Science.gov

Sample records for adverse antiepileptic drug

  1. Adverse effects of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Onat, Filiz; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-04-01

    Starting with phenobarbital in the 1900s, it took almost 70-80 years to introduce old-generation agents for the treatment of epilepsy. Then, in eleven years, nine more new antiepileptic drugs were added to the armamentarium. These drugs produce a nearly 40-50% decrease in seizure incidence in refractory patients, but few patients have been able to achieve complete freedom from seizures. So the search for more effective drugs with minimal adverse effect profiles will continue. Although the new antiepileptic drugs do not demonstrate a superior efficacy compared to the older ones, they do offer some advantages in terms of tolerability, fewer drug interactions and simpler pharmacokinetics. However, our knowledge concerning their safety profiles can not yet be considered adequate due to the relatively short time these drugs have been on the market and to the limited number of patients exposed to them. The fact that the serious side effects of felbamate and vigabatrine appeared late after marketing should be taken as an important lesson because it implies the potential for unknown side effects at any time during treatment. Antiepileptic drug treatment should begin with diagnosis of the seizure and epileptic syndrome, followed by selection of the drug most appropriate for treatment of the individual patient, and continued with monitoring of not only the seizures but the adverse effect profile as well.

  2. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  3. Adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy: Each additional drug matters.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    The study was set up to evaluate the impact of the total drug load of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy on cognition. Retrospective analyses were based on 834 patients with epilepsy who underwent a brief routine assessment of executive function and verbal memory (EpiTrack Plus) at our department. The total drug load was quantified in two ways: (1) number of concurrent antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and (2) total drug load according to the defined daily dose (DDD) provided by the World Health Organization. The cognitive measures showed higher inverse correlations with the number of AEDs (executive function: r=-0.35, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.22, p<0.001) than with the total DDD (executive function: r=-0.27, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.17, p<0.001). Reanalysis with statistical control for disease severity hardly changed the aforementioned results. With each additional drug in polytherapy, we observed a significantly lower performance in executive function. In this regard an additional explorative approach revealed that regimens combining AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles were associated with higher cognitive performance. Correlations between indicators of disease severity and drug load indices were low: altogether explaining only up to 9% of the observed variance in drug load. The findings demonstrate a considerable adverse effect of a higher drug load on cognition, especially on executive functions. Simply counting the number of drugs may be sufficient as a rough estimate of the risk of side effects. However, the combination of AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles may attenuate the negative effect of the total drug load.

  4. Antiepileptic drugs and adverse skin reactions: An update.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Lasoń, Władysław; Czuczwar, Stanisław Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes current views on clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, prognosis and management of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced adverse skin reactions. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched. The recent classification, among drug-induced skin injuries, points to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), which may be also recognized as a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). The use of aromatic AEDs, e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, zonisamide, and lamotrigine is more frequently associated with cutaneous eruption and other signs or symptoms of drug hypersensitivity. There is a high degree of cross-reactivity (40-80%) in patients with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions to AEDs. Pharmacogenetic variations in drug biotransformation may also play a role in inducing these undesired effects. It is suggested that avoidance of specific AEDs in populations at special risk, cautious dose titration and careful monitoring of clinical response and, if applicable, laboratory parameters can minimize the serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions.

  5. Antiepileptic drug teratogenesis: what are the risks for congenital malformations and adverse cognitive outcomes?

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure in utero has been associated with major congenital malformations (MCMs) and adverse cognitive outcomes in the offspring of women with epilepsy (WWE). However, determining the exact risk and the relative risks of AEDs for these outcomes has been challenging, and only in recent years has improved study designs enabled us to get a clearer picture of the risks. Still, there is a startling lack of information for many of the newer and widely used AEDs. At this point of time, studies clearly show that valproate (VPA) as a part of polytherapy or when used as a monotherapy is associated with an increased risk of MCMs, and that it poses about threefold the risk of carbamazepine (CBZ). It is unclear if any other AEDs studied pose an increased risk of MCM occurrence; in the best available large study the absolute rates of MCMs with other several other AEDs were not different from untreated WWE. The absolute risks have been reported as CBZ 2.2%, lamotrigine (LTG) 3.2%, phenytoin (PHT) 3.7%, untreated WWE 3.5%, with VPA as the outlier at 6.2%. In utero VPA exposure is also associated with a risk of lower verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) in children, at approximately 10 points lower than controls. CBZ appears to pose no risk to cognitive outcome, and there is some evidence that PHT and phenobarbital (PB) may be associated with risk of reduced cognitive outcome. Polytherapy is associated with greater risk than monotherapy for both MCMs and cognitive outcome. Although more information is needed and hopefully will be obtained from ongoing prospective studies, it is clear that WWE taking VPA and planning pregnancy should have a discussion with their physician about considering changing to another AED before pregnancy, if possible.

  6. Antiepileptic drugs and brain development.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder in young humans, has its highest incidence during the first year of life. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in infants, children and pregnant women target ion channels, neurotransmitters and second messenger systems in the brain. The same targets regulate brain processes essential both for propagation of seizures and for brain development, learning, memory and emotional behavior. Here we review adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain. In addition, we discuss mechanisms explaining adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain including interference with cell proliferation and migration, neurogenesis, axonal arborization, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity and physiological apoptotic cell death.

  7. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    PubMed

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), and uncontrolled seizures (P=0.045). The intraclass coefficient (test-retest reliability) for LAEP overall score was 0.848 (95% CI=0.782-0.895), with a range from 0.370 (unsteadiness) to 0.750 (memory problems). Cronbach's α coefficient (internal consistency) was 0.903. The LAEP was highly correlated with Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 inventory (r=-0.804, P>0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  8. Teratogenicity of Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Güveli, Betül Tekin; Rosti, Rasim Özgür; Güzeltaş, Alper; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Ataklı, Dilek; Sencer, Serra; Yekeler, Ensar; Kayserili, Hülya; Dirican, Ahmet; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gökyiğit, Ayşen; Gürses, Candan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Antiepileptic drugs (AED) have chronic teratogenic effects, the most common of which are congenital heart disease, cleft lip/palate, urogenital and neural tube defects. The aim of our study is to examine teratogenic effects of AED and the correlation between these malformations and AED in single or multiple pregnancies. Methods This is a retrospective study of malformations in children born to mothers currently followed up by our outpatient clinics who used or discontinued AED during their pregnancy. Their children were then investigated using echocardiography, urinary ultrasound, cranial magnetic resonance image, and examined by geneticists and pediatric dentists. Results One hundred and seventeen children were included in the study. Ninety one of these children were exposed to AED during pregnancy. The most commonly used AED were valproic acid and carbamazepine in monotherapy. The percentage of major anomaly was 6.8% in all children. Dysmorphic features and dental anomalies were observed more in children exposed especially to valproic acid. There were 26 mothers with two and four mothers with three pregnancies from the same fathers. No correlation was found between the distribution of malformations in recurring pregnancies and AED usage. Conclusion Our study has the highest number of dysmorphism examined in literature, found in all the children exposed to valproic acid, which may account for the higher rate of facial dysmorphism and dental anomalies. On lower doses of valproic acid, major malformations are not seen, although the risk increases with polytherapy. Our data also indicate possible effects of genetic and environmental factors on malformations. PMID:28138106

  9. Antiepileptic Drugs and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Palacios, Ana M.; George, Timothy M.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of epilepsy in women of reproductive age remains a clinical challenge. While most women with epilepsy require anticonvulsant drugs for adequate control of their seizures, the teratogenicity associated with some antiepileptic drugs is a risk that needs to be carefully addressed. Antiepileptic medications are also used to treat an ever broadening range of medical conditions such as bipolar disorder, migraine prophylaxis, cancer and neuropathic pain. Despite the fact that the majority of pregnancies of women with epilepsy who are receiving pharmacological treatment are normal, studies have demonstrated that the risk of having a pregnancy complicated by a major congenital malformation is doubled when comparing the risk of untreated pregnancies. Furthermore, when antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used in polytherapy regimens, the risk is tripled, especially when valproic acid (VPA) is included. However, it should be noted that the risks are specific for each anticonvulsant drug. Some investigations have suggested that the risk of teratogenicity is increased in a dose-dependent manner. More recent studies have reported that in utero exposure to AEDs can have detrimental effects on the cognitive functions and language skills in later stages of life. In fact, the FDA just issued a safety announcement on the impact of VPA on cognition (Safety Announcement 6-30-2011). The purpose of this document is to review the most commonly used compounds in the treatment of women with epilepsy, and to provide information on the latest experimental and human epidemiological studies of the effects of antiepileptic drugs in the exposed embryos. PMID:22711424

  10. Antiepileptic Drugs 2012: Recent Advances and Trends

    PubMed Central

    Sirven, Joseph I.; Noe, Katherine; Hoerth, Matthew; Drazkowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    There are now 24 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) approved for use in epilepsy in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google for all English-language articles that discuss newly approved AEDs and the use of AEDs in epilepsy in the United States from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2011. Five new agents were identified that have come onto the market within the past 2 years. Moreover, 3 trends involving AEDs have become clinically important and must be considered by all who treat patients with epilepsy. These trends include issues of generic substitution of AEDs, pharmacogenomics predicting serious adverse events in certain ethnic populations, and the issue of the suicide risk involving the entire class of AEDs. This article discusses the most recent AEDs approved for use in the United States and the 3 important trends shaping the modern medical management of epilepsy. PMID:22958992

  11. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  12. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  13. [Mechanism of action of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Saidón, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (DAEs) act through different mechanisms of action: increase in central inhibition, inhibition of excitatorios mechanisms and modification of the excitability through their action on the ionic channels. Epilepsy is characterized by an abnormal and hypersynchronic unloading of a neuronal population. The activity of numerous drugs is associated to increase in gabaergic activity. Another group of drugs decreases excitatory mechanisms, through the inhibition of ionic channels, or through a decrease in the activity of the excitatory neurotransmitters. There are some of antiepileptic drugs, especially within the group of drugs of recent appearance, for wich the mechanism of action remains unknown.

  14. Methods of assessment of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, N; Richens, A

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy is a symptom with protean manifestations and as such it is a difficult disease in which to carry out a therapeutic trial. The methods available to research workers for the assessment of new antiepileptic drugs are hampered by the fact that epilepsy is a fluctuant condition. Although it is a chronic disorder open to study using cross-over trials and within-patient comparisons, accurate assessment cannot be easily made at any one point in time. Research workers are therefore automatically placed at a time factor disadvantage and this is especially so for those searching for quick methods of evaluating new compounds. The need for a quick and reliable method of assessing a new antiepileptic drug has long been appreciated. This article will discuss the methods currently available and we will begin by considering the most commonly used method of assessment with particular reference to some of the problems involved in conducting a controlled clinical trial in epilepsy. PMID:7272157

  15. Effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure

    PubMed Central

    Baker, G.A.; Browning, N.; Cohen, M.J.; Bromley, R.L.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Kalayjian, L.A.; Kanner, A.; Liporace, J.D.; Pennell, P.B.; Privitera, M.; Loring, D.W.; Labiner, David; Moon, Jennifer; Sherman, Scott; Combs Cantrell, Deborah T.; Silver, Cheryl; Goyal, Monisha; Schoenberg, Mike R.; Pack, Alison; Palmese, Christina; Echo, Joyce; Meador, Kimford J.; Loring, David; Pennell, Page; Drane, Daniel; Moore, Eugene; Denham, Megan; Epstein, Charles; Gess, Jennifer; Helmers, Sandra; Henry, Thomas; Motamedi, Gholam; Flax, Erin; Bromfield, Edward; Boyer, Katrina; Dworetzky, Barbara; Cole, Andrew; Halperin, Lucila; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Barkley, Gregory; Moir, Barbara; Harden, Cynthia; Tamny-Young, Tara; Lee, Gregory; Cohen, Morris; Penovich, Patricia; Minter, Donna; Moore, Layne; Murdock, Kathryn; Liporace, Joyce; Wilcox, Kathryn; Kanner, Andres; Nelson, Michael N.; Rosenfeld, William; Meyer, Michelle; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Mawer, George; Kini, Usha; Martin, Roy; Privitera, Michael; Bellman, Jennifer; Ficker, David; Baade, Lyle; Liow, Kore; Baker, Gus; Booth, Alison; Bromley, Rebecca; Casswell, Miranda; Barrie, Claire; Ramsay, Eugene; Arena, Patricia; Kalayjian, Laura; Heck, Christianne; Padilla, Sonia; Miller, John; Rosenbaum, Gail; Wilensky, Alan; Constantino, Tawnya; Smith, Julien; Adab, Naghme; Veling-Warnke, Gisela; Sam, Maria; O'Donovan, Cormac; Naylor, Cecile; Nobles, Shelli; Santos, Cesar; Holmes, Gregory L.; Druzin, Maurice; Morrell, Martha; Nelson, Lorene; Finnell, Richard; Yerby, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Wells, Peter; Browning, Nancy; Blalock, Temperance; Crawford, Todd; Hendrickson, Linda; Jolles, Bernadette; Kunchai, Meghan Kelly; Loblein, Hayley; Ogunsola, Yinka; Russell, Steve; Winestone, Jamie; Wolff, Mark; Zaia, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine outcomes at age 4.5 years and compare to earlier ages in children with fetal antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure. Methods: The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on AED monotherapy (1999–2004) to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across 4 commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate). The primary outcome is IQ at 6 years of age. Planned analyses were conducted using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID at age 2) and Differential Ability Scale (IQ at ages 3 and 4.5). Results: Multivariate intent-to-treat (n = 310) and completer (n = 209) analyses of age 4.5 IQ revealed significant effects for AED group. IQ for children exposed to valproate was lower than each other AED. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) were carbamazepine 106 (102–109), lamotrigine 106 (102–109), phenytoin 105 (102–109), valproate 96 (91–100). IQ was negatively associated with valproate dose, but not other AEDs. Maternal IQ correlated with child IQ for children exposed to the other AEDs, but not valproate. Age 4.5 IQ correlated with age 2 BSID and age 3 IQ. Frequency of marked intellectual impairment diminished with age except for valproate (10% with IQ <70 at 4.5 years). Verbal abilities were impaired for all 4 AED groups compared to nonverbal skills. Conclusions: Adverse cognitive effects of fetal valproate exposure persist to 4.5 years and are related to performances at earlier ages. Verbal abilities may be impaired by commonly used AEDs. Additional research is needed. PMID:22491865

  16. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs in utero and child development

    PubMed Central

    Veiby, Gyri; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Schjølberg, Synnve; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Øyen, Anne-Siri; Vollset, Stein Emil; Engelsen, Bernt A.; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose Antiepileptic drugs may cause congenital malformations. Less is known about the effect on development in infancy and childhood. The aim of this study was to examine whether exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy has an impact on early child development. Methods From mid-year 1999 through December 2008, children of mothers recruited at 13–17 weeks of pregnancy were studied in the ongoing prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Information on birth outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry (108,264 –children), and mothers reported on their child’s motor development, language, social skills, and autistic traits using items from standardized screening tools at 18 months (61,351 children) and 36 months of age (44,147 children). The relative risk of adverse outcomes in children according to maternal or paternal epilepsy with and without prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs was estimated as odds ratios (ORs), using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, parity, education, smoking, depression/anxiety, folate-supplementation, and child congenital malformation or low birth weight. Key findings A total of 333 children were exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero. At 18 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal scores for gross motor skills (7.1 % vs. 2.9 %; OR, 2.0; 95 % Confidence Interval [CI], 1.1–3.7) and autistic traits (3.5 % vs. 0.9 %; OR, 2.7; CI, 1.1–6.7) compared to children of parents without epilepsy. At 36 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal score for gross motor skills (7.5 % vs. 3.3 %; OR, 2.2; CI, 1.1–4.2), sentence skills (11.2 % vs. 4.8 %; OR, 2.1; CI, 1.2–3.6), and autistic traits (6.0 % vs. 1.5 %; OR, 3.4; CI, 1.6–7.0). The drug-exposed children also had increased risk of congenital malformations (6.1 % vs. 2.9 %; OR, 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.4), but exclusion of congenital malformations did not affect the risk of adverse development

  17. Pros and cons for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Walker, Matthew C; Sander, Josemir W

    2002-01-01

    There continues to be an escalation in the number of new antiepileptic drugs, with many recently marketed drugs and many more entering clinical trials. This growth begs the question as to whether we need additional antiepileptic drugs. We consider the answer to this question from the medical perspective and also from the viewpoint of the pharmaceutical industry, health providers and from a more global, international perspective. There is undoubtedly a medical need for new antiepileptic drugs, and despite growing competition, the antiepileptic drug market remains profitable. However, in health services with limited resources, it is important that this expense is not offset by failure to research more appropriate use of existing antiepileptic drugs that may have a greater impact on healthcare. This is especially true for developing countries where resources would be much better spent on prevention and closing the treatment gap (the difference between those who can be treated and those who are treated).

  18. Psychotic disorders induced by antiepileptic drugs in people with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyi; Lusicic, Ana; O'Brien, Terence J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Adams, Sophia J; Kwan, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Antiepileptic drug treatment can induce psychosis in some patients. However, there are no agreed definitions or diagnostic criteria for antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in the classification systems of either epileptology or psychiatry. In this study we investigated the clinical spectrum of antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in patients with epilepsy. The medical records of all patients with epilepsy who were diagnosed by a neuropsychiatrist as having a psychotic disorder at the Royal Melbourne Hospital from January 1993 to June 2015 were reviewed. Data were extracted regarding epilepsy and its treatment, psychotic symptoms profile and outcome. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in accordance to the classification system of the International League Against Epilepsy while that of psychotic disorder was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition and the proposal on neuropsychiatric disorders in epilepsy. Patients with antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder were compared to those with psychotic disorders unrelated to antiepileptic drugs assessed over the same period (non-antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group). Univariate comparisons were performed and variables with a value of P < 0.1 were selected for the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The records of 2630 in-patients and outpatients with epilepsy were screened, from which 98 (3.7%) with psychotic disorders were identified. Among these, 14 (14.3%) were diagnosed to have antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder. Excluding one patient who developed psychosis after valproate withdrawal, 76.9% in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group were female and the percentage of temporal lobe involvement was higher in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group (69.2% versus 38.1%, P < 0.05). Current use of levetiracetam was higher in antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder group (84

  19. The Controversy over Generic Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Susan J.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2010-01-01

    As patent protection ends for the next generation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a complex debate continues over generic substitution of AEDs. On one hand, generic drug formulations provide cost savings for patients and society. On the other hand, patients with epilepsy and physicians are wary about the adequacy and efficacy of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) standards for generics. This article reviews current and proposed bioequivalence test procedures, summarizes new generic AED formulations and their costs, and discusses potential pitfalls in the current standards. These shortcomings include certain pharmacokinetic factors and clinical pharmacologic factors that may affect bioequivalence of generic AEDs, and statistical limitations of the standards. While the drug concentration differences between the brand name drug and each generic formulation are unlikely to be substantial, the differences with generic-to-generic switches will be greater and potentially clinically significant. Conversely, owing to their more favorable pharmacokinetic profile, newer AEDs may be less prone to problems with generic substitution than older ones. Unfortunately, very few data are available to guide decisions regarding what is best for an individual patient. Based on new prediction methods, generic substitution should be safe for many patients but identifying them ultimately requires more rigorous study. PMID:22477799

  20. Potential new methods for antiepileptic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Ho, Jet

    2002-01-01

    Use of novel drug delivery methods could enhance the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Slow-release oral forms of medication or depot drugs such as skin patches might improve compliance and therefore seizure control. In emergency situations, administration via rectal, nasal or buccal mucosa can deliver the drug more quickly than can oral administration. Slow-release oral forms and rectal forms of AEDs are already approved for use, nasal and buccal administration is currently off-label and skin patches for AEDs are an attractive but currently hypothetical option. Therapies under development may result in the delivery of AEDs directly to the regions of the brain involved in seizures. Experimental protocols are underway to allow continuous infusion of potent excitatory amino acid antagonists into the CSF. In experiments with animal models of epilepsy, AEDs have been delivered successfully to seizure foci in the brain by programmed infusion pumps, acting in response to computerised EEG seizure detection. Inactive prodrugs can be given systemically and activated at the site of the seizure focus by locally released compounds. One such drug under development is DP-VPA (or DP16), which is cleaved to valproic acid (sodium valproate) by phospholipases at the seizure focus. Liposomes and nanoparticles are engineered micro-reservoirs of a drug, with attached antibodies or receptor-specific binding agents designed to target the particles to a specific region of the body. Liposomes in theory could deliver a high concentration of an AED to a seizure focus. Penetration of the blood-brain barrier can be accomplished by linking large particles to iron transferrin or biological toxins that can cross the barrier. In the near future, it is likely that cell transplants that generate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators will accomplish renewable endogenous drug delivery. However, the survival and viability of transplanted cells have yet to be demonstrated

  1. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents.

  2. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  3. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A; Aneja, J

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs.

  4. [Antiepileptic drugs for the prevention of pediatric migraine].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J-C

    2009-12-01

    Migraine, according to the criteria of the International Headache Society, occurs in about 5 to 10% of children and adolescents. Pediatric migraine can cause a significant impact on quality of life. As stated by the American Academy of Neurology and Child Neurology Society's migraine guidelines, situations for prophylaxis consideration include recurring migraines that significantly interfere with daily activities, despite acute therapy; frequent headaches; contraindication, overuse, or failure of acute therapy; adverse reactions to acute therapy; cost of acute and preventive therapies; patient preferences; and presence of uncommon migraine conditions. Preventive therapy may be warranted in as many as 30% of young patients with migraine seen in tertiary headache centers. Headache related disability can be measured by scoring systems such as the Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment Scale. Numerous medications have been studied to prevent migraines in children, including antihistamines, antidepressants, and antihypertensive agents. However, few high quality clinical trials actually demonstrate efficacy in this population. Recently, many studies dealt with the use of antiepileptic drugs in this indication but there is a paucity of placebo controlled studies. Both topiramate (TPM) and divalproex sodium have been studied in a randomized-controlled study. Only TPM showed efficacy, though, clearly, further controlled trials are needed to confirm these data. Besides unproven efficacy, adverse effects of valproic acid, such as weight gain, somnolence, and alopecia may limit its use. Additional studies are warranted before recommending levetiracetam (LVT), zonisamide (ZNS) and gabapentin (GBP) agents for migraine prophylaxis in children and adolescents.

  5. Functional roles of benzothiazole motif in antiepileptic drug research.

    PubMed

    Amir, Mohammad; Hassan, Mohd Zaheen

    2013-12-01

    Benzothiazoles are promising candidates for the design of novel antiepileptic drugs. The endocyclic sulphur and nitrogen functions present in this heterocyclic nucleus have been shown to be critical for the anticonvulsant activity. The present review outlines the rational design and anticonvulsant potential of promising benzothiazole lead molecules. Particular focus has been placed on the structure activity relationship of different benzothiazole derivatives giving selected examples of molecules with significant activity being that these molecules may serve as prototypes for the development of more active antiepileptic drugs.

  6. [Use of antiepileptic drugs for the preventive treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Junichi

    2009-10-01

    Migraine and epilepsy share several common characteristic clinical features, and epilepsy is a comorbid disorder of migraine. Clinical studies have shown that some antiepileptic drugs are effective for the preventive treatment of migraine. The rationale for the use of these antiepileptic drugs in migraine prophylaxis is the hypothesis that migraine and epilepsy have several common pathophysiological mechanisms. It has been suggested that in these 2 pathological conditions, an imbalance exists between excitatory glutamate-mediated transmission and inhibitory GABA-mediated transmission in cerebral tissues, mainly in specific brain areas. Moreover, it has been postulated that abnormal activation of some kinds of voltage-gated ionic channels has been postulated to have a key role in both migraine and epilepsy, especially when caused by a genetic abnormality. It has been found that cortical spreading depression is involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of epilepsy, in addition to the generation of migraine aura. Preventive antiepileptic drugs can be chosen for treatment after considering clinical efficacy- scientific evidence, side effects, and patients' specific personal conditions. Recently, scientific evidence was found to demonstrate efficacy of valproic acid and topiramate in the preventive treatment of migraine. These drugs can reduce the incidence of migraine attacks in the large clinical studies. Other new antiepileptic drugs can be tried in future clinical study.

  7. The Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Classroom Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Jeffrey B.; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in children, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cognitive, psychiatric, and learning problems. Although side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been long studied in adults, an understanding of how they manifest in children is only beginning to emerge. Careful…

  8. Neurologic birth defects after prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Daniela; Rozental, Renato

    2008-12-01

    Maternal epilepsy has a potential for fetal injury, either antiepileptic drug (AED)--induced or as a consequence of seizures per se. The intent of this article is to explore this relationship, discussing similar patterns of malformations seen with AEDs or different disease exposure during pregnancy, and the potential role of gap junctional intercellular communication in abnormal morphogenesis.

  9. Antiepileptic Drug Nonadherence and Its Predictors among People with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Asmamaw; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Bekana, Lulu; Menberu, Melak; Yimer, Solomon; Assaye, Adisu; Belete, Habte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs are effective in the treatment of epilepsy to the extent that about 70% of people with epilepsy can be seizure-free, but poor adherence to medication is major problem to sustained remission and functional restoration. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted on 450 individuals who were selected by systematic random sampling method. Antiepileptic drug nonadherence was measured by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and logistic regression was used to look for significant associations. Result. The prevalence of AEDs nonadherence was 37.8%. Being on treatment for 6 years and above [AOR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.88, 6.40], payment for AEDs [AOR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.73, 4.42], lack of health information [AOR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.41,3.43], poor social support [AOR = 1.88, 95%, CI: 1.01, 3.50], perceived stigma [AOR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.45, 3.56], and experience side effect [AOR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.72] were significantly associated with antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Conclusion. More than one-third of people with epilepsy were not compliant with their AEDs. Giving health information about epilepsy and its management and consequent reduction in stigma will help for medication adherence. PMID:28053370

  10. Bone mass and turnover in women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drug monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pack, Alison M; Morrell, Martha J; Marcus, Robert; Holloway, Leah; Flaster, Edith; Doñe, Silvia; Randall, Alison; Seale, Cairn; Shane, Elizabeth

    2005-02-01

    Antiepileptic drugs, particularly cytochrome P450 enzyme inducers, are associated with disorders of bone metabolism. We studied premenopausal women with epilepsy receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy (phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, and lamotrigine). Subjects completed exercise and nutrition questionnaires and bone mineral density studies. Serum was analyzed for indices of bone metabolism including calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, insulin growth factor I, insulin binding protein III, and bone formation markers, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin. Urine was analyzed for cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen, a bone resorption marker. Calcium concentrations were significantly less in subjects receiving carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate than in those receiving lamotrigine (p = 0.008). Insulin growth factor-I was significantly reduced in subjects receiving phenytoin compared with those receiving lamotrigine (p = 0.017). Subjects receiving phenytoin had significantly greater levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.007). Our results demonstrate that phenytoin is associated with changes in bone metabolism and increased bone turnover. The lower calcium concentrations in subjects taking carbamazepine or valproate compared with those taking other antiepileptic drugs suggest that these antiepileptic drugs may have long-term effects. Subjects receiving lamotrigine had no significant reductions in calcium or increases in markers of bone turnover, suggesting this agent is less likely to have long-term adverse effects on bone.

  11. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  12. Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; River, Yaron; Shifrin, Ala; Krivoy, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are an effective treatment for various forms of neuropathic pain of peripheral origin, although they rarely provide complete pain relief. Multiple multicentre randomised controlled trials have shown clear efficacy of gabapentin and pregabalin for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. Theses drugs can be rapidly titrated and are well tolerated. Topiramate, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are alternatives for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, but should be titrated slowly. Carbamazepine remains the drug of choice for trigeminal neuralgia; however, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine are potential alternatives. There is an apparent need for large-scale randomised controlled trials on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain in general, and in cancer-related neuropathic pain and neuropathic pain of central origin in particular. Trials with long-term follow-up are required to establish the long-term efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain. There is only limited scientific evidence to support the idea that drug combinations are likely to be more efficacious and safer than each drug alone; further studies are warranted in this area.

  13. Current discoveries on the cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meador, K J

    2000-08-01

    The cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are of particular concern to clinicians because these drugs are the primary therapeutic modality for managing epilepsy. In general, the cognitive effects of most AEDs are modest and offset by their benefit in reducing seizures. Nonetheless, the cognitive effects of a particular AED may be clinically significant when treating specific patient populations, such as children and the elderly.

  14. Levetiracetam as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Altamirano, J L; Olmos-Hernández, A; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Bandala, C; González-Maciel, A; Alfaro-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this review was to expound upon the mechanism of action of Levetiracetam (LEV) as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. LEV is a second-generation anti-epileptic drug (AED) that is approved for clinical use as monotherapy and may also be used for adjunctive treatment of patients with seizures. Several researchers have recommended LEV as a treatment option in different diseases causing neuronal damage, and recently, LEV has been used as an antihyperalgesic drug. LEV exhibits favorable characteristics, including a low potential for interaction, a short elimination half-life, and has neither active metabolites nor major negative effects on cognition. This has generated many new research avenues for the utilization of this drug. However, the precise mechanism of action of LEV has not been fully elucidated. In this review, a search was conducted on PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO, and the Science Citation index for studies evaluating the effects of LEV as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. A total of 32 studies related to the use of LEV suggested different mechanisms of action, such as binding to the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) protein, inhibition of Ca2+ N-type channels, and its presence as a neuromodulator. These studies concluded that the pharmacodynamics of LEV should be viewed as a single pathway, and should not be based on specific molecular targets that depend on the physiological or pathological conditions prevalent at that time.

  15. Therapeutic strategies in the choice of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    de Borchgrave, V; Delvaux, V; de Tourchaninoff, M; Dubru, J M; Ghariani, S; Grisar, Th; Legros, B; Ossemann, M; Sadzot, B; Tugendhaft, P; Van Bogaert, P; van Rijckevorsel, K

    2002-03-01

    The choice of treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy involves many factors such as age, sex, life style, general health and concomitant medication. The seizure type, syndrome, and the pharmacology, efficacy and safety of the antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should also be considered. Some of the new AEDs appear to provide at least equivalent efficacy with better tolerability. Some of these drugs have the potential to become drugs of first choice in newly diagnosed epilepsy. At the present time, we also must consider the criteria of reimbursement of these drugs. In this paper, we try to describe common and practical strategies to start a treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy.

  16. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  17. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs: does exposure alter normal brain development?

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric D; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Porter, Brenda E

    2006-12-01

    Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affect brain development and have long-term neurological consequences. The specific molecular and cellular changes, the precise timing of their influence during brain development, and the full extent of the long-term consequences of seizures and AEDs exposure have not been established. This review critically assesses both the basic and clinical science literature on the effects of seizures and AEDs on the developing brain and finds that evidence exists to support the hypothesis that both seizures and antiepileptic drugs influence a variety of biological process, at specific times during development, which alter long-term cognition and epilepsy susceptibility. More research, both clinical and experimental, is needed before changes in current clinical practice, based on the scientific data, can be recommended.

  18. Neurological and Psychiatric Sequelae of Developmental Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gedzelman, Evan R.; Meador, Kimford J.

    2012-01-01

    The neurons in the developing mammalian brain are susceptible to antiepileptic drug (AED) effects. It is known that later in life deficits in cognitive performance as well as psychiatric deficits can manifest after early AED exposure. The extent of these deficits will be addressed. This review will attempt to draw parallels between the existent animal models and human studies. Through analysis of these studies, important future research will be elucidated and possible new and emerging therapies will be discussed. PMID:23293628

  19. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the Fifth Eilat Conference (EILAT V).

    PubMed

    Bialer, M; Johannessen, S I; Kupferberg, H J; Levy, R H; Loiseau, P; Perucca, E

    2001-01-01

    The Fifth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) took place at the Dan Hotel, Eilat, Israel, 25-29 June 2000. Basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 20 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included recognition of unexpected adverse effects, new indications of AEDs, and patient-tailored AED therapy. According to tradition, the central part of the conference was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well to updates on AEDs that have been marketed in recent years. This article summarizes the information presented on drugs in preclinical and clinical development, including AWD 131-138, DP-valproate, harkoseride, LY300164, NPS 1776, NW 1015, pregabalin, remacemide, retigabine, rufinamide and valrocemide. The potential value of an innovative strategy, porcine embryonic GABAergic cell transplants, is also discussed. Finally, updates on felbamate, fosphenytoin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, zonisamide, and the antiepileptic vagal stimulator device are presented.

  20. Is primary prevention with antiepileptic drugs effective in brain tumors or brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Lobos-Urbina, Diego; Kittsteiner-Manubens, Lucas; Peña, José

    2017-03-21

    Patients with brain tumors –primary or metastatic- have an increased risk of presenting seizures during the course of their disease. So, prophylactic antiepileptic drugs have been proposed. However, the effects of this intervention are not yet clear. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified 12 systematic reviews including 80 studies overall. Twelve corresponded to randomized trials, but only two answered the question of interest. We extracted data, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE method. We concluded primary prevention with antiepileptic drugs might not reduce the risk of seizures, and it is associated to frequent adverse effects.

  1. Effect of anti-epileptic drugs in pregnancy and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Sowbhagya; Sunanda, Kulkarni

    2008-07-01

    Epilepsy raises special concern in women during pregnancy. Antiepileptic drugs are known to induce major and minor malformations in the foetus. Aim of the study was to find an association between maternal serum alpha fetoprotein levels, foetal abnormalities and antiepileptic drugs mediated teratogenicity. Maternal serum alpha feto protein levels, kidney and liver function tests in age matched normal pregnant women and seizure free epileptic pregnant women during 12-14 weeks of gestation were estimated. Cases were subjected to ultrasonography at 11(th)-14(th) week of pregnancy and again at 20(th) week of pregnancy. maternal serum alfa feto protein was assayed by a specific Electro Chemiluminescence Immuno Assay test. There was no significant difference in kidney and liver function tests in cases as compared to controls. There were elevated levels of alpha feto protein in cases as compared to controls but this was not statistically significant. No anomalies were detected in ultrasound reports. Most women had normal full term delivery with healthy children but of low birth weight. No correlation was seen between maternal serum alfa feto protein levels and antiepileptic drug leading to teratogenesis.

  2. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  3. [The "cost-benefit" analysis of new antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Vlasov, P N; Orekhova, N V

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to optimize the pharmaceutical treatment of epileptic patients and to evaluate the clinical-economical effectiveness of new antiepileptic drugs (AED)--levetiracetam, lamotrigine, topiramate and oxcarbazepine. The study included 134 patients with different types of seizures who received earlier antiepileptics with the addition of new AED as mono- or polytherapy. The cost of treatment and pharmacoeconomic "cost-benefit" index were calculated before and after the treatment optimization. After one year of the treatment with "news" AED, the decrease in seizure frequency was 75-92%. The "cost-benefit" ratio was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased by 2-3 times in all types of seizures despite the increase of direst costs of the treatment. The significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the cost of treatment of epilepsy was noted in all groups studied. In conclusion, the rational treatment using "new" AED allows to reduce both the total cost of treatment and ccost-benefits ratio.

  4. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  5. The rise and fall of borax as an antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed

    Jensen, John P A

    2006-04-01

    Five hundred eighty-six patients with epilepsy were treated with borax (hydrated sodium tetraborate) between 1912 and 1948 at the Kolonien Filadelfia Epilepsy Hospital, Dianalund, Denmark. A rough estimation shows that less than 5% experienced a more than 50% reduction in the total number of seizures. Charts were reviewed to find a connection between the concept of Bacillus epilepticus (1916) and the so-called renaissance of borax treatment described in 1923, and to find an explanation for the popularity of this seemingly ineffective antiepileptic drug.

  6. Pharmacy and generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs: missing in action?

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E

    2007-06-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs is an issue that is gathering a lot of attention in the neurology community but is not receiving much attention within pharmacy. Several proposals have been drafted that restrict a pharmacist's decision-making in generic substitution. These proposals highlight concerns about the pharmacy community related to generic substitution. Careful consideration needs to be given to these issues by pharmacists and pharmacy professional organizations. Unless pharmacy as a profession takes strong positions in support of a pharmacist's ability to make decisions about pharmacotherapy and addresses many of the pharmacy-related problems of generic substitution, policies that negatively impact pharmacy will be established.

  7. Teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72 hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data.

  8. Brain Graph Topology Changes Associated with Anti-Epileptic Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Zulfi; Levin, Harvey S; Chiang, Sharon

    2015-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies of functional connectivity using graph theory have furthered our understanding of the network structure in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Brain network effects of anti-epileptic drugs could influence such studies, but have not been systematically studied. Resting-state functional MRI was analyzed in 25 patients with TLE using graph theory analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on anti-epileptic medication use: those taking carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine (CBZ/OXC) (n=9) and those not taking CBZ/OXC (n=16) as a part of their medication regimen. The following graph topology metrics were analyzed: global efficiency, betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient, and small-world index. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association of CBZ/OXC with graph topology. The two groups did not differ from each other based on epilepsy characteristics. Use of CBZ/OXC was associated with a lower BC. Longer epilepsy duration was also associated with a lower BC. These findings can inform graph theory-based studies in patients with TLE. The changes observed are discussed in relation to the anti-epileptic mechanism of action and adverse effects of CBZ/OXC.

  9. Antiepileptic Drugs-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome: A case Series

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Bhavi S.; Darji, Nishita H.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Patel, Pankaj R.

    2016-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an acute life-threatening mucocutaneous reaction, characterized by extensive necrosis and detachment of the epidermis from the skin. The overall incidence of SJS is seen in five cases per million people per year. SJS is typically caused by drugs and is a kind of idiosyncratic reaction. Adverse drug reactions such an SJS have a remarkable effect on patient's safety issues. We encountered nine cases of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced SJS, specifically with carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin. To manage the reaction, the clinician withdrew the drug in all 8 cases, and in 1 case, the patient was shifted to valproate and symptomatic treatment was provided. There is still a controversy whether or not all AEDs can cause SJS. Recent studies have investigated the role of genetic factors - HLAB*502 allele in the development of AED-induced SJS in patients of Asian ancestry. PMID:28104975

  10. Neurological teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qingmei; Su, Baohua; Wei, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the few neurologic disorders that requires a constant treatment during pregnancy. Epilepsy affects 0.3–0.8% of pregnant women. Prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to pregnant women with epilepsy requires monitoring and maintaining a balance between limiting seizures and decreasing fetal exposure to the potential teratogenic effects. AEDs are also commonly used for psychiatric disorders, pain disorders, and migraines. The types of malformations that can result in fetuses exposed to AEDs include minor anomalies, major congenital malformations, intrauterine growth retardation, cognitive dysfunction, low IQ, microcephaly, and infant mortality. In the present review, we analyzed and summarized the current understanding of neurological development in fetuses that are exposed to various AEDs administered to pregnant epileptic women. PMID:27698740

  11. Use of Antiepileptic Drugs for Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, A; Gallelli, L; De Sarro, G

    2010-01-01

    Many studies investigated the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in several neurological diseases other than epilepsy. These neurological disorders, usually, involve neuronal excitability through the modulating of ion channels, receptors and intracellular signaling pathways, and are the targets of the AEDs. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of both conventional and newer AEDs in hyperkinetic movement disorders. Some of these indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The modulation of GABAergic transmission may explain the neuronal hyper-excitability that underlies some forms of hyperkinetic movement disorders. So, AEDs able to increase GABAergic neurotransmission may play a role in hyperkinetic movement disorders treatment. Therefore, AEDs could represent a useful therapeutic option in the management of hyperkinetic movement disorders where the available treatments are ineffective. PMID:21629443

  12. Antiepileptic drug effects on mood and behavior: molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Piero; Mula, Marco

    2013-03-01

    With almost 100 years of clinical experience, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) remain the mainstay of epilepsy treatment. They suppress epileptic seizures by acting on a variety of mechanisms and molecular targets involved in the regulation of neuronal excitability. These include inhibitory-GABAergic and excitatory-glutamatergic neurotransmission, as well as ion (sodium and calcium) conductance through voltage-gated channels. On the other hand, accruing evidence indicates that these mechanisms and targets are also implicated in the regulation of mood and behavior, which may explain why each AED is associated with specific psychotropic effects. These effects, however, cannot be explained solely on the basis of the known mode of action of each AED, and other mechanisms or targets are likely to be implicated. In this article, we review positive and negative effects of AEDs on mood and behavior, discuss putative underlying mechanisms, and highlight knowledge gaps which should be addressed in future studies.

  13. Antiepileptic drug trials: the view from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A golden age of antiepileptic drug development has yielded over a dozen useful new compounds, but the nature of clinical trials has made translation to practical use in the clinic difficult. Most clinical trials are designed for regulatory purposes and fail to answer critical clinical questions. These questions include: which drug is best as initial therapy, which drugs work as monotherapy, what are good drug combinations, what is the best starting dose and titration schedule, what is a reasonable target dose, what is the shape of the dose-response curve and does it vary significantly between patients, what is the true incidence of side effects, and what is the long-term efficacy of the drug? Most of these questions could be answered by changing trial designs, but many changes would entail additional time and money. There are encouraging signs that trials with procedures more directly applicable to the clinic are becoming common. These include direct comparative trials, longer trials with emphasis on seizure freedom, and trials with more flexible dosing schedules. In the past, funding of longer and more naturalistic trials has fallen to government agencies, but commercial funding has been obtained for several recent studies. Better quality control, innovative endpoints, structured searching for side effects, and standardisation of data collection are also promising topics for development.

  14. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  15. Prediction of antiepileptic drug treatment outcomes using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G.; Lang, Min; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments produce inconsistent outcomes, often necessitating patients to go through several drug trials until a successful treatment can be found. This study proposes the use of machine learning techniques to predict epilepsy treatment outcomes of commonly used AEDs. Approach. Machine learning algorithms were trained and evaluated using features obtained from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of the epileptiform discharges observed in Mecp2-deficient mouse model of the Rett Syndrome. Previous work have linked the presence of cross-frequency coupling (I CFC) of the delta (2-5 Hz) rhythm with the fast ripple (400-600 Hz) rhythm in epileptiform discharges. Using the I CFC to label post-treatment outcomes we compared support vector machines (SVMs) and random forest (RF) machine learning classifiers for providing likelihood scores of successful treatment outcomes. Main results. (a) There was heterogeneity in AED treatment outcomes, (b) machine learning techniques could be used to rank the efficacy of AEDs by estimating likelihood scores for successful treatment outcome, (c) I CFC features yielded the most effective a priori identification of appropriate AED treatment, and (d) both classifiers performed comparably. Significance. Machine learning approaches yielded predictions of successful drug treatment outcomes which in turn could reduce the burdens of drug trials and lead to substantial improvements in patient quality of life.

  16. Old and new antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation--report of a case.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Rostasy, Kevin; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    We describe a case of a woman with epilepsy treated with primidone/phenobarbital (so-called "old" antiepileptic drug) and levetiracetam (so-called "new" antiepileptic drug) who was discouraged from breastfeeding, resulting in clinically significant withdrawal seizures in her newborn. As a consequence, even when two or more antiepileptic drugs are needed for the treatment of women with epilepsy, breastfeeding should be recommended, mothers should be informed about the possibility of drug effects on the neonate, and infants of mothers treated with primidone/phenobarbital should be closely monitored for possible signs of sedation.

  17. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  18. Feasibility and acceptance of salivary monitoring of antiepileptic drugs via the US Postal Service.

    PubMed

    Tennison, Michael; Ali, Imran; Miles, Michael V; D'Cruz, O'Neill; Vaughn, Bradley; Greenwood, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Salivary and serum levels of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and phenytoin are closely correlated. Salivary monitoring of antiepileptic drugs has a number of advantages including the potential for home collection if measured levels are unaffected by transit in the mail. Saliva was collected from 60 adult and 42 pediatric patients in the clinic. A control aliquot was immediately frozen, and a second aliquot was packaged and mailed to the laboratory. Patients were also asked to collect another sample at the same time on the following day and mail it to the laboratory. On receipt, all samples were held frozen and analyzed as a single batch by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The effects of mailing, the duration in transit, and the season were assessed by multivariable, repeated-measures analysis of variance. One hundred two saliva samples were collected in a mean of 2.6 minutes, and the mailed aliquot was received in a mean of 6.4 days. Two children and 3 adults (4.9% of total) preferred blood collection, but the rest preferred saliva collection or had no preference. There was no significant difference between the control sample and the clinic mailed samples for any of the 3 medications. There were no significant effects of the duration in transit or the season on reliability. Transit of saliva samples in the mail does not adversely affect accuracy of antiepileptic drug measurement. Patients prefer and can successful collect saliva samples at home. Home monitoring of salivary antiepileptic drug levels is a cost-effective technique that deserves additional study.

  19. Why are antiepileptic drugs used for nonepileptic conditions?

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir

    2012-12-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat various nonepileptic central nervous system (CNS) disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. Most AEDs have multiple mechanisms of action (MOAs), which include modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, and alteration of voltage-gated ion channels or intracellular signaling pathways. These MOAs may explain the efficacy of AEDs in the treatment of bipolar disorder and neuropathic pain. Bipolar disorder and epilepsy have some common features, such as their episodic nature and associated kindling phenomena, which led to the regulatory approval and use of the AEDs carbamazepine (CBZ), valproic acid (VPA), and lamotrigine (LTG) in the treatment of bipolar disorder. A major limitation for the development of drugs with improved mood-stabilizing activity is the lack of knowledge on the mechanism of treatment for bipolar disorder. In contrast to epilepsy, no animal models in bipolar disorder are universally accepted and no model is able to exhibit the characteristic mood swings. Although most AEDs have now been investigated for their mood-stabilizing effects, only three (e.g., VPA, CBZ, and LTG) demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients. This suggests that the mechanism of drug action in mood disorder and in epilepsy only partially overlaps. Peripheral nerve damage leads to the initiation of cellular and molecular changes in the nervous system resulting in ectopic, repetitive firing perceived as chronic pain. Epileptic seizures are also characterized by hyperexcitability of neurons in the brain. The spontaneous electrogenesis in neuropathic pain has similarities to that of epilepsy. Alteration in sodium channels expression suggests that the mechanism underlying epileptic hyperexcitability may be similar to those underlying neuropathic pain. The AEDs gabapentin (GBP) and pregabalin (PGB) have become the mainstay of treatment for various neuropathic pain syndromes, owing to their ability

  20. Antiepileptic Drugs with Mood Stabilizing Properties and Their Relation with Psychotropic Drug Use in Institutionalized Epilepsy Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leunissen, C. L. F.; de la Parra, N. M.; Tan, I. Y.; Rentmeester, Th. W.; Vader, C. I.; Veendrick-Meekes, M. J. B. M.; Aldenkamp, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability take medication, amongst which antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs, often simultaneously. Certain antiepileptic drugs have mood-stabilizing properties, e.g. carbamazepine, valproic acid and lamotrigine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of these…

  1. Are antiepileptic drugs used in the treatment of migraine associated with an increased risk of suicidality?

    PubMed

    Kanner, Andres M

    2011-06-01

    Three antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), valproic acid, gabapentin, and topiramate (TPM), are used frequently in the prophylactic treatment of migraines. In December 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning suggesting that the use of all AEDs is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. This warning has been received by the medical community with great skepticism, and the validity of the findings of the meta-analysis that led to its publication has been questioned because of various methodological problems. Yet, migraine by itself is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior as well as with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders that facilitate the development of suicidal behavior. Furthermore, TPM has been associated with psychiatric adverse events that potentially could result in suicidal ideation and behavior. In this article, we review data to determine whether the AEDs used in the prevention of migraine are associated with an increased risk of suicidality.

  2. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  3. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  4. Polycystic ovary syndrome in patients on antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram G.; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Bhimani, Bipin C.; Reddy, Janardhan YC; Rama Murthy, Batchu S.; Subbakrishna, Doddaballapura K.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to discuss the prevalence of polycystic ovary (PCO) and Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women with epilepsy (WWE) on valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), or phenobarbitone (PB), drug naive WWE and women with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) on VPA. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 190 women aged 18–45 years, who had epilepsy or BPAD (on VPA), and consented for study. Patients were grouped as Group 1 (n = 40): WWE on VPA, Group 2 (n = 50): WWE on CBZ, Group 3 (n = 50): WWE on PB, Group 4 (n = 30): drug naïve WWE, and Group 5 (n = 20): women with BPAD on VPA. All women were interviewed for medical, menstrual, drug and treatment history, nature of epilepsy, and seizure control. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were done to compare results between the groups. Results: Fifty-two women (52/190; 27.4%) had menstrual disturbances, in which oligomenorrhea was the most common (55.8%). There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PCOS in patients on VPA versus normal population (P = 0.05) and patients on other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (P = 0.02). There was, however, no significant difference in the occurrence of PCO between patients on VPA and the untreated epileptic women. VPA group (Epilepsy + BPAD) had a significantly higher occurrence of obesity than other treatment groups (P = 0.043, OR = 2.11). Conclusions: The study observed significantly higher occurrence of PCO in patients on VPA compared to other AEDs and the normal population. The importance of proper clinical evaluation before initiating VPA is highlighted. PMID:27570385

  5. Modulating Behavior in C. elegans Using Electroshock and Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kailiang; Grill, Brock; Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a valuable model for understanding the molecular and cellular basis of neurological disorders. The worm offers important physiological similarities to mammalian models such as conserved neuron morphology, ion channels, and neurotransmitters. While a wide-array of behavioral assays are available in C. elegans, an assay for electroshock/electroconvulsion remains absent. Here, we have developed a quantitative behavioral method to assess the locomotor response following electric shock in C. elegans. Electric shock impairs normal locomotion, and induces paralysis and muscle twitching; after a brief recovery period, shocked animals resume normal locomotion. We tested electric shock responses in loss-of-function mutants for unc-25, which encodes the GABA biosynthetic enzyme GAD, and unc-49, which encodes the GABAA receptor. unc-25 and unc-49 mutants have decreased inhibitory GABAergic transmission to muscles, and take significantly more time to recover normal locomotion following electric shock compared to wild-type. Importantly, increased sensitivity of unc-25 and unc-49 mutants to electric shock is rescued by treatment with antiepileptic drugs, such as retigabine. Additionally, we show that pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a GABAA receptor antagonist and proconvulsant in mammalian and C. elegans seizure models, increases susceptibility of worms to electric shock. PMID:27668426

  6. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  7. [Antiepileptic drugs as mood stabilizers: what did we learn from the epileptology?].

    PubMed

    Rajna, Péter

    2008-09-30

    Author summarizes the practical aspects of psychiatric application of mood stabilizing antiepileptic drugs. He observes how to transfer experiences taken from the "epileptologic" practice into the psychiatric care of bipolar patients. He shortly demonstrates the relevant information on the mechanisms of action, controversies and possible clinical effects influenced by the seizure inhibiting effect of the concerning molecules. By the opinion of the author the clinical importance of pharmacokinetic parameters are underestimated in the psychiatric practice. Therefore--as an original approach in the literature--he summarizes the detailed clinical indications of serum level measurements of antiepileptic drugs applied in psychiatry as mood stabilizers. The therapeutic experiences in epilepsy added a lot of practices for the most effective dosing, building, tapering and exchange of the mood stabilizer antiepileptics. Drug interactions (appear among the psychotropic drugs or with the commonly used medicines). As in any chronic therapies the main condition of patient's compliance is the lacking or very mild presence of the applied therapy. The paper discusses the most frequently occurring and drug-specific side effects in table forms. Using the term of "relative therapeutic potential" the need of balance between the efficacy (influenced by the choice and dosing) and the tolerance are pointed. Rules of application can change significantly in special populations like in pregnancy, obesity, chronic diseases or in chronic comorbid states and in case of polytherapy. As for the special therapeutic effects, the experiences are not completed even in group of antiepileptics: we have larger and more favorable knowledge on the traditional drugs (carbamazepine and valproate) and on lamotrigine (from the newer generation) but promising but not enough information exists on the newest antiepileptic molecules. Further targeted studies are needed for the identification and positioning of

  8. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Harpreet S; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer's Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  9. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet S.; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  10. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  11. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  12. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on antioxidant and oxidant molecular pathways: focus on trace elements.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Yürekli, Vedat Ali

    2013-07-01

    Current reports on trace elements, oxidative stress, and the effect of antiepileptic drugs are poor and controversial. We aimed to review effects of most common used antiepileptics on antioxidant, trace element, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx, and oxidant systems in human and experimental animal models. Observations of lower blood or tissue antioxidant levels in epileptic patients and animals compared to controls in recent publications may commonly support the proposed crucial role of antioxidants in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Effects of old and new antiepileptics on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in epilepsy are controversial. The old antiepileptic drugs like valproic acid, phenytoin, and carbamazepine induced ROS overproduction, while new epileptic drugs (e.g., topiramate and zonisamide) induced scavenger effects on over production of ROS in human and animals. Antioxidant trace element levels such as selenium, copper, and zinc were generally low in the blood of epileptic patients, indicating trace element deficiencies in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Recent papers indicate that selenium with/without topiramate administration in human and animals decreased seizure levels, although antioxidant values were increased. Recent studies also reported that sustained depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, enhanced ROS production and Ca(2+) influx may be modulated by topiramate. In conclusion, there is a large number of recent studies about the role of antioxidants or neuroprotectants in clinical and experimental models of epilepsy. New antiepileptic drugs are more prone to restore antioxidant redox systems in brain and neurons.

  13. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on the growth of glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Chan, She-Hung; Hsiao, Ling-Ping; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effects of antiepileptic drug compounds on glioblastoma cellular growth, we exposed glioblastoma cell lines to select antiepileptic drugs. The effects of selected antiepileptic drugs on glioblastoma cells were measured by MTT assay. For compounds showing significant inhibition, cell cycle analysis was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The antiepileptic compounds selected for screening included carbamazepine, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, magnesium sulfate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, and vigabatrin. Dexamethasone and temozolomide were used as a negative and positive control respectively. Our results showed temozolomide and oxcarbazepine significantly inhibited glioblastoma cell growth and reached IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The other antiepileptic drugs screened were unable to reach IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The metabolites of oxcarbazepine were also unable to reach IC50. Dexamethasone, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin showed some growth enhancement though they did not reach statistical significance. The growth enhancement effects of ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin found in the study may indicate that these compounds should not be used for prophylaxis or short term treatment of epilepsy in glioblastoma. While valproic acid and oxcarbazepine were effective, the required dose of valproic acid was far above that used for the treatment of epilepsy and the metabolites of oxcarbazepine failed to reach significant growth inhibition ruling out the use of oral oxcarbazepine or valproic acid as monotherapy in glioblastoma. The possibility of using these compounds as local treatment is a future area of study.

  14. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  15. Developmental effects of antiepileptic drugs and the need for improved regulations

    PubMed Central

    Loring, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the most common teratogenic drugs prescribed to women of childbearing age. AEDs can induce both anatomical (malformations) and behavioral (cognitive/behavioral deficits) teratogenicity. Only in the last decade have we begun to truly discriminate differential AED developmental effects. Fetal valproate exposure carries a special risk for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenic abnormalities, but the mechanisms and reasons for individual variability are unknown. Intermediate anatomical risks exist for phenobarbital and topiramate. Several AEDs (e.g., lamotrigine and levetiracetam) appear to possess low risks for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. Despite advances in the past decade, our knowledge of the teratogenic risks for most AEDs and the underlying mechanisms remain inadequate. Further, the long-term effects of AEDs in neonates and older children remain uncertain. The pace of progress is slow given the lifelong consequences of diminished developmental outcomes, exposing children unnecessarily to potential adverse effects. It is imperative that new approaches be employed to determine risks more expediently. Our recommendations include a national reporting system for congenital malformations, federal funding of the North American AED Pregnancy Registry, routine meta-analyses of cohort studies to detect teratogenic signals, monitoring of AED prescription practices for women, routine preclinical testing of all new AEDs for neurodevelopmental effects, more specific Food and Drug Administration requirements to establish differential AED cognitive effects in children, and improved funding of basic and clinical research to fully delineate risks and underlying mechanisms for AED-induced anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. PMID:26519545

  16. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi . E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  17. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  18. New generation antiepileptic drugs: what do they offer in terms of improved tolerability and safety?

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Deana M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades a total of 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been introduced to the US market. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have yielded information about each drug’s efficacy, tolerability, and safety profile; however, few studies have compared the newer generation AEDs directly with the older generation. Comparative studies are not always straightforward in their interpretation, as many characteristics of drugs, both favorable and unfavorable, may not be highlighted by such studies. In general, findings from the literature suggest that the newer generation AEDs (including vigabatrin, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, tiagabine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, pregabalin, rufinamide, and lacosamide) enjoy both improved tolerability and safety compared with older agents such as phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate. This is partially supported by some of the findings of the QSS and the TTA Committee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), whose review of four AEDs (gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, and tiagabine) is discussed. Briefly, when compared with carbamazepine, lamotrigine was better tolerated; topiramate adverse events (AEs) were fairly comparable to carbamazepine and valproate; and tiagabine compared with placebo was associated with a higher discontinuation rate due to AEs. The findings of the SANAD trial are also presented; when administered to patients with partial epilepsy, carbamazepine was most likely to fail due to AEs, and lamotrigine and gabapentin were least likely to fail due to AEs. When administered to patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, topiramate was most frequently associated with AE-related discontinuation, followed by valproate; and while valproate was the most efficacious drug in this arm of the study, lamotrigine was more tolerable. What makes the SANAD study valuable and somewhat unique is its head-to-head comparison of one drug with another. Such

  19. Foetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure and Verbal versus Non-Verbal Abilities at Three Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled…

  20. Acute drug prescribing to children on chronic antiepilepsy therapy and the potential for adverse drug interactions in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Philipp H; Ekins-Daukes, Suzie; Simpson, Colin R; Milne, Robert M; Helms, Peter; McLay, James S

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the extent of acute coprescribing in primary care to children on chronic antiepileptic therapy, which could give rise to potentially harmful drug–drug interactions. Design Acute coprescribing to children on chronic antiepileptic drug therapy in primary care was assessed in 178 324 children aged 0–17 years for the year 1 November 1999 to 31 October 2000. Computerized prescribing data were retrieved from 161 representative general practices in Scotland. Setting One hundred and sixty-one general practices throughout Scotland. Results During the study year 723 (0.41%) children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy were identified. Fourteen antiepileptic agents were prescribed, with carbamazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine accounting for 80% of the total. During the year children on chronic antiepileptic therapy were prescribed 4895 acute coprescriptions for 269 different medicines. The average number of acute coprescriptions for non-epileptic drug therapy were eight, 11, six, and six for the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-olds, respectively. Of these acute coprescriptions 72 (1.5%) prescribed to 22 (3.0%) children were identified as a potential source of clinically serious interactions. The age-adjusted prevalence rates for potentially serious coprescribing were 86, 26, 22, and 33/1000 children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy in the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-old age groups, respectively. The drugs most commonly coprescribed which could give rise to such interactions were antacids, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, theophylline and the low-dose oral contraceptive. For 10 (45.5%0 of the 20 children identified at risk of a potentially clinically serious adverse drug interaction, the acute coprescription was prescribed off label because of age or specific contraindication/warning. Conclusions In primary care, 3.0% of children on chronic antiepileptic therapy are coprescribed therapeutic agents, which could

  1. Risk of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use in ambulatory elderly populations

    PubMed Central

    Maximos, Mira; Chang, Feng; Patel, Tejal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. About a third of those aged 65 years or older fall at least once each year, which can result in hospitalizations, hip fractures and nursing home admissions that incur high costs to individuals, families and society. The objective of this clinical review was to assess the risk of falls in ambulatory older adults who take antiepileptic drugs, medications that can increase fall risk and decrease bone density. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library electronic databases were searched from inception to July 2014. Case-control, quasi-experimental and observational design studies published in English that assessed quantifiable fall risk associated with antiepileptic drug use in ambulatory patient populations with a mean or median age of 65 years or older were eligible for inclusion. One author screened all titles and abstracts from the initial search. Two authors independently reviewed and abstracted data from full-text articles that met eligibility criteria. Results: Searches yielded 399 unique articles, of which 7 met inclusion criteria—4 prospective or longitudinal cohort studies, 1 cohort study with a nested case-control, 1 cross-sectional survey and 1 retrospective cross-sectional database analysis. Studies that calculated the relative risk of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use reported a range of 1.29 to 1.62. Studies that reported odds ratios of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use ranged from 1.75 to 6.2 for 1 fall or at least 1 fall and from 2.56 to 7.1 for more frequent falls. Discussion: Health care professionals should monitor older adults while they take antiepileptic drugs to balance the need for such pharmacotherapy against an increased risk of falling and injuries from falls.

  2. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on bone health: Need for monitoring, treatment, and prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ekta; Singh, Harmanjit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. In India, overall prevalence of epilepsy is reported to be 5.59/1000 population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) constitute the main-stay of treatment with a large number of AEDs available in the market. High incidence of adverse effects is a major limitation with AEDs. One of the major concerns is significant metabolic effects on the bone. However, little attention has been paid to this issue because most of the bone effects remain subclinical for a long time and may take years to manifest clinically. The main effects include hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, reduced serum levels of Vitamin D, increase in parathormone (PTH) levels, and alterations in bone turnover markers. The CYP450 enzyme-inducing AEDs such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone are the most common AEDs associated with bone disorders while the data regarding the effect of valproate and newer AEDs such as lamotrigine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, and topiramate on bone metabolism and bone density are scanty and controversial. Deficiency of Vitamin D is commonly described as a cause for the bone loss in epileptic patients while others being decreased absorption of calcium, increased PTH levels, and inhibition of calcitonin secretion, etc. However, there are no formal practical guidelines for the management of bone disease among those taking AEDs. Evidence-based strategies regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of bone diseases in patients on AED therapy are needed. PMID:27843822

  3. Influence of Ivabradine on the Anticonvulsant Action of Four Classical Antiepileptic Drugs Against Maximal Electroshock-Induced Seizures in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Katarzyna M; Wawryniuk, Agnieszka; Zwolak, Agnieszka; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Szpringer, Monika; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Drop, Bartlomiej; Zolkowska, Dorota; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2017-01-12

    Although the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission is still unclear, it is postulated that the HCN channels may be involved in seizure activity. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ivabradine (an HCN channel inhibitor) on the protective action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Tonic seizures (maximal electroconvulsions) were evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by an electric current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Acute adverse-effect profiles of the combinations of ivabradine with classical antiepileptic drugs were measured in mice along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. Results indicate that ivabradine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate and considerably reduced that of phenytoin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) had no impact on the anticonvulsant potency of carbamazepine and phenobarbital in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) significantly diminished total brain concentration of phenytoin and had no effect on total brain valproate concentration in mice. In conclusion, the enhanced anticonvulsant action of valproate by ivabradine in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model was pharmacodynamic in nature. A special attention is required when combining ivabradine with phenytoin due to a pharmacokinetic interaction and reduction of the anticonvulsant action of phenytoin in mice. The combinations of ivabradine with carbamazepine and phenobarbital were neutral from a preclinical viewpoint.

  4. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  5. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  6. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on associative LTP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Tonio; Krakow, Karsten; Ziemann, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively in clinical practice but relatively little is known on their specific effects at the systems level of human cortex. Here we tested, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in healthy subjects, the effects of a single therapeutic oral dose of seven AEDs with different modes of action (tiagabine, diazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam and piracetam) on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like motor cortical plasticity induced by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PAS). PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity was assessed from the increase in motor evoked potential amplitude in a hand muscle contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. Levetiracetam significantly reduced LTP-like plasticity when compared to the placebo condition. Tiagabine, diazepam, lamotrigine and piracetam resulted in nonsignificant trends towards reduction of LTP-like plasticity while gabapentin and topiramate had no effect. The particularly depressant effect of levetiracetam is probably explained by its unique mode of action through binding at the vesicle membrane protein SV2A. Enhancement of gamma-amino butyric acid-dependent cortical inhibition by tiagabine, diazepam and possibly levetiracetam, and blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels by lamotrigine, may also depress PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity but these mechanisms appear to be less relevant. Findings may inform about AED-related adverse effects on important LTP-dependent central nervous systems processes such as learning or memory formation. The particular depressant effect of levetiracetam on LTP-like plasticity may also relate to the unique properties of this drug to inhibit epileptogenesis, a potentially LTP-associated process.

  7. Inhibition of aminophylline-induced convulsions in mice by antiepileptic drugs and other agents.

    PubMed

    Czuczwar, S J; Janusz, W; Wamil, A; Kleinrok, Z

    1987-12-15

    Common antiepileptic drugs and agents affecting different neurotransmitter systems were studied against aminophylline (280 mg/kg i.p.)-induced convulsions in mice. All drugs and agents were administered i.p. Diazepam and phenobarbital antagonized the whole seizure pattern and the respective ED50 values for the clonic phase were 3.5 and 62 mg/kg. Valproate at 500 mg/kg protected fewer than 50% of mice against the clonic phase. The remaining antiepileptics (acetazolamide, up to 1,000 mg/kg; carbamazepine and diphenylhydantoin, up to 50 mg/kg; ethosuximide, 500 mg/kg and trimethadione, 400 mg/kg) were totally ineffective in this respect. Propranolol (up to 20 mg/kg), baclofen (20 mg/kg), gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (300 mg/kg), aminooxyacetic acid (20 mg/kg), clonidine (up to 0.2 mg/kg), ketamine (30 mg/kg), atropine (20 mg/kg), papaverine (50 mg/kg) and L-phenylisopropyladenosine (2 mg/kg) did not affect the clonic phase either. Only antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid excitation, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid afforded protection against aminophylline-induced clonic seizure activity. The results show that aminophylline convulsions are relatively resistant to antiepileptic drugs and suggest that antagonists of excitatory transmission are potential antiaminophylline drugs.

  8. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Espinosa, María-Lucila; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-09-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality.

  9. The Australian Register of antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy: changes over time in the epileptic population.

    PubMed

    Vajda, F J E; O'Brien, T J; Graham, J; Lander, C M; Eadie, M J

    2014-09-01

    The demographic characteristics, details of pregnancies, epilepsies, and treatment of 855 pregnant women with epilepsy enrolled in the Australian Antiepileptic Drugs in Pregnancy Register during 1999-2005 were compared with the corresponding data for the 801 women enrolled from 2006-2012. We estimate that the Register captures approximately 1 in 12 of all pregnancies in Australian women with epilepsy. A number of statistically significant changes were found, with nearly all explained by factors such as re-enrolment of women who had enrolled earlier pregnancies, changes in general population behaviour, altered attitudes to prescribing valproate and using it in lower doses, and the advent of newer antiepileptic drugs which have displaced the use of older agents. It appears that the Register has continued to capture a reasonably representative sample of pregnant Australian women with epilepsy as time has passed.

  10. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  11. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  12. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  13. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saruwatari, Junji; Ishitsu, Takateru; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed. PMID:27713373

  14. [Influence of co-administered antiepileptic drugs on nitrazepam tolerance in mice].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Nagai, T; Okada, S

    1998-11-01

    In the treatment of epilepsy, benzodiazepines are often administered in combination with other antiepileptic drug (s) because of the development of tolerance. In this study, the influence of concurrently administered antiepileptic drugs on tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of the nitrazepam (NZP) was studied using an animal tolerance model. Mice were given vehicle, NZP alone or NZP concurrently with one of six antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine CBZ, phenytoin PHT, zonisamide ZNS, vigabatrin VGB, lamotrigine LTG, or flunarizine FNR) twice daily for 5 days. Tolerance was assessed by the ability of NZP to prevent pentylenetetrazol-induced clonic convulsions. Tolerance developed in mice treated with NZP alone, NZP plus CBZ, PHT, ZNS, VGB or LTG. On the other hand, mice receiving NZP + FNR showed no tolerance; there was no significant difference in seizure frequency between the vehicle group and NZP + FNR group. These data suggest that co-administration of FNR but not CBZ, PHT, ZNS, VGB or LTG may delay if not prevent development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of benzodiazepines.

  15. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the fourth Eilat conference (EILAT IV).

    PubMed

    Bialer, M; Johannessen, S I; Kupferberg, H J; Levy, R H; Loiseau, P; Perucca, E

    1999-03-01

    The Fourth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) was held at the Royal Beach Hotel, Eilat, Israel, from 6th to 10th September 1998. Epileptologists and scientists from 20 countries attended the conference, which was held to discuss a number of issues in drug development, including outcome assessment in epilepsy (long-term efficacy, quality of life, safety), cost-effectiveness, an update on drugs in development, a progress report on recently marketed AEDs, and controversies in strategies for drug development. This review focuses on drugs in development and recently marketed AEDs. Drugs in development include ADCI, AWD 131-138, DP16, ganaxolone (CCD 1042), levetiracetam (ucb L059), losigamone, pregabalin (isobutyl GABA [CI-1008]), remacemide hydrochloride, retigabine (D-23129), rufinamide (CGP 33101), soretolide (D2916), TV1901, and 534U87. New information on the safety and efficacy of recently marketed drugs (felbamate, fosphenytoin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, zonisamide) and of a new antiepileptic device, the neurocybernetic prosthesis (NCP), has become available. This paper summarizes the presentations made at the conference.

  16. The role side effects play in the choice of antiepileptic therapy in brain tumor-related epilepsy: a comparative study on traditional antiepileptic drugs versus oxcarbazepine

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Vidiri, Antonello; Pace, Andrea; Fabi, Alessandra; Pompili, Alfredo; Carapella, Maria Carmine; Jandolo, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Background Seizure control doesn't represent the only challenging goal in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy. Side effects have often taken precedence for patients' quality of life. Methods We performed an observational retrospective study on patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy: 35 who had assumed oxcarbazepine monotherapy and 35 patients who had undergone treatment with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Primary variable of efficacy was the mean seizure frequency per month and safety variables were the drop-out for side effects and total incidence of side effects. We applied the Propensity Score technique to minimize selection bias. Results Our results showed a similar efficacy of oxcarbazepine and traditional antiepileptic drugs over time, but the difference in safety and tolerability between the two groups was significant: traditional AEDs caused more side effects, both serious and non serious. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of taking into consideration not only seizure control but also the appearance of side effects when choosing antiepileptic drugs in this patients population. PMID:19419544

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs and Dental Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the association between prenatal exposure to AEDs and the risk of dental agenesis and to differentiate between the possible effects of the different drugs used. Methods Data on 214 exposed and 255 unexposed children, aged 12–18 years, were extracted from the Prescription Database of the Central Denmark Region and North Denmark Region and the Danish Medical Birth Registry. The children's dental charts were examined for the presence of dental agenesis. Results Overall, children exposed to AED in utero had an increased risk of developing dental agenesis, but as a group, the difference was not significant (OR = 1.7; [95% CI: 0.8–3.6]). The risk of developing dental agenesis was three-fold increased (OR = 3.1; [95% CI: 1.3–7.4]) in children exposed to valproate in mono- or in poly-therapy with other AEDs than carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine. The risk was further increased (OR = 11.2; [95% CI: 2.4–51.9]) in children exposed to valproate and carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine in combination. Conclusions The present study shows that dental agenesis is a potential congenital abnormality that is related to prenatal exposure to valproate, and dental agenesis may be considered a sensitive marker for the teratogenicity of valproate. PMID:24416231

  18. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  19. Standardizing drug adverse event reporting data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Jiang, Guoqian; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Normalizing data in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), an FDA database, would improve the mining capacity of AERS for drug safety signal detection. In this study, we aim to normalize AERS and build a publicly available normalized Adverse drug events (ADE) data source.he drug information in AERS is normalized to RxNorm, a standard terminology source for medication. Drug class information is then obtained from the National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Adverse drug events (ADE) are aggregated through mapping with the PT (Preferred Term) and SOC (System Organ Class) codes of MedDRA. Our study yields an aggregated knowledge-enhanced AERS data mining set (AERS-DM). The AERS-DM could provide more perspectives to mine AERS database for drug safety signal detection and could be used by research community in the data mining field.

  20. Cancer risk in people with epilepsy: the role of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Sander, Josemir W

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relationship between epilepsy and cancer, in particular whether the incidence of cancer is increased in people with epilepsy and whether antiepileptic drugs promote or protect against cancer. We review available evidence from animal experiments, genotoxicity studies and clinico-epidemiological observations, and discuss proposed mechanisms underlying the association between epilepsy and cancer. A carcinoma-promoting effect has been seen unequivocally in rodent models for phenobarbital and phenytoin; phenobarbital promoted liver tumours and phenytoin caused lymphoid cell and liver tumours in rats. Early human epidemiological studies found an association between phenobarbital and hepatocellular carcinoma, and several subsequent studies suggested an association with lung cancer. An association with brain tumours has also been demonstrated. Phenytoin has been causally implicated in three human cancers: lymphoma, myeloma and neuroblastoma, the latter specifically in the setting of foetal hydantoin syndrome. However, despite considerable long-term pharmaco-epidemiological data being available for both antiepileptic drugs, evidence for human carcinogenicity is not consistent and both are considered only possibly carcinogenic to humans. Valproate, however, has been found to exert an antiproliferative effect on certain cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. A corresponding cancer-suppressive effect has not been studied in human epidemiological studies, though there are now preliminary reports of the use of valproate in human haematological and solid tumours. The anticancer activity of valproate appears to be driven by histone deacetylase inhibition and to be independent of hormone or multidrug protein resistance dependent mechanisms. The newer antiepileptic drugs appear to be safe, as no carcinogenicity has been demonstrated either during regulatory testing or in post-marketing surveillance. Nevertheless, the subject of

  1. Current understanding of the mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Michael A; Tofighy, Azita; White, H Steve; Matagne, Alain; Wolff, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The antiepileptic drug lacosamide [(R)-2-acetamido-N-benzyl-3-methoxypropanamide], a chiral functionalized amino acid, was originally identified by virtue of activity in the mouse and rat maximal electroshock (MES) test. Attention was drawn to lacosamide because of its high oral potency and stereoselectivity. Lacosamide is also active in the 6 Hz seizure model but inactive against clonic seizures in rodents induced by subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline and picrotoxin. It is also ineffective in genetic models of absence epilepsy. At doses greater than those required to confer protection in the MES test, lacosamide inhibits behavioral and electrographic seizures in hippocampal kindled rats. It also effectively terminates seizures in the rat perforant path stimulation status epilepticus model when administered early after the onset of seizures. Lacosamide does not exhibit antiepileptogenic effects in kindling or post-status epilepticus models. The profile of lacosamide in animal seizure and epilepsy models is similar to that of sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine. However, unlike these agents, lacosamide does not affect sustained repetitive firing (SRF) on a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds or affect fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels; however, it terminates SRF on a time scale of seconds by an apparent effect on sodium channel slow inactivation. Lacosamide shifts the slow inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials and enhances the maximal fraction of channels that are in the slow inactivated state. Currently, lacosamide is the only known antiepileptic drug in clinical practice that exerts its anticonvulsant activity predominantly by selectively enhancing slow sodium channel inactivation.

  2. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  3. Relationship of child IQ to parental IQ and education in children with fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J; Baker, Gus A; Browning, Nancy; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cohen, Morris J; Kalayjian, Laura A; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D; Pennell, Page B; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical trial designs need to control for genetic and environmental influences when examining cognitive outcomes in children for whom clinical considerations preclude randomization. However, the contributions of maternal and paternal IQ and education to pediatric cognitive outcomes are uncertain in disease populations. The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study in the United States and United Kingdom, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used antiepileptic drugs. Here, we examined the relationship of IQ and education in both parents to child IQ at age 3 years. IQ and education for both parents were statistically correlated to child IQ. However, paternal IQ and education were not significant after accounting for maternal IQ effects. Because maternal IQ and education are independently related to child cognitive outcome, both should be assessed in studies investigating the effects of fetal drug exposures or other environmental factors that could affect the child's cognitive outcome.

  4. Design of Adverse Drug Events-Scorecards.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Hackl, Werner; Băceanu, Adrian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Adverse Drug Event-Scorecards. The scorecards described are innovative and novel, not having previously been reported in the literature. The Scorecards provide organizations (e.g. hospitals) with summary information about Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) using a Web-based platform. The data used in the Scorecards are routinely updated and report on ADEs detected through data mining processes. The development of the ADE Scorecards is ongoing and they are currently undergoing clinical testing.

  5. The influence of established and new antiepileptic drugs on visual perception. II. A controlled study in patients with epilepsy under long-term antiepileptic medication.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, B J; Freudenthaler, N; Paulus, W

    1997-12-01

    In this study, we investigated visual performance under chronic antiepileptic drug treatment. Patients were under carbamazepine (CBZ) (n = 18), valproic acid (VPA) (n = 9), CBZ and vigabatrin (VGB) (n = 4), CBZ and gabapentin (GBP) (n = 8), and under CBZ and topiramate (TPR) (n = 6), respectively. Seven untreated patients with epilepsy and 42 healthy volunteers served as controls. The test battery comprised the Lanthony-D15-désaturé colour perception test, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia (TT) threshold measurements, visual perception threshold assessments for monochromatic and chromatic gratings and gaussian dots, and critical flicker fusion (CFF) tests. No differences were seen between naive patients and healthy controls. Patients under drug treatment always showed alterations of visual perception. Postadaptation and TT thresholds were altered under each drug regimen after short delays between switching off the adaptation light and switching on the blue test light. Threshold elevations were maximum under the combination of CBZ and TPR and lowest under CBZ and GBP. Consistent impairment of the CFF was seen under combined CBZ and TPR whereas VPA as well as combined CBZ and VGB led to ameliorations the mechanisms of which are discussed. The other tests were less sensitive. In conclusion, alterations of visual function were apparent under chronic antiepileptic drug treatment both with established and new agents. However, it may be difficult to distinguish between effects based on specific modes of action and nonspecific retino- and neurotoxicity.

  6. Effect of Antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels in childhood.

    PubMed

    Aynaci, F M; Orhan, F; Orem, A; Yildirmis, S; Gedik, Y

    2001-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may alter plasma lipid status in epileptic patients. We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on plasma levels of lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B in 22 epileptic children. The children were separated as group 1, seven children, mean age 1.6+/-0.2 years, treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day, twice daily; group 2, seven children, mean age 9.8+/-1.2 years, treated with carbamazepine, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily; and group 3, eight children, mean age 6.8+/-0.6 years, treated with valproate, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily. Plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels were studied before (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Friedman two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis, and the results were expressed as the mean and standard error of the mean. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low, compared with groups 2 and, 3 (P < .001). The mean pretreatment lipid levels between the groups were not significant. The increase in lipoprotein (a) at 3 and 6 months and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 6 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P < .025). We suggest a careful monitoring of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and other lipids in epileptic children treated with antiepileptic drugs.

  7. Epileptiform activity and cognitive deficits in SNAP-25(+/-) mice are normalized by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Irene; Donzelli, Andrea; Antonucci, Flavia; Welzl, Hans; Loos, Maarten; Martucci, Roberta; De Astis, Silvia; Pattini, Linda; Inverardi, Francesca; Wolfer, David; Caleo, Matteo; Bozzi, Yuri; Verderio, Claudia; Frassoni, Carolina; Braida, Daniela; Clerici, Mario; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Sala, Mariaelvina; Matteoli, Michela

    2014-02-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) is a protein that participates in the regulation of synaptic vesicle exocytosis through the formation of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor complex and modulates voltage-gated calcium channels activity. The Snap25 gene has been associated with schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and bipolar disorder, and lower levels of SNAP-25 have been described in patients with schizophrenia. We used SNAP-25 heterozygous (SNAP-25(+/-)) mice to investigate at which extent the reduction of the protein levels affects neuronal network function and mouse behavior. As interactions of genotype with the specific laboratory conditions may impact behavioral results, the study was performed through a multilaboratory study in which behavioral tests were replicated in at least 2 of 3 distinct European laboratories. Reductions of SNAP-25 levels were associated with a moderate hyperactivity, which disappeared in the adult animals, and with impaired associative learning and memory. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed the occurrence of frequent spikes, suggesting a diffuse network hyperexcitability. Consistently, SNAP-25(+/-) mice displayed higher susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures, paralleled by degeneration of hilar neurons. Notably, both EEG profile and cognitive defects were improved by antiepileptic drugs. These results indicate that reduction of SNAP-25 expression is associated to generation of epileptiform discharges and cognitive dysfunctions, which can be effectively treated by antiepileptic drugs.

  8. Sexual dysfunction in women with epilepsy: role of antiepileptic drugs and psychotropic medications.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mary A; Mushtaq, Romila; Stimmel, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a frequently encountered comorbid disorder in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Importantly, sexual dysfunction can also occur as a treatment emergent adverse effect of a number of commonly used psychotropic and antiepileptic medications, and can include decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, disordered arousal, delayed orgasm, and anorgasmia. These effects can occur in both men and women, and can be seen across age groups. Understanding the neurobiology of normal sexual response, as well as the pharmacologic mechanisms of these commonly used medications can enable the clinician to predict how medication use may impact different phases of sexual response. Discussion of the current treatment strategies for female sexual dysfunction is also elucidated in this chapter.

  9. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: Validation of a Brief Self-Report Measure of Antiepileptic-Drug-Related Neurotoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinsky, Martin C.; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86…

  10. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  11. Antiepileptic drug intervention decouples electroencephalogram (EEG) signals: a case study in Unverricht-Lundborg Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Chaovalitwongse, W; Pardalos, Panos M; Uthman, Basim M

    2008-01-01

    Change in severity of myoclonus as an outcome measure of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg Disease (ULD) has been estimated by utilizing the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale (UMRS). In this study, we measure treatment effects through EEG analysis using mutual information approach to quantify interdependence/coupling strength among different electrode sites. Mutual information is known to have the ability to capture linear and non-linear dependencies between EEG time series with superior performance over the traditional linear measures. One subject with ULD participated in this study and 1-hour EEG recordings were acquired before and after treatment of AED. Our results indicate that the mutual information is significantly lower after taking the add-on AED for four weeks at least. This finding could lead to a new insight for developing a new outcome measure for patient with ULD, when UMRS could potentially fail to detect a significant difference.

  12. Association of antiepileptic drugs, vitamin D, and calcium supplementation with bone fracture occurrence in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Patricio S; Perez, David L; Abner, Erin; Ryan, Melody

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether calcium and vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of bone fractures in adult epilepsy patients. Records were obtained on 7716 patients with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AED) from the Veteran Affairs Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. We performed a single center, retrospective cohort study to examine the proportion of fractures in 3303 patients on AED who took supplements compared to patients on AED not taking supplements. Patients prescribed long-term AEDs taking calcium and vitamin D were as likely to have fractures as those who did not take these supplements (11.7% vs. 9.9%, χ(2)=0.59, p=0.44). Phenytoin use was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of fractures OR=1.55 (1.10-2.24). Thus, in this group of patients with epilepsy on AED, bone fractures were not prevented in individuals taking calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

  13. Psychological factors and use of antiepileptic drugs: pilot work using an objective measure of adherence.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Steven; Feely, Morgan; Hay, Alastair; Wild, Heather; Cooper, Cathryn

    2007-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on the "concordance" prescribing model, a study was designed to determine the influence of patients' beliefs about epilepsy, beliefs about medication and a range of neuroepilepsy variables on drug adherence among a sample of epilepsy patients. A special feature of the study was the use of a credible objective measure of drug adherence. Psychological health was also assessed. Thirty-seven patients were recruited from a local epilepsy clinic. Beliefs about epilepsy (illness representations), beliefs about epilepsy medication, anxiety, depression, neuroepilepsy status and adherence were all measured. Data were collected via clinical interview and questionnaire methods. Adherence with drug treatment was determined by an objective measure using low-dose phenobarbital as an indicator of adherence and, or, measurement of antiepileptic drug levels. Neither illness representations nor beliefs about epilepsy drugs were related to adherence. With the exception of time since last seizure, which was positively related to adherence, neuroepilepsy variables were unrelated to adherence. A number of significant associations between cognitive representations of epilepsy and mood were found.

  14. Disorders of reproduction in patients with epilepsy: antiepileptic drug related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, Jouko

    2008-03-01

    Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and the reproductive system have complex interactions. Fertility is lower in both men and women with epilepsy than in the general population. Moreover, reproductive endocrine disorders are more common among patients with epilepsy than among the population in general. These disorders have been attributed both to epilepsy itself and to AEDs. The use of the liver enzyme inducing AEDs phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine increases serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women with epilepsy. Over time the increase in serum SHBG levels leads to diminished bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol, which may result in diminished potency in men and menstrual disorders in some women, and, thus, to reduced fertility. Valproate (VPA) medication may have effects on serum androgen concentrations and it reduces serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in men with epilepsy. However, the clinical significance of the VPA related reproductive endocrine changes in men is unknown. On the other hand, in women the use of VPA is associated with a frequent occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders characterized by polycystic changes in the ovaries, high serum testosterone concentrations (hyperandrogenism) and menstrual disorders. Young women with epilepsy seem to be especially vulnerable to the effects of VPA on serum androgen levels. The endocrine effects of the new AEDs have not been widely studied. However, it seems they may offer an alternative if reproductive endocrine problems emerge during treatment with the older antiepileptic drugs. On the other hand, it seems that in many cases the reproductive endocrine effects of the AEDs are reversible, if the medication is discontinued.

  15. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  16. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-09

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors.

  17. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP. PMID:26664367

  18. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP.

  19. [Adverse drug effects in the community pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Arnet, Isabelle; Seidling, Hanna M; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2015-12-01

    Community pharmacists represent an important pillar for the identification and the reporting of adverse drug effects (ADE}. Thanks to their broad view on the pharmacotherapy, over-the-counter medication included, they contribute greatly to the improvement of drug safety. In principle, the community pharmacy will face three groups of ADE which require specific attention. This article deals with these specific ADE groups and presents some illustrative examples from daily practice. Furthermore, we suggest some solutions to identify potential relevant interactions - including herbal-drug interactions - and give tips for daily practice, along with some often overseen cutaneous ADE.

  20. Absence of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-A*3101 alleles in 9 Korean patients with antiepileptic drug-induced skin rash: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Sun; Kang, Eun-Suk; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Seo, Dae-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2014-09-01

    There have been a number of studies about correlations between HLA genotypes in various ethnic groups and occurrence of various cutaneous adverse drug reactions, ranging in intensity from mild to severe, caused by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This is the first report analyzing the HLA genotypes of 9 Korean patients with skin rashes induced by various AEDs. The AEDs that induced skin rash were lamotrigine (n=3), carbamazepine (n=3), oxcarbazepine (n=1), phenobarbital (n=1), and phenytoin (n=1). None of the patients' HLA genotypes was either HLA-B*1502 or HLA-A*3101. Based on these series of cases, AED-induced skin rash can occur independently of HLA-B*1502 or HLA-A*3101 genotypes in the Korean patients.

  1. Neuropsychological effects of antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine versus valproate) in adult males with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Bateh, Abd El-aziz M; Hamed, Sherifa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Elsorogy, Yaser B

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on cognition and behavior in adult epileptic males controlled on treatment with conventional antiepileptic medications. Methods: Cognitive, mood, behavior and personality traits were assessed in 45 epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine and/or valproate and free of seizures for ≥1 year. Thirty-four newly diagnosed or untreated patients with epilepsy and 58 matched healthy subjects were also included for comparison. A battery of psychometric tests was utilized including Stanford-Binet (4th edition), Beck Inventory for Depression, Aggressive Scale and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results: Compared to matched control subjects, treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance in different cognitive and behavioral functions testing. Treated patients had worse scores in memory for digits forward and backward, total short-term memory, extroversion and psychosis. The duration of AEDs intake was correlated with memory of objects (r = −0.323; P = 0.030), bead memory (r = −0.314; P = 0.036) and total nonverbal short-term memory (r = −0.346; P = 0.020). Treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance of similar extent in behavioral functions testing (depression, aggression and neurosis). The dose of AEDs was correlated with testing scores for neurosis (r = 0.307; P = 0.040), verbal aggression (r = 0.483; P = 0.001) and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.526; P = 0.000), and duration of drug intake was correlated with scores for depression (r = 0.384; P = 0.009), psychosis (r = 0.586; P = 0.0001) and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.300; P = 0.045). Conclusions: This study provides support for the notion that AEDs can impair performance in cognition, mood and behavior. Duration of drug intake and the number of the utilized AEDs are the main confounding variables. This study did not provide clues on how to exclude the effect of epilepsy itself and psychosocial variables as

  2. Several major antiepileptic drugs are substrates for human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    One of the current hypotheses of pharmacoresistant epilepsy proposes that transport of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may play a significant role in pharmacoresistance in epilepsy by extruding AEDs from their intended site of action. However, several recent in vitro studies using cell lines that overexpress efflux transporters indicate that human Pgp may not transport AEDs to any relevant extent. In this respect it has to be considered that most AEDs are highly permeable, so that conventional bi-directional transport assays as used in these previous studies may fail to identify AEDs as Pgp substrates, particularly if these drugs are not high-affinity substrates for Pgp. In the present study, we used a modified transport assay that allows evaluating active transport independently of the passive permeability component. In this concentration equilibrium transport assay (CETA), the drug is initially added at identical concentration to both sides of a polarized, Pgp-overexpressing cell monolayer instead of applying the drug to either the apical or basolateral side for studying bi-directional transport. Direct comparison of the conventional bi-directional (concentration gradient) assay with the CETA, using MDR1-transfected LLC cells, demonstrated that CETA, but not the conventional assay, identified phenytoin and phenobarbital as substrates of human Pgp. Furthermore, directional transport was determined for lamotrigine and levetiracetam, but not carbamazepine. Transport of AEDs could be completely or partially (>50%) inhibited by the selective Pgp inhibitor, tariquidar. However, transport of phenobarbital and levetiracetam was also inhibited by MK571, which preferentially blocks transport by multidrug resistance transporters (MRPs), indicating that, in addition to Pgp, these AEDs are substrates of MRPs. The present study provides the first direct evidence that several AEDS are substrates of

  3. Selecting anti-epileptic drugs: a pediatric epileptologist’s view, a computer’s view

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, J; Matykiewicz, P; Holland-Bouley, K; Standridge, S; Spencer, M; Glauser, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify which clinical characteristics are important to include in clinical decision support systems developed for Antiepileptic Drug (AEDs) selection. Methods Twenty-three epileptologists from the Childhood Absence Epilepsy network completed a survey related to AED selection. Using cluster analysis their responses where classified into subject matter groups and weighted for importance. Results Five distinct subject matter groups were identified and their relative weighting for importance were determined: disease characteristics (weight 4.8 ± 0.049), drug toxicities (3.82 ± 0.098), medical history (3.12 ± 0.102), systemic characteristics (2.57 ± 0.048) and genetic characteristics (1.08 ± 0.046). Conclusion Research about prescribing patterns exists but research on how such data can be used to train advanced technology is novel. As machine learning algorithms becomes more and more prevalent in clinical decisions support systems, developing methods for determining which data should be part of those algorithms is equally important. PMID:22998126

  4. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes.

  5. An evaluation of factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gurumurthy, Ranjana; Chanda, Kulkarni; Sarma, GRK

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is important for controlling seizures in patients with epilepsy (PWE). It is vital to identify the factors influencing adherence to AED therapy using validated tools. This study aimed to evaluate the pattern and extent of AED adherence among PWE and to identify the factors that influence adherence. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving PWE who had a confirmed diagnosis. Treatment adherence was assessed using the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Univariate analysis with chi-square test was used to observe the association between different variables and AED adherence. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of adherence. RESULTS 451 PWE (mean age 27.3 ± 8.1 years) were enrolled in the study; 251 (55.7%) were male and 198 (43.9%) were from the lower socioeconomic class. 326 (72.3%) patients had high adherence to AED therapy, while 125 (27.7%) had low adherence. AED adherence was significantly associated with socioeconomic status (p = 0.043) and type of epilepsy (p = 0.033). However, no significant difference was observed between adherence and age, gender, marital status, epilepsy duration, number and type of AEDs, and occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Patients with focal epilepsy and those from the middle/lower-middle socioeconomic classes were less likely to be nonadherent. The primary reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness. CONCLUSION This study found that a majority of PWE have optimal rates of AED adherence and that forgetfulness is the primary reason for nonadherence among PWE. PMID:26805666

  6. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipids, lipoprotein (a), and liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Demir, Ercan; Orem, Asim; Yildirmis, Sermet; Orhan, Fazil; Aslan, Adnan; Topbas, Murat

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on serum lipid profiles and lipoprotein (a) in 64 children with epilepsy (aged between 1 and 15 years) admitted to the child neurology outpatient clinic between July 2000 and July 2002. The children were separated as group 1 (18 children), treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day; group 2 (22 children), treated with carbamazepine, 10 to 15 mg/kg/day; and group 3 (24 children), treated with sodium valproate, 20 mg/kg/day. Plasma lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and apolipoprotein B levels, and liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase were determined before the initiation of the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low compared with those in groups 2 and 3 (P <.05). The mean pretreatment lipid levels among the groups were not significantly increased. The mean lipoprotein (a) levels were significantly increased in all groups at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period (P <.05). The increase in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3, 6, and 12 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P <.05). The higher levels in lipoprotein (a) (mean > 30 mg/dL) were observed only in carbamazepine-treated patients at 6 and 12 months. The percentage of children with lipoprotein (a) levels over 30 mg/dL was 44%, 63%, and 33% in the phenobarbital-, carbamazepine-, and valproate-treated children, respectively. Antiepileptic drugs significantly increase the level of lipoprotein (a), which is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, and also have variable effects on other lipid parameters

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  8. Atherosclerotic effects of long-term old and new antiepileptic drugs monotherapy: a cross-sectional comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Farahaty, Reham M; El-Mitwalli, Ashraf; Azzam, Hanan; Wasel, Yasser; Elrakhawy, Mohamed M; Hasaneen, Bothina Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the metabolic and atherogenic effects of long-term antiepileptic drugs in a group of Egyptian epileptic patients. Sixty-nine epileptic patients on antiepileptic drug monotherapy for at least 2 years and 34 control subjects were recruited in this study. Patients were divided into 5 subgroups according to antiepileptic drugs used (valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate, and levetiracetam). Fasting lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were measured for all subjects. Significant higher mean values of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein / high-density lipoprotein ratio, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, significantly lower mean value of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significantly larger diameter of common carotid artery intima-media thickness were observed in each drug-treated group versus control group. Our study supports that long-term monotherapy treatment with valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and topiramate had altered markers of vascular risk that might enhance atherosclerosis, whereas levetiracetam exerted minimal effect.

  9. Idiosyncratic Adverse Drug Reactions: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Naisbitt, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for patients; they also markedly increase the uncertainty of drug development. The major targets are skin, liver, and bone marrow. Clinical characteristics suggest that IDRs are immune mediated, and there is substantive evidence that most, but not all, IDRs are caused by chemically reactive species. However, rigorous mechanistic studies are very difficult to perform, especially in the absence of valid animal models. Models to explain how drugs or reactive metabolites interact with the MHC/T-cell receptor complex include the hapten and P-I models, and most recently it was found that abacavir can interact reversibly with MHC to alter the endogenous peptides that are presented to T cells. The discovery of HLA molecules as important risk factors for some IDRs has also significantly contributed to our understanding of these adverse reactions, but it is not yet clear what fraction of IDRs have a strong HLA dependence. In addition, with the exception of abacavir, most patients who have the HLA that confers a higher IDR risk with a specific drug will not have an IDR when treated with that drug. Interindividual differences in T-cell receptors and other factors also presumably play a role in determining which patients will have an IDR. The immune response represents a delicate balance, and immune tolerance may be the dominant response to a drug that can cause IDRs. PMID:23476052

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness of four antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of status epilepticus according to four different efficacy criteria.

    PubMed

    Redecker, Juliane; Wittstock, Matthias; Benecke, Reiner; Rösche, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    The preliminary data presented here shall give an impression on how different criteria for the identification of an antiepileptic drug (AED) with a possible or certain treatment effect can have an influence on the results of retrospective case series. We present a data subset from a large retrospective study which, when completed, will cover all treatment episodes of status epilepticus (SE) at the neurological department of the Universitätsmedizin Rostock from January 2010 to June 2013. We compare and contrast the results of four different efficacy criteria for the effectiveness of phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA), levetiracetam (LEV), and lacosamide (LCM): criterion 1 = the last AED administered before SE termination; criterion 2 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy within 72 h before SE termination and without changes in the comedication; criterion 3 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy or increased in dose within 24h before SE termination without changes in the comedication; and criterion 4 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy within 72 h before SE termination, even allowing changes in the comedication. Thirty-seven treatment episodes in 32 patients (13 male and 19 female, mean age at first episode: 68 years, SD: 17) could be analyzed. In 31 episodes, at least one AED was given intravenously. Efficacy rates in the whole case series according to all four criteria were not significantly different between the four AEDs, but there was a considerable difference in the efficacy rates of each AED when evaluating them with the different efficacy criteria. Our data show that statistically significant results concerning the efficacy of different AEDs in different subtypes of SE may depend on the outcome criteria. Therefore, efficacy criteria for the effectiveness of AEDs in the treatment of SE should be standardized. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Status Epilepticus.

  11. Inhibition of the enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase in human platelets by vigabatrin, a potential antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, E; Kongola, G; Richens, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of the new antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl GABA), on the platelet enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) was investigated in volunteers and patients. Platelets GABA-T activity was assayed using a radioenzymic method. 2. Three single oral doses of vigabatrin (1 g, 2 g and 4 g) were given to six healthy male volunteers in an open randomised cross over study and compared with a baseline period preceding the three treatments. 3. Significant inhibition of the platelet GABA-T was produced by treatment with all three doses and a dose-response relationship was demonstrated. The minimum enzyme activities after 1 g, 2 g and 4 g doses were 43%, 30% and 21% respectively compared with the control values. 4. A significant depression of enzyme activity occurred at 30 min after drug administration and the values remained below control values for 72 h post-dose, outlasting the presence of the drug itself in the plasma. 5. Eight patients with chronic refractory epilepsy were treated with vigabatrin for 6 weeks. After taking the 2 g daily dose for 1 week there was a marked reduction in platelet enzyme activity in all subjects but the enzyme inhibition produced by the 3 g dose was not significantly different from that produced by the 2 g dose, even after 4 weeks treatment with the larger dose. The mean enzyme activity was approximately 30% throughout the active treatment period. One week after stopping vigabatrin, the enzyme levels were not significantly different from the baseline values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358887

  12. A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial to improve antiepileptic drug adherence in young children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Modi, Avani C; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Mann, Krista A; Rausch, Joseph R

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim was to examine the preliminary efficacy of a family tailored problem-solving intervention to improve antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence in families of children with new-onset epilepsy. Secondary aims were to assess changes in targeted mechanisms and treatment feasibility and acceptability. Fifty families (M(age) = 7.6 ± 3.0; 80% Caucasian; 42% idiopathic localization related) completed baseline questionnaires and were given an electronic monitor to observe daily AED adherence. If adherence was ≤ 95% in the first 7 months of the study, families were randomized (Supporting Treatment Adherence Regimens (STAR): n = 11; Treatment as Usual (TAU): n = 12). Twenty-one families were not randomized due to adherence being ≥95%. The STAR intervention included four face-to-face and two telephone problem-solving sessions over 8 weeks. Significant group differences in adherence were found during active intervention (weeks 4-6; TAU = -12.0 vs. STAR = 18.1, p < 0.01; and weeks session 6-8: TAU = -9.7 vs. STAR = 15.3, p < 0.05). Children who received the STAR intervention exhibited improved adherence compared to children in the TAU group during active treatment. Significant changes in epilepsy knowledge and management were noted for the STAR group. Families expressed benefitting from the STAR intervention. Future studies should include a larger sample size and booster intervention sessions to maintain treatment effects over time.

  13. Hyperammonaemia and hepatotoxicity during chronic valproate therapy: enhancement by combination with other antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaike, R N; Schapel, G J; Purdie, G; Rischbieth, R H; Hoffmann, S

    1986-01-01

    Erythrocyte (ENH3) and plasma (PNH3) ammonia levels, liver function tests and plasma valproate concentration were measured in 81 epileptic patients, comprising three therapeutic groups: Group 1 (23 patients) received sodium valproate (VPA) monotherapy, group 2 (33 patients) received sodium valproate combined with phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbitone and/or primidone and group 3 (25 patients) received one or more of these anti-epileptic drugs without sodium valproate. The mean ENH3 and PNH3 of patients in group 1 (41.1 +/- 30.7 mumol l-1 and 37.1 +/- 31.8 mumol l-1, respectively) and group 2 (44.5 +/- 21.3 and 37.6 +/- 21.4 mumol l-1, respectively) were significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than those in group 3 (28.7 +/- 10.6 and 21.5 +/- 7.8 mumol l-1, respectively) and the reference range (30.1 +/- 7.9 and 20.8 +/- 5.7 mumol l-1, respectively). Hyperammonaemia was more prevalent amongst patients in group 2, for both ENH3 (45.5%) and PNH3 (54.6%), than amongst patients in group 1 (30.4% and 52.2%, respectively) and group 3 (8% and 8%, respectively). There was a significant (P less than 0.05) positive correlation between plasma VPA and total bilirubin concentrations. Chronic VPA therapy was also associated with an increase in bilirubin concentrations measured on average four months apart. PMID:3091053

  14. Lacosamide neurotoxicity associated with concomitant use of sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs: a pharmacodynamic interaction?

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Patsalos, Philip N; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) apparently devoid of major pharmacokinetic interactions. Data from a small postmarketing assessment suggest people who had lacosamide co-prescribed with a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-blocking AED seemed more likely to discontinue lacosamide because of tolerability problems. Among 39 people with refractory epilepsy who developed neurotoxicity (diplopia, dizziness, drowsiness) on lacosamide treatment given in combination with VGSC-blocking AEDs, we identified 7 (17.9%) without any changes in serum levels of other AEDs in whom the symptoms were ameliorated by dose reduction of the concomitant VGSC-blocking AED. Symptoms in these people seem to have arisen from a pharmacodynamic interaction between lacosamide and other VGSC-blocking AEDs. Slow-inactivated VGSCs targeted by lacosamide might be more sensitive to the effects of conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs. Advising people to reduce concomitantly the conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs during lacosamide uptitration in cases of neurotoxicity might improve the tolerability of combination treatment.

  15. Homocysteine, folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin B-6 in patients receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Aiso, K; Johnston, K E; Black, L; Faught, E

    2000-06-01

    We hypothesized that elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations (hyperhomocysteinemia) exist in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AED), and a long-term administration of AED may result in an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease in these patients. A total of 62 patients who received AED monotherapy (phenytoin, lamotrigine, carbamazepine or valproate) participated in this study. Blood concentrations of homocysteine, folate, vitamin B-12 and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP, a coenzyme form of vitamin B-6) were measured, and thermolabile genotypes of 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) were also determined. Of 62 patients, only seven (11.4%) had hyperhomocysteinemia. Of 20 patients who received phenytoin, three (15.0%) had hyperhomocysteinemia, whereas 85% of these had plasma folate concentrations below the normal range. However, erythrocyte folate concentrations were abnormally low in only 25% of the patients who received phenytoin. Valproate administration increased serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Over 55% of the entire patients had PLP concentrations below the normal range, although the reason is unknown. Only three patients had the homozygous thermolabile genotype of MTHFR; therefore, meaningful statistical analysis was not possible in this study. However, one patient with homozygous genotype who received phenytoin therapy had hyperhomocysteinemia with poor folate nutritional status, and the other two had normal homocysteine concentrations with normal folate status. Our data suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia is not a serious clinical concern in epileptic patients when folate nutriture is adequate.

  16. Is breast-feeding of infants advisable for epileptic mothers taking antiepileptic drugs?

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Fang; Yoshida, Shuichi; Kaneko, Sunao

    2010-10-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common maternal complication affecting 0.3-0.5% of pregnant women. For most mothers with epilepsy, the use of antiepileptic drugs (AED) is unavoidable, even during pregnancy and lactation. Therefore, the fetus is indirectly exposed to AED via the placenta and breast milk. AED are also prescribed for female patients with other diseases, such as bipolar disorders. In clinical settings, physicians are frequently questioned whether or not women patients taking AED should breast-feed their offspring. Thus, it is necessary to establish an optimum AED regimen for women taking AED, in particular for those with epilepsy during pregnancy and lactation. In this article, we critically review the effects of AED on infants via breast milk and attempt to provide suggestions for clinicians regarding these effects during breast-feeding, based on the data of transplacental passage of AED, breast milk concentration/maternal serum concentration ratios, AED metabolism in infants and the effects of AED in breast milk on infants.

  17. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2015-03-01

    The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time.

  18. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on the postictal state. A critical overview.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2010-10-01

    Although postictal events contribute to seizure severity and thus affect quality of life, the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the postictal state is not well known. This review assesses the available evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effect of AEDs on postictal events. The instruments used in AED trials include postictal items of The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and Seizure Severity Scale (SSQ) and postictal recovery of electroencephalography (EEG) background activity. The effect of AEDs on postictal components of LSSS, if documented separately or at all, was either too small to be clinically significant (for lamotrigine) or not different from that of controls (topiramate, valproate). However, lacosamide showed improvement on the SSQ over placebo, and levetiracetam was associated with a speedier postictal recovery of EEG background activity compared with placebo. Although measuring the effect of AEDs on postictal state is of great clinical interest, the limited evidence found in this review suggests that further work is needed to evaluate current instruments used to assess AED-associated changes in postictal events.

  19. Understanding patients' perspective in the use of generic antiepileptic drugs: compelling lessons for physicians to improve physician/patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Liow, Kore

    2009-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a condition in which consistency of treatment is paramount to successful management and for most patients, effective seizure control can be achieved. Given the severe consequences of even a single breakthrough seizure, patients should be afforded every opportunity to succeed on their given regimens. Discussion Some experts argue that global policy on generic antiepileptic drug substitution in epilepsy should be limited – occurring at the discretion of and with careful monitoring by the physician. While the debate continues, physicians still have daily responsibilities to their patients to help them best manage their epilepsy within the context of the current environment – the reality of which may involve switching to a generic antiepileptic drug or navigating various formulations between generics. Summary To provide context, this paper first reviews the main "hot button" issues fueling the ongoing generic debate, including a broad overview of the current state of the literature. The main goal however is to provide physicians with a patient perspective on generic antiepileptic drug use in epilepsy as a source of clinically useful, everyday advice to improve communication and increase patient self-advocacy, both of which are necessary for optimal patient outcome. PMID:19292903

  20. [Jacksonian fits and threatened premature labour (the effect of valium, prepar and antiepileptic drugs on the fetus and uterine contractility ante and intra partum) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tempfer, H

    1975-12-12

    The case is reported of a 30-year-old patient whose fifth pregnancy (para 2, no living children) was complicated by the necessity of surgical removal of a stage II astrocytoma. Threatened premature labour was averted by the continuous administration of Prepar as from the 25th week of pregnancy and spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live-born infant was achieved in the 35th week. The development of repeated Jacksonian fits necessitated the administration of high doses of Valium (215 mg i.v. over a 50-nour period) both pre and intra partum, over and above the long-term antiepileptic maintenance therapy which the patient had received throughout the entire pregnancy. The fetal heart rate was not affected by Valium even at such high dosage. This case serves to illustrate that if the indication arises, high doses of Valium may be given before and during labour in conjunction with long-term antiepileptic drugs and Prepar apparently without adverse effects on the fetus or on uterine activity.

  1. Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs and use of primary healthcare during childhood: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Anne Mette; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Vestergaard, Mogens; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been associated with adverse outcomes in the offspring such as congenital malformations and neuropsychiatric disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate whether prenatal exposure to AEDs is also associated with more frequent use of primary healthcare during childhood. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Nationwide national registers in Denmark. Participants All live-born singletons in Denmark during 1997–2012 identified in the Danish National Patient Register and followed until 31 December 2013 (n=963 010). Information on prenatal exposure to AEDs for maternal indication of epilepsy and other neurological conditions was obtained from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the number and type of contacts with the general practitioner (GP), excluding routine well-child visits and vaccinations. The secondary outcome measure was specific services provided at the GP contact. The association between prenatal exposure to AEDs and contacts with the GP was estimated by using negative binomial regression adjusting for sex and date of birth of the child, maternal age, cohabitation status, income, education, substance abuse, depression, severe psychiatric disorders and use of antipsychotics, antidepressants and insulin. Results Children exposed prenatally to AEDs (n=4478) had 3% (95% CI 0 to 5%) more GP contacts during the study period than unexposed children. This was primarily accounted for by the number of phone contacts. Within each year of follow-up, exposed children tended to have more contacts than unexposed children, but the differences were small. We found no difference between exposed and unexposed children with regard to specific services provided at the GP contact. For the individual AEDs, we found that exposure to valproate or oxcarbazepine was associated with more GP contacts. Conclusions We found only minor

  2. A novel HPLC method for quantification of 10 antiepileptic drugs or metabolites in serum/plasma using a monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Heideloff, Courtney; Bunch, Dustin R; Wang, Sihe

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is important in maximizing the therapeutic response while minimizing the adverse effects. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the most commonly used technique for this purpose. Recently, commercial monolithic columns were introduced, which consist of a single rod of fused silica or polymer. The objective of this work was to develop a simple and fast method to quantify 10 commonly measured AEDs or metabolites [carbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, felbamate, lamotrigine, 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxy-carbamazepine (active metabolite of oxcarbazepine), pentobarbital, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, and zonisamide] in serum/plasma by HPLC using a reverse-phase monolithic column. Serum/heparin plasma (100 microL) was mixed with an internal standard solution (5-ethyl-5-p-tolylbarbituric acid in methanol, 250 microL). After centrifugation at 15,500 g for 10 minutes, 15 microL of supernatant was injected into a monolithic column. The analytes were eluted with an isocratic solution of 0.1 M, pH 6.5, phosphate buffer:methanol:acetonitrile (77:20:3), monitored at 210 nm. The chromatography time was 16 minutes. The method was linear from 0.4-4.9 to 21.2-190.9 microg/mL depending on the analytes with analytical recovery of 80%-114%. The inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variation were <8% in 3 levels of serum-based controls for all the analytes. No significant carryover was observed. Commercial controls containing >100 therapeutic drugs and common endogenous substances were tested and showed no interference. Comparison studies for 6 AEDs or metabolites were performed against commercial HPLC methods. Three AEDs were compared with Food and Drug Administration-approved immunoassays. All comparisons had R > 0.96 with slope ranging from 0.86 to 1.20. This is a simple and fast HPLC method suitable for measuring the 10 AEDs or metabolites. The use of the monolithic column resulted in increased

  3. Inverse Association between Sodium Channel-Blocking Antiepileptic Drug Use and Cancer: Data Mining of Spontaneous Reporting and Claims Databases

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Mai; Motomura, Haruka; Hosomi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are drug targets for the treatment of epilepsy. Recently, a decreased risk of cancer associated with sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has become a research focus of interest. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the use of sodium channel-blocking AEDs are inversely associated with cancer, using different methodologies, algorithms, and databases. Methods: A total of 65,146,507 drug-reaction pairs from the first quarter of 2004 through the end of 2013 were downloaded from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) and information component (IC) were used to detect an inverse association between AEDs and cancer. Upper limits of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of < 1 and < 0 for the ROR and IC, respectively, signified inverse associations. Furthermore, using a claims database, which contains 3 million insured persons, an event sequence symmetry analysis (ESSA) was performed to identify an inverse association between AEDs and cancer over the period of January 2005 to May 2014. The upper limit of the 95% CI of adjusted sequence ratio (ASR) < 1 signified an inverse association. Results: In the FAERS database analyses, significant inverse associations were found between sodium channel-blocking AEDs and individual cancers. In the claims database analyses, sodium channel-blocking AED use was inversely associated with diagnoses of colorectal cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, and hematological malignancies, with ASRs of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.60 - 0.86), 0.65 (0.51 - 0.81), 0.80 (0.65 - 0.98), and 0.50 (0.37 - 0.66), respectively. Positive associations between sodium channel-blocking AEDs and cancer were not found in the study. Conclusion: Multi-methodological approaches using different methodologies, algorithms, and databases suggest that sodium channel-blocking AED use is inversely associated with colorectal cancer, lung cancer, gastric

  4. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  5. Antiepileptic drug treatment of rolandic epilepsy and Panayiotopoulos syndrome: clinical practice survey and clinical trial feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, Louise C; Dunkley, Colin; Ferrie, Colin D; Pal, Deb K

    2015-01-01

    Background The evidence base for management of childhood epilepsy is poor, especially for the most common specific syndromes such as rolandic epilepsy (RE) and Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS). Considerable international variation in management and controversy about non-treatment indicate the need for high quality randomised controlled trials (RCT). The aim of this study is, therefore, to describe current UK practice and explore the feasibility of different RCT designs for RE and PS. Methods We conducted an online survey of 590 UK paediatricians who treat epilepsy. Thirty-two questions covered annual caseload, investigation and management practice, factors influencing treatment, antiepileptic drug preferences and hypothetical trial design preferences. Results 132 responded (22%): 81% were paediatricians and 95% at consultant seniority. We estimated, annually, 751 new RE cases and 233 PS cases. Electroencephalography (EEG) is requested at least half the time in approximately 70% of cases; MRI brain at least half the time in 40%–65% cases and neuropsychological evaluation in 7%–8%. Clinicians reported non-treatment in 40%: main reasons were low frequency of seizures and parent/child preferences. Carbamazepine is the preferred older, and levetiracetam the preferred newer, RCT arm. Approximately one-half considered active and placebo designs acceptable, choosing seizures as primary and cognitive/behavioural measures as secondary outcomes. Conclusions Management among respondents is broadly in line with national guidance, although with possible overuse of brain imaging and underuse of EEG and neuropsychological assessments. A large proportion of patients in the UK remains untreated, and clinicians seem amenable to a range of RCT designs, with carbamazepine and levetiracetam the preferred active drugs. PMID:25202134

  6. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  7. Discontinuing antiepileptic drugs in patients who are seizure free on monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Specchio, L; Tramacere, L; La Neve, A; Beghi, E

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the recurrence rate of epilepsy attributable to discontinuation of treatment in seizure free patients and to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Methods: 330 patients referred to an epilepsy centre who were seizure free for at least 2 years while on stable monotherapy were the study population. Discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) was proposed to all eligible patients or to their carers after discussion of the risks and benefits. Depending on whether they accepted or refused treatment withdrawal, the patients were stratified into two cohorts and followed up until seizure relapse or 31 March 1999, whichever came first. For each patient, records were taken of the main demographic and clinical variables. Results: The sample comprised 225 patients who entered the discontinuation programme and 105 who decided to continue treatment. Twenty nine patients (28%) continuing treatment had a relapse, compared with 113 (50%) of those entering the withdrawal programme. For patients continuing treatment, the probability of remission was 95% at 6 months, 91% at 12 months, 82% at 24 months, 80% at 36 months, and 68% at 60 months. The corresponding values for patients discontinuing treatment were 88%, 74%, 57%, 51%, and 48%. After adjusting for the principal prognostic factors, in patients discontinuing AEDs the risk of seizure relapse was 2.9 times that of patients continuing treatment. A relation was also found between relapse and duration of active disease, number of years of remission while on treatment, and abnormal psychiatric findings. Conclusions: Seizure free referral patients on stable monotherapy who elect to withdraw drug treatment are at higher risk of seizure relapse compared with patients continuing treatment. Severity of disease and seizure free period are significant prognostic factors. PMID:11784819

  8. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  9. The novel antiepileptic drug imepitoin compares favourably to other GABA-mimetic drugs in a seizure threshold model in mice and dogs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Katrin; Twele, Friederike; Potschka, Heidrun; Töllner, Kathrin

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the imidazolinone derivative imepitoin has been approved for treatment of canine epilepsy. Imepitoin acts as a low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BZD) site of the GABAA receptor and is the first compound with such mechanism that has been developed as an antiepileptic drug (AED). This mechanism offers several advantages compared to full agonists, including less severe adverse effects and a lack of tolerance and dependence liability, which has been demonstrated in rodents, dogs, and nonhuman primates. In clinical trials in epileptic dogs, imepitoin was shown to be an effective and safe AED. Recently, seizures in dogs have been proposed as a translational platform for human therapeutic trials on new epilepsy treatments. In the present study, we compared the anticonvulsant efficacy of imepitoin, phenobarbital and the high-affinity partial BZD agonist abecarnil in the timed i.v. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold test in dogs and, for comparison, in mice. Furthermore, adverse effects of treatments were compared in both species. All drugs dose-dependently increased the PTZ threshold in both species, but anticonvulsant efficacy was higher in dogs than mice. At the doses selected for this study, imepitoin was slightly less potent than phenobarbital in increasing seizure threshold, but markedly more tolerable in both species. Effective doses of imepitoin in the PTZ seizure model were in the same range as those suppressing spontaneous recurrent seizures in epileptic dogs. The study demonstrates that low-affinity partial agonists at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, such as imepitoin, offer advantages as a new category of AEDs.

  10. Disseminating findings from a drug class review: using best practices to inform prescription of antiepileptic drugs for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Cathy L; Ranney, Leah M; Carey, Timothy S; Evans, W Douglas; AED Dissemination Panel; Kreps, Gary; Linden, Thomas; Oldham, John

    2008-03-01

    Evidence from drug class reviews is often not accessible to practicing clinicians nor is it presented in a way that allows clinicians to use the information to guide treatment and prescribing decisions. Nevertheless, information from such reviews can be very helpful to clinicians as they evaluate the "evidence" provided to them through marketing strategies implemented, primarily, by the pharmaceutical industry and designed to influence their prescribing behavior. Unfortunately, these marketing strategies can be used to promote the off-label use of drugs that may not be efficacious. One example is the pharmaceutical marketing to promote off-label use of gabapentin (Neurontin) for the treatment of bipolar disorder, the legality of which was later addressed in a major lawsuit by the National Association of Attorneys General. We describe an effort to use counter-marketing strategies to compete with those implemented by the pharmaceutical industry and to help clinicians, principally psychiatrists, make use of available evidence to inform their prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the treatment of bipolar disorder. A growing body of literature describes industry marketing practices designed to influence prescriber behavior. This literature suggests that use of competing approaches involving the same underlying strategies to deliver highly credible information from trusted sources can inform prescriber knowledge and prescribing practice. We describe our use of existing evidence to develop accurate and convincing messages and materials to be disseminated nationally to counter industry misinformation and promote evidence-based prescription of AEDs.

  11. Use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation: Type of information provided by searching Google.

    PubMed

    Lavi-Blau, Tal; Ekstein, Dana; Neufeld, Miri Y; Eyal, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Surveys among women with epilepsy (WWE) show that they receive their essential pregnancy-related information from many sources, including the internet. Our aim was to assess the types of websites provided by searching Google for the use of four antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy and lactation. The search was performed on 40 computers used by health-care professionals, on 40 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals, and on 5 computers used by WWE in Israel and on 8 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals in the U.S. On each computer, a Google search was conducted for term combinations that included one AED name ("carbamazepine","valproic acid", "lamotrigine", "levetiracetam", or "Keppra") and "Pregnancy", "Lactation", or "Breastfeeding". The top three and top ten websites retrieved in every search were mapped (a total of 45 and 150 websites, respectively, from each computer). Across all searches in English, on both U.S. and Israeli computers, the majority of websites listed among the first three and first ten results were those of independent health portals. The representation of the Epilepsy Foundation website was 10% or less, and only a few results were obtained from the NIH's general public-oriented MedlinePlus. In Hebrew, results included almost exclusively Israeli or Hebrew-translated websites. As in English, results from public-oriented, professionally-written websites in Hebrew accounted for less than 50% of entries. Overall, the availability of readable and high-quality information on AEDs used by pregnant and breastfeeding women is limited. Guiding patients towards accurate web resources can help them navigate among the huge amount of available online information.

  12. Apgar-score in children prenatally exposed to antiepileptic drugs: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jakob; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Vestergaard, Mogens; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is unknown if prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of low Apgar score in offspring. Setting Population-based study using health registers in Denmark. Participants We identified all 677 021 singletons born in Denmark from 1997 to 2008 and linked the Apgar score from the Medical Birth Register with information on the women's prescriptions for AEDs during pregnancy from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. We used the Danish National Hospital Registry to identify mothers diagnosed with epilepsy before birth of the child. Results were adjusted for smoking and maternal age. Results Among 2906 children exposed to AEDs, 55 (1.9%) were born with an Apgar score ≤7 as compared with 8797 (1.3%) children among 674 115 pregnancies unexposed to AEDs (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.41 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.85). When analyses were restricted to the 2215 children born of mothers with epilepsy, the aRR of having a low Apgar score associated with AED exposure was 1.34 (95% CI 0.90 to 2.01) When assessing individual AEDs, we found increased, unadjusted RR for exposure to carbamazepine (RR=1.86 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.42)), valproic acid (RR=1.85 (95% CI 1.04 to 3.30)) and topiramate (RR=2.97 (95% CI 1.26 to 7.01)) when compared to unexposed children. Conclusions Prenatal exposure to AEDs was associated with increased risk of being born with a low Apgar score, but the absolute risk of a low Apgar score was <2%. Risk associated with individual AEDs indicate that the increased risk is not a class effect, but that there may be particularly high risks of a low Apgar score associated with certain AEDs. PMID:26359281

  13. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Irene; Collings, Shuk-Li; McCrea, Rachel L; Nazareth, Irwin; Osborn, David P; Cowen, Phil J; Sammon, Cormac J

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in pregnancy. Patients and methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment. Results In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6%) women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to threefold higher in women prescribed valproate. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that lamotrigine and carbamazepine are safer treatment options than valproate in pregnancy and should be considered as alternative treatment options for women of childbearing potential and in pregnancy. PMID:28243149

  14. Early pediatric antiepileptic drug nonadherence is related to lower long-term seizure freedom

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Joseph R.; Glauser, Tracy A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between previously identified nonadherence trajectories during the first 6 months of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy and long-term seizure-free rates (defined as ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone) in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Methods: A prospective longitudinal observational study of AED adherence and seizure freedom in a consecutive cohort of 124 children (ages 2–12 years) with newly diagnosed epilepsy was conducted. The association between previously identified AED adherence trajectories (i.e., near-perfect adherence [e.g., average adherence = 96.8%] vs nonadherent) and seizure freedom for ≥1 year at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone was determined. Results: Children who exhibited nonadherence to AED therapy in the first 6 months of treatment were 3.24 times more likely not to have achieved ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone compared to children in the near-perfect adherence group (χ2 = 5.13; p = 0.02). Specifically, at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone, only 12% of children in the near-perfect adherence group were continuing to experience seizures compared to 31% of children in the nonadherent group. Conclusions: Children with epilepsy who achieved near-perfect adherence during the first 6 months of therapy experienced a higher rate of seizure freedom 4 years postdiagnosis compared with those children who demonstrated early nonadherence. This suggests that adherence intervention early in the course of treatment could play a role in improving long-term seizure freedom rates in children with epilepsy. PMID:24463625

  15. Developmental Enamel Defects in Children Prenatally Exposed to Anti-Epileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Some anti-epileptic drugs (AED) have well-known teratogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to AED and the risk of enamel defects in the primary and permanent dentition. Methods A total of 38 exposed and 129 non-exposed children, 6–10 years of age, were recruited from the Aarhus Birth Cohort and the Department of Neurology, Viborg Regional Hospital, Denmark. Medication during pregnancy was confirmed by the Danish Prescription Database. All children had their teeth examined and outcomes in terms of enamel opacities and enamel hypoplasia were recorded. Results Children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (11% vs. 4%, odds ratio (OR) = 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9 to 15.4]), diffuse opacities (18% vs. 7%, OR = 3.0; [95% CI: 1.0 to 8.7, p<0.05]), and numerous (>3) white opacities (18% vs. 10%, OR = 2.2; [95% CI: 0.8 to 6.1]) in the primary dentition. In the permanent dentition, an increased risk of numerous (>3) white opacities (34% vs. 12%, OR = 3.3; [95% CI: 1.3 to 8.4]) was found. Conclusions The present study shows that children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased risk of developing numerous teeth with white opacities in their primary and permanent dentition. In addition, they also have an increased risk of developing diffuse opacities and enamel hypoplasia in their primary teeth. PMID:23520494

  16. Adverse immunologic effects of antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Fantus, I G

    1987-01-01

    Propylthiouracil and methimazole are frequently used in the management of hyperthyroidism. Two patients in whom adverse immunologic effects other than isolated agranulocytosis developed during treatment with propylthiouracil are described. A review of the literature revealed 53 similar cases over a 35-year period. Rash, fever, arthralgias and granulocytopenia were the most common manifestations. Vasculitis, particularly with cutaneous manifestations, occurs and may be fatal. The clinical evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism is involved. A number of different autoantibodies were reported, but antinuclear antibodies were infrequent, and none of the cases met the criteria for a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, the reactions do not represent a true drug-induced lupus syndrome. Current hypotheses and experimental data regarding the cause of the reactions are reviewed. No specific clinical subgroup at high risk can be identified, and manifestations may occur at any dosage and at any time during therapy. Cross-reactivity between the two antithyroid drugs can be expected. Except for minor symptoms (e.g., mild arthralgias or transient rash), such reactions are an indication for withdrawal of the drug and the use of alternative methods to control the hyperthyroidism. In rare cases of severe vasculitis a short course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy may be helpful. PMID:3539299

  17. Antiepileptic drugs in non-epilepsy disorders: relations between mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively to treat multiple non-epilepsy disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of AEDs in non-epilepsy disorders based on recently published preclinical and clinical studies, and attempts to relate this efficacy to the mechanism of action of AEDs and pathophysiological processes associated with the disorders. Some newer indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The disorders where AEDs have been demonstrated to be of clinical importance include neurological disorders, such as essential tremor, neuropathic pain and migraine, and psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Many of the AEDs have various targets of action in the synapse and have several proposed relevant mechanisms of action in epilepsy and in other disorders. Pathophysiological processes disturb neuronal excitability by modulating ion channels, receptors and intracellular signalling pathways, and these are targets for the pharmacological action of various AEDs. Attention is focused on the glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. In psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, AEDs such as valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine appear to have clear roles based on their effect on intracellular pathways. On the other hand, some AEDs, e.g. topiramate, have efficacy for nonpsychiatric disorders including migraine, possibly by enhancing GABAergic and reducing glutamatergic neurotransmission. AEDs that seem to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission, e.g. tiagabine, valproate, gabapentin and possibly levetiracetam, may have a role in treating neurological disorders such as essential tremor, or anxiety disorders. AEDs with effects on voltage-gated sodium or calcium channels may be advantageous in treating neuropathic pain, e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. Co

  18. [Medical and medico-social case management of drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Specific implementation of long-term antiepileptic treatment in the adult].

    PubMed

    Chassagnon, S

    2004-06-01

    Medical treatment of refractory localisation-related epilepsies in adults should always be considered with regard to surgical possibilities. When long-term therapy with antiepileptic drugs is necessary, the treatment tries to achieve maximal efficacy with the lowest unavoidable toxicity. Until an evidence-based choice can be made, the management is currently based on empirical knowledge. In this article, the available literature on effectiveness and monitoring of long term antiepileptic therapy is reviewed.

  19. Learning Lessons from Adverse Drug Reactions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Helen M.; Choonara, Imti

    2016-01-01

    Drug toxicity is, unfortunately, a significant problem in children both in the hospital and in the community. Drug toxicity in children is different to that seen in adults. At least one in 500 children will experience an adverse drug reaction each year. For children in hospital, the risk is far greater (one in ten). Additionally, different and sometimes unique adverse drug reactions are seen in the paediatric age groups. Some of the major cases of drug toxicity historically have occurred in neonates. It is important that we understand the mechanism of action of adverse drug reactions. Greater understanding alongside rational prescribing should hopefully reduce drug toxicity in children in the future. PMID:27417239

  20. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  1. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs. Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74–0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85–0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65–0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82–0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06–1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98–1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58–0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35–0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26–1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses. The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  2. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  3. Clinical applications of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Issa, Amalia M

    2008-03-01

    The problem of adverse drug reactions is a well-documented global public health problem. Recent withdrawals of several widely used prescription medications in the USA and other countries have raised concerns among patients, clinicians, scientists and policy makers. The increasing interest and concern regarding withdrawal of previously approved prescription medications and drug safety has prompted renewed research efforts aimed at improving surveillance of approved drugs and reducing adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenomics research is increasingly directed at developing genomic diagnostics and tests with predictive ability for adverse drug reactions. This paper focuses on the problem of adverse drug reactions and reviews the evidence and the state of the science for the application of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

  4. Mechanisms of adverse drug reactions to biologics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janet B

    2010-01-01

    Biologics encompass a broad range of therapeutics that include proteins and other products derived from living systems. Although the multiplicity of target organs often seen with new chemical entities is generally not seen with biologics, they can produce significant adverse reactions. Examples include IL-12 and an anti-CD28 antibody that resulted in patient deaths and/or long stays in intensive care units. Mechanisms of toxicities can be categorized as pharmacological or nonpharmacological, with most, excepting hypersensitivity reactions, associated with the interaction of the agent with its planned target. Unexpected toxicities generally arise as a result of previously unknown biology. Manufacturing quality is a significant issue relative to the toxicity of biologics. The development of recombinant technology represented the single biggest advance leading to humanized products with minimal or no contaminants in comparison to products purified from animal tissues. Nevertheless, the type of manufacturing process including choice of cell type, culture medium, and purification method can result in changes to the protein. For example, a change to the closure system for erythropoietin led to an increase in aplastic anemia as a result of changing the immunogenicity characteristics of the protein. Monoclonal antibodies represent a major class of successful biologics. Toxicities associated with these agents include those associated with the binding of the complementary determining region (CDR) with the target. First dose reactions or infusion reactions are generally thought to be mediated via the Fc region of the antibody activating cytokine release, and have been observed with several antibodies. Usually, these effects (flu-like symptoms, etc.) are transient with subsequent dosing. Although biologics can have nonpharmacologic toxicities, these are less common than with small molecule drugs.

  5. Predicting adverse drug events from personal health messages.

    PubMed

    Chee, Brant W; Berlin, Richard; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) remain a large problem in the United States, being the fourth leading cause of death, despite post market drug surveillance. Much post consumer drug surveillance relies on self-reported "spontaneous" patient data. Previous work has performed datamining over the FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and other spontaneous reporting systems to identify drug interactions and drugs correlated with high rates of serious adverse events. However, safety problems have resulted from the lack of post marketing surveillance information about drugs, with underreporting rates of up to 98% within such systems. We explore the use of online health forums as a source of data to identify drugs for further FDA scrutiny. In this work we aggregate individuals' opinions and review of drugs similar to crowd intelligence3. We use natural language processing to group drugs discussed in similar ways and are able to successfully identify drugs withdrawn from the market based on messages discussing them before their removal.

  6. Intrapatient variation in antiepileptic drug plasma concentration after generic substitution vs stable brand-name drug regimens.

    PubMed

    Contin, Manuela; Alberghini, Lucia; Candela, Carmina; Benini, Giulia; Riva, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is still a matter of controversy and concern among clinicians and patients. We aimed to assess intrasubject variation in plasma concentrations of lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV) and topiramate (TPM) after generic substitution compared with a stable brand-name drug regimen in a population of patients with epilepsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on prospectively collected and stored data from our therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database for the years 2009-2014. The main outcome variable was the proportion of patients who, after switching from branded to generic formulations, showed a greater than ±20% change in AED plasma concentrations compared to the proportion of control patients showing a change in AED plasma concentrations of the same extent while receiving stable branded formulations over repeated TDM tests. Fifty patients on LTG, 27 on LEV and 16 on TPM showing at least one TDM test while receiving generic products fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria for the analysis and were compared with 200 control patients for LTG, 120 for LEV and 80 for TPM. The proportion of patients showing an intrasubject change greater than ±20% in AED plasma concentrations was similar in the brand name vs generic group compared with the control one for LTG (22% vs 33%) and LEV (44% vs 38%), while it was higher in the control group for TPM (41% vs 6%, p<0.01). These are the first data in the literature about the within-patient variation in steady-state plasma concentrations of a series of stable treatments with brand-name AEDs in a real clinical setting. In conclusion, a significant interday variability in intrapatient LTG, LEV and TPM plasma concentrations can be observed even in patients stabilized with the same brand name product over time. This suggests that any change in plasma AED concentration and possible related clinical effects after generic substitution may be not necessarily related to the switch

  7. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    delinquent boys. Authors’ conclusions The authors consider that the body of evidence summarised in this review is insufficient to allow any firm conclusion to be drawn about the use of antiepileptic medication in the treatment of aggression and associated impulsivity. Four antiepileptics (valproate/ divalproex, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine and phenytoin) were effective, compared to placebo, in reducing aggression in at least one study, although for three drugs (valproate, carbamazepine and phenytoin) at least one other study showed no statistically significant difference between treatment and control conditions. Side effects were more commonly noted for the intervention group although adverse effects were not well reported. Absence of information does not necessarily mean that the treatment is safe, nor that the potential gains from the medication necessarily balance the risk of an adverse event occurring. Further research is needed. PMID:20166067

  8. Ziconotide: new drug. Limited analgesic efficacy, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) When oral morphine does not relieve severe pain and when there is no specific treatment for the underlying cause, the first option is to try subcutaneous or intravenous administration. If this standard treatment fails or is poorly tolerated, intrathecal injection is usually preferred as the direct route to the central nervous system. However, one-quarter to one-half of patients still do not achieve adequate pain relief, and adverse effects are relatively frequent; (2) Ziconotide is not an opiate and is not related to the usual classes of drugs that interfere with nervous transmission in the posterior horn of the spinal cord. Marketing authorization has been granted for "severe, chronic pain in patients who require intrathecal analgesia". The Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) recommends continuous infusion via an intrathecal catheter connected to a pump; (3) Clinical evaluation of ziconotide does not include any trials versus morphine in patients with nociceptive pain, or any trials versus tricyclic or antiepileptic drugs in patients with neurogenic pain; (4) In a trial in 220 patients in whom systemic morphine had failed, the mean pain score on a 100-mm visual analogue scale was 69.8 mm after three weeks on ziconotide, compared to 75.8 mm with placebo. This difference, although statistically significant, is clinically irrelevant. The proportion of "responders" (reduction of at least 30% in the initial pain score) was respectively 16.1% and 12.0% (no statistically significant difference); (5) The two other placebo-controlled trials included 112 patients with pain linked to cancer or HIV infection, and 257 patients with non-cancer pain. After a titration phase lasting 5 to 6 days, a combined analysis of the two trials showed that the mean pain score was 48.8 mm with ziconotide and 68.4 mm with placebo (statistically significant difference). However, many patients did not complete the titration phase. Efficacy also appeared to differ according to the type

  9. Markers of bone turnover in patients with epilepsy and their relationship to management of bone diseases induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies revealed that patients with epilepsy and on long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are at increased risk for metabolic bone diseases. Bone diseases were reported in about 50% of patients on AEDs. Low bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteomalacia, rickets, altered concentration of bone turnover markers and fractures were reported with phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine. The mechanisms for AEDs-induced bone diseases are heterogeneous and include hypovitaminosis D, hypocalcemia and direct acceleration of bone loss and/or reduction of bone formation. This article reviews the evidence, predictors and mechanisms of AEDs-induced bone abnormalities and its clinical implications. For patients on AEDs, regular monitoring of bone health is recommended. Prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D is recommended for all patients. Treatment doses of calcium and vitamin D and even anti-resorptive drug therapy are reserved for patients at high risk of pathological fracture.

  10. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Methods Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary’s teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010–2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton’s preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Results Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), and more likely to be type A reactions (73.5% vs. 18.8%, p < 0.001). Females were over-represented among drug-induced adverse reactions (68.1%, p < 0.001) but not among contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p < 0.001). Conclusions We found differences in sex, preventability, severity, and type A/B reactions between spontaneously reported drug and contrast media-induced adverse

  11. [Current movements of four serious adverse events induced by medicinal drugs based on spontaneous reports in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Chie; Azuma, Yu-ichiro; Maekawa, Keiko; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous reports on suspected serious adverse events caused by medicines from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety features. Although causal relationship between the medicine and the adverse event is not evaluated, and one incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current movements of drug-related serious adverse events, We searched open-source data of the spontaneous reports publicized by Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency for 4 serious adverse events (interstitial lung disease, rhabdomyolysis, anaphylaxis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) from 2004 to 2010 fiscal year (for 2010, from April 1 st to January 31th). Major drug-classes suspected to the adverse events were antineoplastics for interstitial lung disease, hyperlipidemia agents and psychotropics for rhabdomyolysis, antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antineoplastics and intracorporeal diagnostic agents for anaphylaxis (anaphylactic shock, anaphylactic reactions, anaphylactoid shock and anaphylactoid reactions), and antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antipyretics and analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, and antiepileptics for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. These results would help understanding of current situations of the 4 drug-related serious adverse events in Japan.

  12. Using Literature-Based Discovery to Explain Adverse Drug Effects.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Dimitar; Kastrin, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Burgun, Anita; Žiberna, Lovro; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    We report on our research in using literature-based discovery (LBD) to provide pharmacological and/or pharmacogenomic explanations for reported adverse drug effects. The goal of LBD is to generate novel and potentially useful hypotheses by analyzing the scientific literature and optionally some additional resources. Our assumption is that drugs have effects on some genes or proteins and that these genes or proteins are associated with the observed adverse effects. Therefore, by using LBD we try to find genes or proteins that link the drugs with the reported adverse effects. These genes or proteins can be used to provide insight into the processes causing the adverse effects. Initial results show that our method has the potential to assist in explaining reported adverse drug effects.

  13. Promoting adverse drug reaction reporting: comparison of different approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Vaz, Inês; Santos, Cristina Costa; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe different approaches to promote adverse drug reaction reporting among health care professionals, determining their cost-effectiveness. METHODS We analyzed and compared several approaches taken by the Northern Pharmacovigilance Centre (Portugal) to promote adverse drug reaction reporting. Approaches were compared regarding the number and relevance of adverse drug reaction reports obtained and costs involved. Costs by report were estimated by adding the initial costs and the running costs of each intervention. These costs were divided by the number of reports obtained with each intervention, to assess its cost-effectiveness. RESULTS All the approaches seem to have increased the number of adverse drug reaction reports. We noted the biggest increase with protocols (321 reports, costing 1.96 € each), followed by first educational approach (265 reports, 20.31 €/report) and by the hyperlink approach (136 reports, 15.59 €/report). Regarding the severity of adverse drug reactions, protocols were the most efficient approach, costing 2.29 €/report, followed by hyperlinks (30.28 €/report, having no running costs). Concerning unexpected adverse drug reactions, the best result was obtained with protocols (5.12 €/report), followed by first educational approach (38.79 €/report). CONCLUSIONS We recommend implementing protocols in other pharmacovigilance centers. They seem to be the most efficient intervention, allowing receiving adverse drug reactions reports at lower costs. The increase applied not only to the total number of reports, but also to the severity, unexpectedness and high degree of causality attributed to the adverse drug reactions. Still, hyperlinks have the advantage of not involving running costs, showing the second best performance in cost per adverse drug reactions report. PMID:27143614

  14. The Secondary Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) in Children and Their Implications on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Processes: A Best-Evidence Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Saranya

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a best-evidence synthesis method to investigate the secondary effects of various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and their implications on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) processes. Epilepsy is a common serious neurological disorder, a concomitant condition in individuals with severe developmental and intellectual…

  15. Pregnancy outcome in women exposed to antiepileptic drugs: teratogenic role of maternal epilepsy and its pharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Cassina, Matteo; Dilaghi, Arianna; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Cesari, Elena; De Santis, Marco; Mannaioni, Guido; Pistelli, Alessandra; Clementi, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    Infants born to epileptic women treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have an increased risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs). In order to determine the role of maternal epilepsy we conducted a prospective cohort study on three cohorts of pregnant women: (i) 385 epileptic women treated with AEDs, (ii) 310 non-epileptic women treated with AEDs, (iii) 867 healthy women not exposed to AEDs (control group). The rate of MCMs in the epileptic group (7.7%) was not statistically higher than in the non-epileptic one (3.9%) (p=0.068). The rate in the first group was higher compared to the control group (p=0.001), while the rate in the second one was not (p=0.534). Our data confirm that AEDs therapy is the main cause of the increased risk of malformations in the offspring of epileptic women; however a teratogenic role of the maternal epilepsy itself cannot be excluded.

  16. Predictive value of isolated epileptiform discharges for a favorable therapeutic response to antiepileptic drugs in nonepileptic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nash N; Kirollos, Sandra B; Pogarell, Oliver; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in treating behavioral symptoms in nonepileptic psychiatric patients with abnormal EEGs is currently unknown. Although isolated epileptiform discharges have been reported in many psychiatric conditions, they are most commonly observed in patients with aggression, panic, or autistic spectrum disorders. The literature search was guided by 3 criteria: (1) studies had patients who did not experience seizures, (2) patients had EEGs, and (3) an AED was administered. Most important finding is that the number of "controlled" studies was extremely small. Overall, most reports suggest that the use of an AED can be associated with clinical and, at times, improved EEG abnormalities. Additionally, six controlled studies were found for other psychiatric disorders, such as learning disabilities with similar results. Overall, the use of anticonvulsants to treat nonepileptic psychiatric patients needs further controlled studies to better define indications, adequate EEG work-up, best AED to be used, and optimal durations of treatment attempts.

  17. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides III; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress. PMID:24454986

  18. Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

  19. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-02

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed.

  20. Toxins and adverse drug reactions affecting the equine nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dominic R

    2011-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the more common toxins and adverse drug reactions, along with more rare toxins and reactions (Table 1), that result in neurologic dysfunction in horses. A wide variety of symptoms, treatments, and outcomes are seen with toxic neurologic disease in horses. An in-depth history and thorough physical examination are needed to determine if a toxin or adverse drug reaction is responsible for the clinical signs. Once a toxin or adverse drug reaction is identified, the specific antidote, if available, and supportive care should be administered promptly.

  1. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-02-24

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  2. Common Variants of KCNJ10 Are Associated with Susceptibility and Anti-Epileptic Drug Resistance in Chinese Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Yan, Kui Po; Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Chen, Zi Gui; Song, Tao; Luo, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Zhong-Yi; Bi, Chang-Long; Liu, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To explore genetic mechanism of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) is challenging because of their complex heritance pattern and genetic heterogeneity. KCNJ10 gene encodes Kir4.1 channels and plays a major role in modulating resting membrane potentials in excitable cells. It may cause GGEs if mutated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between KCNJ10 common variants and the susceptibility and drug resistance of GGEs in Chinese population. The allele-specific MALDI–TOF mass spectrometry method was used to assess 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNJ10 in 284 healthy controls and 483 Chinese GGEs patients including 279 anti-epileptic drug responsive patients and 204 drug resistant patients. We found the rs6690889 TC+TT genotypes were lower frequency in the GGEs group than that in the healthy controls (6.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.50[0.29–0.86]). The frequency of rs1053074 G allele was lower in the childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) group than that in the healthy controls (28.4% vs 36.2%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.70[0.53–0.93]). The frequency of rs12729701 G allele and AG+GG genotypes was lower in the CAE group than that in the healthy controls (21.2% vs 28.4%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.74[0.59–0.94] and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). The frequency of rs12402969 C allele and the CC+CT genotypes were higher in the GGEs drug responsive patients than that in the drug resistant patients (9.3% vs 5.6%, OR = 1.73[1.06–2.85], p = 0.026 and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). This study identifies potential SNPs of KCNJ10 gene that may contribute to seizure susceptibility and anti-epileptic drug resistance. PMID:25874548

  3. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on mRNA levels of BDNF and NT-3 and cell neogenesis in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu-Yu; Wang, Ji-Wen; Cui, Hong; Li, Bao-Min; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng

    2010-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that occurs more frequently in childhood than in adulthood. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in pregnant women, infants, and young children may cause cognitive impairment or other uncertain injury. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for adverse effects of AEDs in the developing brain are still not clear. In the present study, we investigate the effects of AEDs on mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cell neogenesis and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) in the developing rat brain. Long-term treatment with Phenobarbital (40mg/kg), valproate (100mg/kg) and topiramate (40mg/kg) reduces BDNF and NT-3 mRNA expression in the developing brain, while lamotrigine reduces mRNA expression only at high dose level (80mg/kg). Cell neogenesis only increases in the rats treated with valproate and lamotrigine. And no differences are observed between the control group and the AEDs-treated groups in the Timm scores of the CA3 region and supragranular region. Our findings present some possible mechanisms to explain why different AEDs cause different cognitive impairment.

  4. Cadec: A corpus of adverse drug event annotations.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Sarvnaz; Metke-Jimenez, Alejandro; Kemp, Madonna; Wang, Chen

    2015-06-01

    CSIRO Adverse Drug Event Corpus (Cadec) is a new rich annotated corpus of medical forum posts on patient-reported Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). The corpus is sourced from posts on social media, and contains text that is largely written in colloquial language and often deviates from formal English grammar and punctuation rules. Annotations contain mentions of concepts such as drugs, adverse effects, symptoms, and diseases linked to their corresponding concepts in controlled vocabularies, i.e., SNOMED Clinical Terms and MedDRA. The quality of the annotations is ensured by annotation guidelines, multi-stage annotations, measuring inter-annotator agreement, and final review of the annotations by a clinical terminologist. This corpus is useful for studies in the area of information extraction, or more generally text mining, from social media to detect possible adverse drug reactions from direct patient reports. The corpus is publicly available at https://data.csiro.au.(1).

  5. Association of SCN1A gene polymorphism with antiepileptic drug responsiveness in the population of Thrace, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Veletza, Stavroula; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Stathi, Chrysa; Piperidou, Charitomeni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to examine the influence of the SCN1A gene polymorphism IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A on the response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in monotherapy or polytherapy. Material and methods Two hundred epilepsy patients and 200 healthy subjects were genotyped for SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A polymorphism using TaqMan assay. Patients were divided into drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients. The drug-responsive group was further studied, comparing monotherapy in maximum and minimum doses and monotherapy-responsive and -resistant groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the allelic frequencies and genotype distributions between patients and controls (p = 0.178). The distribution of SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A genotypes was similar between drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients (p = 0.463). The differences in genotype distributions (A/A or A/G vs. G/G) between monotherapy-responsive and -resistant groups were statistically significant (p = 0.021). Within the monotherapy-responsive group, patients with the A/A or A/G genotype needed higher dose AEDs than patients with the G/G genotype (p = 0.032). The relative risk for generalized epilepsy due to A-containing genotypes was of marginal statistical significance when compared with the G/G genotype (p = 0.05). Conclusions Overall, our findings demonstrate an association of SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A polymorphism with AED responsiveness in monotherapy without evidence of an effect on drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:28144265

  6. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  7. A Survey of Adverse Drug Reactions in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 232 Canadian family physicians recorded suspected adverse drug reactions (SADRs) in their practices for five months. Patients' age and sex, the drug(s) implicated, type of reaction and any disability were recorded on a card and sent to a central coordinating office each week. The number of SADRs in clinical practice seems to be small. An estimated 300,000 patients were involved in the study, and a total of 314 suspected adverse drug reactions in 314 patients were reported. A proposal is made for a surveillance system for new drugs. Family physicians would monitor all patients taking a drug or group of drugs and matched controls. The status of patients and controls would be recorded regularly and any SADRs reported to a central coordinating centre. PMID:21283495

  8. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  9. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation. PMID:27102014

  10. Adverse drug reactions and their measurement in the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Day, R O; Quinn, D I; Conaghan, P G; Tett, S E

    1995-05-01

    Drugs administered as therapy for rheumatological disorders are a relatively common cause of adverse events. Important data regarding the effects of drugs on patients with rheumatological conditions is being lost or rendered inaccessible because of deficiencies in classification, measurement, and collection methods for adverse drug reactions. A significant number of adverse reactions to drugs will not be known before marketing, and hence vigilance on the part of clinicians and patients in observing and documenting these reactions is paramount in building our knowledge and modifying our practice accordingly. A variety of systems and methods for detecting adverse drug reactions are described, critically evaluated, and compared for cost, potential bias, ethical concerns, and subject recruitment required for necessary statistical power. Systems need to be developed to give access to the wealth of clinical experimental data available in the individual practices of a broad spectrum of clinicians. To facilitate this, representative organizations need to make adverse drug reactions a high priority as well as contributing expertise and finance to database formulation and accessibility.

  11. Current Research on Antiepileptic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Xi; Bian, Ming; Gong, Guo-Hua

    2015-11-20

    Epilepsy affects about 1% of the world's population. Due to the fact all antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have some undesirable side effects and about 30% of epileptic patients are not seizure-free with the existing AEDs, there is still an urgent need for the development of more effective and safer AEDs. Based on our research work on antiepileptic compounds and other references in recent years, this review covers the reported work on antiepileptic compounds which are classified according to their structures. This review summarized 244 significant anticonvulsant compounds which are classified by functional groups according to the animal model data, although there are some limitations in the data. This review highlights the properties of new compounds endowed with promising antiepileptic properties, which may be proven to be more effective and selective, and possibly free of unwanted side effects. The reviewed compounds represent an interesting possibility to overcome refractory seizures and to reduce the percentage of patients with a poor response to drug therapy.

  12. Influence of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grażyna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether ethacrynic acid (EA), a loop diuretic with anticonvulsant activity, would affect the protective action of the conventional antiepileptics (AEDs) carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. The effects of acute and chronic treatment with EA on these AEDs were examined. At a single dose of 100 mg/kg ip, EA enhanced the antielectroshock activity of VPA, decreasing its ED₅₀ value from 225.6 to 146.6 mg/kg (p < 0.05), but enhancement was not observed following continuous administration of EA (12.5 mg/kg) for seven days. Combined treatment of EA with other AEDs had no effect on their ED₅₀ values. The observed interaction between EA and VPA was pharmacodynamic in nature as EA did not alter free plasma (non-protein-bound) and total brain concentrations of VPA. Taking into consideration the clinical use of both drugs, this interaction between EA and VPA can be important for patients receiving these drugs.

  13. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    PubMed Central

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  14. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Lang, Sen-Yang; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED) to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproate (VPA), have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. Methods: This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), or levetiracetam (LEV), were identified and followed up from May 2007 to October 2014, and time to first seizure after treatment, 12-month remission rate, retention rate, reasons for treatment discontinuation, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: A total of 789 patients were enrolled. The median time of follow-up was 56.95 months. CBZ exhibited the best time to first seizure, with a median time to first seizure of 36.06 months (95% confidential interval: 30.64–44.07). CBZ exhibited the highest 12-month remission rate (85.55%), which was significantly higher than those of TPM (69.38%, P = 0.006), LTG (70.79%, P = 0.001), LEV (72.54%, P = 0.005), and VPA (73.33%, P = 0.002). CBZ, OXC, and LEV had the best retention rate, followed by LTG, TPM, and VPA. Overall, adverse effects occurred in 45.87% of patients, and the most common adverse effects were memory problems (8.09%), rashes (7.76%), abnormal hepatic function (6.24%), and drowsiness (6.24%). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that CBZ, OXC, and LEV are relatively effective in managing focal epilepsy as measured by time to first seizure

  15. The novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (ucb L059) appears to act via a specific binding site in CNS membranes.

    PubMed

    Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Matagne, A; Hénichart, J P; Wülfert, E

    1995-11-14

    Levetiracetam ((S)-alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidine acetamide, ucb L059) is a novel potential antiepileptic agent presently in clinical development with unknown mechanism of action. The finding that its anticonvulsant activity is highly stereoselective (Gower et al., 1992) led us to investigate the presence of specific binding sites for [3H]levetiracetam in rat central nervous system (CNS). Binding assays, performed on crude membranes, revealed the existence of a reversible, saturable and stereoselective specific binding site. Results obtained in hippocampal membranes suggest that [3H]levetiracetam labels a single class of binding sites (nH = 0.92 +/- 0.06) with modest affinity (Kd = 780 +/- 115 nM) and with a high binding capacity (Bmax = 9.1 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein). Similar Kd and Bmax values were obtained in other brain regions (cortex, cerebellum and striatum). ucb L060, the (R) enantiomer of levetiracetam, displayed about 1000 times less affinity for these sites. The binding of [3H]levetiracetam is confined to the synaptic plasma membranes in the central nervous system since no specific binding was observed in a range of peripheral tissues including heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, adrenals, lungs and liver. The commonly used antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, phenobarbital and clonazepam, as well as the convulsant agent t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), picrotoxin and bicuculline did not displace [3H]levetiracetam binding. However, ethosuximide (pKi = 3.5 +/- 0.1), pentobarbital (pKi = 3.8 +/- 0.1), pentylenetetrazole (pKi = 4.1 +/- 0.1) and bemegride (pKi = 5.0 +/- 0.1) competed with [3H]levetiracetam with pKi values comparable to active drug concentrations observed in vivo. Structurally related compounds, including piracetam and aniracetam, also displaced [3H]levetiracetam binding. (S) Stereoisomer homologues of levetiracetam demonstrated a rank order of affinity for [3H]levetiracetam binding in correlation with their

  16. Adverse drug reactions reported by consumers for nervous system medications in Europe 2007 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. In the European Union, more countries have allowed consumers to report ADRs directly to the regulatory agencies. The aim of this study was to characterize ADRs reported by European consumer for nervous system medications. Methods ADRs reported by consumers for nervous system medications (ATC group N) from 2007 to 2011 and located in the European ADR database, EudraVigilance, were analysed. Data were categorized with respect to age and sex, category and seriousness of reported ADRs and medications. The unit of analysis was one ADR. Results We located 4766 ADRs reported for nervous system medications, and one half of these were serious including 19 deaths. Less than 5% of ADRs were reported in children. Totally, 58% of ADRs were reported for women, 42% for men. The majority of reported ADRs were of the types “nervous system disorders” (18% of total ADRs) followed by “psychiatric disorders” (18% of total ADRs) and “general disorders” (15% of total ADRs) which also were the system organ classes in which the majority of serious ADRs were found. ADR reports encompassed medicines from the therapeutic groups: antiepileptics (ATC group N03) (36% of total ADRs), parasympathomimetics (ATC group N07) (22% of total ADRs) and antidepressants ATC group N06A (9% of total ADRs). Antiepileptics were the therapeutic group with the highest share of serious ADRs (60%) followed by antidepressants (15%). Many serious ADRs were reported for pregabalin and varenicline. Conclusions The majority of ADRs from nervous system mediations reported by consumers that were identified from the EudraVigilance database were serious. The value of consumer reports in pharmacovigilance still remains unclarified. PMID:23763896

  17. Critical review of current animal models of seizures and epilepsy used in the discovery and development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Animal models for seizures and epilepsy have played a fundamental role in advancing our understanding of basic mechanisms underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis and have been instrumental in the discovery and preclinical development of novel antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, there is growing concern that the efficacy of drug treatment of epilepsy has not substantially improved with the introduction of new AEDs, which, at least in part, may be due to the fact that the same simple screening models, i.e., the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and s.c. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure tests, have been used as gatekeepers in AED discovery for >6 decades. It has been argued that these old models may identify only drugs that share characteristics with existing drugs, and are unlikely to have an effect on refractory epilepsies. Indeed, accumulating evidence with several novel AEDs, including levetiracetan, has shown that the MES and PTZ models do not identify all potential AEDs but instead may fail to discover compounds that have great potential efficacy but work through mechanisms not tested by these models. Awareness of the limitations of acute seizure models comes at a critical crossroad. Clearly, preclinical strategies of AED discovery and development need a conceptual shift that is moving away from using models that identify therapies for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy to those that may be useful for identifying therapies that are more effective in the refractory population and that may ultimately lead to an effective cure in susceptible individuals by interfering with the processes underlying epilepsy. To realize this goal, the molecular mechanisms of the next generation of therapies must necessarily evolve to include targets that contribute to epileptogenesis and pharmacoresistance in relevant epilepsy models.

  18. Adverse drug events in hospital: pilot study with trigger tool

    PubMed Central

    Rozenfeld, Suely; Giordani, Fabiola; Coelho, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the frequency of and to characterize the adverse drug events at a terciary care hospital. METHODS A retrospective review was carried out of 128 medical records from a hospital in Rio de Janeiro in 2007, representing 2,092 patients. The instrument used was a list of triggers, such as antidotes, abnormal laboratory analysis results and sudden suspension of treatment, among others. A simple random sample of patients aged 15 and over was extracted. Oncologic and obstetric patients were excluded as were those hospitalized for less than 48 hours or in the emergency room. Social and demographic characteristics and those of the disease of patients who underwent adverse events were compared with those of patients who did not in order to test for differences between the groups. RESULTS Around 70.0% of the medical records assessed showed at least one trigger. Adverse drug events triggers had an overall positive predictive value of 14.4%. The incidence of adverse drug events was 26.6 per 100 patients and 15.6% patients suffered one or more event. The median length of stay for patients suffering an adverse drug event was 35.2 days as against 10.7 days for those who did not (p < 0.01). The pharmacological classes most commonly associated with an adverse drug event were related to the cardiovascular system, nervous system and alimentary tract and metabolism. The most common active substances associated with an adverse drug event were tramadol, dypirone, glibenclamide and furosemide. Over 80.0% of events provoked or contributed to temporary harm to the patient and required intervention and 6.0% may have contributed to the death of the patient. It was estimated that in the hospital, 131 events involving drowsiness or fainting 33 involving falls, and 33 episodes of hemorrhage related to adverse drug effects occur annually. CONCLUSIONS Almost one-sixth of in-patients (16,0%) suffered an adverse drug event. The instrument used may prove useful as a technique for

  19. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability.

  20. Postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions: problems and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Lortie, F M

    1986-01-01

    The surveillance of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is an unqualified must. However, the optimal means of surveillance is still unclear. Although anecdotal reports are the backbone of an ADR surveillance system, they are not enough. The pharmaceutical industry, academics and regulatory agencies need to expand their efforts in monitoring ADRs. The author discusses the various techniques for counting and evaluating adverse reactions and suggests ways in which the system could be improved. PMID:3719483

  1. [Reported adverse reactions of veterinary drugs and vaccines in 2005].

    PubMed

    Müntener, C R; Bruckner, L; Gassner, B; Demuth, D C; Althaus, F R; Zwahlen, R

    2007-02-01

    We received 105 reports of suspected adverse events (SARs) following the use of veterinary drugs for the year 2005. This corresponds to a 35% increase compared to 2004. Practicing veterinarians sent most of these declarations. 73% of these concerned drugs used on companion animals. Antiparasitic drugs approved for topical use were the most frequently represented group with 48%, followed by drugs used to treat gastrointestinal disorders (11%) and drugs used off-label (14%; other target species or other indication). For the first time 2 declarations concerning the application of permethrin containing spot-on preparations used by mistake on cats were received. An overview of 20 declarations about adverse reactions following application of different vaccines is also presented with emphasis on the problem of fibrosarcoma in cats. We are pleased by the growing interest shown by practicing veterinarians for the vigilance system and hope to further develop this collaboration in the future.

  2. Prevalence of Different Combinations of Antiepileptic Drugs and CNS Drugs in Elderly Home Care Service and Nursing Home Patients in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat different conditions in elderly patients and are among the drug classes most susceptible to be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDI). The aim of the study was to describe and compare use of AEDs between home care service and nursing home patients, as these patients are not included in nationwide databases of drug utilization. In the combined population, we investigate DDI of AEDs with other central nervous system- (CNS-) active drugs and DDIs involving AEDs in general. Materials and Methods. Point-prevalence study of Norwegian patients in home care services and nursing homes in 2009. At the patient level, we screened for different DDIs involving AEDs. Results. In total, 882 patients (7.8%) of 11,254 patients used AEDs and number of users did not differ between home care services and nursing homes (8.2% versus 7.7%). In the combined population, we identified 436 potential DDIs in 45% of the patients. Conclusions. In a large population of elderly, home care service and nursing home patients do not differ with respect to exposure of AEDs but use more AEDs as compared to the general population of similar age. The risk of DDIs with AEDs and other CNS-active drugs should be taken into consideration and individual clinical evaluations are assessed in this population. PMID:27525114

  3. Adverse drug reactions in neonates: could we be documenting more?

    PubMed

    Hawcutt, Daniel B; O'Connor, Olya; Turner, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Neonates are vulnerable to adverse drug reactions but reports of these events are relatively infrequent. Reporting can be increased by adapting a number of standard techniques to the unique features of neonatal care and pathology. However, clinicians and parents will be reluctant to report information about harms in the absence of mechanisms to ensure that reports affect clinical practice. Improved reporting will depend on education and cultural change that are informed by research about pharmacovigilance in neonatal settings. The efficient use of neonatal adverse drug reaction reports will require harmonization of terminology and interoperable databases.

  4. Does brain slices from pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice provide a more predictive screening model for antiepileptic drugs?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Suzanne L; Sterjev, Zoran; Werngreen, Marie; Simonsen, Bodil J; Knudsen, Katrine E; Nielsen, Ane H; Pedersen, Mikael E; Badolo, Lassiana; Kristiansen, Uffe; Vestergaard, Henrik T

    2012-05-05

    The cortical wedge is a commonly applied model for in vitro screening of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and has been extensively used in characterization of well-known AEDs. However, the predictive validity of this model as a screening model has been questioned as, e.g., carbamazepine has been reported to lack effect in this model. The neuroplastic changes induced in acute and chronic animal models of epilepsy are known to affect the pharmacological profile of AEDs in vivo. Hence, we investigated whether brain slices from pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled animals could provide a more predictive screening model for AEDs. To this end, we compared the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of several selected AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, tiagabine, fosphenytoin, valproate, and carbamazepine) along with citalopram using the PTZ-kindled model and brain slices from naïve, saline-injected and PTZ-kindled mice. Our data suggest that the use of slices from PTZ-kindled mice in the cortical wedge does not increase the predictive validity of the model as an in vitro screening model for AEDs. Traditionally, the incidence of certain seizure types is widely used as a measure to characterize drug action in animal models of epilepsy. In our study, the anticonvulsant effect of the AEDs was investigated in vivo using several observational parameters (i.e., incidence and duration of convulsions, latency to clonic convulsions, and severity of convulsions). We found that including the observational parameter "severity" offered important additional information about the drug profile that would otherwise be lost if only a single parameter as "incidence" was used.

  5. New Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drugs: α2δ, SV2A, and Kv7/KCNQ/M Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rogawski, Michael A.; Bazil, Carl W.

    2008-01-01

    Many currently prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) act via voltage-gated sodium channels, through effects on γ-aminobutyric acid–mediated inhibition, or via voltage-gated calcium channels. Some newer AEDs do not act via these traditional mechanisms. The molecular targets for several of these nontraditional AEDs have been defined using cellular electrophysiology and molecular approaches. Here, we describe three of these targets: α2δ, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels through which the gabapentinoids gabapentin and pregabalin exert their anticonvulsant and analgesic actions; SV2A, a ubiquitous synaptic vesicle glycoprotein that may prepare vesicles for fusion and serves as the target for levetiracetam and its analog brivaracetam (which is currently in late-stage clinical development); and Kv7/KCNQ/M potassium channels that mediate the M-current, which acts a brake on repetitive firing and burst generation and serves as the target for the investigational AEDs retigabine and ICA-105665. Functionally, all of the new targets modulate neurotransmitter output at synapses, focusing attention on presynaptic terminals as critical sites of action for AEDs. PMID:18590620

  6. Effects of levetiracetam, an antiepileptic drug, on memory impairments associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Devi, Latha; Ohno, Masuo

    2013-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that elevated hippocampal activation may be important for disrupting cognitive functions in aged subjects as well as patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, reducing deleterious overactivity of the hippocampus may have therapeutic benefits. This study was designed to compare the effects of levetiracetam, an antiepileptic drug, on memory deficits associated with normal aging and AD in mouse models. Pretraining administration of levetiracetam ameliorated memory impairments of aged C57BL/6 mice (17-20months of age) in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. Acute levetiracetam immediately after training was also efficacious in rescuing contextual memory decline in aged mice, whereas administration at a later posttraining interval (3h) had no effect. These results suggest that suppressing overexcitation with acute levetiracetam around the time of acquisition or early consolidation may be sufficient to reverse memory decline associated with aging. In contrast, pretraining administration of levetiracetam was not able to rescue memory deficits in 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring amyloid plaque pathologies at moderate (6-8months old) or massive (12-15months old) levels, differentiating between normal aging- and AD-related memory impairments in the responsiveness to acute levetiracetam treatment.

  7. Efficacy of Anti-Epileptic Drugs in the Treatment of Tumor and Its Associated Epilepsy: An in vitro Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Taranjeet; Manchanda, Shaffi; Saini, Vedangana; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S.; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-01-01

    The change in the therapeutic targets from neuron to glia has proved beneficial in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely prescribed for the treatment of partial and complete seizures, bipolar disorder among others. The current study was carried out to explore the efficacy of some conventional and novel AEDs for the treatment of tumor-associated epilepsy which develops in 29-49% of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors. We used C6 glioma cell line as model system to study the effect of selected AEDs, viz., gabapentin (GBP), valproic acid (VPA) and topiramate (TPM). Morphometry, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, expression of different protein markers, viz., GFAP, HSP70 and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were studied in AED-treated cultures. The study was further extended to rat hypothalamic primary explant cultures, and cell migration and expression of plasticity markers - neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialylation of NCAM (PSA-NCAM) - were studied in the explants. TPM was observed to show more pronounced increase in apoptosis of glioblastoma cells accompanied by significant downregulation in the expression of HSP70 and NFκB. TPM-treated explants also showed highest process ramification and cellular migration accompanied by intense expression of the plasticity markers as compared to those treated with GBP and VPA. Among the 3 AEDs tested, TPM was observed to show more promising effects on cytoprotection and plasticity of C6 glioma cells. PMID:27536020

  8. Stepwise optimization approach for improving LC-MS/MS analysis of zwitterionic antiepileptic drugs with implementation of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Nađa; Dotsikas, Yannis; Malenović, Anđelija; Jančić Stojanović, Biljana; Rakić, Tijana; Ivanović, Darko; Medenica, Mirjana

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a step-by-step optimization procedure for improving analyte response with implementation of experimental design is described. Zwitterionic antiepileptics, namely vigabatrin, pregabalin and gabapentin, were chosen as model compounds to undergo chloroformate-mediated derivatization followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Application of a planned stepwise optimization procedure allowed responses of analytes, expressed as areas and signal-to-noise ratios, to be improved, enabling achievement of lower limit of detection values. Results from the current study demonstrate that optimization of parameters such as scan time, geometry of ion source, sheath and auxiliary gas pressure, capillary temperature, collision pressure and mobile phase composition can have a positive impact on sensitivity of LC-MS/MS methods. Optimization of LC and MS parameters led to a total increment of 53.9%, 83.3% and 95.7% in areas of derivatized vigabatrin, pregabalin and gabapentin, respectively, while for signal-to-noise values, an improvement of 140.0%, 93.6% and 124.0% was achieved, compared to autotune settings. After defining the final optimal conditions, a time-segmented method was validated for the determination of mentioned drugs in plasma. The method proved to be accurate and precise with excellent linearity for the tested concentration range (40.0 ng ml(-1)-10.0 × 10(3)  ng ml(-1)).

  9. Intrinsic excitability measures track antiepileptic drug action and uncover increasing/decreasing excitability over the wake/sleep cycle

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Christian; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Freestone, Dean; Cook, Mark James; Achermann, Peter; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Pathological changes in excitability of cortical tissue commonly underlie the initiation and spread of seizure activity in patients suffering from epilepsy. Accordingly, monitoring excitability and controlling its degree using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is of prime importance for clinical care and treatment. To date, adequate measures of excitability and action of AEDs have been difficult to identify. Recent insights into ongoing cortical activity have identified global levels of phase synchronization as measures that characterize normal levels of excitability and quantify any deviation therefrom. Here, we explore the usefulness of these intrinsic measures to quantify cortical excitability in humans. First, we observe a correlation of such markers with stimulation-evoked responses suggesting them to be viable excitability measures based on ongoing activity. Second, we report a significant covariation with the level of AED load and a wake-dependent modulation. Our results indicate that excitability in epileptic networks is effectively reduced by AEDs and suggest the proposed markers as useful candidates to quantify excitability in routine clinical conditions overcoming the limitations of electrical or magnetic stimulation. The wake-dependent time course of these metrics suggests a homeostatic role of sleep, to rebalance cortical excitability. PMID:26554021

  10. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability.

  11. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  12. Adverse drug events: database construction and in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Wang, Xichuan; Zhou, Yadi; Wu, Zengrui; Shen, Jie; Tang, Yun

    2013-04-22

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are the harms associated with uses of given medications at normal dosages, which are crucial for a drug to be approved in clinical use or continue to stay on the market. Many ADEs are not identified in trials until the drug is approved for clinical use, which results in adverse morbidity and mortality. To date, millions of ADEs have been reported around the world. Methods to avoid or reduce ADEs are an important issue for drug discovery and development. Here, we reported a comprehensive database of adverse drug events (namely MetaADEDB), which included more than 520,000 drug-ADE associations among 3059 unique compounds (including 1330 drugs) and 13,200 ADE items by data integration and text mining. All compounds and ADEs were annotated with the most commonly used concepts defined in Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Meanwhile, a computational method, namely the phenotypic network inference model (PNIM), was developed for prediction of potential ADEs based on the database. The area under the receive operating characteristic curve (AUC) is more than 0.9 by 10-fold cross validation, while the AUC value was 0.912 for an external validation set extracted from the US-FDA Adverse Events Reporting System, which indicated that the prediction capability of the method was reliable. MetaADEDB is accessible free of charge at http://www.lmmd.org/online_services/metaadedb/. The database and the method provide us a useful tool to search for known side effects or predict potential side effects for a given drug or compound.

  13. Correlation of the "EMIT" antiepileptic drug assay with a gas liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M; Raisys, V A

    1976-02-01

    Many methodologies have been developed for determining anticonvulsant drug levels in human serum. Unfortunately, most procedures are either time consuming or subject to a variety of interferring substances. The "Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique" (EMIT) system has been evaluated for its speed, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. When compared with a gas-liquid chromatographic procedure, the EMIT assay appeared to yield results which were statistically comparable for the drugs diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbital, and primidone. The EMIT assay also demonstrated no significant interference when challenged with extraordinarily high levels of potentially cross reacting drugs. Results obtained with the EMIT assay correlated well with GLC data and rank it as an attractive alternative to many of the existing procedures now being used.

  14. Fully validated method for rapid and simultaneous measurement of six antiepileptic drugs in serum and plasma using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius

    2013-06-15

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be very useful in the clinical management of antiepileptic drug therapy for multiple reasons, such as individual variability, metabolism, genetic factors or drug-drug or drug-food interactions. In addition, TDM is helpful to study the variation in pharmacokinetics that occurs between individuals. Here, we describe a rapid assay using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry to measure the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, primidone, topiramate, and zonisamide. After the addition of internal standards (ISs) and protein precipitation of serum or plasma, 1 μl of sample was separated on a 2.1×50 mm reverse phase column (Waters, Acquity UPLC BEH Phenyl, 1.7 μm). Analytes were then ionized and detected by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring. Runtime was 2.5 min per injection. Matrix effects were investigated by systematical ion suppression and in-source fragmentation experiments. The calibration curves of the 6 antiepileptic drugs were linear over the working range between 0.05 and 50 mg/L (r>0.99). The limit of detection (LOD) was <0.05 mg/L, whereas the limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.10 mg/L of all drugs measured in the assay. The intraassay and interassay coefficients of variation for all compounds were <15% for very low concentration (0.1 mg/L) and <8% in the clinically relevant concentration range (>1.0 mg/L). Mean recoveries were between 87.8 and 98.6% for all drugs. There were no significant ion suppressions detected at the elution times of the analytes. The mean differences between serum and heparinized plasma values were less than 6% for the 6 antiepileptic drugs. All drugs were stable in serum at -20°C, 4°C, and even at RT for at least 1 month. In summary, a specific and sensitive stable isotope dilution UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for routine clinical monitoring of lacosamide

  15. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions: A Clinicoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Riyaz, Najeeba; Khader, Anza; Rajan, Uma; Binitha, Manikoth P; Sureshan, Deepthi N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Drug eruptions range from transient erythema to the life threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) that encompass Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms complex (DRESS). Aims and Objectives: To study the clinical and epidemiological aspects of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR). Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the institutional ethics committee. All patients admitted in the Dermatology ward of our tertiary care hospital with CADR (those who fit in the category of probable or possible drug reaction as per WHO casuality assessment) from first September 2011 to 31st August 2012 were included in this cross sectional study after obtaining written informed consent. The drug reaction patterns observed in the study population were determined and the common offending drugs were identified. Results: In the study, population of males outnumbered females and the majority were between 46 and 60 years of age. The commonest reaction pattern observed was SJS- TEN spectrum of illness and aromatic anticonvulsants were the common offending drugs. Prompt withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids with or without I/V Ig reverted the adverse reaction in all except one. Conclusion: Severe drug reactions predominated as the study population was comprised of inpatients of a tertiary referral centre. Though; previous authors had reported a mortality rate of up to 20% in DRESS, all our patients with this reaction pattern, responded well to treatment. The mortality rate among TEN cases was much lower than the previous reports. Early diagnosis, prompt withdrawal of the suspected drug, careful monitoring for development of complications and immediate intervention can improve the prognosis of CADR. PMID:25657416

  16. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed.

  17. Low plasma antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and the role of antiepileptic drugs on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Kumar, Rajendiran Vinoth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in various disorders including epilepsy. We studied the antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and aimed at determining whether there was any difference in the antioxidant levels between patients and controls, patients who are not on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and on treatment, between individual AEDs and patients on monotherapy and polytherapy. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant levels like catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin E, glutathione (GSH), thiol group (SH), uric acid, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were compared between 100 patients with epilepsy and equal number of controls. Twenty-five patients who were not on AEDs were compared with patients on AEDs and the control group. Patients were divided into monotherapy and polytherapy group and antioxidant status was compared between the two groups and between individual drugs. Results: Catalase, SH, vitamin E, and TAC were significantly low in patients with epilepsy than those in the control group (P < 0.001). GSH and uric acid did not show any difference; GPx in patients was significantly higher than those in the control group There were no differences in the antioxidant levels between the treated and the untreated groups; however, it was lower in untreated patients than controls (P < 0.001), suggesting that AEDs do not modify the oxidative stress. Patients on Valproate (VPA) showed higher catalase and GPx levels. Catalase was higher in the monotherapy than polytherapy group (P < 0.04). Conclusion: Our study found significantly low levels of antioxidant in patients as compared to controls. AED did not influence the antioxidant status suggesting that seizures induce oxidative stress. PMID:25506160

  18. Seizure Outcomes Following Use of Generic vs. Brand-Name Antiepileptic Drugs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kesselheim, Aaron S.; Stedman, Margaret R.; Bubrick, Ellen J.; Gagne, Joshua J.; Misono, Alexander S.; Lee, Joy L.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The automatic substitution of bioequivalent generic for brand-name antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been linked by anecdotal report to loss of seizure control. Objective To evaluate studies comparing brand-name and generic AEDs and determine whether evidence exists of superiority of the brand-name version in maintaining seizure control. Data Sources English-language human studies identified in searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1984 to August 2009). Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing seizure events or seizure-related outcomes between one brand-name AED and at least one alternate version produced by a distinct manufacturer. Data Extraction We identified 16 articles (9 RCTs, 1 prospective nonrandomized trial, 6 observational studies). We assessed characteristics of the studies and, for RCTs, extracted counts for patients whose seizures were characterized as “controlled” and “uncontrolled.” Data Synthesis Seven RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The aggregate odds ratio (n=204) was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.4), indicating no difference in the odds of uncontrolled seizure for patients on generic medications compared to patients on brand-name medications. In contrast, the observational studies identified trends in drug or health services utilization that the authors attributed to changes in seizure control. Conclusions Though most RCTs were short-term evaluations, the available evidence does not suggest an association between loss of seizure control and generic substitution of at least three types of AEDs. The observational study data may be explained by factors such as undue concern from patients or physicians about the effectiveness of generic AEDs after a recent switch. In the absence of better data, physicians may want to consider more intensive monitoring of high-risk patients taking AEDs when any switch occurs. PMID:20329806

  19. Brain tumors in eloquent areas: A European multicenter survey of intraoperative mapping techniques, intraoperative seizures occurrence, and antiepileptic drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Spena, Giannantonio; Schucht, Philippe; Seidel, Kathleen; Rutten, Geert-Jan; Freyschlag, Christian Franz; D'Agata, Federico; Costi, Emanule; Zappa, Francesca; Fontanella, Marco; Fontaine, Denys; Almairac, Fabien; Cavallo, Michele; De Bonis, Pasquale; Conesa, Gerardo; Foroglou, Nicholas; Gil-Robles, Santiago; Mandonnet, Emanuel; Martino, Juan; Picht, Thomas; Viegas, Catarina; Wager, Michel; Pallud, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative mapping and monitoring techniques for eloquent area tumors are routinely used world wide. Very few data are available regarding mapping and monitoring methods and preferences, intraoperative seizures occurrence and perioperative antiepileptic drug management. A questionnaire was sent to 20 European centers with experience in intraoperative mapping or neurophysiological monitoring for the treatment of eloquent area tumors. Fifteen centers returned the completed questionnaires. Data was available on 2098 patients. 863 patients (41.1%) were operated on through awake surgery and intraoperative mapping, while 1235 patients (58.8%) received asleep surgery and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring or mapping. There was great heterogeneity between centers with some totally AW oriented (up to 100%) and other almost totally ASL oriented (up to 92%) (31% SD). For awake surgery, 79.9% centers preferred an asleep-awake-asleep anesthesia protocol. Only 53.3% of the centers used ECoG or transcutaneous EEG. The incidence of intraoperative seizures varied significantly between centers, ranging from 2.5% to 54% (p < 0.001). It there appears to be a statistically significant link between the mastery of mapping technique and the risk of intraoperative seizures. Moreover, history of preoperative seizures can significantly increase the risk of intraoperative seizures (p < 0.001). Intraoperative seizures occurrence was similar in patients with or without perioperative drugs (12% vs. 12%, p = 0.2). This is the first European survey to assess intraoperative functional mapping and monitoring protocols and the management of peri- and intraoperative seizures. This data can help identify specific aspects that need to be investigated in prospective and controlled studies.

  20. [Photodegradation of chlorpromazine, a drug-related adverse event].

    PubMed

    Chabi, Yossounon; Brahim, Kheira; Da Costa, Maryline; Caffin, Anne-Gaëlle; Camus, Gisèle; Paillet, Michel; Bohand, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The photodegradation of an active substance during treatment is a rare drug-related adverse event which can sometimes have serious consequences. Health professionals must be aware of the specific storage and administration instructions with regard to chlorpromazine and ensure that they are respected.

  1. Risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Resende, Laíse Soares Oliveira; Santos-Neto, Edson Theodoro Dos

    2015-01-01

    This review sought to identify the available scientific evidence on risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. We performed a systematic review of studies published in the 1965-2012 period and indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. A total of 1,389 articles were initially selected. After reading their abstracts, we selected 85 studies. Of those 85 studies, 16 were included in the review. Risk factors for adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs included age > 60 years, treatment regimens, alcoholism, anemia, and HIV co-infection, as well as sodium, iron, and albumin deficiency. Protective factors against hepatic adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs included being male (combined OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20-0.72) and showing a rapid/intermediate N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype (combined OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18-0.90). There is evidence to support the need for management of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs at public health care facilities.

  2. Risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Laíse Soares Oliveira; dos Santos-Neto, Edson Theodoro

    2015-01-01

    This review sought to identify the available scientific evidence on risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. We performed a systematic review of studies published in the 1965-2012 period and indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. A total of 1,389 articles were initially selected. After reading their abstracts, we selected 85 studies. Of those 85 studies, 16 were included in the review. Risk factors for adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs included age > 60 years, treatment regimens, alcoholism, anemia, and HIV co-infection, as well as sodium, iron, and albumin deficiency. Protective factors against hepatic adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs included being male (combined OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20-0.72) and showing a rapid/intermediate N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype (combined OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18-0.90). There is evidence to support the need for management of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs at public health care facilities. PMID:25750677

  3. [Adverse drug reactions reporting is helping "non substituable" prescription!].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Julien; Bagheri, Haleh; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In August 2012, general practitioners of Haute- Garonne received a letter from Health insurance system, informing that prescriptions could be endorsed by "not substituable" after reporting an adverse drug reactions (ADR). Compared to an equivalent period before this letter, we observed an increase of ADRs reports for generics, mainly concerning gastrointestinal ADR and lack of efficacy.

  4. GLO1 inhibitors for neuropsychiatric and anti-epileptic drug development

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Katherine M. J.; Distler, Margaret G.; Sidhu, Preetpal S.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Palmer, Abraham A.; Plant, Leigh D.

    2014-01-01

    Many current pharmacological treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are limited by a delayed onset of therapeutic effect, adverse side effects, abuse potential or lack of effect in many patients. These off-target effects highlight the need to identify novel mechanisms and targets for treatment. Recently, modulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) activity was shown to regulate anxiety-like behavior and seizure susceptibility in mice. These effects are likely mediated through the regulation of methylglyoxal (MG) by GLO1, as MG acts as a competitive partial agonist at GABAA receptors (GABAARs). Thus, modulation of MG by GLO1 represents a novel target for treatment. Here, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of indirectly modulating MG concentrations through GLO1 inhibitors for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24646261

  5. An adverse drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Raman, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Drug interactions are known to play a significant role in the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) both in the community and in hospitals. Both the newer atypical antipsychotics and their more traditional counterparts are subject to drug - drug interactions amongst themselves, with other psychotropics, and with the agents used in the treatment of various physical ailments. The most common interactions encountered in clinical practice are pharmacodynamic in nature. It is well established that antipsychotic drugs reduce the efficacy of levodopa in parkinson's disease by blockade of dopamine receptors in the corpus striatum. The case reported here illustrates a common pharmacodynamic drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa in a 60-year-old female patient.

  6. A time-indexed reference standard of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Odgers, David; Gaskin, Greg; DuMouchel, William; Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier; Ripple, Anna; Szarfman, Ana; Sorbello, Alfred; Horvitz, Eric; White, Ryen W; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-11-11

    Undetected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) pose a major burden on the health system. Data mining methodologies designed to identify signals of novel ADRs are of deep importance for drug safety surveillance. The development and evaluation of these methodologies requires proper reference benchmarks. While progress has recently been made in developing such benchmarks, our understanding of the performance characteristics of the data mining methodologies is limited because existing benchmarks do not support prospective performance evaluations. We address this shortcoming by providing a reference standard to support prospective performance evaluations. The reference standard was systematically curated from drug labeling revisions, such as new warnings, which were issued and communicated by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. The reference standard includes 62 positive test cases and 75 negative controls, and covers 44 drugs and 38 events. We provide usage guidance and empirical support for the reference standard by applying it to analyze two data sources commonly mined for drug safety surveillance.

  7. Using Drug Similarities for Discovery of Possible Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Emir; Nováček, Vít; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new computational method for discovery of possible adverse drug reactions. The method consists of two key steps. First we use openly available resources to semi-automatically compile a consolidated data set describing drugs and their features (e.g., chemical structure, related targets, indications or known adverse reaction). The data set is represented as a graph, which allows for definition of graph-based similarity metrics. The metrics can then be used for propagating known adverse reactions between similar drugs, which leads to weighted (i.e., ranked) predictions of previously unknown links between drugs and their possible side effects. We implemented the proposed method in the form of a software prototype and evaluated our approach by discarding known drug-side effect links from our data and checking whether our prototype is able to re-discover them. As this is an evaluation methodology used by several recent state of the art approaches, we could compare our results with them. Our approach scored best in all widely used metrics like precision, recall or the ratio of relevant predictions present among the top ranked results. The improvement was as much as 125.79% over the next best approach. For instance, the F1 score was 0.5606 (66.35% better than the next best method). Most importantly, in 95.32% of cases, the top five results contain at least one, but typically three correctly predicted side effect (36.05% better than the second best approach). PMID:28269889

  8. Anti-Epileptic Drug Combination Efficacy in an In Vitro Seizure Model – Phenytoin and Valproate, Lamotrigine and Valproate

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Terence J.; Williams, David A.; French, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relative efficacy of different classes of commonly used anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) with different mechanisms of action, individually and in combination, to suppress epileptiform discharges in an in vitro model. Extracellular field potential were recorded in 450 μm thick transverse hippocampal slices prepared from juvenile Wistar rats, in which “epileptiform discharges” (ED’s) were produced with a high-K+ (8.5 mM) bicarbonate-buffered saline solution. Single and dual recordings in stratum pyramidale of CA1 and CA3 regions were performed with 3–5 MΩ glass microelectrodes. All drugs—lamotrigine (LTG), phenytoin (PHT) and valproate (VPA)—were applied to the slice by superfusion at a rate of 2 ml/min at 32°C. Effects upon frequency of ED’s were assessed for LTG, PHT and VPA applied at different concentrations, in isolation and in combination. We demonstrated that high-K+ induced ED frequency was reversibly reduced by LTG, PHT and VPA, at concentrations corresponding to human therapeutic blood plasma concentrations. With a protocol using several applications of drugs to the same slice, PHT and VPA in combination displayed additivity of effect with 50μM PHT and 350μM VPA reducing SLD frequency by 44% and 24% individually (n = 19), and together reducing SLD frequency by 66% (n = 19). 20μM LTG reduced SLD frequency by 32% and 350μM VPA by 16% (n = 18). However, in combination there was a supra-linear suppression of ED’s of 64% (n = 18). In another independent set of experiments, similar results of drug combination responses were also found. In conclusion, a combination of conventional AEDs with different mechanisms of action, PHT and VPA, displayed linear additivity of effect on epileptiform activity. More intriguingly, a combination of LTG and VPA considered particularly efficacious clinically showed a supra-additive suppression of ED’s. This approach may be useful as an in vitro platform for assessing drug

  9. A microdialysis study of the novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam: extracellular pharmacokinetics and effect on taurine in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X; Patsalos, P N

    2001-01-01

    Using a rat model which allows serial blood sampling and concurrent brain microdialysis sampling, we have investigated the temporal kinetic inter-relationship of levetiracetam in serum and brain extracellular fluid (frontal cortex and hippocampus) following systemic administration of levetiracetam, a new antiepileptic drug. Concurrent extracellular amino acid concentrations were also determined. After administration (40 or 80 mg kg−1), levetiracetam rapidly appeared in both serum (Tmax, 0.4 – 0.7 h) and extracellular fluid (Tmax, 2.0 – 2.5 h) and concentrations rose linearly and dose-dependently, suggesting that transport across the blood-brain barrier is rapid and not rate-limiting. The serum free fraction (free/total serum concentration ratio; mean±s.e.mean range 0.93 – 1.05) was independent of concentration and confirms that levetiracetam is not bound to blood proteins. The kinetic profiles for the hippocampus and frontal cortex were indistinguishable suggesting that levetiracetam distribution in the brain is not brain region specific. However, t1/2 values were significantly larger than those for serum (mean range, 3.0 – 3.3 h vs 2.1 – 2.3 h) and concentrations did not attain equilibrium with respect to serum. Levetiracetam (80 mg kg−1) was associated with a significant reduction in taurine in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Other amino acids were unaffected by levetiracetam. Levetiracetam readily and rapidly enters the brain without regional specificity. Its prolonged efflux from and slow equilibration within the brain may explain, in part, its long duration of action. The concurrent changes in taurine may contribute to its mechanism of action. PMID:11454660

  10. Effects of antiepileptic drug therapy on vitamin D status and biochemical markers of bone turnover in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nettekoven, Sina; Ströhle, Alexander; Trunz, Birgit; Wolters, Maike; Hoffmann, Susanne; Horn, Rüdiger; Steinert, Martin; Brabant, Georg; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Welkoborsky, Hans-Jürgen; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Hahn, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Reports of decreased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and altered bone metabolism associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment are inconsistent and predominantly restricted to adults. In this cross-sectional observational study, the aim was to evaluate the influence of AED treatment on vitamin D status and markers of bone turnover in children with epilepsy. In 38 children taking AEDs and 44 healthy control subjects, blood samples were collected to determine the levels of serum 25-OHD, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC) and C terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). More than 75% of the patients were vitamin D deficient (serum 25-OHD<20 ng/mL) and 21% of the patients had an insufficient vitamin D status (serum 25-OHD=20-30 ng/mL). In the patients, the serum levels of OC (p = 0.002) and BAP (p < 0.001) were significantly increased, but ICTP (p = 0.002) concentrations were significantly decreased compared with the control group. When patients where divided into two groups according to their medication (mono- or polytherapy), significantly lower 25-OHD (p = 0.038) and ICTP (p = 0.005) levels and elevated BAP (p = 0.023) concentrations were found in patients under polytherapy. An association between 25-OHD and the measured bone markers could not be determined. Our results indicate that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in epilepsy patients under AED treatment is high, especially under polytherapy, and alteration markers of bone formation and resorption suggests an accelerated skeletal turnover. The routine monitoring of serum 25-OHD and vitamin D supplementation on an individual basis should be considered.

  11. Antiepileptic Drug Use, Falls, Fractures, and BMD in Postmenopausal Women: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative (WHI)

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Laura D; Johnson, Karen C; Robbins, John; Larson, Joseph C; Curb, J David; Watson, Kathleen; Gass, Margery; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2010-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used increasingly in clinical practice to treat a number of conditions. However, the relationship between the use of these medications, particularly the newer AEDs, and fracture risk has not been well characterized. We used data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) to determine the relationship bewteen the use of AEDs and falls, fractures, and bone mineral density (BMD) over an average of 7.7 years of follow-up. We included 138,667 women (1,385 users of AEDs and 137,282 nonusers) aged 50 to 79 years in this longitudinal cohort analyses. After adjustment for covariates, use of AEDs was positively associated with total fractures [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30–1.61], all site-specific fractures including the hip (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.05–2.17), clinical vertebral fractures (HR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.20–2.12), lower arm or wrist fractures (HR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.11–1.76), and other clinical fractures (HR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.29–1.65) and two or more falls (HR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.50–1.74) but not with baseline BMD or changes in BMD (p ≥ .064 for all sites). Use of more than one and use of enzyme-inducing AEDs were significantly associated with total fractures (HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.15–2.09 and HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.09–1.69, respectively). We conclude that in clinical practice, postmenopausal women who use AEDs should be considered at increased risk for fracture, and attention to fall prevention may be particularly important in these women. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:19839772

  12. Antiepileptic drug selection for people with HIV/AIDS: evidence-based guidelines from the ILAE and AAN.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Simpson, David M; Fraimow, Henry; George, Jomy M; Okulicz, Jason F; Clifford, David B; Hachad, Houda; Levy, René H

    2012-01-01

    A joint panel of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) convened to develop guidelines for selection of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) among people with HIV/AIDS. The literature was systematically reviewed to assess the global burden of relevant comorbid entities, to determine the number of patients who potentially utilize AEDs and antiretroviral agents (ARVs), and to address AED-ARV interactions. Key findings from this literature search included the following: AED-ARV administration may be indicated in up to 55% of people taking ARVs. Patients receiving phenytoin may require a lopinavir/ritonavir dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged serum concentrations (Level C). Patients receiving valproic acid may require a zidovudine dosage reduction to maintain unchanged serum zidovudine concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of valproic acid and efavirenz may not require efavirenz dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients receiving ritonavir/atazanavir may require a lamotrigine dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged lamotrigine serum concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir/atazanavir and lamotrigine may not require lamotrigine dosage adjustment (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir and midazolam may not require midazolam dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients may be counseled that it is unclear whether dosage adjustment is necessary when other AEDs and ARVs are combined (Level U). It may be important to avoid enzyme-inducing AEDs in people on ARV regimens that include protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors because pharmacokinetic interactions may result in virologic failure, which has clinical implications for disease progression and development of ARV resistance. If such regimens are required for seizure control, patients may be monitored through pharmacokinetic assessments to ensure efficacy of the ARV regimen (Level C).

  13. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Thale, Zia I; Brodin, Birger; Hansen, Steen H; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an antiepileptic drug substance mainly used in pediatric treatment of infantile spasms. The main source of nutrition for infants is breast milk and/or infant formula. Our hypothesis was that infant formula may affect the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The aim was therefore to investigate the potential effect of coadministration of infant formula with vigabatrin on the oral absorption in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vigabatrin given with an infant formula on the oral uptake and transepithelial transport was investigated in vitro in Caco-2 cells. In vivo effects of infant formula and selected amino acids on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin was investigated after oral coadministration to male Sprague–Dawley rats using acetaminophen as a marker for gastric emptying. The presence of infant formula significantly reduced the uptake rate and permeability of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Oral coadministration of vigabatrin and infant formula significantly reduced Cmax and prolonged tmax of vigabatrin absorption. Ligands for the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, sarcosine, and proline/l-tryptophan had similar effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin. The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems reasonable that infant formula may also directly affect the intestinal absorption rate of vigabatrin possibly via PAT1. PMID:25505585

  14. The Influence of Solid Microneedles on the Transdermal Delivery of Selected Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Julia; Ita, Kevin B.; Morra, Matthew J.; Popova, Inna E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this project was to examine the effect of microneedle rollers on the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride and carbamazepine across porcine skin in vitro. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis was carried out using an Agilent 1200 Series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent G1969A TOF-MS system. Transdermal flux values of the drugs were determined from the steady-state portion of the cumulative amount versus time curves. Following twelve hours of microneedle roller application, there was a 6.74-fold increase in the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride (86.42 ± 25.66 µg/cm2/h) compared to passive delivery (12.83 ± 6.30 µg/cm2/h). For carbamazepine in 20% ethanol, passive transdermal flux of 7.85 ± 0.60 µg/cm2/h was observed compared to 10.85 ± 0.11 µg/cm2/h after microneedle treatment. Carbamazepine reconstituted in 30% ethanol resulted in only a 1.19-fold increase in drug permeation across porcine skin (36.73 ± 1.83 µg/cm2/h versus 30.74 ± 1.32 µg/cm2/h). Differences in flux values of untreated and microneedle-treated porcine skin using solid microneedles for the transdermal delivery of tiagabine were statistically significant. Although there were 1.38- and 1.19-fold increases in transdermal flux values of carbamazepine when applied as 20% and 30% ethanol solutions across microneedle-treated porcine skin, respectively, the increases were not statistically significant. PMID:27854292

  15. [Adverse Event Trends Associated with Over-the-counter Drugs: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Umetsu, Ryogo; Abe, Junko; Ueda, Natsumi; Kato, Yamato; Nakayama, Yoko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs play an important role in self-medication. To ensure patient safety, pharmacists should ask patients to pay attention to possible adverse events (AE) associated with OTC drugs and educate patients about the symptoms related to those AEs. The aims of the present study were as follows: (1) to assess the tendency of AEs to occur with OTC drug use in Japan; (2) to detect a safety signal for OTC drugs using the reporting odds ratio (ROR); and (3) to evaluate clustery features, which include suspected drugs and therapeutic classifications, and safety signal indices (number of reports and the ROR), using cluster analysis. The number of reports of AEs following use of combination cold remedy, antipyretic and analgesic remedy, and herbal medicine was 1007, 566, and 221, respectively. We set the cluster number at five; clustery features obtained were as follows: (1) high reporting rate for skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder AEs was the largest group related to combination cold remedy; (2) high reporting rate for nervous system disorder AEs including dizziness was the second largest group. The same medicinal ingredient may demonstrate similar tendencies of the occurrence of AEs and similar clustery features in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. Our analysis of AEs associated with OTC drugs may be useful for pharmacists and patients alike. Further studies are required to draw better-informed conclusions.

  16. Orally disintegrating tablet of novel salt of antiepileptic drug: formulation strategy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Khan, Mansoor A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of present research was to design and evaluate orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) of novel lamotrigine-cyclamate salt. Box-Behnken response surface methodology was selected to design the optimized formulation. The independent factors selected were tablet hardness (X1), disintegrant (X2) and lubricant (X3) levels, and responses chosen were disintegration time (DT, Y1), friability (Y2), T50 (Y3), and T90 (Y4). The tablets were also characterized for drug uniformity by near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and taste masking evaluation by electronic tongue. All the selected independent variables were statistically (p<0.05) effect the Y1 while Y2, Y3, and Y4 affected only by X2. The optimized ODT was found to meet the regulatory requirement of DT and friability specification. The NIR-CI images indicated uniform distribution of active and inactive ingredients within the tablets. The electronic tongue results were analyzed by principle component analysis (PCA). It indicated that novel salt of lamotrigine and its ODT formulation have a taste similar to cyclamic acid which is indicated by close proximity on PCA score plot, lower Euclidean distance, and high discrimination index values. Furthermore, these parameters were very close to ODT placebo formulation. On the other hand, lamotrigine, its ODT, and placebo formulation were far from each other. In summary, lamotrigine salt provides another avenue for pediatric friendly formulation for children and will enhance patience compliance.

  17. Improvement of physicochemical properties of an antiepileptic drug by salt engineering.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Zidan, Ahmed S; Samy, Raghu; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-09-01

    The focus of the present investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of using cyclamic salt of lamotrigine in order to improve its solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR). The salt was prepared by solution crystallization method and characterized chemically by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton ((1)H) and carbon ((13)C) nuclear magnetic resonance (liquid and solid, NMR) spectroscopy, physically by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), physicochemically for solubility, IDR, solution and solid-state stability, and polymorphism by solution recrystallization and slurry conversion studies. The FTIR, NMR, PXRD, DSC, and TGA spectra and thermograms indicated the salt formation. The salt formation increased lamotrigine solubility by 19-fold and IDR by 4.9-fold in water. The solution and solid-state stability were similar to parent molecule and were resistant to polymorphic transformation. In conclusion, cyclamic salt of lamotrigine provides another potential avenue for the pharmaceutical development of lamotrigine with improved physicochemical properties especially for pediatric population. It is also possible that appropriate dosage forms can be formulated with much lower drug amount and better safety profile than existing products.

  18. Adverse effects of thyroid hormone preparations and antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed

    Bartalena, L; Bogazzi, F; Martino, E

    1996-07-01

    Thyroid hormone preparations, especially thyroxine, are widely used either at replacement doses to correct hypothyroidism or at suppressive doses to abolish thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secretion in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy or with diffuse/ nodular nontoxic goitre. In order to suppress thyrotropin secretion, it is necessary to administer slightly supraphysiological doses of thyroxine. Possible adverse effects of this therapy include cardiovascular changes (shortening of systolic time intervals, increased frequency of atrial premature beats and, possibly, left ventricular hypertrophy) and bone changes (reduced bone density and bone mass), but the risk of these adverse effects can be minimised by carefully monitoring serum free thyroxine and free liothyronine (triiodothyronine) measurements and adjusting the dosage accordingly. Thionamides [thiamazole (methimazole), carbimazole, propylthiouracil] are the most widely used antithyroid drugs. They are given for long periods of time and cause adverse effects in 3 to 5% of patients. In most cases, adverse effects are minor and transient (e.g. skin rash, itching, mild leucopenia). The most dangerous effect is agranulocytosis, which occurs in 0.1 to 0.5% of patients. This life-threatening condition can now be effectively treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. Other major adverse effects (aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, vasculitis) are exceedingly rare.

  19. Patient knowledge on reporting adverse drug reactions in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Staniszewska, Anna; Dąbrowska-Bender, Marta; Olejniczak, Dominik; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to assess patient knowledge on reporting of adverse drug reactions. Materials and methods A prospective study was conducted among 200 patients. The study was based on an original survey composed of 15 single- and multiple-choice questions. The study involved individuals who have experienced adverse reactions as well as individuals who have never experienced any adverse reactions; people over the age of 18; literate; residing in Mazowieckie Voivodeship, who have not been diagnosed with any disease that could compromise their logical thinking skills. Results The respondents who lived in the city had a greater knowledge compared to the respondents who lived in the countryside (Pearson’s χ2=47.70, P=0.0013). The respondents who lived in the city were also more statistically likely to provide a correct answer to the question about the type of adverse reactions to be reported (Pearson’s χ2=50.66, P=0.012). Statistically significant associations were found between the place of residence of the respondents and the correct answer to the question about the data that must be included in the report on adverse reactions (Pearson’s χ2=11.7, P<0.0001). PMID:28096661

  20. Points of view on adverse drug reactions terminology.

    PubMed

    Benichou, C; Castle, W

    1998-01-01

    Global management of drug safety data is the best way to make the detection and validation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) earlier. Centralization needs a previous standardization, of which terminology is a crucial component. ADR terminology must be designed so as to enable users to know exactly what is covered by each term regarding the nature of the reaction and its significance for public health. A worldwide standardized terminology for all drug reporting purposes is currently being developed by the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. However, practical definitions of medical terms will be necessary and could be developed by specialists on drug safety in collaboration with specialists of different system organs, as has already been achieved for some of them.

  1. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  2. ACEA (a highly selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in mice treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andres-Mach, Marta; Haratym-Maj, Agnieszka; Zagaja, Miroslaw; Rola, Radoslaw; Maj, Maciej; Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2015-10-22

    Hippocampal neurogenesis plays a very important role in learning and memory functions. In a search for best neurological drugs that protect neuronal cells and stimulate neurogenesis with no side effects, cannabinoids proved to be a strong group of substances having many beneficial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ACEA (arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide--a highly selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) combined with a classical antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (VPA) on neural precursor cells' proliferation and differentiation in the mouse brain. All experiments were performed on adolescent CB57/BL male mice injected i.p. with VPA (10mg/kg), ACEA (10mg/kg) and PMSF (30 mg/kg) (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride--a substance protecting ACEA against degradation by the fatty-acid amidohydrolase) for 10 days. Next an acute response of proliferating neural precursor cells to ACEA and VPA administration was evaluated with Ki-67 staining (Time point 1). Next, in order to determine whether acute changes translated into long-term alterations in neurogenesis, proliferating cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2deoxyuridine (BrdU) followed by confocal microscopy used to determine the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that showed mature cell phenotypes (Time point 2). Results indicate that ACEA with PMSF significantly increase the total number of Ki-67-positive cells when compared to the control group. Moreover, ACEA in combination with VPA increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells, whereas VPA administered alone had no impact on proliferating cells' population. Accordingly, neurogenesis study results indicate that the combination of ACEA+PMSF administered alone and in combination with VPA considerably increases the total number of BrdU-positive cells in comparison to the control group while ACEA+PMSF alone and in combination with VPA increased total numbers of BrdU-positive cells, newly born neurons and astrocytes as compared to VPA group but not to

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of adjunctive brivaracetam in patients with prior antiepileptic drug exposure: A post-hoc study.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael R; Chung, Steve; Klein, Pavel; Diaz, Anyzeila; Elmoufti, Sami; Schiemann, Jimmy; Whitesides, John

    2017-02-27

    Brivaracetam (BRV), a selective, high-affinity ligand for synaptic vesicle protein 2A, is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) for adjunctive treatment of focal (partial-onset) seizures in adults with epilepsy. This post-hoc analysis was conducted to explore the efficacy of adjunctive BRV in patients with prior levetiracetam (LEV) exposure and whether changes in efficacy were related to the similar mechanism of action of these two drugs. Data were pooled from three Phase III studies (NCT00490035; NCT00464269; NCT01261325) of adults with focal seizures taking 1-2 AEDs who received placebo or BRV 50-200mg/day without titration over a 12-week treatment period. Patients taking concomitant LEV at enrollment were excluded from this analysis. Patients were categorized by their status of prior exposure to LEV, carbamazepine (CBZ), topiramate (TPM), or lamotrigine (LTG), to investigate any consistent trend towards reduced response in AED-exposed subgroups compared to AED-naïve subgroups, regardless of the mechanism of action. Study completion rates, percent reduction from baseline in focal seizure frequency over placebo, ≥50% responder rates, and tolerability were evaluated for each subgroup. A total of 1160 patients were investigated. Study completion rates were similar in the AED-exposed subgroups and AED-naïve subgroups. In subgroups with (531 patients) or without (629 patients) prior LEV exposure, ≥50% responder rates for each dose of BRV compared with placebo were generally higher among the LEV-naïve subgroups than the previously LEV-exposed subgroups. LEV-exposed subgroups receiving BRV doses ≥50mg/day showed greater ≥50% responder rates than those receiving placebo. Similar results were observed for CBZ, TPM, and LTG. Previous treatment failure with commonly prescribed AEDs (LEV, CBZ, TPM, or LTG) is associated with a reduced response to BRV irrespective of the mechanism of action. Hence, this post-hoc analysis indicates that previous treatment failure with LEV

  4. Improving the reporting of adverse drug reactions in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Richard; Frassetto, Lynda; Tsourounis, Candy; Segal, Eleanor S; Kim, Stephanie

    2010-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is perceived by the public as having a substantial responsibility to ensure drug safety; however, the FDA has limited resources for active surveillance and relies on voluntary reporting of adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions. Studies have shown that underreporting of adverse events and adverse drug reactions is widespread. Furthermore, a review of several studies demonstrates that most adverse drug reactions are reported by pharmacists and nurses, with physicians reporting the fewest. The hospital setting, with its clearly defined patient population observed around the clock, is an ideal setting in which to identify potential adverse drug reaction signals and to report them to either the drug manufacturer or the FDA. In this article we describe the present system for addressing adverse events, obstacles to reporting them, and the important role any hospital physician could play in reporting adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions.

  5. Updated ILAE evidence review of antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bourgeois, Blaise; Cnaan, Avital; Guerreiro, Carlos; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Mattson, Richard; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjorn

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this report was to update the 2006 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) report and identify the level of evidence for long-term efficacy or effectiveness for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as initial monotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed or untreated epilepsy. All applicable articles from July 2005 until March 2012 were identified, evaluated, and combined with the previous analysis (Glauser et al., 2006) to provide a comprehensive update. The prior analysis methodology was utilized with three modifications: (1) the detectable noninferiority boundary approach was dropped and both failed superiority studies and prespecified noninferiority studies were analyzed using a noninferiority approach, (2) the definition of an adequate comparator was clarified and now includes an absolute minimum point estimate for efficacy/effectiveness, and (3) the relationship table between clinical trial ratings, level of evidence, and conclusions no longer includes a recommendation column to reinforce that this review of efficacy/evidence for specific seizure types does not imply treatment recommendations. This evidence review contains one clarification: The commission has determined that class I superiority studies can be designed to detect up to a 20% absolute (rather than relative) difference in the point estimate of efficacy/effectiveness between study treatment and comparator using an intent-to-treat analysis. Since July, 2005, three class I randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 11 class III RCTs have been published. The combined analysis (1940-2012) now includes a total of 64 RCTs (7 with class I evidence, 2 with class II evidence) and 11 meta-analyses. New efficacy/effectiveness findings include the following: levetiracetam and zonisamide have level A evidence in adults with partial onset seizures and both ethosuximide and valproic acid have level A evidence in children with childhood absence epilepsy. There are no major changes in the level of evidence

  6. Ofloxacin Induced Angioedema: A Rare Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj; Wani, Umar Rasool

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) to a commonly prescribed anti-microbial can pose a major public health problem. The authors report a rare case of 24-year-old young lady who presented with angioedema of lips after ingestion of Ofloxacin, prescribed to her for treatment of loose motions. Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics for various disease conditions. The history, clinical examination and normal laboratory parameters led to the diagnosis of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids and antihistamines. The hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones are rare with an incidence of 0.4% to 2%. The pharmacovigilance program and self-reporting of all the ADR’s by the health care workers can help in ensuring the judicious use of the drug, drug safety and thus decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28050397

  7. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L.; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. Results: A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  8. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse event co-occurrences. Methods: We analyzed the similarity of adverse event profiles of 2347 patients extracted from EMRs from a mental health center in Denmark. The patients were clustered based on their adverse event profiles and the similarities were presented as a network. The set of adverse events in each main patient cluster was evaluated. Co-occurrences of adverse events in patients (p-value < 0.01) were identified and presented as well. Results: We found that each cluster of patients typically had a most distinguishing adverse event. Examination of the co-occurrences of adverse events in patients led to the identification of potentially interesting adverse event correlations that may be further investigated as well as provide further patient stratification opportunities. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach in pharmacovigilance to stratify patients based on fine-grained adverse event profiles, which also makes it possible to identify adverse event correlations. Used on larger data sets, this data-driven method has the potential to reveal unknown patterns concerning adverse event occurrences. PMID:25249979

  9. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  10. Herbal medication: potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Abebe, W

    2002-12-01

    The use of herbal supplements in the US has increased dramatically in recent years. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the same scrutiny as conventional drugs. Patients who use herbal supplements often do so in conjunction with conventional drugs. This article is a review of potential adverse interactions between some of the commonly used herbal supplements and analgesic drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly aspirin, have the potential to interact with herbal supplements that are known to possess antiplatelet activity (ginkgo, garlic, ginger, bilberry, dong quai, feverfew, ginseng, turmeric, meadowsweet and willow), with those containing coumarin (chamomile, motherworth, horse chestnut, fenugreek and red clover) and with tamarind, enhancing the risk of bleeding. Acetaminophen may also interact with ginkgo and possibly with at least some of the above herbs to increase the risk of bleeding. Further, the incidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity may be augmented by acetaminophen when concomitantly used with the potentially hepatotoxic herbs Echinacea and kava, and with herbs containing salicylate (willow, meadowsweet), respectively. The concomitant use of opioid analgesics with the sedative herbal supplements, valerian, kava and chamomile, may lead to increased central nervous system (CNS) depression. The analgesic effect of opioids may also be inhibited by ginseng. It is suggested that health-care professionals should be more aware of the potential adverse interactions between herbal supplements and analgesic drugs, and take appropriate precautionary measures to avoid their possible occurrences. However, as most of the interaction information available is based on individual case reports, animal studies and in vitro data, further research is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions.

  11. Robust isocratic high performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of seven antiepileptic drugs including lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine and zonisamide in serum after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, T A C; Edelbroek, P M

    2007-09-15

    A rapid, simple and robust method is presented for the simultaneous determination of seven antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), including primidone, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine with its two major metabolites carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide and carbamazepine-10,11-(trans)-dihydrodiol and the new AEDs lamotrigine, hydroxycarbazepine (active metabolite of oxcarbazepine) and zonisamide in serum by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detector (DAD). After solid-phase extraction, separation is achieved on an Alltima 3C18 analytical column using isocratic elution with a mixture of acetonitrile, methanol and phosphate buffer at 45 degrees C. The method is exhaustively validated, including experimental design in combination with statistical evaluation (ANOVA) to study the robustness of chromatography and sample preparation. Commonly co-administered antiepileptic drugs do not interfere with the method. Intra-day precision (RSD<1.9%), linearity, lower limit of quantitation (LOQ<0.065 mg/l) and robustness make the method suitable for daily therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies.

  12. Adverse drug reactions and off-label drug use in paediatric outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Horen, Benjamin; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-mestre, Maryse

    2002-01-01

    Aims To investigate the potential relationship between off-label drug use and increased risk of adverse drug reactions in paediatric outpatients. Methods A prospective pharmacovigilance survey of drug prescribing in office based paediatricians was carried out in Haute-Garonne County (south west of France). Results The study involved a sample of 1419 children under 16 years old. Forty-two percent of patients were exposed to at least one off-label prescription. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 1.41% (95% CI 0.79, 2.11). Off-label drug use was significantly associated with adverse drug reactions (relative risk 3.44; 95% CI 1.26, 9.38), particularly when it was due to an indication different than that defined in the Summary Product Characteristics (relative risk 4.42; 95% CI 1.60, 12.25). Conclusions Our data suggest an increasing risk of adverse drug reactions related to off-label drug use. This risk would be acceptable if further studies prove the potential benefit of such a drug use. PMID:12492616

  13. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mir, Inocencia; García-López, Mercedes; Palop, Vicente; Ferrer, José M; Rubio, Elena; Morales-Olivas, Francisco J

    1999-01-01

    Aims There are few publications of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among paediatric patients, though ADR incidence is usually stated to be higher during the first year of life and in male patients. We have carried out a prospective study to assess the extent, pattern and profile risk for ADRs in hospitalized patients between 1 and 24 months of age. Methods An intensive events monitoring scheme was used. A total of 512 successive admissions to two medical paediatric wards (47 beds) were analysed. The hospital records were screened daily during two periods (summer, 105 days and winter, 99 days), and adverse clinical events observed were recorded. Results A total of 282 events were detected; of these, 112 were considered to be manifestations of ADRs. The cumulative incidence was 16.6%, no differences being observed between periods. Although there were no differences between patients under and over 12 months of age, risk was found to be significantly higher among girls compared with boys (RR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.03–2.52). The gastro-intestinal system was most frequently affected. The therapeutic group most commonly implicated was anti-infective drugs and vaccines (41.5%). The ADRs were mild or moderate in over 90% of cases. A consistent relationship was noted between the number of drugs administered and the incidence of ADRs. Conclusions Hospitalized patients exhibited an ADR risk profile that included female sex and the number of drugs administered. No particular age predisposition was observed. The most commonly prescribed drugs are those most often implicated in ADRs in paediatric patients. PMID:10383547

  14. Data-mining-based detection of adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Preda, Cristian; Merlin, Béatrice; Ficheur, Grégoire; Beuscart, Régis

    2009-01-01

    Every year adverse drug events (ADEs) are known to be responsible for 98,000 deaths in the USA. Classical methods rely on report statements, expert knowledge, and staff operated record review. One of our objectives, in the PSIP project framework, is to use data mining (e.g., decision trees) to electronically identify situations leading to risk of ADEs. 10,500 hospitalization records from Denmark and France were used. 500 rules were automatically obtained, which are currently being validated by experts. A decision support system to prevent ADEs is then to be developed. The article examines a decision tree and the rules in the field of vitamin K antagonists.

  15. Ayurvedic management of adverse drug reactions with Shvitrahara Varti

    PubMed Central

    Jadav, Hasmukh R.; Ghetiya, Hitesh; Prashanth, B.; Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are an expression that describes harm associated with the use of medications at therapeutic dose. Traditional medicines also can develop ADRs due to their improper use. Shvitrahara Varti, one of such medicines holds Bakuchi as a component and is to be used judiciously. Furanocoumarins like psoralen present in Bakuchi makes skin hypersensitive and causes phytophotodermatitis in few cases. Hence, one should be careful while using medicines that contain Bakuchi. One such case is observed, where extensive reactions with application of Shvitrahara Varti were noticed and managed with Ayurvedic treatment. PMID:24250129

  16. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions Reported with Cardiovascular Drugs in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Muthiah; George, Melvin; Subramaniyan, Ganesan; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Jayaraman, Balachander; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the leading causes of non-communicable disease related deaths globally. Patients with cardiovascular diseases are often prescribed multiple drugs and have higher risk for developing more adverse drug reactions due to polypharmacy. Aim To evaluate the pattern of adverse drug reactions reported with cardiovascular drugs in an adverse drug reaction monitoring centre (AMC) of a tertiary care hospital. Settings and Design Adverse drug reactions related to cardiovascular drugs reported to an AMC of a tertiary care hospital were included in this prospective observational study. Materials and Methods All cardiovascular drugs related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) received in AMC through spontaneous reporting system and active surveillance method from January 2011 to March 2013 were analysed for demographic profile, ADR pattern, severity and causality assessment. Statistical Analysis used The study used descriptive statistics and the values were expressed in numbers and percentages. Results During the study period, a total of 463 ADRs were reported from 397 patients which included 319 males (80.4%) and 78 females (19.6%). The cardiovascular drug related reports constituted 18.1% of the total 2188 ADR reports. In this study, the most common ADRs observed were cough (17.3%), gastritis (7.5%) and fatigue (6.5%). Assessment of ADRs using WHO-causality scale revealed that 62% of ADRs were possible, 28.2% certain and 6.8% probable. As per Naranjo’s scale most of the reports were possible (68.8%) followed by probable (29.7%). According to Hartwig severity scale majority of the reports were mild (95%) followed by moderate (4.5%). A system wise classification of ADRs showed that gastrointestinal system (20.7%) related reactions were the most frequently observed adverse reactions followed by respiratory system (18.4%) related adverse effects. From the reported ADRs, the drugs most commonly associated with ADRs were found to be

  17. Physician access to drug profiles to reduce adverse reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasnoff, William A.; Tomkins, Edward L.; Dunn, Louise M.

    1995-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major source of preventable morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly, who use more drugs and are more sensitive to them. The insurance industry has recently addressed this problem through the implementation of drug interaction alerts to pharmacists in conjunction with immediate online claims adjudication for almost 60% of prescriptions (expected to reach 90% within 5 years). These alerts are based on stored patient drug profiles maintained by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) which are updated whenever prescriptions are filled. While these alerts are very helpful, the pharmacist does not prescribe, resulting in time-consuming and costly delays to contact the physician and remedy potential interactions. We have developed and demonstrated the feasibility of the PINPOINT (Pharmaceutical Information Network for prevention of interactions) system for making the drug profile and interaction information easily available to the physician before the prescription is written. We plan to test the cost-effectiveness of the system in a prospective controlled clinical trial.

  18. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

  19. Adverse drug reactions: a hospital pharmacy-based reporting scheme.

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, P A; Irvin, L E; Smith, J C; Orme, M L; Breckenridge, A M

    1989-01-01

    A pharmacy-based adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting scheme, using pharmacists, nurses and medical practitioners as initiators of reports, was set up at the end of 1984 in the Royal Liverpool Hospital in order to encourage reporting. New reports were inspected at weekly intervals by a staff pharmacist, and a clinical pharmacologist. Reports were forwarded to the Committee on Safety of Medicines if the reaction was considered to be serious by the clinicians, or the ADR team or involved 'black triangle' drugs. The total number of ADR reports was increased eightfold by the introduction of the scheme (from 14 in 1984 to 76, 102 and 94 in 1985, 1986 and 1987 respectively), and this rate of reporting has been sustained. PMID:2775609

  20. Adverse drug reactions in special populations – the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E A; O’Mahony, M S

    2015-01-01

    The International Conference on Harmonization considers older people a ‘special population’, as they differ from younger adults in terms of comorbidity, polypharmacy, pharmacokinetics and greater vulnerability to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Medical practice is often based on single disease guidelines derived from clinical trials that have not included frail older people or those with multiple morbidities. This presents a challenge caring for older people, as drug doses in trials may not be achievable in real world patients and risks of ADRs are underestimated in clinical trial populations. The majority of ADRs in older people are Type A, potentially avoidable and associated with commonly prescribed medications. Several ADRs are particularly associated with major adverse consequences in the elderly and their reduction is therefore a clinical priority. Falls are strongly associated with benzodiazepines, neuroleptics, antidepressants and antihypertensives. There is good evidence for medication review as part of a multifactorial intervention to reduce falls risk in community dwelling elderly. Multiple medications also contribute to delirium, another multifactorial syndrome resulting in excess mortality particularly in frail older people. Clostridium difficile associated with use of broad spectrum antibiotics mainly affects frail older people and results in prolonged hospital stay with substantial morbidity and mortality. Antipsychotics increase the risk of stroke by more than three-fold in patients with dementia. Inappropriate prescribing can be reduced by adherence to prescribing guidelines, suitable monitoring and regular medication review. Given the heterogeneity within the older population, providing individualized care is pivotal to preventing ADRs. PMID:25619317

  1. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  2. Natural Inhibitors of Cholinesterases: Implications for Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase are two closely related enzymes important in the metabolism of acetylcholine and anaesthetic drugs, including succinylcholine, mivacurium, and cocaine. The solanaceous glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are naturally occurring steroids in potatoes and related plants that inhibit both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. There are many clinical examples of direct SGA toxicity due to cholinesterase inhibition. The aim of this study was to review the hypotheses that (1) SGAs may be the evolutionary driving force for atypical butyrylcholinesterase alleles and that (2) SGAs may adversely influence the actions of anaesthetic drugs that metabolized by acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Source The information was obtained by Medline search and consultation with experts in the study of SGAs and cholinesterases. Principal findings The SGAs inhibit both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although accurate assays of SGA levels are difficult, published data indicate human serum SGA concentrations at least ten-fold lower than required to inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in vitro. However, we review evidence that suggests the dietary ingestion of SGAs can initiate a cholinergic syndrome in humans. This syndrome occurs at SGA levels lower than those which interfere with anaesthetic drug catabolism. The world distribution of solanaceous plants parallels the distribution of atypical alleles of butyrylcholinesterase and may explain the genetic diversity of the butyrylcholinesterase gene. Conclusion Correlative evidence suggests that dietary SGAs may be the driving force for atypical butyrylcholinesterase alleles. In addition, SGAs may influence the metabolism of anaesthetic drugs and this hypothesis warrants experimental investigation. PMID:9161749

  3. Data mining to generate adverse drug events detection rules.

    PubMed

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Ficheur, Grégoire; Bernonville, Stéphanie; Luyckx, Michel; Beuscart, Régis

    2011-11-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a public health issue. Their detection usually relies on voluntary reporting or medical chart reviews. The objective of this paper is to automatically detect cases of ADEs by data mining. 115,447 complete past hospital stays are extracted from six French, Danish, and Bulgarian hospitals using a common data model including diagnoses, drug administrations, laboratory results, and free-text records. Different kinds of outcomes are traced, and supervised rule induction methods (decision trees and association rules) are used to discover ADE detection rules, with respect to time constraints. The rules are then filtered, validated, and reorganized by a committee of experts. The rules are described in a rule repository, and several statistics are automatically computed in every medical department, such as the confidence, relative risk, and median delay of outcome appearance. 236 validated ADE-detection rules are discovered; they enable to detect 27 different kinds of outcomes. The rules use a various number of conditions related to laboratory results, diseases, drug administration, and demographics. Some rules involve innovative conditions, such as drug discontinuations.

  4. New concepts in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Bahna, Sami L; Khalili, Barzin

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of drug reactions and their management has changed markedly in recent years with the development of several new concepts. Epidermal cell death seen in Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may result from Fas-Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-Fas antibodies that can abrogate apoptosis. Most studies on IVIG in SJS and TEN reported improvement in arresting disease progression and reduction in time to healing. Furthermore, several studies have dispelled the myth of sulfonamide cross-reactivity. Immune-mediated reactions against antibacterial sulfonamides are directed against two unique side chains that non-antibacterial sulfonamides do not contain. Certain patients seem to have a genetic predisposition for "multiple drug sensitivities." Hence, they may react to several drugs that are not necessarily cross-reacting. Also, multiple studies have shown that IgE-mediated nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cross-reactivity is uncommon. Rather, it is cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 inhibition that results in pseudoallergic reactions to multiple NSAIDs. Several studies have indicated that selective COX-2 inhibitors can be safely administered in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and NSAID-induced cutaneous reactions, although their use has been curtailed by their cardiovascular side effects. Biological agents, such as infliximab, are being increasingly used for a variety of diseases and have caused adverse reactions in some patients. Studies differ as to whether concomitant immunosuppressive use with infliximab affects the development of drug-specific antibodies and infusion reactions. Successful desensitization protocols have been developed for reactions to some of these agents.

  5. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  6. Adverse Drug Reactions and quality deviations monitored by spontaneous reports

    PubMed Central

    Visacri, Marília Berlofa; de Souza, Cinthia Madeira; Sato, Catarina Miyako Shibata; Granja, Silvia; de Marialva, Mécia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Moriel, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and profile of spontaneous reports of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and quality deviations in a Brazilian teaching hospital and propose a consistent classification to study quality deviations. Methods This is a descriptive and retrospective study involving the analysis of spontaneous reports of ADRs and quality deviations in 2010. ADRs were classified according to the reaction mechanism, severity, and causality. The drugs were classified according to their therapeutic classes and symptoms according to the affected organ. The quality deviations were classified according to the type of deviation and type of medicine available in the Brazilian market. Results A total of 68 forms were examined; ADRs accounted for 39.7% of the notifications, while quality deviations accounted for 60.3%. ADRs occurred more frequently in men (51.9%) and adults (63.0%). The skin (28.0%) was the most affected organ, while anti-infectives (40.7%) were the therapeutic class that caused the most ADRs. The most common ADRs were type B (74.0%), moderates (37.0%), and probables (55.6%). In relation to quality deviations, the most frequent notifications were breaks, splits and leaks (20.9%) and related to generic drugs (43.9%). Conclusion The classification system to study quality deviations was clear and consistent. This study demonstrated that practices and public policies related to more effective pharmacovigilance need to be implemented so that the number of spontaneous reports increases. PMID:25972731

  7. An overview on adverse drug reactions to traditional Chinese medicines

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kelvin; Zhang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2015-01-01

    The safe use of Chinese materia medica (CMM) and products in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practice conventionally relies on correct pharmacognostic identification, good agricultural and manufacturing practices based on pharmacopoeia standards and rational/correct CMM combinations with TCM-guided clinical prescribing. These experience-based principles may not absolutely ensure safety without careful toxicological investigations when compared with development of new pharmaceutical drugs. Clinically observed toxicity reports remain as guidance for gathering toxicological evidence, though essential as pharmacovigilance, but are considered as late events for ensuring safety. The overview focuses on the following factors: global development of TCM that has affected conventional healthcare; examples of key toxic substances in CMM; reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) consequential to taking CMM and TCM products; and proposals on rational approaches to integrate the knowledge of biomedical science and the principles of TCM practice for detecting early ADRs if both TCM products and orthodox drugs are involved. It is envisaged that good control of the quality and standards of CMM and proprietary Chinese medicines can certainly reduce the incidence of ADRs in TCM practice when these medications are used. PMID:25619530

  8. Adverse drug reactions to herbal and synthetic expectorants.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Sieder, C; März, R

    1995-01-01

    Our knowledge relating to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of phytomedicines is highly fragmentary. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of ADRs following medication with herbal or synthetic expectorants. In a multicentre, comparative post-marketing surveillance study of more than 3000 patients with acute bronchitis, about half were treated with a herbal remedy (SinupretR) and the other half with various other expectorants. In ascending order of incidence, ADRs were noted during mono-medication of SinupretR (0.8%), Ambroxol (1.0%) and acetylcysteine (4.3%). When concomitant drugs were used, this rank order was unchanged but incidence rates were markedly increased (3.4, 6.5 and 8.2%, respectively). The most frequent ADRs were gastrointestinal symptoms. It is concluded that expectorants are associated with ADRs in roughly 1-5% of cases undergoing single drug treatment and in 3-10% when more than one medication is being used. Amongst the expectorants used in this study, the herbal preparation SinupretR is associated with the lowest incidence of ADRs.

  9. Adverse drug reactions in older people: detection and prevention.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Mirko; van der Cammen, Tischa; Onder, Graziano

    2012-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in older adults are an important healthcare problem since they are frequently a cause of hospitalization, occur commonly during admission, and are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Older adults are particularly susceptible to ADRs because they are usually on multiple drug regimens and because age is associated with changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The presentation of an ADR in older adults is often atypical, which further complicates its recognition. One potential strategy for improving recognition of ADRs is to identify those patients who are at risk of an ADR. The recently developed GerontoNet ADR Risk Score is a practical tool for identification of older patients who are at increased risk for an ADR and who may represent a target for interventions aimed at reducing ADRs. Provision of adequate education in the domain of clinical geriatric pharmacology can improve recognition of ADRs. Besides formal surveillance systems, built-in computer programs with electronic prescribing databases and clinical pharmacist involvement in patient care within multidisciplinary geriatric teams might help to minimize the occurrence of ADRs. In addition, a number of actions can be taken in hospitals to stimulate appropriate prescribing and to assure adequate communication between primary and hospital care. In older adults with complex medical problems and needs, a global evaluation obtained through a comprehensive geriatric assessment may be helpful in simplifying drug prescription and prioritizing pharmacological and healthcare needs, resulting in an improvement in quality of prescribing.

  10. Mining unexpected temporal associations: applications in detecting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huidong Warren; Chen, Jie; He, Hongxing; Williams, Graham J; Kelman, Chris; O'Keefe, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    In various real-world applications, it is very useful mining unanticipated episodes where certain event patterns unexpectedly lead to outcomes, e.g., taking two medicines together sometimes causing an adverse reaction. These unanticipated episodes are usually unexpected and infrequent, which makes existing data mining techniques, mainly designed to find frequent patterns, ineffective. In this paper, we propose unexpected temporal association rules (UTARs) to describe them. To handle the unexpectedness, we introduce a new interestingness measure, residual-leverage, and develop a novel case-based exclusion technique for its calculation. Combining it with an event-oriented data preparation technique to handle the infrequency, we develop a new algorithm MUTARC to find pairwise UTARs. The MUTARC is applied to generate adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from real-world healthcare administrative databases. It reliably shortlists not only six known ADRs, but also another ADR, flucloxacillin possibly causing hepatitis, which our algorithm designers and experiment runners have not known before the experiments. The MUTARC performs much more effectively than existing techniques. This paper clearly illustrates the great potential along the new direction of ADR signal generation from healthcare administrative databases.

  11. Muscle spasms: an unexpected adverse drug reaction of pemetrexed?

    PubMed Central

    de Rouw, Hendrika J. A.; Jessurun, Naomi T.; Masen-Poos, Lucie J. P.; Derijks, Hieronymus J.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we describe a 53-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin combination therapy, followed by pemetrexed monotherapy. The patient developed severe muscle spasms at least twice, shortly after administration of pemetrexed monotherapy. A possible explanation for this observation is that in combination with cisplatin therapy, the patient was hyperhydrated before administration to promote renal excretion and reduce toxicity. Pemetrexed is also renally excreted, which supports the finding that toxicity did not occur when the patient was hyperhydrated. After discontinuation of pemetrexed the symptoms did not reoccur. All aspects of this case point to a possible relationship between pemetrexed and an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We conclude that muscle spasms are a rare, but possibly dose-related ADR of pemetrexed-based therapy. PMID:28203304

  12. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT.

  13. The Relationship between Psychotropic Drug Use and Suicidal Behavior in Japan: Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Takenoshita, S; Taka, F; Nakao, M; Nomura, K

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Very few studies have explored the adverse effect of psychotropic drugs worldwide. Methods: This study analyzed 1 813 suicide-related drug reports involving 553 patients collected from the Japanese National Adverse Drug Report Database between October 2001 and January 2012 to investigate psychotropic drugs associated with completed suicide vs. other suicide-related behaviors, including ideation and self-injury. The drugs investigated included antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, non-benzodiazepine hypnotic agents, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and other drugs. Results: These reports referenced 300 (54.2%) individuals who completed suicide. Adjusting for age, sex, and drugs used, the multivariate model revealed that participants who took antipsychotics were 1.70 times (95% CI, 1.11-2.61) more likely to complete suicide compared with those who did not. All other drugs became non-significant. Compared with those who took only one medication, those prescribed more than 4 drugs were more likely to complete suicide (OR 4.44, 95% CI, 2.40-8.20). Discussion: Antipsychotic drugs and polypharmacy may be regarded as predictors of completed suicide.

  14. The influence of established and new antiepileptic drugs on visual perception. 1. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, single-dose study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, B J; Freudenthaler, N; Paulus, W

    1997-12-01

    The influence of single oral dosages of carbamazepine (CBZ), valproic acid, vigabatrin (VGB), lamotrigine (LTG), gabapentin (GBP), and losigamone (LSG) on visual perception was investigated in ten healthy volunteers according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. The test battery comprised visual acuity, the Lanthony-D-15-désaturé colour perception test, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia threshold measurements, perception threshold assessment for monochromatic and chromatic gaussian dots, monochromatic gratings and gratings of differing spatial frequency, and critical flicker fusion tests with various stimuli. The only consistent and partly significant effects were seen after VGB and GBP. After VGB, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia thresholds and the critical flicker fusion increased, whereas GBP led to a somewhat converse profile. The other tests were not influenced consistently by any antiepileptic drug (AED). We conclude that: (i) gamma-amino-butyric acid-(GABA)-related properties as under the prototype drug VGB result in specific alterations of the transient tritanopia phenomenon which is consistent with the physiological hypothesis for this retinal paradigm based on extracellular recordings in primates. The possible mechanisms why VGB improved critical flicker fusion as the only AED in this trial are discussed. The profile of GBP indicates a unique mechanism of action. We have not observed specific influences on visual perception under AEDs which act mainly via alterations of ion membrane conductance. The transient tritanopia and flicker fusion paradigms we used appear to be promising to investigate antiepileptic drugs with hitherto unknown modes of actions in human noninvasively.

  15. N-Alkylprotoporphyrin Formation and Hepatic Porphyria in Dogs After Administration of a New Antiepileptic Drug Candidate: Mechanism and Species Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jean-Marie; Chanteux, Hugues; Mancel, Valérie; Dubin, Guy-Marie; Gerin, Brigitte; Staelens, Ludovicus; Depelchin, Olympe; Kervyn, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A new antiepileptic synaptic vesicle 2a (SV2a) ligand drug candidate was tested in 4-week oral toxicity studies in rat and dog. Brown pigment inclusions were found in the liver of high-dose dogs. The morphology of the deposits and the accompanying liver changes (increased plasma liver enzymes, increased total hepatic porphyrin level, decreased liver ferrochelatase activity, combined induction, and inactivation of cytochrome P-450 CYP2B11) suggested disruption of the heme biosynthetic cascade. None of these changes was seen in rat although this species was exposed to higher parent drug levels. Toxicokinetic analysis and in vitro metabolism assays in hepatocytes showed that dog is more prone to oxidize the drug candidate than rat. Mass spectrometry analysis of liver samples from treated dogs revealed an N-alkylprotoporphyrin adduct. The elucidation of its chemical structure suggested that the drug transforms into a reactive metabolite which is structurally related to a known reference porphyrogenic agent allylisopropylacetamide. That particular metabolite, primarily produced in dog but neither in rat nor in human, has the potential to alkylate the prosthetic heme of CYP. Overall, the data suggested that the drug candidate should not be porphyrogenic in human. This case study further exemplifies the species variability in the susceptibility to drug-induced porphyria. PMID:24973095

  16. Early identification of adverse drug reactions from search log data.

    PubMed

    White, Ryen W; Wang, Sheng; Pant, Apurv; Harpaz, Rave; Shukla, Pushpraj; Sun, Walter; DuMouchel, William; Horvitz, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The timely and accurate identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) following drug approval is a persistent and serious public health challenge. Aggregated data drawn from anonymized logs of Web searchers has been shown to be a useful source of evidence for detecting ADRs. However, prior studies have been based on the analysis of established ADRs, the existence of which may already be known publically. Awareness of these ADRs can inject existing knowledge about the known ADRs into online content and online behavior, and thus raise questions about the ability of the behavioral log-based methods to detect new ADRs. In contrast to previous studies, we investigate the use of search logs for the early detection of known ADRs. We use a large set of recently labeled ADRs and negative controls to evaluate the ability of search logs to accurately detect ADRs in advance of their publication. We leverage the Internet Archive to estimate when evidence of an ADR first appeared in the public domain and adjust the index date in a backdated analysis. Our results demonstrate how search logs can be used to detect new ADRs, the central challenge in pharmacovigilance.

  17. Successful Drug Development Despite Adverse Preclinical Findings Part 2: Examples

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Junji; Plassmann, Stephanie; Hayashi, Makoto; Prentice, David E.

    2010-01-01

    To illustrate the process of addressing adverse preclinical findings (APFs) as outlined in the first part of this review, a number of cases with unexpected APF in toxicity studies with drug candidates is discussed in this second part. The emphasis is on risk characterization, especially regarding the mode of action (MoA), and risk evaluation regarding relevance for man. While severe APFs such as retinal toxicity may turn out to be of little human relevance, minor findings particularly in early toxicity studies, such as vasculitis, may later pose a real problem. Rodents are imperfect models for endocrine APFs, non-rodents for human cardiac effects. Liver and kidney toxicities are frequent, but they can often be monitored in man and do not necessarily result in early termination of drug candidates. Novel findings such as the unusual lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and the bones presented in this review can be difficult to explain. It will be shown that well known issues such as phospholipidosis and carcinogenicity by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The latter is of particular interest because the new PPAR α and dual α/γ agonists resulted in a change of the safety paradigm established with the older PPAR α agonists. General toxicologists and pathologists need some understanding of the principles of genotoxicity and reproductive toxicity testing. Both types of preclinical toxicities are major APF and clinical monitoring is difficult, generally leading to permanent use restrictions. PMID:22272032

  18. Knowledge and attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Pulford, Andrew; Malcolm, William

    The reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by health professionals forms an important component of ongoing surveillance of post-marketing drug safety. The extension of responsibility for all health professionals to report ADRs has coincided with national immunization programmes, such as the national childhood immunization, human papillomavirus (HPV), and seasonal and H1N1 influenza programmes. The study objective was to evaluate knowledge of, and attitudes to, reporting ADRs among the professional groups most likely to see suspected reactions to vaccines. This included nursing professionals, whose views have not been included in previous studies. A survey of 91 practice nurses, health visitors, school nurses and GPs working in Ayrshire and Arran during June, July and August 2007 was undertaken. The respondents' knowledge of ADR reporting varied considerably. Although the majority of respondents recognized that it is the responsibility of health professionals to report suspected ADRs, there were lower levels of knowledge about the purpose of the Yellow Card system specifically; less than 50% of the respondents reported good knowledge about the system. The study suggests implications for practice with regard to the implementation of large-scale immunization programmes and potential solutions to under-reporting among these professional groups.

  19. Pharmacovigilance on Twitter? Mining Tweets for Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Karen; Pimpalkhute, Pranoti; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Ginn, Rachel; Smith, Karen L; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that Twitter data analytics can have broad implications on public health research. However, its value for pharmacovigilance has been scantly studied – with health related forums and community support groups preferred for the task. We present a systematic study of tweets collected for 74 drugs to assess their value as sources of potential signals for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). We created an annotated corpus of 10,822 tweets. Each tweet was annotated for the presence or absence of ADR mentions, with the span and Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concept ID noted for each ADR present. Using Cohen’s kappa1, we calculated the inter-annotator agreement (IAA) for the binary annotations to be 0.69. To demonstrate the utility of the corpus, we attempted a lexicon-based approach for concept extraction, with promising success (54.1% precision, 62.1% recall, and 57.8% F-measure). A subset of the corpus is freely available at: http://diego.asu.edu/downloads. PMID:25954400

  20. Psychiatric uses of antiepileptic treatments.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Laura S.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barry, John J.; Ketter, Terence A.

    2002-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) possess potent negative or positive psychotropic effects. Clear evidence of benefit exists for valproate, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine in bipolar disorder. Reports of benefit from various AEDs in mood, anxiety, impulse control, and personality disorder are reviewed. Further research is needed to clarify which patients are likely to benefit. Clinicians must closely attend to the ongoing risk/benefit analysis and consider possible iatrogenic worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms.

  1. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    PubMed

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs.

  2. The knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nurses about pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction and adverse event reporting in a state hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Fisun; Ciftci, Seval; Vural, Birol

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the use of any drug comes the possibility of unintended consequences which when harmful are referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The development of national pharmacovigilance systems is the responsibility of all health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge of nurses about pharmacovigilance and attitudes about ADR and adverse event reporting. METHODS: This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 112 nurses working in a public hospital. The questionnaire was applied about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions. The knowledge, attitudes and practices about adverse drug reactions were asked. RESULTS: The 74.1% of the nurses definition of “severe adverse effect” of drug therapy. The ratio of participants who knew that ADRs are reported to contact person responsible from pharmacovigilance was 34.9%. Although 70.5% of nurses knew the necessity of ADR reporting, the 8% of the nurses knew Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TÜFAM). Only 8% of nurses reported ADRs in their professionality. CONCLUSION: Although most of the participants knew the importance of ADR event reporting, event reporting was low. Thiese results showed that there is a lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance. Futher studies with different settings and healthcare staff are needed to improve awareness about pharmacovigilance. PMID:28058321

  3. Development of the Liverpool Adverse Drug Reaction Avoidability Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Louise E.; Nunn, Anthony J.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Peak, Matthew; Arnott, Janine; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Turner, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To develop and test a new tool to assess the avoidability of adverse drug reactions that is suitable for use in paediatrics but which is also applicable to a variety of other settings. Methods The study involved multiple phases. Preliminary work involved using the Hallas scale and a modification of the existing Hallas scale, to assess two different sets of adverse drug reaction (ADR) case reports. Phase 1 defined, modified and refined a new tool using multidisciplinary teams. Phase 2 involved the assessment of 50 ADR case reports from a prospective study of paediatric inpatients by individual assessors. Phase 3 compared assessments with the new tool for individuals and groups in comparison to the ‘gold standard’ (the avoidability outcome set by a panel of senior investigators: an experienced clinical pharmacologist, paediatrician and pharmacist). Main Outcome Measures Inter-rater reliability (IRR), measure of disagreement and utilization of avoidability categories. Results Preliminary work—Pilot phase: results for the original Hallas cases were fair and pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.21 to 0.36. Results for the modified Hallas cases were poor, pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.06 to 0.16. Phase 1: on initial use of the new tool, agreement between the two multidisciplinary groups was found on 13/20 cases with a kappa score of 0.29 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.62). Phase 2: the assessment of 50 ADR case reports by six individual reviewers yielded pairwise kappa scores ranging from poor to good 0.12 to 0.75 and percentage exact agreement (%EA) ranged from 52–90%. Phase 3: Percentage exact agreement ranged from 35–70%. Overall, individuals had better agreement with the ‘gold standard’. Conclusion Avoidability assessment is feasible but needs careful attention to methods. The Liverpool ADR avoidability assessment tool showed mixed IRR. We have developed and validated a method for assessing the avoidability of ADRs that is transparent, more objective than

  4. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Juan M.; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Ryan, Patrick B.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies. PMID:27193236

  5. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research.

    PubMed

    Banda, Juan M; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Ryan, Patrick B; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-05-10

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies.

  6. Imputation of adverse drug reactions: Causality assessment in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives Different algorithms have been developed to standardize the causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADR). Although most share common characteristics, the results of the causality assessment are variable depending on the algorithm used. Therefore, using 10 different algorithms, the study aimed to compare inter-rater and multi-rater agreement for ADR causality assessment and identify the most consistent to hospitals. Methods Using ten causality algorithms, four judges independently assessed the first 44 cases of ADRs reported during the first year of implementation of a risk management service in a medium complexity hospital in the state of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Owing to variations in the terminology used for causality, the equivalent imputation terms were grouped into four categories: definite, probable, possible and unlikely. Inter-rater and multi-rater agreement analysis was performed by calculating the Cohen´s and Light´s kappa coefficients, respectively. Results None of the algorithms showed 100% reproducibility in the causal imputation. Fair inter-rater and multi-rater agreement was found. Emanuele (1984) and WHO-UMC (2010) algorithms showed a fair rate of agreement between the judges (k = 0.36). Interpretation & conclusions Although the ADR causality assessment algorithms were poorly reproducible, our data suggest that WHO-UMC algorithm is the most consistent for imputation in hospitals, since it allows evaluating the quality of the report. However, to improve the ability of assessing the causality using algorithms, it is necessary to include criteria for the evaluation of drug-related problems, which may be related to confounding variables that underestimate the causal association. PMID:28166274

  7. The anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam reverses the inhibition by negative allosteric modulators of neuronal GABA- and glycine-gated currents

    PubMed Central

    Rigo, J-M; Hans, G; Nguyen, L; Rocher, V; Belachew, S; Malgrange, B; Leprince, P; Moonen, G; Selak, I; Matagne, A; Klitgaard, H

    2002-01-01

    In this study in vitro and in vivo approaches were combined in order to investigate if the anti-epileptic mechanism(s) of action of levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra®) may involve modulation of inhibitory neurotransmission.GABA- and glycine-gated currents were studied in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques applied on cultured cerebellar granule, hippocampal and spinal neurons. Protection against clonic convulsions was assessed in vivo in sound-susceptible mice. The effect of LEV was compared with reference anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs): carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, clonazepam, phenobarbital and ethosuximide.LEV contrasted the reference AEDs by an absence of any direct effect on glycine-gated currents. At high concentrations, beyond therapeutic relevance, it induced a small reduction in the peak amplitude and a prolongation of the decay phase of GABA-gated currents. A similar action on GABA-elicited currents was observed with the reference AEDs, except ethosuximide.These minor direct effects contrasted with a potent ability of LEV (EC50=1 – 10 μM) to reverse the inhibitory effects of the negative allosteric modulators zinc and β-carbolines on both GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated responses.Clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate showed a similar ability to reverse the inhibition of β-carbolines on GABA-gated currents. Blockade of zinc inhibition of GABA responses was observed with clonazepam and ethosuximide. Phenytoin was the only AED together with LEV that inhibited the antagonism of zinc on glycine-gated currents and only clonazepam and phenobarbital inhibited the action of DMCM.LEV (17 mg kg−1) produced a potent suppression of sound-induced clonic convulsions in mice. This protective effect was significantly abolished by co-administration of the β-carboline FG 7142, from a dose of 5 mg kg−1. In contrast, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (up to 10 mg kg−1) was without any effect on the protection

  8. Adverse drug events and medication errors: detection and classification methods.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, T; Gandhi, T K; Seger, A C; Hsieh, T C; Bates, D W

    2004-08-01

    Investigating the incidence, type, and preventability of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication errors is crucial to improving the quality of health care delivery. ADEs, potential ADEs, and medication errors can be collected by extraction from practice data, solicitation of incidents from health professionals, and patient surveys. Practice data include charts, laboratory, prescription data, and administrative databases, and can be reviewed manually or screened by computer systems to identify signals. Research nurses, pharmacists, or research assistants review these signals, and those that are likely to represent an ADE or medication error are presented to reviewers who independently categorize them into ADEs, potential ADEs, medication errors, or exclusions. These incidents are also classified according to preventability, ameliorability, disability, severity, stage, and responsible person. These classifications, as well as the initial selection of incidents, have been evaluated for agreement between reviewers and the level of agreement found ranged from satisfactory to excellent (kappa = 0.32-0.98). The method of ADE and medication error detection and classification described is feasible and has good reliability. It can be used in various clinical settings to measure and improve medication safety.

  9. Effects of levetiracetam, a novel antiepileptic drug, on convulsant activity in two genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gower, A J; Hirsch, E; Boehrer, A; Noyer, M; Marescaux, C

    1995-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam were assessed in two genetic rat models. In the audiogenic-seizure prone rat, levetiracetam, 5.4 to 96 mg/kg i.p. dose-dependently inhibited both wild running and tonic-clonic convulsions. In the GAERS model of petit mal epilepsy, levetiracetam markedly suppressed spontaneous spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) but left the underlying EEG trace normal. The effects were already marked at 5.4 mg/kg and did not increase significantly up to 170 mg/kg although more animals were completely protected. Levetiracetam produced no observable effects on behaviour apart from slight reversible sedation at 170 mg/kg. In contrast, piracetam, a structural analogue of levetiracetam, significantly and consistently suppressed SWD in GAERS rats only at the high dose of 1000 mg/kg with some slight effects at lower doses. The effect of piracetam appeared to be due to increased sleeping rather than to a direct antiepileptic effect. The results with levetiracetam argue for a clinical application in both petit mal, absence epilepsy and in treating generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures.

  10. Evaluation of Perioperative Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Karen C.; Patel, Amit; Shaikh, Sofia; Seger, Diane L.; Bates, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to assess the rates of perioperative medication errors (MEs) and adverse drug events (ADEs) as percentages of medication administrations, evaluate their root causes, and formulate targeted solutions to prevent them. Methods In this prospective observational study, anesthesia-trained study staff (anesthesiologists/nurse anesthetists) observed randomly selected operations at a 1,046 bed tertiary care academic medical center to identify MEs and ADEs over eight months. Retrospective chart abstraction was performed to flag events that were missed by observation. All events subsequently underwent review by two independent reviewers. Primary outcomes were the incidence of MEs and ADEs. Results A total of 277 operations were observed with 3,671 medication administrations of which 193 (5.3%, 95% CI 4.5 to 6.0) involved a ME and/or ADE. Of these, 153 (79.3%) were preventable and 40 (20.7%) were non-preventable. The events included 153 (79.3%) errors and 91 (47.2%) ADEs. While 32 (20.9%) of the errors had little potential for harm, 51 (33.3%) led to an observed ADE and an additional 70 (45.8%) had the potential for patient harm. Of the 153 errors, 99 (64.7%) were serious, 51 (33.3%) were significant and 3 (2.0%) were life-threatening. Conclusions One in twenty perioperative medication administrations included an ME and/or ADE. More than one third of the MEs led to observed ADEs, and the remaining two thirds had the potential for harm. These rates are markedly higher than those reported by retrospective surveys. Specific solutions exist which have the potential to decrease the incidence of perioperative MEs. PMID:26501385

  11. The Current Availability of Antiepileptic Drugs in Zambia: Implications for the ILAE/WHO “Out of the Shadows” Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Chomba, Elwyn Nachanya; Haworth, Alan; Mbewe, Edward; Atadzhanov, Masharip; Ndubani, Philimon; Kansembe, Henry; Birbeck, Gretchen Lano

    2010-01-01

    Recent concerns regarding antiepileptic drug (AED) availability in Zambia led us to conduct a study in the Lusaka and Southern Provinces to quantify the availability and cost of AEDs and assess determinants. Among 111 pharmacies, almost one-half did not carry AEDs (N = 54; 49.1%). Available AEDs were phenobarbitone (21; 18.9%), carbamazepine (27; 24.3%), valproic acid (4; 3.6%), and phenytoin (3; 2.7%). Adult out-of-pocket monthly costs ranged from US $7 to $30. Pediatric syrups were universally unavailable. Interviews revealed several barriers to AED provision, including that handling phenobarbitone (historically the most affordable AED) has become increasingly difficult because of newly enforced regulatory requirements. Personal communications with epilepsy-care providers in other low income countries suggest that this problem may be widespread. Improved enforcement of existing drug regulations may be contributing to the AED shortage. Social programs aimed at encouraging people with epilepsy to come “out of the shadows” must be preceded by improved AED access. PMID:20810822

  12. Adverse-drug-event surveillance using narrative nursing records in electronic nursing records.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Jung; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of adverse drug events can be extracted by analyzing narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records. For this study, we reviewed the narrative nursing documentations of 487 admissions of 355 cancer patients who were treated with cisplatin at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea. Narrative nursing statements with the terms "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," "hypersensitivity," and other adverse drug events listed in the safety information were analyzed. In addition, nausea, one of the most frequent adverse drug events, was further examined. Narrative statements documenting the presence or absence of an "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," and "hypersensitivity" were found in 162 admissions (33.3%). The presence or absence of adverse drug events due to cisplatin was documented in 476 admissions (97.7%). At least one adverse drug event was noted in 258 admissions (53.0%). The presence of nausea was documented in 214 admissions (43.9%), and the mean duration of nausea was 5.2 days. The results of this study suggest that adverse drug events can be monitored using narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records.

  13. Analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Psychiatry OPD

    PubMed Central

    Piparva, Kiran G.; Buch, J. G.; Chandrani, Kalpesh V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Novel atypical antipsychotics are superior to conventional antipsychotics as they significantly reduce both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and have lower risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). However, these drugs have separate set of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Therefore, this study was carried out to assess these ADRs, which can have impact on long-term compliance and achieving successful treatment. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of analysis of ADR of atypical antipsychotic drugs was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department. Patients of psychotic disorder (any age, either sex), who were prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs, were included. Those who were prescribed conventional antipsychotics or combinations of antipsychotics were excluded from the study. Apart from spontaneously reported ADRs, a questionnaire related to the likely ADR was used and patients’ responses were recorded in the case record form. Results: Totally 93 ADRs were recorded from 84 prescriptions. Majority of the ADRs (82 out of 93) were seen with risperidone and olanzepine, as they were the commonly prescribed drugs. Weight gain, dizziness, sleep disturbance and appetite disturbance accounted for nearly 78% of the total events. With risperidone (at 4–6 mg/day) and olanzepine (at 10–15 mg/day), gastrointestinal and sleep disturbance were observed in the initial (within 7 days to 2–3 months after treatment) course of treatment, while EPS, fatigue, seizure, increased frequency of micturition and dizziness were observed after long-term (3–9 months) use. Conclusion: The present study adds to the existing information on the prevalence of adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Role of active surveillance in post-marketing phase is also emphasized. PMID:22345840

  14. Epidemiology of drug exposure and adverse drug reactions in two Swiss departments of internal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fattinger, Karin; Roos, Malgorzata; Vergères, Patrice; Holenstein, Clemens; Kind, Brigitt; Masche, Urspeter; Stocker, David N; Braunschweig, Suzanne; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Galeazzi, Renato L; Follath, Ferenc; Gasser, Theo; Meier, Peter J

    2000-01-01

    Aims To explore drug exposure, frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), types of ADRs, predisposing risk factors and ADR-related excess hospital stay in medical inpatients. Methods Structured data regarding patient characteristics, ‘events’ (symptoms, laboratory results), diagnoses (ICD10) and drug therapy were collected using a computer-supported data entry system and an interface for data retrieval from electronic patient records. ADR data were collected by ‘event monitoring’ to minimize possible bias by the drug monitor. The causality of each event was assessed in relation to disease(s) and drug therapy. Results The analysis included 4331 (100%) hospitalizations. The median observation period was 8 days. The median number of different drugs administered per patient and day was 6 and varied between 4 (Q1) and 9 (Q3) different drugs in 50% of all hospital days. In 41% of all hospitalizations at least one disease-unrelated event could be possibly attributed to drug therapy. Clinically relevant ADRs occurred in 11% of all hospitalizations. In 3.3% of all hospitalizations ADRs were the cause of hospital admission. The incidence of possibly ADR-related deaths was 1.4. Factors predisposing for clinically relevant ADRs were female gender and polypharmacy. ADR-related excess hospital stay accounted for 8.6% of hospital days. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of the developed ‘event monitoring’ system for quantitative analysis of ADRs in medical inpatients. With increasing numbers of recorded patients the pharmacoepidemiological database provides a valuable tool to study specific questions regarding drug efficacy and safety in hospitalized patients. PMID:10671911

  15. Evaluation of transport of common antiepileptic drugs by human multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is one of the most serious problems in the treatment of epilepsy. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that increased expression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may be involved in the mechanisms leading to AED resistance. In addition to Pgp, increased expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) has been determined in epileptogenic brain regions of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, it is not known whether AEDs are substrates for MRPs. In the present experiments, we evaluated whether common AEDs are transported by human MRPs (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in AED resistant epilepsy. For this purpose, we used a highly sensitive assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) in polarized kidney cell lines (LLC, MDCKII) transfected with human MRPs. The assay was validated by known MRP substrates, including calcein-AM (MRP1), vinblastine (MRP2) and chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA; MRP5). The directional transport determined with these drugs in MRP-transfected cell lines could be blocked with the MRP inhibitor MK571. However, in contrast to transport of known MRP substrates, none of the common AEDs (carbamazepine, valproate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, lamotrigine and phenobarbital) used in this study was transported by MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5. A basolateral-to-apical transport of valproate, which could be inhibited by MK571 and probenecid, was determined in LLC cells (both wildtype and transfected), but the specific transporter involved was not identified. The data indicate that common AEDs are not substrates for human MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5, at least in the in vitro models used in this study.

  16. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; de Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-11-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH) and levetiracetam (LEV). For VPA, histopathology was the most sensitive parameter, showing effects already at 60μM. For CBZ, morphology and MA were the most sensitive parameters, showing effects at 180μM. For ETH, all endpoints showed similar sensitivity (6.6mM), whereas MA was the most sensitive parameter for LEV (40mM). Inclusion of kinetics did not alter the absolute ranking of the compounds, but the relative potency was changed considerably. Taking all together, this demo-case study showed that inclusion of multiple-endpoints in ZET may increase the sensitivity of the assay, contribute to the elucidation of the mode of toxic action and to a better definition of the applicability domain of ZET.

  17. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the C-C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system.

  18. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: Vigabatrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I. Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the Csbnd C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system.

  19. Novel antiepileptic drug lacosamide exerts neuroprotective effects by decreasing glial activation in the hippocampus of a gerbil model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yun; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Dae Hwan; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Chen, Bai Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Young Shin; Shin, Myoung Chul; Cho, Jun Hwi; Hong, Seongkweon; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Sung Koo

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide, which is a novel antiepileptic drug, has been reported to exert various additional therapeutic effects. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide against transient cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal cell damage in the hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)-1 region of a gerbil model. Neuronal Nuclei immunohistochemistry demonstrated that pre- and post-surgical treatment (5 min ischemia) with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons in the lacosamide-treated-ischemia-operated group from ischemic injury 5 days post-ischemia, as compared with gerbils in the vehicle-treated-ischemia-operated group. Furthermore, treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide markedly attenuated the activation of astrocytes and microglia in the ischemic CA1 region at 5 days post-ischemia. The results of the present study suggested that pre- and post-surgical treatment of the gerbils with lacosamide was able to protect against transient cerebral ischemic injury-induced CA1 pyramidal neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide may be associated with decreased activation of glial cells in the ischemic CA1 region.

  20. Management of serious adverse drug reactions: proposals from a victims' organisation.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    Amalyste is a French patient-advocacy group for victims of two very serious adverse drug reactions: Lyell and Stevens-Johnson syndromes. The aims of this organisation are to represent the interests of patients who have experienced these syndromes; to better inform the public about these syndromes; to provide analyses of drug-related risks; and to demand collective compensation for victims of serious adverse drug reactions. The following text is our translation of an Amalyste position statement on drug-related risks. It provides valuable food for thought, both for healthcare professionals and for drug regulatory agencies, and has the potential to improve practice (a).

  1. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-01

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  2. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-05

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  3. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  4. The Antiepileptic Drug Levetiracetam Suppresses Non-Convulsive Seizure Activity and Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Permanent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Ornella; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Leo, Antonio; Politi, Giovanni Bosco; Vinciguerra, Antonio; di Renzo, Gianfranco; Cataldi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug Levetiracetam (Lev) has neuroprotective properties in experimental stroke, cerebral hemorrhage and neurotrauma. In these conditions, non-convulsive seizures (NCSs) propagate from the core of the focal lesion into perilesional tissue, enlarging the damaged area and promoting epileptogenesis. Here, we explore whether Lev neuroprotective effect is accompanied by changes in NCS generation or propagation. In particular, we performed continuous EEG recordings before and after the permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (pMCAO) in rats that received Lev (100 mg/kg) or its vehicle immediately before surgery. Both in Lev-treated and in control rats, EEG activity was suppressed after pMCAO. In control but not in Lev-treated rats, EEG activity reappeared approximately 30-45 min after pMCAO. It initially consisted in single spikes and, then, evolved into spike-and-wave and polyspike-and-wave discharges. In Lev-treated rats, only rare spike events were observed and the EEG power was significantly smaller than in controls. Approximately 24 hours after pMCAO, EEG activity increased in Lev-treated rats because of the appearance of polyspike events whose power was, however, significantly smaller than in controls. In rats sacrificed 24 hours after pMCAO, the ischemic lesion was approximately 50% smaller in Lev-treated than in control rats. A similar neuroprotection was observed in rats sacrificed 72 hours after pMCAO. In conclusion, in rats subjected to pMCAO, a single Lev injection suppresses NCS occurrence for at least 24 hours. This electrophysiological effect could explain the long lasting reduction of ischemic brain damage caused by this drug. PMID:24236205

  5. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  6. Adverse event detection in drug development: recommendations and obligations beyond phase 3.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Jesse A; Glasser, Susan C; Ellenberg, Susan S

    2008-08-01

    Premarketing studies of drugs, although large enough to demonstrate efficacy and detect common adverse events, cannot reliably detect an increased incidence of rare adverse events or events with significant latency. For most drugs, only about 500 to 3000 participants are studied, for relatively short durations, before a drug is marketed. Systems for assessment of postmarketing adverse events include spontaneous reports, computerized claims or medical record databases, and formal postmarketing studies. We briefly review the strengths and limitations of each. Postmarketing surveillance is essential for developing a full understanding of the balance between benefits and adverse effects. More work is needed in analysis of data from spontaneous reports of adverse effects and automated databases, design of ad hoc studies, and design of economically feasible large randomized studies.

  7. Adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Glauciene Santana; Guaraldo, Lusiele; Engstrom, Elyne Montenegro; Filha, Mariza Miranda Theme; Santos, Reinaldo Souza-; Vasconcelos, Ana Gloria Godoi; Rozenfeld, Suely

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to characterize and estimate the frequency of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in the population treated at the Centro de Saúde Escola Germano Sinval Faria, a primary health care clinic in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro City, and to explore the relationship between adverse drug reactions and some of the patients' demographic and health characteristics. METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted via patient record review of incident cases between 2004 and 2008. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients studied, 41.5% developed one or more adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, totaling 126 occurrences. The rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs was higher among women, patients aged 50 years or older, those with four or more comorbidities, and those who used five or more drugs. Of the total reactions, 71.4% were mild. The organ systems most affected were as follows: the gastrointestinal tract (29.4%), the skin and appendages (21.4%), and the central and peripheral nervous systems (14.3%). Of the patients who experienced adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, 65.8% received no drug treatment for their adverse reactions, and 4.1% had one of the antituberculosis drugs suspended because of adverse reactions. “Probable reactions” (75%) predominated over “possible reactions” (24%). In the study sample, 64.3% of the reactions occurred during the first two months of treatment, and most (92.6%) of the reactions were ascribed to the combination of rifampicin + isoniazid + pyrazinamide (Regimen I). A high dropout rate from tuberculosis treatment (24.4%) was also observed. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a high rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. PMID:23644852

  8. Drug-Related Adverse Events of Osteoporosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Cheung, Angela M; Khan, Aliya A

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is associated with microarchitectural deterioration and increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis therapy effectively reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fracture and has been associated with increased survival. Currently approved treatments for osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, denosumab, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and teriparatide. This article reviews the adverse events of therapy associated with these medical interventions. Hormone replacement therapy is not included, because it is no longer indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in all countries. Calcitonin and strontium ranelate are also not included, because their indication for osteoporosis has recently been limited or withdrawn.

  9. Improving drug safety: From adverse drug reaction knowledge discovery to clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuxiang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yin, Zhinan; Chen, Xue-Wen; Liu, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern, causing over 100,000 fatalities in the United States every year with an annual cost of $136 billion. Early detection and accurate prediction of ADRs is thus vital for drug development and patient safety. Multiple scientific disciplines, namely pharmacology, pharmacovigilance, and pharmacoinformatics, have been addressing the ADR problem from different perspectives. With the same goal of improving drug safety, this article summarizes and links the research efforts in the multiple disciplines into a single framework from comprehensive understanding of the interactions between drugs and biological system and the identification of genetic and phenotypic predispositions of patients susceptible to higher ADR risks and finally to the current state of implementation of medication-related decision support systems. We start by describing available computational resources for building drug-target interaction networks with biological annotations, which provides a fundamental knowledge for ADR prediction. Databases are classified by functions to help users in selection. Post-marketing surveillance is then introduced where data-driven approach can not only enhance the prediction accuracy of ADRs but also enables the discovery of genetic and phenotypic risk factors of ADRs. Understanding genetic risk factors for ADR requires well organized patient genetics information and analysis by pharmacogenomic approaches. Finally, current state of clinical decision support systems is presented and described how clinicians can be assisted with the integrated knowledgebase to minimize the risk of ADR. This review ends with a discussion of existing challenges in each of disciplines with potential solutions and future directions.

  10. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Materials and Methods: Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. Results: A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. Conclusions: This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society. PMID:27721535

  11. A pipeline to extract drug-adverse event pairs from multiple data sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacovigilance aims to uncover and understand harmful side-effects of drugs, termed adverse events (AEs). Although the current process of pharmacovigilance is very systematic, the increasing amount of information available in specialized health-related websites as well as the exponential growth in medical literature presents a unique opportunity to supplement traditional adverse event gathering mechanisms with new-age ones. Method We present a semi-automated pipeline to extract associations between drugs and side effects from traditional structured adverse event databases, enhanced by potential drug-adverse event pairs mined from user-comments from health-related websites and MEDLINE abstracts. The pipeline was tested using a set of 12 drugs representative of two previous studies of adverse event extraction from health-related websites and MEDLINE abstracts. Results Testing the pipeline shows that mining non-traditional sources helps substantiate the adverse event databases. The non-traditional sources not only contain the known AEs, but also suggest some unreported AEs for drugs which can then be analyzed further. Conclusion A semi-automated pipeline to extract the AE pairs from adverse event databases as well as potential AE pairs from non-traditional sources such as text from MEDLINE abstracts and user-comments from health-related websites is presented. PMID:24559132

  12. Be sure to read the fine print: the agency for healthcare research and quality comparative effectiveness report on antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E; Faught, Edward; Schmidt, Dieter; McAuley, James W; Ryan, Melody

    2012-05-01

    For many questions related to the pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, there are few or no published data. This lack of data presents dilemmas to practitioners who must make informed, rational decisions about therapy on a daily basis and to policymakers dealing with drug formulary management and reimbursement. Reliance on randomized, clinical trial data is inefficient because of the extensive time and expense involved in conducting a study and the inability to answer every question encountered in practice. In addition, results from randomized, clinical studies are not fully applicable in the clinical setting because of short trial duration and the frequent use of surrogate controls that are rarely seen in routine practice.

  13. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  14. Genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Empey, Philip E

    2010-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant public health problem that leads to mortality, hospital admissions, an increased length of stay, increasing healthcare costs, and withdrawal of drugs from market. Intensive care unit patients are particularly vulnerable and are at an elevated risk. Critical care practitioners, regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry aggressively seek biomarkers to mitigate patient risk. The rapidly expanding field of pharmacogenomics focuses on the genetic contributions to the variability in drug response. Polymorphisms may explain why some groups of patients have the expected response to pharmacotherapy whereas others experience adverse drug reactions. Historically, genetic association studies have focused on characterizing the effects of variation in drug metabolizing enzymes on pharmacokinetics. Recent work has investigated drug transporters and the variants of genes encoding drug targets, both intended and unintended, that comprise pharmacodynamics. This has led to an appreciation of the role that genetics plays in adverse drug reactions that are either predictable extensions of a drug's known therapeutic effect or idiosyncratic.This review presents the evidence for a genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions, focusing on gene variants producing alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care unit patients. Genetic biomarkers with the strongest associations to adverse drug reaction risk in the intensive care unit are presented along with the medications involved. Variant genotypes and phenotypes, allelic frequencies in different populations, and clinical studies are discussed. The article also presents the current recommendations for pharmacogenetic testing in clinical practice and explores the drug, patient, research study design, regulatory, and practical issues that presently limit more widespread implementation.

  15. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 inductions by anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine, and carbamazepine using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Murayama, Norie; Kuroki, Ayaka; Kota, Jagannath; Iwano, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hirota, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine is structurally related to carbamazepine, but has reportedly different metabolic pathway. Auto-induction potentials of oxcarbazepine, its pharmacologically active metabolite 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine were evaluated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels and primary metabolic rates using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. For the CYP1A2 the induction potential determined as the fold change in mRNA levels was 7.2 (range: 2.3-11.5) and 10.0 (6.2-13.7) for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively, while 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine did not induce. The fold change in mRNA levels for CYP2B6 was 11.5 (3.2-19.3), 7.0 (2.5-10.8) and 14.8 (3.1-29.1) for oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively. The fold change for CYP3A4 induction level by oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine was 3.5 (1.2-7.4), 2.7 (0.8-5.7) and 8.3 (3.5-14.5), respectively. The data suggest lower induction potential of oxcarbazepine and 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine relative to carbamazepine. The results in HepaRG cells showed similar trend as the human hepatocytes. After incubation for 72 h in hepatocytes and HepaRG cells, auto-induction was evident for only carbamazepine metabolism. The 10-keto group instead of double bond at C10 position is evidently a determinant factor for limited auto-induction of P450 enzymes by oxcarbazepine.

  16. [Methodology for Estimating the Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Pregnant Women: Analysis of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takamasa; Ohtsu, Fumiko; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Mori, Chiyo; Sakata, Hiroshi; Goto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Safety information regarding drug use during pregnancy is insufficient. The present study aimed to establish an optimal signal detection method to identify adverse drug reactions in pregnant women and to evaluate information in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database between April 2004 and November 2014. We identified reports on pregnant women using the Standardised MedDRA Queries. We calculated the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) and reporting odds ratio (ROR) of the risk factors for the two known risks of antithyroid drugs and methimazole (MMI) embryopathy, and ritodrine and fetal/infant cardiovascular events. The PRR and ROR values differed between all reports in the JADER database and those on pregnant women, affecting whether signal detection criteria were met. Therefore we considered that reports on pregnant women should be used when risks associated with pregnancy were determined using signal detection. Analyses of MMI embryopathy revealed MMI signals [PRR, 159.7; ROR, 669.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 282.4-1588.7] but no propylthiouracil signals (PRR, 1.98; ROR, 2.0; 95%CI, 0.3-15.4). These findings were consistent with those of reported risks. Analyses of fetal/infant cardiovascular events revealed ritodrine signals (PRR, 2.1; ROR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.3). These findings were also consistent with reported risks. Mining the JADER database was helpful for analyzing adverse drug reactions in pregnant women.

  17. Identifying genomic and developmental causes of adverse drug reactions in children

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Mara L; Leeder, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a concern for all clinicians who utilize medications to treat adults and children; however, the frequency of adult and pediatric adverse drug reactions is likely to be under-reported. In this age of genomics and personalized medicine, identifying genetic variation that results in differences in drug biotransformation and response has contributed to significant advances in the utilization of several commonly used medications in adults. In order to better understand the variability of drug response in children however, we must not only consider differences in genotype, but also variation in gene expression during growth and development, namely ontogeny. In this article, recommendations for systematically approaching pharmacogenomic studies in children are discussed, and several examples of studies that investigate the genomic and developmental contribution to adverse drug reactions in children are reviewed. PMID:21121777

  18. Subchronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs modifies pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice: Its correlation with benzodiazepine receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Experiments using male CD1 mice were carried out to investigate the effects of subchronic (daily administration for 8 days) pretreatments with drugs enhancing GABAergic transmission (diazepam, 10 mg/kg, ip; gabapentin, 100 mg/kg, po; or vigabatrin, 500 mg/kg, po) on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures, 24 h after the last injection. Subchronic administration of diazepam reduced latencies to clonus, tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic vigabatrin produced enhanced latency to the first clonus but faster occurrence of tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic gabapentin did not modify PTZ-induced seizures. Autoradiography experiments revealed reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding in several brain areas after subchronic treatment with diazepam or gabapentin, whereas subchronic vigabatrin did not induce significant receptor changes. The present results indicate differential effects induced by the subchronic administration of diazepam, vigabatrin, and gabapentin on the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures, benzodiazepine receptor binding, or both. PMID:18830436

  19. Reporting of adverse events for marketed drugs: Need for strengthening safety database

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Aditi Anand

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is an evolving discipline in the Indian context. However, there is limited regulatory guidance for adverse event reporting outside the purview of clinical trials. There are number of deficiencies in the framework for adverse event reporting from the perspective of pharma industry, health-care professional and general public due to which adverse events for marketed drugs are highly underreported. This article discusses the need to strengthen national safety database by promoting and mandating reporting of adverse events by all the stakeholders. PMID:27453826

  20. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells.

  1. The radiology of adverse drug reactions and toxic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ansell has produced a scholarly review of the radiology of drug reactions and toxic hazards in his latest book, which is based on over 1,200 articles in the world literature. About 800 of these articles are taken from outside the radiology literature, which indicates the need for this subject to be brought to the attention of the radiologist, particularly as concern about drug reactions and toxic hazards is always increasing. The book includes sections covering the chest, gastrointestinal tract, renal tract, skeletal system and soft tissues, and skull and central nervous system. Each section treats specific substances, such as steroids and heavy metals; specific radiologic signs, such as ureteric dilation; specific symptoms, such as dysphagia; industrial toxins; radiographic abnormalities are discussed; and numerous high-quality radiographs.

  2. Risk factors for adverse drug reactions--epidemiological approaches.

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R; Lawson, D H; Weber, E

    1990-01-01

    Age by itself is not an important risk factor for ADRs. Age-related changes are the consequence of a number of individual factors, for example morbidity associated with polypharmacy, decline in renal or liver function in the elderly, hypoalbuminaemia, reduced body weight, etc. The relationship between gastrointestinal bleeding and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be assessed globally in large cohort studies with access to computerized data, but complete accuracy requires access to the original patient records. The increase in the risk of GI bleeding in users of NSAIDs and aspirin was 50% above that in non-users. About a quarter of ADRs in hospitalized patients seem not to arise from purely pharmacological mechanisms. They are mainly due to allergic, anaphylactoid, or idiosyncratic reactions and to intolerance. In such non-pharmacological reactions, the time of exposure, reaction time, and even dosage may be important factors in identification of the causal drug. The use of benzodiazepines can be optimized by taking into account potency, time of action and the different syndromes encountered after withdrawal. Following long-term use problems of relapse and rebound are being increasingly recognized, in addition to organic withdrawal symptoms. In psychiatric patients extrapyramidal disorders due to neuroleptics are common. The rates of these ADRs differ markedly between various drugs, even after dosages and co-medications are taken into account. Epidemiological screening for potentially carcinogenic drugs can only be done in large cohorts of patients with pre-recorded full information sets as may be found in an HMO (Health Maintenance Organization). The findings of several such studies have been published in specialist cancer journals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and reporting of postmarketing adverse drug experiences to FDA. (b) Definitions. The following... severity) if the labeling only referred to elevated hepatic enzymes or hepatitis. Similarly, cerebral... and Drug Administration, 5901-B Ammendale Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705-1266. (1) Postmarketing...

  4. Pharmacodynamic potentiation of antiepileptic drugs' effects by some HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Donato di Paola, Eugenio; Gareri, Pietro; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Gallelli, Luca; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-04-01

    It is known that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are effective in both the primary and the secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease. Increasing evidence indicates that statins have protective effects in several neurological diseases including stroke, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and epilepsy. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of some HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e. lovastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin and pravastatin) commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia in the DBA/2 mice, an animal model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the co-administration of these compounds with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; i.e. carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate and valproate) was studied in order to identify possible positive pharmacological interactions. Simvastatin only was active against both the tonic and clonic phase of audiogenic seizures, whereas the other statins tested were only partially effective against the tonic phase with the following order of potency: lovastatin>fluvastatin>atorvastatin; pravastatin was completely ineffective up to the dose of 150mg/kg. The co-administration of ineffective doses of all statins with AEDs generally increased the potency of the latter reducing their ED50 values. In particular, simvastatin was the most active in potentiating the activity of AEDs and the combinations of statins with carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate and valproate were the most favorable, whereas, the co-administrations with the other AEDs studied was in most cases neutral. The increase in potency was generally associated with an enhancement of motor impairment (TD50); however, the therapeutic index (TD50/ED50) of combined treatment of AEDs with statins was predominantly more

  5. [Understanding and reducing the risk of adverse drug reactions in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Gotta, Verena; van den Anker, Johannes; Pfister, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Developmental pharmacology influences the safety profile of drugs in pediatrics. Altered pharmacokinetics and/ or pharmacodynamics of drugs make pediatric patients susceptible to adverse drug reactions (ADRs), especially infants and newborns. Since the efficacy/ safety balance of most available drugs has not been formally evaluated in pediatric clinical trials, optimal dosing is rarely known in pediatrics. Suboptimal pediatric drug formulations make dose optimization even more difficult exposing pediatric patients to medication errors like overdosing and associated ADRs. We provide an overview of pediatric ADRs and discuss recent regulatory and pharmacological measures to understand and reduce risk of ADRs in pediatric patients.

  6. Using Temporal Patterns in Medical Records to Discern Adverse Drug Events from Indications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan; Shah, Nigam H.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers estimate that electronic health record systems record roughly 2-million ambulatory adverse drug events and that patients suffer from adverse drug events in roughly 30% of hospital stays. Some have used structured databases of patient medical records and health insurance claims recently—going beyond the current paradigm of using spontaneous reporting systems like AERS—to detect drug-safety signals. However, most efforts do not use the free-text from clinical notes in monitoring for drug-safety signals. We hypothesize that drug–disease co-occurrences, extracted from ontology-based annotations of the clinical notes, can be examined for statistical enrichment and used for drug safety surveillance. When analyzing such co-occurrences of drugs and diseases, one major challenge is to differentiate whether the disease in a drug–disease pair represents an indication or an adverse event. We demonstrate that it is possible to make this distinction by combining the frequency distribution of the drug, the disease, and the drug-disease pair as well as the temporal ordering of the drugs and diseases in each pair across more than one million patients. PMID:22779050

  7. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  8. A comparison of the efficacy of carbamazepine and the novel anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam in the tetanus toxin model of focal complex partial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Doheny, H C; Whittington, M A; Jefferys, J G R; Patsalos, P N

    2002-01-01

    The tetanus toxin seizure model, which is associated with spontaneous and intermittent generalized and non-generalized seizures, is considered to reflect human complex partial epilepsy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine with that of levetiracetam, a new anti-epileptic drug in this model. One μl of tetanus toxin solution (containing 12 mLD50 μl−1 of tetanus toxin) was placed stereotactically into the rat left hippocampus resulting in generalized and non-generalized seizures. Carbamazepine (4 mg kg−1 h−1) and levetiracetam (8 and 16 mg kg−1 h−1) were administered during a 7 day period via an osmotic minipump which was placed in the peritoneal cavity. Carbamazepine (4 mg kg−1 h−1) exhibited no significant anticonvulsant effect, compared to control, when the entire 7 day study period was evaluated but the reduction in generalized seizures was greater (35.5%) than that for non-generalized seizures (12.6%). However, during the first 2 days of carbamazepine administration a significant reduction in both generalized seizure frequency (90%) and duration (25%) was observed. Non-generalized seizures were unaffected. This time-dependent anticonvulsant effect exactly paralleled the central (CSF) and peripheral (serum) kinetics of carbamazepine in that steady-state concentrations declined over time, with the highest concentrations achieved during the first 2 days. Also there was a significant 27.3% reduction in duration of generalized seizures during the 7 day study period (P=0.0001). Levetiracetam administration (8 and 16 mg kg−1 h−1) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in the frequency of both generalized (39 v 57%) and non-generalized (36 v 41%) seizures. However, seizure suppression was more substantial for generalized seizures. Also a significant dose-dependent reduction in overall generalized seizure duration was observed. These data provide

  9. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  10. 3D pharmacophoric similarity improves multi adverse drug event identification in pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-06

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  11. Pattern mining for extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from user comments.

    PubMed

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%.

  12. Pattern Mining for Extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from User Comments

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%. PMID:22195162

  13. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing) is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics) and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer) were utilized. An I2E query extracts “Serious Adverse Events” (SAE) data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer). PMID:28348935

  14. Biometrical issues in the analysis of adverse events within the benefit assessment of drugs.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ralf; Beckmann, Lars; Lange, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of adverse events plays an important role in the benefit assessment of drugs. Consequently, results on adverse events are an integral part of reimbursement dossiers submitted by pharmaceutical companies to health policy decision-makers. Methods applied in the analysis of adverse events commonly include simple standard methods for contingency tables. However, the results produced may be misleading if observations are censored at the time of discontinuation due to treatment switching or noncompliance, resulting in unequal follow-up periods. In this paper, we present examples to show that the application of inadequate methods for the analysis of adverse events in the reimbursement dossier can lead to a downgrading of the evidence on a drug's benefit in the subsequent assessment, as greater harm from the drug cannot be excluded with sufficient certainty. Legal regulations on the benefit assessment of drugs in Germany are presented, in particular, with regard to the analysis of adverse events. Differences in safety considerations between the drug approval process and the benefit assessment are discussed. We show that the naive application of simple proportions in reimbursement dossiers frequently leads to uninterpretable results if observations are censored and the average follow-up periods differ between treatment groups. Likewise, the application of incidence rates may be misleading in the case of recurrent events and unequal follow-up periods. To allow for an appropriate benefit assessment of drugs, adequate survival time methods accounting for time dependencies and duration of follow-up are required, not only for time-to-event efficacy endpoints but also for adverse events. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmaceutical Statistics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [International reporting of adverse drug reactions. Final report of CIOMS ADR Working Group].

    PubMed

    Royer, R J; Benichou, C

    1991-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, a working group composed of representatives of seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities developed and implemented a standardized method for reporting post-approval adverse drug reactions (ADR). The method is based on a set of uniform definitions and procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be feasible and effective. Regulators and manufacturers, in establishing requirements and systems for reporting of adverse drug reactions, should consider adopting this method.

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation in drug-resistant epilepsy: the efficacy and adverse effects in a 5-year follow-up study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, Hossein; Amini Harandi, Ali; Abbasi, Mehdi; Karimi, Mohammad; Arami, Mohammad Ali; Mosavi, Seyed Ali; Haddadian, Karim; Rezaei, Omidvar; Sadeghi, Sohrab; Sharifi, Guive; Gharagozli, Koroush; Bahrami, Parviz; Ashrafi, Farzad; Kasmae, Hosein Delavar; Ghassemi, Amirhossein; Arabahmadi, Mehran; Behnam, Behdad

    2016-11-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy seems like a different disease compared with easy to control epilepsy, and new strategies are needed to help these patients. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy is the most frequently used neurostimulation modality for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy who are not eligible for seizure surgery. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of VNS in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in an open-label, prospective, long-term study in Iran. We selected 48 patients with partial-onset drug-resistant epilepsy. Implantations were performed in the neurosurgery department of Loghman Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Follow-up visits were done on monthly bases for 5 years. Forty-four patients completed the study. Mean age of patients was 24.4 years. Mean years of epilepsy history was 14 years. The mean number of anti-epileptic drugs did not significantly change over five years (p = 0.15). There was no exacerbation of epilepsy; however, one patient discontinued his therapy due to unsatisfactory results. Five patient had more than 50 %, and 26 patients (59 %) had 25-49 % reduction in the frequency of monthly seizures persistently. Overall mean frequency of monthly seizures decreased by 57.8, 59.6, 65, 65.9, and 67 %, in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th years of follow-up, respectively. Most common side effects were as follows: hoarseness (25 %) and throat discomfort (10 %). We found VNS as a safe and effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, with an approximate long-term decrease in mean seizure frequency of 57.8-67 %. Thus, VNS is recommended for suitable patients in developing countries.

  17. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Therapy-Related Adverse Drug Reactions and Their Management.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, M; Zweifel, S; Barthelmes, D; Meier, F; Fehr, J; Böni, C

    2017-03-22

    Background There are different treatment options for ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). "Classic" therapy consists of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid combined with systemic steroids and is still widely used. However, potentially severe side effects of this therapy have been reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and types of adverse drug reactions in patients treated for OT. Clinical management of each adverse drug reaction was assessed. Patients and Methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed data of patients with OT, who were consecutively examined between December 2011 and December 2015 at the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich. Results In total, 49 patients had at least one episode of active OT. In 54 (83.0 %) of 65 treated episodes, the classic regimen was used. Of the 37 patients who received classic treatment, 9 (24.3 %) developed at least one adverse drug reaction which led to drug discontinuation, including elevated creatinine (5.4 %), elevated liver enzymes (5.4 %), vomiting (5.4 %), rash (5.4 %) and facial swelling (2.7 %). In 5 patients, treatment was switched to another drug, while in the other 4 patients, therapy was stopped. In these 9 patients, inflammation was well controlled 8 weeks after onset of therapy. No patient suffered from severe side effects, such as potentially life-threatening allergic reactions or pancytopenia. Conclusions In OT patients who were treated with classic therapy, adverse drug reactions are common. Therefore, clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory. Adverse drug reactions may require interdisciplinary management.

  18. Adverse drug reactions to self-medication: a study in a pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Berreni, Aurélia; Montastruc, François; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Vanessa; Abadie, Delphine; Durrieu, Geneviève; Chebane, Leila; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Bagheri, Haleh; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Although self-medication is widely developed, there are few detailed data about its adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This study investigated the main characteristics of ADRs with self-medication recorded in the Midi-Pyrénées PharmacoVigilance between 2008 and 2014. Self-medication included first OTC drugs and second formerly prescribed drugs later used without medical advice (reuse of previously prescribed drugs). Among the 12 365 notifications recorded, 160 (1.3%) were related to SM with 186 drugs. Around three-forth of the ADRs were 'serious'. Mean age was 48.8 years with 56.3% females. The most frequent ADRs were gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric and main drug classes involved NSAIDs, analgesics, and benzodiazepines. Phytotherapy-homeopathy accounted for 9.1% of drugs.

  19. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  20. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce.

  1. Antiepileptics for post-herpetic neuralgia in the elderly: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Gisèle

    2014-09-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia is a painful condition and its prevalence increases with age. It is a burden for older patients and the association of age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, high co-morbidity and polypharmacy leads to the risk of adverse drug reactions and interactions. This type of neuropathic pain is particularly difficult to treat and guidelines recommend the use of gabapentinoids and some antidepressants, the utility of which may be hampered by adverse effects such as sedation, dizziness and impaired age-related renal function. Re-formulations of antiepileptics (anticonvulsants) are being developed and/or marketed and suggest interesting innovative profiles with improved bioavailability, low drug-drug interactions and better tolerability that need to be confirmed in future studies. However, there are no new antiepileptics being developed for post-herpetic neuralgia, and prospective studies specifically focused on the older population are still missing, while this age group is particularly at risk of developing shingles and chronic neuropathic pain with a deleterious impact on quality of life.

  2. Adverse event profile of tigecycline: data mining of the public version of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration adverse event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Kadoyama, Kaori; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Tamon, Akiko; Okuno, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and/or pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics considerations may result in off-label use of a certain class of antibacterials, including tigecycline. This study was performed to clarify the safety profile of tigecycline in the user-derived manner and to compare it with the prescribing information provided by the manufacturer. Numerous spontaneous adverse event reports (AERs) submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were analyzed after a revision of arbitrary drug names and the deletion of duplicated submissions. Standardized official pharmacovigilance tools were used for quantitative detection of signals, i.e., drug-associated adverse events, including the proportional reporting ratio, the reporting odds ratio, the information component given by a Bayesian confidence propagation neural network, and the empirical Bayes geometric mean. Based on 22017956 co-occurrences, i.e., drug-adverse event pairs, found in 1644220 AERs from 2004 to 2009, 248 adverse events were suggested as tigecycline-associated ones. Adverse events with a relatively high frequency included nausea, vomiting, pancreatitis, hepatic failure, hypoglycemia, and increase in levels of alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase. It is noted that cholestasis, jaundice, an increase in International Normalized Ratio, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome were also, although they were infrequent. The adverse events suggested were in agreement with information provided by the manufacturer, suggesting that off-label use hardly results in unexpected adverse events, presumably due to usage with extreme caution.

  3. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Ashley M; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs) may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis. PMID:11914150

  4. Silicone gel breast implant adverse event reports to the Food and Drug Administration, 1984-1995.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S L; Parmentier, C M; Woo, E K; Vishnuvajjala, R L; Headrick, M L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the adverse event reports on silicone gel breast implants (SGBIs), including death reports, submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 1984 through 1995 and to analyze changes in the type and complexity of reports following extensive media coverage of breast implants. METHODS: The authors analyzed mandatory and voluntary reports from the adverse events reporting system for medical devices at the FDA. RESULTS: In 1988, adverse event reports related to SGBIs accounted for 2.4% of the 14,473 mandatory reports entered into the FDA database on medical devices. In 1992, SGBI-related reports accounted for 30.3% of the total 66,476 mandatory reports of adverse events. The most frequently reported adverse event in 1988, before the widespread publicity on breast implants, was implant burst or rupture. In contrast, in 1992 the most frequently reported event was reaction, a term used to describe a range of adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: The numbers of mandatory and voluntary reports of SGBI-related adverse events increased exponentially, as did the complexity of the reports, following publicity over the lack of safety data on breast implants and a short voluntary moratorium on their sale. A significant proportion of reports lacked information on specific medical symptoms or diagnoses. PMID:9847926

  5. Drug target prediction using adverse event report systems: a pharmacogenomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Takarabe, Masataka; Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Unexpected drug activities derived from off-targets are usually undesired and harmful; however, they can occasionally be beneficial for different therapeutic indications. There are many uncharacterized drugs whose target proteins (including the primary target and off-targets) remain unknown. The identification of all potential drug targets has become an important issue in drug repositioning to reuse known drugs for new therapeutic indications. Results: We defined pharmacological similarity for all possible drugs using the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse event reporting system (AERS) and developed a new method to predict unknown drug–target interactions on a large scale from the integration of pharmacological similarity of drugs and genomic sequence similarity of target proteins in the framework of a pharmacogenomic approach. The proposed method was applicable to a large number of drugs and it was useful especially for predicting unknown drug–target interactions that could not be expected from drug chemical structures. We made a comprehensive prediction for potential off-targets of 1874 drugs with known targets and potential target profiles of 2519 drugs without known targets, which suggests many potential drug–target interactions that were not predicted by previous chemogenomic or pharmacogenomic approaches. Availability: Softwares are available upon request. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp Supplementary Information: Datasets and all results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/aers/. PMID:22962489

  6. Mining multi-item drug adverse effect associations in spontaneous reporting systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multi-item adverse drug event (ADE) associations are associations relating multiple drugs to possibly multiple adverse events. The current standard in pharmacovigilance is bivariate association analysis, where each single drug-adverse effect combination is studied separately. The importance and difficulty in the detection of multi-item ADE associations was noted in several prominent pharmacovigilance studies. In this paper we examine the application of a well established data mining method known as association rule mining, which we tailored to the above problem, and demonstrate its value. The method was applied to the FDAs spontaneous adverse event reporting system (AERS) with minimal restrictions and expectations on its output, an experiment that has not been previously done on the scale and generality proposed in this work. Results Based on a set of 162,744 reports of suspected ADEs reported to AERS and published in the year 2008, our method identified 1167 multi-item ADE associations. A taxonomy that characterizes the associations was developed based on a representative sample. A significant number (67% of the total) of potential multi-item ADE associations identified were characterized and clinically validated by a domain expert as previously recognized ADE associations. Several potentially novel ADEs were also identified. A smaller proportion (4%) of associations were characterized and validated as known drug-drug interactions. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that multi-item ADEs are present and can be extracted from the FDA’s adverse effect reporting system using our methodology, suggesting that our method is a valid approach for the initial identification of multi-item ADEs. The study also revealed several limitations and challenges that can be attributed to both the method and quality of data. PMID:21044365

  7. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, Ramya; Karthik, K. S.; David, Chaya; Ameerunnisa; Keerthi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:23066260

  8. [Recomendations for the prevention of adverse drug reactions in older adults with dementia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pavón, Javier; González García, Paloma; Francés Román, Inés; Vidán Astiz, Maite; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, José; Jiménez Díaz, Gregorio; Montero Fernández, Nuria Pilar; Alvarez Fernández, Baldomero; Jiménez Páez, José María

    2010-01-01

    The elderly are one of the groups at greatest risk for adverse drugs reactions (ADR). The mean prevalence of these reactions in this population is 30%. Dementia is not an independent risk factor of ADR, but is the main condition that increases all risk factors (polypharmacy, comorbidity, inappropriate prescribing, drug-drug interactions, advanced age, and treatment adherence). The present article discusses revised and consensual recommendations for the prevention of ADR in the elderly, as well as recommendations specifically for dementia patients in relation to the management of comorbidity and cognitive, behavioral and psychological symptoms.

  9. Statistical Mining of Potential Drug Interaction Adverse Effects in FDA's Spontaneous Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Haerian, Krystl; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2010-11-13

    Many adverse drug effects (ADEs) can be attributed to drug interactions. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) provide a rich opportunity to detect novel post-marketed drug interaction adverse effects (DIAEs), as they include populations not well represented in clinical trials. However, their identification in SRS is nontrivial. Most existing research have addressed the statistical issues used to test or verify DIAEs, but not their identification as part of a systematic large scale database-wide mining process as discussed in this work. This paper examines the application of a highly optimized and tailored implementation of the Apriori algorithm, as well as methods addressing data quality issues, to the identification of DIAEs in FDAs SRS.

  10. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov. Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs. PMID:27631620

  11. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  12. Significant HLA class I type associations with aromatic antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced SJS/TEN are different from those found for the same AED-induced DRESS in the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Elena; Bellón, Teresa; Tong, Hoi Y; Borobia, Alberto M; de Abajo, Francisco J; Lerma, Victoria; Moreno Hidalgo, Miguel A; Castañer, José L; Cabañas, Rosario; Fiandor, Ana; González-Ramos, Jessica; Herranz, Pedro; Cachafeiro, Lucía; González-Herrada, Carlos; González, Olga; Aramburu, José A; Laosa, Olga; Hernández, Rafael; Carcas, Antonio J; Frías, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the drugs most frequently involved in severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). This study investigated the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of HLA class-I and AED-induced SCARs in the Spanish population. HLA class-I genotypes were determined in AED (phenytoin[PHT],lamotrigine[LTG],carbamazepine[CBZ],phenobarbital[PB])-induced SJS/TEN (n=15) or DRESS (n=12) cases included in the Spanish SCAR registry, PIELenRed. There were 3 control groups: (A)tolerant to a single AED, (B)tolerant to any AED, and (C)Spanish population controls. For SJS/TEN, concomitant HLA-A*02:01/Cw15:02 alleles were significantly associated with PHT-cases compared to control groups B and C [(B)odds ratio(OR):14.75, p=0.009;(C)OR:27.50, p<0.001], and were close to significance with respect to control group A (p=0.060). The genotype frequency of the HLA-B*38:01 was significantly associated with PHT-LTG-cases compared with the 3 groups of controls [(A)OR:12.86, p=0.012;(B)OR:13.81; p=0.002;(C)OR:14.35, p<0.001], and with LTG-cases [(A)OR:147.00, p=0.001;(B)OR:115.00, p<0.001;(C)OR:124.70, p<0.001]. We found the HLA-B*15:02 allele in a Spanish Romani patient with a CBZ-case. The HLA-A*11:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-cases [(A)OR:63.89, p=0.002;(B)OR:36.33, p=0.005;(C)OR:28.29, p=0.007]. For DRESS, the HLA-A*24:02 genotype frequency was statistically significant in the PHT-LTG-cases [(A)OR:22.56, p=0.003;(B)OR:23.50. p=0.001; (C)OR:33.25, p<0.001], and in the LTG-cases [(A),OR:49.00, p=0.015;(B)OR:27.77, p=0.005; (C)OR:34.53, p=0.002]. HLA-A*31:01 was significantly associated with the CBZ-cases [(A)OR:22.00, p=0.047;(B)OR:29.50, p=0.033;(C)OR:35.14, p=0.006]. In conclusion, we identified several significant genetic risk factors for the first time in the Spanish Caucasian population: HLA

  13. Evidence behind FDA alerts for drugs with adverse cardiovascular effects: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Daniel M; C Herink, Megan; Stevens, Ian G; Cardoza, Natalie M; Singh, Harleen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) periodically publishes Drug Safety Communications and Drug Alerts notifying health care practitioners and the general public of important information regarding drug therapies following FDA approval. These alerts can result in both positive and negative effects on patient care. Most clinical trials are not designed to detect long-term safety end points, and postmarketing surveillance along with patient reported events are often instrumental in signaling the potential harmful effect of a drug. Recently, many cardiovascular (CV) safety announcements have been released for FDA-approved drugs. Because a premature warning could discourage a much needed treatment or prompt a sudden discontinuation, it is essential to evaluate the evidence supporting these FDA alerts to provide effective patient care and to avoid unwarranted changes in therapy. Conversely, paying attention to these warnings in cases involving high-risk patients can prevent adverse effects and litigation. This article reviews the evidence behind recent FDA alerts for drugs with adverse CV effects and discusses the clinical practice implications.

  14. The role of the clinical pharmacologist in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, N

    2001-01-01

    The classical definition of clinical pharmacology is the study or the knowledge of the effects of drugs in humans. The activities of a clinical pharmacologist can vary from country to country, usually ranging from involvement in clinical trials, especially fundamental pharmacodynamic studies, to studies of pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism, to pharmacogenetics. Most clinical pharmacologists outside industry are in hospitals or university hospitals and research centres. In addition to research, this implies teaching of clinical pharmacology, and interacting with other medical staff: in the field of research, giving advice on clinical trials methodology and often managing a therapeutic drug monitoring centre. Some clinical pharmacologists have clinical departments with beds or consulting offices. Can there be another role for the clinical pharmacologist that would increase his or her usefulness for the medical community? Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are remarkably complex events, related to drug effects, patient characteristics (background diseases, genetics), and drug/disease interactions. Evaluation of ADRs requires understanding of drug mechanisms and interactions, and of disease diagnostics, especially in the discussion of alternative diagnoses. This implies expertise as a pharmacologist and a clinician. In addition, because not all adverse reactions or interactions are in the Summary of Product Characteristics, and because problems arise long before they report in the literature, it is necessary for the clinical pharmacologist to have knowledge of ongoing regulatory processes, in addition to having access to the published literature. Helping clinicians cope with individual patient problems will also improve the clinical pharmacologist's integration into the healthcare process.

  15. Identifying plausible adverse drug reactions using knowledge extracted from the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ning; Xu, Hua; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Cohen, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance involves continually monitoring drug safety after drugs are put to market. To aid this process; algorithms for the identification of strongly correlated drug/adverse drug reaction (ADR) pairs from data sources such as adverse event reporting systems or Electronic Health Records have been developed. These methods are generally statistical in nature, and do not draw upon the large volumes of knowledge embedded in the biomedical literature. In this paper, we investigate the ability of scalable Literature Based Discovery (LBD) methods to identify side effects of pharmaceutical agents. The advantage of LBD methods is that they can provide evidence from the literature to support the plausibility of a drug/ ADR association, thereby assisting human review to validate the signal, which is an essential component of pharmacovigilance. To do so, we draw upon vast repositories of knowledge that has been extracted from the biomedical literature by two Natural Language Processing tools, MetaMap and SemRep. We evaluate two LBD methods that scale comfortably to the volume of knowledge available in these repositories. Specifically, we evaluate Reflective Random Indexing (RRI), a model based on concept-level co-occurrence, and Predication-based Semantic Indexing (PSI), a model that encodes the nature of the relationship between concepts to support reasoning analogically about drug-effect relationships. An evaluation set was constructed from the Side Effect Resource 2 (SIDER2), which contains known drug/ADR relations, and models were evaluated for their ability to “rediscover” these relations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both RRI and PSI can recover known drug-adverse event associations. However, PSI performed better overall, and has the additional advantage of being able to recover the literature underlying the reasoning pathways it used to make its predictions. PMID:25046831

  16. Misuse of the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale in toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Seger, Donna; BARKER, Kimberly; McNAUGHTON, Candace D.

    2014-01-01

    Context When an adverse event occurs in an overdose patient, it may be difficult to determine whether the event was caused by the ingested drug or by medical therapy. Naranjo and colleagues developed a probability scale, the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale (Naranjo Scale), to assess the probability that a drug administered in therapeutic doses caused an adverse event thereby classifying the event as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). Although Naranjo et al. specifically excluded the application of this scale to adverse events in overdose patients, case reports demonstrate that authors continue to apply the Naranjo Scale to events in these patients. Objective The World Health Organization defines an ADR as occurring only when drugs are administered in therapeutic doses. Yet ADRs continue to be reported in overdose patients. We sought to examine the use of the Naranjo scale in case reports of overdose patients to assess the potential consequences of that application. Methods A Medline search via PubMed without language limits, through September 2012, using the search terms “Naranjo” and “overdose” or “poisoning” yielded 146 publications. Additional searches were performed to find articles with keywords of the Naranjo Scale development, current applications and validity of application in specific populations such as critically ill and overdose patients. Results From the 146 publications, we identified 17 case reports or series of overdose patients in which the Naranjo Scale was applied to a clinical complication to support a causal relationship between an administered drug and the clinical complication and thereby classify the clinical complication as an ADR. We also identified a recent publication in which the Naranjo Scale was applied to a new treatment modality (lipid emulsion) that is currently administered to overdose patients. Conclusion Adverse events that occur in overdose patients are excluded from the definition of ADR. Yet in case

  17. Assessment of the expectancy, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions reported for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Guenka; Stoimenova, Assena; Dimitrova, Maria; Kamusheva, Maria; Petrova, Daniela; Georgiev, Ognian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Adverse drug reactions can cause increased morbidity and mortality, and therefore information needs to be studied systematically. Little is known about the adverse drug reactions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. The goal of this study is to assess the expectedness, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy based on their reporting in the national pharmacovigilance system. Methods: This was a prospective, observational, 1-year, real-life study about the pharmacotherapy of a sample of 390 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Prescribed medicines were systematized and national pharmacovigilance databases were searched for reported adverse drug reactions. The expectedness was evaluated through the review of the summary of product characteristics, the seriousness was evaluated by the clinicians based on the life threatening nature of the adverse drug reactions, and the severity was evaluated through Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Descriptive statistics of the reported adverse drug reactions was performed and the relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction with all international non-proprietary names included in the analysis was calculated. Results: Results confirm that the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease with high appearance of adverse drug reactions, and causes many additional costs to the healthcare system. Unexpected and severe adverse drug reactions are frequent. A total of 4.8% of adverse drug reactions were evaluated as life threatening. Majority of adverse drug reactions are classified in Levels 1 (32.6%), 2 (26.4%) and 3 (19%) according to Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Approximately 22% of reported adverse drug reactions affect people’s everyday life to a greater extent and require additional therapy which might further increase the risk. The relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction was highest for

  18. Detecting adverse drug events in discharge summaries using variations on the simple Bayes model.

    PubMed

    Visweswaran, Shyam; Hanbury, Paul; Saul, Melissa; Cooper, Gregory F

    2003-01-01

    Detection and prevention of adverse events and, in particular, adverse drug events (ADEs), is an important problem in health care today. We describe the implementation and evaluation of four variations on the simple Bayes model for identifying ADE-related discharge summaries. Our results show that these probabilistic techniques achieve an ROC curve area of up to 0.77 in correctly determining which patient cases should be assigned an ADE-related ICD-9-CM code. These results suggest a potential for these techniques to contribute to the development of an automated system that helps identify ADEs, as a step toward further understanding and preventing them.

  19. Integrating Multiple Evidence Sources to Predict Adverse Drug Reactions Based on a Systems Pharmacology Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, D-S; Xiao, N; Li, Y-J; Zeng, W-B; Liang, Y-Z; Lu, A-P; Xu, Q-S; Chen, AF

    2015-01-01

    Identifying potential adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is critically important for drug discovery and public health. Here we developed a multiple evidence fusion (MEF) method for the large-scale prediction of drug ADRs that can handle both approved drugs and novel molecules. MEF is based on the similarity reference by collaborative filtering, and integrates multiple similarity measures from various data types, taking advantage of the complementarity in the data. We used MEF to integrate drug-related and ADR-related data from multiple levels, including the network structural data formed by known drug–ADR relationships for predicting likely unknown ADRs. On cross-validation, it obtains high sensitivity and specificity, substantially outperforming existing methods that utilize single or a few data types. We validated our prediction by their overlap with drug–ADR associations that are known in databases. The proposed computational method could be used for complementary hypothesis generation and rapid analysis of potential drug–ADR interactions. PMID:26451329

  20. [Evaluation of the Association of Hand-Foot Syndrome with Anticancer Drugs Using the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Databases].

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Sayaka; Matsui, Toshinobu; Abe, Junko; Umetsu, Ryogo; Kato, Yamato; Ueda, Natsumi; Hane, Yuuki; Motooka, Yumi; Hatahira, Haruna; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare lists hand-foot syndrome as a serious adverse drug event. Therefore, we evaluated its association with anticancer drug therapy using case reports in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). In addition, we calculated the reporting odds ratio (ROR) of anticancer drugs potentially associated with hand-foot syndrome, and applied the Weibull shape parameter to time-to-event data from JADER. We found that JADER contained 338224 reports from April 2004 to November 2014, while FAERS contained 5821354 reports from January 2004 to June 2014. In JADER, the RORs [95% confidence interval (CI)] of hand-foot syndrome for capecitabine, tegafur-gimeracil-oteracil, fluorouracil, sorafenib, and regorafenib were 63.60 (95%CI, 56.19-71.99), 1.30 (95%CI, 0.89-1.89), 0.48 (95%CI, 0.30-0.77), 26.10 (95%CI, 22.86-29.80), and 133.27 (95%CI, 112.85-157.39), respectively. Adverse event symptoms of hand-foot syndrome were observed with most anticancer drugs, which carry warnings of the propensity to cause these effects in their drug information literature. The time-to-event analysis using the Weibull shape parameter revealed differences in the time-dependency of the adverse events of each drug. Therefore, anticancer drugs should be used carefully in clinical practice, and patients may require careful monitoring for symptoms of hand-foot syndrome.

  1. Pharmacovigilance and drug safety in Calabria (Italy): 2012 adverse events analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giofrè, Chiara; Scicchitano, Francesca; Palleria, Caterina; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Gallelli, Luca; Paletta, Laura; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Leporini, Christian; Ventrice, Pasquale; Carbone, Claudia; Saullo, Francesca; Rende, Pierandrea; Menniti, Michele; Mumoli, Laura; Chimirri, Serafina; Patanè, Marinella; Esposito, Stefania; Cilurzo, Felisa; Staltari, Orietta; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Pharmacovigilance (PV) is designed to monitor drugs continuously after their commercialization, assessing and improving their safety profile. The main objective is to increase the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in order to have a wide variety of information. The Italian Drug Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco [AIFA]) is financing several projects to increase reporting. In Calabria, a PV information center has been created in 2010. Materials and Methods: We obtained data using the database of the National Health Information System AIFA relatively to Italy and Calabria in the year 2012. Descriptive statistics were performed to analyze the ADRs. Results: A total number of 461 ADRs have been reported in the year 2012 with an increase of 234% compared with 2011 (138 reports). Hospital doctors are the main source of this reporting (51.62%). Sorafenib (Nexavar®), the combination of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and ketoprofen represent the drugs most frequently reported causing adverse reactions. Adverse events in female patients (61.83%) were more frequently reported, whereas the age groups “41-65” (39.07%) and “over 65” (27.9%) were the most affected. Conclusions: Calabria has had a positive increase in the number of ADRs reported, although it has not yet reached the gold standard set by World Health Organization (about 600 reports), the data have shown that PV culture is making inroads in this region and that PV projects stimulating and increasing PV knowledge are needed. PMID:24347984

  2. Systematic investigation of time windows for adverse event data mining for recently approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Alan M; Hauben, Manfred; Pearson, Ronald K; O'Hara, Donald J; Reisinger, Stephanie J

    2009-06-01

    The optimum timing of drug safety data mining for a new drug is uncertain. The objective of this study was to compare cumulative data mining versus mining with sliding time windows. Adverse Event Reporting System data (2001-2005) were studied for 27 drugs. A literature database was used to evaluate signals of disproportionate reporting (SDRs) from an urn model data-mining algorithm. Data mining was applied cumulatively and with sliding time windows from 1 to 4 years in width. Time from SDR generation to the appearance of a publication describing the corresponding adverse event was calculated. Cumulative data mining and 1- to 2-year sliding windows produced the most SDRs for recently approved drugs. In the first postmarketing year, data mining produced SDRs an average of 800 days in advance of publications regarding the corresponding drug-event combination. However, this timing advantage reduced to zero by year 4. The optimum window width for sliding windows should increase with time on the market. Data mining may be most useful for early signal detection during the first 3 years of a drug's postmarketing life. Beyond that, it may be most useful for supporting or weakening hypotheses.

  3. Adverse drug reactions – examples of detection of rare events using databases

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Esther W; Liu, Kirin Q L; Chui, Celine S L; Sing, Chor-Wing; Wong, Lisa Y L; Wong, Ian C K

    2015-01-01

    It is recognised that randomised controlled trials are not feasible for capturing rare adverse events. There is an increasing trend towards observational research methodologies using large population-based health databases. These databases offer more scope for adequate sample sizes, allowing for comprehensive patient characterisation and assessment of the associated factors. While direct causality cannot be established and confounders cannot be ignored, databases present an opportunity to explore and quantify rare events. The use of databases for the detection of rare adverse events in the following conditions, sudden death associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment, retinal detachment associated with the use of fluoroquinolones and toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with drug exposure, are discussed as examples. In general, rare adverse events tend to have immediate and important clinical implications and may be life-threatening. An understanding of the causative factors is therefore important, in addition to the research methodologies and database platforms that enable the undertaking of the research. PMID:25060360

  4. Recent Literature on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Semla, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are common in older adults, but locating literature addressing these issues is often challenging. The objective of this article was to summarize recent studies addressing medication errors and adverse drug events in a single location to improve accessibility for individuals working with older adults. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search for studies published in 2014 and identified 51 potential articles. After critical review, 17 studies were selected for inclusion based on innovation, rigorous observational or experimental study designs, and use of reliable, valid measures. Four articles characterizing potentially inappropriate prescribing and interventions to optimize medication regimens were annotated and critiqued in detail. We hope that health policy makers and clinicians find this information helpful in improving the quality of care for older adults. PMID:26804210

  5. Adverse effects of drugs used in the management of constipation and diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, J M; Kamm, M A

    1994-01-01

    Most laxatives, if used intermittently in the absence of contraindications, are relatively safe. Bulking agents may diminish absorption of some minerals and drugs, but this is not usually clinically significant. Ispaghula can cause serious allergic reactions. The chronic ingestion of stimulant laxatives has been blamed for the development of the 'cathartic colon', but there are no definitive studies which have demonstrated this. Dantron (danthron) preparations should only be used in older patients and the terminally ill because of the risk of hepatotoxicity with this drug. Oral oxyphenisatine should no longer be used. Senna would appear to be the stimulant laxative of choice during pregnancy and lactation. Bisacodyl is the polyphenolic derivative of choice. Lactulose, sorbitol and lactilol rarely cause significant adverse effects. Magnesium salt laxatives and phosphate enemas can cause serious metabolic disturbances in babies and young children. Liquid paraffin is contraindicated if there is any risk of aspiration. Interference with the absorption of fat soluble vitamins would not appear to be clinically significant. Docusate sodium may potentiate the hepatotoxicity of other drugs, but reports of this are rare. The role of cisapride in constipation has not been established. Antidiarrhoeal drugs are second line drugs whose use is aimed at minimising inconvenience and discomfort. No antidiarrhoeals can be recommended for children under 4 years of age. Loperamide is the drug of choice in older children and adults. The atropine component of diphenoxylate/atropine combinations can cause significant adverse effects. Bismuth salicylate is an inconvenient treatment for travellers' diarrhoea as large frequent doses of the liquid formulation are needed. Some bismuth can be absorbed and there is the potential to cause encephalopathy. Octreotide, methysergide and cholestyramine have a role for specific causes of diarrhoea only. Octreotide is effective in high output states

  6. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Maponga, Charles C.; Khoza, Star; Ma, Qing; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2%) of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%), Bidens pilosa (66.0%), Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%), Moringa oleifera (44.1%), Lippia javanica (36.3%), and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%). Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR = 0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828) and Peltoforum africanum (OR = 0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839) reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles. PMID:22506106

  7. International reporting on adverse drug reactions: the CIOMS project. CIOMS ADR Working Group.

    PubMed

    Faich, G A; Castle, W; Bankowski, Z

    1990-04-01

    A method for standardized postapproval adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting has been developed and implemented by seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities. This is based on a set of uniform definitions, procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be useful and effective. When regulators and manufacturers develop requirements and systems for ADR reporting they should consider adapting this method.

  8. Novel data-mining methodologies for adverse drug event discovery and analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, R; DuMouchel, W; Shah, N H; Madigan, D; Ryan, P; Friedman, C

    2012-06-01

    An important goal of the health system is to identify new adverse drug events (ADEs) in the postapproval period. Datamining methods that can transform data into meaningful knowledge to inform patient safety have proven essential for this purpose. New opportunities have emerged to harness data sources that have not been used within the traditional framework. This article provides an overview of recent methodological innovations and data sources used to support ADE discovery and analysis.

  9. Knowledge-based extraction of adverse drug events from biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many biomedical relation extraction systems are machine-learning based and have to be trained on large annotated corpora that are expensive and cumbersome to construct. We developed a knowledge-based relation extraction system that requires minimal training data, and applied the system for the extraction of adverse drug events from biomedical text. The system consists of a concept recognition module that identifies drugs and adverse effects in sentences, and a knowledge-base module that establishes whether a relation exists between the recognized concepts. The knowledge base was filled with information from the Unified Medical Language System. The performance of the system was evaluated on the ADE corpus, consisting of 1644 abstracts with manually annotated adverse drug events. Fifty abstracts were used for training, the remaining abstracts were used for testing. Results The knowledge-based system obtained an F-score of 50.5%, which was 34.4 percentage points better than the co-occurrence baseline. Increasing the training set to 400 abstracts improved the F-score to 54.3%. When the system was compared with a machine-learning system, jSRE, on a subset of the sentences in the ADE corpus, our knowledge-based system achieved an F-score that is 7 percentage points higher than the F-score of jSRE trained on 50 abstracts, and still 2 percentage points higher than jSRE trained on 90% of the corpus. Conclusion A knowledge-based approach can be successfully used to extract adverse drug events from biomedical text without need for a large training set. Whether use of a knowledge base is equally advantageous for other biomedical relation-extraction tasks remains to be investigated. PMID:24593054

  10. Novel Data Mining Methodologies for Adverse Drug Event Discovery and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; DuMouchel, William; Shah, Nigam H.; Madigan, David; Ryan, Patrick; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of new adverse drug events (ADEs) in the post-approval period is an important goal of the health system. Data mining methods that can transform data into meaningful knowledge to inform patient safety have proven to be essential. New opportunities have emerged to harness data sources that have not been used within the traditional framework. This article provides an overview of recent methodological innovations and data sources used in support of ADE discovery and analysis. PMID:22549283

  11. Nature of preventable adverse drug events in hospitals: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kanjanarat, Penkarn; Winterstein, Almut G; Johns, Thomas E; Hatton, Randy C; Gonzalez-Rothi, Ricardo; Segal, Richard

    2003-09-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify the drug classes, types of errors, and types of adverse outcomes related to preventable adverse drug events (pADEs). Studies were identified by keyword search of MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and by a manual search. The search was limited to peer-reviewed literature reporting pADEs in hospitalized patients and the frequencies of at least one pADE characteristic. The frequencies of pADEs and their characteristics were summarized using median and range. Ten studies published between 1994 and 2001 were included in the review. The reported median frequency of pADEs was 1.8% (range, 1.3-7.8%), and the median preventability rate of ADEs in the hospitals was 35.2% (range, 18.7-73.2%). Cardiovascular drugs were implicated for 17.9% of pADEs (range, 4.3-28.1%). Most pADEs occurred in the prescribing stage of the medication-use process and were dose related. Inappropriate prescribing decisions and patient monitoring were the most frequently identified causes of pADEs. The most common adverse outcomes were allergic reactions, hepatic or renal problems, cardiovascular problems, hematologic problems and bleeding, and central nervous system problems. Frequently reported examples of pADEs included antihypertensive overdose associated with bradycardia or hypotension, antiinfectives prescribed despite a history of allergy, warfarin overdose and inappropriate monitoring resulting in hemorrhage, and opioid overdose or underdose associated with respiratory depression or poor pain control, respectively. Despite the heterogeneity of pADEs, the results of this literature review suggest that a few types of drugs, errors, and adverse outcomes constitute a substantial proportion of pADEs. Targeting these high-priority areas could significantly reduce the overall frequency of pADEs.

  12. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  13. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models. PMID:27713344

  14. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-07-05

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models.

  15. Epigenetics and transcriptomics to detect adverse drug effects in model systems of human development.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Nina V; Leist, Marcel

    2014-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals or drugs has been associated with functional or structural deficits and the development of diseases in later life. For example, developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) is triggered by lead, and this compound may predispose to neurodegenerative diseases in later life. The molecular memory for such late consequences of early exposure is not known, but epigenetic mechanisms (modification of the chromatin structure) could take this role. Examples and underlying mechanisms have been compiled here for the field of DNT. Moreover, we addressed the question as to what readout is suitable for addressing drug memory effects. We summarize how complex developmental processes can be modelled in vitro by using the differentiation of human stem cells. Although cellular models can never replicate the final human DNT phenotype, they can model the adverse effect that a chemical has on key biological processes essential for organ formation and function. Highly information-rich transcriptomics data may inform on these changes and form the bridge from in vitro models to human prediction. We compiled data showing that transcriptome analysis can indicate toxicity patterns of drugs. A crucial question to be answered in our systems is when and how transcriptome changes indicate adversity (as opposed to transient adaptive responses), and how drug-induced changes are perpetuated over time even after washout of the drug. We present evidence for the hypothesis that changes in the histone methylation pattern could represent the persistence detector of an early insult that is transformed to an adverse effect at later time-points in life.

  16. Evaluation of adverse drug reactions in HIV positive patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anshu Kumar; Gadgade, Akash; Shenoy, Ashok K.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advancement and development of new drugs and treatment strategies increase the risk of unusual Adverse Events (AEs) in HIV patients. Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the incidence, types and nature of AEs in HIV positive subjects. Settings and Design: Patients with WHO stage IV disease irrespective of the CD4 cell count, or WHO stage III disease with a CD4 cell count <350 cell/cu. Mm, or, WHO stage I or II disease with a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/cu. mm, and on prior anti-retroviral therapy for not more than six months preceding the observation date, were included in the study. After initiation of therapy, the patients were examined for the occurrence any adverse events including the type and severity, or any other abnormal laboratory findings. Causality assessment of the adverse events was done using the Naranjo's scale. Results: Out of 327 patients studied prospectively, 43 patients developed AEs. Out of these, 23 (53.5%) were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. A total of 53 (16.21%) AEs were reported. Antitubercular drugs caused the maximum AEs (28.3%) followed by zidovudine (20.7%), nevirapine (15.0%) and efavirenz (5.6%). Stavudine, ethambutol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and atazanavir were also responsible for 3.7% of AEs individually. Causality assessment done according to the Naranjo's scale revealed that 66.04% AEs were ‘probable’ and 33.96% were ‘possible’. Conclusions: Anemia, hepatitis and dermatological adverse effects are the most common AEs. Antitubercular drugs contributed significantly for the incidence of AEs in these patients. Frequency of AEs was slightly more in males compared to females. PMID:25657900

  17. Analysis of factors associated with hiccups based on the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Ryuichiro; Ishii-Nozawa, Reiko; Kagaya, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Hiccups are occasionally experienced by most individuals. Although hiccups are not life-threatening, they may lead to a decline in quality of life. Previous studies showed that hiccups may occur as an adverse effect of certain medicines during chemotherapy. Furthermore, a male dominance in hiccups has been reported. However, due to the limited number of studies conducted on this phenomenon, debate still surrounds the few factors influencing hiccups. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of medicines and patient characteristics on hiccups using a large-sized adverse drug event report database and, specifically, the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. Cases of adverse effects associated with medications were extracted from JADER, and Fisher’s exact test was performed to assess the presence or absence of hiccups for each medication. In a multivariate analysis, we conducted a multiple logistic regression analysis using medication and patient characteristic variables exhibiting significance. We also examined the role of dexamethasone in inducing hiccups during chemotherapy. Medicines associated with hiccups included dexamethasone, levofolinate, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and irinotecan. Patient characteristics associated with hiccups included a male gender and greater height. The combination of anti-cancer agent and dexamethasone use was noted in more than 95% of patients in the dexamethasone-use group. Hiccups also occurred in patients in the anti-cancer agent-use group who did not use dexamethasone. Most of the medications that induce hiccups are used in chemotherapy. The results of the present study suggest that it is possible to predict a high risk of hiccups using patient characteristics. We confirmed that dexamethasone was the drug that has the strongest influence on the induction of hiccups. However, the influence of anti-cancer agents on the induction of hiccups cannot be denied. We consider the results of the

  18. Incidence of adverse cutaneous drug reactions in 22,866 Chinese inpatients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Yin; Liu, Bing; Shi, Hao; Zhao, Zi-Ran; Zhou, Xi-Ping; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Qiu-Ning; Zuo, Ya-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common. However, no prospective study assessing cutaneous ADRs is available for Chinese populations. This study aimed to assess the incidence, manifestations, causative drugs, and other factors related to cutaneous ADRs. A total of 22,866 inpatients were surveyed prospectively from January to April 2012 at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Only cutaneous ADRs induced by systemic drugs were considered. Fifty cases were confirmed as cutaneous ADRs, for an estimated incidence of 2.2 per 1000 during this period (95 % confidence interval 1.6-2.8). Cases of cutaneous ADRs comprised 69 % females, while 63 % of all inpatients were female (χ (2) = 0.641, P = 0.427). The department of infectious diseases was the most frequently involved department. Morbilliform exanthema (40 %) was the most frequent cutaneous ADR, followed by urticaria (23.1 %). Anti-infection drugs (36.9 %) caused most cases of cutaneous ADRs, followed by iodinated contrast media (ICM, 18.5 %) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, 18.5 %). The most frequently associated disorders were cancer (24 %), infection (22 %), cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (20 %), and autoimmune diseases (18 %). In this first prospective study assessing the incidence of cutaneous ADRs in China, anti-infection drugs were the most commonly involved drugs, followed by ICM and NSAIDs. No evidence of increased cutaneous ADR incidence in AIDS or SLE patients was observed. Our findings indicate that cancer and its treatments were often related to cutaneous ADRs in China.

  19. Capture and documentation of coded data on adverse drug reactions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lindsay; Robinson, Kerin M

    2012-01-01

    Allergic responses to prescription drugs are largely preventable, and incur significant cost to the community both financially and in terms of healthcare outcomes. The capacity to minimise the effects of repeated events rests predominantly with the reliability of allergy documentation in medical records and computerised physician order entry systems (CPOES) with decision support such as allergy alerts. This paper presents an overview of the nature and extent of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Australia and other developed countries, a discussion and evaluation of strategies which have been devised to address this issue, and a commentary on the role of coded data in informing this patient safety issue. It is not concerned with pharmacovigilance systems that monitor ADRs on a global scale. There are conflicting reports regarding the efficacy of these strategies. Although in many cases allergy alerts are effective, lack of sensitivity and contextual relevance can often induce doctors to override alerts. Human factors such as user fatigue and inadequate adverse drug event reporting, including ADRs, are commonplace. The quality of and response to allergy documentation can be enhanced by the participation of nurses and pharmacists, particularly in medication reconciliation. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding of drug allergies potentially yields valuable evidence, but the quality of local and national level coded data is hampered by under-documenting and under-coding.

  20. Adverse effects of drug therapies on male and female sexual function.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Th; Bader, M; Uckert, S; Staehler, M; Becker, A; Stief, C G

    2006-12-01

    Sexual dysfunctions (SD) are adverse effects of common drug therapies that have rarely been considered in investigations so far. Possibly it is barely known that many widespread and frequently prescribed medications and drug therapies can have significant impact on vascular and nerval processes as well as on endocrinologic and psychoneuroendocrinologic systems and therefore can influence sexual functions. Impotence and disorders of the erectile function can mainly be caused by antidopaminergic mechanisms, whereas ejaculatory disorders and anorgasmia often can be explained by antiserotoninergic effects. Anticholinergic and adrenoloytic agents can also cause a particular impairment of erectile functions. The following considerations will show that the detection and treatment of SD (also in women!) should be given much more attention since drug-induced SDs occur predominantly in indications where a SD itself can be a symptom of the disease.

  1. Automated Summarization of Publications Associated with Adverse Drug Reactions from PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Chen, Qinlang; Adams, Hayden; Friedman, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Academic literature provides rich and up-to-date information concerning adverse drug reactions (ADR), but it is time consuming and labor intensive for physicians to obtain information of ADRs from academic literature because they would have to generate queries, review retrieved articles and summarize the results. In this study, a method is developed to automatically detect and summarize ADRs from journal articles, rank them and present them to physicians in a user-friendly interface. The method studied ADRs for 6 drugs and returned on average 4.8 ADRs that were correct. The results demonstrated this method was feasible and effective. This method can be applied in clinical practice for assisting physicians to efficiently obtain information about ADRs associated with specific drugs. Automated summarization of ADR information from recent publications may facilitate translation of academic research into actionable information at point of care. PMID:27570654

  2. Wheeze as an Adverse Event in Pediatric Vaccine and Drug Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Marangu, Diana; Kovacs, Stephanie; Walson, Judd; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Ortiz, Justin R.; John-Stewart, Grace; Horne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wheeze is an important sign indicating a potentially severe adverse event in vaccine and drug trials, particularly in children. However, there are currently no consensus definitions of wheeze or associated respiratory compromise in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Objective To identify definitions and severity grading scales of wheeze as an adverse event in vaccine and drug RCTs enrolling children <5 years and to determine their diagnostic performance based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Methods We performed a systematic review of electronic databases and reference lists with restrictions for trial settings, English language and publication date ≥ 1970. Wheeze definitions and severity grading were abstracted and ranked by a diagnostic certainty score based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Results Of 1,205 articles identified using our broad search terms, we identified 58 eligible trials conducted in 38 countries, mainly in high-income settings. Vaccines made up the majority (90%) of interventions, particularly influenza vaccines (65%). Only 15 trials provided explicit definitions of wheeze. Of 24 studies that described severity, 11 described wheeze severity in the context of an explicit wheeze definition. The remaining 13 studies described wheeze severity where wheeze was defined as part of a respiratory illness or a wheeze equivalent. Wheeze descriptions were elicited from caregiver reports (14%), physical examination by a health worker (45%) or a combination (41%). There were 21/58 studies in which wheeze definitions included combined caregiver report and healthcare worker assessment. The use of these two methods appeared to have the highest combined sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Standardized wheeze definitions and severity grading scales for use in pediatric vaccine or drug trials are lacking. Standardized definitions of wheeze are needed for assessment of possible adverse events as

  3. Drug adverse events and drop-out risk: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Scoyni, R M; Aiello, L; Trani, I; Felli, B; Masin, A M R; Camponi, V; Dignazio, L; Cortese, M; Pacitti, M T; Carratelli, D; Morocutti, C

    2007-01-01

    We report a brief discussion on a clinical case of a female patient, 85 years old, affected by severe cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The patient was not taking drugs at home (apart from promazine: 10 drops when necessary to control her behavioral diseases). A previous neuropsychological evaluation had shown a severe cognitive impairment MMSE=16/30; ADL=3/6; IADL=0/8) due to multiple brain ischemic areas (confirmed in 2003 by MRI neuroimaging). When the patient was admitted to our center she was able to perform some basic activities of daily living such as eating and walking and was not too confused. She was included in cognitive rehabilitation groups. Since she showed signs of Parkinsonism, a therapy based on omeprazol 20mg, acetylsalicylic acid, donepezil 10mg, pramipexol 0.18 mg, nimodipine 10 drops, levodopa+carbidopa 100/25mg was started. A few days later she became sleepy during daytime and, once, she lost her balance and fell. She was not self-sufficient any more. At first this was attributed to a lung infection that the patient had, but her state continue after the infection was completely cured with appropriate antibiotics therapy. At that point an adverse drug reaction was suspected and therapy with pramipexol 0.18 mg was interrupted. In a few days the patient regained her previous level of consciousness and self-sufficiency. We consider this a typical case of complex management in a patient with dementia and comorbidity in which adverse drug reactions can play an important role in lowering the level of cognitive functions. In this case the relationship with the family of the patient was made difficult by the attitude of the patient's daughter who decided, after the onset of the adverse drug reaction, to interrupt her mother's stay in our center even at risk of the worst consequences.

  4. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two “challenging” case reports

    PubMed Central

    Palleria, Caterina; Leporini, Christian; Chimirri, Serafina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Sacchetta, Sabrina; Bruno, Lucrezia; Lista, Rosaria M.; Staltari, Orietta; Scuteri, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs) are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. Materials and Methods: We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. Results: First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Discussion and Conclusion: Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health. PMID:24347986

  5. Quality of Reporting of Serious Adverse Drug Events to an Institutional Review Board

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Burdon, Rachel; West, Dennis P.; Lagman, Jennifer; Georgopoulos, Christina; Belknap, Steven M.; McKoy, June M.; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Boyle, Simone; Tallman, Martin S.; Talpaz, Moshe; Sartor, Oliver; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Serious adverse drug event (sADE) reporting to Institutional Review Boards (IRB) is essential to ensure pharmaceutical safety. However, the quality of these reports has not been studied. Safety reports are especially important for cancer drugs that receive accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval, like imatinib, as preapproval experience with these drugs is limited. We evaluated the quality, accuracy, and completeness of sADE reports submitted to an IRB. Experimental Design sADE reports submitted to an IRB from 14 clinical trials with imatinib were reviewed. Structured case report forms, containing detailed clinical data fields and a validated causality assessment instrument, were developed. Two forms were generated for each ADE, the first populated with data abstracted from the IRB reports, and the second populated with data from the corresponding clinical record. Completeness and causality assessments were evaluated for each of the two sources, and then compared. Accuracy (concordance between sources) was also assessed. Results Of 115 sADEs reported for 177 cancer patients to the IRB, overall completeness of adverse event descriptions was 2.4-fold greater for structured case report forms populated with information from the clinical record versus the corresponding forms from IRB reports (95.0% versus 40.3%, P < 0.05). Information supporting causality assessments was recorded 3.5-fold more often in primary data sources versus IRB adverse event descriptions (93% versus 26%, P < 0.05). Some key clinical information was discrepant between the two sources. Conclusions The use of structured syndrome-specific case report forms could enhance the quality of reporting to IRBs, thereby improving the safety of pharmaceuticals administered to cancer patients. PMID:19458059

  6. Adverse Health Effects Associated with Living in a Former Methamphetamine Drug Laboratory - Victoria, Australia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jackie; Kenneally, Michaela E; Edwards, John W; Walker, G Stewart

    2017-01-06

    The manufacture of methamphetamine in clandestine drug laboratories occurs in various locations, including residential houses and apartments. Unlike the controlled manufacture of chemicals and drugs, clandestine manufacture results in the uncontrolled storage, use, generation, and disposal of a wide range of chemicals and the deposit of methamphetamine drug residues on indoor surfaces (1). These residues have been found at high levels on porous and nonporous surfaces and have been shown to persist for months to years (1). Persons exposed to these environments often have poorly defined exposures and health effects. It is commonly assumed that these levels of exposure are low compared with those related to illicit drug use or therapeutic use of amphetamine-based drugs for managing behavioral issues such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (2). In 2015, a family that was unknowingly exposed to methamphetamine residues in a house in Australia was found to have adverse health effects and elevated methamphetamine levels in hair samples, highlighting the potential for public health risks for persons who might live in methamphetamine-contaminated dwellings. This case study highlights the importance of the identification and effective decontamination of former clandestine drug laboratories.

  7. Label-inconsistent use of sibutramine in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports in Germany.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Wulf, F; Sachs, B

    2008-07-01

    In Germany, reports on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are centrally collected and analyzed by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM). During routine analysis of ADR reports related to the antiobesity drug sibutramine, we repeatedly observed descriptions of its label*-inconsistent use (*European Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC)). In order to quantify this observation, we analyzed all sibutramine-related ADR reports received by the BfArM so far. Using the same data source, we further analyzed the effect of a Dear Doctor Letter (DDL) which was distributed in 2002 in order to reinforce the label-consistent use of sibutramine. Out of a total of 170 identified reports, 104 were considered as suitable for further analysis. Of these, applying a catalogue of 24 SmPC-derived criteria, 34% (35 reports) contained information indicative of label-inconsistent use. The individual SmPC-criteria most often violated were (% of total analyzed reports): the recommended starting dose of 10 mg/day (9%), the body mass index (BMI)-related threshold permitting drug therapy (6%), and the contraindicated "history of drug abuse" (6%). The DDL was ineffective. The observed percentage of ADR reports, indicating a label-inconsistent use of sibutramine, is considered a signal for a therapeutic risk. This signal should be addressed in a drug utilization study investigating the use of sibutramine by means of a representative patient sample.

  8. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative signal detection, can provide additional information concerning a possible relationship between a drug and an ADR. We describe the role of quantitative signal detection and the way it is applied at the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb. Results of the statistical analysis are implemented in the traditional case-by-case analysis. In addition, for data-mining purposes, a list of associations of ADRs and suspected drugs that are disproportionally present in the database is periodically generated. Finally, quantitative signal generation can be used to study more complex relationships, such as drug-drug interactions and syndromes. The results of quantitative signal detection should be considered as an additional source of information, complementary to the traditional analysis. Techniques for the detection of drug interactions and syndromes offer a new challenge for pharmacovigilance in the near future.

  9. Recognizing Severe Adverse Drug Reactions: Two Case Reports After Switching Therapies to the Same Generic Company.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, Luca; Gallelli, Giuseppe; Codamo, Giuseppe; Argentieri, Angela; Michniewicz, Andzelika; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Stefanelli, Roberta; Cione, Erika; Caroleo, Maria C; Longo, Paola; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-01-01

    Generic formulations represent a way to reduce the costs of brand compounds when their patent is expired. While, the bio-equivalence in generic drugs is guaranteed, some excipients as well as dyes could be different and this could reduce the drug safety. Herein, we report the development of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in two patients after the switch from brand to generic formulations. We have tested cytochrome P450 enzymes expression as well as drug serum levels. None of these markers were altered. Checking deeply into both patient's medical history, they harbored poly-sensitivity or allergy to pollen and graminacea and used different active ingredients for different health problems coming from the same generic company Almus(®). This company used different dyes and excipients compared to the branded drugs made by distinguished companies. In conclusion, we strongly suggest to both pharmacists and physicians to be careful in giving the advice to change the drug, thinking to reduce health sanitary costs without considering the personal clinical history of each one. Paradoxically this behavior is causing other health issues, bringing to an increase of the overall costs for patients as well as for National Health System.

  10. Knowledge discovery of drug data on the example of adverse reaction prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are the widely prescribed drugs for children and most likely to be related with adverse reactions. Record on adverse reactions and allergies from antibiotics considerably affect the prescription choices. We consider this a biomedical decision-making problem and explore hidden knowledge in survey results on data extracted from a big data pool of health records of children, from the Health Center of Osijek, Eastern Croatia. Results We applied and evaluated a k-means algorithm to the dataset to generate some clusters which have similar features. Our results highlight that some type of antibiotics form different clusters, which insight is most helpful for the clinician to support better decision-making. Conclusions Medical professionals can investigate the clusters which our study revealed, thus gaining useful knowledge and insight into this data for their clinical studies. PMID:25079450

  11. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital.

  12. Clinically Inconsequential Alerts: The Characteristics of Opioid Drug Alerts and Their Utility in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Genco, Emma K.; Forster, Jeri E.; Flaten, Hanna; Goss, Foster; Heard, Kennon J.; Hoppe, Jason; Monte, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Study objective We examine the characteristics of clinical decision support alerts triggered when opioids are prescribed, including alert type, override rates, adverse drug events associated with opioids, and preventable adverse drug events. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study assessing adverse drug event occurrences for emergency department (ED) visits in a large urban academic medical center using a commercial electronic health record system with clinical decision support. Participants include those aged 18 to 89 years who arrived to the ED every fifth day between September 2012 and January 2013. The main outcome was characteristics of opioid drug alerts, including alert type, override rates, opioid-related adverse drug events, and adverse drug event preventability by clinical decision support. Results Opioid drug alerts were more likely to be overridden than nonopioid alerts (relative risk 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21 to 1.50). Opioid drug-allergy alerts were twice as likely to be overridden (relative risk 2.24; 95% CI 1.74 to 2.89). Opioid duplicate therapy alerts were 1.57 times as likely to be overridden (95% CI 1.30 to 1.89). Fourteen of 4,581 patients experienced an adverse drug event (0.31%; 95% CI 0.15% to 0.47%), and 8 were due to opioids (57.1%). None of the adverse drug events were preventable by clinical decision support. However, 46 alerts were accepted for 38 patients that averted a potential adverse drug event. Overall, 98.9% of opioid alerts did not result in an actual or averted adverse drug event, and 96.3% of opioid alerts were overridden. Conclusion Overridden opioid alerts did not result in adverse drug events. Clinical decision support successfully prevented adverse drug events at the expense of generating a large volume of inconsequential alerts. To prevent 1 adverse drug event, providers dealt with more than 123 unnecessary alerts. It is essential to refine clinical decision support alerting systems to eliminate

  13. Assessment of adverse effects of neurotropic drugs in monkeys with the "drug effects on the nervous system" (DENS) scale.

    PubMed

    Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Shaffer, Christopher L; Menniti, Frank S; Schmidt, Christopher J; Papa, Stella M

    2013-04-30

    Research into therapeutics for neuropsychiatric disorders is increasingly focusing on drugs with new mechanisms of action, and such agents are often assessed in preclinical studies using nonhuman primates. However, researchers lack a standardised method to compare different drugs for common adverse effects on the nervous system. We have developed a new scale for this purpose, named "Drug Effects on the Nervous System" (DENS), and tested its utility in an analysis of the second-generation antipsychotic risperidone in monkeys. The behavioural effects of risperidone over a ten-fold clinically relevant exposure range were rated with the DENS scale and compared with a standard motor disability scale for primates. The ratings were correlated with projected D2 and 5-HT2A receptor occupancies over time. The DENS scale detected dose-dependent side effects of risperidone in addition to the motor effects detected with the motor disability scale, including cognitive, sensorimotor and autonomic functions. A consistent temporal association between the DENS scale changes and the projected D2 receptor occupancy was observed, and the DENS scale ratings demonstrated high inter-rater reliability. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the DENS scale as a highly sensitive, reliable and accurate method to identify common adverse effects of risperidone and potentially other neurotropics for translational studies in primates.

  14. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  15. On the creation of a clinical gold standard corpus in Spanish: Mining adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Oronoz, Maite; Gojenola, Koldo; Pérez, Alicia; de Ilarraza, Arantza Díaz; Casillas, Arantza

    2015-08-01

    The advances achieved in Natural Language Processing make it possible to automatically mine information from electronically created documents. Many Natural Language Processing methods that extract information from texts make use of annotated corpora, but these are scarce in the clinical domain due to legal and ethical issues. In this paper we present the creation of the IxaMed-GS gold standard composed of real electronic health records written in Spanish and manually annotated by experts in pharmacology and pharmacovigilance. The experts mainly annotated entities related to diseases and drugs, but also relationships between entities indicating adverse drug reaction events. To help the experts in the annotation task, we adapted a general corpus linguistic analyzer to the medical domain. The quality of the annotation process in the IxaMed-GS corpus has been assessed by measuring the inter-annotator agreement, which was 90.53% for entities and 82.86% for events. In addition, the corpus has been used for the automatic extraction of adverse drug reaction events using machine learning.

  16. [Pharmacogenomic research for avoiding adverse reactions by anti-cancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-02-01

    Anti-cancer drugs have relatively low effective rates and high frequencies of adverse reactions, occasionally leading to cessation of their treatments. Use of pharmacogenomic (PGx) information could be able to select the patients with high-response and less-adverse reactions, resulting in increase of patients' QOL and proper use of drugs. We have been collaborating with National Cancer Center for PGx analysis of anti-cancer drugs including irinotecan and gemcitabine in Japanese cancer patients. Irinotecan, now used for treatments of many cancers, is metabolically activated to SN-38 and then inactivated to SN-38 glucuronide by a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT1A1. In the UGT1A1 gene, two representative genetic polymorphisms, *28 and *6, were detected at 0.138 and 0.167, respectively in 177 Japanese cancer patients. When the patients were homozygotes of *28 or *6, or compound heterozygotes of them, statistically significant decreases were observed in the SN-38 glucuronidation activity and increases in the rate of severe neutropenia, compared to those in the patients without *28 or *6. Our results and papers were cited in the Japanese package inserts of irinotecan. Gemcitabine was inactivated by cytidine deaminase (CDA) into 2'-2'-difluorodeoxyuridine. A CDA polymorphism 208G>A (Ala70Thr) was detected at 0.037 frequency in 256 Japanese cancer patients and associated with reduced gemcitabine clearance as well as increased frequency of severe neutropenia. In the 4 patients suffered from very severe bone marrow toxicities, 3 patients were homozygous CDA*3, suggesting that this polymorphism is exquisite for predicting severe adverse reactions by gemcitabine in Japanese.

  17. Potentially inappropriate prescribing andthe risk of adverse drug reactions in critically ill older adults

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Thamires B.; Reis, Wálleri C.; Andrzejevski, Vânia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use in the elderly is associated with increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), but there is limited information regarding PIM use in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Objective: The aim of the study is to describe the prevalence and factors associated with the use of PIM and the occurrence of PIM-related adverse reactions in the critically ill elderly. Methods: This study enrolled all critically ill older adults (60 years or more) admitted to medical or cardiovascular ICUs between January and December 2013, in a large tertiary teaching hospital. For all patients, clinical pharmacists listed the medications given during the ICU stay and data on drugs were analyzed using 2012 Beers Criteria, to identify the prevalence of PIM. For each identified PIM the medical records were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with its use. The frequency of ADRs and, the causal relationship between PIM and the ADRs identified were also evaluated through review of medical records. Results: According to 2012 Beers Criteria, 98.2% of elderly patients used at least one PIM (n=599), of which 24.8% were newly started in the ICUs. In 29.6% of PIMs, there was a clinical circumstance that justified their prescription. The number of PIMs was associated with ICU length of stay and total number of medications. There was at least one ADR identified in 17.8% of patients; more than 40% were attributed to PIM, but there was no statistical association. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of PIM used in acutely ill older people, but they do not seem to be the major cause of adverse drug reactions in this population. Although many PIMs had a clinical circumstance that led to their prescription during the course of ICU hospitalization, many were still present upon hospital discharge. Therefore, prescription of PIMs should be minimized to improve the safety of elderly patients. PMID:28042352

  18. Patterns of Adverse Drug Reactions in Different Age Groups: Analysis of Spontaneous Reports by Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun Mi; Shin, Wan Gyoon; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Choi, Soo An; Jo, Yun Hee; Youn, So Jung; Lee, Mo Se; Choi, Kwang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical manifestations and causative drugs associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) spontaneously reported by community pharmacists and to compare the ADRs by age. Methods ADRs reported to the Regional Pharmacovigilance Center of the Korean Pharmaceutical Association by community pharmacists from January 2013 to June 2014 were included. Causality was assessed using the WHO-Uppsala Monitoring Centre system. The patient population was classified into three age groups. We analyzed 31,398 (74.9%) ADRs from 9,705 patients, identified as having a causal relationship, from a total pool of 41,930 ADRs from 9,873 patients. Median patient age was 58.0 years; 66.9% were female. Results Gastrointestinal system (34.4%), nervous system (14.4%), and psychiatric (12.1%) disorders were the most frequent symptoms. Prevalent causative drugs were those for acid-related disorders (11.4%), anti-inflammatory products (10.5%), analgesics (7.2%), and antibacterials (7.1%). Comparisons by age revealed diarrhea and antibacterials to be most commonly associated with ADRs in children (p < 0.001), whereas dizziness was prevalent in the elderly (p < 0.001). Anaphylactic reaction was the most frequent serious event (19.7%), mainly associated with cephalosporins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Among 612 ADRs caused by nonprescription drugs, the leading symptoms and causative drugs were skin disorders (29.6%) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (16.2%), respectively. Conclusions According to the community pharmacist reports, the leading clinical manifestations and causative drugs associated with ADRs in outpatients differed among age groups. PMID:26172050

  19. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions as a cause of admission to a paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    MARTÍNEZ-MIR, I.; GARCÍA-LÓPEZ, M.; PALOP, V.; FERRER, J. M.; ESTAÑ, L.; RUBIO, E.; MORALES-OLIVAS, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1A total of 512 consecutive paediatric hospital admissions of children 2 years old or less were evaluated to assess the extent and pattern of admission caused by suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The proportion of suspected ADRs related to hospital admissions was 4.3%. 2The organ-systems most commonly implicated were the central nervous system (40.5%), digestive system (16.7%), and skin and appendages (14.3%). Together, they accounted for 71.5% of admissions attributed to ADRs. The most common clinical manifestations inducing admission were convulsions (4 cases), dizziness (4), vomiting (3), and tremor, fever, itching and apnoea (2 cases each). 3The four classes of drugs most frequently suspected in admissions due to ADRs were respiratory drugs (35%), anti-infective agents (25%), drugs active on the central nervous system (15%) and drugs used in dermatology (10%). The most common drugs related to ADRs were a combination of chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, phenylephrine, guaiphenesin and salicylic acid (4 cases), followed by fenoterol, adrenaline, paracetamol, DTP vaccine and antipolio vaccine (2 cases each). 4There were no significant differences between children older and younger than 1 year (odds ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.37–2.17) or between the sexes as regards hospital admittance due to suspected ADRs (odds ratio 1.94; 95% CI 0.72–5.42). 5The results of this kind of study may be influenced by patterns of drug utilization. Nevertheless, the lack of specific studies of drug effects in young children makes it desirable to carry out pharmacoepidemiological studies in this age group. PMID:8877022

  20. Modeling Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs Using kNN QSAR Method

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Amie D.; Zhu, Hao; Fourches, Dennis; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Adverse effects of drugs (AEDs) continue to be a major cause of drug withdrawals both in development and post-marketing. While liver-related AEDs are a major concern for drug safety, there are few in silico models for predicting human liver toxicity for drug candidates. We have applied the Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) approach to model liver AEDs. In this study, we aimed to construct a QSAR model capable of binary classification (active vs. inactive) of drugs for liver AEDs based on chemical structure. To build QSAR models, we have employed an FDA spontaneous reporting database of human liver AEDs (elevations in activity of serum liver enzymes), which contains data on approximately 500 approved drugs. Approximately 200 compounds with wide clinical data coverage, structural similarity and balanced (40/60) active/inactive ratio were selected for modeling and divided into multiple training/test and external validation sets. QSAR models were developed using the k nearest neighbor method and validated using external datasets. Models with high sensitivity (>73%) and specificity (>94%) for prediction of liver AEDs in external validation sets were developed. To test applicability of the models, three chemical databases (World Drug Index, Prestwick Chemical Library, and Biowisdom Liver Intelligence Module) were screened in silico and the validity of predictions was determined, where possible, by comparing model-based classification with assertions in publicly available literature. Validated QSAR models of liver AEDs based on the data from the FDA spontaneous reporting system can be employed as sensitive and specific predictors of AEDs in pre-clinical screening of drug candidates for potential hepatotoxicity in humans. PMID:20192250

  1. Genetics or environment in drug transport: the case of organic anion transporting polypeptides and adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, John D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) uptake transporters are important for the disposition of many drugs and perturbed OATP activity can contribute to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). It is well documented that both genetic and environmental factors can alter OATP expression and activity. Genetic factors include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that change OATP activity and epigenetic regulation that modify OATP expression levels. SNPs in OATPs contribute to ADRs. Environmental factors include the pharmacological context of drug--drug interactions and the physiological context of liver diseases. Liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis and hepatocellular carcinoma change the expression of multiple OATP isoforms. The role of liver diseases in the occurrence of ADRs is unknown. Areas covered This article covers the roles OATPs play in ADRs when considered in the context of genetic or environmental factors. The reader will gain a greater appreciation for the current evidence regarding the salience and importance of each factor in OATP-mediated ADRs. Expert opinion A SNP in a single OATP transporter can cause changes in drug pharmacokinetics and contribute to ADRs but, because of overlap in substrate specificities, there is potential for compensatory transport by other OATP isoforms. By contrast, the expression of multiple OATP isoforms is decreased in liver diseases, reducing compensatory transport and thereby increasing the probability of ADRs. To date, most research has focused on the genetic factors in OATP-mediated ADRs while the impact of environmental factors has largely been ignored. PMID:22280100

  2. [Nalmefene and Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome: Analysis of the Global Pharmacovigilance Database for Adverse Drug Reactions].

    PubMed

    Dahmke, Hendrike; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Weiler, Stefan

    2015-10-14

    Nalmefene (Selincro®) is a selective opioid receptor antagonist, licensed in April 2014 in Switzerland for the reduction of alcohol consumption in adults with a high drinking risk level. 200 reports of adverse drug reactions of nalmefene have been documented worldwide in the WHO global pharmacovigilance database between 7th March 1997 to 1st March 2015. In 21 cases (10,5%) nalmefene and an opioid were administered concomitantly, causing withdrawal symptoms. Until now, the regional pharmacovigilance center in Zurich received four cases of nalmefene combined with opioids. This combination should be avoided.

  3. Tramadol hydrochloride: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse side effects, co-administration of drugs and new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, M; Andreani, T; Fangueiro, J; Faggio, C; Silva, C; Santini, A; Garcia, M L; Silva, A M; Souto, E B

    2015-03-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride (TrHC) is a synthetic analgesic drug exhibiting opioid and non-opioid properties, acting mainly on the central nervous system. It has been mostly used to treat pain, although its use to treat anxiety and depression has also been documented. These properties arise from the fact that they inhibit serotonin (5-HT) reuptake augmenting 5-HT concentration on the synaptic cleft. Despite this, TrHC has also been described to have several side effects which are mainly due to its fast metabolization and excretion which in turn requires multiple doses per day. To surpass this limitation, new pharmaceutical formulations are being developed intending the protection, target and sustained delivery as well as a reduction on daily dose aiming a reduction on the side effects. In the present work we have revised the efficacy, safety, biological and adverse effects of TrHC, and the added value of developing a novel drug delivery system for topical administration.

  4. Adverse Drug Event Causality Analysis (ADECA): A Process for Evaluating Evidence and Assigning Drugs to Risk Categories for Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Woosley, Raymond L; Romero, Klaus; Heise, Craig W; Gallo, Tyler; Tate, Jared; Woosley, Raymond David; Ward, Sophie

    2017-03-08

    Growing evidence indicates that many drugs have the ability to cause a potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia, torsades de pointes (TdP). This necessitates the development of a compilation of drugs that have this potential toxicity. Such a list is helpful in identifying the etiology of TdP in patients taking multiple drugs and assists decision making by those caring for patients at high risk of TdP. The Arizona Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics (AZCERT) has developed a process to standardize the identification of drugs and place them in risk categories for their clinical ability to cause TdP and QT prolongation. AZCERT's Adverse Drug Event Causality Analysis (ADECA) utilizes 16 types of data drawn from four sources to compile an open-source knowledge base, QTdrugs, which is maintained on the CredibleMeds.org website. Because the evidence for most drugs is incomplete, the ADECA process is used to place drugs into one of three categories that represent different levels of certainty: known TdP risk, possible TdP risk, and conditional TdP risk. Each category has strict evidentiary requirements for clinical evidence of TdP and/or QT prolongation. These are described in this paper. Because evidence can evolve over time, the ADECA process includes the continuous gathering and analysis of newly emerging evidence to revise the lists. The QTdrugs lists have proven to be a valued, readily available, commercial influence-free resource for healthcare providers, patients, researchers, and authors of consensus guidelines for the safe use of medicines.

  5. Information Systems Developments to Detect and Analyze Chemotherapy-associated Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Mark G.; Livshits, Alice; Carozzoni, Carol; McMenamin, Erin; Gibson, Gene; Loren, Alison W.; Hennessy, Sean

    2002-01-01

    A difficult balance exists in the use of cancer chemotherapy in which the cytotoxic medicine must act on the cancer without causing neutropenic fever, a condition that is caused by over-suppression of the immune system. An improved understanding of dosing strategies as well as the use of medications to support the immune system has helped to reduce the likelihood of an admission for neutropenic fever following cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, as with any drug therapy, chemotherapy administration that is temporally associated with an unexpected hospitalization for neutropenia is an adverse drug event (ADE). Analogous to other informatics research to monitor and address the occurrence of ADEs, this work develops and validates the information systems infrastructure necessary to detect the occurrence of and analyze the factors contributing to chemotherapy associated ADEs.

  6. ADEpedia: a scalable and standardized knowledge base of Adverse Drug Events using semantic web technology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    A source of semantically coded Adverse Drug Event (ADE) data can be useful for identifying common phenotypes related to ADEs. We proposed a comprehensive framework for building a standardized ADE knowledge base (called ADEpedia) through combining ontology-based approach with semantic web technology. The framework comprises four primary modules: 1) an XML2RDF transformation module; 2) a data normalization module based on NCBO Open Biomedical Annotator; 3) a RDF store based persistence module; and 4) a front-end module based on a Semantic Wiki for the review and curation. A prototype is successfully implemented to demonstrate the capability of the system to integrate multiple drug data and ontology resources and open web services for the ADE data standardization. A preliminary evaluation is performed to demonstrate the usefulness of the system, including the performance of the NCBO annotator. In conclusion, the semantic web technology provides a highly scalable framework for ADE data source integration and standard query service.

  7. Fixed drug eruption to sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is a common adverse effect seen with various drugs notably antibiotics, antiepileptics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein we report a case of Sitagliptin induced fixed drug eruption in a 46 year old female who developed circumscribed, erythematous macules all over the body within one week of initiation of Sitagliptin. The lesions resolved with residual hyperpigmentation on cessation of the drug. The diagnosis was confirmed by an oral provocation test which led to a reactivation of the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fixed drug eruption to Sitagliptin reported in the literature.

  8. A drug-adverse event extraction algorithm to support pharmacovigilance knowledge mining from PubMed citations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Haerian, Krystl; Salmasian, Hojjat; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert; Friedman, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) create a serious problem causing substantial harm to patients. An executable standardized knowledgebase of drug-ADE relations which is publicly available would be valuable so that it could be used for ADE detection. The literature is an important source that could be used to generate a knowledgebase of drug-ADE pairs. In this paper, we report on a method that automatically determines whether a specific adverse event (AE) is caused by a specific drug based on the content of PubMed citations. A drug-ADE classification method was initially developed to detect neutropenia based on a pre-selected set of drugs. This method was then applied to a different set of 76 drugs to determine if they caused neutropenia. For further proof of concept this method was applied to 48 drugs to determine whether they caused another AE, myocardial infarction. Results showed that AUROC was 0.93 and 0.86 respectively.

  9. Surveillance of methadone-related adverse drug events using multiple public health data sources.

    PubMed

    Sims, Shannon A; Snow, Laverne A; Porucznik, Christina A

    2007-08-01

    Healthcare safety and quality surveillance is increasingly conducted by public health agencies. We describe a biomedical informatics method that uses multiple public health data sources to perform surveillance of methadone-related adverse drug events. Data from Utah medical examiner records, vital statistics, emergency department encounter administrative data and a database of controlled substances prescriptions are used to examine trends in state-wide adverse events related to methadone. From 1997 to 2004, population-adjusted methadone prescriptions increased 727%, with evidence to suggest the rise in the methadone prescription rate is for treatment of pain, not addiction therapy. During the same period of time, population adjusted, accidental methadone-related deaths in medical examiner data increased 1770%. Population adjusted methadone-related emergency department encounters rose 612% from 1997 to 2003. Our results suggest that the increase in methadone prescription rates from 1997 to 2004 was accompanied by a concurrent increase in methadone-related morbidity and mortality. Although patient data is not linked between data sources, our results demonstrate that utilizing multiple public health data sources captures more cases and provides more clinical detail than individual data sources alone. Our approach is a successful biomedical informatics approach for surveillance of adverse events and utilizes widely available public health data sources, as well as an emerging source of public health data, controlled substance prescription registries.

  10. Adverse drug effects attributed to phenylpropanolamine: a review of 142 case reports.

    PubMed

    Lake, C R; Gallant, S; Masson, E; Miller, P

    1990-08-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is contained in about 106 products, over half of which are available over-the-counter (OTC). Most are cough/cold remedies; nine are OTC diet aids. More than nine million Americans were using OTC diet aids in 1981, making PPA the fifth most used drug in the United States, responsible for over $200 million in revenues. The safety of PPA remains controversial. Although most controlled studies indicate minimal pressor effects with recommended doses, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) continue to be documented. Since 1965, 142 ADRs have been reported in 85 studies, 69% of these in North America. Many such cases may go unrecognized. About two thirds of all ADRs occurred in females and in patients under 30. Of ADRs attributed to legitimately sold PPA products, 85% occurred after consumption of OTC products versus only 15% after prescription drugs. The PPA product often contained combination ingredients, or PPA was consumed along with additional drugs. An overdose of PPA was taken in about a third of the cases. After ingestion of non-overdose amounts, 82% of the ADRs were severe. The most frequent side effects involved symptoms compatible with acute hypertension, with severe headache the most common complaint. Twenty-four intracranial hemorrhages, eight seizures, and eight deaths (most due to stroke) were associated with PPA ingestion. We have summarized these data in an effort to alert clinicians to the prevalence of usage of PPA products and the potential for adverse effects. In patients who present with elevated blood pressure or signs of acute hypertension, especially hypertensive encephalopathy of undetermined origin, we recommend inquiry about recent ingestion of PPA-containing diet aids and cough/cold products and suggest having such patients remain upright rather than supine.

  11. Retrospective Analysis of Pattern of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Tertiary Hospital of Pauri Garhwal

    PubMed Central

    Dimri, Deepak; Thapliyal, Swati; Thawani, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions (CADR) are the common drug induced adverse reactions which usually have wide range of manifestations and severity. Aim To describe the prevalence and clinical spectrum of CADR’s in a tertiary hospital of the Garhwal region in Uttarakhand, India. Materials and Methods All patients suspected of having CADRs reported in the various out-patient departments, and in-patients of HNB Base & Teaching Hospital, from 1st January 2012 to 31st December 2014 were retrospectively analysed. Drug history was recorded in a format specified in Indian National Pharmacovigilance Programme. Results Total 111 cases of CADRs were reported from Jan 2012 to Dec 2014. Mean age of patients was 33.34±18.7 years and maximum ADRs were reported in the age group of 20-39 years (36.9%). Female were affected more than male (W:M :: 66:45). Most of the ADRs were exanthematous eruptions (EE) type (33.3%). Medicine department reported maximum cases of CADRs (47.7%), followed by Dermatology. Most of the CADRs were reported with antimicrobial agents (69.4%). Significant associations of different types of various cutaneous reactions were observed in relation to the duration (in days) of ADRs (p = 0.038), types of outcome (p= 0.006), different departments (p= 0.014) and between different groups of medicines (p = 0.008). Conclusion CADRs have proved a significant problem in healthcare for decades. Major bulk of CADR result from physician prescribed drugs. Hence, awareness on part of the physician can help in timely detection of cutaneous reactions, thereby restricting damage from them. PMID:27437240

  12. Hospitalizations Due to Adverse Drug Events in the Elderly—A Retrospective Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Laatikainen, Outi; Sneck, Sami; Bloigu, Risto; Lahtinen, Minna; Lauri, Timo; Turpeinen, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital. A total number of 290 admissions were screened for ADEs, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) by a multi-disciplinary research team. Customized Naranjo scale was used as a control method. All admissions were categorized into “probable,” “possible,” or “doubtful” by both assessment methods. In total, 23.1% of admissions were categorized as “probably” or “possibly” medication-related. Vertigo, falling, and fractures formed the largest group of ADEs. The most common ADEs were related to medicines from N class of the ATC-code system. Age, sex, residence, or specialty did not increase the risk for medication-related admission significantly (min p = 0.077). Polypharmacy was, however, found to increase the risk (OR 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5–6.9; p = 0.01). In conclusion, screening patients for specific demographics or symptoms would not significantly improve the recognition of ADEs. In addition, as ADE detection today is largely based on voluntary reporting systems and retrospective manual tracking of errors, it is evident that more effective methods for ADE detection are needed in the future. PMID:27761112

  13. Implementing a pharmacovigilance program to evaluate cutaneous adverse drug reactions in an antiretroviral access program

    PubMed Central

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Sibanda, Marvelous; Gavi, Samuel; Maponga, Charles Chiedza; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) can cause significant morbidity and distress in patients especially in the HIV infected population on antiretroviral therapy. Adverse Drug Reaction monitoring and ascertaining causality in resource limited settings still remains a challenge. This study was carried out to evaluate causality and measure incidence of cADRs in HIV infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The study was also designed to test a 3-step approach in the monitoring and evaluation of ADRs in resource limited settings. Methodology A retrospective patient medical records review was carried out at the Parirenyatwa Family Care Centre, (Harare, Zimbabwe). Cases of cADRs were reported to the Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe (Drug regulating body in Zimbabwe) for assessment and causality classification. Results Two hundred and twenty-one patient records were randomly selected and reviewed to determine if any diagnosis of cADRs was made by clinicians. Causality assessment revealed 13.1% of cADRs which were due to an offending agent in the antiretroviral therapy against an initial incidence of 17.6% which had been determined by the physicians. Conclusions cADRs had an incidence of 13.1% within the population under study due to non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Most reactions were due to the NNRTIs which contributed 72.4 % of all cADRs. A panel of experts from the drug regulatory authority can be used as an implementation based mechanism in ascertaining causality objectively in settings where resources are constrained. PMID:23277506

  14. Reported Adverse Drug Reactions in Infants: A Nationwide Analysis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Rosliana; Dali, Ahmad Fauzi; Aziz, Noorizan Abd; Ming, Long Chiau; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting is a useful source of drug safety information in infants as only adult patients are routinely tested in clinical trials. This study was aimed to evaluate the spontaneously reported ADRs using WHO Adverse Reaction Terminology and to identify the common drugs associated with ADRs in children under 2 years of age. A retrospective analysis of ADR data for children below 2 years old from 2000 to 2013 was conducted using the data extracted from Malaysia's national pharmacovigilance database, QUEST2 System. From 2000 to 2013, Malaysia's National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau received a total of 11,932 reports for children from various healthcare facilities in Malaysia. 14.0% (n = 1667) of the ADRs reported for those children were related to children under 2 years old. The data retrieved was analyzed in terms of age, gender, source of reporting, type of reporters, suspected medicines and characteristics of ADRs (category, onset, severity, and outcomes). A total of 1312 ADRs reported in 907 ADR reports were analyzed. The most common ADRs reported were skin appendage disorders (60.1%), and the most frequently reported symptoms were rash (n = 215), maculopapular rash (n = 206), urticaria (n = 169), erythematous rash (n = 76), and pruritus (n = 58). In general, drugs from antibacterials for systemic use (58.8%) appeared to be the most common contributors to ADRs in children below 2 years old. Penicillins and other β-Lactam Antibacterials accounted for more than 40% of all drugs implicated in ADRs. The majority of ADRs were subacute reactions that occurred within 24 h of exposure to the drug. A high proportion of ADRs was classified as mild, and most victims had no sequela. Only one fatality was seen. There were 10 cases for each symptom, namely erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, observed in this study. A large proportion of ADRs in children under 2 years old were mainly caused by drugs from antibacterial for

  15. Reported Adverse Drug Reactions in Infants: A Nationwide Analysis in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Rosliana; Dali, Ahmad Fauzi; Aziz, Noorizan Abd.; Ming, Long Chiau; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting is a useful source of drug safety information in infants as only adult patients are routinely tested in clinical trials. This study was aimed to evaluate the spontaneously reported ADRs using WHO Adverse Reaction Terminology and to identify the common drugs associated with ADRs in children under 2 years of age. A retrospective analysis of ADR data for children below 2 years old from 2000 to 2013 was conducted using the data extracted from Malaysia’s national pharmacovigilance database, QUEST2 System. From 2000 to 2013, Malaysia’s National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau received a total of 11,932 reports for children from various healthcare facilities in Malaysia. 14.0% (n = 1667) of the ADRs reported for those children were related to children under 2 years old. The data retrieved was analyzed in terms of age, gender, source of reporting, type of reporters, suspected medicines and characteristics of ADRs (category, onset, severity, and outcomes). A total of 1312 ADRs reported in 907 ADR reports were analyzed. The most common ADRs reported were skin appendage disorders (60.1%), and the most frequently reported symptoms were rash (n = 215), maculopapular rash (n = 206), urticaria (n = 169), erythematous rash (n = 76), and pruritus (n = 58). In general, drugs from antibacterials for systemic use (58.8%) appeared to be the most common contributors to ADRs in children below 2 years old. Penicillins and other β-Lactam Antibacterials accounted for more than 40% of all drugs implicated in ADRs. The majority of ADRs were subacute reactions that occurred within 24 h of exposure to the drug. A high proportion of ADRs was classified as mild, and most victims had no sequela. Only one fatality was seen. There were 10 cases for each symptom, namely erythema multiforme and Stevens–Johnson Syndrome, observed in this study. A large proportion of ADRs in children under 2 years old were mainly caused by drugs from antibacterial

  16. PERSYVE - Design and validation of a questionnaire about adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Silva, Daniela; Figueiras, Adolfo; Herdeiro, Maria T.; Teixeira Rodrigues, António; Silva Branco, Fábio; Polónia, Jorge; Figueiredo, Isabel V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire to measure perceived symptoms associated with antihypertensive drugs (PERSYVE). Methods The PERSYVE development and validation included four stages: 1) item development (bibliographic review and questionnaire elaboration); 2) face and content validation; 3) field testing (pre-test); and 4) test-retest validation, assessment of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and reproducibility over time (intraclass correlation coefficient and Cohen’s kappa coefficient). Results PERSYVE is divided into six sections according to results obtained from the literature review: (1) drug adherence, (2) perceived symptoms and how they affect quality of life (five-point Likert scale), (3) communication with health professionals, (4) perception of symptoms as adverse reactions, (5) influence on therapy compliance, and (6) adoption of non-pharmacological methods for blood pressure control. Content and face validation of the questionnaire led to some vocabulary changes and the introduction of section 2.1. Field-testing (n=26) revealed high comprehensibility of the questions. The Cronbach's alpha, calculated for section 2 (five-point Likert scale) was 0.850. PERSYVE was reproducible (n=167): kappa values presented fair to substantial reproducibility and, in section 2, ICC values resulted in good to excellent reproducibility. Conclusion Results showed that PERSYVE is a well-structured, objective, patient-friendly, valid and reliable questionnaire. PERSYVE can be a very useful instrument in hypertensive patients’ monitoring and in the screening of adverse effects. PMID:25035716

  17. Investigating clandestine drug laboratories: adverse medical effects in law enforcement personnel.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J L; Barnhart, S; Checkoway, H

    1996-10-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted among an international group of 46 law enforcement chemists and 13 Washington State clandestine drug laboratory investigation team members with more than 2,800 combined investigations. Each participant completed a questionnaire concerning previous drug laboratory investigations and adverse health effects during response activities. Methamphetamine laboratories accounted for 81-97% of all responses. Total illness incident rates varied between 0.75-3.4% of responses. Most exposures were through inhalation, and many occurred in the years prior to use of personal protective equipment. Symptoms were primarily those of headache and respiratory, mucous membrane, and skin irritation. Most illness episodes occurred during the processing phase of laboratory responses, and none occurred during the entry phase. A majority of illness episodes occurred in laboratories with leak/spills, fire/explosion, or uncontrolled reactions. Responding to an active laboratory was associated with a 7 to 15-fold risk of becoming ill as compared with setup, in-transit, or former (equipment removed) laboratory responses. No other laboratories characteristics were consistently associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of adverse health effects.

  18. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  19. Adjustable silicone gastric banding adverse events reported to the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Brown, S Lori; Reid, Marie H; Duggirala, Hesha Jani

    2003-01-01

    A silicone adjustable gastric banding system was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in June, 2001. The purpose of this report is to review and characterize the reports on silicone adjustable gastric banding systems received by the FDA through August 8, 2002. We also review medical literature on adverse events with silicone adjustable gastric banding systems. Manufacturers of regulated medical devices, such as adjustable silicone gastric bands, are required to report adverse events, including deaths and serious injuries, to the FDA. We reviewed all such reports received by the FDA through August 8, 2002, for adjustable silicone gastric bands and summarize the data by type of adverse event, reported device problems, and reported patient problems. The FDA received 556 reports of adverse events related to the use of adjustable silicone gastric bands. Two of these reports were for deaths, one during surgery and the other as a result of an erosion of the gastric band into the stomach 9 weeks after implantation. Forty-four reports were for injuries including band erosions, slippage, and infection. The most common type of report (499) was for device malfunction, and of these, 485 (97.2%) described a leak at or near the port. Of the 485 leaks reported as malfunctions, 99.4% were treated surgically. The majority of reports were related to disconnection, breakage, and leakage at or near the access port. Physicians and potential patients should be aware of these problems and recognize the possibility that additional surgery(ies) may be required for leaking access port/connections. The loose connection may cause pain and the device no longer performs as intended when there is a leak.

  20. Sulfites--a food and drug administration review of recalls and reported adverse events.

    PubMed

    Timbo, Babgaleh; Koehler, Kathleen M; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Klontz, Karl C

    2004-08-01

    Sulfite-sensitive individuals can experience adverse reactions after consuming foods containing sulfiting agents (sulfites), and some of these reactions may be severe. In the 1980s and 1990s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acted to reduce the likelihood that sulfite-sensitive individuals would unknowingly consume foods containing sulfites. The FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables (except potatoes) to be served or presented fresh to the public and required that the presence of detectable levels of sulfites be declared on food labels, even when these sulfites are used as a processing aid or are a component of another ingredient in the food. In the present study, data from FDA recall records and adverse event reports were used to examine the current status of problems of sensitivity to sulfites in foods. From 1996 through 1999, the FDA processed a total of 59 recalls of foods containing undeclared sulfites; these 59 recalls involved 93 different food products. Fifty (55%) of the recalled products were classified as class I, a designation indicating that a consumer reasonably could have ingested > or = 10 mg of undeclared sulfites on a single occasion, a level that could potentially cause a serious adverse reaction in a susceptible person. From 1996 through mid-1999, the FDA received a total of 34 reports of adverse reactions allegedly due to eating foods containing undeclared sulfites. The average of 10 reports per year, although derived from a passive surveillance system, was lower than the average of 111 reports per year that the FDA received from 1980 to 1987, a decrease that may have resulted in part from FDA regulatory action.

  1. Large-scale identification of adverse drug reaction-related proteins through a random walk model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shi, Hongbo; Yang, Feng; Yang, Lei; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shuyuan; Dai, Enyu; Sun, Dianjun; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are responsible for drug failure in clinical trials and affect life quality of patients. The identification of ADRs during the early phases of drug development is an important task. Therefore, predicting potential protein targets eliciting ADRs is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of ADRs. In this study, we proposed a computational algorithm,Integrated Network for Protein-ADR relations (INPADR), to infer potential protein-ADR relations based on an integrated network. First, the integrated network was constructed by connecting the protein-protein interaction network and the ADR similarity network using known protein-ADR relations. Then, candidate protein-ADR relations were further prioritized by performing a random walk with restart on this integrated network. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to evaluate the ability of the INPADR. An AUC of 0.8486 was obtained, which was a significant improvement compared to previous methods. We also applied the INPADR to two ADRs to evaluate its accuracy. The results suggested that the INPADR is capable of finding novel protein-ADR relations. This study provides new insight to our understanding of ADRs. The predicted ADR-related proteins will provide a reference for preclinical safety pharmacology studies and facilitate the identification of ADRs during the early phases of drug development. PMID:27805066

  2. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release.

  3. Adverse drug reactions in neonates and infants: a population-tailored approach is needed

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, Johannes N

    2015-01-01

    Drug therapy is a powerful tool to improve outcome, but there is an urgent need to improve pharmacotherapy in neonates through tailored prevention and management of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). At present, infants commonly receive off-label drugs, at dosages extrapolated from those in children or adults. Besides the lack of labelling, inappropriate formulations, (poly)pharmacy, immature organ function and multiple illnesses further raise the risk for ADRs in neonates and infants. Pharmacovigilance to improve the prevention and management of ADRs needs to be tailored to neonates and infants. We illustrate this using prevention strategies for drug prescription and administration errors (e.g. formulation, bedside manipulation, access), detection through laboratory signalling or clinical outlier data (e.g. reference laboratory values, overall high morbidity), assessment through algorithm scoring (e.g. Naranjo or population specific), as well as understanding of the developmental toxicology (e.g. covariates, developmental pharmacology) to avoid re-occurrence and for development of guidelines. Such tailored strategies need collaborative initiatives to combine the knowledge and expertise of different disciplines, but hold promise to become a very effective tool to improve pharmacotherapy and reduce ADRs in infants. PMID:24862557

  4. Drug therapy and adverse drug reactions to terbutaline in obstetric patients: a prospective cohort study in hospitalized women

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Dulce María; Vargas-Rivera, María Josefa E; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A; Palma-Aguirre, José Antonio; Sumano-López, Héctor

    2002-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADR's) could be expected more frequently in pregnant women. This study was performed in order to identify ADR's to tocolytic drugs in hospitalised pregnant women. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed in two General Hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Mexico City. Two hundred and seven women undergoing labor, premature labor, threatened abortion or suffering any obstetric related disease were included. Drug prescription and signs and symptoms of any potential ADR were registered daily during the hospital stay. Any potential ADR to tocolytic drugs was evaluated and classified by three of the authors using the Kramer's algorithm. Results Of the 207 patients, an ADR was positively classified in 25 cases (12.1%, CI95% 8.1 to 17.5%). All ADR's were classified as minor reactions. Grouping patients with diagnosis of threatened abortion, premature labor or under labor (n= 114), 24 ADR's were related to terbutaline, accounting for a rate of 21.1 ADR's per 100 obstetric patients. Obstetric patients suffering an ADR were older than obstetric patients without any ADR. However, the former received less drugs/day × patient-1 and had a shorter hospital stay (p < 0.05) whereas the dose of terbutaline was similar between the two groups. Terbutaline inhibited uterine motility in women with and without any ADR at a similar rate, 70 and 76% respectively (x2 = 0.07; p = 0.8). Conclusion Terbutaline, used as a tocolytic drug, was related to a high frequency of minor ADRs and to a high rate of effcicacy. PMID:11934352

  5. Comparative analysis of pharmacovigilance methods in the detection of adverse drug reactions using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; McPeek Hinz, Eugenia Renne; Matheny, Michael Edwin; Denny, Joshua C; Schildcrout, Jonathan Scott; Miller, Randolph A; Xu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Medication  safety requires that each drug be monitored throughout its market life as early detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can lead to alerts that prevent patient harm. Recently, electronic medical records (EMRs) have emerged as a valuable resource for pharmacovigilance. This study examines the use of retrospective medication orders and inpatient laboratory results documented in the EMR to identify ADRs. Methods Using 12 years of EMR data from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), we designed a study to correlate abnormal laboratory results with specific drug administrations by comparing the outcomes of a drug-exposed group and a matched unexposed group. We assessed the relative merits of six pharmacovigilance measures used in spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs): proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting OR (ROR), Yule's Q (YULE), the χ2 test (CHI), Bayesian confidence propagation neural networks (BCPNN), and a gamma Poisson shrinker (GPS). Results We systematically evaluated the methods on two independently constructed reference standard datasets of drug–event pairs. The dataset of Yoon et al contained 470 drug–event pairs (10 drugs and 47 laboratory abnormalities). Using VUMC's EMR, we created another dataset of 378 drug–event pairs (nine drugs and 42 laboratory abnormalities). Evaluation on our reference standard showed that CHI, ROR, PRR, and YULE all had the same F score (62%). When the reference standard of Yoon et al was used, ROR had the best F score of 68%, with 77% precision and 61% recall. Conclusions Results suggest that EMR-derived laboratory measurements and medication orders can help to validate previously reported ADRs, and detect new ADRs. PMID:23161894

  6. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Ruiz, Andrés Felipe; Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique

    2014-12-01

    This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART). A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years); these patients were from a cohort of 1,364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9). The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4%) and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1). The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively). The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  7. Adverse drug reactions due to cancer chemotherapy in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Julie Birdie; Laishram, Purnima Devi; Brahma, Dhriti Kumar; Sarkar, Chayna; Lahon, Joonmoni; Nongkynrih, Banylla Shisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: An adverse drug reaction (ADR) is defined by World Health Organization (WHO) as ‘Any response to a drug which is noxious, unintended and occurs at doses used in man for prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy’. ADRs associated with cancer chemotherapy warrant analysis on their severity and preventability. The outcome would create awareness among health care providers and prevent their recurrence. We have performed a hospital-based prospective observational study designed to analyze the pattern of ADRs to chemotherapeutic agents in cancer patients of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A total of 119 cancer patients were monitored for suspected ADRs during the course of chemotherapy from November 2014 to December 2015. Clinical events were recorded and analyzed with regard to the demographics and drug details of the patients. Results: A total of 106 ADRs were recorded from 119 cases. The ADRs commonly encountered included constipation, nausea, vomiting, alopecia and hematological changes. Cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and 5-FU were used for the treatment of commonly found cancers in this region affecting the lungs, esophagus and lymphomas. Naranjo’s causality assessment showed 86.7% possible (score 4) and 13.2% probable (score 5–6). Severity of adverse reactions showed 77.4% mild, 18.9% moderate and 3.8% severe. A total of 45.3% of ADRs were preventable reactions such as nausea, vomiting and constipation. Conclusions: This study highlights the role of active monitoring as an important tool for early detection, assessment and timely management of ADRs in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. The observed ADRs were preventable although ADRs such as hiccough, anemia, neutropenia and alopecia were not preventable.

  8. Prevalence and characteristics of adverse drug reactions at admission to hospital: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sze Ling; Ang, Xiaohui; Sani, Levana L.; Ng, Hong Yen; Winther, Michael D.; Liu, Jian Jun; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) contribute to poorer patient outcomes and additional burden to the healthcare system. However, data on the true burden, relevant types and drugs causing ADRs are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ADR‐related hospitalization in the general adult population in Singapore and to investigate their characteristics. Methods We prospectively recruited 1000 adult patients with unplanned admission to a large tertiary‐care hospital. Two independent reviewers evaluated all suspected ADRs for causality, type, severity and avoidability. The prevalence of ADR‐related hospitalization was calculated based on ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ ADRs. Logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors for having an ADR at admission. Results The prevalence of all ADRs at admission was 12.4% (95% CI: 10.5–14.6%) and ADRs causing admission was 8.1% (95% CI: 6.5–10.0%). The most common ADRs were gastrointestinal‐related. The most common drug category causing ADRs were cardiovascular drugs. Patients with ADRs had a longer length of stay than those who did not (median 4 vs. 3 days, P = 1.70 × 10−3). About 30% of ADRs at admission were caused by at least one drug with a clinical annotation in the Pharmacogenomics KnowledgeBase (PharmGKB), suggesting that some of these ADRs may have been predicted by pharmacogenetic testing. Conclusions We have quantified the burden and characteristics of clinically impactful ADRs in the Singaporean general adult population. Our results will provide vital information for efforts in reducing ADRs through targeted vigilance, patient education and pharmacogenomics in Singapore. PMID:27640819

  9. Comparative evaluation of adverse drug reaction reporting forms for introduction of a spontaneous generic ADR form

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anshi; Bhatt, Parloop

    2012-01-01

    Despite comprehensive and stringent phases of clinical trials and surveillance efforts, unexpected and serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) repeatedly occur after the drug is marketed. ADR reporting is an important aspect of an efficient and effective pharmacovigilance program. Although Medwatch, Yellow Card, CDSCO form, etc. are the protocol forms of ADR collection and reports, a number of countries design and use their respective ADR forms. This review compares similarities and dissimilarities of 13 ADR forms of countries representing their geographical location. This study extracted 73 data elements mentioned in 13 different ADR forms. Only 13 elements were common. An ADR form of Malaysia and Canada covers the highest number of data 43, while Brazil falls to the opposite end with a number of 17 data elements in lieu with the Generic ADR Form. The result of this review highlights 58 data elements of the proposed generic ADR form which ensures that requisite reporting information essential for correct causality assessment of ADRs are included. The proposed “Generic ADR form” could be adopted worldwide mandatorily for reporting any/all ADRs associated with marketed drugs. PMID:23129957

  10. Ascertainment of risk of serious adverse reactions associated with chemoprophylactic antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Howard, P. A.; Bjorkman, A. B.

    1990-01-01

    Serious adverse reactions during malaria chemoprophylaxis are reviewed. Three drugs considered to have caused serious reactions in recent years are pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine (Fansidar), pyrimethamine/dapsone (Maloprim) and amodiaquine. These reactions are principally independent of dose and cannot be determined during screening for optimal doses. However, host factors may precipitate dose-dependent reactions, some of which could be avoided with improvements in drug licensing. Since serious and life-threatening reactions are relatively rare (between 1:1000 and 1:20,000), Phase I to III trials cannot identify them. Reliance must therefore be placed on Phase IV post-marketing studies, including ongoing reviews of national registers, and specially tailored studies to identify the risk using prescription-event monitoring in high-risk populations. Occasionally, medical-record linkage, case-control and cohort studies may provide supportive data. Although large numbers of travellers must, of necessity, be exposed to a drug before relatively rare reactions are identified, the ascertainment of risk using post-marketing surveillance was prevented by the following five deficiencies: lack of awareness of early alerts, inadequate use of national registers, poor attention to epidemiological and statistical rigour, inadequate verification of denominators, and inadequacy of data records. Recommendations are given for minimizing such errors in the future. PMID:2208562

  11. Using trigger phrases to detect adverse drug reactions in ambulatory care notes

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Michael N; Feldman, Henry J; Triola, Marc M

    2007-01-01

    Background As medical care moves towards an outpatient focus, monitoring systems for ambulatory patients are increasingly important. Because adverse outcomes due to medications are an important problem in outpatients, the authors developed an automated monitoring system for detecting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in ambulatory patients. Methods The authors obtained a set of approximately 110 000 ambulatory care notes from the medicine clinic at Bellevue Hospital Centre for 2003–4, and manually analysed a representative sample of 1250 notes to obtain a gold standard. To detect ADRs in the text of electronic ambulatory notes, the authors used a “trigger phrases” methodology, based on a simple grammar populated with a limited set of keywords. Results Under current functionality, this system detected 38 of 54 cases in the authors' gold standard set, of which 17 were true positives, for a sensitivity of 31%, a specificity of 98%, and a positive predictive value of 45%. Their proxy measure correlated with 70% of the ADRs in the gold standard. These values are comparable or superior to other systems described in the literature. Conclusions These results show that an automated system can detect ADRs with moderate sensitivity and high specificity, and has the potential to serve as the basis for a larger scale reporting system. PMID:17403760

  12. CORAL: binary classifications (active/inactive) for Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor F; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-09-01

    Classification data related to the Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs have been studied with the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). Two datasets which contain compounds with two serum enzyme markers of liver toxicity: alanine aminotransferase (ALT, n=187) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, n=209) are analyzed. Statistical quality of the prediction for ALT activity is n=35, Sensitivity = 0.5556, Specificity = 0.8077, and Accuracy = 0.7429. In the case of AST activity the prediction is characterized by n=42, Sensitivity = 0.6875, Specificity = 0.7692, and Accuracy = 0.7381. A number of structural alerts which can be related to the studied activities are revealed. It is the first attempt to build up the classification QSAR model by means of the Monte Carlo technique based on representation of the molecular structure by SMILES using the CORAL software.

  13. Text mining for adverse drug events: the promise, challenges, and state of the art.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Tamang, Suzanne; Low, Yen; Odgers, David; Finlayson, Sam; Jung, Kenneth; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-10-01

    Text mining is the computational process of extracting meaningful information from large amounts of unstructured text. It is emerging as a tool to leverage underutilized data sources that can improve pharmacovigilance, including the objective of adverse drug event (ADE) detection and assessment. This article provides an overview of recent advances in pharmacovigilance driven by the application of text mining, and discusses several data sources-such as biomedical literature, clinical narratives, product labeling, social media, and Web search logs-that are amenable to text mining for pharmacovigilance. Given the state of the art, it appears text mining can be applied to extract useful ADE-related information from multiple textual sources. Nonetheless, further research is required to address remaining technical challenges associated with the text mining methodologies, and to conclusively determine the relative contribution of each textual source to improving pharmacovigilance.

  14. Pattern of adverse drug reactions reported by the community pharmacists in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Palaian, Subish; Ibrahim, Mohamed I.M.; Mishra, Pranaya

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacovigilance program in Nepal is less than a decade old, and is hospital centered. This study highlights the findings of a community based pharmacovigilance program involving the community pharmacists. Objectives: To collect the demographic details of the patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADR) reported by the community pharmacists; to identify the common drugs causing the ADRs, the common types of ADRs; and to carry out the causality, severity and preventability assessments of the reported ADRs. Methods: The baseline Knowledge-Attitude-Practices (KAP) of 116 community pharmacists from Pokhara valley towards drug safety was evaluated using a validated (Cronbach alpha=0.61) KAP questionnaire having 20 questions [(knowledge 11, attitude 5 and practice 4) maximum possible score 40]. Thirty community pharmacists with high scores were selected for three training sessions, each session lasting for one to two hours, covering the basic knowledge required for the community pharmacists for ADR reporting. Pharmacist from the regional pharmacovigilance center visited the trained community pharmacists every alternate day and collected the filled ADR reporting forms. Results: Altogether 71 ADRs, from 71 patients (37 males) were reported. Antibiotics/ antibacterials caused 42% (n=37) of the total ADRs followed by non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [25% (n=22)]. Ibuprofen/paracetamol combination accounted for ten ADRs. The most common type of ADR was itching [17.2 % (n=20), followed by generalized edema [8.6 % (n=10)]. In order to manage the ADRs, the patients needed medical treatment in 69% (n=49) of the cases. Over two third (69%) of the ADRs had a ‘possible’ association with the suspected drugs and a high percentage (70.4%) were of ‘mild (level 2)’ type. Nearly two third [64.7 % (n=46)] of the ADRs were ‘definitely preventable’. Conclusion: The common class of drugs known to cause ADRs was antibacterial/ antibiotics. Ibuprofen/ Paracetamol

  15. Evaluating the risk of patient re-identification from adverse drug event reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our objective was to develop a model for measuring re-identification risk that more closely mimics the behaviour of an adversary by accounting for repeated attempts at matching and verification of matches, and apply it to evaluate the risk of re-identification for Canada’s post-marketing adverse drug event database (ADE).Re-identification is only demonstrably plausible for deaths in ADE. A matching experiment between ADE records and virtual obituaries constructed from Statistics Canada vital statistics was simulated. A new re-identification risk is considered, it assumes that after gathering all the potential matches for a patient record (all records in the obituaries that are potential matches for an ADE record), an adversary tries to verify these potential matches. Two adversary scenarios were considered: (a) a mildly motivated adversary who will stop after one verification attempt, and (b) a highly motivated adversary who will attempt to verify all the potential matches and is only limited by practical or financial considerations. Methods The mean percentage of records in ADE that had a high probability of being re-identified was computed. Results Under scenario (a), the risk of re-identification from disclosing the province, age at death, gender, and exact date of the report is quite high, but the removal of province brings down the risk significantly. By only generalizing the date of reporting to month and year and including all other variables, the risk is always low. All ADE records have a high risk of re-identification under scenario (b), but the plausibility of that scenario is limited because of the financial and practical deterrent even for highly motivated adversaries. Conclusions It is possible to disclose Canada’s adverse drug event database while ensuring that plausible re-identification risks are acceptably low. Our new re-identification risk model is suitable for such risk assessments. PMID:24094134

  16. Direct evidence of nonadherence to antiepileptic medication in refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Nicolas; Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Rikir, Estelle; Baumann, Cédric; Lapicque, Françoise; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Vespignani, Hervé; Maillard, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The adherence to medication in drug-resistant focal epilepsy (RFE) remains largely unknown. The present work aimed to assess the frequency of recent adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with RFE. This prospective observational study screened all patients with RFE, admitted to the Nancy University Hospital between April 2006 and September 2008, for a 5-day hospitalization without AED tapering. The adherence to AEDs was assessed by measuring serum drug levels on day 1 (reflecting the recent "at home" adherence) and day 5 (reflecting the individual reference concentration when drug ingestion was supervised). A patient was considered nonadherent if at least one of their serum drug levels was different between days 1 and 5. The day-1 value was considered different from day 5 when it was at least 30% lower (underdosed) or 30% higher (overdosed). Nonadherent patients were classified as under-consumers in the case of one or more underdosed day-1 values, over-consumers in the case of one or more overdosed day-1 values, or undefined if they exhibited both underdosed and overdosed day-1 values. Forty-four of the 48 screened patients were included. Eighteen (40.9%) of 44 patients were nonadherent. Among them, 12 (66.7%) were over-consumers, 4 (22.2%) were under-consumers, and 2 (11.1%) were undefined nonadherents. The study indicates that recent adherence to antiepileptic medication in this group of patients with RFE is poor. Overconsumption is the most frequent form of nonadherence in this population and should be specifically assessed to prevent its possible consequences in terms of AEDs dose-dependent adverse events.

  17. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  18. An analysis of serious adverse drug reactions at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Kinjal; Desai, Mira; Shah, Samidh; Panchal, Jigar; Kapadia, Jigar; Dikshit, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the various aspects of serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs) such as clinical presentation, causality, severity, and preventability occurring in a hospital setting. Materials and Methods: All serious ADRs reported from January 2010 to May 2015 at ADR Monitoring Centre, Department of Pharmacology, B. J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, were selected as per the World health Organization –Uppsala Monitoring Center (WHO-UMC) criteria. A retrospective analysis was carried out for clinical presentation, causality (as per the WHO-UMC scale and Naranjo's algorithm), severity (Hartwig and Siegel scale), and preventability (Schumock and Thornton criteria). Results: Out of 2977 ADRs reported, 375 were serious in nature. The most common clinical presentation involved was skin and appendageal disorders (71, 18.9%). The common causal drug group was antitubercular (129, 34.4%) followed by antiretroviral (76, 20.3%) agents. The criteria for the majority of serious ADRs were intervention to prevent permanent impairment or damage (164, 43.7%) followed by hospitalization (158, 42.1%). Majority of the serious ADRs were continuing (191, 50.9%) at the time of reporting, few recovered (101, 26.9%), and two were fatal. The majority of serious ADRs were categorized as possible (182, 48.8%) followed by probable (173, 46.1%) in nature. Conclusion: Antitubercular, antiretroviral, and antimicrobial drugs were the most common causal drug groups for serious ADRs. This calls for robust ADR monitoring system and education of patients and prescribers for identification and effective management. PMID:27843794

  19. Patient Characteristics Associated with Adverse Drug Events in Hospital: An Overview of Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Silvija; Gauthier, Jeremie; MacDonald, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug events (ADEs) occurring in hospital inpatients can have serious implications. The ability to identify and prioritize patients at higher risk of ADEs could help pharmacists to optimize their impact as members of the patient care team. Objective: To identify risk factors, patient characteristics, and medications associated with a higher likelihood of ADEs in adult inpatients through an overview of reviews on this topic. Data Sources: Systematic reviews and narrative reviews or guidelines identified through a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (limited to articles published from 1995 to June 4, 2015), as well as a grey literature search. Study Selection and Data Extraction: For inclusion in this overview, a review had to discuss patient characteristics or risk factors associated with ADEs, medications associated with ADEs, or drug–drug interactions associated with ADEs, in adult inpatients. Articles retrieved by the literature search were screened for eligibility by a single reviewer. Data Synthesis: Eleven articles were deemed eligible for inclusion in this overview: 4 systematic reviews and 7 narrative reviews or guidelines. Their results were described narratively. Older age and polypharmacy were the most frequently cited risk factors associated with ADEs in hospital inpatients. Renal impairment, female sex, and decline in cognition were also frequently reported as being associated with ADEs. Medication classes reported to be associated with ADEs during the hospital stay included anticoagulants, anti-infectives/antibiotics, antidiabetic agents, analgesics (including opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), and cardiovascular drugs (including antihypertensive agents, diuretics, and digoxin). Two publications reported on preventable ADEs in hospital inpatients; the medications associated with preventable ADEs were consistent with those reported above. Conclusions: The risk factors, patient

  20. Adverse Drug Reactions in a Tertiary Care Emergency Medicine Ward - Prevalence, Preventability and Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Diana M.; Holm, Lennart; Engqvist, Ida; Fryckstedt, Jessica; Lindh, Jonatan D.; Stiller, Carl-Olav; Asker-Hagelberg, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the prevalence and preventability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in an emergency ward setting in a tertiary hospital in Sweden and to what extent the detected ADRs were reported to the Medical Product Agency (MPA). Methods In this prospective cross sectional observational study, 706 patients admitted to one of the Emergency Wards, at the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Stockholm during September 2008 –September 2009, were included. The electronic patient records were reviewed for patients’ demographic parameters, prevalence of possible ADRs and assessment of their preventability. In addition, the extent of formal and required ADR reporting to national registers was studied. Results Approximately 40 percent of the patient population had at least one possible ADR (n = 284). In the multivariable regression model, age and number of drugs were significantly associated with risk of presenting with an ADR (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Sex was not identified as a significant predictor of ADRs (p = 0.27). The most common ADRs were cardiovascular, followed by electrolyte disturbances, and hemorrhage. In 18 percent of the patient population ADRs were the reason for admission or had contributed to admission and 24% of these ADRs were assessed as preventable. The under-reporting of ADRs to the MPA was 99%. Conclusions ADRs are common in Emergency Medicine in tertiary care in Sweden, but under-reporting of ADRs is substantial. The most frequent ADRs are caused by cardiovascular drugs, and significantly associated with age and number of drugs. However, only a minority of the detected serious ADRs contributing to admission could have been avoided by increased risk awareness. PMID:27622270

  1. Trends of adverse drug reactions related-hospitalizations in Spain (2001-2006)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are a substantial cause of hospital admissions. We conducted a nationwide study to estimate the burden of hospital admissions for ADRs in Spain during a six-year period (2001-2006) along with the associated total health cost. Methods Data were obtained from the national surveillance system for hospital data (Minimum Basic Data Set) maintained by the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs, and covering more than 95% of Spanish hospitals. From these admissions we selected all hospitalization that were code as drug-related (ICD-9-CM codes E), but intended forms of overdoses, errors in administration and therapeutics failure were excluded. The average number of hospitalizations per year, annual incidence of hospital admissions, average length of stay in the hospital, and case-fatality rate, were calculated. Results During the 2001-2006 periods, the total number of hospitalized patients with ADR diagnosis was 350,835 subjects, 1.69% of all acute hospital admissions in Spain. The estimated incidence of admissions due to ADR decreased during the period 2001-2006 (p < 0.05). More than five percent of patients (n = 19,734) died during an ADR-related hospitalization. The drugs most commonly associated with ADR-related hospitalization were antineoplastic and immunosuppressive drugs (n = 75,760), adrenal cortical steroids (n = 47,539), anticoagulants (n = 26,546) and antibiotics (n = 22,144). The costs generated by patients in our study increased by 19.05% between 2001 and 2006. Conclusions Approximately 1.69% of all acute hospital admissions were associated with ADRs. The rates were much higher for elderly patients. The total cost of ADR-related hospitalization to the Spanish health system is high and has increased between 2001 and 2006. ADRs are an important cause of admission, resulting in considerable use of national health system beds and a significant number of deaths. PMID:20942906

  2. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  3. A web resource for mining HLA associations with adverse drug reactions: HLA-ADR.

    PubMed

    Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Dundar, Yenal; González-Galarza, Faviel F; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; Santos, Eduardo José Melo; da Silva, Andréa Luciana Soares; McCabe, Antony; Middleton, Derek; Alfirevic, Ana; Dickson, Rumona; Jones, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are an important family of genes involved in the immune system. Their primary function is to allow the host immune system to be able to distinguish between self and non-self peptides-e.g. derived from invading pathogens. However, these genes have also been implicated in immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), presenting a problem to patients, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies. We have previously developed the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) that captures the allelic and haplotype frequencies for these HLA genes across many healthy populations from around the world. Here, we report the development and release of the HLA-ADR database that captures data from publications where HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs (e.g. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and drug-induced liver injury). HLA-ADR was created by using data obtained through systematic review of the literature and semi-automated literature mining. The database also draws on data already present in AFND allowing users to compare and analyze allele frequencies in both ADR patients and healthy populations. The HLA-ADR database provides clinicians and researchers with a centralized resource from which to investigate immune-mediated ADRs.Database URL: http://www.allelefrequencies.net/hla-adr/.

  4. Assessment of three systems to empower the patient and decrease the risk of adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Kitta; Skjoet, Peter

    2011-01-01

    One way to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs) is to empower the patient to participate in the control of medication. This empowerment can be supported in different ways by making knowledge and information available to the patient. This study examines the usefulness and safety of two different systems on the background of a paper-based medication list presenting prescribed medicine presently used in hospitals in Copenhagen. Each of the systems examined aims to reduce ADEs but presents information in different levels of detail, and anticipates different level of prior knowledge from the patient: a Web-based prototype presenting medication, lab-results and alerts, and a cell phone-based prototype presenting alerts. Six patients were introduced to each of the systems by performing small tasks and subsequently interviewed. The patients found the paper-based medication list useful and comprehensive for control of own prescribed medication. The Web-based prototype also proved to be useful, but drug and lab values were hard to correlate, and the alerts were hard to understand. The cell phone-based prototype proved less useful as the patients were challenged to vision the applicability of the system. Furthermore, it is a safety issue that the information the alert is based upon, stems from the patient alone. We conclude that, in order for the Web-based system as well as the cell phone system to empower patient and increase patient safety, further development of the systems is necessary.

  5. Ocular Adverse Events Associated with Antibody–Drug Conjugates in Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul E.; Mannis, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews ocular adverse events (AEs) reported in association with administration of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) in human clinical trials. References reporting ocular toxicity or AEs associated with ADCs were collected using online publication searches. Articles, abstracts, or citations were included if they cited ocular toxicities or vision-impairing AEs with a confirmed or suspected association with ADC administration. Twenty-two references were found citing ocular or vision-impairing AEs in association with ADC administration. All references reported use of ADCs in human clinical trials for treatment of various malignancies. The molecular target and cytotoxic a