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  1. Vegetarian diets in the Adventist Health Study 2: a review of initial published findings1234

    PubMed Central

    Orlich, Michael J; Fraser, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    The Adventist Health Study 2 is a large cohort that is well suited to the study of the relation of vegetarian dietary patterns to health and disease risk. Here we review initial published findings with regard to vegetarian diets and several health outcomes. Vegetarian dietary patterns were associated with lower body mass index, lower prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus, lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its component factors, lower prevalence of hypertension, lower all-cause mortality, and in some instances, lower risk of cancer. Findings with regard to factors related to vegetarian diets and bone health are also reviewed. These initial results show important links between vegetarian dietary patterns and improved health. PMID:24898223

  2. Vegetarian diets in the Adventist Health Study 2: a review of initial published findings.

    PubMed

    Orlich, Michael J; Fraser, Gary E

    2014-07-01

    The Adventist Health Study 2 is a large cohort that is well suited to the study of the relation of vegetarian dietary patterns to health and disease risk. Here we review initial published findings with regard to vegetarian diets and several health outcomes. Vegetarian dietary patterns were associated with lower body mass index, lower prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus, lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its component factors, lower prevalence of hypertension, lower all-cause mortality, and in some instances, lower risk of cancer. Findings with regard to factors related to vegetarian diets and bone health are also reviewed. These initial results show important links between vegetarian dietary patterns and improved health. PMID:24898223

  3. Validation of self-reported anthropometrics in the Adventist Health Study 2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Relying on self-reported anthropometric data is often the only feasible way of studying large populations. In this context, there are no studies assessing the validity of anthropometrics in a mostly vegetarian population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of self-reported anthropometrics in the Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2). Methods We selected a representative sample of 911 participants of AHS-2, a cohort of over 96,000 adult Adventists in the USA and Canada. Then we compared their measured weight and height with those self-reported at baseline. We calculated the validity of the anthropometrics as continuous variables, and as categorical variables for the definition of obesity. Results On average, participants underestimated their weight by 0.20 kg, and overestimated their height by 1.57 cm resulting in underestimation of body mass index (BMI) by 0.61 kg/m2. The agreement between self-reported and measured BMI (as a continuous variable), as estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient, was 0.97. The sensitivity of self-reported BMI to detect obesity was 0.81, the specificity 0.97, the predictive positive value 0.93, the predictive negative value 0.92, and the Kappa index 0.81. The percentage of absolute agreement for each category of BMI (normoweight, overweight, and obese) was 83.4%. After multivariate analyses, predictors of differences between self-reported and measured BMI were obesity, soy consumption and the type of dietary pattern. Conclusions Self-reported anthropometric data showed high validity in a representative subsample of the AHS-2 being valid enough to be used in epidemiological studies, although it can lead to some underestimation of obesity. PMID:21466678

  4. Vegetarian diets and cardiovascular risk factors in black members of the Adventist Health Study-2

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Gary; Katuli, Sozina; Anousheh, Ramtin; Knutsen, Synnove; Herring, Patti; Fan, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare cardiovascular risk factors between vegetarians and non-vegetarians in black individuals living in the USA. Design A cross-sectional analysis of a sub-set of 592 black women and men enrolled in the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) cohort of Seventh-day Adventists. Setting Members of the AHS-2 cohort, who lived in all states of the USA and provinces of Canada. Subjects Black/African-American members of two sub-studies of AHS-2 where blood and physiological measurements were obtained. Results Of these women and men, 25% were either vegan or lacto-ovo-vegetarians (labelled ‘vegetarian/vegans’), 13 % were pesco-vegetarian and 62% were non-vegetarian. Compared with non-vegetarians, the vegetarian/vegans had odds ratios for hypertension, diabetes, high blood total cholesterol and high blood LDL-cholesterol of 0·56 (95% CI 0·36, 0·87), 0·48 (95% CI 0·24, 0·98), 0·42 (95% CI 0·27, 0·65) and 0·54 (95% CI 0·33, 0·89), respectively, when adjusted for age, gender, education, physical activity and sub-study. Corresponding odds ratios for obesity in vegetarian/vegans and pesco-vegetarians, compared with non-vegetarians, were 0·43 (95% CI 0·28, 0·67) and 0·47 (95% CI 0·27, 0·81), respectively; and for abdominal obesity 0·54 (95% CI 0·36, 0·82) and 0·50 (95% CI 0·29, 0·84), respectively. Results for pesco-vegetarians did not differ significantly from those of non-vegetarians for other variables. Further adjustment for BMI suggested that BMI acts as an intermediary variable between diet and both hypertension and diabetes. Conclusions As with non-blacks, these results suggest that there are sizeable advantages to a vegetarian diet in black individuals also, although a cross-sectional analysis cannot conclusively establish cause. PMID:24636393

  5. Trans fatty acid intake is related to emotional affect in the Adventist Health Study-2.

    PubMed

    Ford, Patricia A; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Lee, Jerry W; Tonstad, Serena

    2016-06-01

    Trans fatty acids in Western diets increase health risks, and have been associated with the risk of depression. We hypothesized that intakes of trans fatty acids (primarily from margarines and baked goods) were inversely associated with positive affect and positively associated with negative affect in a longitudinal study. Church attendees residing in North America completed a food frequency questionnaire in 2002-6 as part of the Adventist Health Study-2. A subset in which we excluded participants with established cardiovascular disease (n=8,771) completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) in 2006-7. The associations between dietary intakes of fatty acids to positive and negative affect were tested with linear regression analysis controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, education, body mass index, exercise, sleep, sleep squared, Mediterranean diet, total energy intake and alcohol. Intakes of trans fatty acids were inversely associated with positive affect (β=-0.06, B=-0.27 [95% CI -0.37, -0.17], p<.001) and positively associated with negative affect (β=0.05, B=0.21 [95% CI 0.11, 0.31], p<.001). In comparison, we found no association between n-3 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFA) intakes with affect. The n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was inversely associated with positive affect (β=-0.03, B=-0.34 [95% CI -0.58, -0.10], p=0.006). The findings suggest that a lower dietary trans fatty acid intake has beneficial effects on emotional affect while the n-6: n-3 ratio is detrimental to positive affect. PMID:27188896

  6. Race-specific validation of food intake obtained from a comprehensive FFQ: the Adventist Health Study-2

    PubMed Central

    Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fan, Jing; Sabaté, Joan; Knutsen, Synnove F; Haddad, Ella; Beeson, W Lawrence; Herring, R Patti; Butler, Terrence L; Bennett, Hannelore; Fraser, Gary E

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess race-specific validity of food and food group intakes measured using an FFQ. Design Calibration study participants were randomly selected from the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) cohort by church, and then by subject-within-church. Intakes of forty-seven foods and food groups were assessed using an FFQ and then compared with intake estimates measured using six 24 h dietary recalls (24HDR). We used two approaches to assess the validity of the questionnaire: (i) cross-classification by quartile and (ii) de-attenuated correlation coefficients. Setting Seventh-day Adventist church members geographically spread throughout the USA and Canada. Subjects Members of the AHS-2 calibration study (550 whites and 461 blacks). Results The proportion of participants with exact quartile agreement in the FFQ and 24HDR averaged 46% (range: 29–87%) in whites and 44% (range: 25–88%) in blacks. The proportion of quartile gross misclassification ranged from 1 % to 11 % in whites and from 1 % to 15% in blacks. De-attenuated validity correlations averaged 0·59 in whites and 0·48 in blacks. Of the forty-seven foods and food groups, forty-three in whites and thirty-three in blacks had validity correlations >0·4. Conclusions The AHS-2 questionnaire has good validity for most foods in both races; however, validity correlations tend to be higher in whites than in blacks. PMID:21557864

  7. Body Mass Index at Age 20 and Subsequent Childbearing: The Adventist Health Study-2

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Synnøve F.; Oda, Keiji; Fraser, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Some epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies suggest that underweight and obesity impact fertility. Methods This is cross-sectional study of 33,159 North American Adventist women, who were nulliparous at age 20 years and who, as a group, have a healthy lifestyle. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess how body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) at age 20 was related to never becoming pregnant, never giving birth to a living child, or not giving birth to a second or third child. Results A total of 4954 (15%) of the women reported never becoming pregnant (nulligravidity) and 7461 (23%) women remained nulliparous. Underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2) at age 20 was associated with approximately 13% increased risk of nulligravidity or nulliparity. Women with BMI≥32.5 kg/m2 when aged 20 had 2.5 (95% CI: 2.0, 3.1) times increased odds of nulliparity compared to women with BMI 20–24.9 kg/m2. Increased risk was found for all groups of overweight women (BMI≥25 kg/m2). However, if the women gave birth to one live child after age 20, BMI≥32.5 kg/m2 at age 20 had less impact (OR 1.6 [95% CI: 1.2, 2.2]) on the likelihood of not delivering a second child. In women who delivered two living children, obesity at age 20 had no bearing on the odds of having a third child. Conclusions Obesity and, to a lesser extent, underweight at age 20 increases the nulliparity rate. The results underscore the importance of a healthy weight in young women. PMID:23611121

  8. Short- and long-term reliability of adult recall of vegetarian dietary patterns in the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2).

    PubMed

    Teixeira Martins, Marcia C; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fan, Jing; Singh, Pramil; Fraser, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Past dietary patterns may be more important than recent dietary patterns in the aetiology of chronic diseases because of the long latency in their development. We developed an instrument to recall vegetarian dietary patterns during the lifetime and examined its reliability of recall over 5·3 and 32·6 years on average. The short-term/5-year recall ability study (5-RAS) was done using 24 690 participants from the cohort of the Adventist Health Study-2 (mean age 62·2 years). The long-term/33-year recall ability study (33-RAS) included an overlap population of 1721 individuals who joined the Adventist Health Study-1 and Adventist Health Study-2 (mean age 72·5 years). Spearman correlation coefficients for recall of vegetarian status were 0·78 and 0·72 for the 5-RAS and 33-RAS, respectively, when compared with 'reference' data. For both time periods sensitivity and positive predictive values were highest for the lacto-ovo-vegetarian and non-vegetarian patterns (vegans, lacto-ovo-vegetarians, pesco-vegetarians, semi-vegetarians and non-vegetarians). In the 5-RAS analyses, male, non-black, younger, and more educated participants, lifetime Adventists, and those with more stability of consumption of animal products generally showed higher recall ability. Somewhat similar tendencies were shown for the 33-RAS analyses. Our findings show that the instrument has higher reliability for recalled lacto-ovo-vegetarian and non-vegetarian than for vegan, semi- and pesco-vegetarian dietary patterns in both short- and long-term recalls. This is in part because these last dietary patterns were greatly contaminated by recalls that correctly would have belonged in the adjoining category that consumed more animal products. PMID:26097699

  9. Comparison of polyphenol intakes according to distinct dietary patterns and food sources in the Adventist Health Study-2 cohort.

    PubMed

    Burkholder-Cooley, Nasira; Rajaram, Sujatha; Haddad, Ella; Fraser, Gary E; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Evidence suggests a relationship between polyphenol intake and health benefits. Polyphenol intake among a large US cohort with diverse dietary practices ranging from meatless to omnivorous diets has not been previously evaluated. The primary aim of this study was to compare polyphenol intakes of several vegetarian and non-vegetarian dietary patterns and to assess phenolic intake by food source. To characterise dietary intake, a FFQ was administered to 77 441 participants of the Adventist Health Study-2. Dietary patterns were defined based on the absence of animal food consumption as vegan, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian and non-vegetarian. Polyphenol intakes were calculated based on chromatography-derived polyphenol content data of foods from Phenol-Explorer, US Department of Agriculture databases and relevant literature. Results revealed a mean unadjusted total polyphenol intake of 801 (sd 356) mg/d, and the main foods contributing to polyphenol intakes were coffee, fruits and fruit juices. Total polyphenol intake differed significantly between dietary patterns, with phenolic acids from coffee contributing the greatest variation. The dominant classes and sources of dietary polyphenols differed between vegetarian and non-vegetarian diets. Flavonoid intake was the highest among pesco-vegetarians, and phenolic acid intake was the highest among non-vegetarians. In addition, coffee consumers appeared to have a different dietary profile than non-coffee consumers, including greatly reduced contribution of fruits, vegetables and legumes to total phenolic intake. Coffee drinkers were more likely to be non-vegetarians, which explained several of these observations. Further evaluating these differences may be important in identifying relationships between plant-based diets and health outcomes. PMID:27080936

  10. Utilization of Prostate Cancer Screening According to Dietary Patterns and Other Demographic Variables. The Adventist Health Study-2

    PubMed Central

    Ibrayev, Yermek; Oda, Keiji; Fraser, Gary E; Knutsen, Synnove F

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prostate-specific antigen test and digital rectal examination are considered important screening methods for early detection of prostate cancer. However, the utilization of prostate cancer screening varies widely and there is limited knowledge of the predictors of utilization. Methods: Self-reported prostate cancer screening utilization within the last 2 years was investigated among 11,162 black and non-black North American Seventh-day Adventist men, aged 50-75 years, with different dietary patterns and lifestyle characteristics. Results: Blacks were more likely to screen for prostate cancer than non-blacks (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-1.57). Those with a vegetarian diet, especially vegans, were less likely to follow screening guidelines, particularly among non-Blacks: vegans (OR=0.47, 0.39-0.58), lacto-ovo-vegetarians (OR=0.75, 0.66-0.86), and pesco-vegetarians (OR=0.74, 0.60-0.91) compared to non-vegetarians after adjusting for age, BMI, marital status, education, income, and family history of cancer. Trends for dietary patterns remained unchanged after stratification on age, family history of cancer, education, personal income, marital status, and BMI. Among black men, diet patterns showed no significant associations with utilization of prostate cancer screening, although vegans tended to underutilize screening compared to non-vegetarians (OR=0.70, 0.44-1.10). Conclusions: Vegetarians, especially non-black vegans, are less likely to follow recommended prostate cancer screening guidelines. The effect of diet was attenuated, and not statistically significant, among black men. Impact: Since only about 60% of US men follow prostate cancer screening guidelines, it is important to study reasons for non-compliance in order to increase utilization of preventive measures against prostate cancer. PMID:23833686

  11. Soy milk and dairy consumption is independently associated with ultrasound attenuation of the heel bone among postmenopausal women: the Adventist Health Study-2.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Vichuda Lousuebsakul; Knutsen, Synnove F; Beeson, W Lawrence; Fraser, Gary E

    2011-10-01

    Soy milk has become a popular substitute for dairy milk with important health claims. We hypothesized that soy milk, based on its nutrient composition, is comparable to dairy products and, therefore, beneficial for bone health. To test this hypothesis, we examined the benefit of soy milk and dairy products intake on bone health using broadband ultrasound attenuation of the calcaneus. Postmenopausal white women (n = 337) who had completed a lifestyle and dietary questionnaire at enrollment into the Adventist Health Study-2 had their calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation measured 2 years later. The association between osteoporosis (defined as a T-score <-1.8) and some dietary factors (soy milk, dairy) and selected lifestyle factors was assessed using logistic regression. In a multivariable model adjusted for demographics, hormone use, and other dietary factors, osteoporosis was positively associated with age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.12) and inversely associated with body mass index (OR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97) and current estrogen use (OR = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.13-0.56). Compared with women who did not drink soy milk, women drinking soy milk once a day or more had 56% lower odds of osteoporosis (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.20-0.98; P(trend) = .04). Women whose dairy intake was once a day or more had a 62% reduction in the likelihood of having osteoporosis (OR = 0.38; 95% CI, 0.17-0.86; P(trend) = .02) compared with women whose dairy intake was less than twice a week. Among individual dairy products, only cheese showed an independent and significant protection (OR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.12-0.66; P(trend) = .004) for women eating cheese more than once per week vs those who ate cheese less than once a week. We concluded that osteoporosis is inversely associated with soy milk intake to a similar degree as dairy intake after accounting for age, body mass index, and estrogen use. PMID:22074801

  12. Beyond Meatless, the Health Effects of Vegan Diets: Findings from the Adventist Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Le, Lap Tai; Sabaté, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Vegetarians, those who avoid meat, and vegans, additionally avoiding dairy and eggs, represent 5% and 2%, respectively, of the US population. The aim of this review is to assess the effects of vegetarian diets, particularly strict vegetarian diets (i.e., vegans) on health and disease outcomes. We summarized available evidence from three prospective cohorts of Adventists in North America: Adventist Mortality Study, Adventist Health Study, and Adventist Health Study-2. Non-vegetarian diets were compared to vegetarian dietary patterns (i.e., vegan and lacto-ovo-vegetarian) on selected health outcomes. Vegetarian diets confer protection against cardiovascular diseases, cardiometabolic risk factors, some cancers and total mortality. Compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets, vegan diets seem to offer additional protection for obesity, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, and cardiovascular mortality. Males experience greater health benefits than females. Limited prospective data is available on vegetarian diets and body weight change. Large randomized intervention trials on the effects of vegetarian diet patterns on neurological and cognitive functions, obesity, diabetes, and other cardiovascular outcomes are warranted to make meaningful recommendations. PMID:24871675

  13. Beyond meatless, the health effects of vegan diets: findings from the Adventist cohorts.

    PubMed

    Le, Lap Tai; Sabaté, Joan

    2014-06-01

    Vegetarians, those who avoid meat, and vegans, additionally avoiding dairy and eggs, represent 5% and 2%, respectively, of the US population. The aim of this review is to assess the effects of vegetarian diets, particularly strict vegetarian diets (i.e., vegans) on health and disease outcomes. We summarized available evidence from three prospective cohorts of Adventists in North America: Adventist Mortality Study, Adventist Health Study, and Adventist Health Study-2. Non-vegetarian diets were compared to vegetarian dietary patterns (i.e., vegan and lacto-ovo-vegetarian) on selected health outcomes. Vegetarian diets confer protection against cardiovascular diseases, cardiometabolic risk factors, some cancers and total mortality. Compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets, vegan diets seem to offer additional protection for obesity, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, and cardiovascular mortality. Males experience greater health benefits than females. Limited prospective data is available on vegetarian diets and body weight change. Large randomized intervention trials on the effects of vegetarian diet patterns on neurological and cognitive functions, obesity, diabetes, and other cardiovascular outcomes are warranted to make meaningful recommendations. PMID:24871675

  14. The Effects of Health and Wellness on Academic Achievement and Cognitive Ability in Students Attending Seventh-Day Adventist Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patricia C.

    2011-01-01

    Healthful living has been a cornerstone of Seventh-day Adventist belief and practice almost from the very beginning of the church's history. The problem was that no one had studied the role healthful practices play in Seventh-day Adventist education using the entire Seventh-day Adventist student population. The correlations between four aspects of…

  15. Association Between Dietary Fiber and Incident Cases of Colon Polyps: The Adventist Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Tantamango, Yessenia M.; Knutsen, Synnove F.; Beeson, Larry; Fraser, Gary; Sabate, Joan

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Most cases of CRC arise in adenomatous polyps. It has been estimated that 25%–35% of colon adenoma risk could be avoidable by modification of dietary and life-style habits. Methods: We estimated the association between total dietary fiber and fiber intake from fruits, vegetables, and grains, and the risk of physician-diagnosed colon polyps among 2818 men and women who had undergone colonoscopy. Data were drawn from 2 cohort studies—the Adventist Health Study-1 (AHS-1) of 1976 and the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) conducted from 2002 to 2005. Dietary information was obtained from the self-administered questionnaire from AHS-1, while outcome was assessed from AHS-2 data. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the period risk of incident cases of polyps. Results: A total of 441 incident cases of colon polyps were identified. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, physical activity, education, and alcohol and meat consumption, total fiber intake was inversely associated with the risk of colon polyps (odds ratio [OR] for highest vs lowest quartile = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51–0.99). This association showed a dose-response effect (p = .04). Analyses of various sources of fiber showed the most clear effect of fiber from vegetables including legumes (OR for highest vs lowest quartile = 0.65; 95% CI 0.47–0.90; p = .02). Conclusions: In this population comprising a high proportion of vegetarians, persons who consumed low amounts of fiber, especially fiber contained in vegetables, had a higher risk of developing colon polyps. PMID:22295127

  16. [Medicine on mission: The international health reform of Seventh-Day Adventists and their health care facilities in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Eklöf, Motzi

    2008-01-01

    The international non-conformist denomination, Seventh-day Adventists, have since their foundation in 1863, had a distinctive health care model for their members. The life-style has included vegetarian diet, abstinence from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and the observance of a day of rest once a week. The health policy has striven to care for God's creation in the hope of resurrection at the Day of Judgment and to reform the conventional medical practice. The Adventists have pursued an extensive international health care system--from the start based on dietary and physical treatment methods, such as hydrotherapy, massage and physiotherapy--in line with the Christian mission. Health care establishments have been inaugurated around the world as a vehicle for enabling the Christian health care message to reach the upper classes. With Adventist and Doctor, John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanatorium in Michigan as both inspirational source and educational institution, the health care mission--including a vegetarian health food industry, following in the footsteps of cornflakes--spread to the Nordic countries by the turn of the century, 1900. Skodsborgs Badesanatorium near Copenhagen became the model institution for several health care establishments in Sweden during the 1900's, such as Hultafors Sanatorium. The American-Nordic link has manifested itself through co-publication of papers, exchange of health care personnel and reporting to the central Adventist church. The American non-conformist domain as well as a private sphere of activity, aiming mainly from the outset at society's upper classes, has encountered certain difficulties in maintaining this distinction in Sweden's officially increasing secularised society, and in relation to a state health insurance and a publicly financed health care system. With the passing of time, the socioeconomic composition of patients at Hultafors became more heterogeneous, and conventional medical procedures were increasingly

  17. Transforming Patient Care in Adventist Health (West) Through Use of Information Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Wynelle J. , Bancarz, Gloria P.

    2009-07-01

    In 2002, Adventist Health(West) embarked upon a major project to better serve its communities by enhancing the safety, quality and clinical outcomes of the patients served by its 20 hospitals, i.e. the transformation of patient care through the use of information technology. The project is the implementation of the Cerner Millenium clinical information system (CIS) entitled Project IntelliCare. Budgeted allocations will go toward the training of 'super users' in 5-7 California Sites scheduled for installation and go-live of Phases I and II in 2005 and early 2006. Numerous super users in each hospital must be educated to provide support for every shift, every unit/department throughout the hospital. The hospitals experience significant costs associated with training these super users to thoroughly understand the CIS software, to train clinical users, to support the 'go-live' installations, and be there as a 'cheerleader to encourage and support all clinical users, and most importantly help guide users to transform their work processes using this information technology to provide the safest, highest quality care possible. Indeed, super users are critical to the success of Project IntelliCare. The 'super users' contributed significantly to the success of the 'go-live' impementations as well as ongoing support. Care has been transformed through clinicians use of information technology.

  18. Religious Engagement in a Risky Family Model Predicting Health in Older Black and White Seventh-day Adventists.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kelly R; Lee, Jerry W; Haviland, Mark G; Fraser, Gary E

    2012-11-01

    In a structural equation model, associations among latent variables - Child Poverty, Risky Family exposure, Religious Engagement, Negative Social Interactions, Negative Emotionality, and Perceived Physical Health - were evaluated in 6,753 Black and White adults aged 35-106 years (M = 60.5, SD = 13.0). All participants were members of the Seventh-day Adventist church surveyed in the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (BRHS). Child Poverty was positively associated with both Risky Family exposure (conflict, neglect, abuse) and Religious Engagement (intrinsic religiosity, religious coping, religiousness). Risky Family was negatively associated with Religious Engagement and positively associated with both Negative Social Interactions (intrusive, failed to help, insensitive, rejecting) and Negative Emotionality (depression, negative affect, neuroticism). Religious Engagement was negatively associated with Negative Emotionality and Negative Social Interactions at a given level of risky family. Negative Social Interactions was positively associated with Negative Emotionality, which had a direct, negative effect on Perceived Physical Health. All constructs had indirect effects on Perceived Physical Health through Negative Emotionality. The effects of a risky family environment appear to be enduring, negatively affecting one's adult religious life, emotionality, social interactions, and perceived health. Religious engagement, however, may counteract the damaging effects of early life stress. PMID:23560134

  19. Allergy and cancer: organ site-specific results from the Adventist Health Study.

    PubMed

    Mills, P K; Beeson, W L; Fraser, G E; Phillips, R L

    1992-08-01

    The relation between allergy and risk of cancer was evaluated in a cohort study of 34,198 Seventh-day Adventists in California. Information on prevalence of asthma, hay fever, and reactions to chemicals, medications, bee stings, and poison oak (or ivy) was obtained by questionnaire in 1976. The reported allergies must have been serious enough to require treatment by a physician. The cohort was then followed for 6 years (1977-1982). Both stratified analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were utilized to evaluate the relation of allergy to cancer after taking into account several potentially confounding variables. For all cancer sites combined in males, there was a 33% increased risk associated with reaction to medications. In contrast, among females, reaction to medications was associated with a 21% decrease in risk. Both results were statistically significant. Prostate and breast cancer risk were elevated in persons who reported any type of allergic history, as was risk of lymphatic or hematopoietic cancers and sarcoma. For each of these types of cancer, risk increased with increasing numbers of allergies. However, ovarian cancer risk was decreased in persons with any allergic history and increasing numbers of allergies was associated with decreasing risk of this form of cancer. These results suggest that the association between allergy and cancer is complex and depends on the specific allergy and the specific organ site under consideration. PMID:1415150

  20. The 'Adventist advantage'. Glendale Adventist Medical Center distinguishes itself.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, Calif., adopted an image-building campaign to differentiate the 450-bed hospital from its neighbors. This included the headline "Adventist Advantage," used in a series of sophisticated ads, printed in gold. In all their efforts, marketers consider the sensibilities of the sizable Armenian, Korean, Hispanic and Chinese populations. PMID:12134406

  1. Age at menarche, total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke: the Adventist Health Study, 1976–88

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, B K; Oda, K; Knutsen, S F; Fraser, G E

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relationship between age at menarche and total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke. Methods A cohort study of 19 462 Californian Seventh-Day Adventist women followed-up from 1976 to 1988. A total of 3313 deaths occurred during follow-up, of which 809 were due to ischaemic heart disease and 378 due to stroke. Results An early menarche was associated with increased total mortality (P-value for linear trend <0.001), ischaemic heart disease (P-value for linear trend = 0.01) and stroke (P-value for linear trend = 0.02) mortality. There were, however, also some indications of an increased ischaemic heart disease mortality in women aged 16–18 at menarche (5% of the women). When assessed as a linear relationship, a 1-year delay in menarche was associated with 4.5% (95% CI 2.3–6.7) lower total mortality. The association was stronger for ischaemic heart disease [6.0% (95% CI 1.2–10.6)] and stroke [8.6% (95% CI 1.6–15.1)] mortality. Conclusions The results suggest that there is a linear, inverse relationship between age at menarche and total mortality as well as with ischaemic heart disease and stroke mortality. PMID:19188208

  2. The Devil Takes a Look at Adventist Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, George R.

    2001-01-01

    Compares the educational philosophies of Hitler and the Seventh-day Adventist Church. While they both emphasize physical health, mental training, and character education, Hitler's motive was to promote a diabolical agenda. The article stresses the importance of reading deeper than mere words and practices to understand any author's philosophy and…

  3. Religious Social Support and Hypertension Among Older North American Seventh-Day Adventists.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne-Badal, Sherma J; Lee, Jerry W

    2016-04-01

    Seventh-day Adventists have been noted for their unique lifestyle, religious practices and longevity. However, we know little about how religion is directly related to health in this group. Specifically, we know nothing about how religious social support is related to hypertension. Using data from the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study, we carried out a cross-sectional study of 9581 and a prospective study of 5720 North American Seventh-day Adventists examining new 534 cases of hypertension occurring up to 4 years later. We used binary logistic regression analyses to examine study hypotheses. Of the religious social support variables, in both the cross-sectional and prospective study only anticipated support significantly predicted hypertension, but the relationship was mediated by BMI. There were no significant race or gender differences. The favorable relationships between anticipated support and hypertension appear to be mediated by BMI and are an indication of how this dimension of religion combined with lifestyle promotes good health, specifically, reduced risk of hypertension. PMID:26337436

  4. Personal Problems of Seventh-Day Adventist Academy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Ellen; Freed, Shirley; Gabriel, Elvin

    2006-01-01

    The Personal Problems Checklist for Adolescents (PPC-A) was administered to students in 14 Adventist academies for the purpose of determining the extent of their personal problems. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the top 10 problems were: (1) poor study habits; (2) worrying about future…

  5. Assessing the Practicality and Relevance of Adventist Educational Philosophy in a Contemporary Education Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, W. Marc

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the key tenets of contemporary education philosophy and compares it to the principles of the Adventist educational philosophy. The intent is to determine whether Adventist educational philosophy aligns with the demands of contemporary education. In this vein, 10 key principles of contemporary education are first described.…

  6. Prevalence of overweight and obesity among Seventh-day Adventist African American and Caucasian college students.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman; Sovyanhadi, Marta

    2009-01-01

    All age, sex, and racial groups are affected by the obesity epidemic in the United States, although disparities exist among these groups. The Seventh-day Adventists are a religious group of people who are believed to live longer and healthier lives than do their non-Adventist counterparts because they do not smoke or drink alcohol and they eat a healthier diet. This study assessed the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Seventh-day Adventist college students attending 2 private universities in the southern United States. Most students' body mass index (65.8%) was within the normal weight category, 3.7% were underweight, 20.6% were overweight, and 9.9% were obese. Body mass index > or = 25 kg/m2 was more prevalent among men and African Americans. In all ethnic subgroups, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was lower than that among non-Adventist students reported in other studies. PMID:19537219

  7. Religiosity, dietary habit, intake of fruit and vegetable, and vegetarian status among Seventh-Day Adventists in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Min; Chan, Carina K Y; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2016-08-01

    Religion has been shown to be salutary on health, and a possible link between religion and positive health outcomes is diet. Research has shown that religiosity is associated with better diet but most studies were conducted in a multi-denominational context, which might be confounded with theological differences. This study examined the relationship between religiosity and diet within a homogenous group of believers. Data from survey of 574 Seventh-Day Adventists residing in West Malaysia, aged 18-80, were analyzed using multiple regressions. While none of the religious variables were significantly associated with fruit and vegetable intake, a higher level of religiosity was associated with a better dietary habit and vegetarian status. The mixed relationship between religiosity and diet suggest that further research is needed to explore how religion might influence the diet of adherents. PMID:27010212

  8. Intrinsic Religiosity and Hypertension Among Older North American Seventh-Day Adventists.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne-Badal, Sherma J; Lee, Jerry W

    2016-04-01

    A unique lifestyle based on religious beliefs has been associated with longevity among North American Seventh-day Adventists (SDAs); however, little is known about how religion is directly associated with hypertension in this group. Identifying and understanding the relationship between hypertension and its predictors is important because hypertension is responsible for half of all cardiovascular-related deaths and one in every seven deaths in the USA. The relationship between intrinsic religiosity and hypertension is examined. Cross-sectional data from the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (N = 9581) were used. The relationship between intrinsic religiosity and hypertension when controlling for demographics, lifestyle variables, and church attendance was examined using binary logistic regression. While lifestyle factors such as vegetarian diet and regular exercise were important predictors of reduced rates of hypertension, even after controlling for these, intrinsic religiosity was just as strongly related to lower hypertension rates as the lifestyle factors. This study is the first to examine the relationship between intrinsic religiosity and hypertension among North American SDAs and demonstrates that in addition to the positive effects of lifestyle choices on health noted in the group, religion may offer direct salutary effects on hypertension. This finding is particularly important because it suggests that religiosity and not just lifestyle is related to lower risk of hypertension, a leading cause of death in the USA. PMID:26330373

  9. A Descriptive Case Study of the Perceptions and Use of Adventist Edge: An Initiative Developed in Response to the North American Division of Seventh-Day Adventists' Document, "Journey to Excellence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Pamela C.

    2011-01-01

    Problem. The Southern Union started the Adventist EDGE initiative as an action plan in response to the North American Division's document, "Journey to Excellence." The Adventist EDGE became a comprehensive educational reform initiative. However, there were different ideas on how the innovation should look when in action in the schools, and these…

  10. Committed Seventh-Day Adventist Students at Secular Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, LaShonda R.

    2013-01-01

    The experiences of Seventh-day Adventist students at secular universities was examined. Seven women and two men attending universities in Michigan and New York were interviewed. The researcher employed a heuristically guided phenomenological method to get rich descriptions of the participants' experiences in the secular university setting.…

  11. Christian Education in Chile: Is the Seventh-Day Adventist System at Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajales G., Tevni; Leon V., Vicente H.; Elias, Galiya

    2010-01-01

    Diverse perspectives with respect to Christian Education constitute a potential path for misunderstanding and contradictions; this study considers this situation in the context of a Seventh-day Adventist Christian system with students and parents from different religious perspectives in Chile. The parents/sponsors of the eighth graders were…

  12. Attitudes toward Sexual Abstinence among Black Seventh-Day Adventist College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, George; Ramirez, Octavio; Cort, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify Black Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) college students' attitudes toward the concept of sexual abstinence. Attitude toward abstinence was operationalized as a dichotomy of acceptance or rejection of the concept as a way to order sexual behavior. The study utilized a convenience sample ("N" =…

  13. Forum Theatre and Parables: A Qualitative Field Experiment in a Seventh-Day Adventist Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Dena Davis

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a qualitative field study designed to test the effectiveness of Forum Theatre (FT) as a cross-disciplinary approach to Biblical parabolic literature analysis for students enrolled in a Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Academy. The author provides a brief overview of the theoretical framework of the study, the study…

  14. AIDS Risk Among Students Attending Seventh-day Adventist Schools in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Gary L.; Hopp, Joyce W.; Marshak, Helen P. Hopp; Neish, Christine; Rhoads, Gayle

    1998-01-01

    Surveys of students attending Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) high schools assessed sexual and drug-use behaviors that placed them at risk for contracting or transmitting HIV. Comparison of the results with data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that SDA students had lower rates of sexual intercourse and substance use. Parental…

  15. Willingness to Participate in Organ Donation among Black Seventh-Day Adventist College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cort, Malcolm; Cort, David

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors studied a group of black and white Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) college students (N = 334) to compare the power of religious socialization with racial socialization. Methods: The authors compared the levels of willingness to donate organs between black and nonblack students in an availability sample. Results:…

  16. An Analysis of Spiritual Factors on Academic Achievement in Seventh-Day Adventist Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Marianne C.

    2013-01-01

    This study asked the question: Do spiritual factors impact academic achievement? The subjects in this study were all students in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11, in Seventh-day Adventist schools in the United States and Bermuda, from 2006 to 2008. The compilation of the results of 75 questions as correlated to academic achievement, controlled…

  17. Challenges to Seventh-Day Adventist Tertiary Education in the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Trevor George

    2010-01-01

    The article briefly summarizes seven challenges that faces the Seventh Day Adventist (SDA) tertiary institutions in the Caribbean. There is no exhaustive discussion of the challenges but each is clearly articulated. There is no attempt to address solution but the discussion of each challenge, however, provides opportunity for several inferences…

  18. Seventh-Day Adventist Teachers' Perceptions of Inclusion Classrooms and Identification of Challenges to Their Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Marcel A. A.; Berkner, Donna

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the perceptions and challenges of Seventh-day Adventist teachers towards inclusion classrooms in the United States. For this study, 17 participants were interviewed using two 12-item interview protocols. The analysis of the teachers' responses revealed five key perceptions. First, teachers have positive…

  19. Cancer morbidity and mortality in USA Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, E

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of cancer morbidity and mortality rates between Mormons and Seventh-day-Adventists and the corresponding rates in the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States, reveals that mortality from malignant neoplasms in general is much lower in Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists than in the Federal Republic of Germany. The difference concerns in particular the tobacco-dependent tumors: compared to the rate of affected males in the Federal Republic of Germany, only some 25% of Mormon males are getting lung cancer. Similar patterns are found in laryngeal carcinoma. Tumors that are related to both alcohol and tobacco, such as carcinomas of tongue, pharynx and esophagus, are also significantly less frequent in Mormons. Malignant neoplasms of the female genital tract show distinct analogies: cervical carcinoma has a morbidity rate of only 26.7% of affected women in Germany. Accordingly, mortality rates of Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists show a significant lower level when compared with cancer data of lung, colon and rectum, and prostate from the best German cancer registry (Saarland). Some tumor rates are higher in Mormons, e.g. malignant melanoma, also all types of malignant lymphoma and myeloma. The life expectancy is generally elevated by 2-4 years in Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists. The association with the particular life style of both religious groups, especially the strict reduction of tobacco consumption, and factors of dietary and other habits is discussed. PMID:1449267

  20. Lifestyle and Risk of Premature Sexual Activity in a High School Population of Seventh-Day Adventists: Valuegenesis 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbender, Miriam L. M.; Rossignol, Annette MacKay

    1996-01-01

    Evaluated Adventist lifestyle as a modification of popular American culture which reduces the risk of early sexual activity in adolescents and thus also reduces the risk for both STDs and teen pregnancy. Data analysis demonstrated a wide variety of behaviors were associated with premature sexual activity, including previously reported high-risk…

  1. Instructional Practices in Fifth-Through Eighth-Grade Science Classrooms of a Selected Seventh-Day Adventist Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Larry D.; Nino, Ruth J.; Hollingsead, Candice C.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation focused on instructional practices within fifth- through eighth-grade science classes of selected Seventh-day Adventist schools. Teachers reported regular use of discussion, student projects, and tests or quizzes. Most respondents said they did not feel prepared or had "never heard of" inquiry, the learning cycle, or…

  2. The Inclusion of Students with Actual or Perceived Learning Disabilities in the Seventh-Day Adventist Elementary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Connie Lee

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the effect of full inclusion of learning disabled students in Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) classrooms. Information on the dynamics of full inclusion was gathered through interviews with 15 elementary teachers in a Western Conference of SDA. Literature on inclusion in public and private educational systems was…

  3. Constituents' Perceptions in Northen California Conference: Determining What Aspects of Seventh-Day Adventist Education Are Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Pohle, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Schools in the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) school system have experienced an enrollment decline of more than 25% over the past 30 years. A wide range of anecdotal explanations for this decline are shared by SDA members of the constituency as well as many views about ways to reverse the decline. There is little empirical data, however, to provide…

  4. Dietary relationships with fatal colorectal cancer among Seventh-Day Adventists.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R L; Snowdon, D A

    1985-02-01

    Associations between fatal colon or colorectal cancer and frequency of use of meat, cheese, milk, eggs, green salad, and coffee, as well as percent desirable weight, are described with the use of 21 years of follow-up for 25,493 white California Seventh-Day Adventists. Associations are presented in terms of relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for heavy or light exposure versus rare exposure. There were no clear relationships evident between colon or rectal cancer and meat, cheese, milk, or green salad use. Egg use was positively associated with risk of fatal colon cancer in both males (RR = 1.6) and females (RR = 1.7). Coffee use was positively associated with both colon and rectal cancer mortality in males and females, particularly for colon cancer during the last 11 years of follow-up (male RR = 3.5; female RR = 1.9). Overweight (percent of desirable weight greater than or equal to 125) was associated with an increased risk of fatal rectal cancer in both sexes combined (RR = 2.8) and colon cancer in males only (RR = 3.3). Furthermore, eggs, coffee, and overweight appear to be independently associated with risk of both colon and colorectal cancer. These three factors may explain a substantial portion of the colorectal cancer mortality differential between Adventists and U.S. whites (62% for males; 30% for females). PMID:3856044

  5. What Does it Mean to be a Christian? Exploring the Religious Identity of Intrinsically and Extrinsically Religious Black Seventh-Day Adventist University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Octavio; Ashley, George; Cort, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the religious identity of Black Seventh-day Adventist University students and the elements that helped form their religious identity. The unidirectional, bidirectional and channeling models of socialization was used to describe the formation of religious identity. The data were collected in two stages. At the first stage, a…

  6. An Audit of Selected Private School Programs: Accelerated Christian Education, Alpha Omega, Mennonite Schools, Seventh-Day Adventist Schools, and A BEKA Instructional Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This report, commissioned by the Minister of Education of Alberta, reviews the programs of study and instructional materials used in four groups of approved private schools: schools using the Accelerated Christian Education curriculum; schools using the Alpha Omega program; Mennonite parochial schools; and Seventh Day Adventist schools. The review…

  7. Differences in Academic Achievement of Students Involved in Extracurricular Activities in Seventh-Day Adventist Schools in the United States and Bermuda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Anderson P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined differences in the academic performance of students in grades 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 in Seventh-day Adventist schools in the United States and Bermuda based on their level of involvement in school music organizations--band or choir--and school sports--varsity or intramural--as measured by standardized achievement and ability tests.…

  8. Research workshop to research work: initial steps in establishing health research systems on Malaita, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Atoifi Adventist Hospital is a 90 bed general hospital in East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands providing services to the population of subsistence villagers of the region. Health professionals at the hospital and attached College of Nursing have considerable human capacity and willingness to undertake health research. However they are constrained by limited research experience, training opportunities, research systems, physical infrastructure and access to resources. This brief commentary describes an 'Introduction to Health Research' workshop delivered at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in September 2009 and efforts to move from 'research workshop' to 'research work'. The Approach Using a participatory-action research approach underpinned by decolonising methodologies, staff from Atoifi Adventist Hospital and James Cook University (Queensland, Australia) collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated a health research workshop. Basic health research principles and methods were presented using active learning methodologies. Following the workshop, Atoifi Adventist Hospital and Atoifi College of Nursing staff, other professionals and community members reported an increased awareness and understanding of health research. The formation of a local Research Committee, improved ethics review procedures and the identification of local research mentors followed the week long workshop. The workshop has acted as a catalyst for research activity, increasing structural and human resource capacity for local health professionals and community leaders to engage in research. Discussion and Conclusions Participants from a variety of educational backgrounds participated in, and received benefit from, a responsive, culturally and linguistically accessible health research workshop. Improving health research systems at a remote hospital and aligning these with local and national research agendas is establishing a base to strengthen public health research and practice on

  9. Long-term ambient concentrations of total suspended particulates and oxidants as related to incidence of chronic disease in California Seventh-Day Adventists

    SciTech Connect

    Abbey, D.E.; Mills, P.K.; Petersen, F.F.; Beeson, W.L. )

    1991-08-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality in a cohort of 6000 nonsmoking California Seventh-Day Adventists were monitored for a 6-year period, and relationships with long-term cumulative air pollution were observed. Total suspended particulates (TSP) and ozone were measured in terms of numbers of hours in excess of several threshold levels corresponding to national standards as well as mean concentration. For all malignant neoplasms among females, risk increased with increasing exceedance frequencies of all thresholds of TSP except the lowest one, and those increased risks were highly statistically significant. For respiratory cancers, increased risk was associated with only one threshold of ozone, and this result was of borderline significance. Respiratory disease symptoms were assessed in 1977 and again in 1987 using the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute respiratory symptoms questionnaire on a subcohort of 3914 individuals. Multivariate analyses which adjusted for past and passive smoking and occupational exposures indicated statistically significantly elevated relative risks ranging up to 1.7 for incidence of asthma, definite symptoms of airway obstructive disease, and chronic bronchitis with TSP in excess of all thresholds except the lowest one but not for any thresholds of ozone. A trend association was noted between the threshold of 10 pphm ozone and incidence of asthma. These results are presented within the context of standards setting for these constituents of air pollution.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptom effects of long-term cumulative exposure to ambient levels of total oxidants and nitrogen dioxide in California Seventh-Day Adventist residents

    SciTech Connect

    Euler, G.L.; Abbey, D.E.; Hodgkin, J.E.; Magie, A.R.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptoms due to long-term exposure to ambient levels of total oxidants and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), symptoms were ascertained using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) respiratory symptoms questionnaire. A total of 7,445 Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) nonsmokers who were 25 yr of age or older and had resided at least 11 yr in areas of California with high to low photochemical air pollution were included in this study. Cumulative exposures to each pollutant in excess of four thresholds were estimated for each participant, using zip codes for months of residence and interpolated dosages from state air-monitoring stations. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted individually and together for pollutants and included eight covariables, including passive smoking. A statistically significant association with chronic symptoms was seen for total oxidants above 10 pphm (196 mcg/m3) (p less than .004, relative risk of 1.20 for 750 hr/yr). Chronic respiratory disease symptoms were not associated with relatively low NO2 exposure levels in this population. When these pollutant exposures were studied with exposures to total suspended particulates (TSP) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), only TSP exposure above 200 mcg/m3 showed statistical significance (p less than .01). Exposure to TSP is either more strongly associated with symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than the other measured exposures or is the best single surrogate representing the mix of pollutants present.

  11. Long-term ambient concentrations of total suspended particulates and oxidants as related to incidence of chronic disease in California Seventh-Day Adventists.

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, D E; Mills, P K; Petersen, F F; Beeson, W L

    1991-01-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality in a cohort of 6000 nonsmoking California Seventh-Day Adventists were monitored for a 6-year period, and relationships with long-term cumulative ambient air pollution were observed. Total suspended particulates (TSP) and ozone were measured in terms of numbers of hours in excess of several threshold levels corresponding to national standards as well as mean concentration. For all malignant neoplasms among females, risk increased with increasing exceedance frequencies of all thresholds of TSP except the lowest one, and those increased risks were highly statistically significant. For respiratory cancers, increased risk was associated with only one threshold of ozone, and this result was of borderline significance. Respiratory disease symptoms were assessed in 1977 and again in 1987 using the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute respiratory symptoms questionnaire on a subcohort of 3914 individuals. Multivariate analyses which adjusted for past and passive smoking and occupational exposures indicated statistically significantly (p less than 0.05) elevated relative risks ranging up to 1.7 for incidence of asthma, definite symptoms of airway obstructive disease, and chronic bronchitis with TSP in excess of all thresholds except the lowest one but not for any thresholds of ozone. A trend association (p = 0.056) was noted between the threshold of 10 pphm ozone and incidence of asthma. These results are presented within the context of standards setting for these constituents of air pollution. PMID:1954938

  12. Teachers' and students' perceptions of seventh- and eighth-grade science education in a selected Seventh-day Adventist Union Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargeant, Marcel Andre Almont

    Problem. Science education has long been a great concern in the United States, where less than one-third of the students perform at or above the proficient level. The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of the science program in a selected Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist school system. Specifically, this study investigated the perceptions of teachers and students regarding the extent to which the science program meets the criteria of the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st century and to what extent these criteria are related to academic performance as indicated by Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) science scores. Method. Two questionnaires designed by the researcher were used to get responses from 424 students in seventh and eighth grades and 68 teachers to see how this school system compares to the criteria of National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21 st century. Three classroom configurations were investigated in this study, namely: (a) multigrade, (b) two-grade, and (c) single-grade. Crosstabulation, one-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, and linear regression were used to analyze the four research questions of this study. Results. The single-grade classroom configuration received a better rating for the science criteria (p < 0.01), and students from single-grade performed significantly better than two-grade/multigrade (p < 0.01) classroom configurations on their science achievement (ITBS). There were significant relationships among science achievement and the factors that measured the criteria of the National Commission for Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st century. Conclusions. The differences in teaching practices explained the discrepancies in the three classroom configurations. Schools can therefore develop policies and strategies to improve the practices in the teaching and learning process in science education that were identified as being

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptom effects of long-term cumulative exposure to ambient levels of total suspended particulates and sulfur dioxide in California Seventh-Day Adventist residents

    SciTech Connect

    Euler, G.L.; Abbey, D.E.; Magie, A.R.; Hodgkin, J.E.

    1987-07-01

    Risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptoms due to long-term exposure to ambient levels of total suspended particulates (TSP) and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) symptoms was ascertained using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) respiratory symptoms questionnaire on 7445 Seventh-Day Adventists. They were non-smokers, at least 25 yr of age, and had lived 11 yr or more in areas ranging from high to low photochemical air pollution in California. Participant cumulative exposures to each pollutant in excess of four thresholds were estimated using monthly residence zip code histories and interpolated dosages from state air monitoring stations. These pollutant thresholds were entered individually and in combination in multiple logistic regression analyses with eight covariables including passive smoking. Statistically significant associations with chronic symptoms were seen for: SO/sub 2/ exposure above 4 pphm (104 mcg/m3), (p = .03), relative risk 1.18 for 500 hr/yr of exposure; and for total suspended particulates (TSP) above 200 mcg/m3, (p less than .00001), relative risk of 1.22 for 750 hr/yr.

  14. The Influence of Religious Affiliation on Participant Responsiveness to the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) Lifestyle Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kent, L M; Morton, D P; Ward, E J; Rankin, P M; Ferret, R B; Gobble, J; Diehl, H A

    2016-10-01

    Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) and non-SDA (21.3 and 78.7 %, respectively) individuals (n = 7172) participating in the Complete Health Improvement Program, a 30-day diet and lifestyle intervention, in North America (241 programs, 2006-2012) were assessed for changes in selected chronic disease risk factors: body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), pulse, lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Reductions were greater among the non-SDA for BMI, pulse and blood lipids. Furthermore, the majority of non-SDA in the highest risk classifications for BP, lipids and FPG, but only some lipids among SDA, were able to show improvement by 20 % or more. PMID:26472654

  15. Who wants to work in a rural health post? The role of intrinsic motivation, rural background and faith-based institutions in Ethiopia and Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Serneels, Pieter; Montalvo, Jose G; Lievens, Tomas; Butera, Jean Damascene; Kidanu, Aklilu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand the factors influencing health workers’ choice to work in rural areas as a basis for designing policies to redress geographic imbalances in health worker distribution. Methods A cohort survey of 412 nursing and medical students in Rwanda provided unique contingent valuation data. Using these data, we performed a regression analysis to examine the determinants of future health workers’ willingness to work in rural areas as measured by rural reservation wages. These data were also combined with those from an identical survey in Ethiopia to enable a two-country analysis. Findings Health workers with higher intrinsic motivation – measured as the importance attached to helping the poor – as well as those who had grown up in a rural area and Adventists who had participated in a local bonding scheme were all significantly more willing to work in a rural area. The main result for intrinsic motivation in Rwanda was strikingly similar to the result obtained for Ethiopia and Rwanda combined. Conclusion Intrinsic motivation and rural origin play an important role in health workers’ decisions to work in a rural area, in addition to economic incentives, while faith-based institutions can also influence the decision. PMID:20461138

  16. From 'what' to 'how' -- capacity building in health promotion for HIV/AIDS prevention in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    McPhail-Bell, Karen; MacLaren, David; Isihanua, Angela; MacLaren, Michelle

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a capacity building process undertaken within the HIV/AIDS prevention project of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) in the Solomon Islands. ADRA HIV/AIDS has recently reoriented its project structure, moving beyond its awareness raising approach to incorporate health promotion frameworks, theories, strategies and assumptions. These have been used to inform project practice in project planning, delivery and evaluation. This paper shares what has worked and not worked in the capacity building process, including a project evaluation of the initial HIV/AIDS awareness raising project and the application of a number of capacity building strategies, including utilising a volunteer Australian Youth Ambassador for Development (AYAD) funded by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID). Existing and new projects are outlined. The underlying theme is that any capacity building exercise must include structural support (e.g. management, national frameworks) to ensure the incorporation of new initiatives and approaches. With time this enables ownership by counterparts and external partnerships to develop. The presence of an AYAD volunteer has been an effective strategy to achieve this. Reflections from the evaluators, the AYAD volunteer and the HIV/AIDS team are included. PMID:19588619

  17. Strengthening capacity for local evidence to inform local responses to HIV in a remote Solomon Islands health service

    PubMed Central

    Redman-MacLaren, Michelle; Timothy-Harrington, Relmah; Asugeni, Rowena; Muse, Elmah; Jimuru, Emmy; Moutoa, Kenny; Speare, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Background Documenting specific knowledge and attitudes about HIV in the culturally diverse nation of Solomon Islands is essential to inform locally targeted public health responses. As part of a large capacity-strengthening project at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in East Kwaio, Solomon Islands, researchers, using a ‘learn-by-doing’ process, worked with participants in public health research methods. Methods Overall, 43 people attended research capacity building workshops in 2011; eight joined the HIV study group. A cross-sectional survey including semi-structured interviews on HIV was conducted by the group. In February 2014, a hospital administrator was interviewed about how the 2011 study informed local HIV responses. Results Of the 53 survey participants, 64% self-assessed as having little or no HIV knowledge, but 90% knew HIV could be transmitted between men and women during sex. Less than 50% knew HIV could be transmitted between two men having sex, 45% thought HIV could be transmitted by mosquitoes and 55% agreed condoms help protect from HIV. Most participants reported negative attitudes towards people with HIV. Three years later the health administrator reported ad hoc responses to HIV because of low HIV prevalence, increasing noncommunicable diseases, staff turnover and resource shortages. Discussion This HIV study was used to strengthen research skills in local health professionals and community members in Solomon Islands. It showed that community members require accurate information about HIV transmission and that entrenched stigma is an issue. Although results provided local evidence for local response, ongoing health system challenges and little local HIV transmission meant HIV services remain rudimentary. PMID:26306218

  18. Libraries in Florida: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 34108 239-513-1135 http://www.wolford.edu Orlando Adventist University of the Health Sciences, Florida Hospital's University R. A. Williams Library 671 Winyah Drive Orlando, FL 32803 407-303-1851 ext. 9890 http:// ...

  19. Secondary Analysis of National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Tyler A.; Knollman, Greg A.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines published secondary analyses of National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 (NLTS2) data, with a primary focus upon statistical objectives, paradigms, inferences, and methods. Its primary purpose was to determine which statistical techniques have been common in secondary analyses of NLTS2 data. The review begins with an…

  20. [Chang Sei Kim's activities on public health in colonial Korea].

    PubMed

    Park, Yunjae

    2006-12-01

    After graduating from Severance Medical College in 1916, Chang Sei Kim went to Shanghai to work as a missionary in a adventist hospital. The establishment of the Korean Provisional Government led him to participate in the independence movement. Educating nurses to assist the forthcoming war for independence, he seemed to realize the fact that the health of Koreans would be a key factor for achieving independence. He left for the U.S. to conduct comprehensive research on medicine. Chang Sei Kim was the first Korean to receive a Ph. D. degree of Public Health, graduating from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1925. He then gained an opportunity to work for Korea as a professor at Severance Medical College. His objective was the 'Reconstruction of the Korean People In Terms of Physical Constitution.' He pointed out that Koreans' weak state of health was a major reason for Korea's colonization. To gain independence, he emphasized that the Korean people should receive education on public health in order to improve the primitive conditions of sanitation. There is little doubt that Chang Sei Kim's ideas developed Heungsadan's views on medicine in terms of its stress on cultivation of ability, especially considering the fact that he was a member of the organization. As a member of the colonized who could not participate in the developing official policy, Chang Sei Kim was not able to implement his ideas fully, because an individual or a private organization could not carry out policy on public health as large a scale as the government did. Never giving up his hopes for Korean independence, he rejected requests to assume official posts in the Government-General. That was why he was particularly interested in the Self-Governing Movement in 1920s Korea. If the movement had attained its goal, he might have worked for the enhancement of sanitary environment as a director of Sanitary Department. His application for funding to establish a hygiene laboratory

  1. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Basic HIV/AIDS information and resources for prevention LGBT Health Information for lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individuals Sexual Health News & Information Understanding Sexual Health ...

  2. Mutual research capacity strengthening: a qualitative study of two-way partnerships in public health research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Capacity building has been employed in international health and development sectors to describe the process of ‘experts’ from more resourced countries training people in less resourced countries. Hence the concept has an implicit power imbalance based on ‘expert’ knowledge. In 2011, a health research strengthening workshop was undertaken at Atoifi Adventist Hospital, Solomon Islands to further strengthen research skills of the Hospital and College of Nursing staff and East Kwaio community leaders through partnering in practical research projects. The workshop was based on participatory research frameworks underpinned by decolonising methodologies, which sought to challenge historical power imbalances and inequities. Our research question was, “Is research capacity strengthening a two-way process?” Methods In this qualitative study, five Solomon Islanders and five Australians each responded to four open-ended questions about their experience of the research capacity strengthening workshop and activities: five chose face to face interview, five chose to provide written responses. Written responses and interview transcripts were inductively analysed in NVivo 9. Results Six major themes emerged. These were: Respectful relationships; Increased knowledge and experience with research process; Participation at all stages in the research process; Contribution to public health action; Support and sustain research opportunities; and Managing challenges of capacity strengthening. All researchers identified benefits for themselves, their institution and/or community, regardless of their role or country of origin, indicating that the capacity strengthening had been a two-way process. Conclusions The flexible and responsive process we used to strengthen research capacity was identified as mutually beneficial. Using community-based participatory frameworks underpinned by decolonising methodologies is assisting to redress historical power imbalances and

  3. Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of climate change Video not supported Human Health Climate change threatens human health and well-being ... Copy link to clipboard Key Message: Wide-ranging Health Impacts Climate change threatens human health and well- ...

  4. Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, ... million adults in the United States have low health literacy. It affects their ability to make health decisions. ...

  5. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  6. Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connected Home » Heart Health Heath and Aging Heart Health Your Heart Changes to Your Heart With ... are both taking steps toward heart health. Your Heart Your heart is a strong muscle about the ...

  7. Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  8. Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, and how ... is also about using them to make good health decisions. It involves differences that people have in ...

  9. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  10. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  11. "We can move forward": challenging historical inequity in public health research in Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In resource-poor countries, such as Solomon Islands, the research agenda on health is often dominated by researchers from resource-rich countries. New strategies are needed to empower local researchers to set directions for health research. This paper presents a process which seeks to enable a local and potentially more equitable research agenda at a remote hospital in Solomon Islands. Methods In preparation for a health research capacity-building workshop at Atoifi Adventist Hospital, Malaita, Solomon Islands, a computer-based search was conducted of Solomon Islands public health literature. Using a levels-of-agreement approach publications were categorised as: a) original research, b) reviews, c) program descriptions and d) commentaries or discussion. Original research publications were further sub-categorised as: i) measurement, ii) descriptive research and iii) intervention studies. Results were reviewed with Solomon Islander health professionals in a focus group discussion during the health research workshop. Focus group participants were invited to discuss reactions to literature search results and how results might assist current or future local researchers to identify gaps in the published research literature and possible research opportunities at the hospital and surrounding communities. Focus group data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results Of the 218 publications meeting inclusion criteria, 144 (66%) were categorised as 'original research', 42 (19%) as 'commentaries/discussion', 28 (13%) as 'descriptions of programs' and 4 (2%) as 'reviews'. Agreement between three authors' (MRM, DM, AC) independent categorisation was 'excellent' (0.8 <κ). The 144 'original research' publications included 115 (80%) 'descriptive studies' (κ = 0.82); 19 (13%) 'intervention studies' (κ = 0.77); and 10 (7%) 'measurement studies'(κ = 0.80). Key themes identified in the focus group discussion challenged historical inequities evident from the

  12. College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems Posted under Health Guides . ... March 2015. +Related Content What are student health services? The student health services (sometimes called the student ...

  13. Health Literacy and Health Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When compared to those with adequate health literacy skills, studies have shown that patients with limited health literacy ... literacy skills. 12 Back to Top Health status Studies demonstrate that persons with limited health literacy skills are significantly more likely than persons with adequate ...

  14. Health Fraud

    MedlinePlus

    Health fraud involves selling drugs, devices, foods, or cosmetics that have not been proven effective. Keep in mind - if ... from getting the treatment you really need. Health fraud scams can be found everywhere, promising help for ...

  15. Toddler Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... your intuition. If you are worried about your toddler, call your health care provider right away. Well-child visits are important to your toddler's health. Toddlers will get their recommended immunizations during ...

  16. Health Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter . Additional information regarding the health effects of climate change and references to supporting literature can be found ... globalchange.gov/engage/activities-products/NCA3/technical-inputs . Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health ...

  17. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Sexual Health Basic Facts & Information All adults, including older people, ... the opportunity to enjoy a satisfying and fulfilling sex life. In fact, most of them do, even ...

  18. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... pandemic/avian flu, and tuberculosis. Many countries and health organizations are working together and sharing information on ...

  19. Health Insurance

    MedlinePlus

    Health insurance helps protect you from high medical care costs. It is a contract between you and your ... Many people in the United States get a health insurance policy through their employers. In most cases, the ...

  20. Health Insurance

    MedlinePlus

    Health insurance helps protect you from high medical care costs. It is a contract between you and ... Many people in the United States get a health insurance policy through their employers. In most cases, ...

  1. Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  2. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  3. Health Checkup

    MedlinePlus

    Regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start. They also can help find problems early, ... and screenings you need depends on your age, health and family history, and lifestyle choices such as ...

  4. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  5. Men's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

  6. Health Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the clock, people who work in the health care industry provide care for millions of people, ... newborns to the very ill. In fact, the health care industry is one of largest providers of ...

  7. Health Fraud

    MedlinePlus

    Health fraud involves selling drugs, devices, foods, or cosmetics that have not been proven effective. Keep in ... you from getting the treatment you really need. Health fraud scams can be found everywhere, promising help ...

  8. Children's Health

    MedlinePlus

    Your child's health includes physical, mental and social well-being. Most parents know the basics of keeping children healthy, like offering ... for children to get regular checkups with their health care provider. These visits are a chance to ...

  9. Toddler Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are worried about your toddler, call your health care provider right away. Well-child visits are important to your toddler's health. Toddlers will get their recommended immunizations during these ...

  10. Men's Health

    MedlinePlus

    Most men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to Smoke and drink Make ... There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate cancer and low testosterone. Many ...

  11. Employee health.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a new guideline looking at improving the health and wellbeing of employees, with a particular focus on organisational culture and context, and the role of line managers. PMID:26309009

  12. Health education.

    PubMed

    Kannapiran, C; Ganguly, I; Shiva, M; Sehgal, M; Khanna, P; Bhatia, R

    1992-01-01

    The Central Health Education Bureau of the Ministry of Health of India guides state and district health education units. In fact, health education programs in India are among the most extensive in developing countries. Yet India continues to experience high infant and maternal mortality. The most effective communication strategies and messages are those that consider the cultural attitudes and behavior of the community, but all too often messages are developed without considering these components. Since only 39% of the Indian population is literate, use of print media to impart health messages is controversial. Yet the Directorate of Audio-Visual Publicity conducts health campaigns using newspapers, posters, and pamphlets. Besides 60% of promotions do not exhibit adequate information. Since people tend to remember images longer and visual media educate while entertaining the audience, visual media hold much promise in imparting health education messages, especially family planning messages. Yet research shows that the mass media have not been successful in reaching rural populations. Folk media (puppets, drama, story telling, and music) provide another means to educate the public about health. Ill people and family members in a hospital are a captive audience and tend to be receptive to public health messages. Further health workers at clinics and during home visits can inform clients about health. In addition, traditional health practitioners can communicate health messages in underserved areas. A potentially receptive audience for health education messages is primary school children. In fact, India has implemented the child to child program where children actually educate each other about health. Health educators have not yet tapped perhaps the greatest resources such as religious leaders, traditional healers, and dais. PMID:12343651

  13. Health Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

  14. Foot Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  15. Promoting Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechanic, David

    1990-01-01

    Argues that culture change or modification of the social structure is necessary for effective health promotion because health behavior is closely tied to basic group structures and processes. Examines the health attitudes of Mormons, low income and minority groups, and developing Islamic nations, emphasizing attitudes towards education and women.…

  16. Crew health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger D.

    1992-01-01

    Crew health concerns for Space Station Freedom are numerous due to medical hazards from isolation and confinement, internal and external environments, zero gravity effects, occupational exposures, and possible endogenous medical events. The operational crew health program will evolve from existing programs and from life sciences investigations aboard Space Station Freedom to include medical monitoring and certification, medical intervention, health maintenance and countermeasures, psychosocial support, and environmental health monitoring. The knowledge and experience gained regarding crew health issues and needs aboard Space Station Freedom will be used not only to verify requirements and programs for long duration space flight, but also in planning and preparation for Lunar and Mars exploration and colonization.

  17. Minority Health and Health Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Health and Health Disparities Certain ethnic and racial minorities as well as other underserved populations experience ... disorders than do non-Hispanic whites, ethnic and racial disparities still exist for alcohol-related diseases, problems, ...

  18. Health Literacy and Health Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Health Promotion relied extensively on both the Institute of Medicine (2004) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2004) reports, which include comprehensive reviews of the literature on health literacy and ...

  19. Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Stead, William W.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

    1999-01-01

    Informatics and information technology do not appear to be valued by the health industry to the degree that they are in other industries. The agenda for health informatics should be presented so that value to the health system is linked directly to required investment. The agenda should acknowledge the foundation provided by the current health system and the role of financial issues, system impediments, policy, and knowledge in effecting change. The desired outcomes should be compelling, such as improved public health, improved quality as perceived by consumers, and lower costs. Strategies to achieve these outcomes should derive from the differentia of health, opportunities to leverage other efforts, and lessons from successes inside and outside the health industry. Examples might include using logistics to improve quality, mass customization to adapt to individual values, and system thinking to change the game to one that can be won. The justification for the informatics infrastructure of a virtual health care data bank, a national health care knowledge base, and a personal clinical health record flows naturally from these strategies. PMID:10495093

  20. [Health duties].

    PubMed

    Aron, Emile

    2004-01-01

    The French law dated March 4th, 2002, on patients' rights and the efficiency of the French health care system, astonished many health professionals, who have always considered patients' rights a duty. It would have been preferable to underline the fact that health preservation is first and foremost a social question based on preventive medicine. Prevention is the future of medicine, but can only expand when it is fully accepted by the population and by health professionals. We deeply regret that preventive medicine takes so little place in an official document aiming to improve the efficiency of health care. Worse, this law totally overlooks the responsibilities of patients, many of who currently jeopardize their own health and life expectancy with total impunity. Are not laws built on the twin foundations of duty and responsibility? PMID:15368930

  1. Inclusive health.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Malcolm; Khasnabis, Chapal; Mannan, Hasheem

    2012-01-01

    We propose the concept of Inclusive Health to encapsulate the Health for All ethos; to build on the rights-based approach to health; to promote the idea of inclusion as a verb, where a more proactive approach to addressing distinctive and different barriers to inclusion is needed; and to recognise that new initiatives in human resources for health can offer exciting and innovative ways of healthcare delivery. While Inclusive Education has become a widely recognised and accepted concept, Health for All is still contested, and new thinking is required to develop its agenda in line with contemporary developments. Inclusive Health refers both to who gets health care and to who provides it; and its ethos resonates strongly with Jefferson's assertion that 'there is nothing more unequal, than the equal treatment of unequal people'. We situate the timeliness of the Inclusive Health concept with reference to recent developments in the recognition of the rights of people with disability, in the new guidelines for community-based rehabilitation and in the World Report on Disability. These developments offer a more inclusive approach to health and, more broadly, its inter-connected aspects of wellbeing. A concept which more proactively integrates United Nations conventions that recognise the importance of difference - disability, ethnicity, gender, children - could be of benefit for global healthcare policy and practice. PMID:21895893

  2. No health without mental health.

    PubMed

    Prince, Martin; Patel, Vikram; Saxena, Shekhar; Maj, Mario; Maselko, Joanna; Phillips, Michael R; Rahman, Atif

    2007-09-01

    About 14% of the global burden of disease has been attributed to neuropsychiatric disorders, mostly due to the chronically disabling nature of depression and other common mental disorders, alcohol-use and substance-use disorders, and psychoses. Such estimates have drawn attention to the importance of mental disorders for public health. However, because they stress the separate contributions of mental and physical disorders to disability and mortality, they might have entrenched the alienation of mental health from mainstream efforts to improve health and reduce poverty. The burden of mental disorders is likely to have been underestimated because of inadequate appreciation of the connectedness between mental illness and other health conditions. Because these interactions are protean, there can be no health without mental health. Mental disorders increase risk for communicable and non-communicable diseases, and contribute to unintentional and intentional injury. Conversely, many health conditions increase the risk for mental disorder, and comorbidity complicates help-seeking, diagnosis, and treatment, and influences prognosis. Health services are not provided equitably to people with mental disorders, and the quality of care for both mental and physical health conditions for these people could be improved. We need to develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions that can be integrated into management of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria; gender-based violence; antenatal care; integrated management of childhood illnesses and child nutrition; and innovative management of chronic disease. An explicit mental health budget might need to be allocated for such activities. Mental health affects progress towards the achievement of several

  3. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  4. Consumer Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornacchia, Harold J.

    Consumer health refers to the potential or actual impact upon the consumer, individually or collectively, of any substances, devices, services, or systems that are offered for the supposed purpose of protecting, preserving, or restoring physical or mental health. This book is an effort to help the consumer to choose intelligently in spending for…

  5. Consumer Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an annotated bibliography of 19 titles that focus on cancer and health-care reform. These include: (1) Anderson, John W. "Stand by Her: A Breast Cancer Guide for Men." AMACOM: American Management Assn.; (2) Carstensen, Laura L. "A Long Bright Future: An Action Plan for a Lifetime of Happiness, Health, and Financial Security."…

  6. Health Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDougall, Jennifer; Brittain, J. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Examines recent developments in health informatics from a historical and global perspective relating to information management through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefits of patients, staff, scientists, managers, and caregivers. Highlights include competition; the World Health Organization;…

  7. Public Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earth observations can be used to address human health concerns in many ways: projecting occurrence of disease or disease outbreaks; rapid detection and tracking of events; construction of risk maps; targeting interventions; and enhancing knowledge of human health-environment int...

  8. Health Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... care industry is one of largest providers of jobs in the United States. Many health jobs are in hospitals. Others are in nursing homes, ... clinics and laboratories. To work in a health occupation, you often must have special training. Some, like ...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Are you healthy? Is your environment healthy for you? What does it mean to be healthy? Does it mean you're not achy, or that you are not visibly sick? The World Health Organization defines health broadly as a state of physical, mental, and social well-being. This means that bei...

  10. [Adult health].

    PubMed

    Artazcoz, Lucía; Moya, Carmela; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; Pont, Pepa

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse the social inequalities in health status, health related behaviours and mortality among the 25-64 years Spanish population. Data come from the 1997 Spanish National Health Survey, the 1999 Spanish National Survey on Working Conditions, the 2001 Yearbook of Labour and Social Affairs Statistics and the 1998 Mortality Statistics. Most health-related behaviours are more unfavourable for men (smoking, alcohol consumption and overweight) and for less privileged social classes. Among women, entrance into the labour market is associated with more unhealthy behaviours except for overweight. Low weight, however, is more frequent among employed females. Self-perceived health status is better among men, more privileged social class persons and among workers. Whereas classical physical job hazards and work injuries mostly affect men, the impact of psychosocial job hazards and of exposures derived from the domestic work is higher for women. As in other developed countries, the paradox exists that whereas women have a poorer self-perceived health status, mortality is higher among men. The male excess in mortality is related to health-related behaviours that to a great extent are determined by traditional values assigned to masculinity, with higher consumption of tobacco (lung cancer), alcohol (cirrhosis), drugs (HIV and AIDS) and risky behaviours related to injuries. Health policies should take into account social inequalities in health determined by gender, social class and employment status. For doing so, it is important to increase the development of research on social inequalities and of health information systems sensitive to social inequalities. PMID:15171859

  11. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices can reduce your risk of these problems. Try to stay fit, reduce stress, set up your work area properly, and use the right equipment and gear.

  12. Environmental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gases Impact on Weather Health Effects Take Action Water Pollution Water Pollution Home Chemicals and Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water ... manmade. Learn More Air Pollution Chemicals Climate Change Water Pollution Next Previous Interested in a trailer of our ...

  13. Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help in ensuring there has been understanding. Full Text Ideally, skills related to “teach to goal” help ... patient improve his or her own self management. Full Text Health care systems can also address limited literacy. ...

  14. Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... mental health should be part of your complete medical evaluation before starting antiretroviral medications. And you should ...

  15. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... both men and women. Factors that can affect sexual health include Fear of unplanned pregnancy Concerns about infertility Sexually transmitted diseases Chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease ...

  16. School Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... behaviors such as alcohol and tobacco use, or bullying Encourage healthy habits like exercise and healthy eating Deal with specific health problems in students, such as asthma, obesity and infectious diseases The school building and environment ...

  17. Teen Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... your health. Healthy habits, including eating a healthy diet and being physically active, can help you feel good, look good, and do your best in school, work, or sports. They might also prevent diseases such as diabetes, ...

  18. Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/Go4Life Heart Health Just like an engine makes a car go, your heart keeps your ... all at once —10-minute periods will do. Start by doing activities you enjoy—brisk walking, dancing, ...

  19. Women's health

    MedlinePlus

    ... use at a later date Egg donation Sperm banking Counseling for couples who are dealing with infertility or loss of a baby BLADDER CARE SERVICES The women's health services team can also help diagnose and ...

  20. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... life (the person’s level of health, comfort, and happiness). In fact, people with bladder problems may have a lower quality of life than people with diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Bladder problems ...

  1. Environmental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the environment, like the air, water, or soil become polluted, it can lead to health problems. ... of the natural world, like radon in the soil. Others are the result of human activities, like ...

  2. Girls Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Illness & disability Drugs, alcohol & smoking Your feelings Relationships Bullying Safety Your future Environmental health What's going on " ... friendship? Body basics Food facts Are you being bullied? How much do you know about sleep? The ...

  3. Foot Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... toenails straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall ... disease, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Good foot care and regular foot checks are an important ...

  4. Aging & Health.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    By 2050 an estimated 83.7 million Americans will be ages sixty-five and older, up from 40.3 million in 2010. The shock wave of aging Americans will have profound implications for older people, their families, health care providers, and the economy. Researchers, policy makers, health care leaders, and others are designing responses to the challenges these actuarial shifts will create. For example, delivering health care at home could help keep more older Americans out of costly emergency departments and nursing homes. But such steps require more health care providers, a broader distribution of providers than currently exists, and better use of the resources we have. PMID:27605632

  5. Brain Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise, diet and nutrition, cognitive activity, and social engagement — can help keep your body and brain ... Stay Mentally Active > Mentally challenging activities and social engagement may support brain health. Learn More Plan ahead ...

  6. [Ecosystem health and human health].

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Giuliano; Mancini, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The study of ecosystem health is a relatively recent discipline that has already provided new insights into numerous aspects of environmental management. One of the most interesting fields of study is the one investigating the relationships between ecosystem and human heath. In this paper some basic terms of reference are given in order to help the understanding of this new approach. One definition of ecosystem health is given, possible causes of degradation are indicated and links with human health are addressed. The ecosystem approach to human health stresses the importance of cultural and social values in shaping the concept of health, both at human and at ecosystem level. Two case-studies showing man-ecosystem interactions are described: mining activities, that provide a suitable field of application of the ecosystem approach, and the case of malaria and DDT, that shows the risks of certain policies neglecting basic human expectations such as health. As a conclusion, some suggestions for possible research activities are given and a few recommendations for sound public health policies are indicated. PMID:16552117

  7. HealthIT.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... health data. Learn more ABOUT HealthIT.gov Health information technology (health IT) makes it possible for health care ... The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) Learn more about the National Learning Consortium ...

  8. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP Dietary Guidelines Physical Activity Guidelines Health Literacy and Communication Health Care Quality and Patient Safety Healthy People healthfinder health.gov About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health ...

  9. American Public Health Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health? Creating Healthy Communities Topics & Issues Gun Violence Climate Change Environmental Health Generation Public Health Health Equity Health ... all about it > APHA Webinars Making the Connection: Climate Changes Health Join APHA and ecoAmerica for this series ...

  10. Environmental Health Promotion: Bridging Traditional Environmental Health and Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Elizabeth H.; Baldwin, Grant T.; Kegler, Michelle Crozier

    2004-01-01

    This article highlights the juncture between environmental health and health promotion and underscores the need for health promotion involvement in environmental health practice. It begins with a synopsis of current issues in environmental public health and deficiencies in environmental public health practice that could be partly ameliorated by an…

  11. Exposure of health workers in primary health care to glutaraldehyde

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to avoid proliferation of microorganisms, cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation in health centres is of utmost importance hence reducing exposure of workers to biological agents and of clients that attend these health centres to potential infections. One of the most commonly-used chemical is glutaraldehyde. The effects of its exposure are well known in the hospital setting; however there is very little information available with regards to the primary health care domain. Objective To determine and measure the exposure of health workers in Primary Health Care Centres. Environmental to glutaraldehyde and staff concentration will be measured and compared with regulated Occupational Exposure Limits. Methods/Design Observational, cross-sectional and multi-centre study. The study population will be composed of any health professionals in contact with the chemical substance that work in the Primary Health Care Centres in the areas of Barcelonès Nord, Maresme, and Barcelona city belonging to the Catalan Institute of Health. Data will be collected from 1) Glutaraldhyde consumption from the previous 4 years in the health centres under study. 2) Semi-structured interviews and key informants to gather information related to glutaraldehyde exposure. 3) Sampling of the substance in the processes considered to be high exposure. Discussion Although glutaraldehyde is extensively used in health centres, scientific literature only deals with certain occupational hazards in the hospital setting. This study attempts to take an in-depth look into the risk factors and environmental conditions that exist in the primary care workplace with exposure to glutaraldehyde. PMID:24180250

  12. Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women's Health Healthy Weight Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Men's Health Minority Health Preconception Health and ... Women's Health Healthy Weight Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Men's Health Minority Health Preconception Health and ...

  13. Communicating health through health footprints.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Oliver; Hajat, Cother; Cooper, Cary; Averbuj, Gustavo; Anderson, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The depth and scale of challenges posed by noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease are now well known and clearly documented. Reducing the 4 key risk factors has been shown to reduce premature mortality and morbidity by 70% globally. The authors consider how affirmative action can be driven to reduce these risk factors through Health Footprints, targeted interventions within specific domains of consumption, on the basis of an assessment of the negative health effect of specific choices, with the goal of driving healthy choices and improving health. In this article, the authors propose a methodology that ties together insight from public health, behavioral economics, marketing, and health communication. They offer 3 specific examples for affirmative action: a Pigovian tax on unhealthy foods, group-level interventions on the basis of sharing key health data, and personalized prevention tailored to specific individuals. In addition, they discuss the approach to implementation, including the role of an apex coordinating organization in setting standards for data and ethics, and evaluation of the effect of interventions to drive continuous improvement. PMID:21916720

  14. Health, United States, 2012: Men's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1987-2012 [PDF - 299 KB] [XLS - 310 KB] Health insurance Medicare Table 106 . Health insurance coverage of noninstitutionalized ... 2014 [PDF - 299 KB] [XLS - 310 KB] Private health insurance Table 102 . Private health insurance coverage among persons ...

  15. Continuing Trends in Health and Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ronald W.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses current trends in health and health care, assesses significance of current data, and investigates causes and implications of the data for future health and health care. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)

  16. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  17. College Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough sleep Get regular physical activity Maintain your health with checkups and vaccinations If you decide to have sex, practice safe sex Make smart choices about alcohol and drugs Get help if you are stressed or depressed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  18. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  19. School Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... behaviors such as alcohol and tobacco use, or bullying Encourage healthy habits like exercise and healthy eating Deal with specific health problems in students, such as asthma, obesity and infectious diseases The school building and environment should be a safe and healthy place for your child.

  20. Health. DECIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Ruth E.; And Others

    This module, Health, is one of five from Project DECIDE, which was created to design, develop, write, and implement materials to provide adult basic education administrators, instructors, para-professionals, and other personnel with curriculum to accompany the Indiana Adult Basic Education Curriculum Guide, "Learning for Everyday Living." It…

  1. Preconception Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines you are using. These include dietary or herbal supplements. Be sure your vaccinations are up to date. ... have. Medicines you use, including over-the-counter, herbal, and prescription drugs and supplements. Ways to improve your overall health, such as ...

  2. Environmental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some environmental risks are a part of the natural world, like radon in the soil. Others are the result of human activities, like lead poisoning from paint, or exposure to asbestos or mercury from mining or industrial use. NIH: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

  3. Health Wise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Good indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is an important component for improving the productivity of students, teachers and support staff. It is crucial for a sense of health and well-being. The overall IEQ has a significant influence on student attendance and performance. Studies have shown that poor indoor air quality results in more illness,…

  4. College Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressures related to food, drink, appearance, drugs, and sexual activity. There are steps you can take to stay healthy and safe while you're in college: Eat a balanced diet Get enough sleep Get regular physical activity Maintain your health with checkups and vaccinations If you decide to ...

  5. Minority Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... migrant issues Access to health care Language barriers Human trafficking Taking care of your health Immunizations and screenings Sharing family health history Health before pregnancy More... Government in action on minority women's health Minority partnerships ...

  6. MyHealtheVet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Locations Contact Us Welcome to My Health e Vet My Health e Vet is VA’s online personal health record. It was ... Servicemembers, their dependents and caregivers. My Health e Vet helps you partner with your health care team. ...

  7. Health Insurance Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Health Insurance Basics Print ... thought advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  8. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health Information Center (NHIC) is ... of interest View the NHO calendar . Federal Health Information Centers and Clearinghouses Federal Health Information Centers and ...

  9. Aboriginal health.

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, H L; MacMillan, A B; Offord, D R; Dingle, J L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inform health care workers about the health status of Canada's native people. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search for articles published from Jan. 1, 1989, to Nov. 31, 1995, with the use of subject headings "Eskimos" and "Indians, North American," excluding specific subject headings related to genetics and history. Case reports were excluded. Material was also identified from a review of standard references and bibliographies and from consultation with experts. STUDY SELECTION: Review and research articles containing original data concerning epidemiologic aspects of native health. Studies of Canadian populations were preferred, but population-based studies of US native peoples were included if limited Canadian information was available. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about target population, methods and conclusions was extracted from each study. RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity rates are higher in the native population than in the general Canadian population. The infant mortality rates averaged for the years 1986 to 1990 were 13.8 per 1000 live births among Indian infants, 16.3 per 1000 among Inuit infants, and only 7.3 per 1000 among all Canadian infants. Age-standardized all-cause mortality rates among residents of reserves averaged for the years 1979 to 1983 were 561.0 per 100,000 population among men and 334.6 per 100,000 among women, compared with 340.2 per 100,000 among all Canadian men and 173.4 per 100,000 among all Canadian women. Compared with the general Canadian population, specific native populations have an increased risk of death from alcoholism, homicide, suicide and pneumonia. Of the aboriginal population of Canada 15 years of age and older, 31% have been informed that they have a chronic health problem. Diabetes mellitus affects 6% of aboriginal adults, compared with 2% of all Canadian adults. Social problems identified by aboriginal people as a concern in their community include substance abuse, suicide, unemployment and family violence

  10. Minority Health and Health Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... groups. But those who do drink consume more alcohol and often have higher rates of binge drinking. Alcohol and health consequences ... Hispanic whites. 1 Hispanics and Blacks have a higher risk for developing alcohol-related liver disease than whites. 2 Alcohol-related ...

  11. Discover: What Is Public Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Social Science Biostatistics and Informatics Community Health Environmental Health Epidemiology Global Health Health Policy and Management Health Promotion and Communication Maternal and Child Health ...

  12. Environmental Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; James, John; Russo, Dane; Limero, Thomas; Beck, Steve; Groves, Theron

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Health activity for the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was formed to develop an overall strategy for safeguarding crew members from potential airborne hazards anticipated on missions of extended duration. These efforts were necessary because of major modifications to the air revitalization system of the U.S. Space Shuttle and an increased potential for environmental health risks associated with longer space flights. Degradation of air quality in the Shuttle during a space flight mission has the potential to affect the performance of the crew not only during piloting, landing, or egress, but also during space flight. It was anticipated that the risk of significant deterioration in air quality would increase with extended mission lengths and could result from: (1) a major chemical contamination incident, such as a thermodegradation event or toxic leak, (2) continual accumulation of volatile organic compounds to unacceptable levels, (3) excessive levels of airborne particles, (4) excessive levels of microorganisms, or (5) accumulation of airborne pathogens.

  13. Health Resources Statistics; Health Manpower and Health Facilities, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Intended to provide current statistics on health manpower and inpatient health facilities for the evaluation, planning, and administration of health programs, data were gathered from college and university records, state licensing records, association membership records, and agencies and establishments that provide health services. About 3.7…

  14. Huckstering health.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, P

    1985-01-01

    Social marketers around the world are increasingly using the hard sell techniques of commercial marketers to encourage people to adopt new health practices. Social marketers, like commercial marketers, utilized all forms of mass media. In addition, they use unique communication channels to reach isolated populations rarely exposed to mass media messages. For example, in the Philippines nutritional information was communicated to villagers via a video cassette equipped van which traveled from village to village. Social marketers also use commercial marketing research strategies, including focus groups, message pretesting, and audience segmentation analysis. For instance, in a Brazilian campaign to promote breastfeeding, market research revealed that mothers lacked confidence in their ability to breastfed. Marketers used this information to develop radio spots around the theme that all mothers can breastfeed if they keep trying. The value of pretesting was illustrated in a breastfeeding campaign in Honduras. A radio spot in which a famous soccer player encouraged fathers to be attentive to their breastfeeding wives, was withdrawn after market researchers found that listeners did not take the advice seriously. The soccer player had the reputation of a being a womanizer, and the listeners viewed the advertisements as a joke. Social marketers sell products as well as ideas. Contraceptive sales in Egypt increased markedly following a campaign launched by a private advertising firm. The high technology and research sophistication associated with marketing techniques frequently gives social marketing projects a competitive advantage over other projects in attracting foreign assistance grants. The social marketing approach is not supported by all health educators. Critics are skeptical about social marketers' abilities to bring about longterm behavioral changes, feel that social marketing is too manipulative, and believe that social marketing promotes simplistic thinking

  15. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems that ...

  16. Meditation and Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental Health Healthy Living Injury, Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

  17. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators

    PubMed Central

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients’ confidence and satisfaction in health-care services. PMID:27257387

  18. Public health challenges for universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Radha Madhab

    2014-01-01

    The effective functioning of any health system requires an efficient public health service. Every human being has the right to enjoy "the highest attainable standard of health," which can be fulfilled by giving every man an affordable and equitable health system he deserves and demands. In these years, complex health changes have complicated the situation in India. Most important gaps in the health care include an understanding of the burden of the disease and what leads to and causes ill health, the availability and use of appropriate technology in the management of disease, ill health and health systems that have an impact on service delivery. Universal Health Coverage (UHC) has the potential to increase economic growth, improve educational opportunities, reduce impoverishment and inequalities, and foster social cohesion. Steps taken for achieving UHC will address the public health challenges and vice versa. PMID:25116820

  19. Rural Health Information Hub

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... rural project examples in Rural Health Models and Innovations and proven strategies for strong rural programs with ...

  20. Medicaid and Rural Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Websites & Tools Funding & Opportunities News Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  1. Rural Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Tools Maps Funding & Opportunities News Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  2. Health Literacy Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Literacy and Health Outcomes Strategies Resources What is health literacy? Health literacy is the degree to which individuals ... the information understandable. Back to Top Why is health literacy important? Only 12 percent of adults have Proficient ...

  3. Learn about Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Learn About Health Literacy Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir frame support ... of Public Health, explain health literacy. What Is Health Literacy? The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of ...

  4. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold H. Epstein, ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  5. The Economics of Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, John

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of economics to health, health services, and supply and demand of health care. Examines alternative mechanisms by which health resources can be allocated and considers who should make decisions about rationing medical care. (DB)

  6. Bureau of Health Workforce

    MedlinePlus

    ... providers. These programs include: National Health Service Corps NURSE Corps Faculty Loan Repayment Program Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program Scholarship and Loan Programs for health professions schools Health Professions Training Grants to Support Academic Institutions We support the ...

  7. Changes in Health Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvestri, Lynette; Bonis, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Health education can improve the health of the nation. Emphasis is on promoting health, maintaining good health and preventing health problems. A segment of society that tends to ignore their health is college students. They are a large group that makes up 31% of 18-24 year olds in the U.S. (Hingson, et al, 2001). This population is considered to…

  8. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  9. Public Health Nursing Staff Health Education Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Terence R.; And Others

    Health education attitudes toward prevention, detection, and treatment of selected chronic diseases and conditions confronting public health nursing staffs were investigated at a Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services District, which is composed of 16 county public health units (CPHU). Findings were used to determine type of…

  10. Wholistic Health Care: Challenge to Health Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Susan

    1980-01-01

    Due to the increasing influence of the holistic health movement, health providers will increasingly be challenged to reexamine their roles in patient relationships, increase the extent of interdisciplinary teamwork, emphasize health education and positive health behaviors, examine the usefulness of various alternative therapies, and consider the…

  11. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  12. Strengthening health systems by health sector reforms

    PubMed Central

    Senkubuge, Flavia; Modisenyane, Moeketsi; Bishaw, Tewabech

    2014-01-01

    Background The rising burden of disease and weak health systems are being compounded by the persistent economic downturn, re-emerging diseases, and violent conflicts. There is a growing recognition that the global health agenda needs to shift from an emphasis on disease-specific approaches to strengthening of health systems, including dealing with social, environmental, and economic determinants through multisectoral responses. Methods A review and analysis of data on strengthening health sector reform and health systems was conducted. Attention was paid to the goal of health and interactions between health sector reforms and the functions of health systems. Further, we explored how these interactions contribute toward delivery of health services, equity, financial protection, and improved health. Findings Health sector reforms cannot be developed from a single global or regional policy formula. Any reform will depend on the country's history, values and culture, and the population's expectations. Some of the emerging ingredients that need to be explored are infusion of a health systems agenda; development of a comprehensive policy package for health sector reforms; improving alignment of planning and coordination; use of reliable data; engaging ‘street level’ policy implementers; strengthening governance and leadership; and allowing a holistic and developmental approach to reforms. Conclusions The process of reform needs a fundamental rather than merely an incremental and evolutionary change. Without radical structural and systemic changes, existing governance structures and management systems will continue to fail to address the existing health problems. PMID:24560261

  13. Connecting for health literacy: health information partners.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Karyn L; Muhammad, Abdul-Ali; Downey, Stacey; Kind, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a community-based health information partnership to address health literacy and health information inequalities in marginalized communities. Public health, medical, literacy, and library practitioners promote health literacy through outreach, training, and professional development activities in community settings. They create learning environments for people to develop the necessary knowledge and skills to better understand health information and health policy so they can make decisions concerning personal and community health. Outreach activities focus on visits to neighborhood health centers, health fairs, health exhibits at union meetings and conferences; training programs involve hands-on, peer-led computer classes for people living with HIV and for the general public; and professional development programs connect librarians, health providers, public health workers, and literacy teachers in joint planning and learning. Several learners currently participate in and lead community health education programs and HIV advocacy. The coalition's strength develops from strongly shared objectives, an absence of territoriality, and a core active leadership group. PMID:18544664

  14. BETTER HEALTH FOR MIGRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    THIS ISSUE OF "FLORIDA HEALTH NOTES" DISCUSSES FLORIDA'S MIGRANTS AND THE MIGRANT HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND THE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE DISCUSSED--THEIR HOUSING AND SANITATION FACILITIES, THEIR LONG WORKING HOURS AND LOW WAGES, THEIR SUMMER MIGRATION PATTERNS, THEIR HEALTH PROBLEMS, AND…

  15. ECOSYSTEM HEALTH: ENERGY INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Ecosystem Health and Ecological Integrity
    2. Historical Background on Ecosystem Health
    3. Energy Systems Analysis, Health and Emergy
    4. Energy and Ecosystems
    5. Direct Measures of Ecosystem Health
    6. Indirect Measures of Ecosystem Health

  16. Family/Individual Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a six-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on personal and family health. The units cover: (1) personal health and wellness (including the decisions and other factors that influence health, principles of personal health, and stress management); (2) family health (including coping…

  17. Virginia School Health Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    Virginia's Department of Education and Department of Health are concerned with the health of children and youth, and with the implementation of comprehensive school health programs. These guidelines provide a basis for developing a model school health program or for enriching an existing program, focusing on health services and school environment.…

  18. Health Services and Women's Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mullane, Denis; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data on the relative levels of men's and women's dental health are scarce, but the available data do indicate differences in tooth loss and health-related behavior patterns. Better methods for recording and reporting this information are recommended. (MSE)

  19. Health Ethics Education for Health Administration Chaplains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Russell; Broussard, Amelia; Duckett, Todd

    2008-01-01

    It is imperative for divinity and health administration programs to improve their level of ethics education for their graduates who work as health administration chaplains. With an initial presentation of the variation of ethical dilemmas presented in health care facilities covering social, organizational, and patient levels, we indicate the need…

  20. Environmental and Community Health. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantzler, Nora J.; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. This book is divided into two parts: Part…

  1. Mental and Emotional Health. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantzler, Nora J.; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The five sections in this book provide…

  2. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  3. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  4. Medicare and Rural Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... in rural areas. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) – CMMI, also known as the CMS Innovation ...

  5. American Indian Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us HEALTH TOPICS PEOPLE & TRADITIONS PROGRAMS & SERVICES RESEARCH & DATA HEALTH TOPICS Cancer Diabetes Flu and H1N1 (Influenza) ... Human Services Health Topics | People & Traditions Programs & Services | Research & Data Home | About | Site Map & Search | Contact Us

  6. Better Ear Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Better Ear Health Better Ear Health Patient Health Information News ... often helpful to those with this condition. Swimmer’s Ear An infection of the outer ear structures caused ...

  7. Reinventing public health.

    PubMed

    Lee, P; Paxman, D

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is a review of the current state of public health in light of the social, political, economic, scientific, and technological changes buffeting the United States. As an assessment of progress in current public health efforts, we address the five major issues in public health for the 1990s raised by Breslow (8): reconstruction of public health; setting objectives for public health; from disease control to health promotion; determinants of health and health policy; continuing social inequities and their impacts on health; and the health implications of accelerating developments in technology. Finally, we look to the twenty-first century and provide five clear paths necessary to strengthen the capacity of public health agencies to protect and improve the health status of the population. PMID:9143710

  8. Global Health Observatory (GHO)

    MedlinePlus

    ... repository Reports Country statistics Map gallery Standards Global Health Observatory (GHO) data Monitoring health for the SDGs ... relevant web pages on the theme. Monitoring the health goal: indicators of overall progress Mortality and global ...

  9. Your Health Abroad

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Air Ambulance/Medical Evacuation Company Check Your Health Insurance – Are You Covered Abroad? Before you go abroad, learn what medical services your health insurance will cover overseas. If your health insurance policy ...

  10. Understanding health insurance plans

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000879.htm Understanding health insurance plans To use the sharing features on this ... plan for you and your family. Types of Health Insurance Plans Depending on how you get your health ...

  11. Health Hazard Evaluations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Programs Contact NIOSH HHE Media Health Hazard Evaluations (HHEs) Language: English en Español Recommend on Facebook ... or employers can ask the NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program to help learn whether health hazards ...

  12. [Adolescent health in numbers].

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent health is not a priority to public health services. The physical, psychological and social changes lived by youngsters expose these individuals to several health risks and events that are determinant to their actual and future health status. The main health problems in adolescents are infectious respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases but traumatisms are very important in males. Female adolescents demand services related to their reproductive life and link to early and not desired pregnancies. Another important health problem is overweight and obesity in both sexes. The main causes of death in this age group are malignant tumors, specially leukemias, and accidents. We do not have information related to health risks like addictions and mental health. Data show how important adolescents health should be to the public health sector specially because it will be more easy to tackle their health risks and negative health life-styles at this age than further in their lives. PMID:18647579

  13. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  14. Health expectancy indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Robine, J. M.; Romieu, I.; Cambois, E.

    1999-01-01

    An outline is presented of progress in the development of health expectancy indicators, which are growing in importance as a means of assessing the health status of populations and determining public health priorities. PMID:10083720

  15. Mental Health for Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Sexual health for men Urinary health for ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Other mental health conditions include bipolar disorder , ...

  16. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  17. Literacy and Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Mooney, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the relationship between literacy and health disparities, focusing on the concept of health literacy. Recommendations are provided for ways to bridge the health literacy gap for learners in adult basic education and family literacy programs.

  18. Teen Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  19. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetus grows and develops. There are specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems ...

  20. Health Literacy Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... terms. Back to Top What is cultural and linguistic competency? Culture affects how people communicate, understand, and respond to health information. Cultural and linguistic competency of health professionals can contribute to health ...

  1. The Health Maintenance Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Doman

    1973-01-01

    Controversial proposals to establish health organizations could drastically change the delivery of health services. Understanding the issues in this controversy can help professionals in the human services see what is needed in health reform and legislation. (Author)

  2. Your Health Priorities Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Explore Your Treatment Options: Your Health Priorities Tool Home Why Explore Your Options Start the Conversation ... Home > Your Health Priorities Tool Your Health Priorities Tool If you don’t share details about your ...

  3. Yoga for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... complementary health approaches by Americans, yoga is the sixth most commonly used complementary health practice among adults. ... the Science: 9 Questions To Help You Make Sense of Health Research This page last modified June ...

  4. Asian American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Diseases Behavioral and Mental Health Issues Cancer Diabetes Flu (Influenza) New* Heart Diseases Domestic Violence Mental Health Substance Abuse Complementary/Alternative Medicine Health Organizations Acupuncture Herbal Medicine Tai Chi/Qi Gong National U.S. ...

  5. Men's Reproductive Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Men's Reproductive Health: Overview Skip sharing on social media ... Content Reproductive health is an important component of men's overall health and well-being. Too often, males ...

  6. Health risks.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, J; de Gruijl, F R; Kripke, M L; Abseck, S; Arnold, F; Slaper, H I; Velders, G; Takizawa, Y; van der Leun, J C

    1998-10-01

    The health risks associated with ozone depletion will principally be those due to increased ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation in the environment, i.e., increased damage to the eyes, the immune system, and the skin. Some new risks may also be introduced with the increased use of alternatives to the ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). Quantitative risk estimates are available for some of the UV-B-associated effects, e.g., cataract and skin cancer; however, the data are insufficient to develop similar estimates for effects such as immunosuppression and the toxicity of alternatives. Ocular damage from UV exposures includes effects on the cornea, lens, iris, and associated epithelial and conjunctival tissues. The most common acute ocular effect of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is photokeratitis. Also known as snowblindness in skiers, this condition also occurs in other outdoor recreationists. Chronic eye conditions likely to increase with ozone depletion include cataract, squamous cell carcinoma, ocular melanoma, and a variety of corneal/conjunctival effects, e.g., pterygium and pinguecula. Suppression of local (at the site of UV exposure) and systemic (at a distant, unexposed site) immune responses to a variety of antigens has been demonstrated in both humans and animals exposed to UV-B. In experiments with animals these effects have been shown to worsen the course/outcome of some infectious diseases and cancers. There is reasonably good evidence that such immunosuppression plays a role in human carcinogenesis; however, the implications of such immunosuppression for human infectious diseases are still unknown. In light-skinned populations, exposure to solar UVR appears to be the most important environmental risk factor for basal and squamous cell carcinomas and cutaneous melanoma. Originally it was believed that total accumulated exposure to UVR was the most important environmental factor in determining risk for these tumors. Recent information now suggests

  7. Shared health governance.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2011-07-01

    Health and Social Justice (Ruger 2009a ) developed the "health capability paradigm," a conception of justice and health in domestic societies. This idea undergirds an alternative framework of social cooperation called "shared health governance" (SHG). SHG puts forth a set of moral responsibilities, motivational aspirations, and institutional arrangements, and apportions roles for implementation in striving for health justice. This article develops further the SHG framework and explains its importance and implications for governing health domestically. PMID:21745082

  8. Twitter and public health.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Catherine; Wurtz, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Twitter can serve as a powerful communication modality to both "push" and "pull" public health data; each user is a potential public health sensor and actor. However, in 2012, only 8% of local health departments had Twitter accounts. We outline how Twitter works, describe how to access public tweets for public health surveillance purposes, review the literature on Twitter's current and potential role supporting public health's essential services, summarize Twitter's limitations, and make recommendations for health department use. PMID:24356087

  9. Shared Health Governance

    PubMed Central

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2014-01-01

    Health and Social Justice (Ruger 2009a) developed the “health capability paradigm,” a conception of justice and health in domestic societies. This idea undergirds an alternative framework of social cooperation called “shared health governance” (SHG). SHG puts forth a set of moral responsibilities, motivational aspirations, and institutional arrangements, and apportions roles for implementation in striving for health justice. This article develops further the SHG framework and explains its importance and implications for governing health domestically. PMID:21745082

  10. [Health for women; women for health].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    This document describes a proposed new health policy for Colombian women. The rationale for the new policy, known as "Health for women, women for health", is discussed, and the general and specific objectives, program description, actions and strategies are presented for each of 5 subprograms. The subprograms cover health promotion and self-care for women, reproductive and sexual health care, prevention of abuse and services for women and children who are victims of violence, mental health, and occupational health Changes in Colombian society and living conditions and in the role of women over the past few decades have been reflected in changing epidemiologic profiles, life expectancy, and demands placed on health services. The Health for women, women for health policy takes into account social discrimination against women and its impact on female health. The subprogram of health promotion and self-care is intended to complement, reinforce, and broaden preventive interventions already offered by the health services. The subprogram will require a mobile interdisciplinary team to conduct educational campaigns and to coordinate activities. Promotional actions include staff training in a gender focus on health and health policy for women, development of a health manual for women, and a mass media campaign on self-care for women. The subprogram for reproductive health and sexuality will reorient existing maternal health services away from their emphasis on increasing coverage of prenatal care, promoting births in health facilities, and actions to reduce infant mortality and toward services appropriate to the different phases of the female reproductive cycle. The subprogram will include provision of family planning services, preventing and managing high risk pregnancies, providing adequate care in maternity centers for labor and delivery, and preventing avoidable maternal deaths. Reviewing and revising existing legislation to protect reproductive health is among proposed

  11. M-Health: Emerging Mobile Health Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istepanian, Robert; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Pattichis, Constantinos S.

    M-health can be defined as the "emerging mobile communications and network technologies for healthcare systems.' This book paves the path toward understanding the future of m-health technologies and services and also introducing the impact of mobility on existing e-health and commercial telemedical systems. M-Health: Emerging Mobile Health Systems presents a new and forward-looking source of information that explores the present and future trends in the applications of current and emerging wireless communication and network technologies for different healthcare scenaria.

  12. Behavioral Health & Performance

    NASA Video Gallery

    Summary of the Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group’s work including an overview of astronaut selection, behavioral health services provided to astronauts, the psychological aspects o...

  13. Farm Health and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... jobs in the United States. Farms have many health and safety hazards, including Chemicals and pesticides Machinery, ... equipment can also reduce accidents. Occupational Safety and Health Administration

  14. National Center for Farmworker Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > Services Stories Materials Products > Patient Education > Health Education Understanding Health Care Professional Resources Community Health Workers Digital Stories Digital Archive > Archived NCFH Products & Publications Digital ...

  15. Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Regulations HEALTH EFFECTS Nicotine Addiction and Your Health Secondhand Smoke Effects of Smoking on Your Health Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health ... Health HEALTH EFFECTS Nicotine Addiction and Your Health Secondhand Smoke Effects of Smoking on Your Health Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health ...

  16. The New Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Patricia M.; Davison, Veronica; Slutsker, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Global health reflects the realities of globalization, including worldwide dissemination of infectious and noninfectious public health risks. Global health architecture is complex and better coordination is needed between multiple organizations. Three overlapping themes determine global health action and prioritization: development, security, and public health. These themes play out against a background of demographic change, socioeconomic development, and urbanization. Infectious diseases remain critical factors, but are no longer the major cause of global illness and death. Traditional indicators of public health, such as maternal and infant mortality rates no longer describe the health status of whole societies; this change highlights the need for investment in vital registration and disease-specific reporting. Noncommunicable diseases, injuries, and mental health will require greater attention from the world in the future. The new global health requires broader engagement by health organizations and all countries for the objectives of health equity, access, and coverage as priorities beyond the Millennium Development Goals are set. PMID:23876365

  17. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-01

    Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin PMID:12525262

  18. Estimating Health Services Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    In computer program NOROCA populations statistics from National Center for Health Statistics used with computational procedure to estimate health service utilization rates, physician demands (by specialty) and hospital bed demands (by type of service). Computational procedure applicable to health service area of any size and even used to estimate statewide demands for health services.

  19. Go to Health!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Carol

    1976-01-01

    The Health Information and Education Services at the University of Texas/Austin, established to deal with everyday health concerns and potential health problems, conducts programs in response to student-indicated needs, such as breast cancer clinics, smoking cessation clinics, dieting programs, venereal disease detection, and health fairs. (MB)

  20. Kazakhkstan health system review.

    PubMed

    Katsaga, Alexandr; Kulzhanov, Maksut; Karanikolos, Marina; Rechel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Since becoming independent, Kazakhstan has undertaken major efforts in reforming its post-Soviet health system. Two comprehensive reform programmes were developed in the 2000s: the National Programme for Health Care Reform and Development 2005-2010 and the State Health Care Development Programme for 2011-2015 Salamatty Kazakhstan. Changes in health service provision included a reduction of the hospital sector and an increased emphasis on primary health care. However, inpatient facilities continue to consume the bulk of health financing. Partly resulting from changing perspectives on decentralization, levels of pooling kept changing. After a spell of devolving health financing to the rayon level in 2000-2003, beginning in 2004 a new health financing system was set up that included pooling of funds at the oblast level, establishing the oblast health department as the single-payer of health services. Since 2010, resources for hospital services under the State Guaranteed Benefits Package have been pooled at the national level within the framework of implementing the Concept on the Unified National Health Care System. Kazakhstan has also embarked on promoting evidence-based medicine and developing and introducing new clinical practice guidelines, as well as facility-level quality improvements. However, key aspects of health system performance are still in dire need of improvement. One of the key challenges is regional inequities in health financing, health care utilization and health outcomes, although some improvements have been achieved in recent years. Despite recent investments and reforms, however, population health has not yet improved substantially. PMID:22894852

  1. Health Behavior, Health Education, Health Service Utilization and Compliance with Health Regimes: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, J. R.; Hughes, Howard

    This bibliography includes references from major articles, Index Medicus (1972- 1977), and Psychological Abstracts (1967-1977). The material is arranged under four major headings--health behavior, health education, health services utilization, and compliance with health regimes. It will be of interest to persons working in medical settings and…

  2. The Meaning of Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balog, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Many health educators view health as a subjective, comprehensive and multidimensional construct, such as the WHO concept that defines health as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. This paper, through a philosophical analysis, demonstrates that health is not…

  3. Geography and global health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tim; Moon, Graham

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the report of the World Health Organisation's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, Closing the gap in a generation (Marmot 2008), this invited commentary considers the scope for geographical research on global health. We reflect on current work and note future possibilities, particularly those that take a critical perspective on the interplay of globalisation, security and health. PMID:22413171

  4. CHILD HEALTH USA 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Child Health USA 2002, the thirteenth annual report on the health status and service needs of America's children is presented by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). To assess the bureau's progress toward achieving its vision...

  5. Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains 13 articles and book/film reviews on various topics related to the diffusion of health care information in developing countries; beginning with two articles which define primary health care, and suggest principles related to the community, communication, and the health practitioner upon which primary health care should be…

  6. Health, Austerity and Affluence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poland, Blake

    2012-01-01

    On September 28, 2012, the postgraduate students of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto organized a conference on the theme of "Health, Austerity and Affluence." It brought together academics, health-care professionals and public policy makers in a forum to discuss effective health care delivery at a time when the…

  7. HEALTH EDUCATION, GRADE 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno County Schools, CA.

    INCLUDED ARE A UNIT ENTITLED "THE CLASSROOM TEACHER AND THE SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAM," A UNIT ENTITLED "HANDBOOK OF HEALTH ACTIVITIES," AND A SECTION CONTAINING 37 KITS. THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CLASSROOM TEACHER IN CONDUCTING THE SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAM INCLUDE--HELPING TO MAINTAIN A HEALTHFUL CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT, INCORPORATING DESIRABLE HEALTH…

  8. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice. PMID:18372870

  9. Health gain versus equity.

    PubMed

    Scott-Samuel, A

    1992-05-01

    A new organisation, the Association for Public Health, has just been formed 'to help deliver real health gain for the population'. Alex Scott-Samuel suggests that the concept of 'health gain' is counter to health equality and needs wider debate. PMID:1624317

  10. Partnering for Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammerman, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    A little-known health care safety net plays a big role for young people across the U.S. More than 1,900 school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to care--primary health, mental health and counseling, family outreach, and chronic illness management--to nearly 1.7 million children and adolescents. SBHCs are partnerships between schools and…

  11. Health insurance reform legislation.

    PubMed

    DiSimone, R L

    1997-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), enacted on August 21, 1996 (Public Law 104-19), provides for improved access and renewability with respect to employment-related group health plans, to health insurance coverage sold in connection with group plans, and to the individual market (by amending the Public Health Service Act). The Act's provisions include improvements in portability and continuity of health insurance coverage; combatting waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery; promoting the use of medical savings accounts; improving access to long-term care services and insurance coverage; administrative simplification; and addressing duplication and coordination of Medicare benefits. PMID:9483710

  12. [Coverage of health services].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Narváez, G

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the concepts and criteria related to health coverage are discussed in the context of the organization of national health systems. The main international agreements based on WHO/PAHO proposals are also described. The relationship between primary health care and health coverage is analyzed and the evolution of the programs for the extension of health coverage in Mexico are discussed, with emphasis on the problems of overlap and definition of the universe in the several institutions of the health sector. Finally, the author reviews the problems to measure coverage in order to guarantee social and operative efficiency of the Mexican health system. PMID:1411776

  13. Internationally Comparable Health Indices

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Erik; Kapteyn, Arie; Andreyeva, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    One of the most intractable problems in international health research is the lack of comparability of health measures across countries or cultures. We develop a cross-country measurement model for health in which functional limitations, self-reports of health, and a physical measure are interrelated to construct health indices. To establish comparability across countries, we define the measurement scales by the physical measure while other parameters vary by country to reflect cultural and linguistic differences in response patterns. We find significant cross-country variation in response styles of health reports along with variability in genuine health that is related to differences in national income. Our health indices achieve satisfactory reliability of about 80% and their gradients by age, income, and wealth for the most part show the expected patterns. Moreover, the health indices correlate much more strongly with income and net worth than self reported health measures. PMID:20572201

  14. Urban Environmental Health Hazards and Health Equity

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Sharon; Dixon, Jane; Corvalan, Carlos; Rehfuess, Eva; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid; Gore, Fiona; Bartram, Jamie

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines briefly how the living environment can affect health. It explains the links between social and environmental determinants of health in urban settings. Interventions to improve health equity through the environment include actions and policies that deal with proximal risk factors in deprived urban areas, such as safe drinking water supply, reduced air pollution from household cooking and heating as well as from vehicles and industry, reduced traffic injury hazards and noise, improved working environment, and reduced heat stress because of global climate change. The urban environment involves health hazards with an inequitable distribution of exposures and vulnerabilities, but it also involves opportunities for implementing interventions for health equity. The high population density in many poor urban areas means that interventions at a small scale level can assist many people, and existing infrastructure can sometimes be upgraded to meet health demands. Interventions at higher policy levels that will create more sustainable and equitable living conditions and environments include improved city planning and policies that take health aspects into account in every sector. Health equity also implies policies and actions that improve the global living environment, for instance, limiting greenhouse gas emissions. In a global equity perspective, improving the living environment and health of the poor in developing country cities requires actions to be taken in the most affluent urban areas of the world. This includes making financial and technical resources available from high-income countries to be applied in low-income countries for urgent interventions for health equity. This is an abbreviated version of a paper on “Improving the living environment” prepared for the World Health Organization Commission on Social Determinants of Health, Knowledge Network on Urban Settings. PMID:17450427

  15. Oral Health in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin; Haber, Judith; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara; Bella, Abigail; Vasilyeva, Anna; Lange Kessler, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Oral health is crucial to overall health. Because of normal physiologic changes, pregnancy is a time of particular vulnerability in terms of oral health. Pregnant women and their providers need more knowledge about the many changes that occur in the oral cavity during pregnancy. In this article we describe the importance of the recognition, prevention, and treatment of oral health problems in pregnant women. We offer educational strategies that integrate interprofessional oral health competencies. PMID:27281467

  16. Comparative optimism for severity of negative health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hevey, D; French, D P

    2012-01-01

    People tend to be comparatively optimistic (i.e., believe that negative outcomes are less likely for themselves than for typical others) regarding their susceptibility to negative health outcomes. The present study investigates the extent to which perceptions of the severity of these health outcomes show similar comparative optimism. A student sample (study 1; N = 200) and a healthy non-student adult sample (study 2; N = 257) completed self-report measures of susceptibility, severity, worry, control and experience in relation to negative health outcomes. Participants in both studies demonstrated significant levels of comparative optimism for both perceived likelihood and severity of health outcomes. Comparative optimism concerning severity was very strongly associated (r = 0.85 to 0.89) with comparative optimism concerning susceptibility. In addition to being comparatively optimistic over their chances of experiencing negative health outcomes, people are also comparatively optimistic regarding how severe the health outcomes will be. PMID:22111753

  17. Ukraine: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Lekhan, Valery; Rudiy, Volodymyr; Richardson, Erica

    2010-01-01

    The HiT profiles are country-based reports that provide a detailed description of a health system and of policy initiatives in progress or under development. HiTs examine different approaches to the organization, financing and delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in health systems; describe the institutional framework, process, content and implementation of health and health care policies; and highlight challenges and areas that require more in-depth analysis. The Ukrainian health system has preserved the fundamental features of the Soviet Semashko system against a background of other changes, which are developed on market economic principles. The transition from centralized financing to its extreme decentralization is the main difference in the health system in comparison with the classic Soviet model. Health facilities are now functionally subordinate to the Ministry of Health, but managerially and financially answerable to the regional and local self-government, which has constrained the implementation of health policy and fragmented health financing. Health care expenditure in Ukraine is low by regional standards and has not increased significantly as a proportion of gross domestic product (GDP) since the mid 1990s; expenditure cannot match the constitutional guarantees of access to unlimited care. Although prepaid schemes such as sickness funds are growing in importance, out-of-pocket payments account for 37.4% of total health expenditure. The core challenges for Ukrainian health care therefore remain the ineffective protection of the population from the risk of catastrophic health care costs and the structural inefficiency of the health system, which is caused by the inefficient system of health care financing. Health system weaknesses are highlighted by increasing rates of avoidable mortality. Recent political impasse has complicated health system reforms and policy-makers face significant challenges in overcoming popular distrust and

  18. Democracy and Women's Health

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Jalil

    2009-01-01

    New research on broader determinants of health has culminated into the new paradigm of social determinants of health. The fundamental view that underlies this new paradigm is that socioeconomic and political contexts in which people live have significant bearing upon their health and well-being. Unlike a wealth of research on socioeconomic determinants, few studies have focused on the role of political factors. Some of these studies examine the role of political determinants on health through their mediation with the labour environments and systems of welfare state. A few others study the relationship between polity regimes and population health more directly. However, none of them has a focus on women's health. This study explores the interactions, both direct and indirect, between democracy and women's health. In doing so, it identifies some of the main health vulnerabilities for women and explains, through a conceptual model, how democracy and respect for human rights interacts with women's health. PMID:21836777

  19. [Mental health problems].

    PubMed

    Momotani, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Haruyoshi

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes current issues in occupational mental health, occupational mental health activities currently underway, and priorities to improve the situation in Japan. A new tool to support these activities is then discussed. The incidence of employee mental health problems is rising, despite efforts to promote occupational mental health activities. The adoption of such activities is lagging behind in medium and small-sized enterprises. Priorities to improve occupational mental health include motivating business operators to address mental health issues, focusing more on prevention, and promoting mental health initiatives in medium and small-sized enterprises. Mental-Rosai, a web-based mental health check system, is a useful tool for the prevention of mental health problems and can provide support for medium and small-sized enterprises. PMID:24605529

  20. Training Public Health Advisors

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Pamela A.; Brusuelas, Kristin M.; Baden, Daniel J.; Duncan, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management. PMID:25564995

  1. [SCHOOL HEALTH IN FRANCE].

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Didier

    2015-12-01

    On average, French children spend 18.5 years n schools. Improving the effectiveness of interventions in school setting aiming at promoting children's health and reducing health inequities is critical in public health. Evidence shows that a whole school approach, where there is coherence between the school's policies and practices that promote social inclusion and commitment to education, actually facilitates improved learning outcomes, increases emotional wellbeing and reduces health risk behaviours. Many factors govern the ways in which school health education is implemented and within these factors, staff commitment and partnership with local health professionals play a crucial role. The effectiveness of health promotion in schools is directly linked to the way in which school environment is supportive. There is a need to improve school organisation, ethos and environment as well as to invest in partnerships with local organisations and services especially the health professionals who are in charge of children's health. PMID:26979015

  2. Energy and human health.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kirk R; Frumkin, Howard; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Butler, Colin D; Chafe, Zoë A; Fairlie, Ian; Kinney, Patrick; Kjellstrom, Tord; Mauzerall, Denise L; McKone, Thomas E; McMichael, Anthony J; Schneider, Mycle

    2013-01-01

    Energy use is central to human society and provides many health benefits. But each source of energy entails some health risks. This article reviews the health impacts of each major source of energy, focusing on those with major implications for the burden of disease globally. The biggest health impacts accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels and electricity in the world's poor households is a particularly serious risk for health. Although energy efficiency brings many benefits, it also entails some health risks, as do renewable energy systems, if not managed carefully. We do not review health impacts of climate change itself, which are due mostly to climate-altering pollutants from energy systems, but do discuss the potential for achieving near-term health cobenefits by reducing certain climate-related emissions. PMID:23330697

  3. Training Public Health Advisors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management. PMID:25564995

  4. Personality, relationships, and health.

    PubMed

    Markey, Charlotte N; Markey, Patrick M

    2014-12-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Personality focuses on the importance of considering both personality and relationship forces when examining physical and psychological health. The nine articles presented in this issue employed a variety of research designs, theoretical rationales, health outcomes, and advanced statistical methodologies in order to better understand how both individual differences and social factors are relevant to our health. These articles embody several prominent themes: Conscientiousness is a robust predictor of health; traits beyond the Five-Factor Model should be considered in attempts to understand personality, relationships, and health; links among personality, relationships, and health begin early in life; and relationship transitions are consequential to health. It is hoped that these studies inspire personality researchers to consider the relationship context of health and relationship researchers to consider individual differences when attempting to understand health behaviors and outcomes. PMID:24299020

  5. Slovenia: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Albreht, Tit; Pribakovic Brinovec, Radivoje; Josar, Dusan; Poldrugovac, Mircha; Kostnapfel, Tatja; Zaletel, Metka; Panteli, Dimitra; Maresso, Anna

    2016-06-01

    This analysis of the Slovene health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The health of the population has improved over the last few decades. While life expectancy for both men and women is similar to EU averages, morbidity and mortality data show persistent disparities between regions, and mortality from external causes is particularly high. Satisfaction with health care delivery is high, but recently waiting times for some outpatient specialist services have increased. Greater focus on preventive measures is also needed as well as better care coordination, particularly for those with chronic conditions. Despite having relatively high levels of co-payments for many services covered by the universal compulsory health insurance system, these expenses are counterbalanced by voluntary health insurance, which covers 95% of the population liable for co-payments. However, Slovenia is somewhat unique among social health insurance countries in that it relies almost exclusively on payroll contributions to fund its compulsory health insurance system. This makes health sector revenues very susceptible to economic and labour market fluctuations. A future challenge will be to diversify the resource base for health system funding and thus bolster sustainability in the longer term, while preserving service delivery and quality of care. Given changing demographics and morbidity patterns, further challenges include restructuring the funding and provision of long-term care and enhancing health system efficiency through reform of purchasing and provider-payment systems. PMID:27467813

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Health Education for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgerly, Gisele; And Others

    Text, illustrations and exercises are utilized in this set of six learning modules dealing with health topics of interest to the general public. The first module, "Do You Know Your Rights as a Patient?" by Gisele Edgerly, details the personal and financial rights of hospital patients. The second module, "The Consumer's Guide to Hearing Health Care…

  7. The Psychological Impact of Teleworking: Stress, Emotions and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Sandi; Holdsworth, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Study 1 included interviews with 12 teleworkers and office workers. Study 2 surveyed 32 office workers and 30 teleworkers. Results suggest that teleworking has negative emotional impact in terms of such emotions as loneliness, irritability, worry, and guilt and that teleworkers experience significantly more mental health symptoms of stress and…

  8. Allied health: integral to transforming health.

    PubMed

    Lizarondo, Lucylynn; Turnbull, Catherine; Kroon, Tracey; Grimmer, Karen; Bell, Alison; Kumar, Saravana; McEvoy, Maureen; Milanese, Steve; Russell, Mary; Sheppard, Lorraine; Walters, Julie; Wiles, Louise

    2016-04-01

    Objective South Australia is taking an innovative step in transforming the way its healthcare is organised and delivered to better manage current and future demands on the health system. In an environment of transforming health services, there are clear opportunities for allied health to assist in determining solutions to various healthcare challenges. A recent opinion piece proposed 10 clinician-driven strategies to assist in maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. The present study aimed to seek the perspectives of allied health clinicians, educators, researchers, policy makers and managers on these strategies and their relevance to allied health. Methods A survey of allied health practitioners was undertaken to capture their perspectives on the 10 clinician-driven strategies for maximising value and sustainability of healthcare in Australia. Survey findings were then layered with evidence from the literature. Results Highly relevant across allied health are the strategies of discontinuation of low value practices, targeting clinical interventions to those getting greatest benefit, active involvement of patients in shared decision making and self-management and advocating for integrated systems of care. Conclusions Allied health professionals have been involved in the South Australian healthcare system for a prolonged period, but their services are poorly recognised, often overlooked and not greatly supported in existing traditional practices. The results of the present study highlight ways in which healthcare services can implement strategies not only to improve the quality of patient outcomes, but also to offer innovative solutions for future, sustainable healthcare. The findings call for concerted efforts to increase the utilisation of allied health services to ensure the 'maximum value for spend' of the increasingly scarce health dollar. What is known about the topic? In medicine, clinician-driven strategies have been proposed to

  9. Health policy basics: health insurance marketplaces.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Ryan A; Tape, Thomas G

    2013-12-01

    Starting on 1 October 2013, most individuals and small businesses will be able to shop for and enroll in health insurance coverage through their state's health insurance marketplace, also known as an exchange. The health insurance marketplaces will serve as a one-stop resource to help the uninsured and the underinsured find comprehensive health coverage that fits their needs and budget and determine whether they qualify for health insurance tax credits provided by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Physicians may benefit because insured patients are more likely to have a regular source of care, adhere to medical regimens, and access preventive care. However, implementation of the marketplaces may prove challenging if enrollment numbers are insufficient, technical problems arise, and patients are unable to access providers. Despite these potential issues, physicians are encouraged to educate themselves about how the marketplaces work so they can direct their patients to find the coverage that best meets their medical needs. PMID:24061932

  10. Health insurance reform: labor versus health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Walid; Awar, May

    2012-01-01

    The Ministry of Labor (MOL) has submitted to the Council of Ministers a social security reform plan. The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) considers that health financing should be dealt with as part of a more comprehensive health reform plan that falls under its prerogatives. While a virulent political discussion is taking place, major stakeholders' inputs are very limited and civil society is totally put away from the whole policy making process. The role of the media is restricted to reproducing political disputes, without meaningful substantive debate. This paper discusses health insurance reform from labor market as well as public health perspectives, and aims at launching a serious public debate on this crucial issue that touches the life of every citizen. PMID:22645894

  11. No Mental Health without Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve

    2016-05-01

    The poor physical health faced by people with mental illness has been the subject of growing attention, but there has been less focus on the issue of oral health even though it is an important part of physical health. This article discusses the two-way association between oral and mental health. In one direction, the prospect of dental treatment can lead to anxiety and phobia. In the other, many psychiatric disorders, such as severe mental illness, affective disorders, and eating disorders, are associated with dental disease: These include erosion, caries, and periodontitis. Left untreated, dental diseases can lead to teeth loss such that people with severe mental illness have 2.7 times the likelihood of losing all their teeth, compared with the general population. Possible interventions include oral health assessments using standard checklists that can be completed by nondental personnel, help with oral hygiene, management of iatrogenic dry mouth, and early dental referral. PMID:27254802

  12. Health and health services in Central America.

    PubMed

    Garfield, R M; Rodriguez, P F

    1985-08-16

    Despite rapid economic growth since World War II, health conditions improved only slowly in most of Central America. This is a result of poor medical, social, and economic infrastructure, income maldistribution, and the poor utilization of health investments. The economic crisis of the 1980s and civil strife have further endangered health in the region. Life expectancy has fallen among men in El Salvador and civil strife has become the most common cause of death in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. Large-scale US assistance has done little to improve conditions, and refugees continue to pour into North America. It is estimated that there are more than a million refugees within Central America, while a million have fled to the United States. Costa Rica and Nicaragua are partial exceptions to this dismal health picture. An effective approach to the many health problems in Central America will require joint planning and cooperation among all countries in the region. PMID:4021026

  13. Shopping for health information.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, M L; Mailander, N K; Danner, R A

    2000-01-01

    In this time of ongoing health care changes, consumers need to become better informed to actively participate in their health care decisions. As a result, hospital libraries are being challenged to address this need. Scottsdale Healthcare's Health Sciences Libraries have responded to this challenge by establishing a Health Information Center at the premiere shopping mall in the area. Implementing a Health Information Center at a mall is a unique way to bring medical information to the community. The purpose of this paper is to describe the planning process, the implementation, and the future vision of the Health Information Center at Scottsdale Fashion Square. PMID:11299612

  14. Health physics ethics.

    PubMed

    Evdokimoff, Victor

    2004-02-01

    Ethics is defined in the New World Dictionary as ". . . moral principles governing appropriate conduct for an individual or group." The Health Physics Membership Directory contains 2 references for professional conduct for health physicists. The first is for members of the Health Physics Society. The second is for Certified Health Physicists. They are similar: A health physicist must always maintain the highest ethical standards whether beginning a career or having practiced for decades. A review of some key principles by example will hopefully demonstrate how to avoid ethical dilemmas for health physicists. PMID:14744062

  15. mHealth in Cardiovascular Health Care.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clara K; Ariyarathna, Nilshan; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Redfern, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) has been defined as medical and public health practice supported by mobile devices, such as mobile phones, patient monitoring devices and personal digital assistants. Cardiovascular mHealth is, arguably, leading the mHealth space, through innovation, research and implementation, and especially in the areas of prevention, cardiac rehabilitation and education. mHealth includes simple strategies, such as the use of short message service (SMS) or text messages in successful short-term smoking-cessation, weight loss and diabetes management programs. The recent Australian Tobacco, Exercise and Diet Messages (TEXT ME) randomised clinical trial addressed multiple cardiovascular risk factors. mHealth can also involve more complex strategies, such as smart phone applications (apps), global positioning systems (GPS) and Bluetooth technologies. Although many apps could be considered suitable for primary prevention, they are largely unregulated and most are not evidence-based. Some have been well-developed, such as the Food Switch app and an iPhone electrocardiogram (ECG) system. The "explosion" of apps has driven initiatives such as the Mobile Applications Rating Scale (MARS). More recently, the use of sensors to monitor and provide feedback to patients and healthcare providers is being explored. With almost two billion people currently owning a Smartphone, and 50% of adults (globally) predicted to own one by 2018, mHealth provides the prospect of delivering efficient, affordable healthcare services to widespread populations both locally and globally. In particular, it has the potential to reduce socioeconomic disparity and alleviate the burden of cardiovascular disease. There is now a need to rethink traditional health service structures and bioengineering capacity, to ensure mHealth systems are also safe, secure and robust. PMID:27262389

  16. Germany: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Busse, Reinhard; Blümel, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    This analysis of the German health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. In the German health care system, decision-making powers are traditionally shared between national (federal) and state (Land) levels, with much power delegated to self-governing bodies. It provides universal coverage for a wide range of benefits. Since 2009, health insurance has been mandatory for all citizens and permanent residents, through either statutory or private health insurance. A total of 70 million people or 85% of the population are covered by statutory health insurance in one of 132 sickness funds in early 2014. Another 11% are covered by substitutive private health insurance. Characteristics of the system are free choice of providers and unrestricted access to all care levels. A key feature of the health care delivery system in Germany is the clear institutional separation between public health services, ambulatory care and hospital (inpatient) care. This has increasingly been perceived as a barrier to change and so provisions for integrated care are being introduced with the aim of improving cooperation between ambulatory physicians and hospitals. Germany invests a substantial amount of its resources on health care: 11.4% of gross domestic product in 2012, which is one of the highest levels in the European Union. In international terms, the German health care system has a generous benefit basket, one of the highest levels of capacity as well as relatively low cost-sharing. However, the German health care system still needs improvement in some areas, such as the quality of care. In addition, the division into statutory and private health insurance remains one of the largest challenges for the German health care system, as it leads to inequalities. PMID:25115137

  17. Latvia: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Mitenbergs, Uldis; Taube, Maris; Misins, Janis; Mikitis, Eriks; Martinsons, Atis; Rurane, Aiga; Quentin, Wilm

    2012-01-01

    This analysis of the Latvian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health-system performance. Latvia has been constantly reforming its health system for over two decades. After independence in 1991, Latvia initially moved to create a social health insurance type system. However, problems with decentralized planning and fragmented and inefficient financing led to this being gradually reversed, and ultimately the establishment in 2011 of a National Health Service type system. These constant changes have taken place against a backdrop of relatively poor health and limited funding, with a heavy burden for individuals; Latvia has one of the highest rates of out-of-pocket expenditure on health in the European Union (EU). The lack of financial resources resulting from the financial crisis has posed an enormous challenge to the government, which struggled to ensure the availability of necessary health care services for the population and to prevent deterioration of health status. Yet this also provided momentum for reforms: previous efforts to centralise the system and to shift from hospital to outpatient care were drastically accelerated, while at the same time a social safety net strategy was implemented (with financial support from the World Bank) to protect the poor from the negative consequences of user charges. However, as in any health system, a number of challenges remain. They include: reducing smoking and cardiovascular deaths; increasing coverage of prescription pharmaceuticals; reducing the excessive reliance on out-of-pocket payments for financing the health system; reducing inequities in access and health status; improving efficiency of hospitals through implementation of DRG-based financing; and monitoring and improving quality. In the face of these challenges at a time of financial crisis, one further challenge emerges: ensuring adequate funding for the health

  18. Engendering health disparities.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2005-01-01

    How is gender implicated in our exploration of health disparities in Canada? Set against the backdrop of federal government policy, this review paper examines the ways in which gender intersects with other health determinants to produce disparate health outcomes. An overview of salient issues including the impact of gender roles, environmental exposures, gender violence, workplace hazards, economic disparities, the costs of poverty, social marginalization and racism, aging, health conditions, interactions with health services, and health behaviours are considered. This review suggests health is detrimentally affected by gender roles and statuses as they intersect with economic disparities, cultural, sexual, physical and historical marginalization as well as the strains of domestic and paid labour. These conditions result in an unfair health burden borne in particular by women whose access to health determinants is--in various degrees--limited. While progress has certainly been made on some fronts, the persistence of health disparities among diverse populations of women and men suggests a postponement of the vision of a just society with health for all that was articulated in the Federal Plan on Gender Equality. Commitment, creativity and collaboration from stakeholders ranging from various levels of government, communities, academics, non-governmental agencies and health professionals will be required to reduce and eliminate health disparities between and among all members of our society. PMID:16078557

  19. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ivo de Carvalho, Antonio; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Pereira Lima, Vera Lucia Góes

    2007-01-01

    Brazil, a Latin American country of continental proportions and contrasts, demographic inequalities, and social inequities, concomitantly faces the challenge of preventing and controlling infectious diseases, injuries, and non-communicable diseases. The loss of strength of the biomedical paradigm, the change in epidemiological profile, and the sociopolitical and cultural challenges of recent decades have fostered the emergence of new formulations about public health thinking and practice. Among them, are the paradigms of Brazilian Collective Health and Health Promotion. The former provides philosophical support for Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS). The aim of this article is to discuss the development of public health within the country's history, and to analyze and compare the theoretical assumptions of Health Promotion and Collective Health. We conclude that health promotion, based on the principles and values disseminated by the international Charters and concerned with social actors and social determinants of the health-disease process, has significant potential to promote the improvement of living and health conditions of the population. This frame of reference guided the formulation of the National Policy of Health Promotion within the Unified Health System, which was institutionalized by a ministerial decree. The importance and application of evaluating the effectiveness of health promotion processes and methodologies in Brazil have been guided by various frames of reference, which we clarify in this article through describing historical processes. PMID:17596091

  20. 78 FR 16685 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ]...

  1. 75 FR 1384 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers:...

  2. Supervisor Health and Safety Support: Scale Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Marcus M.; Hurst, Carrie S.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    Executive Summary Two studies were conducted to develop a psychometrically sound measure of supervisor health and safety support (SHSS). We identified three dimensions of supervisor support (physical health, psychological health, safety) and used Study 1 to develop items and establish content validity. Study 2 was used to establish the dimensionality of the new measure and provide criterion-related and discriminant validity evidence of the measure using supervisor and subordinate data. The measure had incremental validity in predicting employee performance and psychological strain outcomes above and beyond general work support variables. Implications of these findings and for workplace support theory and practice are discussed. PMID:24771991

  3. Is Seniors' Dental Health Tied to Mental Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158104.html Is Seniors' Dental Health Tied to Mental Health? Declines in one seem to mirror declines in ... Dementia Seniors' Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Dementia Dental Health Seniors' Health About MedlinePlus ...

  4. Environmental health--champions of One Health.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Christopher; Stull, Paul A; Balster, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The authors find overwhelming evidence among environmental health practitioners that One Health disease reporting concepts are essential to the early detection of, and expedient recovery from, pandemic disease events. The authors also find, however, extraordinary evidence that local public health is not prepared, and potentially unaware of their responsibility, to be the initiator of the zoonotic infectious disease information intelligence necessary to make such early event mitigation possible. The authors propose that NEHA take an affirmative step towards the development of local public health-initiated biosurveillance systems by organizing and leading a tabletop study group that includes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Veterinary Medical Association, American Medical Association, Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Institute of Medicine, and a robust panel of NEHA state affiliates. This study group should discuss the infrastructure necessary for local public health-the frontline against community-acquired infectious disease-to be the initiators of environmental health, veterinary, and medical One Health biosurveillance systems. The need to establish a community-focused, integrated disease prevention strategy that cautions people about the risks associated with food, water, animal, and contaminated environmental media, both prior to and during epidemic and pandemic events is equally important. PMID:23947288

  5. Health Check Tools

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/healthchecktools.html Health Check Tools To use the sharing features on ... Schedule (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Children's Health Body Mass Index: Calculator for Child and Teen ( ...

  6. Humidifiers and health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and humidifiers; Using a humidifier for colds; Humidifiers and colds ... Commission. CPSC safety alert: dirty humidifiers may cause health problems. Available at: www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/121804/ ...

  7. Projecting Health Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a computer model for planning future health care needs in the Los Angeles area. The model integrates demographic health and other data to provide rational projections of hospital bed and physician specialty requirements.

  8. HealthCare.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask for more info Site Search Search Need health insurance? See if you qualify You can enroll in ... September 01 Start the school year strong with health insurance See More Footer Resources About the Affordable Care ...

  9. NIHSeniorHealth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Healthy Aging Heart and Lungs Memory and Mental Health Treatments and Therapies Vision and Hearing All Topics A-Z Featured Topic Bladder Health Exercise Stories People of all ages and physical conditions ...

  10. Climate Change and Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Fact sheets Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Climate change and health Fact sheet Reviewed June 2016 Key ... in improved health, particularly through reduced air pollution. Climate change Over the last 50 years, human activities – particularly ...

  11. Health Risk of Radon

    MedlinePlus

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  12. Caregiver Health and Wellness

    MedlinePlus

    ... content was developed with general underwriting support from Nature Made®. ... Caregiver stress fact sheet by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women’s Health ( April 10, 2012, ...

  13. Rural Health Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... outcomes; quality; and cost, use, and access. AHRQ publishes an annual National Healthcare Disparities Report that summarizes ... is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and ...

  14. Henry Ford Health Systems

    Cancer.gov

    Henry Ford Health Systems evolved from a hospital into a system delivering care to 2.5 million patients and includes the Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program, which focuses on epidemiologic and public health aspects of cancer.

  15. Pan American Health Organization

    MedlinePlus

    ... international partner organizations are urging strong financial and political support for a medium-term cholera plan recently ... Collaborating Centers IRIS Institutional Repository for Information Sharing Public Health Associations Bulletins Virtual Campus for Public Health ...

  16. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  17. Vacation health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 - 6 ... If you are taking medicine, talk to your health care provider before leaving. Carry all medicines with you ...

  18. Women's Health Topics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women's Health 10903 New Hampshire Avenue WO32-2333 Silver Spring, MD 20993 More in Women's Health Topics ... Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1- ...

  19. Women's Health Checkup

    MedlinePlus

    Regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start. They also can help find problems early, when your ... better. As a woman, you need some special exams and screenings. During your checkup, your health care ...

  20. Vacation health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the sharing features on this page, ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 to ...

  1. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  2. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Affordable Care Act Clinical Practice Emergency Preparedness Finance Health Information Technology ICD-10 Integrity Medicaid Medicare ... Facility Operations Affordable Care Act Clinical Emergency Preparedness Finance Health Information Technology Integrity Medicaid Medicare Patient Privacy ...

  3. Does Commuting Affect Health?

    PubMed

    Künn-Nelen, Annemarie

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyzes the relation between commuting time and health in the UK. I focus on four different types of health outcomes: subjective health measures, objective health measures, health behavior, and healthcare utilization. Fixed effect models are estimated with British Household Panel Survey data. I find that whereas objective health and health behavior are barely affected by commuting time, subjective health measures are clearly lower for people who commute longer. A longer commuting time is, moreover, related to more visits to the general practitioner. Effects turn out to be more pronounced for women and for commuters driving a car. For women, commuting time is also negatively related to regular exercise and positively to calling in sick. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26010157

  4. Disability and Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... existing policies and services, identify priorities to reduce health inequalities and plan improvements for access and inclusion. Make changes to comply with the CRPD. Establish health care standards related to care of persons with ...

  5. Good Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... all the difference. Mind/Body Connection: How Your Emotions Affect Your Health (Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians) - This site discusses ways to improve your emotional health in order to have better ...

  6. Understanding Health News

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z Know the Science: The Facts About Health News Stories Understanding Health ... only on animals without explaining that such basic science may have little immediate significance to people. For ...

  7. Spotlight: Health Newsmakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tom Daschle, Democrat from South Dakota, was President Obama's choice to run the U.S. Department of Health ... may be on the way , as the new Obama administration health policies and players take shape. President ...

  8. UnitedHealth Group

    Cancer.gov

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  9. Women's Health Checkup

    MedlinePlus

    Regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start. They also can help find problems early, ... special exams and screenings. During your checkup, your health care provider will usually do: A pelvic exam - ...

  10. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  11. Environmental Health Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Alan; Smith, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Describes an environmental health science technology curriculum designed to provide technicians in the areas of air, water and wastewater analyses, treatment plant operators, public health enforcement officers, and pollution inspectors. (GS)

  12. Stress and your health

    MedlinePlus

    ... org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/emotional-wellbeing/mental-health/stress-how-to-cope-better-with-lifes-challenges.html. ... on Stress. Available at: www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/stress/index.shtml. Accessed April 17, 2014. US Department ...

  13. Aging and Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kay H.

    2014-01-01

    A recent study comparing older adults’ health literacy skills with their satisfaction with health care providers’ communication efforts did not find a correlation between the two measures. However, the results were interesting, including the fact that almost 40 percent of participants experienced moderate to severe difficulties in understanding everyday health information as presented in a food label (Newest Vital Sign assessment). This has implications for senior patient engagement in health care, particularly at a time when so many health transactions such as scheduling and records requests, not to mention general health information, are moving to online only format. Librarians should be aware of the issues surrounding health literacy in older adults and work with providers to address those deficits in health care navigation in this population. PMID:24634614

  14. Creating a Health Journal

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor can also help you keep your health journal up-to-date. Keeping track of your health history helps you to be an informed, knowledgeable patient. Knowledge allows you to take more control of your ...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Public Health Indicators (EPHIs), quantitative measures of health factors and environmental influences tracked over time, can be used to identify specific areas and populations for intervention and prevention efforts and to evaluate the outcomes of implemented polic...

  16. Women, disadvantage and health.

    PubMed

    Luddy, G

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the issue of disadvantage and health and how gender also affects health inequalities. Socio-economic status has been found to influence access to many social determinants of health, such as education and employment, food and nutrition, work opportunities, and housing. Socio-economic status has also been found to greatly impact on a person's access to effective healthcare in Ireland. Ireland has one of the widest gaps between rich and poor in Europe. Women in less well-off socio-economic groups are at the greatest disadvantage with regard to health and have been found to be at greater risk of developing poor health. The health of disadvantaged women is compromised by: lack of education, lack of information, and lack of awareness of factors that contribute to disease. These issues are explored in the paper with special focus on cancer, mental health, cardiovascular disease and sexual health. PMID:17955712

  17. Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research on Conditions Affecting Older Adults Research on Pain Management Be an Informed Consumer Talk With Your Health ... integrative health in a variety of situations, including pain management for military personnel and veterans, relief of symptoms ...

  18. What Is Mental Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Basics What is Mental Health Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What To Look For Anxiety Disorders Behavioral Disorders Eating Disorders Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders Mood Disorders ...

  19. Stress and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... ePublications > Stress and your health fact sheet ePublications Stress and your health fact sheet Print this fact ... a big difference in my life! What is stress? Stress is a feeling you get when faced ...

  20. The health of children.

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, P G; Schor, E L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the concept of child health and the measurement of child health status in order to help guide the evaluation of the effectiveness of medical, social, and policy programs. CONCLUSIONS: Opportunities for research on children's health status and quality of care abound. Comprehensive and functional definitions create problems of measurement, but investigators are making progress in measuring children's health status both generically and for specific chronic health conditions. RECOMMENDATIONS: Measures of child health need to be developed, improved, tested, and made user-friendly for clinical and policy research. The relationship between health status and a variety of social programs for children and families needs study. The impact of changes in healthcare organization and financing must be investigated, especially for children from vulnerable subgroups. Determining the value and effectiveness of preventive services is a pressing issue. It is crucial to understand better the link among quality of care; other factors biological, family, and social; and children's health status. PMID:9776947

  1. NATIONAL HEALTH PROVIDER INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health Provider Inventory provides data on services, location, staff, capacity, and other characteristics of selected health care providers in the United States. Information is collected via mail questionnaire with telephone follow up to all providers (100% census) o...

  2. Monitoring Your Kidney Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families For Health Care Professionals Print or Order Publications You can also order print materials from our ... Families For Health Care Professionals Print or Order Publications You can also order print materials from our ...

  3. Understanding population health terminology.

    PubMed

    Kindig, David A

    2007-01-01

    Population health is a relatively new term, with no agreement about whether it refers to a concept of health or a field of study of health determinants. There is debate, sometimes heated, about whether population health and public health are identical or different. Discussions of population health involve many terms, such as outcomes, disparities, determinants, and risk factors, which may be used imprecisely, particularly across different disciplines, such as medicine, epidemiology, economics, and sociology. Nonetheless, thinking and communicating clearly about population health concepts are essential for public and private policymakers to improve the population's health and reduce disparities. This article defines and discusses many of the terms and concepts characterizing this emerging field. PMID:17319809

  4. Sleep and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Sleep Tips for Children's Mental Health Page Content ​​​Sleep has become a casualty ... MPH, FAAP Last Updated 5/23/2016 Source Mental Health, Naturally: The Family Guide to Holistic Care ...

  5. Health Instruction Framework for California Public Schools: Preschool Through Young Adult Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of Curriculum Services.

    This book presents a framework to serve as a foundation for the total process of health curriculum development. It may be used to: (1) plan courses of study; (2) explore interrelationships between and among content areas within the school health instruction program; and (3) enhance continuity and articulation within the total school health…

  6. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  7. Older Adults With Intellectual Disability in Residential Care Centers in Israel: Health Status and Service Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, Joav; Davidson, Philip W.; Morad, Mohammed; Janicki, Matthew P.; Wexler, Orren; Henderson, C. Michael

    2004-01-01

    To determine their health status, we studied 2,282 Israeli adults with intellectual disability who were at least 40 years of age and lived in residential care. Results showed that age is a significant factor in health status. The frequency of different disease categories (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, and sensory impairments) increased…

  8. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:25372246

  9. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10114933

  10. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10122365

  11. Reproductive health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Mark C; Ross, Lawrence S

    2014-02-01

    Most patients in the United States with reproductive health disorders are not covered by their health insurance for these problems. Health insurance plans consider reproductive care as a lifestyle choice not as a disease. If coverage is provided it is, most often, directed to female factor infertility and advanced reproductive techniques, ignoring male factor reproductive disorders. This article reviews the history of reproductive health care delivery and its present state, and considers its possible future direction. PMID:24286778

  12. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Lazenby, Helen C.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10120177

  13. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:25372574

  14. Inequality aversion, health inequalities and health achievement.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Adam

    2002-07-01

    This paper addresses two issues. The first is how health inequalities can be measured in such a way as to take into account policymakers' attitudes towards inequality. The Gini coefficient and the related concentration index embody one particular set of value judgements. By generalising these indices, alternative sets of value judgements can be reflected. The other issue addressed is how information on health inequality can be used together with information on the mean of the relevant distribution to obtain an overall measure of health "achievement". PMID:12146594

  15. A Certified Health Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    This article features a certification program for health care workers in Southeastern Oklahoma. Kiamichi Technology Center is certifying success for its students while helping to meet the demand for trained health care workers in Southeastern Oklahoma. Through the health careers certification program at Kiamichi Technology Center in Hugo, Oklahoma…

  16. Health-Care Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  17. Trade in health services.

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Rupa

    2002-01-01

    In light of the increasing globalization of the health sector, this article examines ways in which health services can be traded, using the mode-wise characterization of trade defined in the General Agreement on Trade in Services. The trade modes include cross- border delivery of health services via physical and electronic means, and cross-border movement of consumers, professionals, and capital. An examination of the positive and negative implications of trade in health services for equity, efficiency, quality, and access to health care indicates that health services trade has brought mixed benefits and that there is a clear role for policy measures to mitigate the adverse consequences and facilitate the gains. Some policy measures and priority areas for action are outlined, including steps to address the "brain drain"; increasing investment in the health sector and prioritizing this investment better; and promoting linkages between private and public health care services to ensure equity. Data collection, measures, and studies on health services trade all need to be improved, to assess better the magnitude and potential implications of this trade. In this context, the potential costs and benefits of trade in health services are shaped by the underlying structural conditions and existing regulatory, policy, and infrastructure in the health sector. Thus, appropriate policies and safeguard measures are required to take advantage of globalization in health services. PMID:11953795

  18. HAPPIER: Health Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg.

    Based on findings of Project HAPPIER surveys and intended as a resource for health care providers and educators who serve the migrant community, this guide describes over 375 instructional materials in the areas of dental health, disease control, fitness, health promotion, human growth and development, hypertension, maternal and child care, mental…

  19. Health Aides Serve...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huscher, John

    1976-01-01

    The student health aide program of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln is a paid, auxiliary, trained health position in dorms, co-ops, and Greek houses, with personnel evaluated on the assistance provided for any physical, personal, social, or environmental health concerns students may have in accordance with the aide's training. (MB)

  20. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  1. Exercise and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Thomas W.

    This book paints a broad picture of the role of exercise in children's health and provides information for the physician and other health care providers on healthful forms of physical activity for children. The book is divided into three parts: (1) "Developmental Exercise Physiology: The Physiological Basis of Physical Fitness in Children"; (2)…

  2. Ecuador's silent health reform.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Pierre; Echeverría Tapia, Ramiro; Aguilar Santacruz, Edison; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Health sector reform was implemented in many Latin American countries in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to reduced public expenditure on health, limitations on public provision for disease control, and a minimum package of services, with concomitant growth of the private sector. At first sight, Ecuador appeared to follow a different pattern: no formal reform was implemented, despite many plans to reform the Ministry of Health and social health insurance. The authors conducted an in-depth review and analysis of published and gray literature on the Ecuadorian health sector from 1990 onward. They found that although neoliberal reform of the health sector was not openly implemented, many of its typical elements are present: severe reduction of public budgets, "universal" health insurance with limited coverage for targeted groups, and contracting out to private providers. The health sector remains segmented and fragmented, explaining the population's poor health status. The leftist Correa government has prepared an excellent long-term plan to unite services of the Ministry of Health and social security, but implementation is extremely slow. In conclusion, the health sector in Ecuador suffered a "silent" neoliberal reform. President Correa's progressive government intends to reverse this, increasing public budgets for health, but hesitates to introduce needed radical changes. PMID:22611652

  3. Operational health physics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth L

    2005-06-01

    A review of the operational health physics papers published in Health Physics and Operational Radiation Safety over the past fifteen years indicated seventeen general categories or areas into which the topics could be readily separated. These areas include academic research programs, use of computers in operational health physics, decontamination and decommissioning, dosimetry, emergency response, environmental health physics, industrial operations, medical health physics, new procedure development, non-ionizing radiation, radiation measurements, radioactive waste disposal, radon measurement and control, risk communication, shielding evaluation and specification, staffing levels for health physics programs, and unwanted or orphan sources. That is not to say that there are no operational papers dealing with specific areas of health physics, such as power reactor health physics, accelerator health physics, or governmental health physics. On the contrary, there have been a number of excellent operational papers from individuals in these specialty areas and they are included in the broader topics listed above. A listing and review of all the operational papers that have been published is beyond the scope of this discussion. However, a sampling of the excellent operational papers that have appeared in Health Physics and Operational Radiation Safety is presented to give the reader the flavor of the wide variety of concerns to the operational health physicist and the current areas of interest where procedures are being refined and solutions to problems are being developed. PMID:15891458

  4. Operational health physics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    A review of the operational health physics papers published in Health Physics and Operational Radiation Safety over the past fifteen years indicated seventeen general categories or areas into which the topics could be readily separated. These areas include academic research programs, use of computers in operational health physics, decontamination and decommissioning, dosimetry, emergency response, environmental health physics, industrial operations, medical health physics, new procedure development, non-ionizing radiation, radiation measurements, radioactive waste disposal, radon measurement and control, risk communication, shielding evaluation and specification, staffing levels for health physics programs, and unwanted or orphan sources. That is not to say that there are no operational papers dealing with specific areas of health physics, such as power reactor health physics, accelerator health physics, or governmental health physics. On the contrary, there have been a number of excellent operational papers from individuals in these specialty areas and they are included in the broader topics listed above. A listing and review of all the operational papers that have been published is beyond the scope of this discussion. However, a sampling of the excellent operational papers that have appeared in Health Physics and Operational Radiation Safety is presented to give the reader the flavor of the wide variety of concerns to the operational health physicist and the current areas of interest where procedures are being refined and solutions to problems are being developed. PMID:15596985

  5. Sexuality. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stang, Lucas; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The seven sections in this book on…

  6. Benefits for Health; NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. Presentation discusses (1) Bone Health: Vitamin D, Fish Consumption and Exercise (2) Medical Support in Remote Areas (3) ISS Ultrasound 4) Dry electrode EKG System (5) Environmental Factors and Psychological Health.

  7. Your Health Information Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office for Civil Rights or your State's Attorneys General Office. Are State ... Rights . Protect Patients’ Health Information and Their Privacy Rights The US Dept. of Health and Human Services has just released the latest version of ...

  8. HIV Prevention. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stang, Lucas; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The seven sections in this book provide…

  9. Disease Prevention. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stang, Lucas; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and to provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The five sections in this book on…

  10. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  11. Understanding health insurance plans

    MedlinePlus

    Most insurance companies offer different types of health plans. And when you are comparing plans, it can sometimes seem ... Depending on how you get your health insurance, you may have a ... (HMOs). These plans offer a network of health care providers ...

  12. Child Health USA '90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.

    The report summarizes the health status and service needs of children in the United States. The first of the report's three sections describes the general population to provide a context for health measures. In the second section selected health status measures are presented graphically with accompanying text organized according to three age…

  13. Introduction to Health Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergwall, David F.; And Others

    This fundamental text is designed for students of both health care administration and comprehensive health planning. It is intended as a resource on the theory and process of health project planning with some mention of possible sources for further exploration. The emphasis is on how to develop a plan when the planner also has the authority to…

  14. Emergency response health physics.

    PubMed

    Mena, Rajah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. This paper aims to illustrate the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. PMID:22469932

  15. HEALTH SECTOR ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the USGCRP's First National Assessment effort, EPA's Global Change Research Program sponsored the Health Sector Assessment. The Health Sector Assessment was co-chaired by Dr. Jonathan A. Patz, Director of the Program on the Health Effects of Global Environmental Change...

  16. STD Prevention. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stang, Lucas; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The five sections in this book provide…

  17. School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C., Ed.

    A comprehensive guide for health procedures in small and large school systems, this volume emphasizes the need for coordination of school efforts with those of parents, departments of health, private practitioners of medicine and dentistry, and community health agencies. Particular attention is given to the role of the teacher in school health…

  18. Juvenile Incarceration and Health.

    PubMed

    Barnert, Elizabeth S; Perry, Raymond; Morris, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Addressing the health status and needs of incarcerated youth represents an issue at the nexus of juvenile justice reform and health care reform. Incarcerated youth face disproportionately higher morbidity and higher mortality compared to the general adolescent population. Dental health, reproductive health, and mental health needs are particularly high, likely as a result of lower access to care, engagement in high-risk behaviors, and underlying health disparities. Violence exposure and injury also contribute to the health disparities seen in this population. Further, juvenile incarceration itself is an important determinant of health. Juvenile incarceration likely correlates with worse health and social functioning across the life course. Correctional health care facilities allow time for providers to address the unmet physical and mental health needs seen in this population. Yet substantial challenges to care delivery in detention facilities exist and quality of care in detention facilities varies widely. Community-based pediatricians can serve a vital role in ensuring continuity of care in the postdetention period and linking youth to services that can potentially prevent juvenile offending. Pediatricians who succeed in understanding and addressing the underlying social contexts of their patients' lives can have tremendous impact in improving the life trajectories of these vulnerable youth. Opportunities exist in clinical care, research, medical education, policy, and advocacy for pediatricians to lead change and improve the health status of youth involved in the juvenile justice system. PMID:26548359

  19. Nutrition. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stang, Lucas; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement to health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The five sections in this book provide…

  20. Fitness. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantzler, Nora J.; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and to provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. The five sections in this book provide…

  1. Home Health in Chinatown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The document reports on the successful efforts of the San Francisco Home Health Service, which brings much needed homemaker/home health aide services to hundreds of elderly people in the San Francisco Chinatown area. Providing historical and cultural background information about the area, its residents, and its particular health problems, the…

  2. Doing the math. Groups say the debt-ceiling law's $11.1 billion hit to Medicare would lead to mass layoffs in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Jessica; Daly, Rich

    2012-09-17

    As Washington wrestles with looming mandatory cuts forced by a deficit agreement, the AMA, AHA and ANA are warning of massive job cuts. "If I've got a choice of maintaining these beneficial programs or contract them for my core mission, you're going to choose your core mission. And that will cost the community more in terms of health and of dollars," says Rich Morrison, of Adventist Health System. PMID:23166934

  3. Health Update: Health Concerns for Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses job-related health problems, such as infectious diseases and job stress, that are of concern to child caregivers in child care settings. Ways that these problems can be alleviated and/or medically treated are also discussed. (BB)

  4. Lithuania: health system review.

    PubMed

    Murauskiene, Liubove; Janoniene, Raimonda; Veniute, Marija; van Ginneken, Ewout; Karanikolos, Marina

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Lithuanian health system reviews the developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance since 2000.The Lithuanian health system is a mixed system, predominantly funded from the National Health Insurance Fund through a compulsory health insurance scheme, supplemented by substantial state contributions on behalf of the economically inactive population amounting to about half of its budget. Public financing of the health sector has gradually increased since 2004 to 5.2 per cent of GDP in 2010.Although the Lithuanian health system was tested by the recent economic crisis, Lithuanias counter-cyclical state health insurance contribution policies (ensuring coverage for the economically inactive population) helped the health system to weather the crisis, and Lithuania successfully used the crisis as a lever to reduce the prices of medicines.Yet the future impact of cuts in public health spending is a cause for concern. In addition, out-of-pocket payments remain high (in particular for pharmaceuticals) and could threaten health access for vulnerable groups.A number of challenges remain. The primary care system needs strengthening so that more patients are treated instead of being referred to a specialist, which will also require a change in attitude by patients. Transparency and accountability need to be increased in resource allocation, including financing of capital investment and in the payer provider relationship. Finally, population health,albeit improving, remains a concern, and major progress can be achieved by reducing the burden of amenable and preventable mortality. PMID:23902994

  5. Health and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Kjӕrgård, Bente; Land, Birgit; Bransholm Pedersen, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we explore how sustainable development strategies and health promotion strategies can be bridged. The concept of the 'duality of structure' is taken as our starting point for understanding the linkages between health promotion and sustainable development, and for uncovering the structural properties or conditions which either enable or constrain sustainable public health initiatives. We argue that strategies towards health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development, and thus political strategies aimed at solving health problems or sustainability problems may cause new, undesired and unforeseen environmental or health problems. First, we explore how the relation between health and sustainability is articulated in international policy documents. Next, we develop a model for understanding the relation between health promotion and sustainability. Third, we use examples from agriculture and food production to illustrate that health and sustainability are mutually enabling and constraining. We conclude that while the renewed focus on food security and food inequalities has brought the health and sustainability dimensions of the food system onto the political agenda, the conceptualization of duality between health and sustainability could be a new platform for a critical and theoretical stance towards the market-oriented food system strategy. Thinking along the lines of duality means that the integration of health promotion strategies and sustainable development strategies cannot be based on an approach to integration in which either health or sustainability is given precedence over the other. From a duality perspective, integration means conceiving sustainability from a health perspective and health from a sustainability perspective. PMID:23300191

  6. National health expenditures, 1989

    PubMed Central

    Lazenby, Helen C.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1990-01-01

    Spending for health care in the United States grew to $604.1 billion in 1989, an increase of 11.1 percent from the 1988 level. Growth in national health expenditures has been edging upward since 1986, when the annual growth in the health care bill was 7.7 percent. Health care spending continues to command a larger and larger proportion of the resources of the Nation: In 1989, 11.6 percent of the Nation's output, as measured by the gross national product, was consumed by health care, up from 11.2 percent in 1988. PMID:10113559

  7. National health expenditures, 1984

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Katharine R.; Lazenby, Helen; Waldo, Daniel R.; Davidoff, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Growth in health care expenditures slowed to 9.1 percent in 1984, the smallest increase in expenditures in 19 years. Economic forces and emerging structural changes within the health sector played a role in slowing growth. Of the $1,580 per person spent for health care in 1984, 41 percent was financed by public programs; 31 percent by private health insurance; and the remainder by other private sources. Together, Medicare and Medicaid accounted for 27 percent of all health spending. PMID:10311395

  8. Insights in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Donald

    2014-01-01

    There are significant shortages in the public health workforce and it's expected to worsen. Efforts to reduce this shortage are varied and include building the workforce by increasing exposure of students and young professionals in applied public health experiences. Providing these experiences increases productivity, and may help alleviate some of the workforce shortages in public health. This article seeks to highlight the work done at the Family Health Services Division (FHSD) in the Hawai‘i Department of Health over the past 6 and half years in working with students in epidemiology practicum and fellowship experiences. PMID:24660128

  9. [Roma populations and health].

    PubMed

    Jackson, Y; Tabin, J P; Hourton, G; Bodenmann, P

    2015-03-25

    The health status of the so-called "Roma" is usually much poorer than that of neighbouring non-Roma populations with a life expectancy gap of 5-15 years. This results from prolonged exposure to adverse determinants of health and to persistent exclusion from social and political arenas. Scientific and social research has only poorly addressed the health issues of Roma and evidences are scarce. Insufficient access to public services, including to health care and non optimal clinical practices are modifiable factors. If correctly addressed, this could contribute to reduce health disparities, including in Switzerland. PMID:26027205

  10. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genomics in Practice Newborn Screening Pharmacogenomics Reproductive Health Tools and Databases About the Genomics & Health Impact Update The Office of Public Health Genomics provides updated and credible ...

  11. Women and Heart Health Awareness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental Health Healthy Living Injury, Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

  12. Office of Rural Health Policy

    MedlinePlus

    ... programs for the promotion of health care delivery, education, and health information services through telehealth technologies.   Rural Health Research Programs Learn more about FORHP research ...

  13. Ukraine: health system review.

    PubMed

    Lekhan, Valery; Rudiy, Volodymyr; Shevchenko, Maryna; Nitzan Kaluski, Dorit; Richardson, Erica

    2015-03-01

    This analysis of the Ukrainian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Since the country gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, successive governments have sought to overcome funding shortfalls and modernize the health care system to meet the needs of the population's health. However, no fundamental reform of the system has yet been implemented and consequently it has preserved the main features characteristic of the Semashko model; there is a particularly high proportion of total health expenditure paid out of pocket (42.3 % in 2012), and incentives within the system do not focus on quality or outcomes. The most recent health reform programme began in 2010 and sought to strengthen primary and emergency care, rationalize hospitals and change the model of health care financing from one based on inputs to one based on outputs. Fundamental issues that hampered reform efforts in the past re-emerged, but conflict and political instability have proved the greatest barriers to reform implementation and the programme was abandoned in 2014. More recently, the focus has been on more pressing humanitarian concerns arising from the conflict in the east of Ukraine. It is hoped that greater political, social and economic stability in the future will provide a better environment for the introduction of deep reforms to address shortcomings in the Ukrainian health system. PMID:26106880

  14. Functional foods: health claim-food product compatibility and the impact of health claim framing on consumer evaluation.

    PubMed

    van Kleef, Ellen; van Trijp, Hans C M; Luning, Pieternel

    2005-06-01

    Two studies are reported, which aim to strengthen the scientific underpinning of strategic decisions regarding functional food development, as to (1) which health benefits to claim, (2) with which product (category), and (3) in which communication format. The first exploratory study is a secondary analysis of 10 different health claims systematically combined with 10 different food carriers to evaluate their combined suitability for functional food positioning. The results show that consumers tend to prefer functional food concepts that primarily communicate disease-related health benefits in carriers with a healthy image or health positioning history. Study 2 examines health claim format and systematically varies the way in which specific health benefits are being communicated to the consumer. Two physiologically oriented claims (heart disease and osteoporosis) and two psychologically oriented food claims (stress and lack of energy) are expressed in enhanced function format versus disease risk reduction format. Also, it includes the individual difference variable of 'regulatory focus' and the health status of the respondent to explore how these factors impact health claim evaluation. The results show that consumer evaluations primarily differ to the extent that health claims are personally relevant in addressing an experienced disease state. Framing is important, but its effect differs by health benefit. No strong effects for consumers' regulatory focus were found. Underlying mechanisms of these effects and their implications for the development of functional foods are discussed. PMID:15894404

  15. Mental Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Robert A.; Huang, Larke Nahme; McCuan, Ron; Pham, Phuong Kim; Fisher, Sylvia Kay; McDuffie, Kathleen Y.; Trachtenberg, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Mental health disparities have received increased attention in the literature in recent years. After considering 165 different health disparity conditions, the Federal Collaborative for Health Disparities Research chose mental health disparity as one of four topics warranting its immediate national research attention. In this essay, we describe the challenges and opportunities encountered in developing a research agenda to address mental health disparities in the United States. Varying definitions of mental health disparity, the heterogeneity of populations facing such disparity, and the power, complexity, and intertwined nature of contributing factors are among the many challenges. We convey an evolving interagency approach to mental health disparities research and guidance for further work in the field. PMID:19820213

  16. Pakistan's community health workers.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, B; Amarsi, Y; Carpio, B

    1997-05-01

    Pakistan's health characteristics are worse than those of other Asian countries at similar stages of development. Its mortality rate for children under five is 139 per 1,000, and its maternal mortality is 60 per 10,000. Malnutrition in women and children is widespread; 50 per cent of children under five are stunted. Pakistan's population growth rate of 3.1 per cent per year is among the highest in Asia. The high population growth rate and poor health status of many people call for extensive health care services, but, unfortunately, health services do not reach most of the people of Pakistan. Partly because the training of doctors and nurses is lengthy and expensive, there is an acute shortage of health care providers, especially women. Although female health professionals are preferred for caring for women, cultural constraints inhibit women from seeking education. Such is the multifaceted dilemma in the provision of primary health care in Pakistan. PMID:9223980

  17. Quantifying Health Across Populations.

    PubMed

    Kershnar, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    In this article, I argue that as a theoretical matter, a population's health-level is best quantified via averagism. Averagism asserts that the health of a population is the average of members' health-levels. This model is better because it does not fall prey to a number of objections, including the repugnant conclusion, and because it is not arbitrary. I also argue that as a practical matter, population health-levels are best quantified via totalism. Totalism asserts that the health of a population is the sum of members' health-levels. Totalism is better here because it fits better with cost-benefit analysis and such an analysis is the best practical way to value healthcare outcomes. The two results are compatible because the theoretical and practical need not always align, whether in general or in the context of population health. PMID:26766584

  18. [Equity and health].

    PubMed

    Laguna-García, J; Fernández de Castro, J; Cordera, A

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the right to health in Mexico. The authors present some ideas regarding equity and data which shows the existence of a deep inequity in the field of health in the country. The efforts of the social security agencies and of the Ministry of Health aimed at diminishing inequity in health are also described. The authors conclude that it is time to avoid retorical positions and attitudes of administrative solidarity and start to implement actions to improve the health conditions of those living in extreme poverty. These actions should include providing comprehensive health services to all the population, reinforcing specific preventive programs, improving certain basic health indicators and prompting intersectoral collaboration. PMID:1411783

  19. What is health?

    PubMed Central

    Brüssow, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Summary Classical medical research is disease focused and still defines health as absence of disease. Languages, however, associate a positive concept of wholeness with health as does the WHO health definition. Newer medical health definitions emphasize the capacity to adapt to changing external and internal circumstances. The results of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study provides keys for a quantifiable health metrics by developing statistical tools calculating healthy life expectancy. Of central social and economic importance is the question whether healthy ageing can be achieved. This concept hinges on theories on the biological basis of lifespan determination and whether negligible senescence and the compression of morbidity can be achieved in human societies. Since the health impact of the human gut microbiome is currently a topical research area, microbiologists should be aware of the problems in defining health. PMID:23647782

  20. Relative value health insurance.

    PubMed

    Korobkin, Russell

    2014-04-01

    Increases in health costs continue to outpace general inflation, and implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will exacerbate the problem by adding more Americans to the ranks of the insured. The most commonly proposed solutions--bureaucratic controls, greater patient cost sharing, and changes to physician incentives--all have substantial weaknesses. This article proposes a new paradigm for rationalizing health care expenditures called "relative value health insurance," a product that would enable consumers to purchase health insurance that covers cost-effective treatments but excludes cost-ineffective treatments. A combination of legal and informational impediments prevents private insurers from marketing this type of product today, but creative use of comparative effectiveness research, funded as a part of health care reform, could make relative value health insurance possible. Data deficits, adverse selection risks, and heterogeneous values among consumers create obstacles to shifting the health insurance system to this paradigm, but they could be overcome. PMID:24523448

  1. 77 FR 21568 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Overview Information: Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health...

  2. Health Literacy and Health Actions: A Review and a Framework from Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Wagner, Christian; Steptoe, Andrew; Wolf, Michael S.; Wardle, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The association between performance on health literacy measures and health outcomes is well established. The next step is to understand the processes through which health literacy affects health. This review introduces a framework drawing on ideas from health psychology and proposing that associations between health literacy and health outcomes…

  3. NATIVE HEALTH DATABASES: NATIVE HEALTH HISTORY DATABASE (NHHD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Native Health Databases contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The databases provide i...

  4. NATIVE HEALTH DATABASES: NATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH DATABASE (NHRD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Native Health Databases contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The databases provide i...

  5. Iceland: health system review.

    PubMed

    Sigurgeirsdóttir, Sigurbjörg; Waagfjörð, Jónína; Maresso, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This analysis of the Icelandic health system reviews the developments in its organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Life expectancy at birth is high and Icelandic men and women enjoy longer life in good health than the average European. However, Icelanders are putting on weight, more than half of adult Icelanders were overweight or obese in 2004, and total consumption of alcohol has increased considerably since 1970. The health care system is a small, state centred, publicly funded system with universal coverage, and an integrated purchaser provider relationship in which the state as payer is also the owner of most organizations providing health care services. The country's centre of clinical excellence is the University Hospital, Landspitali, in the capital Reykjavik, which alone accounts for 70 percent of the total national budget for general hospital services. However, since 1990, the health system has become increasingly characterized by a mixed economy of care and service provision, in which the number and scope of private non profit and private for profit providers has increased. While Iceland's health outcomes are some of the best among OECD countries, the health care system faces challenges involving the financial sustainability of the current system in the context of an ageing population, new public health challenges, such as obesity, and the continued impact of the country's financial collapse in 2008. The most important challenge is to change the pattern of health care utilization to steer it away from the most expensive end of the health services spectrum towards more cost efficient and effective alternatives. To a large degree, this will involve renewed attempts to prioritize primary care as the first port of call for patients, and possibly to introduce a gatekeeping function for GPs in order to moderate the use of specialist services. PMID:25720021

  6. Italy: health system review.

    PubMed

    Ferre, Francesca; de Belvis, Antonio Giulio; Valerio, Luca; Longhi, Silvia; Lazzari, Agnese; Fattore, Giovanni; Ricciardi, Walter; Maresso, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Italy is the sixth largest country in Europe and has the second highest average life expectancy, reaching 79.4 years for men and 84.5 years for women in 2011. There are marked regional differences for both men and women in most health indicators, reflecting the economic and social imbalance between the north and south of the country. The main diseases affecting the population are circulatory diseases, malignant tumours and respiratory diseases. Italy's health care system is a regionally based national health service that provides universal coverage largely free of charge at the point of delivery. The main source of financing is national and regional taxes, supplemented by copayments for pharmaceuticals and outpatient care. In 2012, total health expenditure accounted for 9.2 percent of GDP (slightly below the EU average of 9.6 percent). Public sources made up 78.2 percent of total health care spending. While the central government provides a stewardship role, setting the fundamental principles and goals of the health system and determining the core benefit package of health services available to all citizens, the regions are responsible for organizing and delivering primary, secondary and tertiary health care services as well as preventive and health promotion services. Faced with the current economic constraints of having to contain or even reduce health expenditure, the largest challenge facing the health system is to achieve budgetary goals without reducing the provision of health services to patients. This is related to the other key challenge of ensuring equity across regions, where gaps in service provision and health system performance persist. Other issues include ensuring the quality of professionals managing facilities, promoting group practice and other integrated care organizational models in primary care, and ensuring that the concentration of organizational control by regions of health-care providers does not stifle innovation. PMID:25471543

  7. Israel: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Bruce; Waitzberg, Ruth; Merkur, Sherry

    2015-12-01

    Israel is a small country, with just over 8 million citizens and a modern market-based economy with a comparable level of gross domestic product per capita to the average in the European Union. It has had universal health coverage since the introduction of a progressively financed statutory health insurance system in 1995. All citizens can choose from among four competing, non-profit-making health plans, which are charged with providing a broad package of benefits stipulated by the government. Overall, the Israeli health care system is quite efficient. Health status levels are comparable to those of other developed countries, even though Israel spends a relatively low proportion of its gross domestic product on health care (less than 8%) and nearly 40% of that is privately financed. Factors contributing to system efficiency include regulated competition among the health plans, tight regulatory controls on the supply of hospital beds, accessible and professional primary care and a well-developed system of electronic health records. Israeli health care has also demonstrated a remarkable capacity to innovate, improve, establish goals, be tenacious and prioritize. Israel is in the midst of numerous health reform efforts. The health insurance benefits package has been extended to include mental health care and dental care for children. A multipronged effort is underway to reduce health inequalities. National projects have been launched to measure and improve the quality of hospital care and reduce surgical waiting times, along with greater public dissemination of comparative performance data. Major steps are also being taken to address projected shortages of physicians and nurses. One of the major challenges currently facing Israeli health care is the growing reliance on private financing, with potentially deleterious effects for equity and efficiency. Efforts are currently underway to expand public financing, improve the efficiency of the public system and constrain

  8. Austria: health system review.

    PubMed

    Hofmarcher, Maria M; Quentin, Wilm

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Austrian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health-system performance. The Austrian health system provides universal coverage for a wide range of benefits and high-quality care. Free choice of providers and unrestricted access to all care levels (general practitioners, specialist physicians and hospitals) are characteristic features of the system. Unsurprisingly, population satisfaction is well above EU average. Income-related inequality in health has increased since 2005, although it is still relatively low compared to other countries. The health-care system has been shaped by both the federal structure of the state and a tradition of delegating responsibilities to self-governing stakeholders. On the one hand, this enables decentralized planning and governance, adjusted to local norms and preferences. On the other hand, it also leads to fragmentation of responsibilities and frequently results in inadequate coordination. For this reason, efforts have been made for several years to achieve more joint planning, governance and financing of the health-care system at the federal and regional level. As in any health system, a number of challenges remain. The costs of the health-care system are well above the EU15 average, both in absolute terms and as a percentage of GDP. There are important structural imbalances in healthcare provision, with an oversized hospital sector and insufficient resources available for ambulatory care and preventive medicine. This is coupled with stark regional differences in utilization, both in curative services (hospital beds and specialist physicians) and preventative services such as preventive health check-ups, outpatient rehabilitation, psychosocial and psychotherapeutic care and nursing. There are clear social inequalities in the use of medical services, such as preventive health check-ups, immunization or dentistry

  9. Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

    2012-01-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

  10. France: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Chevreul, Karine; Berg Brigham, Karen; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Hernandez-Quevedo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the French health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The French population has a good level of health, with the second highest life expectancy in the world for women. It has a high level of choice of providers, and a high level of satisfaction with the health system. However, unhealthy habits such as smoking and harmful alcohol consumption remain significant causes of avoidable mortality. Combined with the significant burden of chronic diseases, this has underscored the need for prevention and integration of services, although these have not historically been strengths of the French system. Although the French health care system is a social insurance system, it has historically had a stronger role for the state than other Bismarckian social insurance systems. Public financing of health care expenditure is among the highest in Europe and out-of-pocket spending among the lowest. Public insurance is compulsory and covers the resident population; it is financed by employee and employer contributions as well as increasingly through taxation. Complementary insurance plays a significant role in ensuring equity in access. Provision is mixed; providers of outpatient care are largely private, and hospital beds are predominantly public or private non-profit-making. Despite health outcomes being among the best in the European Union, social and geographical health inequities remain. Inequality in the distribution of health care professionals is a considerable barrier to equity. The rising cost of health care and the increasing demand for long-term care are also of concern. Reforms are ongoing to address these issues, while striving for equity in financial access; a long-term care reform including public coverage of long-term care is still pending. PMID:26766545

  11. Estonia: health system review.

    PubMed

    Lai, Taavi; Habicht, Triin; Kahur, Kristiina; Reinap, Marge; Kiivet, Raul; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Estonian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Without doubt, the main issue has been the 2008 financial crisis. Although Estonia has managed the downturn quite successfully and overall satisfaction with the system remains high, it is hard to predict the longer-term effects of the austerity package. The latter included some cuts in benefits and prices, increased cost sharing for certain services, extended waiting times, and a reduction in specialized care. In terms of health outcomes, important progress was made in life expectancy, which is nearing the European Union (EU) average, and infant mortality. Improvements are necessary in smoking and alcohol consumption, which are linked to the majority of avoidable diseases. Although the health behaviour of the population is improving, large disparities between groups exist and obesity rates, particularly among young people, are increasing. In health care, the burden of out-of-pocket payments is still distributed towards vulnerable groups. Furthermore, the number of hospitals, hospital beds and average length of stay has decreased to the EU average level, yet bed occupancy rates are still below EU averages and efficiency advances could be made. Going forwards, a number of pre-crisis challenges remain. These include ensuring sustainability of health care financing, guaranteeing a sufficient level of human resources, prioritizing patient-centred health care, integrating health and social care services, implementing intersectoral action to promote healthy behaviour, safeguarding access to health care for lower socioeconomic groups, and, lastly, improving evaluation and monitoring tools across the health system. PMID:24334730

  12. Belgium: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Gerkens, Sophie; Merkur, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) profiles are country-based reports that provide a detailed description of a health system and of policy initiatives in progress or under development. HiTs examine different approaches to the organization, financing and delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in health systems; describe the institutional framework, process, content and implementation of health and health care policies; and highlight challenges and areas that require more in-depth analysis. The Belgian population continues to enjoy good health and long life expectancy. This is partly due to good access to health services of high quality. Financing is based mostly on proportional social security contributions and progressive direct taxation. The compulsory health insurance is combined with a mostly private system of health care delivery, based on independent medical practice, free choice of physician and predominantly fee-for-service payment. This Belgian HiT profile (2010) presents the evolution of the health system since 2007, including detailed information on new policies. While no drastic reforms were undertaken during this period, policy-makers have pursued the goals of improving access to good quality of care while making the system sustainable. Reforms to increase the accessibility of the health system include measures to reduce the out-of-pocket payments of more vulnerable populations (low-income families and individuals as well as the chronically ill). Quality of care related reforms have included incentives to better integrate different levels of care and the establishment of information systems, among others. Additionally, several measures on pharmaceutical products have aimed to reduce costs for both the National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance (NIHDI) and patients, while maintaining the quality of care. PMID:21224177

  13. Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2014 Mar 5]. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ... Office on Smoking and Health, 2006 [accessed 2014 Mar 5]. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ...

  14. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for Health A family health history is a ... family members grew up. It's like a family tree for health. Click for more information What a ...

  15. Air Pollution Affects Community Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shy, Carl M.; Finklea, John F.

    1973-01-01

    Community Health and Environmental Surveillance System (CHESS), a nationwide program relating community health to environmental quality, is designed to evaluate existing environmental standards, obtain health intelligence for new standards, and document health benefits of air pollution control. (BL)

  16. Paying for Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... use complementary health approaches, but the type of health insurance they have affects their decisions to use these ... more pronounced among those who did not have health insurance. For those who had health insurance, coverage for ...

  17. Health sciences librarians and mental health laws.

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, F R

    1978-01-01

    Two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, O'Connor v. Donaldson and Bounds v. Smith, hold important implications for health sciences librarians serving in mental health facilities. The first, O'Connor, with its many ancillary holdings, puts mental health personnel on notice that patients have certain basic rights, which courts all over the country will now be required to enforce. In Bounds the court has ruled that prison authorities must assist prison inmates in preparing and filing legal papers. The ruling will most likely benefit all mentally disabled prisoners, and future litigation may expand this category to include: (1) persons committed under the criminal code, (2) persons under involuntary commitment not related to the criminal code, and (3) persons voluntarily committed. A selective annotated bibliography, consisting of background readings in mental health and the law, basic rights, law library materials, and mental health legal services, has been compiled to help librarians establish and develop legal collections in anticipation of court decisions that will expand the conditions of Bounds to include all mentally disabled patients. PMID:361117

  18. [Public health and public health systems sustainability].

    PubMed

    Repullo Labrador, José R; Segura Benedicto, Andreu

    2006-01-01

    Public health and healthcare originally started out separately from one another in the past, having later further developed taking different paths in modern times. The major development the health systems underwent in the last half of the 20th century entailed a heightening of the individual standpoint and a division of these two approaches despite the attempts made to bring them together as of the WHO Alma-Ata Conference in 1978. The waning of rationalism and other social phenomena had a hand the collective or population-oriented focus being focused on to a lesser degree in Public Health, but these trends also gave rise to a growing problem of rationality in individual healthcare and sustainability in the public health systems. The debate on the current scene stands to set out the sustainability-related problems mediated by internal and external agents and to revise Public Health's possible contribution to the improvement thereof by advocating yet a further attempt at bringing together and integrating these two diverging standpoints. PMID:17193811

  19. Ecosystem health: I. Measuring ecosystem health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, David J.; Herricks, Edwin E.; Kerster, Harold W.

    1988-07-01

    Ecosystem analysis has been advanced by an improved understanding of how ecosystems are structured and how they function. Ecology has advanced from an emphasis on natural history to consideration of energetics, the relationships and connections between species, hierarchies, and systems theory. Still, we consider ecosystems as entities with a distinctive character and individual characteristics. Ecosystem maintenance and preservation form the objective of impact analysis, hazard evaluation, and other management or regulation activities. In this article we explore an approach to ecosystem analysis which identifies and quantifies factors which define the condition or state of an ecosystem in terms of health criteria. We relate ecosystem health to human/nonhuman animal health and explore the difficulties of defining ecosystem health and suggest criteria which provide a functional definition of state and condition. We suggest that, as has been found in human/nonhuman animal health studies, disease states can be recognized before disease is of clinical magnitude. Example disease states for ecosystems are functionally defined and discussed, together with test systems for their early detection.

  20. Poland health system review.

    PubMed

    Sagan, Anna; Panteli, Dimitra; Borkowski, W; Dmowski, M; Domanski, F; Czyzewski, M; Gorynski, Pawel; Karpacka, Dorota; Kiersztyn, E; Kowalska, Iwona; Ksiezak, Malgorzata; Kuszewski, K; Lesniewska, A; Lipska, I; Maciag, R; Madowicz, Jaroslaw; Madra, Anna; Marek, M; Mokrzycka, A; Poznanski, Darius; Sobczak, Alicja; Sowada, Christoph; Swiderek, Maria; Terka, A; Trzeciak, Patrycja; Wiktorzak, Katarzyna; Wlodarczyk, Cezary; Wojtyniak, B; Wrzesniewska-Wal, Iwona; Zelwianska, Dobrawa; Busse, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Since the successful transition to a freely elected parliament and a market economy after 1989, Poland is now a stable democracy and is well represented within political and economic organizations in Europe and worldwide. The strongly centralized health system based on the Semashko model was replaced with a decentralized system of mandatory health insurance, complemented with financing from state and territorial self-government budgets. There is a clear separation of health care financing and provision: the National Health Fund (NFZ) the sole payer in the system is in charge of health care financing and contracts with public and non-public health care providers. The Ministry of Health is the key policy-maker and regulator in the system and is supported by a number of advisory bodies, some of them recently established. Health insurance contributions, borne entirely by employees, are collected by intermediary institutions and are pooled by the NFZ and distributed between the 16 regional NFZ branches. In 2009, Poland spent 7.4% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health. Around 70% of health expenditure came from public sources and over 83.5% of this expenditure can be attributed to the (near) universal health insurance. The relatively high share of private expenditure is mostly represented by out-of-pocket (OOP) payments, mainly in the form of co-payments and informal payments. Voluntary health insurance (VHI) does not play an important role and is largely limited to medical subscription packages offered by employers. Compulsory health insurance covers 98% of the population and guarantees access to a broad range of health services. However, the limited financial resources of the NFZ mean that broad entitlements guaranteed on paper are not always available. Health care financing is overall at most proportional: while financing from health care contributions is proportional and budgetary subsidies to system funding are progressive, high OOP expenditures

  1. Bulgaria health system review.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Antoniya; Rohova, Maria; Moutafova, Emanuela; Atanasova, Elka; Koeva, Stefka; Panteli, Dimitra; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years, demographic development in Bulgaria has been characterized by population decline, a low crude birth rate, a low fertility rate, a high mortality rate and an ageing population. A stabilizing political situation since the early 2000s and an economic upsurge since the mid-2000s were important factors in the slight increase of the birth and fertility rates and the slight decrease in standardized death rates. In general, Bulgaria lags behind European Union (EU) averages in most mortality and morbidity indicators. Life expectancy at birth reached 73.3 years in 2008 with the main three causes of death being diseases of the circulatory system, malignant neoplasms and diseases of the respiratory system. One of the most important risk factors overall is smoking, and the average standardized death rate for smoking-related causes in 2008 was twice as high as the EU15 average. The Bulgarian health system is characterized by limited statism. The Ministry of Health is responsible for national health policy and the overall organization and functioning of the health system and coordinates with all ministries with relevance to public health. The key players in the insurance system are the insured individuals, the health care providers and the third party payers, comprising the National Health Insurance Fund, the single payer in the social health insurance (SHI) system, and voluntary health insurance companies (VHICs). Health financing consists of a publicprivate mix. Health care is financed from compulsory health insurance contributions, taxes, outofpocket (OOP) payments, voluntary health insurance (VHI) premiums, corporate payments, donations, and external funding. Total health expenditure (THE) as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) increased from 5.3% in 1995 to 7.3% in 2008. At the latter date it consisted of 36.5% OOP payments, 34.8% SHI, 13.6% Ministry of Health expenditure, 9.4% municipality expenditure and 0.3% VHI. Informal payments in the health

  2. Circumpolar Inuit health systems

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Leanna; O'Keeffe, Annmaree

    2013-01-01

    Background The Inuit are an indigenous people totalling about 160,000 and living in 4 countries across the Arctic – Canada, Greenland, USA (Alaska) and Russia (Chukotka). In essence, they are one people living in 4 countries. Although there have been significant improvements in Inuit health and survival over the past 50 years, stark differences persist between the key health indicators for Inuit and those of the national populations in the United States, Canada and Russia and between Greenland and Denmark. On average, life expectancy in all 4 countries is lower for Inuit. Infant mortality rates are also markedly different with up to 3 times more infant deaths than the broader national average. Underlying these statistical differences are a range of health, social, economic and environmental factors which have affected Inuit health outcomes. Although the health challenges confronting the Inuit are in many cases similar across the Arctic, the responses to these challenges vary in accordance with the types of health systems in place in each of the 4 countries. Each of the 4 countries has a different health care system with varying degrees of accessibility and affordability for Inuit living in urban, rural and remote areas. Objective To describe funding and governance arrangements for health services to Inuit in Canada, Greenland, USA (Alaska) and Russia (Chukotka) and to determine if a particular national system leads to better outcomes than any of the other 3 systems. Study design Literature review. Results It was not possible to draw linkages between the different characteristics of the respective health systems, the corresponding financial investment and the systems’ effectiveness in adequately serving Inuit health needs for several reasons including the very limited and inadequate collection of Inuit-specific health data by Canada, Alaska and Russia; and second, the data that are available do not necessarily provide a feasible point of comparison in terms of

  3. Strategic Factors in the Choice of a Model of Public Relations. Case Study: Seventh-day Adventist Church World Headquarters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Holly M.

    A study tested a model of organizational variables that earlier research had identified as important in influencing what model(s) of public relations an organization selects. Models of public relations (as outlined by J. Grunig and Hunt in 1984) are defined as either press agentry, public information, two-way asymmetrical, or two-way symmetrical.…

  4. Health disparities among health care workers.

    PubMed

    Mawn, Barbara; Siqueira, Eduardo; Koren, Ainat; Slatin, Craig; Devereaux Melillo, Karen; Pearce, Carole; Hoff, Lee Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe the process of an interdisciplinary case study that examined the social contexts of occupational and general health disparities among health care workers in two sets of New England hospitals and nursing homes. A political economy of the work environment framework guided the study, which incorporated dimensions related to market dynamics, technology, and political and economic power. The purpose of this article is to relate the challenges encountered in occupational health care settings and how these could have impacted the study results. An innovative data collection matrix that guided small-group analysis provided a firm foundation from which to make design modifications to address these challenges. Implications for policy and research include the use of a political and economic framework from which to frame future studies, and the need to maintain rigor while allowing flexibility in design to adapt to challenges in the field. PMID:19940090

  5. Prioritizing Sleep Health: Public Health Policy Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Christopher M; Drake, Christopher L

    2015-11-01

    The schedules that Americans live by are not consistent with healthy sleep patterns. In addition, poor access to educational and treatment aids for sleep leaves people engaging in behavior that is harmful to sleep and forgoing treatment for sleep disorders. This has created a sleep crisis that is a public health issue with broad implications for cognitive outcomes, mental health, physical health, work performance, and safety. New public policies should be formulated to address these issues. We draw from the scientific literature to recommend the following: establishing national standards for middle and high school start times that are later in the day, stronger regulation of work hours and schedules, eliminating daylight saving time, educating the public regarding the impact of electronic media on sleep, and improving access to ambulatory in-home diagnostic testing for sleep disorders. PMID:26581727

  6. National health expenditures, 1987

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Suzanne W.; Levit, Katharine R.; Waldo, Daniel R.

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 national health expenditure estimates are examined from different perspectives in the following two articles. In the first article, revised expenditure estimates for 1984-87 are presented. A breakdown of the type of services and products purchased is included, as well as the source of funds used to finance health care. In the second article, health care expenditure estimates are used to explore marginal analysis as a policy tool for understanding health spending in relation to our Nation's ability to finance that spending. The concept of marginal analysis is also used to examine selected periods that were relevant to health policy and the timing of public and private changes in health policy in the past. PMID:10313081

  7. National health expenditures, 1990

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Katharine R.; Lazenby, Helen C.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1991-01-01

    During 1990, health expenditures as a share of gross national product rose to 12.2 percent, up from 11.6 percent in 1989. This dramatic increase is the second largest increase in the past three decades. The national health expenditure estimates presented in this article document rapidly rising health care costs and provide a context for understanding the health care financing crisis facing the Nation today. The 1990 national health expenditures incorporate the most recently available data. They differ from historical estimates presented in the preceding article. The length of time and complicated process of producing projections required use of 1989 national health expenditures—data available prior to the completion of the 1990 estimates presented here. PMID:10114934

  8. Hungary health system review.

    PubMed

    Gaal, Peter; Szigeti, Szabolcs; Csere, Marton; Gaskins, Matthew; Panteli, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    Hungary has achieved a successful transition from an overly centralized, integrated Semashko-style health care system to a purchaser provider split model with output-based payment methods. Although there have been substantial increases in life expectancy in recent years among both men and women, many health outcomes remain poor, placing Hungary among the countries with the worst health status and highest rate of avoidable mortality in the EU (life expectancy at birth trailed the EU27 average by 5.1 years in 2009). Lifestyle factors especially the traditionally unhealthy Hungarian diet, alcohol consumption and smoking play a very important role in shaping the overall health of the population.In the single-payer system, the recurrent expenditure on health services is funded primarily through compulsory, non-risk-related contributions made by eligible individuals or from the state budget. The central government has almost exclusive power to formulate strategic direction and to issue and enforce regulations regarding health care. In 2009 Hungary spent 7.4% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health, with public expenditure accounting for 69.7% of total health spending, and with health expenditure per capita ranking slightly above the average for the new EU Member States, but considerably below the average for the EU27 in 2008. Health spending has been unstable over the years, with several waves of increases followed by longer periods of cost-containment and budget cuts. The share of total health expenditure attributable to private sources has been increasing, most of it accounted for by out-of-pocket (OOP) expenses. A substantial share of the latter can be attributed to informal payments, which are a deeply rooted characteristic of the Hungarian health system and a source of inefficiency and inequity. Voluntary health insurance, on the other hand, amounted to only 7.4% of private and 2.7% of total health expenditure in 2009. Revenue sources for health have been

  9. National health expenditures, 1988

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Every year, analysts in the Health Care Financing Administration present figures on what our Nation spends for health. As the result of a comprehensive re-examination of the definitions, concepts, methods, and data sources used to prepare those figures, this year's report contains new estimates of national health expenditures for calendar years 1960 through 1988. Significant changes have been made to estimates of spending for professional services and to estimates of what consumers pay out of pocket for health care. In the first article, trends in use of and expenditure for various types of goods and services are discussed, as well as trends in the sources of funds used to finance health care. In a companion article, the benchmark process is described in more detail, as are the data sources and methods used to prepare annual estimates of health expenditures. PMID:10113395

  10. [Advertising and health education].

    PubMed

    López González, M L; Cueto Espinar, A; Martínez Cuervo, F; Redondo Cornejo, M L; Suárez González, J R; Secall Mellén, L

    1990-01-01

    Health education and advertising have a common aim: to modify human behaviour. Health education tries to induce healthy behaviours. In some occasions Publicity proposes risky behaviours. Ads appearing during a two-month period in magazines of the largest circulation in Spain are analyzed here. A total of 1,726 ads which could have a negative influence on health either because of the product or service offered or for the use of health as a persuasive argument in their text, are considered. The magazines Hola and Lecturas had the highest ratio ads/magazine. Spirits, food and drugs were the most frequently advertised products. And more than 50% of the ads used health and welfare as argument for better selling. Health educators should know and teach the critical analysis of publicity, and use advertisements as a teaching tool to enable people to see through misleading advertising. PMID:2086532

  11. Consumer Health: Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Jessie Helen

    This book presents a general overview of consumer health, its products and services. Consumer health is defined as those topics dealing with a wise selection of health products and services, agencies concerned with the control of these products and services, evaluation of quackery and health misconceptions, health careers, and health insurance.…

  12. Health Contract in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2007-01-01

    A health contract is a technique used by health professionals to help clients achieve a health goal. This article describes a course, "Changing Health Behaviors," in which a health contract strategy is taught and practiced with older adults. The health contract can also be included as a smaller educational component within a gerontology course…

  13. School Health Practice. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, C. L.; Creswell, William H.

    This text provides core subject matter relating to health services, health education, and healthful living for teachers, health educators, school nurses, administrators, and any others who have a role in the school health program. Its six parts focus on the what, how, and why of a functional school health program today. To start, the history of…

  14. National Health Expenditures, 1982

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Robert M.; Waldo, Daniel R.; Levit, Katharine R.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid growth in the share of the nation's gross national product devoted to health expenditure has heightened concern over the survival of government entitlement programs and has led to debate of the desirability of current methods of financing health care. In this article, the authors present the data at the heart of the issue, quantifying spending for various types of health care in 1982 and discussing the sources of funds for that spending. PMID:10310273

  15. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Singer, Naphtale; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1991-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10112766

  16. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Levit, Katharine R.; Maple, Brenda T.; Stewart, Madie W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10110874

  17. Upstream health law.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M; McIlhattan, Kelley

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, entrepreneurs are aggressively developing new technologies and business models designed to improve individual and population health, not just to deliver specialized medical care. Consumers of these goods and services are not yet "patients"; they are simply people. As this sector of the health care industry expands, it is likely to require new forms of legal governance, which we term "upstream health law." PMID:25565619

  18. Obesity and mental health.

    PubMed

    Talen, Mary R; Mann, Misty M

    2009-06-01

    Mental health factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of overweight and obese status in children, adolescents, and adults. Binge eating disorder (BED), body image, self-esteem, mood disorders, and social and family factors affect individuals in different ways and contribute to weight gain and failure in weight loss management. Assessment of these mental health factors and treatment by 1 of several mental health treatment models may not only improve self-worth but also weight loss and maintenance. PMID:19501244

  19. Sweden health system review.

    PubMed

    Anell, Anders; Glenngård, Anna H; Merkur, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Life expectancy in Sweden is high and the country performs well in comparisons related to disease-oriented indicators of health service outcomes and quality of care. The Swedish health system is committed to ensuring the health of all citizens and abides by the principles of human dignity, need and solidarity, and cost-effectiveness. The state is responsible for overall health policy, while the funding and provision of services lies largely with the county councils and regions. The municipalities are responsible for the care of older and disabled people. The majority of primary care centres and almost all hospitals are owned by the county councils. Health care expenditure is mainly tax funded (80%) and is equivalent to 9.9% of gross domestic product (GDP) (2009). Only about 4% of the population has voluntary health insurance (VHI). User charges fund about 17% of health expenditure and are levied on visits to professionals, hospitalization and medicines. The number of acute care hospital beds is below the European Union (EU) average and Sweden allocates more human resources to the health sector than most OECD countries. In the past, the Achilles heel of Swedish health care included long waiting times for diagnosis and treatment and, more recently, divergence in quality of care between regions and socioeconomic groups. Addressing long waiting times remains a key policy objective along with improving access to providers. Recent principal health reforms over the past decade relate to: concentrating hospital services; regionalizing health care services, including mergers; improving coordinated care; increasing choice, competition and privatization in primary care; privatization and competition in the pharmacy sector; changing co-payments; and increasing attention to public comparison of quality and efficiency indicators, the value of investments in health care and responsiveness to patients needs. Reforms are often introduced on the local level, thus the pattern of

  20. Health care informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng

    2003-03-01

    The health care industry is currently experiencing a fundamental change. Health care organizations are reorganizing their processes to reduce costs, be more competitive, and provide better and more personalized customer care. This new business strategy requires health care organizations to implement new technologies, such as Internet applications, enterprise systems, and mobile technologies in order to achieve their desired business changes. This article offers a conceptual model for implementing new information systems, integrating internal data, and linking suppliers and patients. PMID:12670013

  1. Promoting Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Winker, Margaret A.; Ferris, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of MCH and AIDS (IJMA) is a member of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME). The Editorial Board of IJMA believes it is important that the statement on promoting global health and this accompanying editorial is brought to the attention of our readers. Medical journal editors have a social responsibility to promote global health by publishing, whenever possible, research that furthers health worldwide.

  2. Pesticides and health risks.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Robyn C; Huffling, Katie; Sattler, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Pesticides are a category of chemicals formulated to kill or repel a pest or halt its reproduction. In this article we review the toxicological and epidemiological literature; describe common potential pesticide exposures; and focus on the associated health risks to fetal development. Clinical implications are reviewed, and recommendations are made regarding the integration of this environmental health concern into nursing education, practice, research, and policy/advocacy work. Recommendations for pesticide elimination and reduction in health care settings are included. PMID:20409108

  3. The 2014 Minority Health and Health Disparities Grantees’ Conference

    PubMed Central

    Edberg, Mark; Hayes, Barbara E.; Montgomery-Rice, Valerie; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Health disparities have been defined as a particular type of health difference closely linked with social, economic and/or environmental disadvantage. The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the National Institutes of Health, has a comprehensive portfolio of grants that fund scientific research to improve racial/ethnic minority health and eliminate health disparities. The 2014 Minority Health and Health Disparities Grantees’ Conference highlighted excellence and innovation in biological, environmental, sociocultural, clinical and behavioral research supported by NIMHD. This special issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health includes peer-reviewed publications from investigators who participated in this conference.

  4. Approaching Health Disparities from a Population Perspective: The NIH Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addressing health disparities has been a national challenge for decades. The NIH-sponsored Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHDs) represent the first federal initiative to support transdisciplinary multilevel research on the determinants of health disparities. Using preliminar...

  5. Health scares: Professional priorities.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Currently, many health scholars are concerned about health scares. But what do they mean by the term 'health scare' - are health scares an identifiable phenomenon and how do we currently understand their causation and consequences? By collecting and analysing published articles about events considered to be health scares, this article maps the current views of scholars on their characteristics and causes. Results show that health scares are generally understood as events characterized by fears of catastrophic consequences but little actual mortality. However, the social and economic impacts of these events have often been severe. This survey shows that health scares can be usefully sorted into six categories, each with identifiable internal dynamics, suggesting different communications strategies to achieve resolution in each category. Using the social amplification of risk framework, the conditions under which risk signals were amplified were traced in general terms among major stakeholders. Simple causes for health scare events could not be identified, though some triggers did emerge. Importantly, public ignorance of real risk, media scaremongering and political inaction could be dismissed as primary explanations, though they were sometimes factors in scare events. Implications for risk communication and for future research on risk and public health are discussed. PMID:20051427

  6. Romania: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Vladescu, Cristian; Scintee, Silvia Gabriela; Olsavszky, Victor; Hernandez-Quevedo, Cristina; Sagan, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This analysis of the Romanian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Romanian health care system is a social health insurance system that has remained highly centralized despite recent efforts to decentralize some regulatory functions. It provides a comprehensive benefits package to the 85% of the population that is covered, with the remaining population having access to a minimum package of benefits. While every insured person has access to the same health care benefits regardless of their socioeconomic situation, there are inequities in access to health care across many dimensions, such as rural versus urban, and health outcomes also differ across these dimensions. The Romanian population has seen increasing life expectancy and declining mortality rates but both remain among the worst in the European Union. Some unfavourable trends have been observed, including increasing numbers of new HIV/AIDS diagnoses and falling immunization rates. Public sources account for over 80% of total health financing. However, that leaves considerable out-of-pocket payments covering almost a fifth of total expenditure. The share of informal payments also seems to be substantial, but precise figures are unknown. In 2014, Romania had the lowest health expenditure as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) among the EU Member States. In line with the government's objective of strengthening the role of primary care, the total number of hospital beds has been decreasing. However, health care provision remains characterized by underprovision of primary and community care and inappropriate use of inpatient and specialized outpatient care, including care in hospital emergency departments. The numbers of physicians and nurses are relatively low in Romania compared to EU averages. This has mainly been attributed to the high rates of workers emigrating abroad over the

  7. Values in health care.

    PubMed

    Gish, O

    1984-01-01

    The first part of the paper is concerned with the health care values of various groups; namely, those which are resource oriented, disease oriented, political decision-makers, organized sellers and purchasers of health care and patients. These groups are further divided according to selected political/ideological and socio-economic characteristics, essentially along capitalist and socialist lines. Some of the ways in which the values held by these groups are determined, formulated and, by implication at least, changed and the political, economic and other bases for some of their practical applications are identified. The second part of the paper focuses upon values in public health education and related practice. It is argued that to become more useful to the 'health of the public' the new public health worker will have to become more activist, assuming an adversarial stance toward the market economy in capitalist countries and oppressive governmental structures everywhere. A wider integration of knowledge concerning the effects of health of all types of economic, social and political practices is required; this, in turn, would contribute to the emergence of alternative forms of public health analysis and practice. The recognition of wider forms of public health leadership should follow, coupled with organizational changes directed at the greater participation of popular groupings in all types of public health activities. PMID:6484620

  8. TRICARE, Military Health System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Change My Primary Care Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When Traveling Information about Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Costs Health Plan Costs Prescription Costs Dental Costs Pay My ...

  9. Promoting Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    McCray, Alexa T.

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews some of the extensive literature in health literacy, much of it focused on the intersection of low literacy and the understanding of basic health care information. Several articles describe methods for assessing health literacy as well as methods for assessing the readability of texts, although generally these latter have not been developed with health materials in mind. Other studies have looked more closely at the mismatch between patients' literacy levels and the readability of materials intended for use by those patients. A number of studies have investigated the phenomenon of literacy from the perspective of patients' interactions in the health care setting, the disenfranchisement of some patients because of their low literacy skills, the difficulty some patients have in navigating the health care system, the quality of the communication between doctors and their patients including the cultural overlay of such exchanges, and ultimately the effect of low literacy on health outcomes. Finally, the impact of new information technologies has been studied by a number of investigators. There remain many opportunities for conducting further research to gain a better understanding of the complex interactions between general literacy, health literacy, information technologies, and the existing health care infrastructure. PMID:15561782

  10. Health and peace.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S

    2002-04-01

    Health and peace are closely linked. One cannot have one without the other. Although health and peace are desirable conditions, we human beings often thwart our best intentions to achieve and maintain them. War has profound impacts on human health. In addition to direct consequences, including the fact that 90% of all deaths related to recent wars were among civilians, war has several indirect consequences, including long-term physical and psychological adverse health effects, damage to the social fabric and infrastructure of society, displacement of people, damage to the environment, drainage of human, financial, and other resources away from public health and other socially productive activities, and fostering of a culture of violence. Many public health issues can be both a consequence and a cause of war, including infectious diseases, mental health disorders, vulnerability of population groups, disparities in health status within and among countries, and weakening of human rights. We, health professionals, can promote peace in many ways and facilitate this work by demonstrating our values, vision, and leadership. PMID:11885034

  11. Child health in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Nieto, G Arias; Mutis, F Suescun; Mercer, R; Bonati, M; Choonara, I

    2009-11-01

    Colombia is a country with major problems, mainly a high degree of inequality and an unacceptably high level of violence (both armed military conflict and crime related). There are unacceptably high variations in health and health provision. Despite these difficulties, there are important steps being taken by both the government and independent organisations to try and improve child health and to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in relation to poverty, hunger and health issues. The participation of different sectors and stakeholders (including government, non-governmental organisations and other organisations of civil society) is essential to overcome Colombian history and to promote a better place for children. PMID:19586926

  12. [Concept analysis of health literacy].

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Chuan; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Chang, Shu-Chuan

    2009-10-01

    Health literacy has risen to become one of the dominant issues in Taiwan's healthcare system today. Level of health literacy impacts upon public health outcomes. Nevertheless, healthcare professionals in Taiwan remain largely unfamiliar with the concept and importance of health literacy. This paper employs concept analysis as described by Walker & Avant to introduce and analyze the attributes, antecedents and consequences of health literacy. Defining attributes of health literacy include: 1. enabling an individual to function successfully in a healthcare context; 2. facilitating the obtaining, comprehending, communicating and evaluating of health information to make appropriate health decisions and conduct positive health practices; and 3. achieving a good health status. The antecedent of health literacy is literacy. Consequences of health literacy include differences in health outcomes such as health knowledge, use of healthcare services and health status. Hopefully, through concept analysis, findings can help promote nursing clinical practice and related research quality. PMID:19760583

  13. [Health and the city: physical health and mental health].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M

    2001-08-01

    In France, city size has very little bearing on the mortality rate as a function of age and life expectancy and it is in large cities that these indicators are the most favorable. No increase in maternal or infant mortality rates or deaths due to cancers has been observed in large cities. The lower mortality rate linked to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in large urban areas contradicts the fears concerning the impact of air pollution. Deaths linked to lifestyle are less frequent in big cities, which could be due to social structures (socio-professional level: the proportion of white-collar workers and professionals is higher in bigger cities than in the suburbs or small cities). However, although the overall mortality rate is lower, it should be emphasized that there is in large cities a greater incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS and certain infectious diseases (because of social diversity and the fact that certain individuals seeking anonymity and marginality are drawn to large cities). In terms of mental health, the breakdown of family structures, instability, unemployment, the lack of parental authority and failing schools render adolescents vulnerable and hinder their social integration. When the proportion of adolescents at risk is high in a neighborhood, individual problems are amplified and social problems result. In order to restore mental and social health to these neighborhoods, ambitious strategies are necessary which take into account family and social factors as well as environmental ones. At the present time, when physical health is constantly improving, the most pressing problems are those related to lifestyle and mental health which depend for a large part on social factors. PMID:11510421

  14. Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

  15. [Health of peacekeepers protection with perspective of global health].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhou, Laixin; Tang, Shenglan; Cao, Jia

    2015-03-01

    Global health arisen recently, but it developed rapidly and attracted great attention from global researchers and institutions. China, as a member of United Nation, actively participated in many international peacekeeping activities. Health of peacekeepers is global health and it is important to consider and dealt with health of peacekeepers with conception of global health. This article reviewed and analyzed health problems and risk factors faced by peacekeepers,and provided suggestions to strategies to protect health of peacekeepers. PMID:26268861

  16. Norway: health system review.

    PubMed

    Ringard, Ånen; Sagan, Anna; Sperre Saunes, Ingrid; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2013-01-01

    Norways five million inhabitants are spread over nearly four hundred thousand square kilometres, making it one of the most sparsely populated countries in Europe. It has enjoyed several decades of high growth, following the start of oil production in early 1970s, and is now one of the richest countries per head in the world. Overall, Norways population enjoys good health status; life expectancy of 81.53 years is above the EU average of 80.14, and the gap between overall life expectancy and healthy life years is around half the of EU average. The health care system is semi decentralized. The responsibility for specialist care lies with the state (administered by four Regional Health Authorities) and the municipalities are responsible for primary care. Although health care expenditure is only 9.4% of Norways GDP (placing it on the 16th place in the WHO European region), given Norways very high value of GDP per capita, its health expenditure per head is higher than in most countries. Public sources account for over 85% of total health expenditure; the majority of private health financing comes from households out-of-pocket payments.The number of practitioners in most health personnel groups, including physicians and nurses, has been increasing in the last few decades and the number of health care personnel per 100 000 inhabitants is high compared to other EU countries. However, long waiting times for elective care continue to be a problem and are cause of dissatisfaction among the patients. The focus of health care reforms has seen shifts over the past four decades. During the 1970s the focus was on equality and increasing geographical access to health care services; during the 1980s reforms aimed at achieving cost containment and decentralizing health care services; during the 1990s the focus was on efficiency. Since the beginning of the millennium the emphasis has been given to structural changes in the delivery and organization of health care and to policies

  17. Women's lives, mothers' health.

    PubMed

    Chauliac, M; Masse-raimbault, A M

    1985-01-01

    This document dealing with women's lives and the health of mothers identifies factors conditioning the health and nutritional status of women and girls (life expectancy at birth, maternal mortality rate, and the birthrate); considers nutritional requirements of pregnant and lactating women, weight gain during preganncy, mothers' age and number of children and interbirth interval, maternal nutritional status and breastfeeding, anemia, work and women's health, pregnancy in adolescents, abortion, the growth of small girls and its effect on future pregnancies, and sexual mutilations; and reports on actions aimed at improving the health of women as well as health problems facing rural women. The 3 key concepts of this reflection on women's lives are: women's health should be taken into account as well as children's health; the development of the whole human being should be respected, implying ongoing surveillance of the health status of women and of their children; and the overall living conditions of women within the family and society must be analyzed at the different phases of their life, so as to encourage integrated actions rather than various uncoordinated efforts. Women's health status, like the health status of everyone, depends on a multitude of socioeconomic and sanitational factors. A figure illustrates several of the many interrelations between the various factors which influence the nutritional status of all individuals. Women of childbearing age are at greater risk than other population groups, due to their reproductive function and their ability to nurse children: pregnancy, like lactation, generates metabolic changes and increases nutritional needs. Delivery itself presents a series of risks for the woman's health, and only regular surveillance of pregnancy may prevent many of these. A woman's health status and, most of all her nutritional status during pregnancy and delivery, condition her future health and ability to assume her many tasks as well as

  18. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  19. Stakeholders in One Health.

    PubMed

    Mazet, J A K; Uhart, M M; Keyyu, J D

    2014-08-01

    The stakeholders in One Health include the ultimate beneficiaries (i.e. animals, people and the environment) and the organisations that work to protect them (i.e. research institutes, government ministries, international organisations and professional bodies). However, identifying these stakeholders who will contribute to One Health activities and develop solutions to complex health problems can be difficult, as these problems often affect all sectors of society. In addition, evolving concepts about health and its dependence on environmental resilience necessitate the inclusion of ministries, organisations and disciplines that may not have been traditionally considered to be related to health. The multilateral organisations with greatest responsibilities in the global health arena have recognised that the best way to protect health security and promote overall global well-being is to work together across disciplinary and jurisdictional boundaries. Permanent regional networks and ad hoc networks created to tackle specific issues (both of which require donor investment) are also facilitating improved disease surveillance and collaborative approaches to synchronised interventions across country borders. These networks necessarily involve the key ministries for One Health, those of health, agriculture/livestock, and natural resources/environment. Ministries play a critical role in the formulation and implementation of policies for the promotion of health and disease control. They contribute to all stages of the One Heath process, as do universities, which engage by generating knowledge and capacity through teaching, research and extension services. Similarly, non-governmental organisations have a key role in stewardship; resource mobilisation; generation of knowledge; capacity development; intervention design; and implementation. Finally, communities, including rural and indigenous peoples, particularly those that are in close proximity to natural areas, are at the

  20. [Health system of Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S

    1994-01-01

    Vietnam's health system consists of four levels: national, provincial/special city, prefecture/ward, and basic unit of town or village. Health care is managed by the Health Department at the national level and by the health and welfare section of the People's Committee at all other levels. Actual medical services are provided by the National Central Hospital at the national level, by general hospitals at the provincial/special city level, by general hospitals and multi-purpose health clinics at the prefecture/ward level, and by health stations at the basic unit level. Health services provide not only doctors, nurses, and pharmacists, but also paramedical staff, especially at the basic unit level. Just as with other developing countries, infectious diseases are the most important priorities in health/medical care policies; especially malaria, which is the number one priority followed by diarrhea. Because of well-established health stations at the basic unit level throughout the country and a relatively sufficient supply of medication, the mortality rate due to the above is low. The maternal/infant health care index of 1988 shows the following: low birth weight (14%); maternal mortality (1.4/1000); neonatal mortality (33.5/1000); and perinatal mortality (22.5/1000). Malnutrition of children under 3 years of age in farming areas, insufficient supply of drinking water, and lack of industrial health insurance are some of the problems yet to be solved. It is hoped that medical services can be a significant part of the comprehensive economic development program within the framework of Japan's international cooperation/assistance. PMID:8111100

  1. Promoting women's health.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L

    1991-01-01

    The male-dominated medical establishment continues to make health promotion policies for women. Women must have access to a more accurate information base about women's health and the link between their health and socioeconomic roles. They must be full partners in formulating and implementing health promotion strategies. Yet, such a database does not exist due to systemic bias in research. For example, research shows alcoholism affects men and women differently, but prevention and treatment strategies and evaluation of their outcomes do not take this into account. Further, men do not understand subjective aspects of female conditions. In addition, even though women provide most care in our society, health promotion policies do not incorporate their knowledge. Moreover, care of the sick can damage the health of the care giver. Statistics on women's health are lacking, e.g., exhaustion and depression as consequences of child care and housework, especially among poor women. Developed countries continue to use maternal mortality as a means of measuring reproductive hazard, but maternal death is a rarity. In fact, a reproductive mortality rate would be more applicable, which would include deaths from abortions, pregnancy, and contraception. Besides, birth control has real disadvantages, e.g., a painful medical procedure is needed to insert IUDs and they increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. Paid employment has positive and negative effects depending on whether women are alone or have a partner and have children, their income, and educational level. Women in industry face considerable health hazards, e.g., textile workers at increased risk of several lung diseases. Appropriate expenditure on health and social services and sound economic policies at the central level will benefit women's health. Besides, when society values and supports all aspects of women's work and roles, women's health will achieve its potential. PMID:1817541

  2. Health Concepts, Guides for Health Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    Concepts and supporting data pertaining to major health problems facing youth today as well as those anticipated in the next decade are enumerated in this resource. The material is designed as a reference for curriculum planners and classroom teachers in developing curriculum and teaching guides, units and instruction, and other curriculum…

  3. Horizons in Health (Allied Health Careers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emphasis Career Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The latest conditions affecting job demand, advancement, and compensation potential; educational requirements; and job descriptions are reported for allied health careers in the laboratory and hospital as physician assistants; therapists; nurses and nurses aids; dieticians and nutritionists; and dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory…

  4. Health is wealth! Is wealth health?

    PubMed

    Klinkmann, Horst; Vienken, Joerg

    2008-12-01

    Current demographic analyses of the world population show a considerable increase in life expectancy of the general population in nearly all regions of the world. Consequently, "Health Economy", defined as "Provision and marketing of goods and services in order to support the maintenance and restoration of health", has become the megatrend of the millenium. This holds true not only for national economies and GDPs, but also - in qualitative terms - for the elderly generation. Guestimates on the purchasing power of the elderly generation show a threefold higher figure compared to the actual working population, at least in the Western hemisphere. A globally organized wellness industry will profit from this situation. However, the increased morbidity of the elderly generation requires enormous financial endeavours to provide resources not only for healthcare programmes, such as disease prevention, healthcare education and improvement in quality-of-life pattern, but also for the development of sophisticated medical devices and therapies which are closely adapted to the needs of the elderly. The notion "Wealth is health" is valid indeed and so is "Health is wealth". Wellness, not just sickness, will determine the lifestyle of coming elderly generations. PMID:19259035

  5. Health Insurance: Understanding Your Health Plan's Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... have to pay more for it. Your insurance company can give you a list of drugs that are on the formulary. If necessary, show the list to your doctor when he or she writes you a ... for help. SourceInformation adapted from "Understanding Your Health ...

  6. An overview of health forecasting.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    Health forecasting is a novel area of forecasting, and a valuable tool for predicting future health events or situations such as demands for health services and healthcare needs. It facilitates preventive medicine and health care intervention strategies, by pre-informing health service providers to take appropriate mitigating actions to minimize risks and manage demand. Health forecasting requires reliable data, information and appropriate analytical tools for the prediction of specific health conditions or situations. There is no single approach to health forecasting, and so various methods have often been adopted to forecast aggregate or specific health conditions. Meanwhile, there are no defined health forecasting horizons (time frames) to match the choices of health forecasting methods/approaches that are often applied. The key principles of health forecasting have not also been adequately described to guide the process. This paper provides a brief introduction and theoretical analysis of health forecasting. It describes the key issues that are important for health forecasting, including: definitions, principles of health forecasting, and the properties of health data, which influence the choices of health forecasting methods. Other matters related to the value of health forecasting, and the general challenges associated with developing and using health forecasting services are discussed. This overview is a stimulus for further discussions on standardizing health forecasting approaches and methods that will facilitate health care and health services delivery. PMID:22949173

  7. Selected Health Service Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Arthur D.

    Prepared by an occupational analyst of the Utah Department of Employment Security, this manual provides job guides for 39 health service occupations concerned mainly with doctors, nurses, and related hospital-medical-health consultants and services. Classified according to "The Dictionary of Occupational Titles," each occupational description…

  8. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  9. The Comprehensive Health Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

    This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

  10. Mental Health Issues

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peggy A.

    2004-01-01

    The following overview discusses and compares the findings and implications of the articles in this issue of the Health Care Financing Review that deal with mental health topics—particularly children's mental health— in the Medicaid context. It also briefly describes articles concerning prospective payments for psychiatric patients under Medicare. PMID:25372025

  11. Minnesota Health Statistics 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    This document comprises the 1988 annual statistical report of the Minnesota Center for Health Statistics. After introductory technical notes on changes in format, sources of data, and geographic allocation of vital events, an overview is provided of vital health statistics in all areas. Thereafter, separate sections of the report provide tables…

  12. Health Resources Statistics; Health Manpower and Health Facilities, 1968. Public Health Service Publication No. 1509.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    This report is a part of the program of the National Center for Health Statistics to provide current statistics as baseline data for the evaluation, planning, and administration of health programs. Part I presents data concerning the occupational fields: (1) administration, (2) anthropology and sociology, (3) data processing, (4) basic sciences,…

  13. DEMOGRAPHIC AND HEALTH SURVEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Demographic and Health Surveys are nationally representative household surveys with large sample sizes of between 5,000 and 30,000 households, typically. DHS surveys provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, a...

  14. Water, hydration, and health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review examines the current knowledge of water intake as it pertains to human health, including overall patterns of intake and some factors linked with intake, the complex mechanisms behind water homeostasis, and the effects of variation in water intake on health and energy intake, weight, huma...

  15. Mental Health. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This comprehensive course from the Practical Nursing series of competency-based curricula is designed to prepare students for employment by systematically guiding the students' learning activities from the simple to the complex. These materials prepare health care practitioners to function effectively in the rapidly changing health care industry.…

  16. Health Informatics: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

  17. Health. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Place, John

    This book examines comprehensively all the major health topics covered in an introductory health course and may be used in courses with a science orientation as well as in those oriented toward behavioral and social issues. The book is designed so that each chapter is a complete, independent unit. Relevant physiological facts are presented in the…

  18. Holistic Approaches to Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinkmeyer, Don; Dinkmeyer, Don, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The holistic approach to health includes a spectrum of concepts that have an important influence on our health. Elementary school counselors must recognize this previously neglected need for a holistic approach. Stress, relaxation response, biofeedback, and the orthomolecular approach are discussed. (Author/BEF)

  19. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  20. What Ails Public Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcabes, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Public health, once the gem of American social programs, has turned to dross. During the 20th century, the public-health sector wiped smallpox and polio off the U.S. map; virtually eliminated rickets, rubella, and goiter; stopped epidemic typhoid and yellow fever; and brought tuberculosis--once the leading cause of death in U.S. cities--under…

  1. Health Tips for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  2. Health Science. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kenneth L.; And Others

    The central theme of this book is that each person is responsible for his or her own physical well-being. It offers factual knowledge of which forms of behavior are beneficial and why and emphasizes the need for positive motivation toward healthful living. The major categories covered in 24 chapters are: (1) emotional and neurological health; (2)…

  3. Can Water Mean Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Maggie, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    This issue of UNICEF News explores the theme of connections between water and health in developing countries. The introductory article discusses prospects for improving health through water projects during the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1981-90). Subsequent articles focus on (1) effects of a piped water supply on…

  4. Health supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Rolf; Gallagher, Pat

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The actual application of supply chain practice and disciplines required for service delivery improvement within the current health environment. * A rationale for the application of Supply Chain Management (SCM) approaches to the Health sector. * The tools and methods available for supply chain analysis and benchmarking. * Key supply chain success factors. PMID:20407173

  5. Housing and child health.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, Michael; Baten, Ahmareen; Rosenthal, David G; Hoshino, Risa; Tohn, Ellen; Jacobs, David E

    2013-09-01

    The connection between housing and health is well established. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the child's home, such as cleanliness, moisture, pests, noise, accessibility, injury risks, and other forms of housing environmental quality, all have the potential to influence multiple aspects of the health and development of children. Basic sanitation, reduced household crowding, other improvements in housing and expanded, and improved housing regulations have led to advances in children's health. For example, lead poisoning prevention policies have profoundly reduced childhood lead exposure in the United States. This and many other successes highlight the health benefits for families, particularly children, by targeting interventions that reduce or eliminate harmful exposures in the home. Additionally, parental mental health problems, food insecurity, domestic violence, and the presence of guns in children's homes all are largely experienced by children in their homes, which are not as yet considered part of the Healthy Homes agenda. There is a large movement and now a regulatory structure being put in place for healthy housing, which is becoming closely wedded with environmental health, public health, and the practice of pediatrics. The importance of homes in children's lives, history of healthy homes, asthma, and exposures to lead, carbon monoxide, secondhand/thirdhand smoke, radon, allergy triggers is discussed, as well as how changes in ambient temperature, increased humidity, poor ventilation, water quality, infectious diseases, housing structure, guns, electronic media, family structure, and domestic violence all affect children's health. PMID:23953987

  6. Learning about Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geertshuis, Susan; Cooper-Thomas, Helena

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the extent of patients' health-related learning from a range of sources and aims to identify psycho-cognitive variables that predict learning. Using a survey design, we found that people higher in perceived health competence were lower in anxiety and took a more logical approach to decision making. Low perceived health…

  7. Public health workforce taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Matthew L; Beck, Angela J; Coronado, Fátima; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Friedman, Charles P; Stamas, George D; Tyus, Nadra; Sellers, Katie; Moore, Jean; Tilson, Hugh H; Leep, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Thoroughly characterizing and continuously monitoring the public health workforce is necessary for ensuring capacity to deliver public health services. A prerequisite for this is to develop a standardized methodology for classifying public health workers, permitting valid comparisons across agencies and over time, which does not exist for the public health workforce. An expert working group, all of whom are authors on this paper, was convened during 2012-2014 to develop a public health workforce taxonomy. The purpose of the taxonomy is to facilitate the systematic characterization of all public health workers while delineating a set of minimum data elements to be used in workforce surveys. The taxonomy will improve the comparability across surveys, assist with estimating duplicate counting of workers, provide a framework for describing the size and composition of the workforce, and address other challenges to workforce enumeration. The taxonomy consists of 12 axes, with each axis describing a key characteristic of public health workers. Within each axis are multiple categories, and sometimes subcategories, that further define that worker characteristic. The workforce taxonomy axes are occupation, workplace setting, employer, education, licensure, certification, job tasks, program area, public health specialization area, funding source, condition of employment, and demographics. The taxonomy is not intended to serve as a replacement for occupational classifications but rather is a tool for systematically categorizing worker characteristics. The taxonomy will continue to evolve as organizations implement it and recommend ways to improve this tool for more accurate workforce data collection. PMID:25439251

  8. Rx for Student Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Collegiate Health Care, the only private managed-care company devoted solely to administering college health centers, is addressing student concerns about care and efficiency at traditional campus infirmaries. Detractors take exception to aggressive marketing tactics, and feel students will interpret any care other than the family doctor's as…

  9. Health Care System Accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Annie G; Barnett, Steven; Meador, Helen E; Wiggins, Erin A; Zazove, Philip

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND People who are deaf use health care services differently than the general population; little research has been carried out to understand the reasons. OBJECTIVE To better understand the health care experiences of deaf people who communicate in American Sign Language. DESIGN Qualitative analyses of focus group discussions in 3 U.S. cities. PARTICIPANTS Ninety-one deaf adults who communicate primarily in American Sign Language. MEASUREMENTS We collected information about health care communication and perceptions of clinicians' attitudes. We elicited stories of both positive and negative encounters, as well as recommendations for improving health care. RESULTS Communication difficulties were ubiquitous. Fear, mistrust, and frustration were prominent in participants' descriptions of health care encounters. Positive experiences were characterized by the presence of medically experienced certified interpreters, health care practitioners with sign language skills, and practitioners who made an effort to improve communication. Many participants acknowledged limited knowledge of their legal rights and did not advocate for themselves. Some participants believed that health care practitioners should learn more about sociocultural aspects of deafness. CONCLUSIONS Deaf people report difficulties using health care services. Physicians can facilitate change to improve this. Future research should explore the perspective of clinicians when working with deaf people, ways to improve communication, and the impact of programs that teach deaf people self-advocacy skills and about their legal rights. PMID:16499543

  10. Healthful School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C., Ed.; Wilson, Elizabeth Avery, Ed.

    A broad range of topics deals with the development, maintenance, and full utilization of a healthful school environment, encompassing such areas as--(1) school organizations which affect the student environment, (2) accident prevention, (3) the criteria for healthful food services, (4) physical education and the necessary athletic facilities, (5)…

  11. Incentives for health.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter; Harrison, Oliver; Cooper, Cary; Jané-Llopis, Eva

    2011-08-01

    This article discusses incentives to help make healthy choices the easy choices for individuals, operating at the levels of the individual, producers and service providers, and governments. Whereas paying individuals directly to be healthier seems to have a limited effect, offering financial incentives through health insurance improves health. Changing the environment to make healthier choices more accessible acts as an incentive to improve health. Employers can provide incentives to improve the health of their employees. Producers and service providers can take voluntary action to make their products less harmful, and they can be nudged into marketing healthier products within a regulatory environment. International agreements and monitoring systems can incentivize governments to do more for health. Lessons from climate change adaptation suggest that multilevel governance and policy integration are greater obstacles to policy change and implementation than knowing what has to be done. Policy change and implementation are triggered by many drivers, many of which are side effects of other policy pressures rather than of the direct policy goal itself. Effective action to reduce noncommunicable diseases will require leveraging social networks into a new ways of thinking about health; making better health prestigious and aspirational, and giving health and wellness a brand that encourages positive behavior change. PMID:21916718

  12. Current Health Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, John; And Others

    The basic premise of this text is that, in addition to the presentation of basic cognitive and affective information, health education should go one step further by assisting student in developing decision-making skills. The text begins by offering the student a basic foundation of what is meant by health and how this meaning applies to the world,…

  13. DETROIT CHILDREN'S HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Children's Health Study will consist of health questionnaires for 15,000 children enrolled in the fourth- and fifth-grades of selected elementary schools, and measurements of lung function and exhaled breath in a subset of 3,500 of these children. Participation in bo...

  14. Monitoring Your Kidney Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. ​​September 17, 2014​​ ​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  15. Careers in Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman-Vargas, Madeline; Estrada, Ricardo A.

    2008-01-01

    Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) provides bilingual/bicultural individuals with a fully-supported customized career path for nursing and other allied health occupations bridging individuals from unemployment/underemployment to high-demand healthcare positions. Healthcare providers, elected officials, and community leaders have partnered with…

  16. Neighbors United for Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  17. You and Your Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fassbender, William

    This book presents a broad but indepth coverage of the subject of personal health. It is divided into seven parts in which the following topics are discussed: (1) the human personality, social behavior, emotional growth, mental health, and coping skills; (2) drug dependencies, alcoholism, use of tobacco, psychological dependencies; (3) sexuality,…

  18. Health and Medical News

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preferences (HealthDay) Children under 8 most vulnerable to marketing's effects, study says Related MedlinePlus Topic: Child Nutrition ... that Related MedlinePlus Topics: Flu Shot , Pregnancy Savvy Marketing Gets School Kids to Snap Up Veggies (HealthDay) ...

  19. Soil Health Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoorman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil health and cover crops are topics of interest to farmers, gardeners, and students. Three soil health and cover crop demonstrations provide educational resources. Demonstrations one outlines two educational cover crop seed displays, including the advantages and disadvantages. Demonstration two shows how to construct and grow a cover crop root…

  20. Evaluating Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    Millions of consumers get health information from magazines, TV or the Internet. Some of the information is reliable and up to date; some is not. ... a branch of the government, a university, a health organization, a hospital or a business? Focus on ...

  1. Forest Health Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    "Forest health" is an important concept often not covered in tree, forest, insect, or fungal ecology and biology. With minimal, inexpensive equipment, students can investigate and conduct their own forest health survey to assess the percentage of trees with natural or artificial wounds or stress. Insects and diseases in the forest are…

  2. Fish Health Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For commercial success, a recirculating aquaculture operation must maintain fish at densities far greater than normally found in nature. At the same time, the producer must maintain an environment that supports good fish health. This chapter discusses various aspects of fish health management, inclu...

  3. Training Public Health Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Paul; And Others

    Funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity and carried out in Springfield, Massachusetts, during 1965-67, this training project sought to meet employment needs of disadvantaged high school graduates, the shortage of health professionals, and the need to improve and coordinate professional public health services. It combined a half-time,…

  4. Belarus: health system review.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Erica; Malakhova, Irina; Novik, Irina; Famenka, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Belarusian health system reviews the developments in organization and governance, health financing, healthcare provision, health reforms and health system performance since 2008. Despite considerable change since independence, Belarus retains a commitment to the principle of universal access to health care, provided free at the point of use through predominantly state-owned facilities, organized hierarchically on a territorial basis. Incremental change, rather than radical reform, has also been the hallmark of health-care policy, although capitation funding has been introduced in some areas and there have been consistent efforts to strengthen the role of primary care. Issues of high costs in the hospital sector and of weaknesses in public health demonstrate the necessity of moving forward with the reform programme. The focus for future reform is on strengthening preventive services and improving the quality and efficiency of specialist services. The key challenges in achieving this involve reducing excess hospital capacity, strengthening health-care management, use of evidence-based treatment and diagnostic procedures, and the development of more efficient financing mechanisms. Involving all stakeholders in the development of further reform planning and achieving consensus among them will be key to its success. PMID:24334702

  5. Globalism and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of twenty-four-hour news media, local, state, and national agencies' warnings and with the explosive role of the Internet, people are more aware of global health concerns that may have significant consequences for the world's population. As international travel continues to increase, health care professionals around the world are…

  6. Noise, Health, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Leo L.

    There is reasonable agreement that hearing impairment is related to noise exposure. This hearing loss due to noise is considered a serious health injury, but there is still difficulty in delineating the importance of noise related to people's general non-auditory well-being and health. Beside hearing loss, noise inhibits satisfactory speech…

  7. Seed health and vigor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The health of lentil and chickpea seed greatly impacts the quality of the crop stand and yield. Healthy seed has a high germination rate, is whole (free of cracks or other damage), is free from foreign matter including weed seed and has limited seedborne pathogens. The health of the seed often dep...

  8. Air Travel Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Air Travel Health Tips Air Travel Health Tips How can I improve plane travel? Most people don't have any problems when ... and dosages of all of your medicines. The air in airplanes is dry, so drink nonalcoholic, decaffeinated ...

  9. Protecting Student Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2004-01-01

    Public schools have certain responsibilities for the health of their students. Approximately half of the states require schools to implement health standards, including physical exams, as a prerequisite to attendance. All 50 states require public school students to be vaccinated against diseases such as diphtheria, measles, and rubella. And,…

  10. Health Careers Film Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower Education.

    This document, which represents a survey of the entire health career film field, was designed to provide information for people interested in a health career. The guide indicates that a major criteria for film selection was recency; however, some older films that give a fairly accurate image of a profession were included, with some emphasis given…

  11. Rethinking School Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Donald, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    School health and nutrition programs can contribute to achieving the goals of the Education for All initiative (EFA) by helping children enroll on time, complete their education, and realize their cognitive potential. Achieving these goals depends on reaching the children most in need. One strong feature of school health and nutrition programs is…

  12. Child Health USA '95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

    Published to provide reliable and current data for public health professionals and other individuals in the public and private sector to inform policymaking, this book compiles secondary data for 50 health status indicators and service needs of America's children. The book provides both a graphic and textual summary of the data and addresses…

  13. Child Health USA '91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.

    This booklet summarizes recent information on the current health status and service needs of America's children. The booklet is intended to present sentinel health measures in a readily accessible and readable format to illustrate what has been accomplished for children and to identify what challenges remain. The booklet's four sections cover:…

  14. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... That’s why testing is so important. The health care provider tests your blood and urine to check how well ... family history of kidney failure— ask your health care provider to test your kidneys. NATIONAL KIDNEY DISEASE EDUCATION PROGRAM l ...

  15. Smoking and Eye Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health Apr. 14, 2014 Avoiding smoking and second hand smoke — or quitting if you are a smoker — are ... influence your eyes’ health. And tobacco smoke, including second-hand smoke, is an irritant that worsens dry eye , a ...

  16. CHILDREN'S HEALTH MONTH 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protecting the health of children from environmental risks is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a part of the Agency's efforts to address children's health issues, EPA's Office of Research and Development, a leader in the area of hum...

  17. Health Information Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of health information technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 14 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 6 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

  18. Lean health care.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Henry C; Masterson, David J

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Lean management are being adopted more widely in health care as a way of improving quality and safety while controlling costs. The authors, who are chief executive officers of rural North Carolina hospitals, explain how their organizations are using Lean principles to improve quality and safety of health care delivery. PMID:23802475

  19. Degrassi Health Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Robin J.

    This health curriculum is intended to help teachers deal with some of today's adolescent health issues: (1) alcoholism (issues surrounding family alcoholism); (2) relationships (stereotyping and teen friendships); (3) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) (insight into what it is like to live with HIV);…

  20. Stress, Hyperreactivity, and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Sharon Ann

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have not yet agreed upon links between stress and illness. Levels of response mediated by the central nervous system are considered important in predicting and determining health consequences of stress. The paper uses the cardiovascular system to examine experimental evidence for the relationship between stress, health/illness, and…

  1. Insights in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Canyon, Deon V

    2013-01-01

    The strengthening of health systems is fundamental to improving health outcomes, crisis preparedness, and our capacity to meet global challenges, such as accelerating progress towards the Millennium Development Goals, reducing maternal and child mortality, combating HIV, malaria and other diseases, limiting the effects of a new influenza pandemic, and responding appropriately to climate change. To meet these complex needs, the Association of Schools and Programs in Public Health, the World Health Organization, and the Institute of Medicine promote systems thinking as the only sensible means to respond to issues that greatly exceed the normal capacity of health and medical services. This paper agrees with the application of systems thinking but argues that health organizations have misunderstood and misapplied systems thinking to the extent that the term has become meaningless. This paper presents the basic constructs of systems thinking, explains why systems thinking has been misapplied, examines some misapplications of systems thinking in health, and suggests how the concept can be applied correctly to medicine and public health to achieve the reason it was adopted in the first place. PMID:24377080

  2. Reminiscing on School Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper examines how former and current school health programs differ (e.g., school nurses moved from simply treating minor injuries and communicable diseases to working cooperatively with physicians and school staff to develop policies and procedures, and health education moved from simple anatomy and physiology to broader personal and…

  3. Apartheid: Focus on Health

    PubMed Central

    Dines, George B.

    1979-01-01

    This paper focuses on health in the Republic of South Africa and calls not only for technical warfare against disease, poverty, and bigotry but also for attention to predisposing causes of disease and ill health among the African majority. PMID:522192

  4. A COLLEGE HEALTH CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRAD, BERNARD

    THIS REPORT CONSIDERS PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS RELATED TO THE DESIGN AND ESTABLISHMENT OF COLLEGE HEALTH FACILITIES. THIS INCLUDES THE RESULTS OF A STUDY INVOLVING COLORADO, KNOX, AND WITTENBERG COLLEGES IN WHICH PERSONAL VISITS AND EXPERT TESTIMONY CONCLUDED THAT THE HEALTH SERVICES OF SMALL COLLEGES IN THE CENTRAL AND WESTERN STATES WERE SERIOUSLY…

  5. A College Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Bernard

    This report considers problems and solutions related to the design and establishment of college health facilities. This includes the results of a study involving Colorado, Knox, and Wittenberg Colleges in which personal visits and expert testimony concluded that the health services of small colleges in the central and western states were seriously…

  6. Ecosystem Health: Energy Indicators.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Just as for human beings health is a concept that applies to the condition of the whole organism, the health of an ecosystem refers to the condition of the ecosystem as a whole. For this reason, the study and characterization of ecosystems is fundamental to establishing accurate ...

  7. Preventive Health Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    The principal health-related killers of modern man--heart disease, cancer, stroke, and accidents--are best described as lifestyle diseases, for the etiology of these killers includes the abuse and neglect of the body. Health depends essentially upon the control of environmental influences, including those aspects that the individual creates.…

  8. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  9. Exercise Prescription for Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    Data on the dose-response gradient for the relation of physical activity or physical fitness to health and function are reviewed, refuting the idea that physical activity programs are either exercise for health or for fitness and suggesting that the key factor is the total energy expenditure of the activity. (SM)

  10. Up with Emotional Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Carolyn R.

    1997-01-01

    Daniel Goleman, author of the bestseller "Emotional Intelligence," spoke at the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development annual conference about children's declining emotional health indicators. He noted that emotional well-being predicts success in academic achievement, employment, marriage, and physical health; and that schools…

  11. Turkey. Health system review.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Mehtap; Mollahaliloğlu, Salih; Sahin, Bayram; Aydin, Sabahattin; Maresso, Anna; Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Turkey has accomplished remarkable improvements in terms of health status in the last three decades, particularly after the implementation of the Health Transformation Program (HTP (Saglikta Donus, um Programi)). Average life expectancy reached 71.8 for men and 76.8 for women in 2010. The infant mortality rate (IMR) decreased to 10.1 per 1000 live births in 2010, down from 117.5 in 1980. Despite these achievements, there are still discrepancies in terms of infant mortality between rural and urban areas and different parts of the country, although these have been diminishing over the years. The higher infant mortality rates in rural areas can be attributed to low socioeconomic conditions, low female education levels and the prevalence of infectious diseases. The main causes of death are diseases of the circulatory system followed by malignant neoplasms. Turkeys health care system has been undergoing a far-reaching reform process (HTP) since 2003 and radical changes have occurred both in the provision and the financing of health care services. Health services are now financed through a social security scheme covering the majority of the population, the General Health Insurance Scheme (GHIS (Genel Saglik Sigortasi)), and services are provided both by public and private sector facilities. The Social Security Institution (SSI (Sosyal Guvenlik Kurumu)), financed through payments by employers and employees and government contributions in cases of budget deficit, has become a monopsonic (single buyer) power on the purchasing side of health care services. On the provision side, the Ministry of Health (Saglik Bakenligi) is the main actor and provides primary, secondary and tertiary care through its facilities across the country. Universities are also major providers of tertiary care. The private sector has increased its range over recent years, particularly after arrangements paved the way for private sector provision of services to the SSI. The most important reforms since

  12. Switzerland: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    De Pietro, Carlo; Camenzind, Paul; Sturny, Isabelle; Crivelli, Luca; Edwards-Garavoglia, Suzanne; Spranger, Anne; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Quentin, Wilm

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Swiss health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Swiss health system is highly complex, combining aspects of managed competition and corporatism (the integration of interest groups in the policy process) in a decentralized regulatory framework shaped by the influences of direct democracy. The health system performs very well with regard to a broad range of indicators. Life expectancy in Switzerland (82.8 years) is the highest in Europe after Iceland, and healthy life expectancy is several years above the European Union (EU) average. Coverage is ensured through mandatory health insurance (MHI), with subsidies for people on low incomes. The system offers a high degree of choice and direct access to all levels of care with virtually no waiting times, though managed care type insurance plans that include gatekeeping restrictions are becoming increasingly important. Public satisfaction with the system is high and quality is generally viewed to be good or very good. Reforms since the year 2000 have improved the MHI system, changed the financing of hospitals, strengthened regulations in the area of pharmaceuticals and the control of epidemics, and harmonized regulation of human resources across the country. In addition, there has been a slow (and not always linear) process towards more centralization of national health policy-making. Nevertheless, a number of challenges remain. The costs of the health care system are well above the EU average, in particular in absolute terms but also as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) (11.5%). MHI premiums have increased more quickly than incomes since 2003. By European standards, the share of out-of-pocket payments is exceptionally high at 26% of total health expenditure (compared to the EU average of 16%). Low and middle-income households contribute a greater share of their income to

  13. Occupational health in Cuba.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M R

    1981-01-01

    Health and safety regulation, training, and research were practically non-existent in Cuba before the Revolution in 1959. Since that time important advances have been made. Specialized inspectors, occupational physicians, and other such personnel are now trained in Cuba. An Occupational Health Institute, founded in 1976, provides training and specialized technical services, and conducts research. In 1978, a far reaching "Work Safety and Health Law" was enacted which defines the rights and responsibility of government agencies, workplace administrators, unions, and workers. Comprehensive control of toxic substances in workplaces, still at an early stage, is likely to increase in light of the new law, the growing availability of qualified personnel, and the mounting concern of public health authorities with the increasingly "developed" health profile of the population. PMID:7212141

  14. mHealth Security.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    With the implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR), the patients' health information will reside on the network of computers that can be accessed through a variety of techniques and technologies. One of the widely used present-day communication technology is the mobile/cell phone that has great potential in the healthcare delivery and management as the healthcare providers can remotely access electronically stored health information of patients from anywhere anytime. One of the greatest advantages of the mobile health technology is convenience of time-independent communication from geographically distant places with the healthcare centers and patients that enhances healthcare quality at reduced cost. However, its equally great disadvantage lies in sending and receiving the health information wirelessly through atmosphere which can be easily intercepted, eavesdropped, interjected, modified or even destroyed. PMID:25097542

  15. National health expenditures, 1991

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Suzanne W.; Lazenby, Helen C.; Levit, Katharine R.; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1992-01-01

    Spending for health care rose to $751.8 billion in 1991, an increase of 11.4 percent from the 1990 level. National health expenditures as a share of gross domestic product increased to 13.2 percent, up from 12.2 percent in 1990. The health care sector exhibited strong growth, despite slow growth in the overall economy. This combination resulted in the largest increase in the share of the Nation's output consumed by health care in the past three decades. In this article, the authors present estimates of health spending in the United States for 1991. The authors also examine reasons for the unusually large growth in Medicaid expenditures and highlight recent trends in the hospital sector. PMID:10127445

  16. Choosing health, constrained choices.

    PubMed

    Chee Khoon Chan

    2009-12-01

    In parallel with the neo-liberal retrenchment of the welfarist state, an increasing emphasis on the responsibility of individuals in managing their own affairs and their well-being has been evident. In the health arena for instance, this was a major theme permeating the UK government's White Paper Choosing Health: Making Healthy Choices Easier (2004), which appealed to an ethos of autonomy and self-actualization through activity and consumption which merited esteem. As a counterpoint to this growing trend of informed responsibilization, constrained choices (constrained agency) provides a useful framework for a judicious balance and sense of proportion between an individual behavioural focus and a focus on societal, systemic, and structural determinants of health and well-being. Constrained choices is also a conceptual bridge between responsibilization and population health which could be further developed within an integrative biosocial perspective one might refer to as the social ecology of health and disease. PMID:20028669

  17. Prevention of Ill Health

    PubMed Central

    Muir, D. C. F.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose and possibilities of prevention in the workplace are described. A problem solving approach begins by identifying physical, chemical or organizational factors in the work environment and personal health factors in the individual worker. Consulting experts may be required to assist in the process. Methodical assessment of the value of collecting data or of intervention policies will be required as increasing emphasis is placed on the development of truly effective preventive health policies. Major success so far must be credited to engineering and industrial hygiene endeavors. However, the occupational health professional is the only member of the team with knowledge of individual workers' health and who can thus render appropriate advice. With the employment of handicapped, disabled or recently ill workers, the physician's role will become increasingly important in the prevention of ill health at work. PMID:21289686

  18. Genomics, health, and society.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chee Khoon

    2002-01-01

    On June 27, 2001, the World Health Organization conducted hearings in Geneva for a Special Report on Genomics & Health. Initially intended as a document to address the ethical, legal, and social implications of the gathering genomics resolution (ELSI), the terms of reference of the report were significantly modified to give primary emphasis to a scientific and technological assessment of the implications of genomics for human health. The Citizens' Health Initiative, one of two NGOs invited to make submissions at these consultations, suggested that no less important than the scientific and technical assessment was a perspective which gave due attention to the social context and political economy of scientific/technological development and its deployment. The article below touches upon neglected health priorities of poor countries, intellectual property rights and patents, risk management, insurance and discrimination, and predictive (prenatal) testing, reproductive choice, and eugenics. PMID:17208760

  19. Migration and women's health.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2009-08-01

    Women have been migrating at similar rates to men for the past 40 years, and comprised about half of all migrants in 2005. Women and children are most affected by displacement as a result of wars and human trafficking. In some cases, the health of female migrants is improved via integration into better health systems in the host country. More often, however, the health of female migrants is affected negatively. Women are doubly disadvantaged because they are discriminated against as women and as migrants. Female migrants are also highly vulnerable to acts of sexual abuse, rape, and violence. This is especially true for women in refugee camps, whose reproductive health needs are often overlooked. To improve the health of female migrants it is important to develop and implement policies that recognize and insist on the respect of the rights of migrants. PMID:19539929

  20. Migration of health workers.

    PubMed

    Buchan, James

    2008-01-01

    The discussion and debate stimulated by these papers focused across a range of issues but there were four main areas of questioning: "measuring" and monitoring migration (issues related to comparability, completeness and accuracy of data sets on human resources); the impact of migration of health workers on health systems; the motivations of individual health workers to migrate (the "push" and "pull" factors) and the effect of policies designed either to reduce migration (e.g "self ufficiency") or to stimulate it (e.g active international recruitment). It was recognised that there was a critical need to examine migratory flows within the broader context of all health care labour market dynamics within a country, that increasing migration of health workers was an inevitable consequence of globalisation, and that there was a critical need to improve monitoring so as to better inform policy formulation and policy testing in this area. PMID:18561695