking design. A fabricated multi-absorber transition edge sensor (PoST) was designed in order to reduce device wiring density by a factor of four. The finite element model consists of breaking the microcalorimeter array into separate elements, including the transition edge sensor (TES) and the silicon substrate on which the sensor is deposited. Each element is then broken up into subelements, whose surface area subtends 10 10 microns. The heat capacity per unit temperature, thermal conductance, and thermal diffusivity of each subelement are the model inputs, as are the temperatures of each subelement. Numerical integration using the Finite in Time Centered in Space algorithm of the thermal diffusion equation is then performed in order to obtain a temporal evolution of the subelement temperature. Thermal transport across interfaces is modeled using a thermal boundary resistance obtained using the acoustic mismatch model. The document concludes with a discussion of the PoST fabrication. PoSTs are novel because they enable incident x-ray position sensitivity with good energy resolution and low wiring density.

  17. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  19. Modeling VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the VOC permeability had been measured. Permeabilities for five VOCs [methylene chloride, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethylene] were measured across a polyethylene bag. Comparison of model and experimental results of VOC concentration as a function of time indicate that model accurately accounts for significant VOC transport mechanisms in a lab-scale waste drum.

  20. High Order Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2014-11-01

    In most fluid phenomena, advection plays an important roll. A numerical scheme capable of making quantitative predictions and simulations must compute correctly the advection terms appearing in the equations governing fluid flow. Here we present a high order forward semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme specifically tailored to compute material derivatives. The scheme relies on the geometrical interpretation of material derivatives to compute the time evolution of fields on grids that deform with the material fluid domain, an interpolating procedure of arbitrary order that preserves the moments of the interpolated distributions, and a nonlinear mapping strategy to perform interpolations between undeformed and deformed grids. Additionally, a discontinuity criterion was implemented to deal with discontinuous fields and shocks. Tests of pure advection, shock formation and nonlinear phenomena are presented to show performance and convergence of the scheme. The high computational cost is considerably reduced when implemented on massively parallel architectures found in graphic cards. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  1. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  2. Quantification of Stokes Drift as a Mechanism for Surface Oil Advection in the DWH Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.

    2013-12-01

    Stokes drift has previously been qualitatively shown to be a factor in ocean surface particle transport, but has never been comprehensively quantified. In addition, most operational ocean particle advection models used during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill do not explicitly account for Stokes drift, instead using a simple parameterization based on wind drift (or ignoring it completely). This research works to quantify Stokes drift via direct calculation, with a focus on shallow water, where Stokes drift is more likely to have a relatively large impact compared to other transport processes such as ocean currents. For this study, WaveWatch III modeled waves in the Gulf of Mexico are used, from which Stokes drift is calculated using the peak wave period and significant wave height outputs. Trajectories are also calculated to examine the role Stokes drift plays in bringing surface particles (and specifically surface oil slicks) onshore. The impact of Stokes drift is compared to transport by currents and traditional estimates of wind drift.

  3. A non-Linear transport model for determining shale rock characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Iftikhar; Malik, Nadeem

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs consist of tight porous rocks which are characterised by nano-scale size porous networks with ultra-low permeability [1,2]. Transport of gas through them is not well understood at the present time, and realistic transport models are needed in order to determine rock properties and for estimating future gas pressure distribution in the reservoirs. Here, we consider a recently developed non-linear gas transport equation [3], ∂p-+ U ∂p- = D ∂2p-, t > 0, (1) ∂t ∂x ∂x2 complimented with suitable initial and boundary conditions, in order to determine shale rock properties such as the permeability K, the porosity φ and the tortuosity, τ. In our new model, the apparent convection velocity, U = U(p,px), and the apparent diffusivity D = D(p), are both highly non-linear functions of the pressure. The model incorporate various flow regimes (slip, surface diffusion, transition, continuum) based upon the Knudsen number Kn, and also includes Forchchiemers turbulence correction terms. In application, the model parameters and associated compressibility factors are fully pressure dependent, giving the model more realism than previous models. See [4]. Rock properties are determined by solving an inverse problem, with model parameters adjustment to minimise the error between the model simulation and available data. It is has been found that the proposed model performs better than previous models. Results and details of the model will be presented at the conference. Corresponding author: namalik@kfupm.edu.sa and nadeem_malik@cantab.net References [1] Cui, X., Bustin, A.M. and Bustin, R., "Measurements of gas permeability and diffusivity of tight reservoir rocks: different approaches and their applications", Geofluids 9, 208-223 (2009). [2] Chiba R., Fomin S., Chugunov V., Niibori Y. and Hashida T., "Numerical Simulation of Non Fickian Diffusion and Advection in a Fractured Porous Aquifer", AIP Conference Proceedings 898, 75 (2007

  4. Modeling Electrical Transport through Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing

    Nucleic acids play a vital role in many biological systems and activities. In recent years, engineers and scientists have been interested in studying their electrical properties. The motivation for these studies stems from the following facts: (1) the bases, which form the building blocks of nucleic acids, have unique ionization potentials. Further, nucleic acids are one of the few nanomaterials that can be reproducibly manufactured with a high degree of accuracy (though admittedly their placement at desired locations remains a challenge). As a result, designed strands with specific sequences may offer unique device properties; (2) electrical methods offer potential for sequencing nucleic acids based on a single molecule; (3) electrical methods for disease detection based on the current flowing through nucleic acids are beginning to be demonstrated. While experiments in the above mentioned areas is promising, a deeper understanding of the electrical current flow through the nucleic acids needs to be developed. The modeling of current flowing in these molecules is complex because: (1) they are based on atomic scale contacts between nucleic acids and metal, which cannot be reproducibly built; (2) the conductivity of nucleic acids is easily influenced by the environment, which is constantly changing; and (3) the nucleic acids by themselves are floppy. This thesis focuses on the modeling of electrical transport through nucleic acids that are connected to two metal electrodes at nanoscale. We first develop a decoherent transport model for the double-stranded helix based on the Landauer-Buttiker framework. This model is rationalized by comparison with an experiment that measured the conductance of four different DNA strands. The developed model is then used to study the: (1) potential to make barriers and wells for quantum transport using specifically engineered sequences; (2) change in the electrical properties of a specific DNA strand with and without methylation; (3

  5. Io Volcanism: Modeling Vapor And Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Daniel R.; Howell, R. R.

    2010-10-01

    Loki is a large, active volcanic source on Jupiter's moon, Io, whose overall temperatures are well explained by current cooling models, but there are unexplainable subtleties. Using the SO2 atmospheric models of Ingersoll (1989) as a starting point, we are investigating how volatiles, specifically sulfur, are transported on the surface and how they modify the temperatures at Loki and other volcanoes. Voyager images reveal light colored deposits, colloquially called "sulfur bergs,” on Loki's dark patera floor that may be sulfur fumaroles. Galileo images show the presence of red short-chain sulfur deposits around the patera. We are investigating the mechanisms that lead to these features. The light deposits are a few kilometers across. Calculations of the mean free paths for day time conditions on Io indicate lengths on the order of 0.1 km while poorly constrained night time conditions indicate mean free paths about 100 times greater, on the order of what is needed to produce the deposits under ballistic conditions. Preliminary calculations reveal horizontal transport length scales for diffuse transport in a collisional atmosphere of approximately 30 km for sublimating S8 sulfur at 300 K. These length scales would be sufficient to move the sulfur from the warm patera floor to the locations of the red sulfur deposits. At a typical Loki temperature of 300 K, the sublimation/evaporation rate of S8 is a few tens of microns/day. It then requires just a few days to deposit an optically thick 100 µm layer of material. Preliminary length scales and sublimation rates are thus of sufficient scale to produce the deposits. Investigations into the sulfur transport and its effect on temperature are ongoing.

  6. Impact of immobile porosity architecture on reactive transport in mobile/immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; De Dreuzy, J.; Rapaport, A.; Casenave, C.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusive porosity structures in aquifers can display a large diversity of topologies, from intergranular porosity to the ';dead-ends' of fracture networks. Here we study numerically the influence of this topology on solute transport parameters, such as dispersion coefficient, and on a simple equilibrium reaction. We build a model where diffusive structures of variable topology (with junctions, loops...) exchange with a fast, advective zone. We show that the internal organization of volumes of the diffusive structure has a strong and non-trivial influence on transport and reactivity. We also show, through Multi-Rate Mass Transfer framework, that the signature of this topology on residence times is often sufficient to reproduce the initial reaction rates. We thus propose new ways to determine the appropriate MRMT models for a wide range of porosity types. However, more complex chemical / physical processes (kinetic-limited reactions, gravity effects...) may diminish this relevance of MRMT models to reproduce reaction rates, and additional parameters linked to the topology of diffusive structures may be required.

  7. Impact of immobile porosity architecture on reactive transport in mobile/immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; De Dreuzy, J.; Rapaport, A.; Casenave, C.

    2013-12-01

    Diffusive porosity structures in aquifers can display a large diversity of topologies, from intergranular porosity to the ';dead-ends' of fracture networks. Here we study numerically the influence of this topology on solute transport parameters, such as dispersion coefficient, and on a simple equilibrium reaction. We build a model where diffusive structures of variable topology (with junctions, loops...) exchange with a fast, advective zone. We show that the internal organization of volumes of the diffusive structure has a strong and non-trivial influence on transport and reactivity. We also show, through Multi-Rate Mass Transfer framework, that the signature of this topology on residence times is often sufficient to reproduce the initial reaction rates. We thus propose new ways to determine the appropriate MRMT models for a wide range of porosity types. However, more complex chemical / physical processes (kinetic-limited reactions, gravity effects...) may diminish this relevance of MRMT models to reproduce reaction rates, and additional parameters linked to the topology of diffusive structures may be required.

  8. 3 Lectures: "Lagrangian Models", "Numerical Transport Schemes", and "Chemical and Transport Models"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.

    2005-01-01

    The topics for the three lectures for the Canadian Summer School are Lagrangian Models, numerical transport schemes, and chemical and transport models. In the first lecture I will explain the basic components of the Lagrangian model (a trajectory code and a photochemical code), the difficulties in using such a model (initialization) and show some applications in interpretation of aircraft and satellite data. If time permits I will show some results concerning inverse modeling which is being used to evaluate sources of tropospheric pollutants. In the second lecture I will discuss one of the core components of any grid point model, the numerical transport scheme. I will explain the basics of shock capturing schemes, and performance criteria. I will include an example of the importance of horizontal resolution to polar processes. We have learned from NASA's global modeling initiative that horizontal resolution matters for predictions of the future evolution of the ozone hole. The numerical scheme will be evaluated using performance metrics based on satellite observations of long-lived tracers. The final lecture will discuss the evolution of chemical transport models over the last decade. Some of the problems with assimilated winds will be demonstrated, using satellite data to evaluate the simulations.

  9. DCPT v1.0 - New particle tracker for modeling transport in dual-continuum - User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Liu, Hui Hai; Cushey, Mark; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2001-04-01

    DCPT (Dual-Continuum Particle Tracker) V1.0 is a new software for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. It is based on the random-walk method for modeling transport processes such as advection, dispersion/diffusion, linear sorption, radioactive decay, and fracture-matrix mass exchange (in fractured porous media). The user shall provide flow-field and other parameters in the form of input files. In Comparison to several analytical and numerical solutions for a number of test cases, DCPT shows excellent performance in both accuracy and efficiency. This report serves as a user's manual of DCPT V1.0. It includes theoretical basis, numerical methods, software structure, input/output description, and examples.

  10. Can contaminant transport models predict breakthrough?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, Wei-Shyuan; Hampton, Duane R.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Kambham, Kiran; Benegar, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    A solute breakthrough curve measured during a two-well tracer test was successfully predicted in 1986 using specialized contaminant transport models. Water was injected into a confined, unconsolidated sand aquifer and pumped out 125 feet (38.3 m) away at the same steady rate. The injected water was spiked with bromide for over three days; the outflow concentration was monitored for a month. Based on previous tests, the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the thick aquifer varied by a factor of seven among 12 layers. Assuming stratified flow with small dispersivities, two research groups accurately predicted breakthrough with three-dimensional (12-layer) models using curvilinear elements following the arc-shaped flowlines in this test. Can contaminant transport models commonly used in industry, that use rectangular blocks, also reproduce this breakthrough curve? The two-well test was simulated with four MODFLOW-based models, MT3D (FD and HMOC options), MODFLOWT, MOC3D, and MODFLOW-SURFACT. Using the same 12 layers and small dispersivity used in the successful 1986 simulations, these models fit almost as accurately as the models using curvilinear blocks. Subtle variations in the curves illustrate differences among the codes. Sensitivities of the results to number and size of grid blocks, number of layers, boundary conditions, and values of dispersivity and porosity are briefly presented. The fit between calculated and measured breakthrough curves degenerated as the number of layers and/or grid blocks decreased, reflecting a loss of model predictive power as the level of characterization lessened. Therefore, the breakthrough curve for most field sites can be predicted only qualitatively due to limited characterization of the hydrogeology and contaminant source strength.

  11. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  12. Influence of porewater advection on denitrification in carbonate sands: Evidence from repacked sediment column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2012-11-01

    Porewater flow enhances mineralization rates in organic-poor permeable sands. Here, a series of sediment column experiments were undertaken to assess the potential effect of advective porewater transport on denitrification in permeable carbonate sands collected from Heron Island (Great Barrier Reef). Experimental conditions (flow path length, advection rate, and temperature) were manipulated to represent conditions similar to near shore tropical environments. HgCl2-poisoned controls were used to assess whether reactions were microbially mediated. Overall, significant correlations were found between oxygen consumption and N2 production. The N:O2 slope of 0.114 implied that about 75% of all the nitrogen mineralized was denitrified. A 4-fold increase in sediment column length (from 10 to 40 cm) resulted in an overall increase in oxygen consumption (1.6-fold), TCO2 production (1.8-fold), and denitrification (1.9-fold). Oxic respiration increased quickly until advection reached 80 L m-2 h-1 and then plateaued at higher advection rates. Interestingly, denitrification peaked (up to 336 μmol N2 m-2 h-1) at intermediate advection rates (30-80 L m-2 h-1). We speculate that intermediate advection rates enhance the development of microniches (i.e., steep oxygen gradients) within porous carbonate sands, perhaps providing optimum conditions for denitrification. The denitrification peak fell within the broad range of advection rates (often on scales of 1-100 L m-2 h-1) typically found on continental shelves implying that carbonate sands may play a major, but as yet unquantified, role in oceanic nitrogen budgets.

  13. Risk management model in road transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhapov, R. L.; Nikolaeva, R. V.; Gatiyatullin, M. H.; Makhmutov, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of a study of road safety indicators that influence the development and operation of the transport system. Road safety is considered as a continuous process of risk management. Authors constructed a model that relates the social risks of a major road safety indicator - the level of motorization. The model gives a fairly accurate assessment of the level of social risk for any given level of motorization. Authors calculated the dependence of the level of socio-economic costs of accidents and injured people in them. The applicability of the concept of socio-economic damage is caused by the presence of a linear relationship between the natural and economic indicators damage from accidents. The optimization of social risk is reduced to finding the extremum of the objective function that characterizes the economic effect of the implementation of measures to improve safety. The calculations make it possible to maximize the net present value, depending on the costs of improving road safety, taking into account socio-economic damage caused by accidents. The proposed econometric models make it possible to quantify the efficiency of the transportation system, allow to simulate the change in road safety indicators.

  14. Modeling charge transport in organic photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jenny; Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Kirkpatrick, James; Frost, Jarvist M

    2009-11-17

    The performance of an organic photovoltaic cell depends critically on the mobility of charge carriers within the constituent molecular semiconductor materials. However, a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales control charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. This Account describes a set of computational methods, specifically molecular modeling methods, to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. Using case studies, we show how this combination of methods can reproduce experimental mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Although currently applied to material systems of high symmetry or well-defined structure, further developments of this approach could address more complex systems such anisotropic or multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers. Even with an approximate treatment of packing disorder, these computational methods simulate experimental mobilities within an order of magnitude at high electric fields. We can both reproduce the relative values of electron and hole mobility in a conjugated small molecule and rationalize those values based on the symmetry of frontier orbitals. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of molecular packing, we can quantitatively replicate vertical charge transport along stacks of discotic liquid crystals which vary only in the structure of their side chains. We can reproduce the trends in mobility with molecular weight for self-organizing polymers using a cheap, coarse

  15. A space transportation system operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a description of a computer program which permits assessment of the operational support requirements of space transportation systems functioning in both a ground- and space-based environment. The scenario depicted provides for the delivery of payloads from Earth to a space station and beyond using upper stages based at the station. Model results are scenario dependent and rely on the input definitions of delivery requirements, task times, and available resources. Output is in terms of flight rate capabilities, resource requirements, and facility utilization. A general program description, program listing, input requirements, and sample output are included.

  16. Theoretical and Numerical Modeling of Transport of Land Use-Specific Fecal Source Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, F. A.; Sirikanchana, K. J.; Bae, S.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial contamination in coastal and estuarine waters is of particular concern to public health officials. In this work, we advocate that well-formulated and developed mathematical and numerical transport models can be combined with modern molecular techniques in order to predict continuous concentrations of microbial indicators under diverse scenarios of interest, and that they can help in source identification of fecal pollution. As a proof of concept, we present initially the theory, numerical implementation and validation of one- and two-dimensional numerical models aimed at computing the distribution of fecal source identifiers in water bodies (based on Bacteroidales marker DNA sequences) coming from different land uses such as wildlife, livestock, humans, dogs or cats. These models have been developed to allow for source identification of fecal contamination in large bodies of water. We test the model predictions using diverse velocity fields and boundary conditions. Then, we present some preliminary results of an application of a three-dimensional water quality model to address the source of fecal contamination in the San Pablo Bay (SPB), United States, which constitutes an important sub-embayment of the San Francisco Bay. The transport equations for Bacteroidales include the processes of advection, diffusion, and decay of Bacteroidales. We discuss the validation of the developed models through comparisons of numerical results with field campaigns developed in the SPB. We determine the extent and importance of the contamination in the bay for two decay rates obtained from field observations, corresponding to total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells, respectively. Finally, we infer transport conditions in the SPB based on the numerical results, characterizing the fate of outflows coming from the Napa, Petaluma and Sonoma rivers.

  17. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. The effect of diffusion and advection across the snow pores on the snow microstructure were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments and possible effects on natural snowpacks discussed. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective permeability. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Isothermal snow metamorphism is driven by sublimation deposition caused by the Kelvin effect and is the limiting factor independently of the transport regime in the pores.

  18. Metamorphism during temperature gradient with undersaturated advective airflow in a snow sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography is applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Cold saturated air at the inlet was blown into the snow samples and warmed up while flowing across the sample with a temperature gradient of around 50 K m-1. Changes of the porous ice structure were observed at mid-height of the snow sample. Sublimation occurred due to the slight undersaturation of the incoming air into the warmer ice matrix. Diffusion of water vapor opposite to the direction of the temperature gradient counteracted the mass transport of advection. Therefore, the total net ice change was negligible leading to a constant porosity profile. However, the strong recrystallization of water molecules in snow may impact its isotopic or chemical content.

  19. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.

  20. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M. Sinan; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors

  1. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  2. A Dynamic and Spatial Scaling Approach to Advection Forecasting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, A. W.

    2003-03-01

    Quantitative nowcasts of rainfall are frequently based on the advection of rain fields observed by weather radar. Spectral Prognosis (S-PROG) is an advection-based nowcasting system that uses the observations that rain fields commonly exhibit both spatial and dynamic scaling properties, that is, the lifetime of a feature in the field is dependent on the scale of the feature (large features evolve more slowly than small features), and that features at all scales between the outer and inner observed scales are present in the field. The logarithm of the radar reflectivity field is disaggregated into a set or cascade of fields, in which each field in the set (or level in the cascade) represents the features of the original field over a limited range of scales. The Lagrangian temporal evolution of each level in the cascade is modeled using a simple autoregressive (lag 2) model, which automatically causes the forecast field to become smooth as the structures at the various scales evolve through their life cycles, or can be used to generate conditional simulations if the noise term is included. This paper describes the model and presents preliminary results.

  3. Reactive transport modeling of Li isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, C.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    The fractionation of Li isotopes has been used as a proxy for interaction processes between silicate rocks and any kind of fluids. In particular, Li isotope measurements are powerful because Li is almost exclusively found in silicate minerals. Moreover, the two stable Li isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, differ by 17% in mass introducing a large mass dependent isotope fractionation even at high temperature. Typical applications include Li isotope measurements along soil profiles and of river waters to track silicate weathering patterns and Li isotope measurements of geothermal wells and springs to assess water-rock interaction processes in geothermal systems. For this contribution we present a novel reactive transport modeling approach for the simulation of Li isotope fractionation using the code TOUGHREACT [1]. It is based on a 6Li-7Li solid solution approach similar to the one recently described for simulating Cr isotope fractionation [2]. Model applications include the simulation of granite weathering along a 1D flow path as well as the simulation of a column experiment related to an enhanced geothermal system. Results show that measured δ7Li values are mainly controlled by (i) the degree of interaction between Li bearing primary silicate mineral phases (e.g., micas, feldspars) and the corresponding fluid, (ii) the Li isotope fractionation factor during precipitation of secondary mineral phases (e.g., clays), (iii) the Li concentration in primary and secondary Li bearing mineral phases and (iv) the proportion of dissolved Li that adsorbs to negatively charged surfaces (e.g., clays, Fe/Al-hydroxides). To date, most of these parameters are not very well constrained. Reactive transport modeling thus currently has to rely on many assumptions. Nevertheless, such models are powerful because they are the only viable option if individual contributions of all potential processes on the resulting (i.e., measured) Li isotopic ratio have to be quantitatively assessed. Accordingly, we

  4. Flow characteristics in a crowded transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Pietschmann, Jan-Frederik

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the appropriate modelling of in- and outflow boundary conditions for nonlinear drift-diffusion models for the transport of particles including size exclusion and their effect on the behaviour of solutions. We use a derivation from a microscopic asymmetric exclusion process and its extension to particles entering or leaving on the boundaries. This leads to specific Robin-type boundary conditions for inflow and outflow, respectively. For the stationary equation we prove the existence of solutions in a suitable set-up. Moreover, we investigate the flow characteristics for a small diffusion parameter \\varepsilon , which yields the occurrence of a maximal current phase in addition to well-known one-sided boundary layer effects for linear drift-diffusion problems. In a 1D set-up we provide rigorous estimates in terms of ε, which confirm three different phases. Finally, we derive a numerical approach to solve the problem also in multiple dimensions.

  5. Documentation of TRU biological transport model (BIOTRAN)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Garcia, B.J.; Sutton, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusive of Appendices, this document describes the purpose, rationale, construction, and operation of a biological transport model (BIOTRAN). This model is used to predict the flow of transuranic elements (TRU) through specified plant and animal environments using biomass as a vector. The appendices are: (A) Flows of moisture, biomass, and TRU; (B) Intermediate variables affecting flows; (C) Mnemonic equivalents (code) for variables; (D) Variable library (code); (E) BIOTRAN code (Fortran); (F) Plants simulated; (G) BIOTRAN code documentation; (H) Operating instructions for BIOTRAN code. The main text is presented with a specific format which uses a minimum of space, yet is adequate for tracking most relationships from their first appearance to their formulation in the code. Because relationships are treated individually in this manner, and rely heavily on Appendix material for understanding, it is advised that the reader familiarize himself with these materials before proceeding with the main text.

  6. Experiments and modeling of the transport of trichloroethene vapor in unsaturated aquifer material

    SciTech Connect

    Lorden, S.W.; Lion, L.W.; Chen, W.

    1998-07-01

    A bench-scale reactor system was used to investigate mass-transfer dynamics and transport of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor in a column of unsaturated aquifer material under conditions of advective gas flow, at 25 C and 90% relative humidity. Two gas flows and two relative vapor pressures of TCE (10% and 90% P/P{sub o}, where P is vapor pressure and P{sub o} is the saturation vapor pressure) were selected as experimental variables. Breakthrough curves were generated for week-long inputs of TCE-laden air and for short pulses of a nonsorbing tracer gas. Equilibrium sorption isotherms for TCE were also measured and used as tools for interpreting the column experiment results. Slow mass-transfer kinetics were observed in all of the transport experiments. Evidence from the breakthrough curves and the sorption isotherms suggested that, at 90% P/P{sub o}, a significant amount of TCE was condensed in pores or sorbed at the gas-water interface. Desorption and volatilization of interfacially sorbed TCE appeared to be rapid processes. The applicability of a recently developed mathematical transport model using a statistical {gamma} distribution of desorption rate constants was tested using the experimental data. The {gamma} distribution provides two adjustable parameters to account for sorption site heterogeneity and multiple mechanisms of sorption. When fit to the breakthrough curve obtained at high flow and high relative pressure, the model successfully predicted TCE frontal breakthrough and elution profiles at all other experimental conditions with no adjustable parameters. The predictive capability of the {gamma} model was shown to be superior to that of two commonly used alternative model paradigms: the two-site first-order and two-site spherical diffusion models.

  7. Description of sorbing tracers transport in fractured media using the lattice model approach.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Hornero, Francisco J; Giráldez, Juan V; Laguna, Ana

    2005-12-01

    The transport of contaminants in fractured media is a complex phenomenon with a great environmental impact. It has been described with several models, most of them based on complex partial differential equations, that are difficult to apply when equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics are considered in complex boundaries. With the aim of overcoming this limitation, a combination of two lattice Bathnagar, Gross and Krook (BGK) models, derived from the lattice Boltzmann model, is proposed in this paper. The fractured medium is assumed to be a single fissure in a porous rock matrix. The proposed approach permits us to deal with two processes with different length scales: advection-dispersion in the fissure and diffusion within the rock matrix. In addition to the mentioned phenomena, sorption reactions are also considered. The combined model has been tested using the experimental breakthrough curves obtained by Garnier et al. (Garnier, J.M., Crampon, N., Préaux, C., Porel, G., Vreulx, M., 1985. Traçage par 13C, 2H, I- et uranine dans la nappe de la craie sénonienne en écoulement radial convergent (Béthune, France). J. Hidrol. 78, 379-392.) giving acceptable results. A study on the influence of the lattice BGK models parameters controlling sorption and matrix diffusion on the breakthrough curves shape is included. PMID:16183166

  8. Development and Implementation of a Transport Method for the Transport and Reaction Simulation Engine (TaRSE) based on the Godunov-Mixed Finite Element Method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Andrew I.; Jawitz, James W.; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    A model to simulate transport of materials in surface water and ground water has been developed to numerically approximate solutions to the advection-dispersion equation. This model, known as the Transport and Reaction Simulation Engine (TaRSE), uses an algorithm that incorporates a time-splitting technique where the advective part of the equation is solved separately from the dispersive part. An explicit finite-volume Godunov method is used to approximate the advective part, while a mixed-finite element technique is used to approximate the dispersive part. The dispersive part uses an implicit discretization, which allows it to run stably with a larger time step than the explicit advective step. The potential exists to develop algorithms that run several advective steps, and then one dispersive step that encompasses the time interval of the advective steps. Because the dispersive step is computationally most expensive, schemes can be implemented that are more computationally efficient than non-time-split algorithms. This technique enables scientists to solve problems with high grid Peclet numbers, such as transport problems with sharp solute fronts, without spurious oscillations in the numerical approximation to the solution and with virtually no artificial diffusion.

  9. Modelling the transport of suspended particulate matter by the Rhone River plume (France). Implications for pollutant dispersion.

    PubMed

    Periáñez, R

    2005-01-01

    A model to simulate the transport of suspended particulate matter by the Rhone River plume has been developed. The model solves the 3D hydrodynamic equations, including baroclinic terms and a 1-equation turbulence model, and the suspended matter equations including advection/diffusion of particles, settling and deposition. Four particle classes are considered simultaneously according to observations in the Rhone. Computed currents, salinity and particle distributions are, in general, in good agreement with observations or previous calculations. The model also provides sedimentation rates and the distribution of different particle classes over the sea bed. It has been found that high sedimentation rates close to the river mouth are due to coarse particles that sink rapidly. Computed sedimentation rates are also similar to those derived from observations. The model has been applied to simulate the transport of radionuclides by the plume, since suspended matter is the main vector for them. The radionuclide transport model, previously described and validated, includes exchanges of radionuclides between water, suspended matter and bottom sediment described in terms of kinetic rates. A new feature is the explicit inclusion of the dependence of kinetic rates upon salinity. The model has been applied to 137Cs and 239,240Pu. Results are, in general, in good agreement with observations. PMID:15519466

  10. The effect of advection at luminosities close to Eddington: The ULX in M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, O.; Done, C.; Middleton, M.

    2013-05-01

    The transient, ultra-luminous X-ray source CXOM31 J004253.1+411422 in the Andromeda galaxy is most likely a 10 solar mass black hole, with super-Eddington luminosity at its peak. The XMM-Newton spectra taken during the decline then trace luminosities of 0.86-0.27 LEdd. These spectra are all dominated by a hot disc component, which roughly follows a constant inner radius track in luminosity and temperature as the source declines. At the highest luminosity the disc structure should change due to advection of radiation through the disc. This advected flux can be partly released at lower radii thus modifying the spectral shape. To study the effect of advection at luminosities close to Eddington we employ a fully relativistic slim disc model, SLIMBH, that includes advective cooling and full radiative transfer through the photosphere based on tlusty. The model also incorporates relativistic photon ray-tracing from the proper location of the disc photosphere rather than the mid-plane as the slim disc is no longer geometrically thin. We find that these new models differ only slightly from the non-advective (standard) BHSPEC models even at the highest luminosities considered here. While both discs can fit the highest luminosity data, neither is a very good fit to the lower luminosities. This could indicate a missing physical process that acts in low luminosity discs and subsides as the disc luminosity approaches the Eddington limit.

  11. Tomography-based characterization of ice-air interface dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Andreoli, Christian; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. A functional understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on regional and global climate to assessing avalanche formation. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Experiments specifically analyzed sublimation and deposition of water vapor on the ice structure. In addition, an analysis of the ice-air interface dynamics was carried out using a macroscopic equivalent model of heat and water vapor transport through a snow layer. The results indicate that sublimation of the ice matrix dominated for flow rates < 10-6 m3 s-1 while during increased mass flow rates the water vapor deposition supplied by the advective flow counteracted sublimation. A flow rate dependence of water vapor deposition at the ice interface was observed, asymptotically approaching an average estimated maximum deposition rate on the whole sample of 1.05 · 10-4 kg m-3 s-1. The growth of microsized whisker-like crystals on larger ice crystals was detected on microscope photographs, leading to an increase of the specific surface area and thus suggest a change of the physical and optical properties of the snow. The estimated values of the curvature effect of the ice crystals and the interface kinetic coefficient are in good agreement with previously published values.

  12. Modeling birch pollen emission and transport with the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potier, Aurelie; Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Sofiev, Mikhail; Viovy, Nicolas; Vautard, Robert; Thibaudon, Michel; Tao, Phikune

    2013-04-01

    Among pollen species, birch pollen is recognized to have one of the highest allergenic effects. Its emission as well as its transport with air masses depend on several meteorological parameters. If the conditions are favourable (typically sunny and windy days), the pollen can travel at distances of hundred kilometers in only one day. For analysis and source-oriented forecast, the chemistry-transport models are promising tools to simulate emissions and concentrations over large domains such as Europe. In addition to pollution gaseous and particulate species, the birch pollen related processes were recently added in the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE. This first includes an emission module based on a double-threshold temperature sum concept which describes the onset of the flowering season as well as its propagation using a birch pollen source emission. The parameterization is defined following Sofiev et al. (2012). Second, the processes such as transport, turbulent vertical mixing, dry deposition, wash out and resuspension were updated in CHIMERE to account for the specificities of the pollen grains. In this study, we present a simulation of pollen emissions and transport over Europe with an horizontal resolution of 15km. The CHIMERE model is driven by the WRF meteorological fields and the simulation covers the complete spring of 2008. The modeled pollen concentrations are compared to the R.N.S.A. french national aerobiological survey network measurements. The strength and weaknesses of the modeled results are discussed in terms of emissions data available, meteorology and all specific processes added in the model.

  13. Transport characteristics of a finite-difference dynamics model combined with a spectral transport model of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, T.; Fairlie, A.; Turner, Richard E.; Siskind, David E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional off-line spectral transport model has been combined with a global, mechanistic, finite-difference dynamics model of the middle atmosphere in order to study transport and photochemistry in the middle atmosphere for specific, observed episodes. In this paper, the basic transport characteristics of the combined models are examined, first using steady, idealized flow fields and second using time-dependent flow fields closely related to observed atmospheric behavior. Transport conducted with the combined models is found to compare favorably with transport conducted on-line in the dynamics model, given appropriate time averaging of the flow fields and suitable choice of artificial diffusion.

  14. Modeling substrate-bacteria-grazer interactions coupled to substrate transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajracharya, Bijendra M.; Lu, Chuanhe; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2014-05-01

    Models of microbial dynamics coupled to solute transport in aquifers typically require the introduction of a bacterial capacity term to prevent excessive microbial growth close to substrate-injection boundaries. The factors controlling this carrying capacity, however, are not fully understood. In this study, we propose that grazers or bacteriophages may control the density of bacterial biomass in continuously fed porous media. We conceptualize the flow-through porous medium as a series of retentostats, in which the dissolved substrate is advected with water flow whereas the biomasses of bacteria and grazers are considered essentially immobile. We first model a single retentostat with Monod kinetics of bacterial growth and a second-order grazing law, which shows that the system oscillates but approaches a stable steady state with nonzero concentrations of substrate, bacteria, and grazers. The steady state concentration of the bacteria biomass is independent of the substrate concentration in the inflow. When coupling several retentostats in a series to mimic a groundwater column, the steady state bacteria concentrations thus remain at a constant level over a significant travel distance. The one-dimensional reactive transport model also accounts for substrate dispersion and a random walk of grazers influenced by the bacteria concentration. These dispersive-diffusive terms affect the oscillations until steady state is reached, but hardly the steady state value itself. We conclude that grazing, or infection by bacteriophages, is a possible explanation of the maximum biomass concentration frequently needed in bioreactive transport models. Its value depends on parameters related to the grazers or bacteriophages and is independent of bacterial growth parameters or substrate concentration, provided that there is enough substrate to sustain bacteria and grazers.

  15. Modeling Transport of Flushed Reservoir Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    Drawdown flushing of a reservoir is often part of a reservoir sediment management program. Flushing can deliver higher than normal sediment loads to the river channel located downstream of a reservoir. The flushed sediment may contain a higher proportion of finer sediment than what was delivered to a channel prior to the presence of the reservoir. The extent of long-term impacts caused by the flushed sediment on the channel morphology and habitat will in part depend on the residence time of the sediment within the channel. In this study we used MIKE 21C to model the fate of flushed sediment through a river channel where the bed material consists of an armoring layer of gravels overlying finer sediment. MIKE 21C is a two-dimensional curvilinear morphological model for rivers developed by DHI. Curvilinear means that the model grid may curve to better follow the channel and flow direction, for example in a meandering channel. Multiple bed material layers are included in the model to represent the armoring and underlying layers existing in the bed separately from the overlying flushed sediment. These layers may also mix. The nature of the interactions between these two layers helps regulate transport and deposition of the flushed sediment, thus are critical to assessing the fate of the flushed sediment and associated potential impacts.

  16. Waves, advection, and cloud patterns on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Smith, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The stable layers adjacent to the nearly neutral layer within the Venus clouds are found to be capable of supporting vertically trapped, horizontally propagating waves with horizontal wavelengths of about 10 km and speeds of a few meters per second relative to the mean wind in the neutral layer. These waves may possibly be excited by turbulence within the neutral layer. Here, the properties of the waves, and the patterns which they might produce within the visible clouds if excited near the subsolar point are examined. The patterns can be in agreement with many features in images. The waves are capable of transferring momentum latitudinally to help maintain the general atmospheric spin, but at present we are not able to evaluate wave amplitudes. We also examine an alternative possibility that the cloud patterns are produced by advection and shearing by the mean zonal and meridional flow of blobs formed near the equator. It is concluded that advection and shearing by the mean flow is the most likely explanation for the general pattern of small scale striations.

  17. Signal Processing Model for Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H

    2008-07-28

    This note describes the design of a simplified gamma ray transport model for use in designing a sequential Bayesian signal processor for low-count detection and classification. It uses a simple one-dimensional geometry to describe the emitting source, shield effects, and detector (see Fig. 1). At present, only Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are implemented for the shield and the detector. Other effects may be incorporated in the future by revising the expressions for the probabilities of escape and absorption. Pair production would require a redesign of the simulator to incorporate photon correlation effects. The initial design incorporates the physical effects that were present in the previous event mode sequence simulator created by Alan Meyer. The main difference is that this simulator transports the rate distributions instead of single photons. Event mode sequences and other time-dependent photon flux sequences are assumed to be marked Poisson processes that are entirely described by their rate distributions. Individual realizations can be constructed from the rate distribution using a random Poisson point sequence generator.

  18. RAETRAD MODEL OF RADON GAS GENERATION, TRANSPORT, AND INDOOR ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the theoretical basis, implementation, and validation of the Radon Emanation and Transport into Dwellings (RAETRAD) model, a conceptual and mathematical approach for simulating radon (222Rn) gas generation and transport from soils and building foundations to ...

  19. Contaminant transport in groundwater in the presence of colloids and bacteria: model development and verification.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Hesham M; El-Kordy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Ahmed E

    2009-09-01

    Colloids and bacteria (microorganisms) naturally exist in groundwater aquifers and can significantly impact contaminant migration rates. A conceptual model is first developed to account for the different physiochemical and biological processes, reaction kinetics, and different transport mechanisms of the combined system (contaminant-colloids-bacteria). All three constituents are assumed to be reactive with the reactions taking place between each constituent and the porous medium and also among the different constituents. A general linear kinetic reaction model is assumed for all reactive processes considered. The mathematical model is represented by fourteen coupled partial differential equations describing mass balance and reaction processes. Two of these equations describe colloid movement and reactions with the porous medium, four equations describe bacterial movement and reactions with colloids and the porous medium, and the remaining eight equations describe contaminant movement and its reactions with bacteria, colloids, and the porous medium. The mass balance equations are numerically solved for two-dimensional groundwater systems using a third-order, total variance-diminishing scheme (TVD) for the advection terms. Due to the complex coupling of the equations, they are solved iteratively each time step until a convergence criterion is met. The model is tested against experimental data and the results are favorable.

  20. Modelling the dynamics of polar auxin transport in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boot, Kees J M; Hille, Sander C; Libbenga, Kees R; Peletier, Lambertus A; van Spronsen, Paulina C; van Duijn, Bert; Offringa, Remko

    2016-02-01

    The polar transport of the plant hormone auxin has been the subject of many studies, several involving mathematical modelling. Unfortunately, most of these models have not been experimentally verified. Here we present experimental measurements of long-distance polar auxin transport (PAT) in segments of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana together with a descriptive mathematical model that was developed from these data. It is based on a general advection-diffusion equation for auxin density, as suggested by the chemiosmotic theory, but is extended to incorporate both immobilization of auxin and exchange with the surrounding tissue of cells involved in PAT, in order to account for crucial observations. We found that development of the present model assisted effectively in the analysis of experimental observations. As an example, we discuss the analysis of a quadruple mutant for all four AUX1/LAX1-LAX3 influx carriers genes. We found a drastic change in the parameters governing the exchange of PAT channels with the surrounding tissue, whereas the velocity was still of the order of magnitude of the wild type. In addition, the steady-state flux of auxin through the PAT system of the mutant did not exhibit a saturable component, as we found for the wild type, suggesting that the import carriers are responsible for the saturable component in the wild type. In the accompanying Supplementary data available at JXB online, we describe in more detail the data-driven development of the model, review and derive predictions from a mathematical model of the chemiosmotic theory, and explore relationships between parameters in our model and processes and parameters at the cellular level.