Science.gov

Sample records for adverse atmospheric conditions

  1. Mean Atmospheric Conditions - Australian Tropical Operating Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    The ARDU mean tropical atmosphere differs significantly from the ICAO standard atmosphere and is based upon data gathered prior to 1965. More recent...atmosphere and the ICAO atmosphere to describe mean conditions in their respective regions of application. It is recommended, however, that where extreme

  2. Modelling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Jørgensen and Dau (J Acoust Soc Am 130:1475-1487, 2011) proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech. Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well as noisy speech processed by spectral subtraction. The key role of the SNRenv metric is further supported here by the ability of a short-term version of the sEPSM to predict speech masking release for different speech materials and modulated interferers. However, the sEPSM cannot account for speech subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of the intelligibility of speech signal is strongly affected, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast, the effects of this distortion can be predicted -successfully by the spectro-temporal modulation index (STMI) (Elhilali et al., Speech Commun 41:331-348, 2003), which assumes an explicit analysis of the spectral "ripple" structure of the speech signal. However, since the STMI applies the same decision metric as the STI, it fails to account for spectral subtraction. The results from this study suggest that the SNRenv might reflect a powerful decision metric, while some explicit across-frequency analysis seems crucial in some conditions. How such across-frequency analysis is "realized" in the auditory system remains unresolved.

  3. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  4. Flight data recovery under adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, E. J.

    1981-11-01

    Methods for overcoming data loss, including bit dump, bit shift, forward and reverse readout, time displacement compensation (TDC), wideband TDC, and supersynchronization are discussed. Supersynchronization systems recognize acquisition of any one sync word as an in-sync condition and process accordingly. They open a window prior to the end of the subframe which enables the circuit to look for the next sync work up to 8 bits early. A feedback loop enables one shot timing methods to track the average bit rate automatically. A time duration equal to 70.7% of the average bit period is recommended. A digital bit averaging technique, in which the bit decision time is determined by the average of the two previous bits, gives excellent results. With forward and reverse processing, data are processed in the usual way through the engineering conversion process. Valid data, prior to the out of sync area, look normal. The computer then goes to the end of the subframe and processes data from this point backwards toward the sync loss area.

  5. Management of Cattle Exposed to Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, Terry L; Griffin, Dee

    2015-07-01

    During periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort and performance are compromised. Use of alternative supplementation programs need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals reared outside during winter, strategies that increase animal space and environmental buffers need to be used to minimize effects of mud, wet conditions, and windchill. There are ample opportunities for livestock producers to enhance animal welfare and minimize the impact of environmental stress.

  6. Word Learning under Adverse Listening Conditions: Context-Specific Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Sarah C.; Aslin, Richard N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of word learning have presented the items to listeners under ideal conditions. Here we ask how listeners learn new vocabulary items under adverse listening conditions. Would listeners form acoustically-specific representations that incorporated the noise, base their representations on noise-free language knowledge, or both? To…

  7. Quality of whey powders stored under adverse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrate powder (WPC) is exported by the U.S. and is included in emergency aid foods, but the bags sent overseas are usually stored without refrigeration and under elevated temperature and relative humidity (RH). The shelf life of WPC under adverse conditions must be known to preven...

  8. Extinction of CO2 Laser Radiation Under Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    81-1280 B0 91,a 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EXTINCTION OF CO2 LASER RADIATION UNDER FINAL Oct 78 Oct 81 ADVERSE WEATHER...CONDITIONS 6 PERFORMING O0G r_ r NUMBER 7. AUTHOR( s ) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER( s ) Dr. Vincent Chimelis ŝ PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10...number) Laser Propagation Rain Laser Extinction CO2 Lasers Adverse Weather Aerosol s - 20 RACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and Identify by

  9. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the person-environment fit model (J. R. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the demand-control model (R. A. Karasek & T. Theorell, 1990), a third theoretical concept is proposed to assess adverse health effects of stressful experience at work: the effort-reward imbalance model. The focus of this model is on reciprocity of exchange in occupational life where high-cost/low-gain conditions are considered particularly stressful. Variables measuring low reward in terms of low status control (e.g., lack of promotion prospects, job insecurity) in association with high extrinsic (e.g., work pressure) or intrinsic (personal coping pattern, e.g., high need for control) effort independently predict new cardiovascular events in a prospective study on blue-collar men. Furthermore, these variables partly explain prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, atherogenic lipids) in 2 independent studies. Studying adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions seems well justified, especially in view of recent developments of the labor market.

  10. Perceptual Learning of Speech under Optimal and Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xujin; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a remarkable ability to understand spoken language despite the large amount of variability in speech. Previous research has shown that listeners can use lexical information to guide their interpretation of atypical sounds in speech (Norris, McQueen, & Cutler, 2003). This kind of lexically induced perceptual learning enables people to adjust to the variations in utterances due to talker-specific characteristics, such as individual identity and dialect. The current study investigated perceptual learning in two optimal conditions: conversational speech (Experiment 1) vs. clear speech (Experiment 2), and three adverse conditions: noise (Experiment 3a) vs. two cognitive loads (Experiments 4a & 4b). Perceptual learning occurred in the two optimal conditions and in the two cognitive load conditions, but not in the noise condition. Furthermore, perceptual learning occurred only in the first of two sessions for each participant, and only for atypical /s/ sounds and not for atypical /f/ sounds. This pattern of learning and non-learning reflects a balance between flexibility and stability that the speech system must have to deal with speech variability in the diverse conditions that speech is encountered. PMID:23815478

  11. Algorithms for contours depicting static electric fields during adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1991-01-01

    A flexible and functional analytical tool is developed for the study of electric fields during adverse weather conditions. This tool is designed for use by members of the Atmospheric Science Group as part of their overall effort to appraise environmental conditions during these situations. It is also used to illustrate approaches open to those interested in the study of the physics of ambient electric field phenomena. Computer resources of KSC are coordinated with original software to produce contour interpretations of electric field data available from a grid of field mills spanning the region. Three model algorithms are presented and examples are given illustrating the system design, flexibility, and utility.

  12. Assurance of Fault Management: Risk-Significant Adverse Condition Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Fault Management (FM) systems are ranked high in risk-based assessment of criticality within flight software, emphasizing the importance of establishing highly competent domain expertise to provide assurance for NASA projects, especially as spaceflight systems continue to increase in complexity. Insight into specific characteristics of FM architectures seen embedded within safety- and mission-critical software systems analyzed by the NASA Independent Verification Validation (IVV) Program has been enhanced with an FM Technical Reference (TR) suite. Benefits are aimed beyond the IVV community to those that seek ways to efficiently and effectively provide software assurance to reduce the FM risk posture of NASA and other space missions. The identification of particular FM architectures, visibility, and associated IVV techniques provides a TR suite that enables greater assurance that critical software systems will adequately protect against faults and respond to adverse conditions. The role FM has with regard to overall asset protection of flight software systems is being addressed with the development of an adverse condition (AC) database encompassing flight software vulnerabilities.Identification of potential off-nominal conditions and analysis to determine how a system responds to these conditions are important aspects of hazard analysis and fault management. Understanding what ACs the mission may face, and ensuring they are prevented or addressed is the responsibility of the assurance team, which necessarily should have insight into ACs beyond those defined by the project itself. Research efforts sponsored by NASAs Office of Safety and Mission Assurance defined terminology, categorized data fields, and designed a baseline repository that centralizes and compiles a comprehensive listing of ACs and correlated data relevant across many NASA missions. This prototype tool helps projects improve analysis by tracking ACs, and allowing queries based on project, mission

  13. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders “acceptable given mitigations,” for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board (HSRB) determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood (per person per year) by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational (within mission). Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as “accepted with monitoring” while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a “red” risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure (see Table 1). While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so (Whitmire et al, 2013). While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle, “ignoring it” is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism

  14. Effect of Atmospheric Conditions on LIBS Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger; Jill R. Scott

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is typically performed at ambient Earth atmospheric conditions. However, interest in LIBS in other atmospheric conditions has increased in recent years, especially for use in space exploration (e.g., Mars and Lunar) or to improve resolution for isotopic signatures. This review focuses on what has been reported about the performance of LIBS in reduced pressure environments as well as in various gases other than air.

  15. Effect of Atmospheric Conditions on LIBS Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Effenberger, Andrew J.; Scott, Jill R.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is typically performed at ambient Earth atmospheric conditions. However, interest in LIBS in other atmospheric conditions has increased in recent years, especially for use in space exploration (e.g., Mars and Lunar) or to improve resolution for isotopic signatures. This review focuses on what has been reported about the performance of LIBS in reduced pressure environments as well as in various gases other than air. PMID:22399914

  16. Ion-Induced Nucleation Under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Svensmark, H.; Enghoff, M. B.

    2007-12-01

    Experimental studies of aerosol nucleation in air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapor at concentrations relevant for the Earths atmosphere are reported. The production of new aerosol particles is found to be proportional to the negative ion density. These results suggest that ions are important for nucleation processes in the atmosphere and cloud cover -- and may thus link cosmic rays to Earth's climate. The production of aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere is an unresolved and challenging problem. Atmospheric and experimental observations have shown that the nucleation of aerosol particles can occur under conditions that cannot be explained by classical nucleation theory. Several ideas have been put forward to solve the nucleation problem, e.g., Ion-induced Nucleation and Ternary Nucleation. However, experimental investigations exploring the role of ions in particle production are scarce, and often at conditions far removed from those relevant for the lower part of the atmosphere. In our laboratory we have performed1 an experimental investigation of nucleation that confirms the importance of ions under conditions that do prevail in the lower atmosphere. The measurements were performed in a 7 m3 reaction chamber, which was continuously flushed with dry purified air. Variable concentrations of water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) could be added to the chamber, where the pressure was held a few Pa above atmospheric pressure, and the temperature fixed at 296 K. UV-lamps (253.7 nm) were used to initiate a photochemical reaction that transforms (H2O), ozone (O3), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) to sulphuric acid (H2SO4). Ions were produced in the chamber by galactic cosmic radiation. This natural production of ions could be enhanced with gamma sources, mounted outside of the chamber. A Gerdien tube was used to measure the ion current, and aerosols generated in the chamber were measured with a TSI Ultra Fine Condensation

  17. 75 FR 8353 - Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions February 16, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Due to adverse weather conditions, the Federal Communications..., February 11, 2010. In recognition of the numerous closings and disruptions caused by the weather in...

  18. Fluorescence parameters of leaves of trees and shrubs during period of adverse weather conditions in Krasnoyarsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorueva, E. N.; Zavoruev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of adverse weather conditions (AWC) on the fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Amelanchier florida, Crataegus chlorocarca is obtained. However, significant changes in the fluorescence of the leaves of Acer negundo, Betula pendula under AWC were not observed.

  19. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  20. Styles of ejecta emplacement under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments provide essential first-order constraints on processes affecting ballistic ejecta and styles of ejecta emplacement under different atmospheric environments at planetary scales. The NASA-Ames Vertical Gun allows impacting different fine-grained particulate targets under varying atmospheric pressure and density, thereby helping to isolate controlling variables. Further analysis now permits characterizing distinct modes of emplacement that reflect the degree of ejecta entrainment within a turbidity flow created by ejecta curtain movement through the atmosphere.

  1. Health Monitoring and Management for Manufacturing Workers in Adverse Working Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoya; Zhong, Miao; Wan, Jiafu; Yi, Minglun; Gao, Tiancheng

    2016-10-01

    In adverse working conditions, environmental parameters such as metallic dust, noise, and environmental temperature, directly affect the health condition of manufacturing workers. It is therefore important to implement health monitoring and management based on important physiological parameters (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature). In recent years, new technologies, such as body area networks, cloud computing, and smart clothing, have allowed the improvement of the quality of services. In this article, we first give five-layer architecture for health monitoring and management of manufacturing workers. Then, we analyze the system implementation process, including environmental data processing, physical condition monitoring and system services and management, and present the corresponding algorithms. Finally, we carry out an evaluation and analysis from the perspective of insurance and compensation for manufacturing workers in adverse working conditions. The proposed scheme will contribute to the improvement of workplace conditions, realize health monitoring and management, and protect the interests of manufacturing workers.

  2. Adverse Pregnancy Conditions, Infertility, and Future Cardiovascular Risk: Implications for Mother and Child

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Wei, Janet; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2016-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy conditions in women are common and have been associated with adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes such as myocardial infarction and stroke. As risk stratification in women is often suboptimal, recognition of non-traditional risk factors such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and premature delivery has become increasingly important. Additionally, such conditions may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the children of afflicted women. In this review, we aim to highlight these conditions, along with infertility, and the association between such conditions and various cardiovascular outcomes and related maternal risk along with potential translation of risk to offspring. We will also discuss proposed mechanisms driving these associations as well as potential opportunities for screening and risk modification. PMID:26037616

  3. Causal Factors and Adverse Conditions of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2010-01-01

    The causal factors of accidents from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database and incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) database associated with loss of control (LOC) were examined for four types of operations (i.e., Federal Aviation Regulation Part 121, Part 135 Scheduled, Part 135 Nonscheduled, and Part 91) for the years 1988 to 2004. In-flight LOC is a serious aviation problem. Well over half of the LOC accidents included at least one fatality (80 percent in Part 121), and roughly half of all aviation fatalities in the studied time period occurred in conjunction with LOC. An adverse events table was updated to provide focus to the technology validation strategy of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project. The table contains three types of adverse conditions: failure, damage, and upset. Thirteen different adverse condition subtypes were gleaned from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), the FAA Accident and Incident database, and the NTSB database. The severity and frequency of the damage conditions, initial test conditions, and milestones references are also provided.

  4. Assessment of the State of the Art of Flight Control Technologies as Applicable to Adverse Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary s.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Leone, Karen M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies was surveyed to assess the state of the art in current Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) aircraft technologies. Over 100 papers from 25 conferences from the time period 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. An assessment of the general state of the art in adaptive flight control is summarized first, followed by an assessment of the state of the art as applicable to 13 identified adverse conditions. Specific areas addressed in the general assessment include flight control when compensating for damage or reduced performance, retrofit software upgrades to flight controllers, flight control through engine response, and finally test and validation of new adaptive controllers. The state-of-the-art assessment applicable to the adverse conditions include technologies not specifically related to flight control, but may serve as inputs to a future flight control algorithm. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IRAC Project

  5. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  6. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Williams, Thomas J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Shea, Camille

    2016-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama declared a space pioneering goal for the United States in general and NASA in particular. "Fifty years after the creation of NASA, our goal is no longer just a destination to reach. Our goal is the capacity for people to work and learn and operate and live safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time, ultimately in ways that are more sustainable and even indefinite." Thus NASA's Strategic Objective 1.1 emerged as "expand human presence into the solar system and to the surface of Mars to advance exploration, science, innovation, benefits to humanity, and international collaboration" (NASA 2015b). Any space flight, be it of long or short duration, occurs in an extreme environment that has unique stressors. Even with excellent selection methods, the potential for behavioral problems among space flight crews remain a threat to mission success. Assessment of factors that are related to behavioral health can help minimize the chances of distress and, thus, reduce the likelihood of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders arising within a crew. Similarly, countermeasures that focus on prevention and treatment can mitigate the cognitive or behavioral conditions that, should they arise, would impact mission success. Given the general consensus that longer duration, isolation, and confined missions have a greater risk for behavioral health ensuring crew behavioral health over the long term is essential. Risk, which within the context of this report is assessed with respect to behavioral health and performance, is addressed to deter development of cognitive and behavioral degradations or psychiatric conditions in space flight and analog populations, and to monitor, detect, and treat early risk factors, predictors and other contributing factors. Based on space flight and analog evidence, the average incidence rate of an adverse behavioral health event occurring during a space mission is relatively low for the

  7. Significance of frailty for predicting adverse clinical outcomes in different patient groups with specific medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Martin; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Sieber, Cornel Christian

    2016-10-01

    Frailty is a major health burden in an aging society. It constitutes a clinical state of reduced physiological reserves that is associated with a diminished ability to withstand internal and external stressors. Frail patients have an increased risk for adverse clinical outcomes, such as mortality, readmission to hospital, institutionalization and falls. Of further clinical interest, frailty might be at least in part reversible in some patients and subject to preventive strategies. In daily clinical practice older patients with a complex health status, who are mostly frail or at least at risk of developing frailty, are frequently cared for by geriatricians. Recently, clinicians and scientists from other medical disciplines, such as cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, endocrinology, rheumatology, surgery and critical care medicine also discovered frailty to be an interesting instrument for risk stratification of patients, including younger patients. In this review we highlight the results of recent studies that demonstrated the significance of frailty to predict adverse clinical outcomes in patients with specific medical conditions, such as cardiac, lung, liver and kidney diseases as well as diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, trauma patients, patients undergoing surgery and critically ill patients. Multiple studies in patients with the aforementioned specific medical conditions could be identified demonstrating a predictive role of frailty for several adverse clinical outcomes. The association between frailty and adverse clinical outcomes reported in these studies was in part independent of several major potential confounder factors, such as age, sex, race, comorbidities and disabilities and were also detected in younger patients.

  8. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and minor psychiatric disorders among bank workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In most countries, the financial service sector has undergone great organizational changes in the past decades, with potential negative impact on bank workers' mental health. The aim of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders (MPD) among Brazilian bank workers and to investigate whether they are associated with an adverse psychosocial working environment. Methods A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 2,500 workers in a Brazilian state bank in 2008. The presence of MPD was determined by the General Health Questionnaire.(GHQ). Psychosocial work conditions were assessed by means of the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The presence and magnitude of the independent associations between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions were determined by Prevalence Ratios, obtained by Poisson regression. Results From 2,337 eligible workers, 88% participated. The prevalence of MPD was greater among women (45% vs. 41%; p > 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of MPD was twice as high among bank workers exposed to high psychological demand and low control at work and under high effort and low reward working conditions. The lack of social support at work and the presence of over-commitment were also associated with higher prevalence of MPD. A negative interaction effect was found between over-commitment and effort-reward imbalance. Conclusion The prevalence of MPD is high among bank workers. The results reinforce the association between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions, assessed by the JCQ and ERI models. The direction of the interaction observed between over-commitment and ERI was contrary to what was expected. PMID:21062496

  9. Exoplanetary Atmospheres-Chemistry, Formation Conditions, and Habitability.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Agúndez, Marcelino; Moses, Julianne I; Hu, Yongyun

    2016-12-01

    Characterizing the atmospheres of extrasolar planets is the new frontier in exoplanetary science. The last two decades of exoplanet discoveries have revealed that exoplanets are very common and extremely diverse in their orbital and bulk properties. We now enter a new era as we begin to investigate the chemical diversity of exoplanets, their atmospheric and interior processes, and their formation conditions. Recent developments in the field have led to unprecedented advancements in our understanding of atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets and the implications for their formation conditions. We review these developments in the present work. We review in detail the theory of atmospheric chemistry in all classes of exoplanets discovered to date, from highly irradiated gas giants, ice giants, and super-Earths, to directly imaged giant planets at large orbital separations. We then review the observational detections of chemical species in exoplanetary atmospheres of these various types using different methods, including transit spectroscopy, Doppler spectroscopy, and direct imaging. In addition to chemical detections, we discuss the advances in determining chemical abundances in these atmospheres and how such abundances are being used to constrain exoplanetary formation conditions and migration mechanisms. Finally, we review recent theoretical work on the atmospheres of habitable exoplanets, followed by a discussion of future outlook of the field.

  10. LEARNING TO BE BAD: ADVERSE SOCIAL CONDITIONS, SOCIAL SCHEMAS, AND CRIME

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Ronald L.; Burt, Callie Harbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop and test a new approach to explain the link between social factors and individual offending. We argue that seemingly disparate family, peer, and community conditions lead to crime because the lessons communicated by these events are similar and promote social schemas involving a hostile view of people and relationships, a preference for immediate rewards, and a cynical view of conventional norms. Further, we posit that these three schemas are interconnected and combine to form a criminogenic knowledge structure that gives rise to situational interpretations legitimating criminal behavior. Structural equation modeling with a sample of roughly 700 hundred African American teens provided strong support for the model. The findings indicated that persistent exposure to adverse conditions such as community crime, discrimination, harsh parenting, deviant peers and low neighborhood collective efficacy increased commitment to the three social schemas. The three schemas were highly intercorrelated and combined to form a latent construct that strongly predicted increases in crime. Further, in large measure the effect of the various adverse conditions on increases in crime was indirect through their impact on this latent construct. We discuss the extent to which the social schematic model presented in the paper might be used to integrate concepts and findings from several of the major theories of criminal behavior. PMID:21760641

  11. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  12. Research Spotlight: Sulfate isotopes explain past Antarctic atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi; Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-12-01

    The past 230 years have seen great changes in atmospheric conditions in the Northern Hemisphere, due to pollutants released from biomass and coal burning as societies became industrialized and the fossil fuel burning that began to dominate energy consumption at the turn of the twentieth century. The changes from low pollution levels to biomass burning to fossil fuel burning are recorded in Greenland ice cores—the burning of different fuels releases chemical species that influence the oxidation capacity (or reactivity) of the atmosphere. The oxidation capacity of the atmosphere influences atmospheric concentrations of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Sulfate isotopes record this oxidation chemistry in the atmosphere, and these isotopically distinct molecules then precipitate in the Arctic's yearly snow cycles.

  13. Speech perception under adverse conditions: insights from behavioral, computational, and neuroscience research

    PubMed Central

    Guediche, Sara; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Fiez, Julie A.; Holt, Lori L.

    2014-01-01

    Adult speech perception reflects the long-term regularities of the native language, but it is also flexible such that it accommodates and adapts to adverse listening conditions and short-term deviations from native-language norms. The purpose of this article is to examine how the broader neuroscience literature can inform and advance research efforts in understanding the neural basis of flexibility and adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Specifically, we highlight the potential role of learning algorithms that rely on prediction error signals and discuss specific neural structures that are likely to contribute to such learning. To this end, we review behavioral studies, computational accounts, and neuroimaging findings related to adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Already, a few studies have alluded to a potential role of these mechanisms in adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Furthermore, we consider research topics in neuroscience that offer insight into how perception can be adaptively tuned to short-term deviations while balancing the need to maintain stability in the perception of learned long-term regularities. Consideration of the application and limitations of these algorithms in characterizing flexible speech perception under adverse conditions promises to inform theoretical models of speech. PMID:24427119

  14. Bill E. Kunkle Interdisciplinary Beef Symposium: Animal welfare concerns for cattle exposed to adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L

    2014-12-01

    Increasing awareness of animal welfare has become a priority in food production systems involving animals. Under normal working environments, production practices are constantly evaluated to maintain optimum levels of animal well-being. However, during periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort, as well as animal performance, are often compromised. In the Midwest and Great Plains states, the heat waves of 1995, 1999, 2006, 2009, 2010, and 2013 were particularly difficult on animals reared in confinement, with documented cattle losses approaching 5,000 head each year. Additionally, during the summer of 2011, nearly 15,000 head of cattle across 5 states were lost as a result of heat stress. During prolonged periods of heat stress, lower conceptions rates are observed in livestock. In addition, animals reared in confinement buildings are often compromised because of limitations in ventilation systems. Under the opposite environmental spectrum, the winters of 1992 to 1993, 1996 to 1997, 1997 to 1998, 2006 to 2007, and 2008 to 2009 caused hardship for livestock producers, particularly for those rearing animals in an outdoor environment. During the winters of 1996 to 1997 and 2008 to 2009 up to 50% of the newborn calves were lost in many areas, with over 75,000 head of cattle lost in the northern plains states. Late fall and early winter snowstorms in 1992, 1997, 2006, and 2013 resulted in the loss of over 25,000 head of cattle each year in the Great Plains region of the United States. Economic losses from reduced performance of cattle experiencing severe environmental stress likely exceed losses associated with livestock death by 5- to 10-fold. Use of alternative supplementation programs may need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals

  15. Wear of novel ceramic-on-ceramic bearings under adverse and clinically relevant hip simulator conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jennings, Louise M; Begand, Sabine; Oberbach, Thomas; Delfosse, Daniel; Fisher, John

    2013-11-01

    Further development of ceramic materials for total hip replacement aim to increase fracture toughness and further reduce the incidence of bearing fracture. Edge loading due to translational mal positioning (microseparation) has replicated stripe wear, wear rates, and bimodal wear debris observed on retrievals. This method has replicated the fracture of early zirconia ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. This has shown the necessity of introducing microseparation conditions to the gait cycle when assessing the tribological performance of new hip replacement bearings. Two novel ceramic matrix composite materials, zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) and alumina-toughened zirconia (ATZ), were developed by Mathys Orthopädie GmbH. In this study, ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA bearing combinations were tested and compared with alumina-on-alumina (Al2O3-on-Al2O3) bearings under adverse microseparation and edge loading conditions using the Leeds II physiological anatomical hip joint simulator. The wear rate (±95% confidence limit) of ZTA-on-ZTA was 0.14 ± 0.10 mm(3)/million cycles and that of ATZ-on-ATZ was 0.06 ± 0.004 mm(3)/million cycles compared with a wear rate of 0.74 ± 1.73 mm(3)/million cycles for Al2O3-on-Al2O3 bearings. Stripe wear was evident on all bearing combinations; however, the stripe formed on the ATZ and ZTA femoral heads was thinner and shallower that that formed on the Al2O3 heads. Posttest phase composition measurements for both ATZ and ZTA materials showed no significant change in the monoclinic zirconia content. ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA showed superior wear resistance properties when compared with Al2O3-on-Al2O3 under adverse edge loading conditions.

  16. Quality of Golden papaya stored under controlled atmosphere conditions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Derliane Ribeiro; de Resende, Eder Dutra

    2013-10-01

    This work evaluated physicochemical parameters of Golden papaya stored under refrigeration in controlled atmospheres. The fruits were kept at 13  in chambers containing either 3 or 6% O2 combined with 6%, 10% or 15% CO2. Moreover, a normal atmosphere was produced with 20.8% O2 and 0.03% CO2 with ethylene scrubbing, and a control treatment was used with ambient conditions. Evaluations were performed at the following times: before storage, after 30 days of storage in controlled atmosphere, and after removal from controlled atmosphere and storage for 7 days in the cold room. At the lower O2 levels and higher CO2 levels, the ripening rate was decreased. The drop in pulp acidity was avoided after 30 days of storage at 3% O2, but the fruits reached normal acidity after removal from controlled atmosphere and storage for 7 days in the cold room. The reducing sugars remained at a higher concentration after 30 days under 3% O2 and 15% CO2 even 7 days after removal from controlled atmosphere and storage in the cold room. This atmosphere also preserved the content of ascorbic acid at a higher level.

  17. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  18. Determination and representation of electric charge distributions associated with adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for determining the size and location of electric charges which model storm systems and lightning strikes. The analysis utilizes readings from a grid of ground level field mills and geometric constraints on parameters to arrive at a representative set of charges. This set is used to generate three dimensional graphical depictions of the set as well as contour maps of the ground level electrical environment over the grid. The composite, analytic and graphic package is demonstrated and evaluated using controlled input data and archived data from a storm system. The results demonstrate the packages utility as: an operational tool in appraising adverse weather conditions; a research tool in studies of topics such as storm structure, storm dynamics, and lightning; and a tool in designing and evaluating grid systems.

  19. Probiotics production and alternative encapsulation methodologies to improve their viabilities under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Coghetto, Chaline Caren; Brinques, Graziela Brusch; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-12-01

    Probiotic products are dietary supplements containing live microorganisms producing beneficial health effects on the host by improving intestinal balance and nutrient absorption. Among probiotic microorganisms, those classified as lactic acid bacteria are of major importance to the food and feed industries. Probiotic cells can be produced using alternative carbon and nitrogen sources, such as agroindustrial residues, at the same time contributing to reduce process costs. On the other hand, the survival of probiotic cells in formulated food products, as well as in the host gut, is an essential nutritional aspect concerning health benefits. Therefore, several cell microencapsulation techniques have been investigated as a way to improve cell viability and survival under adverse environmental conditions, such as the gastrointestinal milieu of hosts. In this review, different aspects of probiotic cells and technologies of their related products are discussed, including formulation of culture media, and aspects of cell microencapsulation techniques required to improve their survival in the host.

  20. Cost-sharing, physician utilization, and adverse selection among Medicare beneficiaries with chronic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Geoffrey

    2015-02-01

    Pooled data from the 2007, 2009, and 2011/2012 California Health Interview Surveys were used to compare the number of self-reported annual physician visits among 36,808 Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 in insurance groups with differential cost-sharing. Adjusted for adverse selection and a set of health covariates, Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) only beneficiaries had similar physician utilization compared with HMO enrollees but fewer visits compared with those with supplemental (1.04, p = .001) and Medicaid (1.55, p = .003) coverage. FFS only beneficiaries in very good or excellent health had fewer visits compared with those of similar health status with supplemental (1.30, p = .001) or Medicaid coverage (2.15, p = .002). For subpopulations with several chronic conditions, FFS only beneficiaries also had fewer visits compared with beneficiaries with supplemental or Medicaid coverage. Observed differences in utilization may reflect efficient and necessary physician utilization among those with chronic health needs.

  1. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  2. Global responses of Escherichia coli to adverse conditions determined by microarrays and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Janbu, Astrid Oust; Langsrud, Solveig; Langsrud, Oyvind; Hobman, Jon L; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Kohler, Achim; Rudi, Knut

    2009-06-01

    The global gene expression and biomolecular composition in an Escherichia coli model strain exposed to 10 adverse conditions (sodium chloride, ethanol, glycerol, hydrochloric and acetic acid, sodium hydroxide, heat (46 degrees C), and cold (15 degrees C), as well as ethidium bromide and the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride) were determined using DNA microarrays and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In total, approximately 40% of all investigated genes (1682/4279 genes) significantly changed expression, compared with a nonstressed control. There were, however, only 3 genes (ygaW (unknown function), rmf (encoding a ribosomal modification factor), and ghrA (encoding a glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductase)) that significantly changed expression under all conditions (not including benzalkonium chloride). The FT-IR analysis showed an increase in unsaturated fatty acids during ethanol and cold exposure, and a decrease during acid and heat exposure. Cold conditions induced changes in the carbohydrate composition of the cell, possibly related to the upregulation of outer membrane genes (glgAP and rcsA). Although some covariance was observed between the 2 data sets, principle component analysis and regression analyses revealed that the gene expression and the biomolecular responses are not well correlated in stressed populations of E. coli, underlining the importance of multiple strategies to begin to understand the effect on the whole cell.

  3. Chosen risk level during car-following in adverse weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2016-10-01

    This study examines how precipitation, light conditions and surface conditions affect the drivers' risk perception. An indicator CRI (Chosen Risk Index) is defined, which describes the chosen risk level for drivers in a car-following situation. The dataset contains about 70 000 observations of driver behaviour and weather status on a rural road. Based on the theory of risk homeostasis and an assumption that driving behaviour in situations with daylight, dry road and no precipitation reflects drivers' target level of risk, generalised linear models (GLM) were estimated for cars and trucks separately to reveal the effect of adverse weather conditions on risk perception. The analyses show that both car and truck drivers perceive the highest risk when driving on snow covered roads. For car drivers, a snow covered road in combination with moderate rain or light snow are the factors which lowers the CRI the most. For trucks, snow cover and partially covered roads significantly lowers the CRI, while precipitation did not seem to impose any higher risk. Interaction effects were found for car drivers only.

  4. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF HOT JUPITERS: INSENSITIVITY TO INITIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Beibei; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-06-10

    The ongoing characterization of hot Jupiters has motivated a variety of circulation models of their atmospheres. Such models must be integrated starting from an assumed initial state, which is typically taken to be a wind-free, rest state. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of hot-Jupiter atmospheric circulation to initial conditions with shallow-water models and full three-dimensional models. Those models are initialized with zonal jets, and we explore a variety of different initial jet profiles. We demonstrate that, in both classes of models, the final, equilibrated state is independent of initial condition-as long as frictional drag near the bottom of the domain and/or interaction with a specified planetary interior are included so that the atmosphere can adjust angular momentum over time relative to the interior. When such mechanisms are included, otherwise identical models initialized with vastly different initial conditions all converge to the same statistical steady state. In some cases, the models exhibit modest time variability; this variability results in random fluctuations about the statistical steady state, but we emphasize that, even in these cases, the statistical steady state itself does not depend on initial conditions. Although the outcome of hot-Jupiter circulation models depend on details of the radiative forcing and frictional drag, aspects of which remain uncertain, we conclude that the specification of initial conditions is not a source of uncertainty, at least over the parameter range explored in most current models.

  5. Adverse childhood experiences and mental health, chronic medical conditions, and development in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kerker, Bonnie D.; Zhang, Jinjin; Nadeem, Erum; Stein, Ruth E. K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Heneghan, Amy; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationships between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and mental health, chronic medical conditions and social development among young children in the child welfare system. Methods This was a cross-sectional study, using a nationally representative sample of children investigated by child welfare (National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II) from 2008–2009. Our analysis included caregiver interviews and caseworker reports about children age 18–71 months who were not in out-of-home care (N=912). We examined the associations between ACEs and mental health (measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL)), reported chronic medical conditions, and social development (measured by the Vineland Socialization Scale), in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Nearly all children (98.1%) were reported to have had an ACE in their lifetime; the average number of ACEs was 3.6. For every additional reported ACE there was a 32% increased odds of having a problem score on the CBCL (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.32, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.14, 1.53), and a 21% increased odds of having a chronic medical condition (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40). Among children 36–71 months, for every additional reported ACE there was a 77% increased odds of a low Vineland Socialization score (OR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.78). Conclusion and Relevance ACEs were associated with poor early childhood mental health and chronic medical conditions, and, among children age 3–5, social development. Efforts are needed to examine whether providing early intervention to families with multiple stressors mitigates the impact of ACEs on children’s outcomes. PMID:26183001

  6. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  7. Predictability in France : atmospheric forcing or land surface initial conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, S.; Martin, E.; Céron, J.-P.; Regimbeau, F.

    2010-09-01

    A first study of a hydrological forecasting suite has already been done at seasonal time scales over France (Céron and al., 2010) in a context of adaptation for water resources management. The results showed the feasibility of hydrological seasonal forecasts by forcing the hydrometeorological model Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) with seasonal atmospheric forecasts from the DEMETER project. Scores were better for hydrological variables than for atmospheric variables for four river catchments for the spring season. The purpose of the present study is to quantify the sources of predictability of the hydrometeorological system. Two experiences were conducted in order to address this issue. The first experience consisted in testing the impact of the land surface initial conditions. We used realistic land surface initial state produced by the operational SIM model for the specific year and 9 random years of Safran atmospheric analyses (temperature and precipitation) from 1971 to 2001, in a consistent way with the previous study (Céron et al, 2010). The other atmospheric parameters (wind, specific humidity, long wave and short wave radiation and cloudiness) come from the SAFRAN climatology over the same period. The second experience was designed to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric forcing with 9 random years, chosen for the land surface initial state. The atmospheric forcing (temperature and precipitation) comes from the Safran analysis system for the corresponding year. Some results of this study will be presented on soil wetness index (SWI) forecasts and river flows forecasts for all stations in France. We will compare deterministic and probabilistic scores of the two experiences with those of the hydrological forecasting suite built with the seasonal forecasts from the DEMETER project. Perspectives for the downscaling of seasonal forecasts will be discussed in a last part. Céron J-P, Tanguy G, Franchistéguy L, Martin E, Regimbeau F and Vidal J-P, 2010. Hydrological

  8. Active imaging systems to see through adverse conditions: Light-scattering based models and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, Nicolas; Ceolato, Romain; Hespel, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Onera, the French aerospace lab, develops and models active imaging systems to understand the relevant physical phenomena affecting these systems performance. As a consequence, efforts have been done on the propagation of a pulse through the atmosphere and on target geometries and surface properties. These imaging systems must operate at night in all ambient illumination and weather conditions in order to perform strategic surveillance for various worldwide operations. We have implemented codes for 2D and 3D laser imaging systems. As we aim to image a scene in the presence of rain, snow, fog or haze, we introduce such light-scattering effects in our numerical models and compare simulated images with measurements provided by commercial laser scanners.

  9. Tracking near-surface atmospheric conditions using an infrasound network.

    PubMed

    Marcillo, O; Johnson, J B

    2010-07-01

    Continuous volcanic infrasound signal was recorded on a three-microphone network at Kilauea in July 2008 and inverted for near-surface horizontal winds. Inter-station phase delays, determined by signal cross-correlation, vary by up to 4% and are attributable to variable atmospheric conditions. The results suggest two predominant weather regimes during the study period: (1) 6-9 m/s easterly trade winds and (2) lower-intensity 2-5 m/s mountain breezes from Mauna Loa. The results demonstrate the potential of using infrasound for tracking local averaged meteorological conditions, which has implications for modeling plume dispersal and quantifying gas flux.

  10. Electrospinning jets as X-ray sources at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, P.; Mikeš, P.; Lukáš, D.

    2010-11-01

    Electrospinning jets producing nanofibres from a polymer solution by electrical forces are fine cylindrical electrodes that create extremely high electric-field strength in their vicinity at atmospheric conditions. However, this quality of electrospinning is only scarcely investigated, and the interactions of the electric fields generated by them with ambient gases are nearly unknown. Here we report on the discovery that electrospinning jets generate X-ray beams up to energies of 20 keV at atmospheric conditions. The X-ray nature of the detected radiation is incontrovertibly proved by a spectroscopic experiment. We hypothesize how the field strength increases to gigantic values in the vicinity of charged electrospinning jets, as a consequence of counterion condensation, to accelerate charged particles, at a short distance, comparable with their mean path at atmospheric pressure, up to kinetic energies that give rise to the detection of X-rays. The experimental set-up designed by us for the generation and detection of high-energy electromagnetic radiation from electrospinning is extremely simple.

  11. Kinetics of OH + CO reaction under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser-induced fluorescence technique is used to directly measure the temperature, pressure, and H2O concentration dependence on k1 in air. K1 is found to increase linearly with increasing pressure at pressures of not greater than 1 atm, and the pressure dependence of k1 at 299 K is the same in N2 buffer gas as in O2 buffer gas. The rate constant in the low-pressure limit and the slope of the k1 versus pressure dependence are shown to be the same at 262 K as at 299 K. The present results significantly reduce the current atmospheric model uncertainties in the temperature dependence under atmospheric conditions, in the third body efficiency of O2, and in the effect of water vapor on k1.

  12. Properties of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shengbai; Archer, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed to study the properties of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions. The Wind Turbine and Turbulence Simulator (WiTTS), a 4th-order finite-difference LES code is used for stable, neutral, and unstable conditions. The Coriolis forcing is also considered. Three cases are studied: isolated turbine, finite-size turbine array, and infinite wind farm. The results show strong correlations with stability. For the stable condition, the power extraction by an isolated turbine is highest, but the wake is also longest, thus the relative performance inside the array is lowest. In contrast, although the single-turbine power extraction is low for the unstable condition, the performance of downstream turbines is improved due to faster wake recovery. The wake shape is distorted by the stability-related wind veering. Therefore, the self-similar Gaussian wake deficit is not accurate. Here, a new wake model is proposed for correction. The infinite wind-farm case shows that the temperature near the ground is warmed by about 1 K for the stable condition, but the influence is almost negligible for the unstable and neutral conditions. For all conditions, the near-ground shear stress is reduced.

  13. Alteration of municipal and industrial slags under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafał Kowalski, Piotr; Michalik, Marek

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Management System in Poland is being consequently built since 1998. After important changes in legislation, local governments have taken over the duty of waste collection. New points of selective collection of wastes have been opened and new sorting and composting plants were built. The last stage of introducing the Waste Management System is construction of waste incineration power plants. From nine installations which were planned, six are now under construction and they will start operating within the next two years. It is assumed that the consumption of raw wastes for these installations will reach 974 thousand tons per year. These investments will result in increased slags and ashes production. Now in Poland several local waste incinerators are operating and predominant amount of produced incineration residues is landfilled. These materials are exposed to atmospheric conditions in time of short term storage (just after incineration) and afterwards for a longer period of time on the landfill site. During the storage of slags low temperature mineral transformations and chemical changes may occur and also some components can be washed out. These materials are stored wet because of the technological processes. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of storage in atmospheric conditions on slags from incineration of industrial and municipal wastes. The experiment started in January 2013. During this period slag samples from incineration of industrial and municipal wastes were exposed to atmospheric conditions. Samples were collected after 6 and 12 months. Within this time the pH value was measured monthly, and during the experimental period remained constant on the level of 9.5. After 6 months of exposure only slight changes in mineral compositions were observed in slags. The results of XRD analysis of municipal slags showed increase in content of carbonate minerals in comparison to the raw slag samples. In industrial slags, a decrease in

  14. Pathways from childhood abuse and other adversities to adult health risks: The role of adult socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Font, Sarah A; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks-depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions-marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status-mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15-20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact.

  15. Documentation of Atmospheric Conditions During Observed Rising Aircraft Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted in the fall of 1995 off the coast of Wallops Island, Virginia in order to determine characteristics of wake vortices at flight altitudes. A NASA Wallops Flight Facility C130 aircraft equipped with smoke generators produced visible wakes at altitudes ranging from 775 to 2225 m in a variety of atmospheric conditions, orientations (head wind, cross wind), and airspeeds. Meteorological and aircraft parameters were collected continuously from a Langley Research Center OV-10A aircraft as it flew alongside and through the wake vortices at varying distances behind the C130. Meteorological data were also obtained from special balloon observations made at Wallops. Differential GPS capabilities were on each aircraft from which accurate altitude profiles were obtained. Vortices were observed to rise at distances beyond a mile behind the C130. The maximum altitude was 150 m above the C130 in a near neutral atmosphere with significant turbulence. This occurred from large vertical oscillations in the wakes. There were several cases when vortices did not descend after a very short initial period and remained near generation altitude in a variety of moderately stable atmospheres and wind shears.

  16. Large-scale atmospheric conditions during DEEPWAVE-NZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Rapp, M.; Gisinger, S.; Kaifler, B.; Kaifler, N.; Ehard, B.; Doyle, J. D.; Eckermann, S. D.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R. B.; Taylor, M. J.; Uddstrom, M.

    2014-12-01

    The field phase of DEEPWAVE-NZ (DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experimentover New Zealand) was conducted in June and July 2014. Key instrumentswere the NSF/NCAR GV and the DLR Falcon research aircraft, a suite ofground-based instruments provided by various international partners(e.g. NCAR's Integrated Sounding Station, DLR's Raman lidar, Universityof Utah's Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper and Airglow Imager, ..)and satellite sensors as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). During DEEPWAVE-NZ operational forecasts of the ECMWF's integratedforecast system (IFS) were used to provide guidance for planning theresearch flights of NSF/NCAR GV and the DLR Falcon during intenseobserving periods (IOPs). The IFS has 137 vertical hybrid levels,a model top at 0.01 hPa and a horizontal resolution of about 16 kmglobally. For certain cases, an astonishing agreement was noticed betweenthe forecasted wave events in the upper atmosphere and observations.Here, operational ECMWF analyses and forecasts are used to characterizethe atmospheric state from the Earth's surface to the mesosphere during theDEEPWAVE field campaign. Special focus of the presentations is put on theatmospheric conditions conducive to deep gravity wave propagation fromvarious sources as the flow across the Southern Alps, coupled jet-frontsystems and the polar night jet. Furthermore, resolved gravity waves willbe analysed and compared with observations as aircraft flight level data,radiosondes and ground-based lidar measurements.

  17. Pathways from Childhood Abuse and Other Adversities to Adult Health Risks: The Role of Adult Socioeconomic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks – depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions— marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status—mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15–20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact. PMID:26059537

  18. The Formation of Teacher Work Teams under Adverse Conditions: Towards a More Realistic Scenario for Schools in Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintrop, Rick; Charles, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Group formation studies are rare in the literature on teacher professional learning communities (PLCs). But they are needed to render realistic scenarios and design interventions for practitioners who work in schools where teachers encounter distress and social adversity. Under these conditions, we may need approaches to PLC development that are…

  19. Large-scale atmospheric conditions during DEEPWAVE-NZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gisinger, Sonja; Rapp, Markus; Kaifler, Natalie; Kaifler, Bernd; Ehard, Benedikt; Doyle, James D.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Fritts, David C.; Smith, Ronald B.; Taylor, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The field phase of DEEPWAVE-NZ (DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experiment over New Zealand) was conducted in June and July 2014. Key instruments were the NSF/NCAR GV and the DLR Falcon research aircraft, a suite of ground-based instruments provided by various international partners (e.g. NCAR's Integrated Sounding Station, DLR's Rayleigh lidar, University of Utah's Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper and Airglow Imager, ..), and satellite sensors as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). During DEEPWAVE-NZ operational forecasts of the ECMWF's integrated forecast system (IFS) were used to provide guidance for planning the research flights of NSF/NCAR GV and the DLR Falcon during intense observing periods. The IFS has 137 vertical hybrid levels, a model top at 0.01 hPa and a horizontal resolution of about 16 km globally. For certain cases, an astonishing agreement was noticed between the forecasted wave events in the upper atmosphere and observations. Here, operational ECMWF analyses and forecasts are used to characterize the atmospheric state from the Earth's surface to the mesosphere during the DEEPWAVE field campaign. For selected cases, airborne and ground-based observations are compared with the ECMWF data. Special focus of the presentations is put on the atmospheric conditions conducive to deep gravity wave propagation from various sources as the flow across the Southern Alps, coupled jet-front systems and the polar night jet. Furthermore, resolved gravity waves will be analysed and compared with observations as aircraft flight level data, radiosondes and ground-based lidar measurements.

  20. Instability indices and unstable atmospheric conditions over Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamperakis, Nikolaos; Matsangouras, Ioannis; Nastos, Panagiotis; Pytharoulis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    Significant research has been carried out investigating the use of diagnostic variable sets or instability indices, as forecasting tools or parameters to identify favorable atmospheric conditions of severe convective weather. Indeed, the value of such variables is strongly associated with their capacity to summarize in a single number some characteristics of the severe storm environment, thus, operational forecasters use them to address the overall threat of severe weather associated with convective storms. In this paper a spatial and temporal analysis of specific instability indices over Greece during 2008-2014 period is presented. The energy helicity index (EHI), the bulk Richardson number (BRN) shear, the storm-relative environmental helicity (SRH), and the convective available potential energy (CAPE) were considered as principal diagnostic instability variables and employed in spatial and temporal analysis. The EHI, BRN, SRH and CAPE indices were calculated from ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The lighting activity, recorded by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS) Precision Lighting Network (PLN), is employed to highlight favorable atmospheric conditions of severe convective weather.

  1. The effects of atmospheric optical conditions on perceived scenic beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, Douglas A.; Hogo, Henry; Daniel, Terry C.

    This paper describes the results from the first year of a currently on-going study, the objective of which is to investigate the relationships between atmospheric optical conditions and human perceptions of scenic beauty. Color photographs and atmospheric optical measurements, using telephotometers and nephelometers, were taken in the western U.S.A. (Grand Canyon National Park and Mt. Lemmon near Tucson, Arizona) and in the eastern United States (Great Smoky Mountains and Shenandoah national parks). Over 1300 individual observers rated color slides for either visual air quality or scenic beauty using a 10-point rating scale. Ratings were transformed to indices using standard psychophysical techniques. Relationships between these perceptual indices and physical parameters characteristic of the given landscape represented in the color slides were investigated using scatter plots, correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression. Physical parameters included visual range, horizon sky chromaticity and luminance, solar zenith and scattering angles, and cloud conditions. Results show that observers' ratings of visual air quality and scenic beauty are sensitive to visual range, sky color, and scattering angle. However, in some of the areas investigated, scenic beauty ratings were not affected by changes in visual range. The sensitivity of the scenic beauty of a vista to changes in the extinction coefficient may be useful for establishing visibility goals and priorities.

  2. Potential Climate Change Health Risks from Increases in Heat Waves: Abnormal Birth Outcomes and Adverse Maternal Health Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cil, Gulcan; Cameron, Trudy Ann

    2017-02-23

    We investigate the risks presented by heat waves for adverse health conditions for babies and expectant mothers when these mothers have been exposed to heat waves during gestation or during the period just prior to conception. Rather than just birth weight and gestational age, we focus on less common metrics such as abnormal conditions in the newborn (fetal distress, reliance on a ventilator, and meconium aspiration) and adverse health conditions in the mother (pregnancy-related hypertension, uterine bleeding during pregnancy, eclampsia, and incompetent cervix). We use monthly panel data for over 3,000 U.S. counties, constructed from the confidential version of the U.S. Natality Files for 1989-2008. Our models control for sociodemographic factors and include county, month, and state-by-year fixed effects to control for unobserved spatial and timewise heterogeneity in the data. Even within the United States, where there is widespread access to air conditioning, heat waves increase the fraction of babies with abnormal conditions related to maternal stress, as well as the fraction of mothers who experience pregnancy-related adverse health conditions. The scope for these risks in developing countries is likely to be even greater.

  3. Atmospheric conditions at Cerro Armazones derived from astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakićević, Maša; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Noll, Stefan; Kausch, Wolfgang; Unterguggenberger, Stefanie; Kerber, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We studied the precipitable water vapour (PWV) content near Cerro Armazones and discuss the potential use of our technique of modelling the telluric absorbtion lines for the investigation of other molecular layers. The site is designated for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) and the nearby planned site for the Čerenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Methods: Spectroscopic data from the Bochum Echelle Spectroscopic Observer (BESO) instrument were investigated by using a line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) for the Earth's atmosphere with the telluric absorption correction tool molecfit. All observations from the archive in the period from December 2008 to the end of 2014 were investigated. The dataset completely covers the El Niño event registered in the period 2009-2010. Models of the 3D Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) were used for further comparison. Moreover, we present a direct comparison for those days for which data from a similar study with VLT/X-Shooter and microwave radiometer LHATPRO at Cerro Paranal are available. Results: This analysis shows that the site has systematically lower PWV values, even after accounting for the decrease in PWV expected from the higher altitude of the site with respect to Cerro Paranal, using the average atmosphere found with radiosondes. We found that GDAS data are not a suitable basis for predicting local atmospheric conditions - they usually systematically overestimate the PWV values. The large sample furthermore enabled us to characterize the site with respect to symmetry across the sky and variation with the years and within the seasons. This technique of studying the atmospheric conditions is shown to be a promising step into a possible monitoring equipment for the CTA. Based on archival observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile and of the Cerro Armazones Observatory facilities of the Ruhr Universität Bochum.Full Table 1

  4. Inferring atmospheric weather conditions in volcanic environments using infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, H. D.; Johnson, J. B.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    We use infrasound produced by Tungurahua Volcano (Ecuador) to infer local time-varying atmospheric conditions, which can be used to improve gas flux measurements and tephra dispersal modeling. Physical properties of the atmosphere, including wind and temperature (which controls adiabatic sound speed), can be quantified by studying the travel times of acoustic waves produced during volcanic activity. The travel times between Tungurahua's vent and five infrasound stations located in a network configuration over an area of 90 km2 were used in this study. We are able to quantify the arrival time differences of acoustic waves for ten unique station pairs and use this information to model the average speed of sound between source and receiver. To identify what parameters best fit the observed arrival times, we perform a grid search for a homogeneous two-dimensional wind velocity as well as for air temperature. Due to travel time dependence on the specific path taken by waves, we account for topography using a 5 meter resolution digital elevation model of Tungurahua. To investigate the time-varying atmospheric structure we use data recorded at Tungurahua volcano, during a strombolian eruptive phase in August 2012, however the methodology can be applied to continuous network infrasound data collected since July 2006 as part of the Japanese-Ecuadorian Cooperation Project: "Enhancement of the Volcano Monitoring Capacity in Ecuador". We propose that the computation of wind velocities will help to improve gas flux measurements that are based on remote sensing techniques like Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), resulting in better estimates of sulfur fluxes that can then be related to magma fluxing into the volcanic system. Further, wind field quantification close to the volcano can improve numerical models that are used to forecast tephra deposits, thereby helping to mitigate their effect on inhabitants, infrastructure, livestock, and crops.

  5. Threshold Conditions for Terahertz Laser Discharge in Atmospheric Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarev, V. V.; Getmanov, Ya. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Koshlyakov, P. V.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we accurately measured the breakdown thresholds in four atmospheric gases using the high-power terahertz radiation of the Novosibirsk free electron laser (NovoFEL). The breakdown intensities of the 130-μm radiation in a form of 74-ps pulses were equal to 1.1-1.4 GW/cm2. These data have been compared with calculations based on a phenomenological criterion for a breakdown and the classical theory of stochastic microwave heating of electrons. Presented are threshold conditions for a quasi-continuous plasma discharge that is maintained by means of a sequence of pulses of the NovoFEL. At a pulse repetition rate of 5.6 MHz, the discharge quenching thresholds are 15-60% lower than the breakdown thresholds depending on the amount of plasma emerging.

  6. Filter Media Tests Under Simulated Martian Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will require the optimal utilization of planetary resources. One of its abundant resources is the Martian atmosphere that can be harvested through filtration and chemical processes that purify and separate it into its gaseous and elemental constituents. Effective filtration needs to be part of the suite of resource utilization technologies. A unique testing platform is being used which provides the relevant operational and instrumental capabilities to test articles under the proper simulated Martian conditions. A series of tests were conducted to assess the performance of filter media. Light sheet imaging of the particle flow provided a means of detecting and quantifying particle concentrations to determine capturing efficiencies. The media's efficiency was also evaluated by gravimetric means through a by-layer filter media configuration. These tests will help to establish techniques and methods for measuring capturing efficiency and arrestance of conventional fibrous filter media. This paper will describe initial test results on different filter media.

  7. Atmospheric Response to Variations in Arctic Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, U.; Alexander, M.; Walsh, J.; Timlin, M.; Miller, J.

    2001-12-01

    While it is generally accepted that changes in air temperature and circulation determine sea ice conditions, it is not understood how the atmosphere is influenced by changes in sea ice. We employ the NCAR CCM 3.6 with specified ice extent and sea surface temperatures (sst). The overarching question addressed in this study is: how do variations in sea ice influence the atmosphere? We are particularly interested in the summer time response to highlight this unique aspect of this research. A control experiment has been integrated for 55 years by repeating the mean annual cycle of observed sea ice extent (either 0% or 100% ice cover) and sst, based on the period 1979-99. Sets of 50 member ensemble experiments were constructed by integrating the CCM from October to April using climatological sst (same as control) and observed sea ice extent from the winters of 1982-83 (ice maximum) and 1995-96 (ice minimum). Similar summertime sensitivity experiments were performed using ice extent conditions from April to October during 1982 (maximum) and 1995 (minimum). While responses were found both in winter and summer, the results described below refer to the summer of 1995. A set of 50 ensembles was also integrated for the summer of 1995 using sea ice concentration instead of extent. During the summer of 1995, negative sea ice anomalies were particularly large in the Siberian Arctic. Sea ice reductions result in increased surface and air temperatures and enhanced latent, sensible, and longwave fluxes out of the ocean. However, the net heat flux out of the ocean decreases because the changes are dominated by increased absorption of solar radiation over the low-albedo ocean. Cloud feedbacks are important in the Arctic and the downwelling solar at the surface decreases. The total cloud amount decreases due to reductions in low level clouds, however, convective cloud amounts increased. The net cloud radiative (shortwave and longwave) forcing is smaller in the experiment than the

  8. Correlations between the behavior of recreational horses, the physiological parameters and summer atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Janczarek, Iwona; Wilk, Izabela; Zalewska, Edyta; Bocian, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to select atmospheric factors and their values, which may disrupt the correct behavior and physiological condition of recreational horses. The studies were carried out from 1 July until 1 September on 16 Anglo-Arabian geldings. Each day, from 09.00 to 10.00 hours, the horses worked under saddle. The riders and the authors gave a qualitative behavioral assessment for each horse. Mood and willingness to work were evaluated. The quantitative assessment was called 'incorrect behavior of the horse while riding' (IBHR). The percentage time of duration and the number of occurrences of the features while riding were calculated. Heart rate, body temperature and respiratory rate were taken at 08.00 hours (resting measurement) and at 10.05 hours (post-exercise measurement). Air temperature, relative air humidity, wind speed and atmospheric pressure were measured at 08.00 and 10.00 hours. The results showed that adverse changes in the behavior of recreational horses can occur if the horse is ridden when the air temperature is above 26°C and when wind speeds exceed 5.5 m/s. Such conditions may cause a reduction in the mood and willingness to work in horses. Physiological parameters like heart rate and body temperature seem to be more sensitive indicators of the horse body reaction to the weather than behavioral reactions.

  9. Atmospheric conditions during high ragweed pollen concentrations in Zagreb, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prtenjak, Maja Telišman; Srnec, Lidija; Peternel, Renata; Madžarević, Valentina; Hrga, Ivana; Stjepanović, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    We examined the atmospheric conditions favourable to the occurrence of maximum concentrations of ragweed pollen with an extremely high risk of producing allergy. Over the 2002-2009 period, daily pollen data collected in Zagreb were used to identify two periods of high pollen concentration (> 600 grains/m3) for our analysis: period A (3-4 September 2002) and period B (6-7 September 2003). Synoptic conditions in both periods were very similar: Croatia was under the influence of a lower sector high pressure system moving slowly eastward over Eastern Europe. During the 2002-2009 period, this type of weather pattern (on ~ 70% of days), in conjunction with almost non-gradient surface pressure conditions in the area (on ~ 30% of days) characterised days when the daily pollen concentrations were higher than 400 grains/m3. Numerical experiments using a mesoscale model at fine resolution showed successful multi-day simulations reproducing the local topographic influence on wind flow and in reasonable agreement with available observations. According to the model, the relatively weak synoptic flow (predominantly from the eastern direction) allowed local thermal circulations to develop over Zagreb during both high pollen episodes. Two-hour pollen concentrations and 48-h back-trajectories indicated that regional-range transport of pollen grains from the central Pannonian Plain was the cause of the high pollen concentrations during period A. During period B, the north-westward regional-range transport in Zagreb was supplemented significantly by pronounced horizontal recirculation of pollen grains. This recirculation happened within the diurnal local circulation over the city, causing a late-evening increase in pollen concentration.

  10. Adverse Events of Massage Therapy in Pain-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Gao, Ningyang; Wu, Junyi; Xu, Shifen

    2014-01-01

    Pain-related massage, important in traditional Eastern medicine, is increasingly used in the Western world. So the widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported mainly for pain-related massage between 2003 and 2013. Relevant all-languages reports in 6 databases were identified and assessed by two coauthors. During the 11-year period, 40 reports of 138 AEs were associated with massage. Author, year of publication, country of occurrence, participant related (age, sex) or number of patients affected, the details of manual therapy, and clinician type were extracted. Disc herniation, soft tissue trauma, neurologic compromise, spinal cord injury, dissection of the vertebral arteries, and others were the main complications of massage. Spinal manipulation in massage has repeatedly been associated with serious AEs especially. Clearly, massage therapies are not totally devoid of risks. But the incidence of such events is low. PMID:25197310

  11. Atmospheric and oceanologic conditions favouring large bioproduction of northern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Romina; Lučić, Davor; Njire, Jakica; Djakovac, Tamara; Precali, Robert; Supić, Nastjenjka

    2016-04-01

    An interdisciplinary study based on long term data collected in the northern Adriatic relieved winter period to be crucial for the total annual zooplankton production in the region. Namely, yearly averages of some investigated zooplankton species in the 2000-2007 interval were highly related to their February and/or March abundances. The large winter zooplankton abundances appeared in winters of the "A type", in which freshened waters from the Po River spread over the region. Also, the production of phytoplankton was in winters of the "A type" higher than in winters of the "B type", in which these waters are restricted to the coastal areas and do not impact the open sea. That was presumably due to increase in nutrients. In fact, the total inorganic nitrogen and ortophosphate concentration in eastern part reached maximal February values in the 1990-2007 interval in winters of the "A type". Spreading of the Po River water across the northern Adriatic and appearance of the two winter types depends on the existing geostrophic circulation patterns and atmospheric and hydrologic conditions in the preceding months, thus enabling forecast. Obtained results are basis for the future theoretical ecological model which can explain long term changes in bioproduction in the region and be used in planning future environment actions aimed to sustained development, especially as winter phytoplankton and zooplankton production seems to reflect on annual catch of small pelagic fish important for Adriatic fishery, anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus).

  12. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  13. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  14. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  15. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  16. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Misyura, Maksym; Colasanti, Joseph; Rothstein, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested.

  17. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested. PMID:23162120

  18. Adverse foraging conditions may impact body mass and survival of a high Arctic seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harding, A.M.A.; Welcker, J.; Steen, H.; Hamer, K.C.; Kitaysky, A.S.; Fort, J.; Talbot, S.L.; Cornick, L.A.; Karnovsky, N.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Gremillet, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tradeoffs between current reproduction and future survival are widely recognized, but may only occur when food is limited: when foraging conditions are favorable, parents may be able to reproduce without compromising their own survival. We investigated these tradeoffs in the little auk (Alle alle), a small seabird with a single-egg clutch. During 2005-2007, we examined the relationship between body mass and survival of birds breeding under contrasting foraging conditions at two Arctic colonies. We used corticosterone levels of breeding adults as a physiological indicator of the foraging conditions they encountered during each reproductive season. We found that when foraging conditions were relatively poor (as reflected in elevated levels of corticosterone), parents ended the reproductive season with low body mass and suffered increased post-breeding mortality. A positive relationship between body mass and post-breeding survival was found in one study year; light birds incurred higher survival costs than heavy birds. The results of this study suggest that reproducing under poor foraging conditions may affect the post-breeding survival of long-lived little auks. They also have important demographic implications because even a small change in adult survival may have a large effect on populations of long-lived species. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Use of a driving simulator to assess performance under adverse weather conditions in adults with albinism.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Gwen M; Summers, C Gail; Ward, Nicholas; Bhargava, Esha; Rakauskas, Michael E; Holleschau, Ann M

    2012-04-01

    Participants with albinism have reduced vision and nystagmus with reduced foveation times. This prospective study evaluated driving in 12 participants with albinism and 12 matched controls. Participants drove a vehicle simulator through a virtual rural course in sunny and foggy conditions. Under sunny conditions, participants with albinism showed a narrower preferred minimum safety boundary during car-following tasks than did controls, but there was no difference under foggy conditions. Their driving did not differ significantly from that of controls when approaching a stop sign or when choosing gap size between oncoming vehicles when crossing an intersection. However, when compared to control drivers, participants with albinism had a decreased minimum safety boundary for car-following that should be included in counseling regarding driving safety.

  20. Cl atom initiated oxidation of 1-alkenes under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walavalkar, M.; Sharma, A.; Alwe, H. D.; Pushpa, K. K.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2013-03-01

    In view of the importance of the oxidation pathways of alkenes in the troposphere, and the significance of Cl atom as an oxidant in marine boundary layer (MBL) and polluted industrial atmosphere, the reactions of four 1-alkenes (C6-C9) with Cl atoms are investigated. The rate coefficients at 298 K are measured to be (4.0 ± 0.5), (4.4 ± 0.7), (5.5 ± 0.9) and (5.9 ± 1.7) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene and 1-nonene, respectively. The quoted errors include the experimental 2σ, along with the error in the reference rate coefficients. From the systematic increase in the rate coefficients with the number of carbon atoms, an approximate value for the average rate coefficient for hydrogen abstraction per CH2 group in alkenes is estimated to be (4.9 ± 0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Based on these rate coefficients, the contribution of Cl atom reactions towards the degradation of these molecules is found to be comparable to that of OH radical reactions, under MBL conditions. The products identified in gas phase indicate that Cl atom addition occurs mainly at the terminal carbon, leading to the formation of 1-chloro-2-ketones and 1-chloro-2-ols. The major gas phase products from the alkenyl radicals (formed by H atom abstraction) are different positional isomers of long chain enols and enones. A preference for dissociation leading to an allyl radical, resulting in aldehydes, lower by three carbon atoms, is indicated. The observed relative yields suggest that in general, the increased contribution of the reactions of Cl atoms towards degradation of 1-alkenes in NOx free air does not result in an increase in the generation of small aldehydes (carbon number < 4), including chloroethanal, as compared to that in the reaction of 1-butene.

  1. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR.

  2. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive..., earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a... limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, and volcanic eruption....

  3. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, volcanic eruption, and... limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be... loss condition as determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an...

  4. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive..., earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a... determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane,...

  5. Does toxicity of aromatic pollutants increase under remote atmospheric conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds contribute significantly to the budget of atmospheric pollutants and represent considerable hazard to living organisms. However, they are only rarely included into atmospheric models which deviate substantially from field measurements. A powerful experimental-simulation tool for the assessment of the impact of low- and semi-volatile aromatic pollutants on the environment due to their atmospheric aqueous phase aging has been developed and introduced for the first time. The case study herein reveals that remote biotopes might be the most damaged by wet urban guaiacol-containing biomass burning aerosols. It is shown that only after the primary pollutant guaiacol has been consumed, its probably most toxic nitroaromatic product is largely formed. Revising the recent understanding of atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry, which is mostly concerned with the radical nitration mechanisms, the observed phenomenon is mainly attributed to the electrophilic nitrogen-containing reactive species. Here, their intriguing role is closely inspected and discussed from the ecological perspective. PMID:25748923

  6. Comparison of Infrared and Millimeter-Wave Imager Performance in Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    area, which were used as inputs to Acquire, are different than the Johnson criteria default value of 0.75 and the target area used by Wikner † in his MMW...target is 3 × 3 m. 5 2.3 Weather Analysis Method for MMW Systems The results of this section are taken from Wikner [3]. His assumptions are in table...Science and Technology Division, Arlington, VA (1979). 3. D. Wikner , Prediction of 94 GHz Radiometer Performance in Various Environ- mental Condition

  7. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions.

  8. Geospatial Strategy for Adverse Impact of Urban Heat Island in upper atmospheres of the earth Mountain Areas using LANDSAT ETM+ Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    We are living in the age of the rapidly growing population and changing environmental conditions with advanced technical capacity. This has been resulting in widespread land cover change. Among several human-induced environmental and urban thermal problems are reported to be negatively affecting urban residents in many ways. Urban Heat Islands exist in many large cities especially metropolitan cities and can significantly affect the permafrost layer in mountain areas. The adverse effect of urban heat island has become the subject of numerous studies in recent decades and is reflected in many major mountain cities around the world. The built-up structures in urbanized areas considerably alter land cover thereby affecting thermal energy flow which leads to the development of elevated surface and air temperature. The phenomenon Urban Heat Island implies 'island' of high temperature in cities, surrounded by relatively lower temperature in rural areas. The Urban Heat Island for the temporal period is estimated using geospatial techniques which are then utilized for the impact assessment of the climate of the surrounding regions and how it reduce the sustainability of the natural resources like air, vegetation. The knowledge of surface temperature is important for the study of urban climate and human health. The rapid growth of industries in peri-urban areas results in excessive warming and variations in weather conditions. It leads to soil degradation in frozen areas due to high temperature which leads to melting of snow in mountain areas Remotely sensed data of thermal infrared band in the region of 10.4-12.5 µm of EMR spectrum, available from LANDSAT- ETM+ is proved to be very helpful to identify urban heat islands. Thermal infrared data acquired during the daytime and night time can be used to monitor the heat island associated with urban areas as well as atmospheric pollution. The present paper describes the methodology and resolution dynamic urban heat island

  9. Blind spots and adverse conditions of care: screening migrants for tuberculosis in France and Germany.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Janina

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that declined significantly throughout the 20(th) century. Large-scale TB screening of entire populations in France and Germany has thus been replaced by active screening of risk-groups, particularly migrants. The article engages with its problems and practices on three levels: by looking at the way information on migrants as an at-risk group is produced through disease surveillance data; by analysing how such at-risk group data influence local screening practices; and by showing which political and medical problems arise in the field. I overturn the discussion about screening and surveillance of migrants as a risk-group by showing that it is not the stigmatisation of migrants through disease risk that is most at stake, but the invisibility of the most vulnerable among them in disease surveillance data and the way restrictive national immigration policies interfere with and subvert local screening and treatment practices targeting them. The aim of my article is to promote a pragmatic sociology of screening, while paying attention to the practical complexities, political conditions and medical ambivalences of screening and follow-up care, especially when the migrant groups concerned are socially, politically and medically vulnerable.

  10. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  11. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  12. Computer Modeling of the Effects of Atmospheric Conditions on Sound Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    the temperature , and the distance from the sound receiver to the sound source. The distance cannot exceed the range calculated by SCAFFIP, which is...ARL-TR-7602 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Computer Modeling of the Effects of Atmospheric Conditions on Sound ...Laboratory Computer Modeling of the Effects of Atmospheric Conditions on Sound Signatures by Sarah Wagner Science and Engineering Apprentice

  13. Structural Brain Network Reorganization and Social Cognition Related to Adverse Perinatal Condition from Infancy to Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Fischi-Gomez, Elda; Batalle, Dafnis; Borradori-Tolsa, Cristina; Eixarch, Elisenda; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Gratacós, Eduard; Hüppi, Petra S.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse conditions during fetal life have been associated to both structural and functional changes in neurodevelopment from the neonatal period to adolescence. In this study, connectomics was used to assess the evolution of brain networks from infancy to early adolescence. Brain network reorganization over time in subjects who had suffered adverse perinatal conditions is characterized and related to neurodevelopment and cognition. Three cohorts of prematurely born infants and children (between 28 and 35 weeks of gestational age), including individuals with a birth weight appropriated for gestational age and with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), were evaluated at 1, 6, and 10 years of age, respectively. A common developmental trajectory of brain networks was identified in both control and IUGR groups: network efficiencies of the fractional anisotropy (FA)-weighted and normalized connectomes increase with age, which can be related to maturation and myelination of fiber connections while the number of connections decreases, which can be associated to an axonal pruning process and reorganization. Comparing subjects with or without IUGR, a similar pattern of network differences between groups was observed in the three developmental stages, mainly characterized by IUGR group having reduced brain network efficiencies in binary and FA-weighted connectomes and increased efficiencies in the connectome normalized by its total connection strength (FA). Associations between brain networks and neurobehavioral impairments were also evaluated showing a relationship between different network metrics and specific social cognition-related scores, as well as a higher risk of inattention/hyperactivity and/or executive functional disorders in IUGR children. PMID:28008304

  14. Quantifying the Fate of Stablised Criegee Intermediates under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, Mike; Rickard, Andrew; Alam, Mohammed; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William

    2014-05-01

    The products of alkene ozonolysis have been shown in field experiments to convert SO2 to H2SO4. One fate of H2SO4 formed in the atmosphere is the formation of sulphate aerosol. This has been reported to contribute - 0.4 W m-2 to anthropogenic radiative forcing via the direct aerosol effect and can also contribute to the indirect aerosol effect, currently one of the greatest uncertainties in climate modelling. The observed SO2 oxidation has been proposed to arise from reactions of the carbonyl oxide, or Criegee Intermediate (CI), formed during alkene ozonolysis reactions, with SO2. Direct laboratory experiments have confirmed that stabilised CIs (SCIs) react more quickly with SO2 (k > 10-11 cm3 s-1) than was previously thought. The major sink for SCI in the troposphere is reaction with water vapour. The importance of the SO2 + SCI reaction in H2SO4 formation has been shown in modelling work to be critically dependent on the ratio of the rate constants for the reaction of the SCI with SO2 and with H2O. Such modelling work has suggested that the SCI + SO2 reaction is only likely to be important in regions with high alkene emissions, e.g. forests. Here we present results from a series of ozonolysis experiments performed at the EUPHORE atmospheric simulation chamber, Valencia. These experiments measure the loss of SO2, in the presence of an alkene (ethene, cis-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl butene), as a function of water vapour. From these experiments we quantify the relative rates of reaction of the three smallest SCI with water and SO2 and their decomposition rates. In addition the results appear to suggest that the conversion of SO2 to H2SO4 during alkene ozonolysis may be inconsistent with the SCI + SO2 mechanism alone, particularly at high relative humidities. The results suggest that SCI are likely to provide at least an equivalent sink for SO2 to that of OH in the troposphere, in agreement with field observations. This work highlights the importance of alkene

  15. Effects of Atmospheric Conditions and the Land/Atmospheric Interface on Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Howington, S. E.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the movement of chemical vapors and gas through variably saturated soil subjected to atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land/atmospheric interface is important to many applications, including landmine detection, methane leakage during natural gas production from shale and CO2 leakage from deep geologic storage. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures and gas leakage at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of sensor signals remains a challenge. Chemical vapors are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the soil environment, masking source conditions. The process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal quantification of other processes, such as convective gas flow and temporal or spatial variation in soil moisture. Vapor migration is affected by atmospheric conditions (e.g. humidity, temperature, wind velocity), soil thermal and hydraulic properties and contaminant properties, all of which are physically and thermodynamically coupled. The complex coupling of two drastically different flow regimes in the subsurface and atmosphere is commonly ignored in modeling efforts, or simplifying assumptions are made to treat the systems as de-coupled. Experimental data under controlled laboratory settings are lacking to refine the theory for proper coupling and complex treatment of vapor migration through porous media in conversation with atmospheric flow and climate variations. Improving fundamental understanding and accurate quantification of these processes is not feasible in field settings due to lack of controlled initial and boundary conditions and inability to fully characterize the subsurface at all relevant scales. The goal of this work is to understand the influence of changes in atmospheric conditions to transport of vapors through variably saturated soil. We have developed a tank apparatus

  16. Atmospheric conditions, lunar phases, and childbirth: a multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Angela Megumi; Gonçalves, Fabio Luiz Teixeira; Ambrizzi, Tercio; Florentino, Lucia Cristina; Wei, Chang Yi; Soares, Alda Valeria Neves; De Araujo, Natalucia Matos; Gualda, Dulce Maria Rosa

    2012-07-01

    Our objective was to assess extrinsic influences upon childbirth. In a cohort of 1,826 days containing 17,417 childbirths among them 13,252 spontaneous labor admissions, we studied the influence of environment upon the high incidence of labor (defined by 75th percentile or higher), analyzed by logistic regression. The predictors of high labor admission included increases in outdoor temperature (odds ratio: 1.742, P = 0.045, 95%CI: 1.011 to 3.001), and decreases in atmospheric pressure (odds ratio: 1.269, P = 0.029, 95%CI: 1.055 to 1.483). In contrast, increases in tidal range were associated with a lower probability of high admission (odds ratio: 0.762, P = 0.030, 95%CI: 0.515 to 0.999). Lunar phase was not a predictor of high labor admission ( P = 0.339). Using multivariate analysis, increases in temperature and decreases in atmospheric pressure predicted high labor admission, and increases of tidal range, as a measurement of the lunar gravitational force, predicted a lower probability of high admission.

  17. Atmospheric conditions, lunar phases, and childbirth: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Angela Megumi; Gonçalves, Fabio Luiz Teixeira; Ambrizzi, Tercio; Florentino, Lucia Cristina; Wei, Chang Yi; Soares, Alda Valeria Neves; De Araujo, Natalucia Matos; Gualda, Dulce Maria Rosa

    2012-07-01

    Our objective was to assess extrinsic influences upon childbirth. In a cohort of 1,826 days containing 17,417 childbirths among them 13,252 spontaneous labor admissions, we studied the influence of environment upon the high incidence of labor (defined by 75th percentile or higher), analyzed by logistic regression. The predictors of high labor admission included increases in outdoor temperature (odds ratio: 1.742, P = 0.045, 95%CI: 1.011 to 3.001), and decreases in atmospheric pressure (odds ratio: 1.269, P = 0.029, 95%CI: 1.055 to 1.483). In contrast, increases in tidal range were associated with a lower probability of high admission (odds ratio: 0.762, P = 0.030, 95%CI: 0.515 to 0.999). Lunar phase was not a predictor of high labor admission (P = 0.339). Using multivariate analysis, increases in temperature and decreases in atmospheric pressure predicted high labor admission, and increases of tidal range, as a measurement of the lunar gravitational force, predicted a lower probability of high admission.

  18. Atmospheric wind field conditions generated by active grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, Pascal; Kittel, Achim; Peinke, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    An active grid for turbulence generation of several rotatable axes with surmounted vanes that can be driven via stepper or servo motors is presented. We investigate the impact of different excitation protocols for the grid. Using such protocols that already have the intermittent structure of turbulence, higher intermittent flows can be achieved. This concept can also be used to generate turbulent flows of high turbulence intensities (>25%) exhibiting integral length scales beyond the typical size of the test section of the wind tunnel. Similar two-point correlations measured by the intermittent statistics of velocity increments that are characteristic for flows of high Reynolds number, i.e. in the atmospheric boundary layer, can be reproduced.

  19. [Turbulent characteristics in forest canopy under atmospheric neutral condition].

    PubMed

    Diao, Yi-Wei; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Pei, Tie-Fan

    2010-02-01

    Based on the micrometeorological data of broad-leaved Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountain in 2003, a second-order closure model was employed to calculate and analyze the turbulent characteristics within and above the canopy of the forest. The calculated mean wind profile was coincident with the measured one. The Reynolds stress within the forest was significantly attenuated. The turbulent strength, velocity flux, and skew were the largest at forest-atmosphere interface, as well the wind shear. With the increase of velocity skew, the turbulent intermittence became more significant, and the downward turbulent eddy within the canopy was limited. Most of the turbulent deeply within the forest canopy was produced by the non-local contributions above the canopy.

  20. Separation and Conditioning of Mars Atmospheric Gases via TSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space and planetary exploration almost always presents interesting and unusual engineering challenges. Separations engineering for chemical processes that are critical to humans working in space is no exception. The challenges are becoming clearer as we make the transition from concepts and planning to hardware development, and as we understand better the constraints and environments in which the processes must perform. The coming decade will see a robotic Mars exploration program that has recovered from recent setbacks and is building a knowledge and technology base for human exploration. One of the missions will carry a small chemical pilot plant for demonstrating the manufacture of rocket propellants and life support consumables from the low-pressure (0.01 atm) Martian atmosphere. By manufacturing and storing the fuel and consumables needed for human-return missions in situ, launch mass and landed mass are reduced by tons and missions become far less expensive. The front-end to the pilot plant is a solid-state atmosphere acquisition and separation unit based on temperature-swing adsorption (TSA). The unit produces purified and pressurized (to 1.0 atm) carbon dioxide to downstream reactors that will make methane and oxygen. The unit also produces a nitrogen-argon mixture as a valuable by-product for life support, inflatable structures, and propellant pressurization. With nighttime temperatures falling to -100 degrees C, power availability restricted to a few watts, and flawless operation critical to success, the dusty Martian surface is a difficult place to operate a remote plant. This talk will focus on how this TSA separation process is designed and implemented for this application, and how it might be used in the more distant future for human exploration.

  1. The Cpx system of Escherichia coli, a strategic signaling pathway for confronting adverse conditions and for settling biofilm communities?

    PubMed

    Dorel, Corinne; Lejeune, Philippe; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2006-05-01

    Amongst the thirty or so two-component systems known in Escherichia coli, the Cpx system has been described as being a stress response system the main function of which is to respond to damage to the cell envelope via activation of proteases and folding catalysts. Nevertheless, the size of the Cpx regulon (several dozens of target genes) and the diversity of the physiological functions associated with it (resistance to hostile conditions, mobility, adherence factors, metabolism, etc.) indicate that the role of Cpx in cell physiology is undoubtedly more complex. The range of cellular functions affected by activation of the Cpx pathway corresponds quite closely to the description of the physiological state of cells grown in biofilms. We suggest that Cpx is a strategic signaling pathway for facing adverse conditions and for settling biofilm communities. Current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of the CpxR response (transcriptional and post-transcriptional) and the interactions between CpxR and the other bacterial regulatory systems are presented.

  2. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible.

  3. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  4. Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources to Atmosphere as Affected by Shallow Subsurface and Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Hosken, K.; Schulte, P.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the movement and modeling of chemical vapor through unsaturated soil in the shallow subsurface when subjected to natural atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land surface is of importance to applications such as landmine detection and vapor intrusion into subsurface structures. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of these sensor signals to make assessment of source conditions remains a challenge. Chemical signatures are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the unsaturated soil environment, attenuating signal strength and masking contaminant source conditions. The dominant process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal or no quantification of other processes contributing to vapor migration, such as thermal diffusion, convective gas flow due to the displacement of air, expansion/contraction of air due to temperature changes, temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture and fluctuations in atmospheric pressure. Soil water evaporation and interfacial mass transfer add to the complexity of the system. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmosphere interface and use the resulting dataset to test existing theories on subsurface gas flow and iterate between numerical modeling efforts and experimental data. Ultimately, we aim to update conceptual models of shallow subsurface vapor transport to include conditionally significant transport processes and inform placement of mobile sensors and/or networks. We have developed a two-dimensional tank apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and a flow-through head space for simulation of the atmospheric interface. A detailed matrix of realistic atmospheric boundary conditions was applied in a series of

  5. Ocean-atmosphere conditions associated with hydrological drought in Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleig, Anne K.; Kingston, Daniel G.; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Hannah, David M.

    2010-05-01

    The British Isles experience considerable hydrological variability, including drought, that impacts significantly on society. This paper aims to advance understanding of the climatic conditions leading to the development and evolution of regional hydrological drought by exploring associations between severe hydrological droughts in Great Britain, drought-yielding weather types (WTs) and sea-surface temperatures (SSTs). Droughts were defined using the Regional Drought Area Index (RDAI). Frequencies of drought-yielding WTs (as identified previously based on the RDAI for Great Britain) were derived from the daily OGWL-catalogue, an objective version of the Hess-Brezowsky Grosswetterlagen defined on the ERA40 reanalysis data. Monthly SST data were taken from the ERSST v2 data set. SST variations prior to and during regional drought events are analysed and initial results show the importance of anomalously cool SSTs south of Greenland prior to drought events, combined with anomalously warm conditions in the extra-tropical eastern Atlantic. WTs associated with hydrological drought in Great Britain have previously been found to represent anticyclonic conditions with either a high pressure centre, southerly or south-easterly air flow over the respective drought region. Here ocean conditions favouring these drought-yielding WTs are further explored.

  6. Sea surges around the Gulf of Lions and atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, A.; Pirazzoli, P. A.; Moron, V.

    2008-09-01

    This paper analyses sea surge variations measured at four tide-gauge stations (Port-Vendres, Sète, Grau-de-la-Dent and Marseille) almost evenly located around the Gulf of Lions (NorthWestern corner of Mediterranean Sea) and their relationships with local-scale winds and regional-scale atmospheric patterns (i.e. weather regimes). On the whole 20th century, more than 80% of sea surge > 20 cm occurs in winter and the analyses focus on October to March semester. There is a strong in-phase relationship between the four tide-gauge stations at hourly and daily time scales on the period 1986-1995. The highest sea surges in the Gulf of Lions are associated with a strong negative phase of the North Atlantic oscillation. Around 70% of sea surge > 40 cm at all stations occur during "Greenland Above" and "Blocking" weather regimes, when extratropical storms travelled on a southern track and are associated with onshore southerly winds that drag water toward the coast of the Gulf of Lions. Port-Vendres and mostly Marseille tide-gauge stations are also sensitive to northerly winds due to the local orientation of the coast. The frequency of southerly winds significantly increases since 1950, while the frequency of northerly winds decreases consistent with the increase of sea surges in the Gulf of Lions.

  7. Clinical profiles of adverse drug reactions spontaneously reported at a single Korean hospital dedicated to children with complex chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Kim, Sunwha Zara; Lee, Jin; Jung, Ae Hee; Jung, Sun-Hoi; Hahn, Hyeon-Joo; Kang, Hye Ryun

    2017-01-01

    Children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) are presumed to be vulnerable to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The clinical profiles of ADRs in CCC are not well known. Herein, we aim to describe the ADR profiles in CCC with regard to typical presentations and vulnerable groups. We accessed the ADR yearly reports at a tertiary children's hospital whose practice is mainly dedicated to CCC and descriptively analyzed their clinical profiles according to the presence of a complex chronic condition, ADR severity, and age groups. A total of 1841 cases were analyzed, among which 1258 (68.3%) were mild, 493 (26.8%) moderate, and 90 (4.9%) cases were severe. A total of 1581 (85.9%) cases of complex chronic condition were reported. The proportion of CCC in each severity group increased as the ADR becomes more severe. In CCC, ADRs were most frequently reported by nurses in the adolescent group and in cases where the symptoms involved the gastrointestinal system. The class of antineoplastic and immunomodulating drugs was the most commonly suspected of causing an ADR, followed by one of the antibiotics. When we focus on the trend across the age groups, the ratio of severe-to-total ADRs decreased with older age. Among severe cases, the ratio of off-label prescription-related cases was the highest in the infant/toddler group and decreased as the groups aged. In conclusion, ADRs of CCCs admitted to a tertiary children’s hospital have a unique profile. These groups are vulnerable to ADRs and thus they should be monitored closely, especially when they are infants or toddlers, so that severe ADRs can be identified and treated immediately. PMID:28199420

  8. Formation of an Apokampic Discharge Under Atmospheric Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, V. S.; Panarin, V. A.; Pechenitsyn, D. S.; Sosnin, É. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    A new phenomenon is observed in a spark discharge developing under normal conditions in air in a discharge circuit with a capacitive decoupling. It consists in the current channel bending becoming a source of a 4-6 cm long plasma jet directed across the channel. The phenomenon is termed an apokampic discharge or an apokamp. Its emission spectrum contains the bands of electron-vibration transitions from the second positive group of molecular nitrogen. The conditions of formation of an apokamp are experimentally determined. A conclusion is drawn that in order construct a physical model of an apokamp, one has to take into account: 1) the presence of a local gas overheating in the site of the current channel bending, 2) the similarity of the current and voltage time dependences in the corona discharge and in the current channel (becoming a source of an apokamp), and 3) the length of the apokamp plasma jet.

  9. Health surveillance under adverse ergonomics conditions--validity of a screening method adapted for the occupational health service.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Dirk; Gustafsson, Ewa; Rolander, Bo; Arvidsson, Inger; Nordander, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    A new health surveillance protocol for work-related upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders has been validated by comparing the results with a reference protocol. The studied protocol, Health Surveillance in Adverse Ergonomics Conditions (HECO), is a new version of the reference protocol modified for application in the Occupational Health Service (OHS). The HECO protocol contains both a screening part and a diagnosing part. Sixty-three employees were examined. The screening in HECO did not miss any diagnosis found when using the reference protocol, but in comparison to the reference protocol considerable time savings could be achieved. Fair to good agreement between the protocols was obtained for one or more diagnoses in neck/shoulders (86%, k = 0.62) and elbow/hands (84%, k = 0.49). Therefore, the results obtained using the HECO protocol can be compared with a reference material collected with the reference protocol, and thus provide information of the magnitude of disorders in an examined work group. Practitioner Summary: The HECO protocol is a relatively simple physical examination protocol for identification of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities. The protocol is a reliable and cost-effective tool for the OHS to use for occupational health surveillance in order to detect workplaces at high risk for developing musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Uncontrollable atmospheric conditions which can affect animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Sanz, P; Rodriguez-Vicente, M C; Villar, P; Repetto, M

    1988-10-01

    In our programs of investigation into mechanisms of molecular action of toxic substances, we have had occasion to observe the appearance of anomalous values in biochemical parameters, which we put down to cyclic rhythms or coincidences with the following phenomena: meteorological (storms), geological (earthquakes), and astronomical or phenological (eclipse and lunar phases). This work reviews such observations, which suggest that besides the environmental conditions of the animal room (illumination, humidity, temperature, noise) it is necessary to consider all the external circumstances which occur at the moment of the experiment.

  11. Onset of atmospheric ice formation in natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conen, Franz; Zimmermann, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria growing on plants are the particles with the warmest freezing temperature known for natural particles (-2 oC). Their onset of freezing is known to be conditioned by themperature, growth and nutrient status, and probably other factors that can not be assessed in situ, but are also not likely to be conserved when taking airborne bacteria to the laboratory. Whether such bacteria play a role in initiating the ice phase in clouds is therefore best studied directly in a cooling air mass in the natural environment. Investigations directly at cloud tops would be desirable. A more amenable place is the bottom of a valley where a cold air pool forms during clear nights and when radiation fog is likely to form. When shallow, such fog may resemble an inverted cloud with its top on the land surface and warmer air above it. The temperature of bacteria and other particles suspended in air under a clear sky around the onset of fog formation is probably several degrees below that of the surrounding air because of radiative cooling, which will affect the particle's activation as a cloud condensation nucleus and as an ice nucleus. Hence, ice particles probably form earlier than expected at a particular air temperature, grow rapidly and parachute to the surface, where their descent can be recorded by traps charged with supercooled water. We present, and would like to discuss, this kind of observation in principle and show some first results (subject to suitable weather conditions before the presentation).

  12. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often lead to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Steffes and Eshleman showed that under environmental conditions corresponding to the middle atmosphere of Venus, the microwave absorption due to atmospheric SO2 was 50 percent greater than that calculated from Van Vleck-Weiskopff theory. Similarly, the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 was found to be a factor of 7 greater than theoretically predicted for conditions of the Venus middle atmosphere. The recognition of the need to make such measurements over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the periapsis altitudes of radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements.

  13. Does the Size of the Effect of Adverse Events at High Ages on Daily-Life Physical Functioning Depend on the Economic Conditions Around Birth?

    PubMed

    Scholte, Robert; van den Berg, Gerard J; Lindeboom, Maarten; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers determinants of physical functional limitations in daily-life activities at high ages. Specifically, we quantify the extent to which the impact of adverse life events on this outcome is larger in case of exposure to adverse economic conditions early in life. Adverse life events include bereavement, severe illness in the family, and the onset of chronic diseases. We use a longitudinal data set of individuals born in the first decades of the 20th century. The business cycle around birth is used as an indicator of economic conditions early in life. We find that the extent to which functional limitations suffer from the onset of chronic diseases is larger if the individual was born in a recession. The long-run effect of economic conditions early in life on functional limitations at high ages runs primarily via this life event. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Natural atmospheric microbial conditions in a typical suburban area.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B L; Cookson, J T

    1983-01-01

    Ambient outdoor concentrations and size distributions of airborne microbial particles were measured approximately weekly for 2 years in a Washington, D.C., suburban area. The study objective was to characterize microbial air quality in the vicinity of a proposed sewage sludge composting facility. During the study, 379 samples were taken at 17 stations, using Andersen microbial samplers. Concentration ranges (in viable particles per cubic meter) were as follows: airborne mesophilic fungi, 0 to 7,220 with a geometric mean of 273; thermophilic fungi, 0 to 193 with a median of 2.1; Aspergillus fumigatus, 0 to 71 with a median of 1.0; aerobic bacteria, 4.2 to 1,640 with a geometric mean of 79; and fecal streptococci, 0 to 5.7 with a median of 0. No fecal coliforms were recovered. The potentially respirable fraction (less than 8 microns) averaged 34% for total bacteria, 56% for mesophilic fungi, 91% for thermophilic fungi, and 95% for A. fumigatus. The specific sampling location was not a major factor affecting microbial particle concentrations or size distributions. Conversely, the time of year was an important determinant of viable particle concentrations for all groups of microorganisms studied. The highest concentrations were observed in summer and fall, with significantly lower levels detected in winter. In general, the microbial data did not correlate with other variables, including weather conditions, measured in this study. PMID:6342536

  15. The role of atmospheric synoptic conditions in the Beaufort and Chukchi seasonal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Schweiger, A. J. B.

    2015-12-01

    How atmosphere and sea ice interact depends on the prevailing weather. Synoptic activities transport energy and moisture into the Arctic and modify the structure of the atmosphere, cloud conditions, and the surface energy budget over sea ice. The structure of the atmosphere, such as temperature inversions and specific humidity inversions are critical for the life cycle of Arctic clouds. Cloud radiative heating is an important component of the Arctic surface energy budget. The differences in the structure of the atmosphere, clouds, and the radiation balance at the surface under different synoptic conditions will determine which processes will govern the interaction between the atmosphere and clouds. In this study, dominant synoptic types over the Beaufort and Chukchi seasonal ice zone (BCSIZ) are identified using the ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets and a k-mean clustering synoptic classification algorithm. The synoptic classification algorithm categorizes individual weather events in the atmospheric reanalysis into four synoptic types with distinct signatures in baroclinicity and temperature advection. The typical structure of the atmosphere in ERA-Interim is determined for each synoptic type. In particular the structure of the summer atmosphere across the ice edge along 150°W and 140°W longitude will be the analyzed and evaluated with observations obtained from the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Survey (SIZRS). Cloud conditions and cloud radiative forcings at the surface under different synoptic conditions are determined using satellite observations, from MODIS, CloudSat, and Calipso, and modeled clouds in reanalysis. The influence of synoptic conditions on the structure of atmosphere and cloud through heat and moisture transport is explored and the consequent effects on the surface energy budget in BCSIZ are assessed.

  16. Laser photoacoustic trace detection of C2H4 revealing adverse environmental effects of atmospheric pollution on plant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harren, Frans J. M.; Petruzzelli, Luciana

    1993-03-01

    The photoacoustic detection method for trace gases in the atmosphere is well developed towards very low limits of detection, in the last years. Due to the combination of a sensitive photoacoustic cell placed intracavity in an infrared CO2 laser we were able to detect C2H4 at ultralow (< 1:1011) concentrations within 10 seconds, C2H4 in a plant hormone which seems to play an important role throughout all the life stages of a plant, including seed germination. In addition, various types of stress have been reported to promote ethylene production from different plant tissues. As part of our ongoing research on the role of ethylene in seed germination, we have compared our laser photoacoustic set-up to a gaschromatograph for measuring C2H4 produced by germinating Pisum sativum L. seeds within the first days of imbibition. C2H4 evolution by intact seeds shows a maximum at about 25 hours of germination. Thereafter, the rate of ethylene measured by gaschromatograph continues to decrease while that measured by the laser-driven photoacoustic system shows further increases. Most of the ethylene produced by seeds is found in isolated embryonic axes. The fumigation with ozone affects the growth of seedlings and their ethylene evolution.

  17. Integration of iconic gestures and speech in left superior temporal areas boosts speech comprehension under adverse listening conditions.

    PubMed

    Holle, Henning; Obleser, Jonas; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Gunter, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Iconic gestures are spontaneous hand movements that illustrate certain contents of speech and, as such, are an important part of face-to-face communication. This experiment targets the brain bases of how iconic gestures and speech are integrated during comprehension. Areas of integration were identified on the basis of two classic properties of multimodal integration, bimodal enhancement and inverse effectiveness (i.e., greater enhancement for unimodally least effective stimuli). Participants underwent fMRI while being presented with videos of gesture-supported sentences as well as their unimodal components, which allowed us to identify areas showing bimodal enhancement. Additionally, we manipulated the signal-to-noise ratio of speech (either moderate or good) to probe for integration areas exhibiting the inverse effectiveness property. Bimodal enhancement was found at the posterior end of the superior temporal sulcus and adjacent superior temporal gyrus (pSTS/STG) in both hemispheres, indicating that the integration of iconic gestures and speech takes place in these areas. Furthermore, we found that the left pSTS/STG specifically showed a pattern of inverse effectiveness, i.e., the neural enhancement for bimodal stimulation was greater under adverse listening conditions. This indicates that activity in this area is boosted when an iconic gesture accompanies an utterance that is otherwise difficult to comprehend. The neural response paralleled the behavioral data observed. The present data extends results from previous gesture-speech integration studies in showing that pSTS/STG plays a key role in the facilitation of speech comprehension through simultaneous gestural input.

  18. Contribution of Atmospheric Diffusion Conditions to the Recent Improvement in Air Quality in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Kaicun; Su, Liangyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed hourly mass concentration observations of PM2.5 (particulate matters with diameter less than 2.5 μm) at 512 stations in China from December 2013 to May 2015. We found that the mean concentrations of PM2.5 during the winter and spring of 2015 Dec. 2014 to Feb. 2015 and Mar. 2015 to May 2015) decreased by 20% and 14% compared to the previous year, respectively. Hazardous air-quality days decreased by 11% in 2015 winter, with more frequent good to unhealthy days; and the good and moderate air-quality days in 2015 spring increased by 9% corresponding to the less occurrence of unhealthy conditions. We compared the atmospheric diffusion conditions during these two years and quantified its contribution to the improvement of air quality during the first half of 2015 over China. Our results show that during the 2015 winter and spring, 70% and 57% of the 512 stations experienced more favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions compared to those of previous year. Over central and northern China, approximately 40% of the total decrease in PM2.5 during the 2015 winter can be attributed to the favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions. The atmospheric diffusion conditions during the spring of 2015 were not as favorable as in winter; and the average contributions of the atmospheric conditions were slight. PMID:27805030

  19. Contribution of Atmospheric Diffusion Conditions to the Recent Improvement in Air Quality in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Kaicun; Su, Liangyuan

    2016-11-01

    This study analyzed hourly mass concentration observations of PM2.5 (particulate matters with diameter less than 2.5 μm) at 512 stations in China from December 2013 to May 2015. We found that the mean concentrations of PM2.5 during the winter and spring of 2015 Dec. 2014 to Feb. 2015 and Mar. 2015 to May 2015) decreased by 20% and 14% compared to the previous year, respectively. Hazardous air-quality days decreased by 11% in 2015 winter, with more frequent good to unhealthy days; and the good and moderate air-quality days in 2015 spring increased by 9% corresponding to the less occurrence of unhealthy conditions. We compared the atmospheric diffusion conditions during these two years and quantified its contribution to the improvement of air quality during the first half of 2015 over China. Our results show that during the 2015 winter and spring, 70% and 57% of the 512 stations experienced more favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions compared to those of previous year. Over central and northern China, approximately 40% of the total decrease in PM2.5 during the 2015 winter can be attributed to the favorable atmospheric diffusion conditions. The atmospheric diffusion conditions during the spring of 2015 were not as favorable as in winter; and the average contributions of the atmospheric conditions were slight.

  20. Changes in local oceanographic and atmospheric conditions shortly after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhongzhen; Sui, Yi; Sheng, Jinyu; Tang, Danling; Lin, I.-I.

    2015-06-01

    This study examines changes in the local oceanographic and atmospheric conditions over the southern Bay of Bengal and adjacent Indian Ocean waters after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami based on satellite remote sensing data and atmospheric reanalysis fields. After the tsunami that occurred on 26 December 2004, the accumulated rainfall had a notably increase (600 mm per month) in January of 2005 over deep waters to the southeast of Sri Lanka. This rainfall increase after the tsunami was accompanied with cooling in the sea surface temperature (SST) (up to -2 °C). Four-day averaged SST anomalies had a noticeable increase (1-4 °C) after the tsunami over the deep waters to the southwest of the epicenter. Series of ocean atmospheric and biological variables changed successively after the change of SST. The chain of causality between the tsunami and the changes in the local atmospheric conditions is suggested.

  1. Modeling of the effect of internal gravity waves on upper atmospheric conditions during sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Pavel; Karpov, Ivan; Kshevetskiy, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    We present results of modeling of the effect of internal gravity waves (IGW), excited in the region of the development of a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW), on upper atmospheric conditions. In the numerical experiment, we use a two-dimensional model of propagation of atmospheric waves, taking into account dissipative and nonlinear processes accompanying wave propagation. As a source of disturbances, we consider temperature and density disturbances in the stratosphere during SSWs. Amplitude and frequency characteristics of the source of disturbances are estimated from observations and IGW theory. Numerical calculations showed that waves generated at stratospheric heights during SSW can cause temperature changes in the upper atmosphere. Maximum relative disturbances, generated by such waves, with respect to quiet conditions are observed at 100-200 km. Disturbances of the upper atmosphere in turn have an effect on dynamics of a charged component in the ionosphere and can contribute to observable ionospheric effects of SSW.

  2. The importance of spring atmospheric conditions for predictions of the Arctic summer sea ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Graversen, Rune G.; Economou, Theodoros; Tjernström, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that atmospheric processes in spring play an important role for the initiation of the summer ice melt and therefore may strongly influence the September sea ice concentration (SSIC). Here a simple statistical regression model based on only atmospheric spring parameters is applied in order to predict the SSIC over the major part of the Arctic Ocean. By using spring anomalies of downwelling longwave radiation or atmospheric water vapor as predictor variables, correlation coefficients between observed and predicted SSIC of up to 0.5 are found. These skills of seasonal SSIC predictions are similar to those obtained using more complex dynamical forecast systems, despite the fact that the simple model applied here takes neither information of the sea ice state, oceanic conditions nor feedback mechanisms during summer into account. The results indicate that a realistic representation of spring atmospheric conditions in the prediction system plays an important role for the predictive skills of a model system.

  3. Amplifying Learning through Sites of Pedagogical Practice: A Possible Effect of Working with Disciplinary Technologies in Schools Operating under Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Schools located within communities experiencing high levels of social dislocation, educational disadvantage and student disengagement from learning are working under "adverse conditions". These schools face particular challenges when it comes to stabilising and sustaining wholeschool change aimed at improving students' learning outcomes.…

  4. Description of atmospheric conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antiči'C, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Del Peral, L.; Del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lahurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mi'Canovi'C, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargascárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargüe and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  5. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  6. Relative Influence of Initial Surface and Atmospheric Conditions on Seasonal Water and Energy Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and analyzed wet and dry soil moisture composites for the mid-latitude GCIP region of the central US using long climate model simulations made with the NCAR CCM3 and reanalysis products from NCEP. Using the diagnostic composites as a guide, we have completed a series of predictability experiments in which we imposed soil water initial conditions in CCM3 for the GCIP region for June 1 from anomalously wet and dry years, with atmospheric initial conditions taken from June 1 of a year with 'near-normal' soil water, and initial soil water from the near-normal year and atmospheric initial conditions from the wet and dry years. Preliminary results indicate that the initial state of the atmosphere is more important than the initial state of soil water determining the subsequent late spring and summer evolution of sod water over the GCIP region. Surprisingly, neither the composites or the predictability experiments yielded a strong influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere. To explore this further, we have made runs with extreme dry soil moisture initial anomalies imposed over the GCIP region (the soil close to being completely dry). These runs did yield a very strong effect on the atmosphere that persisted for at least three months. We conclude that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly is crucial, at least in CCM3, and are currently investigating whether a threshold exists, below which little impact is seen. In a complementary study, we compared the impact of the initial condition of snow cover versus the initial atmospheric state over the western US (corresponding to the westward extension of the GAPP program follow-on to GCIP). In this case, the initial prescription of snow cover is far more important than the initial atmospheric state in determining the subsequent evolution of snow cover. We are currently working to understand the very different soil water and snow cover results.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements completed under this grant (NAGW-533), have shown that the opacity from, SO2 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different lineshape than was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  8. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. The goal of this investigation was to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  9. Investigating TIME-GCM Atmospheric Tides for Different Lower Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently established that atmospheric tides generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the geospace environment. In order to extend our knowledge of the various coupling mechanisms between the different atmospheric layers, we rely on model simulations. Currently there exist two versions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM), i.e. GSWM02 and GSWM09, which are used as a lower boundary (ca. 30 km) condition for the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and account for the upward propagating atmospheric tides that are generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this paper we explore the various TIME-GCM upper atmospheric tidal responses for different lower boundary conditions and compare the model diagnostics with tidal results from satellite missions such as TIMED, CHAMP, and GOCE. We also quantify the differences between results associated with GSWM02 and GSWM09 forcing and results of TIMEGCM simulations using Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data as a lower boundary condition.

  10. Modified atmosphere packaging for fresh-cut ‘Kent’ mango under common retail display conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modified atmosphere package (MAP) was designed to optimize the quality and shelf-life of fresh-cut ‘Kent’ mango during exposure to common retail display conditions. The synergism between the MAP system and an antioxidant treatment (calcium ascorbate and citric acid) was also investigated. Mango sl...

  11. Oxidative stability of n-3-enriched chicken patties under different package-atmosphere conditions.

    PubMed

    Penko, Ana; Polak, Tomaž; Lušnic Polak, Mateja; Požrl, Tomaž; Kakovič, Damir; Žlender, Božidar; Demšar, Lea

    2015-02-01

    The oxidation processes were studied in chicken patties, enriched with n-3 fatty acids, after 8days of storage at 4°C, under different aerobic conditions, and following heat treatment. Significant effects were seen on lipid and cholesterol oxidation and the sensory qualities for whole flaxseed addition in the chicken feed (i.e., n-3 fatty acid enrichment), and for the different package-atmosphere conditions. For the raw chicken patties, n-3 enrichment increased the colour L(∗) values while, after the heat treatment, there were higher thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARs) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs), and the rancidity was more pronounced. In comparison with the low O2 (<0.5%) package-atmosphere condition, O2 enrichment (80%) increased the instrumentally measured colour values, TBARs, total and individual COPs, and the rancidity became pronounced. The most suitable package-atmosphere condition of these raw n-3-enriched chicken patties is a very low O2 atmosphere, with or without an O2 scavenger.

  12. Operational implications of a cloud model simulation of space shuttle exhaust clouds in different atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional cloud model was used to characterize the dominant influence of the environment on the Space Shuttle exhaust cloud. The model was modified to accept the actual heat and moisture from rocket exhausts and deluge water as initial conditions. An upper-air sounding determined the ambient atmosphere in which the cloud would grow. The model was validated by comparing simulated clouds with observed clouds from four actual Shuttle launches. Results are discussed with operational weather forecasters in mind. The model successfully produced clouds with dimensions, rise, decay, liquid water contents, and vertical motion fields very similar to observed clouds whose dimensions were calculated from 16 mm film frames. Once validated, the model was used in a number of different atmospheric conditions ranging from very unstable to very stable. Wind shear strongly affected the appearance of both the ground cloud and vertical column cloud. The ambient low-level atmospheric moisture governed the amount of cloud water in model clouds. Some dry atmospheres produced little or no cloud water. An empirical forecast technique for Shuttle cloud rise is presented and differences between natural atmospheric convection and exhaust clouds are discussed.

  13. Quantifying atmospheric stability conditions at a swine facility and an adjacent corn field in Iowa, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo; Sauer, Thomas J.; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Prueger, John H.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric stability conditions in the atmospheric surface layer control the distance and direction of transport of air contaminants. Near confined animal facilities, transport processes significantly impact air quality as these sites typically act as point sources of dust and odor constituents; however, little information is available on atmospheric stability effects. This study was conducted to assess year-round temporal patterns of atmospheric stability at a swine production facility and an adjacent commercial corn field (CF) in the US Midwest. Two towers of 10 and 20 m heights for continuous micrometeorological measurements were deployed within a CF and between swine buildings (BSB), respectively. Each tower was equipped with an eddy-covariance system at 6.8 m height, infrared thermometers, and six cup anemometers with thermocouples installed at log-distributed heights. Overall results from gradient Richardson number and Monin-Obukhov (z/L) calculations revealed a greater prevalence of unstable conditions for BSB compared with CF. During the 13-month measurement period, unstable cases (z/L ranging from -1 to -0.01) occurred 1.4 times more frequently for BSB than CF (52 vs. 39%, respectively), while stable cases (0.011-0.2) were 1.8 times more frequent for CF than BSB (24 vs. 14%, respectively). These patterns were partly associated with higher surface radiometric temperatures for BSB. Relatively greater diurnal heat capture at BSB (ground and roof surfaces) and a cooling effect in CF through active canopy transpiration during the daytime explain these z/L and radiometric temperature results. Prevalent diurnal atmospheric instability at BSB suggests enhanced ascendant vertical transport of air pollutants perhaps causing greater mixing/dilution with the atmospheric layer and/or their facilitated transport over greater distances when sorbed onto particles. This enhanced understanding of the spatio-temporal patterns of atmospheric stability can be subsequently

  14. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements performed by Fahd and Steffes have shown that the opacity from gaseous SO2 under simulated Venus conditions can be well described by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape at wavelengths shortward of 2 cm, but that the opacity of wavelengths greater than 2 cm is best described by a different lineshape that was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  15. A cloud model simulation of space shuttle exhaust clouds in different atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.; Zak, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional cloud model was used to characterize the dominant influence of the environment on the Space Shuttle exhaust cloud. The model was modified to accept the actual heat and moisture from rocket exhausts and deluge water as initial conditions. An upper-air sounding determined the ambient atmosphere in which the cloud could grow. The model was validated by comparing simulated clouds with observed clouds from four actual Shuttle launches. The model successfully produced clouds with dimensions, rise, decay, liquid water contents and vertical motion fields very similar to observed clouds whose dimensions were calculated from 16 mm film frames. Once validated, the model was used in a number of different atmospheric conditions ranging from very unstable to very stable. In moist, unstable atmospheres simulated clouds rose to about 3.5 km in the first 4 to 8 minutes then decayed. Liquid water contents ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 g kg-1 mixing ratios and vertical motions were from 2 to 10 ms-1. An inversion served both to reduce entrainment (and erosion) at the top and to prevent continued cloud rise. Even in the most unstable atmospheres, the ground cloud did not rise beyond 4 km and in stable atmospheres with strong low level inversions the cloud could be trapped below 500 m. Wind shear strongly affected the appearance of both the ground cloud and vertical column cloud. The ambient low-level atmospheric moisture governed the amount of cloud water in model clouds. Some dry atmospheres produced little or no cloud water. One case of a simulated TITAN rocket explosion is also discussed.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements have shown that the centimeter-wavelength opacity from gaseous phosphine (PH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets far exceeds that predicted from theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This fundamentally changed the resulting interpretation of Voyager radio occultation data at Saturn and Neptune. It also directly impacts planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment and the Rossini RADAR instrument. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of high power microwave window breakdown at atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krile, John T.; Neuber, Andreas A.; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Gibson, Thomas L.

    2006-11-13

    A Monte Carlo-type electron motion simulation program was developed to calculate the increasing electron density for pulsed high power microwave window flashover in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressures, i.e., >90 torr. Through comparison of experimental and simulated results several processes such as flashover delay time's strong dependence on pressure and the lack of significant surface charge buildup have been confirmed. The quantitative agreement of the code results with the experiment is a clear step towards predicting high power microwave flashover under a wide range of atmospheric conditions as well as for different gases and more complex window geometries.

  18. Interaction between Late Holocene bottom water conditions in Skagerrak and Kattegat and predominant atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risebrobakken, B.; Kabel, K.; Jentzen, A.; Moros, M.; Jansen, E.

    2011-12-01

    The brackish and anoxic Baltic Sea is episodically ventilated when major inflow of Atlantic water occurs, Atlantic water that enters the Baltic Sea through Skagerrak and Kattegat. Periods with a stronger flux of Atlantic water increases the bottom water temperatures in Skagerrak, and temperatures and salinities in Kattegat. A tight connection between the major inflow events and the predominant atmospheric forcing over the North Atlantic and Nordic Seas are suggested in literature. How the atmospheric forcing and the inflow events are mechanistically connected is however discussed. To detect how periods of stronger inflow of Atlantic water through Skagerrak and Kattegat are related to the predominant atmospheric forcing at longer time scales, we investigate new high-resolution stable isotope, Mg/Ca and foraminiferal assemblage records documenting bottom water conditions in Skagerrak and Kattegat since approximately 1700 AD. Close to annual resolution through the last 30 years enables validation of our reconstructions towards local instrumental records of bottom water conditions and documented changes in atmospheric forcing. High-resolution stable isotope records covering the last 4000 years supplements the 300-year long records so that changes in climatic conditions in the Skagerrak/Kattegat area at longer time-scales through late Holocene are detected and the dynamical forcing behind these climatic changes investigated.

  19. Investigating Atmospheric Effects on Impact Ejecta Morphology: Possible Tool for Determining Past Climate Conditions on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, John F.; Barnouin-Jha, Oliver S.; Cheng, Andrew F.

    1999-01-01

    The combined use of impact crater morphology and mechanics provides important information on the physical conditions of both planetary atmospheres and planetary and asteroid surfaces present during crater formation, while an understanding of the rate of crater production on the surface of asteroids provides information of their surface and spin rate evolution. The research performed with support from this project improves our understanding of (1) the mechanics of impact cratering in order to gain insights on the evolution of these physical surface conditions on planets with atmospheres and asteroids, and (2) how impact flux across an asteroid surface may vary due to anisotropic distribution of impactors in the solar system. As part of this project, we have undertaken three studies. In the first study, we investigate atmospheric effects on the morphology of ejecta excavated during a cratering event in order to determine the atmospheric and target conditions from observed crater morphologies. In the second study, we use the physical and morphological consequences of oblique impacts on an asteroid to understand how the asteroid Mathilde (recently imaged by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous - NEAR- spacecraft) could have survived the formation of five giant craters. In a third study, we use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the impact flux on an asteroid given a distribution of impactors on elliptical orbits. In the following section, we present the result obtained from all three studies.

  20. Launch Condition Deviations of Reusable Launch Vehicle Simulations in Exo-Atmospheric Zoom Climbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urschel, Peter H.; Cox, Timothy H.

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has proposed a two-stage system to deliver a small payload to orbit. The proposal calls for an airplane to perform an exo-atmospheric zoom climb maneuver, from which a second-stage rocket is launched carrying the payload into orbit. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has conducted an in-house generic simulation study to determine how accurately a human-piloted airplane can deliver a second-stage rocket to a desired exo-atmospheric launch condition. A high-performance, fighter-type, fixed-base, real-time, pilot-in-the-loop airplane simulation has been modified to perform exo-atmospheric zoom climb maneuvers. Four research pilots tracked a reference trajectory in the presence of winds, initial offsets, and degraded engine thrust to a second-stage launch condition. These launch conditions have been compared to the reference launch condition to characterize the expected deviation. At each launch condition, a speed change was applied to the second-stage rocket to insert the payload onto a transfer orbit to the desired operational orbit. The most sensitive of the test cases was the degraded thrust case, yielding second-stage launch energies that were too low to achieve the radius of the desired operational orbit. The handling qualities of the airplane, as a first-stage vehicle, have also been investigated.

  1. Video stabilization in atmosphere turbulent conditions based on the Laplacian-Riesz pyramid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bindang; Liu, Yi; Cui, Linyan; Bai, Xiangzhi; Cao, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-11-28

    Video stabilization in atmosphere turbulent conditions is aimed at removing spatiotemporally varying distortions from video recordings. Conventional shaky video stabilization approaches do not perform effectively under turbulent circumstances due to the erratic motion common to those conditions. Using complex-valued image pyramids, we propose a method to mitigate this erratic motion in videos. First, each frame of a video is decomposed into different spatial frequencies using the Laplacian pyramid. Second, a Riesz transform is adopted to extract the local amplitude and the local phase of each sub-band. Next, low-pass filters are designed to attenuate the local amplitude and phase variations to remove turbulence-induced distortions. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is efficient and provides stabilizing video in atmosphere turbulent conditions.

  2. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were conducted to evaluate properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets. A significant addition to this effort was the capability to make such measurements at millimeter wavelengths. Measurements should soon be completed on the millimeter wave absorption from ammonia under Jovian conditions. Also studied will be the feasibility of measuring the microwave and millimeter wave properties of phosphine (PH3) under simulated Jovian conditions. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter wave absorption data for the outer planet, such as Voyager Radio Occultation experiments, will be pursued.

  3. Ray theory analysis and modelling of the secondary sonic boom propagation for realistic atmosphere conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Dallois, Laurent; Scott, Julian; Berger, Uwe; Allwright, David

    2006-05-01

    The shock waves generated by a supersonic aircraft are reflected in the upper part of the atmosphere. Back to the ground, they are indirect sonic booms called secondary sonic booms. The recorded signals of secondary sonic booms show a low amplitude and a low frequency. They sound like rumbling noises due to amplitude bursts. These signals strongly depend on the atmospheric conditions, in particular to the amplitude and to the direction of the wind in the stratopause. In the present work, the propagation of secondary sonic booms is studied using realistic atmospheric models up to the thermosphere. The secondary carpet position is investigated by solving temporal ray equations. An amplitude equation including nonlinearity, absorption and relaxation by various chemical species is coupled to the ray solver to get the secondary boom signature at the ground level. Multipath arrivals are directly linked to wind field or 3D inhomogeneities.

  4. Influences of atmospheric conditions and air mass on the ratio of ultraviolet to total solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, C.J.; Hulstrom, R.L.; Myers, D.R.

    1990-08-01

    The technology to detoxify hazardous wastes using ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation is being investigated by the DOE/SERI Solar Thermal Technology Program. One of the elements of the technology evaluation is the assessment and characterization of UV solar radiation resources available for detoxification processes. This report describes the major atmospheric variables that determine the amount of UV solar radiation at the earth's surface, and how the ratio of UV-to-total solar radiation varies with atmospheric conditions. These ratios are calculated from broadband and spectral solar radiation measurements acquired at SERI, and obtained from the literature on modeled and measured UV solar radiation. The following sections discuss the atmospheric effects on UV solar radiation and provide UV-to-total solar radiation ratios from published studies, as well as measured values from SERI's data. A summary and conclusions are also given.

  5. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements completed recently by Kolodner and Steffes (ICARUS 132, pp. 151-169, March 1998, attached as Appendix A) under this grant (NAGS-4190), have shown that the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different formalism than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter radio occultation experiments and by radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in such experiments, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  6. Comparison of Dynamic Characteristics for an Inflatable Solar Concentrator in Atmospheric and Thermal Vacuum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slade, Kara N.; Tinker, Michael L.; Lassiter, John O.; Engberg, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic testing of an inflatable solar concentrator structure in a thermal vacuum chamber as well as in ambient laboratory conditions is described in detail. Unique aspects of modal testing for the extremely lightweight inflatable are identified, including the use of a noncontacting laser vibrometer measurement system. For the thermal vacuum environment, mode shapes and frequency response functions are compared for three different test article inflation pressures at room temperature. Modes that persist through all the inflation pressure regimes are identified, as well as modes that are unique for each pressure. In atmospheric pressure and room temperature conditions, dynamic measurements were obtained for the expected operational inflation pressure of 0.5 psig. Experimental mode shapes and frequency response functions for ambient conditions are described and compared to the 0.5 psig results from the thermal vacuum tests. Only a few mode shapes were identified that occurred in both vacuum and atmospheric environments. This somewhat surprising result is discussed in detail, and attributed at least partly to 1.) large differences in modal damping, and 2.) significant differences in the mass of air contained by the structure, in the two environments. Results of this investigation point out the necessity of testing inflatable space structures in vacuum conditions before they can be launched. Ground testing in atmospheric pressure is not sufficient for predicting on-orbit dynamics of non-rigidized inflatable systems.

  7. Recreation of Marine Atmospheric Corrosion Condition on Weathering Steel in Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchhait, S. K.; Dewan, S.; Saha, J. K.; Mitra, P. K.

    2014-04-01

    Salt spray test, autoclave corrosion test, SO2 salt spray test, and Relative humidity test are generally used to assess atmospheric corrosion in laboratories at accelerated rates. However, no test can absolutely simulate the service condition. One can get only approximate corrosion rates using the aforesaid tests which serve as an indicative of corrosion behavior of the material in a service condition. The present work is aimed at creating specific environmental condition in laboratory to get the corrosion test done in short duration to compare with on field exposure test which would otherwise take years to complete. In this work recreation of atmospheric environment of Digha was tried and it was simulated in such a manner that the results of laboratory test could be compared with long time field exposure at Digha. Weathering steel (WS) was taken for experimentations. Potentiostatic electrochemical tests route was adopted to simulate atmospheric condition of Digha. Laboratory test results compared well with 18 month field exposure data in terms of corrosion rate, SEM and Ramon Spectroscopy matching.

  8. Comparison of the Response of the UV and visible Cherenkov Telescopes to the Atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badran, Hussein

    With atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes the experiment is totally at the mercy of the environment; particularly the atmospheric conditions. The effect of the atmospheric conditions on the Cherenkov light flashes is closely investigated for UV and visible cameras. The telescope response for light generated at different altitudes does not have the same variation with the wind speed or cloud thickness. For both cameras measurements can be carried out up to wind speed ~17 m/s without much change of the atmospheric transmittance from light generated close to the observing level and up to 12 m/s for higher elevation and higher zenith angles. The suggested limit for cloud thickness for both cameras is around 0.5 km. A cloud thickness of ~0.9 km can be tolerated for zenith angles less than 30°. The suggested limits are particularly important whenever the spectrum is to be determined from the data. No real change of the response function with the air pressure and temperature was found. The seasonal variation has a slight effect on the telescope response.

  9. Chemical Characterization of Extrasolar Super-Earths - Interiors, Atmospheres, and Formation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Lee, K.; Uts, I.; Mousis, O.

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations are allowing unprecedented measurements of masses and radii of low-mass transiting extrasolar planets, particularly super-Earths which are defined as planets with masses between 1 and 10 Earth masses. The observed masses, radii, and temperatures of super-Earths provide constraints on their interior structures, geophysical conditions, as well as their atmospheric compositions. Some of the most recently detected super-Earths span a wide gamut of possible compositions, from super-Mercuries and lava planets to water worlds with thick volatile envelopes. In this work, we report joint constraints on the interior and atmospheric compositions of several super-Earths and discuss their possible formation scenarios using new and comprehensive hybrid models of their interiors, non-gray atmospheres, and formation conditions. Our model constraints are based on the masses and visible radii, as well as the latest infrared measurements of transmission and emission spectrophotometry where available, in addition to revised estimates of the stellar parameters. We will present a comparative analysis of several transiting super-Earths currently known and will discuss in detail two super-Earths (GJ 1214b and 55 Cancri e) which have atmospheric data available and which represent two distinct end members in the thermo-chemical phase space of super-Earth conditions. We will also discuss the implications of our results for the diversity of geochemical and geophysical conditions on super-Earths. We will conclude with comments on new observational, theoretical, and experimental efforts that are critical to detailed characterization of super-Earths.

  10. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  11. SIPEX 2012: Extreme sea-ice and atmospheric conditions off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, P.; Stammerjohn, S.; Reid, P.; Massom, R. A.; Hutchings, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    In 2012, Antarctic sea-ice coverage was marked by weak annual-mean climate anomalies that consisted of opposing anomalies early and late in the year (some setting new records) which were interspersed by near-average conditions for most of the austral autumn and winter. Here, we investigate the ocean-ice-atmosphere system off East Antarctica, prior to and during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment [SIPEX] 2012, by exploring relationships between atmospheric and oceanic forcing together with the sea-ice and snow characteristics. During August and September 2012, just prior to SIPEX 2012, atmospheric circulation over the Southern Ocean was near-average, setting up the ocean-ice-atmosphere system for near-average conditions. However, below-average surface pressure and temperature as well as strengthened circumpolar winds prevailed during June and July 2012. This led to a new record (19.48×106 km2) in maximum Antarctic sea-ice extent recorded in late September. In contrast to the weak circum-Antarctic conditions, the East Antarctic sector (including the SIPEX 2012 region) experienced positive sea-ice extent and concentration anomalies during most of 2012, coincident with negative atmospheric pressure and sea-surface temperature anomalies. Heavily deformed sea ice appeared to be associated with intensified wind stress due to increased cyclonicity as well as an increased influx of sea ice from the east. This increased westward ice flux is likely linked to the break-up of nearly 80% of the Mertz Glacier Tongue in 2010, which strongly modified the coastal configuration and hence the width of the westward coastal current. Combined with favourable atmospheric conditions the associated changed coastal configuration allowed more sea ice to remain within the coastal current at the expense of a reduced northward flow in the region around 141°-145°E. In addition a westward propagating positive anomaly of sea-ice extent from the western Ross Sea during austral winter

  12. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  13. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography.

    PubMed

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  14. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C.; Diver, D.

    2013-04-20

    Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

  15. Measurements of the Centimeter-Wave Properties of Gases under Simulated Conditions for Deep Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Steffes, P. G.; Hanley, T. R.

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, an improved laboratory measurement system was developed at Georgia Tech to measure opacities of trace constituents in a hydrogen/helium atmosphere at wavelengths from 1.1 to 20 cm, pressures up to 12 bars and temperatures from 185 to 550 K. However, the Juno mission will include a microwave radiometer instrument (MWR) capable of sensing centimeter-wavelength emission from the very deep atmosphere of Jupiter at pressures exceeding 100 Bars (Janssen et al., 2005, Icarus 171, 447-453). In order to accurately retrieve the abundances of microwave absorbing constituents such as water vapor, and ammonia from measurements of the centimeter-wave emission from these deep layers, precise knowledge of the absorptive properties of these gases under deep atmospheric conditions is necessary. To date, only a very limited number of measurements have been made of the microwave absorption of water vapor, or ammonia at such high pressures, and none of these measurements were conducted at wavelengths greater than 3.3 cm. The system developed enables the measurement of water vapor, and ammonia opacity in a hydrogen/helium atmosphere at wavelengths from 5 to 22 cm, pressures up to 100 bars, and temperatures from 295 to 600 K, corresponding to the deep atmosphere of Jupiter. The first high-pressure measurements of the 5-22 cm opacity and refractivity of water vapor broadened by hydrogen and helium under Jovian conditions will be presented. This work was supported by NASA Contract NNM06AA75C from the Marshall Space Flight Center supporting the Juno Mission Science Team, under Subcontract 699054X from the Southwest Research Institute.

  16. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  17. Influence of Surface Seawater and Atmospheric Conditions on the Ccn Activity of Ocean-Derived Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Hakala, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean-derived aerosols are produced from direct injection into the atmosphere (primary production) and gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere (secondary production). These different production mechanisms result in a broad range of particle sizes that has implications for the impact of ocean-derived aerosol on climate. The chemical composition of ocean-derived aerosols is a result of a complex mixture of inorganic sea salt and organic matter including polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, microorganisms and their fragments, and secondary oxidation products. Both production mechanisms and biological processes in the surface ocean impact the ability of ocean-derived aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In addition, CCN activity can be impacted by atmospheric processing that modifies particle size and composition after the aerosol is emitted from the ocean. To understand relationships between production mechanism, surface ocean biology, and atmospheric processing, measurements were made of surface ocean chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter; nascent sea spray aerosol freshly emitted from the ocean surface; and ambient marine aerosol. These measurements were made along the coast of California and in the North Atlantic between the northeast US and Bermuda. These regions include both eutrophic and oligotraphic waters and, thus, provide for observations over a wide range of ocean conditions.

  18. Modification of solar radiation components under different atmospheric conditions in the Greater Athens Area, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Jacovides, C. P.; Steven, M. D.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of the atmospheric turbidity on the spectral distribution of solar irradiance components is investigated using ground-based spectroradiometric measurements taken in Athens area during May 1995. It is found that both the diffuse-to-global and diffuse-to-direct-beam irradiance ratios exhibits a strong wavelength dependence and exponential curves associated with 99% of the variance can fit each parameter. These exponential curves are further modified as function of the solar zenith angle and atmospheric turbidity conditions. It is found that the slope of the curves strongly depends on the processes attenuating irradiance and aerosol optical characteristics in the short wavelengths. New relations are proposed, which allow the spectral distribution of diffuse irradiance to be estimated as a function of the measured broadband global and diffuse solar irradiances. The diffuse-to-direct-beam ratio, which is an indicator of the atmospheric transmittance, exhibits a strong wavelength and aerosol-loading dependence. The observed differences between turbid urban and clean rural atmospheres constitute a manifestation of contrasting air properties and influence solar irradiance spectra.

  19. Increased greenhouse-gas intensity of rice production under future atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; van Kessel, Chris; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2013-03-01

    Increased atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are expected to affect rice yields and greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions from rice paddies. This is important, because rice cultivation is one of the largest human-induced sources of the potent GHG methane (CH4) and rice is the world's second-most produced staple crop. The need for meeting a growing global food demand argues for assessing GHG emissions from croplands on the basis of yield rather than land area, such that efforts to reduce GHG emissions take into consideration the consequences for food production. However, it is unclear whether or how the GHG intensity (that is, yield-scaled GHG emissions) of cropping systems will be affected by future atmospheric conditions. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased atmospheric CO2 (ranging from 550 to 743ppmV) and warming (ranging from +0.8°C to +6°C) both increase the GHG intensity of rice cultivation. Increased atmospheric CO2 increased GHG intensity by 31.4%, because CH4 emissions are stimulated more than rice yields. Warming increased GHG intensity by 11.8% per 1°C, largely owing to a decrease in yield. This analysis suggests that rising CO2 and warming will approximately double the GHG intensity of rice production by the end of the twenty-first century, stressing the need for management practices that optimize rice production while reducing its GHG intensity as the climate continues to change.

  20. Future atmospheric conditions increase the greenhouse gas intensity of rice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Van Kessel, C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are both expected to alter rice yields and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from rice paddies. This is important, because rice cultivation is one of the largest anthropogenic sources of the potent GHG methane (CH4) and rice is the world's second-most produced staple crop. Because global food demand is growing, it makes sense to assess GHG emissions from croplands on the basis of yield rather than land area, so that efforts to reduce GHG emissions occur with taking into consideration the effects on food production. However, it is unclear whether or how the GHG intensity (that is, yield-scaled GHG emissions) of cropping systems will be affected by future atmospheric conditions. Using meta-analysis, we show that elevated atmospheric CO2 (ranging from 550 to 743 ppmV) and warming (ranging from +0.8°C to +6°C) both increase the GHG intensity of rice cultivation. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increased GHG intensity by 31.4%, because CH4 emissions are stimulated more than rice yields. Warming increased GHG intensity by 11.8% per 1°C, largely due to a decrease in yield. Our findings underscore the need for mitigation and adaptation efforts to secure global food supply while at the same time keeping GHG emissions in check.

  1. Antagonistic pleiotropy at the human IL6 promoter confers genetic resilience to the pro-inflammatory effects of adverse social conditions in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Steven W; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2011-07-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6-74 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein). This study identifies a protective effect of the same polymorphism in 17- to 19-year-old adolescents confronting socioeconomic adversity. Over 60% of the environmental risk contribution to the IL6 × Socioeconomic Status interaction could be accounted for by interpersonal stress and adult role burden. Thus, the IL6-174G allele does not represent an undifferentiated risk factor but instead sensitizes inflammatory biology to socioenvironmental conditions, conferring either genetic vulnerability or resilience depending on the developmental "somatic environment" that interacts with social conditions to influence gene expression.

  2. The effect of the atmospheric condition on the extensive air shower analysis at the Telescope Array experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Kakimoto, F.; Tomida, T.

    2011-09-22

    The accuracies in determination of air shower parameters such as longitudinal profiles or primary energies with the fluorescence detection technique are strongly dependent on atmospheric conditions of the molecular and aerosol components. Moreover, air fluorescence photon yield depends on the atmospheric density, and the transparency of the air for fluorescence photons depends on the atmospheric conditions from EAS to FDs. In this paper, we describe the atmospheric monitoring system in the Telescope Array (TA experiment), and the impact of the atmospheric conditions in air shower reconstructions. The systematic uncertainties of the determination of the primary cosmic ray energies and of the measurement of depth of maximum development (X{sub max}) of EASs due to atmospheric variance are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter wave properties of the simulated atmosphere of the outer planets and their satellites has continued. One of the focuses is on the development of a radiative transfer model of the Jovian atmosphere at wavelengths from 1 mm to 10 cm. This modeling effort led to laboratory measurements of the millimeter wave opacity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) under simulated Jovian conditions. Descriptions of the modeling effort, the Laboratory experiment, and the observations are presented. Correlative studies of measurements with Pioneer-Venus radio occultation measurements with longer wavelength emission measurements have provided new ways for characterizing temporal and spatial variations in the abundance of both gases H2SO4 and SO2, and for modeling their roles in the subcloud atmosphere. Laboratory measurements were conducted on 1.35 cm (and 13 cm) opacity of gaseous SO2 and absorptivity of gaseous SO2 at the 3.2 mm wavelength under simulated Venus conditions. Laboratory measurements were completed on millimeter wave dielectric properties of liquid H2SO4, in order to model the effects of the opacity of the clouds of Venus onto millimeter wave emission spectrum.

  4. Simulations of warm tropical conditions with application to middle Pliocene atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, M.; Philander, G.; Pacanowski, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2006-03-01

    During the early and mid-Pliocene, the period from 5 to 3 million years ago, approximately, the Earth is believed to have been significantly warmer than it is today, but the reasons for the higher temperatures are unclear. This paper explores the impact of recent findings that suggest that, at that time, cold surface waters were absent from the tropical and subtropical oceanic upwelling zones. El Niño was in effect a perennial rather than intermittent phenomenon, and sea surface temperatures in low latitudes were essentially independent of longitude. When these conditions are specified as the lower boundary condition for an atmospheric GCM, we find that the trade winds along the equator, and hence the Walker Circulation, collapse. The low-level stratus clouds in low latitudes diminish greatly, thus reducing the albedo of the Earth. The atmospheric concentration of water vapor increases, and enhanced latent heat release due to stronger evaporation warms up the tropical atmosphere, particularly between 40°S and 20°N. Moreover, teleconnection patterns from the Pacific induce a warming over North America that is enhanced by surface albedo feedback, a process that may have helped to maintain this region ice-free before 3 Ma. The results presented here indicate that the suggested absence of cold surface waters from the tropical and subtropical oceanic upwelling zones could have contributed significantly to the Pliocene warmth.

  5. Effect of shadowing on survival of bacteria under conditions simulating the Martian atmosphere and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Osman, Shariff; Peeters, Zan; La Duc, Myron T; Mancinelli, Rocco; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-02-01

    Spacecraft-associated spores and four non-spore-forming bacterial isolates were prepared in Atacama Desert soil suspensions and tested both in solution and in a desiccated state to elucidate the shadowing effect of soil particulates on bacterial survival under simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. All non-spore-forming cells that were prepared in nutrient-depleted, 0.2-microm-filtered desert soil (DSE) microcosms and desiccated for 75 days on aluminum died, whereas cells prepared similarly in 60-microm-filtered desert soil (DS) microcosms survived such conditions. Among the bacterial cells tested, Microbacterium schleiferi and Arthrobacter sp. exhibited elevated resistance to 254-nm UV irradiation (low-pressure Hg lamp), and their survival indices were comparable to those of DS- and DSE-associated Bacillus pumilus spores. Desiccated DSE-associated spores survived exposure to full Martian UV irradiation (200 to 400 nm) for 5 min and were only slightly affected by Martian atmospheric conditions in the absence of UV irradiation. Although prolonged UV irradiation (5 min to 12 h) killed substantial portions of the spores in DSE microcosms (approximately 5- to 6-log reduction with Martian UV irradiation), dramatic survival of spores was apparent in DS-spore microcosms. The survival of soil-associated wild-type spores under Martian conditions could have repercussions for forward contamination of extraterrestrial environments, especially Mars.

  6. CARBON-RICH GIANT PLANETS: ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY, THERMAL INVERSIONS, SPECTRA, AND FORMATION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Mousis, Olivier; Johnson, Torrence V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2011-12-20

    The recent inference of a carbon-rich atmosphere, with C/O {>=} 1, in the hot Jupiter WASP-12b motivates the exotic new class of carbon-rich planets (CRPs). We report a detailed study of the atmospheric chemistry and spectroscopic signatures of carbon-rich giant (CRG) planets, the possibility of thermal inversions in their atmospheres, the compositions of icy planetesimals required for their formation via core accretion, and the apportionment of ices, rock, and volatiles in their envelopes. Our results show that CRG atmospheres probe a unique region in composition space, especially at high temperature (T). For atmospheres with C/O {>=} 1, and T {approx}> 1400 K in the observable atmosphere, most of the oxygen is bound up in CO, while H{sub 2}O is depleted and CH{sub 4} is enhanced by up to two or three orders of magnitude each, compared to equilibrium compositions with solar abundances (C/O = 0.54). These differences in the spectroscopically dominant species for the different C/O ratios cause equally distinct observable signatures in the spectra. As such, highly irradiated transiting giant exoplanets form ideal candidates to estimate atmospheric C/O ratios and to search for CRPs. We also find that the C/O ratio strongly affects the abundances of TiO and VO, which have been suggested to cause thermal inversions in highly irradiated hot Jupiter atmospheres. A C/O = 1 yields TiO and VO abundances of {approx}100 times lower than those obtained with equilibrium chemistry assuming solar abundances, at P {approx} 1 bar. Such a depletion is adequate to rule out thermal inversions due to TiO/VO even in the most highly irradiated hot Jupiters, such as WASP-12b. We estimate the compositions of the protoplanetary disk, the planetesimals, and the envelope of WASP-12b, and the mass of ices dissolved in the envelope, based on the observed atmospheric abundances. Adopting stellar abundances (C/O = 0.44) for the primordial disk composition and low-temperature formation conditions

  7. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  8. On the Use of Blanketed Atmospheres as Boundary Conditions for Stellar Evolutionary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Edvardsson, Bengt; Eriksson, Kjell; Gustafsson, Bengt

    2008-03-01

    Stellar models have been computed for stars having [ Fe/H ] = 0.0 (assuming both the Grevesse & Sauval and Asplund et al. heavy-element mixtures) and -2.0 to determine the effects on the predicted Teff scale of using boundary conditions derived from the latest MARCS model atmospheres. The latter were fitted in a fully consistent way to the interior models at the photosphere and at τ = 100: the resultant evolutionary sequences on the H-R diagram were found to be nearly independent of the chosen fitting point. Tracks were also computed in which the pressure at T = Teff was obtained by integrating the hydrostatic equation together with either the classical gray T(τ , Teff) relation or that derived by Krishna Swamy from an empirical solar atmosphere. Due to the effects of differences in the solar-calibrated values of the mixing-length parameter, αMLT, very similar tracks were obtained for the different treatments of the atmosphere, except at solar abundances, where the models based on the Krishna Swamy T(τ , Teff) relationship predicted ~150 K hotter giant branches than the others, in good agreement with the inferred temperatures of giants in the open cluster M67 from recent (V - K) -Teff relations. Tracks that used new ``scaled solar, differentially corrected'' MARCS atmospheres were found to agree well with those that employed the Krishna Swamy T(τ , Teff) relationship, independently of the assumed metal abundance. (Gray atmospheres are quite different from MARCS models.) Fits of isochrones for [ Fe/H ] = - 2.0 to the CMD of the globular cluster M68, as well as the possibility that αMLT varies with stellar parameters, are also discussed.

  9. Monitoring and ANN modeling of coal stockpile behavior under different atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Ozbay, Y.; Yilmaz, N.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile of 5 m width, 4 m height, and 10 m length was built in a coal stock area to investigate coal stockpile behavior under different atmospheric conditions. The effective parameters on the coal stockpile that were time, weather temperature, atmospheric pressure, air humidity, velocity, and direction of wind values were automatically measured by means of a computer-aided measurement system to obtain Artificial Neural Network (ANN) input data. The coal stockpiles, which should be continuously observed, are capable of spontaneous combustion and then causing serious economical losses due to the mentioned parameters. Afterwards, these measurement values were used for training and testing of the ANN model. Comparison of the experimental and ANN results, accuracy rates of training, and testing were found as 98.6% and 98.7%, respectively. It is shown that possible coal stockpile behavior with this ANN model is powerfully estimated.

  10. Investigation of coal stockpiles of Tuncbilek thermal power plant with respect to time under atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.

    2009-07-01

    Thermal power plants have delayed the coal that they will use at stockpiles mandatorily. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stockyards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started itself. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research a coal stockpile at Tuncbilek Thermal Power Plant which was formed in 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m height with a weight of 120 tons to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Later, internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over two layers in the stockpile. The parameters, such as air temperature, humidity, atmosphere pressure, wind speed and direction, which are effective on the stockpiles, were measured and used to obtain the graphs of stockpiles' internal temperature.

  11. Radical product yields from the ozonolysis of short chain alkenes under atmospheric boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Rickard, Andrew R; Camredon, Marie; Wyche, Kevin P; Carr, Timo; Hornsby, Karen E; Monks, Paul S; Bloss, William J

    2013-11-27

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), alkenes, is an important source of the critical atmospheric oxidant OH, especially at night when other photolytic radical initiation routes cannot occur. Alkene ozonolysis is also known to directly form HO2 radicals, which may be readily converted to OH through reaction with NO, but whose formation is poorly understood. We report a study of the radical (OH, HO2, and RO2) production from a series of small alkenes (propene, 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, 2-methylpropene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (tetramethyl ethene, TME), and isoprene). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) atmospheric simulation chamber, with OH and HO2 levels directly measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and HO2 + ΣRO2 levels measured by peroxy-radical chemical amplification (PERCA). OH yields were found to be in good agreement with the majority of previous studies performed under comparable conditions (atmospheric pressure, long time scales) using tracer and scavenger approaches. HO2 yields ranged from 4% (trans-2-butene) to 34% (2-methylpropene), lower than previous experimental determinations. Increasing humidity further reduced the HO2 yields obtained, by typically 50% for an RH increase from 0.5 to 30%, suggesting that HOx production from alkene ozonolysis may be lower than current models suggest under (humid) ambient atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The mechanistic origin of the OH and HO2 production observed is discussed in the context of previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  12. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    After long arduous work with the simulator, measurements of the refractivity and absorptivity of nitrogen under conditions similar to those for Titan were completed. The most significant measurements, however, were those of the microwave absorption from gaseous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres over wavelengths from 1.3 to 22 cm. The results of these measurements are critical in that they confirm the theoretical calculation of the ammonia opacity using the Ben-Reuven lineshape. The application of both these results, and results obtained previously, to planetary observations at microwave frequencies were especially rewarding. Applications of the results for ammonia to radio astronomical observations of Jupiter in the 1.3 to 20 cm wavelength range and the application of results for gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions are discussed.

  13. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-06-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.) during a period of mild winter conditions and their responses to a sudden cold period. The state of the photosynthetic machinery in both periods was thus tested by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials similar to those under spring conditions. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). This change persisted for several weeks after the cold period despite the recovery of the temperature to the conditions

  14. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.). Therefore, we collected twigs from the field during a period of mild winter conditions and after a sudden cold period. After both periods, the state of the photosynthetic machinery was tested in the laboratory by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species specific, with Q. ilex exhibiting the highest and P

  15. Exponential and power-law contact distributions represent different atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A M

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of plant disease epidemics are very sensitive to the functional form of the contact distribution?the probability distribution function for the distance of viable fungal spore movement until deposition. Epidemics can take the form of a constant-velocity travelling wave when the contact distribution is exponentially bounded. Fat-tailed contact distributions, on the other hand, lead to epidemic spreads that accelerate over time. Some empirical data for contact distributions can be well represented by negative exponentials while other data are better represented by fat-tailed inverse power laws. Here we present data from numerical simulations that suggest that negative exponentials and inverse power laws are not competing candidate forms of the contact distribution but are instead representative of different atmospheric conditions. Contact distributions for atmospheric boundary-layers with stabilities ranging from strongly convective (a hot windless day time scenario) to stable stratification (a cold windy night time scenario) but without precipitation events are calculated using well-established state-of-the-art Lagrangian stochastic (particle tracking) dispersal models. Contact distributions are found to be well represented by exponentials for strongly convective conditions; a -3/2 inverse power law for convective boundary-layers with wind shear; and by a -2/3 inverse power law for stably stratified conditions.

  16. Mercury oxidation via chlorine, bromine, and iodine under atmospheric conditions: thermochemistry and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Auzmendi-Murua, Itsaso; Castillo, Álvaro; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2014-04-24

    Emissions of gaseous mercury from combustion sources are the major source of Hg in the atmosphere and in environmental waters and soils. Reactions of Hg(o)(g) with halogens are of interest because they relate to mercury and ozone depletion events in the Antarctic and Arctic early spring ozone hole events, and the formation of Hg-halides (HgX2) is a method for removal of mercury from power generation systems. Thermochemistry and kinetics from published theoretical and experimental studies in the literature and from computational chemistry are utilized to compile a mechanism of the reactions considered as contributors to the formation of HgX2 (X = Cl, Br, I) to understand the reaction paths and mechanisms under atmospheric conditions. Elementary reaction mechanisms are assembled and evaluated using thermochemistry for all species and microscopic reversibility for all reactions. Temperature and pressure dependence is determined with quantum Rice Ramsperger Kassel (RRK) analysis for k(E) and master equation analysis for fall-off. We find that reactions of mercury with a small fraction of the reactor surface or initiation by low concentrations of halogen atoms is needed to explain the experimental conversion of Hg to HgX2 in the gas phase. The models do not replicate data from experiments that do not explicitly provide an atom source. The Hg insertion reaction into X2 (Hg + X2 → HgX2) that has been reported is further studied, and we find agreement with studies that report high barriers. The high barriers prevent this insertion path from explaining the experimental data on HgX2 formation and Hg conversion under atmospheric conditions. Mechanism studies with low initial concentrations of halogen radicals show significant conversion of Hg under the experimental conditions.

  17. Modeling the effect of adverse environmental conditions and clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a fully clothed, finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, subject to the maximum allowable reference level for a 1-GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field for a worker, and also subject to adverse environmental conditions, including high humidity and high ambient temperature. An initial observation is that while electromagnetic fields at the occupational safety limit will contribute an additional thermal load to the tissues, and subsequently, cause an elevated temperature, the magnitude of this effect is far outweighed by that due to the conditions including the ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the type of clothing worn. It is envisaged that the computational modeling approach outlined in this paper will be suitably modified in future studies to evaluate the thermal response of a body at elevated metabolic rates, and for different body shapes and sizes including children and pregnant women.

  18. The reduction of airplane flight test data to standard atmosphere conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S; Lesley, E P

    1926-01-01

    This report was prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in order to supply the need of practical methods of reducing observed performance to standard conditions with a minimum of labor. The first part gives a very simple approximate method of reducing performance in climb, and is particularly adapted to work not requiring extreme accuracy. The second part gives a somewhat more elaborate and more accurate method which is well suited to general flight test reduction. The third part gives the conventional method of calibrating air-speed indicators and reducing the indicated speeds to true air speeds. An appendix gives working tables and charts for the standard atmosphere. (author)

  19. Local-Rapid Evaluation of Atmospheric Conditions (L-REAC (trademark)) System, Volume 4 (System Evaluation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    designing the Local-Rapid Evaluation of Atmospheric Conditions (L-REAC™)* System. From 2009 to 2011, ARL went from a sketched L-REAC™ System concept...Students drew the results on a worksheet, where they also sketched a projected ―plume‖ cloud based on their observed airflow. Their wind and plume... sketches were then compared to the ―live‖ wind field and plume model outputs of the L-REAC™ System simultaneously displayed in the building’s lobby. The

  20. Erosion processes in molassic cliffs: the role of the rock surface temperature and atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Guerin, Antoine; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Voumard, Jérémie

    2014-05-01

    The morphology of the Swiss Plateau is modeled by numerous steep cliffs of Molasse. These cliffs are mainly composed of sub-horizontal alternated layers of sandstone, shale and conglomerates deposed in the Alps foreland basin during the Tertiary period. These Molasse cliffs are affected by erosion processes inducing numerous rockfall events. Thus, it is relevant to understand how different external factors influence Molasse erosion rates. In this study, we focus on analyzing temperature variation during a winter season. As pilot study area we selected a cliff which is formed by a sub-horizontal alternation of outcropping sandstone and shale. The westward facing test site (La Cornalle, Vaud, Switzerland), which is a lateral scarp of a slow moving landslide area, is currently affected by intense erosion. Regarding data acquisition, we monitored both in-situ rock and air temperatures at 15 minutes time-step since October 2013: (1) on the one hand we measured Ground Surface Temperature (GST) at near-surface (0.1 meter depth) using a GST mini-datalogger M-Log5W-Rock model; (2) On the other hand we monitored atmospheric conditions using a weather station (Davis Vantage pro2 plus) collecting numerous parameters (i.e. temperature, irradiation, rain, wind speed, etc.). Furthermore, the area was also seasonally monitored by Ground-Based (GB) LiDAR since 2010 and monthly monitored since September 2013. In order to understand how atmospheric conditions (such as freeze and thaw effect) influence the erosion of the cliff, we modeled the temperature diffusion through the rock mass. To this end, we applied heat diffusion and radiation equation using a 1D temperature profile, obtaining as a result both temperature variations at different depths together with the location of the 0°C isotherm. Our model was calibrated during a given training set using both in-situ rock temperatures and atmospheric conditions. We then carried out a comparison with the rockfall events derived from the

  1. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  2. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  3. Nocturnal surface ozone enhancement over Portugal during winter: Influence of different atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Dasari, Hari Prasad; Sharma, Ashish; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, Rui; Silva, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Four distinct nocturnal surface ozone (NSO) enhancement events were observed, with NSO concentration exceeding 80μg/m3, at multiple ozone (O3) monitoring stations (32 sites) in January, November and December between year 2000-2010, in Portugal. The reasonable explanation for the observed bimodal pattern of surface ozone with enhanced NSO concentration during nighttime has to be transport processes, as the surface ozone production ceases at nighttime. Simultaneous measurements of O3 at multiple stations during the study period in Portugal suggest that horizontal advection alone cannot explain the observed NSO enhancement. Thus, detailed analysis of the atmospheric conditions, simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, were performed to evaluate the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for NSO enhancement in the region. Simulations revealed that each event occurred as a result of one or the combination of different atmospheric processes such as, passage of a cold front followed by a subsidence zone; passage of a moving surface trough, with associated strong horizontal wind speed and vertical shear; combination of vertical and horizontal transport at the synoptic scale; formation of a low level jet with associated vertical mixing below the jet stream. The study confirmed that large-scale flow pattern resulting in enhanced vertical mixing in the nocturnal boundary layer, plays a key role in the NSO enhancement events, which frequently occur over Portugal during winter months.

  4. On the stability of ion water clusters at atmospheric conditions: Open system Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidi, Zouhaier S.

    2012-09-01

    The formation of water clusters on Li+, Na+, K+, Cl-, and I- ions from water vapor at atmospheric conditions have been studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The extended simple point charge model has been employed for water molecules. The polarization of ions in the field of molecules and the polarization of molecules in the field of ions have been considered explicitly in the total Hamiltonian of the molecular system. The cluster formation work and the Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of attachment reactions of one water molecule to the cluster have been calculated via the bicanonical ensemble method. Our results reveal the formation of stable clusters in equilibrium with the moist atmosphere in a wide range of vapor pressure values, with largest clusters are formed around cations. Decreasing the temperature, from 293 K to 253 K, leads to the formation of larger equilibrium clusters, and enhances the stability of systems as whole. According to clusters' molecular structures, negative ions are expected to be more active in atmospheric processes, including chemical reactions and cloud formation, than positive ones.

  5. Risk of Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Inflight Medical Conditions: ExMC Pharmacy Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program is charged with identifying medical capabilities that can address the challenges of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and injuries that could occur during exploration missions beyond Earth's orbit. Faced with the obstacle of access to in-flight medical care, and limitations of vehicle space, time, and communications; it is necessary to prioritize what medical consumables are manifested for the flight, and which medical conditions are addressed. Studies of astronaut health establish the incidence of common and high risk medical conditions that require medical intervention during long-duration exploration missions. In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a committee of experts, Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel beyond Earth Orbit, to examine the issues surrounding astronaut health and safety for long duration space missions. Two themes run throughout the committee's final report: (1) that not enough is known about the risks to human health during long-duration missions beyond Earth's orbit or about what can effectively mitigate those risks to enable humans to travel and work safely in the environment of deep space and (2) that everything reasonable should be done to gain the necessary information before humans are sent on missions of space exploration (IOM, 2001). Although several spaceflight focused pharmaceutical research studies have been conducted, few have provided sufficient data regarding medication usage or potency changes during spaceflight. The Du pharmaceutical stability study assessed medications flown on space shuttles to and from the International Space Station (ISS) from 2006 until 2008; of which some medications were still viable beyond their expiration dates (Du et al, 2011). However, as with many spaceflight studies, the small 'n' associated with this study limits the ability to draw strong conclusions from it

  6. Corrosion of aluminum and copper thin films under simulated atmospheric conditions in laboratory tests

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Raman, A.; Diwan, R.; Bhattacharya, P.K.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion characteristics of Al and Cu thin films have been studied in cyclic fog tests using tap water fog and fog created with 0.1% NaCl solution in tap water. Likewise, their corrosion features have been analyzed in continuous immersion testing in the laboratory in distilled water, tap water, in 0.1% NaCl and 3.5% NaCl solutions in distilled water. The corrosion potentials and the corrosion currents of these thin films change and reach steady state values after some time. However, steady state is not realized in 3.5% NaCl solutions. The corrosion current density data have been used to calculate lifetime of 1 {mu}m thick thin films of Al and Cu in the various tests, and assuming that the fog test data would hold under normal exposure conditions, life spans for these thin film sensor elements in actual exterior exposure have also been calculated. According to estimates, an Al-TF of about 1 {mu}m would last about 9 months in exterior exposure in chloride containing atmospheres, such as in the coastal regions, but would survive nearly 2 years in normal atmospheres not having acidic or chloride pollutants. On the contrary, 1 {mu}m thick Cu-TF would last only for about 2.5 months in chloride-laden environments, but would last for about 2 years in normal atmospheres. However, Cu-TF would be corroded off faster in slightly alkaline atmospheric condensate under total immersion situation. Lifetime estimates are presented and discussed.

  7. Frigate birds track atmospheric conditions over months-long transoceanic flights.

    PubMed

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Bishop, Charles; Jeanniard-du-Dot, Tiphaine; Prudor, Aurélien; Sachs, Gottfried

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how animals respond to atmospheric conditions across space is critical for understanding the evolution of flight strategies and long-distance migrations. We studied the three-dimensional movements and energetics of great frigate birds (Fregata minor) and showed that they can stay aloft for months during transoceanic flights. To do this, birds track the edge of the doldrums to take advantage of favorable winds and strong convection. Locally, they use a roller-coaster flight, relying on thermals and wind to soar within a 50- to 600-meter altitude band under cumulus clouds and then glide over kilometers at low energy costs. To deal with the local scarcity of clouds and gain longer gliding distances, birds regularly soar inside cumulus clouds to use their strong updraft, and they can reach altitudes of 4000 meters, where freezing conditions occur.

  8. One-against-All Weighted Dynamic Time Warping for Language-Independent and Speaker-Dependent Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  9. One-against-all weighted dynamic time warping for language-independent and speaker-dependent speech recognition in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions.

  10. Atmospheric propagation of high power laser radiation at different weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargmann, Carsten; Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Handke, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Applications based on the propagation of high power laser radiation through the atmosphere are limited in range and effect, due to weather dependent beam wandering, beam deterioration, and scattering processes. Security and defense related application examples are countermeasures against hostile projectiles and the powering of satellites and aircrafts. For an examination of the correlations between weather condition and laser beam characteristics DLR operates at Lampoldshausen a 130 m long free transmission laser test range. Sensors around this test range continuously monitor turbulence strength, visibility, precipitation, temperature, and wind speed. High power laser radiation is obtained by a TruDisk 6001 disk laser (Trumpf company) yielding a maximum output power of 6 kW at a wavelength of 1030 nm. The laser beam is expanded to 180 mm and focused along the beam path. Power and intensity distribution are measured before and after propagation, providing information about the atmospheric transmission and alterations of diameter and position of the laser beam. Backscattered laser light is acquired by a photo receiver. As a result, measurements performed at different weather conditions show a couple of correlations to the characteristics of the laser beam. The experimental results are compared to a numerical analysis. The calculations are based on the Maxwell wave equation in Fresnel approximation. The turbulence is considered by the introduction of phase screens and the "von Karman" spectrum.

  11. The influence of surface atmospheric conditions on the range and area reached by animal vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Larom, D; Garstang, M; Payne, K; Raspet, R; Lindeque, M

    1997-02-01

    Low-level vertical changes in temperature and wind exert powerful and predictable influences on the area ensonified by animal vocalizations. Computer modelling of low-frequency sound propagation in measured atmospheric conditions predicts that the calls of the savanna elephant at these frequencies can have ranges exceeding 10 km and that the calls will be highly directional in the presence of wind shear. Calling area is maximized under temperature inversions with low wind speeds. Calling area changes substantially over 24 h periods; on any given day, the calling area undergoes an expansion and contraction which may be as large as one order of magnitude. This cycle is modulated by topography, regional weather patterns, seasonality and possibly by climate variation. Similar influences affect the somewhat higher-frequency calls of lions and may be a selective pressure towards their crepuscular and nocturnal calling behaviour. Coyotes and wolves, which also live in areas with strong and prevalent nocturnal temperature inversions, show similar calling patterns, maximizing their chances of being heard over the longest possible distances. The pronounced dawn and evening vocalization peaks in other animals including birds, frogs and insects may reflect the same influences in combination with other factors which selectively limit high-frequency sound propagation. Atmospheric conditions therefore need to be taken into account in many field studies of animal behaviour. A simplified method for estimating sound propagation during field studies is presented.

  12. Influence of Geomagnetic and IMF conditions on High Latitude Upper Atmospheric winds and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.; Emmert, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the climatological behavior of upper atmospheric winds (horizontal and vertical) and temperatures above Alaska by combining line-of-sight Doppler shifts of 630 nm optical emissions recorded during the 2011 and 2012 winters using a ground based all-sky wavelength scanning Doppler Fabry-Perot interferometer (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W). The wide field of view covered a large geographic region above Alaska. This field was divided in software into multiple zones (115 used here), allowing independent spectra to be sampled from many directions simultaneously. As a result, it is capable of recording the wind field's spatial variations over a wide geographic region with high spatial resolution, and to resolve these variations over time. Although such climatological studies have been performed previously using satellites, models, and narrow field Fabry-Perot interferometers, there are no published climatological studies of thermospheric winds and temperatures using either SDI data or any other technique with comparable geographic coverage and resolution. Wind summary dial plots were produced to depict the climatology of the horizontal winds and temperatures for different geomagnetic conditions and orientation of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Results show that horizontal winds and temperatures had a strong dependence on geospace activity and orientation of IMF. The latitudinal shears in horizontal winds were stronger when geomagnetic conditions were active compared to the latitudinal shears for quiet conditions. Also, shears appeared earlier over Poker Flat when geomagnetic conditions were active. The latitudinal shears showed more dependence on IMF when geomagnetic conditions were active than they did during quieter conditions. F-region temperatures were higher under active geomagnetic conditions than during quiet conditions. They were also observed to be higher in pre-magnetic midnight sector (duskside) than they were post

  13. Factors Promoting a Cool Cambrian Climate: Role of Land Surface Conditions and Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellito, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    In light of recent work suggesting episodic cooling during the Late Cambrian (~500 Ma), an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity is utilized to evaluate the roles of Late Cambrian continental configuration, mountain height, and atmospheric CO2 concentration on Earth's climate. The Planetary Simulator (PLASIM), developed at the Meteorological Institute of the University of Hamburg, is utilized at T21 spectral resolution (5.6° latitude x 5.6° longitude) with a 50 m deep slab ocean in four experiments. The first three experiments are run with a Late Cambrian continental configuration. Two experiments are run with an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 10 x pre-industrial (2800 ppm). This is in the range estimated for the Late Cambrian by carbon cycle modeling studies. One of these experiments utilizes a flat topography (CAMB_FLAT), and the other, includes mountains (CAMB_MTN). A third experiment is identical to CAMB_MTN, but CO2 is set to 280 ppm (CAMB_COLD). All Cambrian experiments are integrated without any vegetation, and with solar luminosity reduced by 6%. The Cambrian experiments also utilize a uniform land surface boundary condition consisting of sand with an albedo of 0.37. A fourth scenario was run with pre-industrial boundary conditions (modern geography and vegetation and 280 ppm CO2) as a control experiment (CONTROL). Despite the high level of CO2, global average temperatures in CAMB_FLAT and CAMB_MTN are cooler than that of CONTROL. In CAMB_COLD, the oceans freeze over completely and 'snowball Earth' conditions are present. These results highlight the importance of vegetation, land surface albedo, and continental position in maintaining an equable climate in modern times. They also suggest that a drop in greenhouse gases during the Cambrian, whether due to reduced natural emissions from biologic or volcanic sources, or an increase in biologic activity in the oceans, could have been responsible for the initiation of cooler climatic conditions.

  14. Effect of femoral head size on the wear of metal on metal bearings in total hip replacements under adverse edge-loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie; Tipper, Joanne L; Jennings, Louise M

    2013-02-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings have shown low-wear rates under standard hip simulator conditions; however, retrieval studies have shown large variations in wear rates and mechanisms. High-wear in vivo has caused catastrophic complications and has been associated with steep cup-inclination angle (rotational malpositioning). However, increasing the cup-inclination angle in vitro has not replicated the increases in wear to the same extent as those observed in retrievals. Clinically relevant wear rates, patterns, and particles were observed in vitro for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings when microseparation (translational malpositioning) conditions were introduced into the gait cycle. In the present study, 28 and 36-mm MoM bearings were investigated under adverse conditions. Increasing the cup angle from 45° to 65° resulted in a significant increase in the wear rate of the 28 mm bearings. However, for the 36 mm bearings, head-rim contact did not occur under the steep cup-angle condition, and the wear rate did not increase. The introduction of microseparation to the gait cycle significantly increased the wear rate of the MoM bearings. Cup angle and head size did not influence the wear rate under microseparation conditions. This study indicated that high-in vivo wear rates were associated with edge loading due to rotational malpositioning such as high-cup-inclination angle and translational malpositioning that could occur due to several surgical factors. Translational malpositioning had a more dominant effect on the wear rate. Preclinical simulation testing should be undertaken with translational and rotational malpositioning conditions as well as standard walking cycle conditions defined by the ISO standard.

  15. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2017-01-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  16. Oceanographic and atmospheric conditions on the continental shelf north of the Monterey Bay during August 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramp, Steven R.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.; Shulman, Igor; Chao, Yi; Wolf, Rebecca E.; Bahr, Frederick L.

    2011-09-01

    A comprehensive data set from the ocean and atmosphere was obtained just north of the Monterey Bay as part of the Monterey Bay 2006 (MB06) field experiment. The wind stress, heat fluxes, and sea surface temperature were sampled by the Naval Postgraduate School's TWIN OTTER research aircraft. In situ data were collected using ships, moorings, gliders and AUVs. Four data-assimilating numerical models were additionally run, including the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS ®) model for the atmosphere and the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS), the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) for the ocean. The scientific focus of the Adaptive Sampling and Prediction Experiment (ASAP) was on the upwelling/relaxation cycle and the resulting three-dimensional coastal circulation near a coastal promontory, in this case Point Año Nuevo, CA. The emphasis of this study is on the circulation over the continental shelf as estimated from the wind forcing, two ADCP moorings, and model outputs. The wind stress during August 2006 consisted of 3-10 day upwelling favorable events separated by brief 1-3 day relaxations. During the first two weeks there was some correlation between local winds and currents and the three models' capability to reproduce the events. During the last two weeks, largely equatorward surface wind stress forced the sea surface and barotropic poleward flow occurred over the shelf, reducing model skill at predicting the circulation. The poleward flow was apparently remotely forced by mesoscale eddies and alongshore pressure gradients, which were not well simulated by the models. The small, high-resolution model domains were highly reliant on correct open boundary conditions to drive these larger-scale poleward flows. Multiply-nested models were no more effective than well-initialized local models in this respect.

  17. Flight in Adverse Environmental Condition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    to 0) exposed. llaysia A)OO. During MS approach in poor visibilityt thundeatorms and heavy rain Aircraft undershot And came to rest 1000 water * before...It calcul des avions I Is rafalt, tiles oot slot-s ith utillis Pour trotrwer dts vs~turs d"Intensiti do ratsle I PoatUt des bn. Devuls Son appart -ion...mean wind Is rather difficult. Using earth fixed sensors, a temporal *vraging Is performed for each measuring point. Out the question for the right

  18. Infrared characterisation of acetonitrile and propionitrile aerosols under Titan's atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Ennis, C; Auchettl, R; Ruzi, M; Robertson, E G

    2017-01-25

    Pure, crystalline acetonitrile (CH3CN) and propionitrile (CH3CH2CN) particles were formed in a collisional cooling cell allowing for infrared (IR) signatures to be compiled from 50 to 5000 cm(-1). The cell temperature and pressure conditions were controlled to simulate Titan's lower atmosphere (80-130 K and 1-100 mbar), allowing for the comparison of laboratory data to the spectra obtained from the Cassini-Huygens mission. The far-IR features confirmed the morphology of CH3CN aerosols as the metastable β-phase (monoclinic) ice, however, a specific crystalline phase for CH3CH2CN could not be verified. Mie theory and the literature complex refractive indices enabled of the experimental spectra to be modelled. The procedure yielded size distributions for CH3CN (55-140 nm) and CH3CH2CN (140-160 nm) particles. Effective kinetic profiles, tracing the evolution of aerosol band intensities, showed that condensation of CH3CH2CN proceeded at twice the rate of CH3CN aerosols. In addition, the rate of CH3CH2CN aerosol depletion via lateral diffusion of the particles from the interrogation volume was approximately 50% faster than that of CH3CN. The far-IR spectra recorded for both nitrile aerosols did not display absorption profiles that could be attributed to the unassigned 220 cm(-1) feature, which has been observed to fluctuate seasonally in the spectra obtained from Titan's atmosphere.

  19. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N2, O2, H2O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O2 and H2O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O2 and H2O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitisation of these agents in chemoradiation cancer therapy.

  20. On the analytic and numeric optimisation of airplane trajectories under real atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo, J.; Domínguez, D.; López, D.

    2014-12-01

    From the beginning of aviation era, economic constraints have forced operators to continuously improve the planning of the flights. The revenue is proportional to the cost per flight and the airspace occupancy. Many methods, the first started in the middle of last century, have explore analytical, numerical and artificial intelligence resources to reach the optimal flight planning. In parallel, advances in meteorology and communications allow an almost real-time knowledge of the atmospheric conditions and a reliable, error-bounded forecast for the near future. Thus, apart from weather risks to be avoided, airplanes can dynamically adapt their trajectories to minimise their costs. International regulators are aware about these capabilities, so it is reasonable to envisage some changes to allow this dynamic planning negotiation to soon become operational. Moreover, current unmanned airplanes, very popular and often small, suffer the impact of winds and other weather conditions in form of dramatic changes in their performance. The present paper reviews analytic and numeric solutions for typical trajectory planning problems. Analytic methods are those trying to solve the problem using the Pontryagin principle, where influence parameters are added to state variables to form a split condition differential equation problem. The system can be solved numerically -indirect optimisation- or using parameterised functions -direct optimisation-. On the other hand, numerical methods are based on Bellman's dynamic programming (or Dijkstra algorithms), where the fact that two optimal trajectories can be concatenated to form a new optimal one if the joint point is demonstrated to belong to the final optimal solution. There is no a-priori conditions for the best method. Traditionally, analytic has been more employed for continuous problems whereas numeric for discrete ones. In the current problem, airplane behaviour is defined by continuous equations, while wind fields are given in a

  1. Mass wasting triggered by seasonal CO2 sublimation under Martian atmospheric conditions: Laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew E.; Conway, Susan J.; Patel, Manish R.; Dixon, John C.; Barnes, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Sublimation is a recognized process by which planetary landscapes can be modified. However, interpretation of whether sublimation is involved in downslope movements on Mars and other bodies is restricted by a lack of empirical data to constrain this mechanism of sediment transport and its influence on landform morphology. Here we present the first set of laboratory experiments under Martian atmospheric conditions which demonstrate that the sublimation of CO2 ice from within the sediment body can trigger failure of unconsolidated, regolith slopes and can measurably alter the landscape. Previous theoretical studies required CO2 slab ice for movements, but we find that only frost is required. Hence, sediment transport by CO2 sublimation could be more widely applicable (in space and time) on Mars than previously thought. This supports recent work suggesting CO2 sublimation could be responsible for recent modification in Martian gullies.

  2. Nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer in conditions of superorbital entry in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, V. A.; Kireev, A. Yu.; Shilenkov, S. V.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    2003-12-01

    This paper considers the peculiarities of thermophysical processes at superorbital space vehicles entry into the Earth's atmosphere. The summary of the simplified CFD-model, taking into account the effect of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) disturbance owing to depopulation of several excited atomic N and O states in emission processes in a shock layer is presented. Some experimental results obtained in the Arc-Driven Shock Tube (ADST) and argumentative the LTE disturbance effect impact are shown. These results are used for verification of the created CFD-model. Additionally, this model is verified by comparison of computations with flight measured data obtained in FIRE II Project. The carried out verification of the model shows a possibility of the presented CFD-model using for calculations of radiative and total heat fluxes at superorbital entry conditions.

  3. A numerical study of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shengbai

    The goal of this research is to investigate the properties of wind turbine wakes and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) via large-eddy simulations (LES) with special emphasis on the effects of atmospheric stability. The ABL is considered stable when the ground surface is cooler than the air, unstable when the opposite happens, and neutral when the temperature effect is negligible. In the literature, neutral conditions have been studied extensively, whereas the effects of stability have not. A new LES code, named Wind Turbine and Turbulence Simulator (WiTTS), was developed based on finite-difference (FD) schemes. First, the code's sensitivity to numerous aspects of the FD LES, such as the subgrid-scale (SGS) model, resolution, numerical treatment of the convective term, and filter types, was analyzed by simulating a neutral ABL. It was found that the Lagrangian-averaged scale-dependent (LASD) SGS model performs better than other scale-invariant Smagorinsky-type models. Second, the WiTTS was used to study the wakes from a miniature wind turbine inside a wind tunnel, following the setup of past experimental and numerical studies. It was found that those wakes are spatially anisotropic, with lateral growth faster than the vertical. Based on this, a new wake model is proposed and the Gaussian-type self-similarity is obtained for this simplified scenario. Third, to study a more realistic ABL, the stability conditions have been considered by the Boussinesq approximation and by varying thermal conditions on the ground surface, together with a constant Coriolis force. The LES results indicate that the properties of utility-scale wind turbine wakes are strongly correlated to the stability conditions. The wake recovery is enhanced by the increased turbulence due to buoyant convection in the unstable ABL, while in the stable ABL the spreading of the wake is significantly larger in the lateral direction than in the vertical direction. The stability

  4. Pressure and Humidity Measurements at the MSL Landing Site Supported by Modeling of the Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harri, A.; Savijarvi, H. I.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Paton, M.; Kauhanen, J.; Atlaskin, E.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpaa, H.; Kemppinen, O.; Haukka, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) called Curiosity Rover landed safely on the Martian surface at the Gale crater on 6th August 2012. Among the MSL scientific objectives are investigations of the Martian environment that will be addressed by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) instrument. It will investigate habitability conditions at the Martian surface by performing a versatile set of environmental measurements including accurate observations of pressure and humidity of the Martian atmosphere. This paper describes the instrumental implementation of the MSL pressure and humidity measurement devices and briefly analyzes the atmospheric conditions at the Gale crater by modeling efforts using an atmospheric modeling tools. MSL humidity and pressure devices are based on proprietary technology of Vaisala, Inc. Humidity observations make use of Vaisala Humicap® relative humidity sensor heads and Vaisala Barocap® sensor heads are used for pressure observations. Vaisala Thermocap® temperature sensors heads are mounted in a close proximity of Humicap® and Barocap® sensor heads to enable accurate temperature measurements needed for interpretation of Humicap® and Barocap® readings. The sensor heads are capacitive. The pressure and humidity devices are lightweight and are based on a low-power transducer controlled by a dedicated ASIC. The transducer is designed to measure small capacitances in order of a few pF with resolution in order of 0.1fF (femtoFarad). The transducer design has a good spaceflight heritage, as it has been used in several previous missions, for example Mars mission Phoenix as well as the Cassini Huygens mission. The humidity device has overall dimensions of 40 x 25 x 55 mm. It weighs18 g, and consumes 15 mW of power. It includes 3 Humicap® sensor heads and 1 Thermocap®. The transducer electronics and the sensor heads are placed on a single multi-layer PCB protected by a metallic Faraday cage. The Humidity device has measurement range

  5. Water ice nucleation characteristics of JSC Mars-1 regolith simulant under simulated Martian atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phebus, Bruce D.; Johnson, Alexandria V.; Mar, Brendan; Stone, Bradley M.; Colaprete, Anthony; Iraci, Laura T.

    2011-04-01

    Water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere are governed by parameters such as number density and particle size distribution that in turn affect how they influence the climate. With some of the underlying properties of cloud formation well known only for Earth, extrapolations to Mars are potentially misleading. We report here continued laboratory experiments to identify critical onset conditions for water ice formation under Martian cloud forming temperatures and water partial pressures (155-182 K, 7.6 × 10-5 to 7.7 × 10-3 Pa H2O). By observing the 3 μm infrared band to monitor nucleation and growth, we observe significant temperature dependence in the nucleation of ice on JSC Mars-1 regolith simulant, with critical saturation ratios, Scrit, as high as 3.8 at 155 K. At temperatures below ˜180 K, ice nucleation on JSC Mars-1 requires significant supersaturation, potentially impacting the Martian hydrological cycle.

  6. Influence of preonset land atmospheric conditions on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Archana; Saha, Subodh K.; Pokhrel, Samir; Sujith, K.; Halder, Subhadeep

    2015-05-01

    A possible link between preonset land atmospheric conditions and the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is explored. It is shown that, the preonset positive (negative) rainfall anomaly over northwest India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Iran is associated with decrease (increase) in ISMR, primarily in the months of June and July, which in turn affects the seasonal mean. ISMR in the months of June and July is also strongly linked with the preonset 2 m air temperature over the same regions. The preonset rainfall/2 m air temperature variability is linked with stationary Rossby wave response, which is clearly evident in the wave activity flux diagnostics. As the predictability of Indian summer monsoon relies mainly on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the found link may further enhance our ability to predict the monsoon, particularly during a non-ENSO year.

  7. Acoustic properties and durability of liner materials at non-standard atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Hsu, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on how acoustic properties of certain absorbing liner materials are affected by nonstandard atmospheric conditions. This study was motivated by the need to assess risks associated with incorporating acoustic testing capability in wind tunnels with semicryogenic high Reynolds number aerodynamic and/or low pressure capabilities. The study consisted of three phases: 1) measurement of acoustic properties of selected liner materials at subatmospheric pressure conditions, 2) periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure of liner materials for 250 cycles, and 3) determination of the effect of periodic cold soak on the acoustic properties of the liner materials at subatmospheric conditions and the effect on mechanical resiliency. The selected liner materials were Pyrell foam, Fiberglass, and Kevlar. A vacuum facility was used to create the subatmospheric environment in which an impedance tube was placed to measure acoustic properties of the test materials. An automated cryogenic cooling system was used to simulate periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure. It was found that lower ambient pressure reduced the absorption effectiveness of the liner materials to varying degrees. Also no significant change in the acoustic properties occurred after the periodic cold soak. Furthermore, mechanical resiliency tests indicated no noticeable change.

  8. Atmospheric conditions associated to an extreme rainfall event on Madeira Island (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Flavio; Salgado, Rui; João Costa, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Located in the Noth Atlantic Ocean (32°75'N and 17°00'W), the Madeira Island presents favourable conditions for orographic precipitation development, sometimes responsible for high records and floods, such as on 20 February 2010, when the island was affected by the worst flash floods in its recent history, causing more than 40 deaths and huge economic losses. After this disaster, there is a growing interest in understanding the main mechanisms and atmospheric conditions that are relevant to the establishment of extreme rainfall and consequently flash flood occurrences in the island. This study describes the meteorological aspects associated to a case study of high rainfall amounts in Madeira on 25 January 2011. In this case, flash floods and socio-economic damages were not reported, but precipitation above 300 mm in less than 24 hours were observed in Madeira's highlands. The heavy rainfall episode is studied based on rain gauge and satellite observations, as well as numerical simulation with the Mesoscale Non-Hydrostatic Model (MESO-NH). The MESO-NH simulation initialized and forced by ECMWF analysis have been performed with 3 horizontal domains (9, 3 and 1 km resolution), making use of the grid nesting technique. The evolution of the mean sea level pressure field (MSLP) was analyzed from the outer domain outputs, while the other meteorological variables were further explored using the 1 km resolution results. The simulation showed that the orography is crucial in the formation and intensification of the localized heavy rainfall in the island. A remarkable aspect is the fact that this episode occurred in a low-cape environment. Related to the synoptic environment, this event was characterized by a low pressure system centered to the southeastern of the island, in opposition to the results obtained for other extreme events occurred in the past two years, when the high precipitation amounts were due to the effects of the orography on the passage of cold fronts

  9. Laboratory facility to create reference radon + thoron atmosphere under dynamic exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Pressyanov, D; Mitev, K; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Kolev, J

    2017-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) levels in the environment are typically subject to significant random and systematic variations. Creation in the laboratory of reproducible and controlled exposure conditions close to that in the real environment can be useful for testing (222)Rn and (220)Rn detectors and for research. In this report the design and performance of a novel laboratory facility with such functionality is presented. The facility allows the exposure of detectors under controlled dynamic as well as static activity concentrations of (222)Rn and (220)Rn (pure and mixed) and temperature. The temperature is measured and regulated within -15 °C ÷ +60 °C by a dedicated programmable thermostat. Different reference activity concentrations in the exposure vessel are made by regulating the flow-rate of the air that flushes (222)Rn/(220)Rn activity from the sources towards the exposure vessel. Reference atmospheres that contain (222)Rn, (220)Rn or a specified ratio of the two can be created. Pilot experiments that demonstrate the feasibility of the approach are presented. They include follow-up of a pre-defined temperature profile (in the range -5 °C ÷ +35 °C), test of the correspondence between planned and measured (222)Rn and (220)Rn activity concentrations, follow-up of a pre-defined dynamic profile of (220)Rn concentrations and test of the possibility to create mixed (220)Rn/(222)Rn atmospheres (experimentally checked for ratio of the activity concentrations from 0.27 to 4.5). The results from the experimental tests are in agreement with the values obtained by the developed theoretical model. The proposed approach can be used to plan and create stationary and dynamic reference exposure conditions that are close to the real exposure regimes in the environment.

  10. Survival of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 in simulated Mars atmosphere in real space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Fox, George E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2010-09-01

    To prevent forward contamination and maintain the scientific integrity of future life detection missions, it is important to characterize and attempt to eliminate terrestrial microorganisms associated with exploratory spacecraft and landing vehicles. Among the organisms isolated from spacecraft-associated habitats, spores of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 exhibited unusually high resistance to decontamination techniques such as UVradiation and peroxide treatment. Subsequently, Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 was flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and exposed to a variety of space conditions using the European Technology Exposure Platform and Experiment Facility (EuTEF). After 18 months exposure in the EuTEF facility under dark space conditions, SAFR-032 spores showed 10 to 40% survivability, whereas a survival rate of 85 to 100% was observed when these spores were kept aboard the ISS under dark simulated-Mars atmospheric conditions. In contrast, when UV (>110nm) was exerted on SAFR-032 spores for the same time period and conditions using the EuTEF, a ~7-log reduction in viability was noticed. However, the UV exposure still did not inactivate all the spores as 19 CFUs were later isolated via cultivation. A parallel experiment was conducted on Earth with identical samples but under simulated conditions. Spores exposed to ground simulations showed less of a reduction in viability when compared with the "real space" exposed spores (~3-log reduction in viability for Mars UV, and ~4-log reduction in viability for Space UV). The data generated is important to assess the probability and mechanisms of microbial survival, microbial contaminants of risk for forward contamination, in situ life detection, and to safeguard the integrity of sample return missions.

  11. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 cell surface hydrophobicity and survival of the cells under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Shakirova, Laisana; Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Auzina, Lilija; Zikmanis, Peteris

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and the survival of these cells were examined in response to varied cultivation conditions and adverse environmental conditions. An inverse linear relationship (P < 0.01) was detected between the CSH of intact L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 and survival of cells subjected to subsequent freezing/thawing, long-term storage or exposure to mineral and bile acids. The observed relationships were supported by significant correlations between the CSH and changes in composition of the cell envelopes (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) of L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 examined using FT-IR spectroscopy and conventional biochemical analysis methods. The results also suggest that the estimates of hydrophobicity, being a generalized characteristic of cell surfaces, are important parameters to predict the ability of intact probiotic bacteria to endure extreme environments and therefore should be monitored during cultivation. A defined balance of cell components, which can be characterized by the reduced CSH values, apparently helps to ensure the resistance, improved viability and hence the overall probiotic properties of bacteria.

  12. The Influence of Atmospheric Conditions on the Production of Ozone during VOC Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. Reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight produce ozone. Ozone production is a non-linear function of the concentrations of both NOx and VOC, with VOC acting as the "fuel" for ozone production and NOx as the "catalyst". Different VOC, due to their differing structure and carbon content, have different maximum potential to produce ozone. Due to different degrees of reactivity, VOC also differ in the time taken to reach this maximum ozone production potential under ideal conditions. Ozone production is also influenced by meteorological factors such as radiation, temperature, advection and mixing, which may alter the rate of ozone production, and the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential. Identifying the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for controlling the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential could inform decisions on emission control to efficiently tackle high levels of tropospheric ozone. In this study we use a boxmodel to determine the chemical processes affecting ozone production under different meteorological and chemical conditions. The chemistry scheme used by the boxmodel is "tagged" for each initial VOC enabling attribution of ozone production to its VOC source. We systematically vary a number of meteorological parameters along with the source of NOx within the box model to simulate a range of atmospheric conditions. These simulations are compared with a control simulation done under conditions of maximum ozone formation to determine which parameters affect the rate at which VOC produce ozone and the extent to which they reach their maximum potential to produce ozone. We perform multi-day simulations in order to examine whether these processes can influence ozone production over

  13. Molybdenum isotope fractionation in soils: Influence of redox conditions, organic matter, and atmospheric inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Opfergelt, S.; Guicharnaud, R. A.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-08-01

    Molybdenum isotope fractionation accompanying soil development is studied across three pedogenic gradients encompassing a range of controlling factors. These factors include variable redox conditions, organic matter content, Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxide content, mineral composition, degree of weathering, pH, type and amount of atmospheric inputs, age, climate, and underlying rock type. Soil profiles from the island of Maui (Hawaii) along a precipitation gradient ranging from 850 to 5050 mm mean annual precipitation show a decrease in average soil δ98Mo from -0.04 ± 0.11‰ at the driest, most oxic site, which is indistinguishable from the basalt parent material (-0.09 ± 0.08‰), to -0.33 ± 0.10‰ at the wettest, most reducing site. A suite of 6 Icelandic soils display a broad trend with heavier δ98Mo values (up to +1.50 ± 0.09‰) in soil horizons that are more weathered and have higher organic matter content. Selective extractions of Mo from different soil components indicate that the association with organic matter and silicate or Ti-oxide residue dominates retention of Mo in these soils, with adsorption on Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxides playing a lesser role. Across all basaltic soils, δ98Mo values are lighter in soils that exhibit the most net Mo loss relative to the parent material, and δ98Mo values are heavier in soils that exhibit net Mo gains. A well-drained regolith profile in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico developed on quartz diorite shows heavier δ98Mo values than the parent material (up to +0.71 ± 0.10‰ with an integrated profile average of +0.28 ± 0.10‰) in soil and shallower saprolite, despite overall moderate loss of 28% of Mo relative to the bedrock. However, the deeper saprolite is unfractionated from bedrock (-0.01 ± 0.10‰, quartz diorite bedrock) indicating that rock weathering dissolution processes and secondary clay formation do not fractionate Mo isotopes. Our data suggest that the Mo mass balance and isotope composition of

  14. Impact of Martian atmosphere parameter uncertainties on entry vehicles aerodynamic for hypersonic rarefied conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Huang; Xu-hong, Jin; Jun-ming, Lv; Xiao-li, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    An attempt has been made to analyze impact of Martian atmosphere parameter uncertainties on entry vehicle aerodynamics for hypersonic rarefied conditions with a DSMC code. The code has been validated by comparing Viking vehicle flight data with present computational results. Then, by simulating flows around the Mars Science Laboratory, the impact of errors of free stream parameter uncertainties on aerodynamics is investigated. The validation results show that the present numerical approach can show good agreement with the Viking flight data. The physical and chemical properties of CO2 has strong impact on aerodynamics of Mars entry vehicles, so it is necessary to make proper corrections to the data obtained with air model in hypersonic rarefied conditions, which is consistent with the conclusions drawn in continuum regime. Uncertainties of free stream density and velocity weakly influence aerodynamics and pitching moment. However, aerodynamics appears to be little influenced by free stream temperature, the maximum error of what is below 0.5%. Center of pressure position is not sensitive to free stream parameters.

  15. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    In the first half of this grant year, laboratory measurements were conducted on the millimeter-wave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planet. Significant improvements in the current system have made it possible to accurately characterize the opacity from gaseous NH3 at longer millimeter wavelengths (7 to 10 mm) under simulated Jovian conditions. In the second half of the grant year, it is hoped to extend such measurements to even shorter millimeter-wavelengths. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter-wave absorption data for the outer planets, such as results from Voyager Radio Occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations will be continued. The analysis of available multispectral microwave opacity data from Venus, including data from the most recent radio astronomical ovservations in the 1.3 to 3.6 cm wavelength range and newly obtained Pioneer-Venus Radio Occulatation measurements at 13 cm, using the laboratory measurements as an interpretative tool will be pursued.

  16. Microfluidic liquid jet system with compatibility for atmospheric and high-vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Trebbin, Martin; Krüger, Kilian; DePonte, Daniel; Roth, Stephan V; Chapman, Henry N; Förster, Stephan

    2014-05-21

    We present microfluidic chip based devices that produce liquid jets with micrometer diameters while operating at very low flow rates. The chip production is based on established soft-lithographical techniques employing a three-layer design protocol. This allows the exact, controlled and reproducible design of critical parts such as nozzles and the production of nozzle arrays. The microfluidic chips reproducibly generate liquid jets exiting at perfect right angles with diameters between 20 μm and 2 μm, and under special circumstances, even down to 0.9 μm. Jet diameter, jet length, and the domain of the jetting/dripping instability can be predicted and controlled based on the theory for liquid jets in the plate-orifice configuration described by Gañán-Calvo et al. Additionally, conditions under which the device produces highly reproducible monodisperse droplets at exact and predictable rates can be achieved. The devices operate under atmospheric and under vacuum conditions making them highly relevant for a wide range of applications, for example, for free-electron lasers. Further, the straightforward integration of additional features such as a jet-in-jet is demonstrated. This device design has the potential to integrate more features based on established microfluidic components and may become a standard device for small liquid jet production.

  17. Asian dust particles converted into aqueous droplets under remote marine atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Tobo, Yutaka; Zhang, Daizhou; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2010-10-19

    The chemical history of dust particles in the atmosphere is crucial for assessing their impact on both the Earth's climate and ecosystem. So far, a number of studies have shown that, in the vicinity of strong anthropogenic emission sources, Ca-rich dust particles can be converted into aqueous droplets mainly by the reaction with gaseous HNO(3) to form Ca(NO(3))(2). Here we show that other similar processes have the potential to be activated under typical remote marine atmospheric conditions. Based on field measurements at several sites in East Asia and thermodynamic predictions, we examined the possibility for the formation of two highly soluble calcium salts, Ca(NO(3))(2) and CaCl(2), which can deliquesce at low relative humidity. According to the results, the conversion of insoluble CaCO(3) to Ca(NO(3))(2) tends to be dominated over urban and industrialized areas of the Asian continent, where the concentrations of HNO(3) exceed those of HCl ([HNO(3)/HCl] >  ∼ 1). In this regime, CaCl(2) is hardly detected from dust particles. However, the generation of CaCl(2) becomes detectable around the Japan Islands, where the concentrations of HCl are much higher than those of HNO(3) ([HNO(3)/HCl] <  ∼ 0.3). We suggest that elevated concentrations of HCl in the remote marine boundary layer are sufficient to modify Ca-rich particles in dust storms and can play a more important role in forming a deliquescent layer on the particle surfaces as they are transported toward remote ocean regions.

  18. Asian dust particles converted into aqueous droplets under remote marine atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tobo, Yutaka; Zhang, Daizhou; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2010-01-01

    The chemical history of dust particles in the atmosphere is crucial for assessing their impact on both the Earth’s climate and ecosystem. So far, a number of studies have shown that, in the vicinity of strong anthropogenic emission sources, Ca-rich dust particles can be converted into aqueous droplets mainly by the reaction with gaseous HNO3 to form Ca(NO3)2. Here we show that other similar processes have the potential to be activated under typical remote marine atmospheric conditions. Based on field measurements at several sites in East Asia and thermodynamic predictions, we examined the possibility for the formation of two highly soluble calcium salts, Ca(NO3)2 and CaCl2, which can deliquesce at low relative humidity. According to the results, the conversion of insoluble CaCO3 to Ca(NO3)2 tends to be dominated over urban and industrialized areas of the Asian continent, where the concentrations of HNO3 exceed those of HCl ([HNO3/HCl] >  ∼ 1). In this regime, CaCl2 is hardly detected from dust particles. However, the generation of CaCl2 becomes detectable around the Japan Islands, where the concentrations of HCl are much higher than those of HNO3 ([HNO3/HCl] <  ∼ 0.3). We suggest that elevated concentrations of HCl in the remote marine boundary layer are sufficient to modify Ca-rich particles in dust storms and can play a more important role in forming a deliquescent layer on the particle surfaces as they are transported toward remote ocean regions. PMID:20921372

  19. Atmospheric synoptic conditions of snow precipitation in East Antarctica using ice core and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Ciardini, Virginia; Bonazza, Mattia; Frezzotti, Massimo; Stenni, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences (IPCS) initiatives the GV7 site (70°41' S - 158°51' E) in East Antarctica was chosen as the new drilling site for the Italian contribution to the understanding of the climatic variability in the last 2000 years (IPICS 2k Array). Water stable isotopes and snow accumulation (SMB) values from a shallow firn core, obtained at GV7 during the 2001-2002 International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE) traverse, are analyzed and compared with different meteorological model output in order to characterize the atmospheric synoptic conditions driving precipitation events at the site. On annual basis, ECMWF +24h forecasted snowfalls (SF) seem to well reproduce GV7 SMB values trend for the period from 1980 to 2005. Calculated air mass back-trajectories show that Eastern Indian - Western Pacific oceans represent the main moisture path toward the site during autumn - winter season. Analysis of the ECMWF 500 hPa Geopotential height field (GP500) anomalies shows that atmospheric blocking events developing between 130° E and 150° W at high latitudes drive the GV7 SMB by blocking zonal flow and conveying warm and moist deep air masses from ocean into the continental interior. On inter-annual basis, The SF variability over GV7 region follows the temporal oscillation of the third CEOF mode (CEOF3 10% of the total explained variance) of a combined complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) performed over GP500 and SF field. The CEOF3 highlights an oscillating feature, with wavenumber 2, in GP500 field over the Western Pacific-Eastern Indian Oceans and propagating westward. The pattern is deeply correlated with the Indian Dipole Oscillation and ENSO and their associated quasi-stationary Rossby waves propagating from the lower toward the higher latitudes.

  20. Future changes in atmospheric condition for the baiu under RCP scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Y.; Takemi, T.; Ishikawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on atmospheric circulation fields during the baiu in Japan with global warming projection experimental data conducted using a 20-km mesh global atmospheric model (MRI-AGCM3.2) under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) scenarios. This model also used 4 different sea surface temperature (SST) initial conditions. Support of this dataset is provided by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI). The baiu front indicated by the north-south gradient of moist static energy moves northward in present-day climate, whereas this northward shift in future climate simulations is very slow during May and June. In future late baiu season, the baiu front stays in the northern part of Japan even in August. As a result, the rich water vapor is transported around western Japan and the daily precipitation amount will increase in August. This northward shift of baiu front is associated with the westward expansion of the enhanced the North Pacific subtropical high (NPSH) into Japan region. However, the convective activity around northwest Pacific Ocean is inactive and is unlikely to occur convective jump (CJ). These models show that the weak trough exists in upper troposphere around Japan. Therefore, the cold advection stays in the northern part of Japan during June. In July, the front due to the strengthening of the NPSH moves northward, and then it stays until August. This feature is often found between the clustered SSTs, Cluster 2 and 3. The mean field of future August also show the inflow of rich water vapor content to Japan islands. In this model, the extreme rainfall suggested tends to almost increase over the Japan islands during future summer. This work was conducted under the Program for Risk Information on Climate Change supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology-Japan (MEXT).

  1. Investigation of aromatic compound degradation under atmospheric conditions in the outdoor simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehr, Sascha; Bohn, Birger; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Häseler, Rolf; Brauers, Theo; Wahner, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Ozone is produced in the lower troposphere by the OH-initiated photooxidation of volatile organic compounds in the presence of NOx. Aromatic hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources are a major contributor to the OH-reactivity and thus to ozone formation in urban areas [1]. Moreover, their degradation leads to formation of secondary organic aerosol. Aromatic compounds are therefore important trace constituents with regard to air quality. We will present the results of photooxidation experiments which were conducted in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The experiments were designed to investigate the degradation mechanisms of benzene and p-xylene, which are among the most abundant aromatics in urban air samples. Benzene and p-xylene were selected because they have high structural symmetry which limits the number of potential isomers of secondary products. The experiments were performed under low-NOx-conditions (≤ 2 ppb). SAPHIR was equipped with instruments for the measurement of the parent aromatics and their major oxidation products, OH radicals, important radical precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), photolysis frequencies and particulate matter. As shown in previous studies, simulation chamber data from the photooxidation of aromatics cannot be explained satisfactorily with current photochemistry mechanisms. For example the MCMv3.1 tends to overestimate the ozone-concentration and to underestimate the OH-concentration [2]. In this study, we will contrast model calculations with experimental results to check if similar discrepancies can be observed in SAPHIR and how they can be resolved. Based on the results of this preparatory study, further simulation chamber experiments with special emphasis on the radical budget are scheduled in 2010. References: [1] J. G. Calvert, R. Atkinson, K.H. Becker, R.M. Kamens, J.H. Seinfeld, T.J. Wallington, G. Yarwood: The mechanisms of atmospheric oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons, Oxford University

  2. Technical Note: Formation of airborne ice crystals in a wall independent reactor (WIR) under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, E.; Haunold, W.; Starokozhev, E.; Palitzsch, K.; Sitals, R.; Jaeschke, W.; Püttmann, W.

    2008-07-01

    Both, gas and particle scavenging contribute to the transport of organic compounds by ice crystals in the troposphere. To simulate these processes an experimental setup was developed to form airborne ice crystals under atmospheric conditions. Experiments were performed in a wall independent reactor (WIR) installed in a walk-in cold chamber maintained constantly at -20°C. Aerosol particles were added to the carrier gas of ambient air by an aerosol generator to allow heterogeneous ice formation. Temperature variations and hydrodynamic conditions of the WIR were investigated to determine the conditions for ice crystal formation and crystal growth by vapour deposition. In detail, the dependence of temperature variations from flow rate and temperature of the physical wall as well as temperature variations with an increasing reactor depth were studied. The conditions to provide a stable aerosol concentration in the carrier gas flow were also studied. The temperature distribution inside the reactor was strongly dependent on flow rate and physical wall temperature. At an inlet temperature of -20°C, a flow rate of 30 L•min-1 and a physical wall temperature of +5°C turned out to provide ideal conditions for ice formation. At these conditions a sharp and stable laminar down draft "jet stream" of cold air in the centre of the reactor was produced. Temperatures measured at the chamber outlet were kept well below the freezing point in the whole reactor depth of 1.0 m. Thus, melting did not affect ice formation and crystal growth. The maximum residence time for airborne ice crystals was calculated to at 40 s. Ice crystal growth rates increased also with increasing reactor depth. The maximum ice crystal growth rate was calculated at 2.82 mg• s-1. Further, the removal efficiency of the cleaning device for aerosol particles was 99.8% after 10 min. A reliable particle supply was attained after a preliminary lead time of 15 min. Thus, the minimum lead time was determined at 25

  3. Photolysis and OH-Initiated oxidation of glycolaldehyde under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Magneron, I; Mellouki, A; Le Bras, G; Moortgat, G K; Horowitz, A; Wirtz, K

    2005-05-26

    The photolysis and OH-initiated oxidation of glycolaldehyde (HOCH(2)CHO), which are relevant atmospheric processes, have been investigated under different conditions using complementary methods in three different laboratories. The UV absorption cross sections of glycolaldehyde determined in two of the laboratories are in excellent agreement. The photolysis of glycolaldehyde in air has been investigated in a quartz cell with sunlamps and in the EUPHORE chamber irradiated by sunlight. The mean photolysis rate measured under solar radiation was (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(-5) s(-1) corresponding to a mean effective photolysis quantum yield of (1.3 +/- 0.3). The major products detected were HCHO and CO, whereas CH(3)OH was also observed with an initial yield around 10%. Evidence for OH production was found in both experiments using either OH scavenger or OH tracer species. Photolysis of glycolaldehyde was used as the OH source to measure the reaction rate constants of OH with a series of dienes by the relative method and to identify and quantify the oxidation products of the OH-initiated oxidation of 2-propanol. The different experiments suggest that OH is produced by the primary channel: HOCH(2)CHO + hnu --> OH + CH(2)CHO (1). The rate constant of the OH reaction with glycolaldehyde has been measured at 298 K using the relative method: k(glyc) = (1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The product study of the OH-initiated oxidation of glycolaldehyde in air has been performed using both a FEP bag and the EUPHORE chamber. HCHO was observed to be the major product with a primary yield of around 65%. Glyoxal (CHOCHO) was also observed in EUPHORE with a primary yield of (22 +/- 6)%. This yield corresponds to the branching ratio ( approximately 20%) of the H-atom abstraction channel from the CH(2) group in the OH + HOCH(2)CHO reaction, the major channel ( approximately 80%) being the H-atom abstraction from the carbonyl group. The data obtained in this work, especially the

  4. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, Sanuel M; Barefield, James E; Humphries, Seth D; Wiens, Roger C; Vaniman, D. T.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2010-12-13

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to

  5. Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Mitra, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the high-temperature corrosion behavior of microstructurally different regions of the weldment of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel used in thermal power plant boiler in SO2 + O2 environment. The weldment is produced by tungsten inert gas welding method, and the different regions of the weldment (weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal) are exposed in SO2 + O2 (ratio 2:1) environment at 973 K for 120 h. The reaction kinetics and corrosion growth rate of different regions of weldment in isothermal condition are evaluated. The post corroded scales of the different specimens are studied in SEM, EDS, and XRD. The results indicate that the weld metal shows higher corrosion rate followed by HAZ and base metal. The higher rate of corrosion of weldmetal is mainly attributed to the least protective inner scale of Cr2O3 with minimum Cr Content. This is due to the formation of delta ferrite, which leads to the precipitation of the Cr-based secondary phases and depletes the free Cr from the matrix. The thermal cycles during welding at high temperature are favorable for the formation of delta ferrite. On the other hand, in absence of delta ferrite, the base metal and HAZ regions of the weldment show lower corrosion rate than weld metal. The difference in corrosion rate in the three regions of the weldment is supplemented by post-corroded scale characterizations.

  6. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    PubMed

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J

    2014-12-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However, this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant, and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant, and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past-year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed.

  7. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed. PMID:25134042

  8. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius

  9. Neural Partial Differentiation for Aircraft Parameter Estimation Under Turbulent Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttieri, R. A.; Sinha, M.

    2012-07-01

    An approach based on neural partial differentiation is suggested for aircraft parameter estimation using the flight data gathered under turbulent atmospheric conditions. The classical methods such as output error and equation error methods suffer from severe convergence issues; resulting in biased, inaccurate, and inconsistent estimates. Though filter error method yields better estimates while dealing with the flight data having process noise, it has few demerits like computational overheads and it allows estimation of a single set of process noise distribution matrix. The proposed neural method does not face any such problem of the classical methods. Moreover, the neural method does not require parameter initialization and a priori knowledge of the model structure. The neural network maps the aircraft state and control variables into the output variables corresponding to aerodynamic forces and moments. The parameter estimation, pertaining to lateral-directional motion, of the research aircraft de Havilland DHC-2 with simulated process noise, is presented. The results obtained using the neural partial differentiation are compared with the nominal values given in literature and with the classical methods. The neural method yields the aerodynamic derivatives very close to the nominal values and having quite low standard deviation. The neural methodology is also validated by comparing actual output variables with the neural predicted and neural reconstructed variables.

  10. Study of the atmospheric conditions affecting infrared astronomical measurements at White Mountain, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, G. B.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements are described of atmospheric conditions affecting astronomical observations at White Mountain, California. Measurements were made at more than 1400 times spaced over more than 170 days at the Summit Laboratory and a small number of days at the Barcroft Laboratory. The recorded quantities were ten micron sky noise and precipitable water vapor, plus wet and dry bulb temperatures, wind speed and direction, brightness of the sky near the sun, fisheye lens photographs of the sky, description of cloud cover and other observable parameters, color photographs of air pollution astronomical seeing, and occasional determinations of the visible light brightness of the night sky. Measurements of some of these parameters have been made for over twenty years at the Barcroft and Crooked Creek Laboratories, and statistical analyses were made of them. These results and interpretations are given. The bulk of the collected data are statistically analyzed, and disposition of the detailed data is described. Most of the data are available in machine readable form. A detailed discussion of the techniques proposed for operation at White Mountain is given, showing how to cope with the mountain and climatic problems.

  11. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Broad Plasma Conditions and Spectrum Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, N. Brice; Chesny, David L.; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.

    2016-12-01

    Solar variability investigations that include magnetic energy coupling are paramount to solving many key solar/stellar physics problems, particularly for understanding the temporal variability of magnetic energy redistribution and heating processes. Using three years of observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager, we measured radiative and magnetic fluxes from gross features and at full-disk scales, respectively. Magnetic energy coupling analyses support radiative flux descriptions via the plasma heating connectivity of dominant (magnetic) and diffuse components, specifically of the predominantly closed-field corona. Our work shows that this relationship favors an energetic redistribution efficiency across large temperature gradients, and potentially sheds light on the long-standing issue of diffuse unresolved low corona emission. The close connection between magnetic energy redistribution and plasma conditions revealed by this work lends significant insight into the field of stellar physics, as we have provided possible means for probing distant sources in currently limited and/or undetectable radiation distributions.

  12. Understanding strategies for seed dispersal by wind under contrasting atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S. Joseph; Trakhtenbrot, Ana; Bohrer, Gil; Detto, Matteo; Katul, Gabriel G.; Horvitz, Nir; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Jones, Frank A.; Nathan, Ran

    2008-01-01

    Traits associated with seed dispersal vary tremendously among sympatric wind-dispersed plants. We used two contrasting tropical tree species, seed traps, micrometeorology, and a mechanistic model to evaluate how variation in four key traits affects seed dispersal by wind. The conceptual framework of movement ecology, wherein external factors (wind) interact with internal factors (plant traits) that enable movement and determine when and where movement occurs, fully captures the variable inputs and outputs of wind dispersal models and informs their interpretation. We used model calculations to evaluate the spatial pattern of dispersed seeds for the 16 factorial combinations of four traits. The study species differed dramatically in traits related to the timing of seed release, and a strong species by season interaction affected most aspects of the spatial pattern of dispersed seeds. A rich interplay among plant traits and seasonal differences in atmospheric conditions caused this interaction. Several of the same plant traits are crucial for both seed dispersal and other aspects of life history variation. Observed traits that limit dispersal are likely to be constrained by their life history consequences. PMID:19060189

  13. Airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain: Identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential source areas.

    PubMed

    Maya-Manzano, José María; Fernández-Rodríguez, Santiago; Smith, Matt; Tormo-Molina, Rafael; Reynolds, Andrew M; Silva-Palacios, Inmaculada; Gonzalo-Garijo, Ángela; Sadyś, Magdalena

    2016-11-15

    The pollen grains of Quercus spp. (oak trees) are allergenic. This study investigates airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain with the aim identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential sources areas. Two types of Quercus distribution maps were produced. Airborne Quercus pollen concentrations were measured at three sites located in the Extremadura region (SW Spain) for 3 consecutive years. The seasonal occurrence of Quercus pollen in the air was investigated, as well as days with pollen concentrations ≥80Pm(-3). The distance that Quercus pollen can be transported in appreciable numbers was calculated using clusters of back trajectories representing the air mass movement above the source areas (oak woodlands), and by using a state-of-the-art dispersion model. The two main potential sources of Quercus airborne pollen captured in SW Spain are Q. ilex subsp. ballota and Q. suber. The minimum distances between aerobiological stations and Quercus woodlands have been estimated as: 40km (Plasencia), 66km (Don Benito), 62km (Zafra) from the context of this study. Daily mean Quercus pollen concentration can exceed 1,700Pm(-3), levels reached not less than 24 days in a single year. High Quercus pollen concentration were mostly associated with moderate wind speed events (6-10ms(-1)), whereas that a high wind speed (16-20ms(-1)) seems to be associated with low concentrations.

  14. Computational investigations of streamers in a single bubble suspended in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-09-01

    We present a computational model of nanosecond streamers generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water at the atmospheric pressure conditions. The model is based on the self-consistent, multispecies and the continuum description of plasma and takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for a more accurate description of the kinetics of the discharge. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are completely different at low and high over voltages. We observe that the polarity of the trigger voltage has a substantial effect on initiation, transition and evolution stages of streamers with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages due to the presence of multiple streamers. We also find that the presence of water vapor significantly influences the distribution of the dominant species in the streamer trail and has a profound effect on the flux of the dominant species to the bubble wall. The research reported in this publication was supported by Competitive Research Funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  15. Changes in atmospheric circulation between solar maximum and minimum conditions in winter and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Nyung

    2008-10-01

    Statistically significant climate responses to the solar variability are found in Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and in the tropical circulation. This study is based on the statistical analysis of numerical simulations with ModelE version of the chemistry coupled Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. The low frequency large scale variability of the winter and summer circulation is described by the NAM, the leading Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) of geopotential heights. The newly defined seasonal annular modes and its dynamical significance in the stratosphere and troposphere in the GISS ModelE is shown and compared with those in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In the stratosphere, the summer NAM obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis as well as from the ModelE simulations has the same sign throughout the northern hemisphere, but shows greater variability at low latitudes. The patterns in both analyses are consistent with the interpretation that low NAM conditions represent an enhancement of the seasonal difference between the summer and the annual averages of geopotential height, temperature and velocity distributions, while the reverse holds for high NAM conditions. Composite analysis of high and low NAM cases in both the model and observation suggests that the summer stratosphere is more "summer-like" when the solar activity is near a maximum. This means that the zonal easterly wind flow is stronger and the temperature is higher than normal. Thus increased irradiance favors a low summer NAM. A quantitative comparison of the anti-correlation between the NAM and the solar forcing is presented in the model and in the observation, both of which show lower/higher NAM index in solar maximum/minimum conditions. The summer NAM in the troposphere obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis has a dipolar zonal structure with maximum

  16. Conditional vulnerability of plant diversity to atmospheric nitrogen deposition across the United States

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Samuel M.; Allen, Edith B.; Bowman, William D.; Clark, Christopher M.; Belnap, Jayne; Brooks, Matthew L.; Cade, Brian S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Gilliam, Frank S.; Jovan, Sarah E.; Pardo, Linda H.; Schulz, Bethany K.; Stevens, Carly J.; Suding, Katharine N.; Throop, Heather L.; Waller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has been shown to decrease plant species richness along regional deposition gradients in Europe and in experimental manipulations. However, the general response of species richness to N deposition across different vegetation types, soil conditions, and climates remains largely unknown even though responses may be contingent on these environmental factors. We assessed the effect of N deposition on herbaceous richness for 15,136 forest, woodland, shrubland, and grassland sites across the continental United States, to address how edaphic and climatic conditions altered vulnerability to this stressor. In our dataset, with N deposition ranging from 1 to 19 kg N⋅ha−1⋅y−1, we found a unimodal relationship; richness increased at low deposition levels and decreased above 8.7 and 13.4 kg N⋅ha−1⋅y−1 in open and closed-canopy vegetation, respectively. N deposition exceeded critical loads for loss of plant species richness in 24% of 15,136 sites examined nationwide. There were negative relationships between species richness and N deposition in 36% of 44 community gradients. Vulnerability to N deposition was consistently higher in more acidic soils whereas the moderating roles of temperature and precipitation varied across scales. We demonstrate here that negative relationships between N deposition and species richness are common, albeit not universal, and that fine-scale processes can moderate vegetation responses to N deposition. Our results highlight the importance of contingent factors when estimating ecosystem vulnerability to N deposition and suggest that N deposition is affecting species richness in forested and nonforested systems across much of the continental United States. PMID:27035943

  17. Conditional vulnerability of plant diversity to atmospheric nitrogen deposition across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simkin, Samuel M.; Allen, Edith B.; Bowman, William D.; Clark, Christopher M.; Belnap, Jayne; Brooks, Matthew L.; Cade, Brian S.; Collins, Scott L.; Geiser, Linda H.; Gilliam, Frank S.; Jovan, Sarah E.; Pardo, Linda H.; Schulz, Bethany K.; Stevens, Carly J.; Suding, Katharine N.; Throop, Heather L.; Waller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has been shown to decrease plant species richness along regional deposition gradients in Europe and in experimental manipulations. However, the general response of species richness to N deposition across different vegetation types, soil conditions, and climates remains largely unknown even though responses may be contingent on these environmental factors. We assessed the effect of N deposition on herbaceous richness for 15,136 forest, woodland, shrubland, and grassland sites across the continental United States, to address how edaphic and climatic conditions altered vulnerability to this stressor. In our dataset, with N deposition ranging from 1 to 19 kg N⋅ha−1⋅y−1, we found a unimodal relationship; richness increased at low deposition levels and decreased above 8.7 and 13.4 kg N⋅ha−1⋅y−1 in open and closed-canopy vegetation, respectively. N deposition exceeded critical loads for loss of plant species richness in 24% of 15,136 sites examined nationwide. There were negative relationships between species richness and N deposition in 36% of 44 community gradients. Vulnerability to N deposition was consistently higher in more acidic soils whereas the moderating roles of temperature and precipitation varied across scales. We demonstrate here that negative relationships between N deposition and species richness are common, albeit not universal, and that fine-scale processes can moderate vegetation responses to N deposition. Our results highlight the importance of contingent factors when estimating ecosystem vulnerability to N deposition and suggest that N deposition is affecting species richness in forested and nonforested systems across much of the continental United States.

  18. Cloud conditions for low atmospheric electricity during disturbed period after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, Akiyo; Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Masahito; Watanabe, Akira; Murata, Ken T.

    2016-04-01

    The vertical (downward) component of the atmospheric electric field, or potential gradient (PG) under cloud generally reflects the electric charge distribution in the cloud. The PG data at Kakioka, 150 km southwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) suggested that this relation can be modified when the radioactive dust was floating in the air, and the exact relation between the weather and this modification could lead to new insight in plasma physics in the wet atmosphere. Unfortunately the detailed weather data was not available above Kakioka (only the precipitation data was available). Therefore, estimation of the cloud condition during March 2011 was strongly needed. We have developed various meteorological information links (http://www.chikyu.ac.jp/akiyo/firis/) and original radar and precipitation data will be released from the page. Here we present various radar images that we have prepared for March 2011. We prepared three-dimensional radar reflectivity of the C-band radar of JMA in every 10 minutes over all Kanto Plain centered at Tokyo and Fukushima prefecture centered at Sendai. We have released images of each altitude (1km interval) for 15th - 16thand 21th March (http://sc-web.nict.go.jp/fukushima/). The vertical structure of the rainfall is almost the same at 4km with the surface and sporadic high precipitation is observed at 6 km height for 15-16th. While, generally precipitation pattern that is similar to the surface is observed at 5km height on 21th. On the other hand, an X-band radar centered at Fukushima university is also used to know more localized raindrop patterns at zenith angle of 4 degree. We prepared 10-minutes/120m mesh precipitation patterns for March 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 20th, 21th, 22th and 23th. Quantitative estimate is difficult from this X-band radar, but localized structure, especially for the rain-band along Nakadori (middle valley in Fukushima prefecture), that is considered to determine the highly

  19. An ENSO prediction approach based on ocean conditions and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Ding, Ruiqiang; Chen, Han-ching

    2017-03-01

    A simple statistical model for the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) prediction is derived based on the evolution of the ocean heat condition and the oceanic Kelvin wave propagation associated with westerly wind events (WWEs) and easterly wind surges (EWSs) in the tropical Pacific. The multivariate linear regression model solely relies on the pentad thermocline depth anomaly evolution in 25 days along with the zonal surface wind modulation. It successfully hindcasts all ENSOs except for the 2000/01 La Niña, using the pentad (or monthly) mean tropical atmosphere ocean array data since 1994 with an averaged skill (measured by anomaly correlation) of 0.62 (or 0.67) with a 6-month lead. The exception is mainly due to the long-lasting cold sea surface temperature anomalies in the subtropics resulting from the strong 1998/99 La Niña, even though the tropical warm water volume (WWV) had rebounded and turned phases after 2000. We also note that the hindcast skill is comparable using pentad or monthly mean NCEP global ocean data assimilation system data for the same time period. The hindcast skill of the proposed statistical model is better than that based on the WWV index in terms of the monthly correlation, normalized RMSEs and ENSO occurrences, which suggest that including the evolution of the subsurface ocean temperature anomaly and the WWEs/EWSs in the central tropical Pacific can enhance the ability to predict ENSO. The hindcast skill is also comparable to the predictions using other dynamical and statistical models, indicating that these processes are the keys to ENSO development. The dynamics behind the statistical model are consistent with the physical processes of ENSO development as follows: the tropical WWV resulting from the interannually-varying meridional subtropical cell transport provides a sufficient heat source. When the seasonal phase lock of ocean-atmosphere coupling triggers the positive (negative) zonal wind anomaly in boreal summer and fall, an

  20. Undergraduate Research at a Minority University: Studying the Atmospheric Conditions in Urban vs. Rural Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Green Garcia, A.; Hromis, A.; Vaquiz, E.; Wright, J. M.; Austin, S. A.; Johnson, L. P.; Musselwhite, D.; Walter, D.

    2009-12-01

    A grant from the National Science Foundation (NFS) funded a three year atmospheric science program known as the Minority University Consortium for Earth and Space Science (MUCESS) that supports undergraduate research programs devoted to studying ozone (O3) profiles. MUCESS institutions are represented by the University of Houston-Downtown (UHD), Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York (MEC), and South Carolina State University (SCSU). The primary strength of the program lies in the fact that it provides a venue for students from the participating minority institutions to build bridges of dialogue and strengthen research capabilities. A secondary strength of MUCESS is that the collaborative institutions are widely separated geographically but they have excellent communications and the ability to coordinate launches and support annual workshops. MUCESS supported a series of ozonesonde launches from multiple sites between April and July 2009. Both urban and rural sites were chosen based on their proximity to the three participating minority universities. Balloon and ozone monitoring technology facilitated data acquisition from cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and reproducible experiments. Payloads consisting of an ozonesonde, Vaisala® radiosonde, and GPS receiver provided information on dynamic atmospheric conditions that exist from ground level through altitudes up to one hundred thousand feet. Preparations for the collaborative launch included an initial calibration phase where identical calibration procedures prepared all three payloads. This calibration phase was performed five to seven days in advance of the launch. An additional calibration was performed the day of launch to verify communications between in-flight and ground radio transmitter and receiver, as well as to validate partial pressure and O3 concentration output from the ozonesonde. Each payload was tethered to a 600 gram weather balloon which was then carried up to the

  1. Atmospheric conditions analysis of the heavy rain phenomenon in Biak (case study 4-5 December 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Prayoga; Larasati Siadari, Ejha

    2017-01-01

    Heavy rain in Biak on 4–5 December 2014 caused a flood. The accumulation of rainfall until 5 December was 102 mm, it exceeded BMKG's threshold about the intensity of extreme condition. This research aimed to find out the atmospheric conditions related to super heavy rain phenomenon. The atmospheric dynamical analysis used ERA-Interim Reanalysis data 0.125x0.125 degrees resolution. Divergence, relative vorticity, and streamline are the parameters investigated. Their dynamic fluctuations in significant pressure levels proved there were strong convergence and negative vorticity. Streamline analysis showed that there was a convergence wind pattern. While, the physical analysis used NOAA/NESDIS SST data to find sea surface temperature anomaly, RMM index data to find MJO phase and ONI index data to find ENSO phase. At the time, SST around Biak was in warmer condition, and there was a weak El Nino influenced by moderate MJO phase 5. Upper air sounding analysis is used to study the predictability of extreme weather. The indices indicated moderately convective activity and very unstable atmospheric layer before the event, while marginally convective activity and unstable boundary layer with possible inversion aloft during the event. All the conditions supported to produce convective cloud (Cumulonimbus) so that cloud had a long lifetime and produced thunderstorm and heavy rainfall. Biak meteorological station observation and MTSAT imagery used to verify the atmospheric conditions.

  2. Estimating spatial veriability in atmospheric properties over remotely sensed land-surface conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates the spatial relationships between land-surface fluxes and near-surface atmospheric properties (AP), and the potential errors in flux estimation due to homogeneous atmospheric inputs over heterogeneous landscapes. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model is coupled to a surface ene...

  3. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - Biological standard particles and the influence of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Huffman, J. Alex; Förster, Jan-David; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    standard bioparticles (pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria) as well as atmospherically relevant chemical substances. We addressed the sensitivity and selectivity of autofluorescence based online techniques. Moreover, we investigated the influence of environmental conditions, such as relative humidity and oxidizing agents in the atmosphere, on the autofluorescence signature of standard bioparticles. Our results will support the molecular understanding and quantitative interpretation of data obtained by real-time FBAP instrumentation [5,6]. [1] Elbert, W., Taylor, P. E., Andreae, M. O., & Pöschl, U. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569-4588. [2] Huffman, J. A., Treutlein, B., & Pöschl, U. (2010). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3215-3233. [3] Pöschl, U., et al. (2010). Science, 329, 1513-1516. [4] Lakowicz, J., Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, Plenum publishers, New York, 1999. [5] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., & Pöschl, U., (2012). Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 37-71. [6] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., Förster J.-D., & Pöschl, U., (2012) in preparation.

  4. Characterization of Multi-Scale Atmospheric Conditions Associated with Extreme Precipitation in the Transverse Ranges of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, N.; Kaplan, M.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The east-west oriented Transverse Ranges of Southern California have historically experienced shallow landslides and debris flows that threaten life and property. Steep topography, soil composition, and frequent wildfires make this area susceptible to mass wasting. Extreme rainfall often acts as a trigger for these events. This work characterizes atmospheric conditions at multiple scales during extreme (>99th percentile) 1-day precipitation events in the major sub-ranges of the Transverse Ranges. Totals from these 1-day events generally exceed the established sub-daily intensity-duration thresholds for shallow landslides and debris flows in this region. Daily extreme precipitation values are derived from both gridded and station-based datasets over the period 1958-2014. For each major sub-range, extreme events are clustered by atmospheric feature and direction of moisture transport. A composite analysis of synoptic conditions is produced for each cluster to create a conceptual model of atmospheric conditions favoring extreme precipitation. The vertical structure of the atmosphere during these extreme events is also examined using observed and modeled soundings. Preliminary results show two atmospheric features to be of importance: 1) closed and cutoff low-pressure systems, areas of counter-clockwise circulation that can produce southerly flow orthogonal to the Transverse Range ridge axes; and 2) atmospheric rivers that transport large quantities of water vapor into the region. In some cases, the closed lows and atmospheric rivers work in concert with each other to produce extreme precipitation. Additionally, there is a notable east-west dipole of precipitation totals during some extreme events between the San Gabriel and Santa Ynez Mountains where extreme values are observed in one range and not the other. The cause of this relationship is explored. The results of this work can help forecasters and emergency responders determine the likelihood that an event will

  5. Instrument intercomparison of glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and NO2 under simulated atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Ball, S. M.; Borrás, E.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Henry, S. B.; Karl, T.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S.; Mak, J.; Monks, P. S.; Muñoz, A.; Orlando, J.; Peppe, S.; Rickard, A. R.; Ródenas, M.; Sánchez, P.; Seco, R.; Su, L.; Tyndall, G.; Vázquez, M.; Vera, T.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-04-01

    The α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methyl glyoxal (CH3C(O)CHO) are produced in the atmosphere by the oxidation of hydrocarbons and emitted directly from pyrogenic sources. Measurements of ambient concentrations inform about the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation, oxidative capacity, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We present results from a comprehensive instrument comparison effort at two simulation chamber facilities in the US and Europe that included nine instruments, and seven different measurement techniques: broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CE-DOAS), white-cell DOAS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, two separate instruments), laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP), solid-phase micro extraction (SPME), and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS, two separate instruments; for methyl glyoxal only because no significant response was observed for glyoxal). Experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) compare three independent sources of calibration as a function of temperature (293-330 K). Calibrations from absorption cross-section spectra at UV-visible and IR wavelengths are found to agree within 2% for glyoxal, and 4% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures; further calibrations based on ion-molecule rate constant calculations agreed within 5% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures. At the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) all measurements are calibrated from the same UV-visible spectra (either directly or indirectly), thus minimizing potential systematic bias. We find excellent linearity under idealized conditions (pure glyoxal or methyl glyoxal, R2 > 0.96), and in complex gas mixtures characteristic of dry photochemical smog systems (o-xylene/NOx and isoprene/NOx, R2 > 0.95; R2 ∼ 0.65 for offline SPME measurements of methyl glyoxal). The correlations are more variable in humid ambient air mixtures (RH

  6. Instrument inter-comparison of glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and NO2 under simulated atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Ball, S. M.; Borrás, E.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Henry, S. B.; Karl, T.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S.; Mak, J.; Monks, P. S.; Muñoz, A.; Orlando, J.; Peppe, S.; Rickard, A. R.; Ródenas, M.; Sánchez, P.; Seco, R.; Su, L.; Tyndall, G.; Vázquez, M.; Vera, T.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.

    2014-08-01

    The α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methyl glyoxal (CH3C(O)CHO) are produced in the atmosphere by the oxidation of hydrocarbons, and emitted directly from pyrogenic sources. Measurements of ambient concentrations inform about the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation, oxidative capacity, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We present results from a comprehensive instrument comparison effort at 2 simulation chamber facilities in the US and Europe that included 9 instruments, and 7 different measurement techniques: Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS), Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS), White-cell DOAS, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR, two separate instruments), Laser Induced Phosphoresence (LIP), Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME), and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS, two separate instruments; only methyl glyoxal as no significant response was observed for glyoxal). Experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) compare 3 independent sources of calibration as a function of temperature (293 K to 330 K). Calibrations from absorption cross-section spectra at UV-visible and IR wavelengths are found to agree within 2% for glyoxal, and 4% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures; further calibrations based on ion-molecule rate constant calculations agreed within 5% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures. At the EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE) all measurements are calibrated from the same UV-visible spectra (either directly or indirectly), thus minimizing potential systematic bias. We find excellent linearity under idealized conditions (pure glyoxal or methyl glyoxal, R2 > 0.96), and in complex gas mixtures characteristic of dry photochemical smog systems (o-xylene/NOx and isoprene/NOx, R2 > 0.95; R2 ~ 0.65 for offline SPME measurements of methyl glyoxal). The correlations are more variable in humid ambient air mixtures (RH > 45%) for methyl

  7. Remote Raman - Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Geochemical Investigation under Venus Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, S. M.; Barefield, J. E.; Humphries, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures (~740 K) and atmospheric pressures (~93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. [1] and Sharma et al. [2] demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic [3] with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachy-andesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to

  8. Reliability of Undergraduate Student in a Research on the Relations between Behavior and Days of the Week or Atmospheric Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, Jean

    The influence of atmospheric conditions and the day of the week on school children's behavior was investigated by undergraduates. The college students were told either that their participation in the research was compulsory and would be graded, or that their participation was voluntary and ungraded. Fifty teachers observed their pupils' behavior…

  9. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  10. Forest biomass estimation with hemispherical photography for multiple forest types and various atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Joshua Andrew

    The importance of accurately identifying inventories of domestic energy, including forest biomass, has increasingly become a priority of the US government and its citizens as the cost of fossil fuels has risen. It is useful to identify which of these resources can be processed and transported at the lowest cost for both private and public landowners. Accurate spatial inventories of forest biomass can help landowners allocate resources to maximize forest biomass utilization and provide information regarding current forest health (e.g., forest fire potential, insect susceptibility, wildlife habitat range). This research has indicated that hemispherical photography (HP) may be an accurate and low cost sensing technique for forest biomass measurements. In this dissertation: (1) It is shown that HP gap fraction measurements and both above ground biomass and crown biomass have a linear relationship. (2) It is demonstrated that careful manipulation of images improves gap fraction estimates, even under unfavorable atmospheric conditions. (3) It is shown that estimates of Leaf Area Index (LAI), based on transformations of gap fraction measurements, are the best estimator for both above ground forest biomass and crown biomass. (4) It is shown that many factors negatively influence the utility of HP for biomass estimation. (5) It is shown that biomass of forests stands with regular spacing is not modeled well using HP. As researchers continue to explore different methods for forest biomass estimation, HP is likely to remain as a viable technique, especially if LAI can be accurately estimated. However, other methods should be compared with HP, particularly for stands where LAI is poorly estimated by HP.

  11. February 2003 marine atmospheric conditions and the bora over the northern Adriatic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorman, C.E.; Carniel, S.; Cavaleri, L.; Sclavo, M.; Chiggiato, J.; Doyle, J.; Haack, T.; Pullen, J.; Grbec, B.; Vilibic, I.; Janekovic, I.; Lee, C.; Malacic, V.; Orlic, M.; Paschini, E.; Russo, A.; Signell, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    A winter oceanographic field experiment provided an opportunity to examine the atmospheric marine conditions over the northern Adriatic. Mean February winds are from a northeasterly direction over most of the Adriatic and a more northerly direction along the western coast. Wind speeds are fastest in jets over the NE coast during bora events and weakest in the mid-northwestern Adriatic. Diurnal air temperature cycles are smallest on the NE coast and largest in the midwestern Adriatic. The maximum sea-air difference is +10??C on the eastern coast and near zero on the midwestern Adriatic. Boras are northeasterly (from) wind events that sweep off Croatia and Slovenia, bringing slightly colder and drier air over the northern Adriatic. The main bora season is December to March. Winter 2002-2003 was normal for bora events. Synoptic-scale temporal variations are correlated over the northern Adriatic. Fastest Bora winds and highest wind stress over the northern Adriatic is concentrated in four topographically controlled jets. The strongest is the Senj Jet, while the Trieste Jet extends across the entire northern Adriatic. Between each two jets is a weak wind zone. The greatest mean net heat loss is in bora jets in the NE Adriatic, where it was -438 W m-2 and is weakest in the midwestern northern Adriatic, where it was near zero. Wind stress is concentrated over the NE half of Adriatic in four bora jets, while wind stress is weak in the NW Adriatic. There is significant variation in wind stress mean and standard deviation structure over the northern Adriatic with each bora event. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. [Concentration distribution of metal elements in atmospheric aerosol under different weather conditions in Qingdao Coastal Region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jian-Hua; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Shen, Heng-Qing; Liu, Ming-Xu

    2014-10-01

    To know the influence of different weather conditions on the concentration of metal elements in aerosols in the coastal region, total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected from April to May 2012, and August 2012 to March 2013 in the Qingdao coastal region, and common trace metals were analyzed by using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results showed that Al, Ca, Fe, Na, K and Mg were the dominant metal elements in TSP, and the sum of the six elements accounted for 94.2% of the sum of all metals. TSP and metal elements had significant monthly variations, Fe, Al, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ba, Mn, Ti, Sr and Li had the highest concentration in November and January, while Be, Sc, Co, Ni and Cr showed the highest value in January. Na had the highest concentration in August, November and February, and the lowest in December. Pb had the highest concentration in January and February, and the lowest in August and December. Enrichment factors indicated that Be, Co, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Sr and Ti were mainly affected by natural sources; Li, Cr, Ni, Zn, Ba and Na were affected by natural sources and part of anthropogenic sources; Pb was mainly from anthropogenic sources. Different weather conditions had great impact on TSP and metal elements concentrations, all the measured metals had the highest concentrations in smog except Ti. Compared with the sunny day, the concentration of atmospheric particulate Ti decreased, while the other elements increased by 1 to 4 times in smog. Li, Be, Cr, Ni, Al, Fe, Mg and Mn had little variation in concentration in foggy day, and the concentration of Pb and Na increased considerably. The concentration of Co, Ca and Ti reduced obviously in fog. Except for Cr, Co and Ti, the other elements increased by 1 to 3 times in haze. Most of the elements had the minimal enrichment factors in sunny day, while the other had the maximal enrichment factor in

  13. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO(2) ON WATER CHEMISTRY AND MOSQUITO (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) GROWTH UNDER COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS IN CONTAINER HABITATS.

    PubMed

    Alto, Barry W; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Lounibos, L Philip; Drake, Bert G

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the direct and indirect effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on freshwater container habitats and their larval mosquito occupants. We predicted that a doubling of atmospheric CO(2) would (1) alter the chemical properties of water in this system, (2) slow degradation of leaf litter, and (3) decrease larval growth of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) mosquitoes raised on that litter under competitive conditions. Effects of elevated CO(2) on water quality parameters were not detected, but the presence of leaf litter significantly reduced pH and dissolved oxygen relative to water-filled containers without litter. Degradation rates of oak leaf litter from plants grown under elevated CO(2) atmospheres did not differ from breakdown rates of litter from ambient CO(2) conditions. Litter from plants grown in an elevated CO(2) atmospheres did not influence mosquito population growth, but mosquito production decreased significantly with increasing larval density. Differences among mosquito density treatments influenced survivorship most strongly among male Ae. albopictus and time to emergence most strongly among females, suggesting fundamental sex-determined differences in response to competition. Results of this and other studies indicate that direct and indirect effects of doubled atmospheric CO(2) are minimal in artificial containers with freshwater.

  14. Atmospheric aerosols in Amazonia and land use change: from natural biogenic to biomass burning conditions.

    PubMed

    Artaxo, Paulo; Rizzo, Luciana V; Brito, Joel F; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Arana, Andrea; Sena, Elisa T; Cirino, Glauber G; Bastos, Wanderlei; Martin, Scot T; Andreae, Meinrat O

    2013-01-01

    fine mode aerosol during the dry season in this region. Aerosol light scattering and absorption coefficients at the TT34 site were low during the wet season, increasing by a factor of 5, approximately, in the dry season due to long range transport of biomass burning aerosols reaching the forest site in the dry season. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) ranged from 0.84 in the wet season up to 0.91 in the dry. At the PVH site, aerosol scattering coefficients were 3-5 times higher in comparison to the TT34 site, an indication of strong regional background pollution, even in the wet season. Aerosol absorption coefficients at PVH were about 1.4 times higher than at the forest site. Ground-based SSA at PVH was around 0.92 year round, showing the dominance of scattering aerosol particles over absorption, even for biomass burning aerosols. Remote sensing observations from six AERONET sites and from MODIS since 1999, provide a regional and temporal overview. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 550 nm of less than 0.1 is characteristic of natural conditions over Amazonia. At the perturbed PVH site, AOD550 values greater than 4 were frequently observed in the dry season. Combined analysis of MODIS and CERES showed that the mean direct radiative forcing of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) during the biomass burning season was -5.6 +/- 1.7 W m(-2), averaged over whole Amazon Basin. For high AOD (larger than 1) the maximum daily direct aerosol radiative forcing at the TOA was as high as -20 W m(-2) locally. This change in the radiation balance caused increases in the diffuse radiation flux, with an increase of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of 18-29% for high AOD. From this analysis, it is clear that land use change in Amazonia shows alterations of many atmospheric properties, and these changes are affecting the functioning of the Amazonian ecosystem in significant ways.

  15. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  16. Remote Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Geochemical Investigation under Venus Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, S. M.; Barefield, J. E.; Humphries, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Vaniman, D.; Dyar, M. D.; Tucker, J. M.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    The extreme Venus surface temperature (740 K) and atmospheric pressure (93 atm) creates a challenging environment for future lander missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within several hours of landing before the lander is overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. [1] and Sharma et al. [2] have demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with LIBS and demonstrate the quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. The LIBS experiment involves focusing a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm onto the surface of the sample. The laser ablates material from the surface, generating a plasma containing electronically excited atoms, ions and small molecules. Some of this emission is collected with an 89 mm diameter telescope. The light is directed into a Princeton Instruments f/4 0.25 m dispersive spectrometer and recorded with an ICCD detector. The powdered and pelletized samples are placed in a pressure vessel containing supercritical CO2 at 93 atm and at least 423 K and the vessel is placed at least 1.6 m from the telescope and laser. A range of Venus-analog basaltic rock types [3] was chosen for this study to reproduce compositions identified by Soviet Venera and VEGA landers, including several standards: four basalts (BCR-2, BIR-1, GUWBM, JB-2), granite (GBW 07015), andesite (JA-1), carbonate (SARM-40), and Kauai volcanic (KV04-17, KV04-25). We also added a good Venus analog, TAP 04, which is an alkali-rich rock from an olivine minette in the Ayutla volcanic field (Righter and Rosas-Elguera [4]). Our goal was to study samples with a

  17. Development of a differential pumping system for soft X-ray beamlines for windowless experiments under normal atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Tamenori, Y

    2010-03-01

    A novel design for a differential pumping system has been investigated. This system allows windowless experiments in a soft X-ray beamline under normal atmospheric conditions. The new design consists of an aperture-based four-stage differential pumping system, based on a simple model calculation. A prototype system with a total length of 600 mm was constructed to confirm the validity of the design concept. Relatively short conductance-limiting components allow easy installation and alignment of the system on a synchrotron beamline. The fabricated system was installed on a beamline to test the transmission of soft X-rays through atmospheric helium.

  18. Study and Optimization on graft polymerization under normal pressure and air atmospheric conditions, and its application to metal adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Yuji; Chandra Dafader, Nirmal; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto non-woven polyethylene (NWPE) fabric was achieved under normal pressure and air atmospheric conditions, without using unique apparatus such as glass ampoules or vacuum lines. To attain graft polymerization under normal pressure and air atmospheric conditions, the effects of the pre-irradiation dose, pre-irradiation atmosphere, pre-irradiation temperature, de-aeration of GMA-emulsion, grafting atmosphere in a reactor, and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in GMA-emulsion on the degree of grafting (Dg) were investigated in detail. It was found that the DO concentration had the strongest influence, the pre-irradiation dose, de-aeration of emulsion and grafting atmosphere had a relatively strong impact, and the pre-irradiation atmosphere and pre-irradiation temperature had the least effect on Dg. The optimum DO concentration before grafting was 2.0 mg/L or less. When a polyethylene bottle was used as a reactor instead of a glass ampoule, graft polymerization under normal pressure and air atmospheric conditions could be achieved under the following conditions; the pre-irradiation dose was more than 50 kGy, the volume ratio of GMA-emulsion to air was 50:1 or less, and the DO concentration in GMA-emulsion during grafting was below 2.0 mg/L. Under these grafting conditions, Dg was controlled within a range of up to 362%. The prepared GMA-grafted NWPE (GMA-g-NWPE) fabric was modified with a phosphoric acid to obtain an adsorbent for heavy metal ions. In the column-mode adsorption tests of Pb(II), the adsorption performance of the produced phosphorylated GMA-g-NWPE fabric (fibrous metal adsorbent) was not essentially dependent on the flow rate of the feed. The breakthrough points of 200, 500, and 1000 h-1 in space velocity were 483, 477 and 462 bed volumes, and the breakthrough capacities of the three flow rates were 1.16, 1.15 and 1.16 mmol-Pb(II)/g-adsorbent.

  19. Attribution of soil moisture dynamics - Initial conditions vs. atmospheric forcing and the role of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Rene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2014-05-01

    conditions versus the atmospheric forcing for monthly soil moisture variations. We find that initial soil moisture anomalies are overall more important than the forcing, even if less pronounced in summer. Especially in southern Europe we show high drought forecasting potential, whereas the forcing is more important in Central and North-eastern Europe.

  20. Experimental and computational investigation of supersonic counterflow jet interaction in atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, Oleksandr

    The flow field generated by the interaction of a converging-diverging nozzle (exit diameter, D=26 mm M=1.5) flow and a choked flow from a minor jet (exit diameter, d=2.6 mm) in a counterflow configuration was investigated. During the tests both the main C-D nozzle and the minor jet stagnation pressures were varied as well as the region of interaction. Investigations were made in the near field, at most about 2D distance, and in the far field, where the repeated patterns of shock waves were eliminated by turbulence. Both nozzles exhausted to the atmospheric pressure conditions. The flow physics was studied using Schlieren imaging techniques, Pitot-tube, conical Mach number probe, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) and acoustic measurement methods. During the experiments in the far field the jets interaction was observed as the minor jet flow penetrates into the main jet flow. The resulting shock structure caused by the minor jet's presence was dependent on the stagnation pressure ratio between the two jets. The penetration length of the minor jet into the main jet was also dependent on the stagnation pressure ratio. In the far field, increasing the minor jet stagnation pressure moved the bow shock forward, towards the main jet exit. In the near field, the minor jet flow penetrates into the main jet flow, and in some cases modified the flow pattern generated by the main jet, revealing a new effect of jet flow interaction that was previously unknown. A correlation function between the flow modes and the jet stagnation pressure ratios was experimentally determined. Additionally the flow interaction between the main and minor jets was simulated numerically using FLUENT. The optimal mesh geometry was found and the k-epsilon turbulence model was defined as the best fit. The results of the experimental and computational studies were used to describe the shock attenuation effect as self-sustain oscillations in supersonic flow. The effects described here can be used

  1. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. Work performed has shown that laboratory measurements of the millimeter-wave opacity of ammonia between 7.5 mm and 9.3 mm and also at the 3.2 mm wavelength require a different lineshape to be used in the theoretical prediction for millimeter-wave ammonia opacity than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  2. Mantle dynamics and the atmospheres of Mars and Venus: implications for surface conditions and interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, C.; Tackley, P.

    2012-04-01

    We propose to investigate the interaction between the mantle and the atmosphere of terrestrial planets, in order to study whereas such coupling could be the cause of the divergent evolution of planets in our solar system. Therefore, we build a coupled model taking into account mantle dynamics, volatile exchanges and atmospheric processes. We focus on Mars and Venus and consider the evolution of CO2 and H2O in the atmosphere. The first main mechanism we consider is the volcanic source of volatiles. Therefore we need to model the mantle dynamics by adapting the highly advanced StagYY code (developed by P. Tackley, 2008) for Mars and Venus. When possible, we compare those results to published modeling (Breuer and Spohn, 2006; Grott et al., 2011) and observation. Atmospheric escape is considered as the main volatile loss flux. Early loss is thermal, caused by hydrodynamic escape. After the first few hundred million years, the main atmospheric escape flux is caused by non-thermal mechanisms. We model their evolution by comparing recent numerical study and ASPERA (Analyzer of Space Plasma and EneRgetic Atoms) measurements. We combine these models to calculate the state of the atmosphere of Venus and Mars. This lets us estimate the surface temperature of those planets either from a Mars Global Circulation Model (e.g. Forget at al., 1999), or with a gray radiative-convective atmosphere model, for Venus. In the case of Mars, we show that the present-day atmosphere of Mars is likely to be constituted by a large part (more than 50%) of volcanic gases emitted since 4 billion years ago, which corresponds to a mean age of 1.9 to 2.3 Gyr. The variations of CO2 pressure over this period seem relatively low (50 mbar at most). This seems in line with the assumption that the heavy loss of volatiles occurred before 500 Myr. Surface temperature variations are likely to be small (several Kelvin) and would not be responsible for periods of flowing liquid surface water by themselves

  3. 'Scarlett Spur Red Delicious' apple volatile production accompanying physiological disorder development during low pO2 controlled atmosphere storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) fruit volatile production is regulated by a variety of factors including storage conditions. Although controlled atmosphere (CA) technology extends apple fruit storage life, improper storage conditions can adversely affect volatile production and increase the risk of ...

  4. Genotype and neuropsychological response inhibition as resilience promoters for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder under conditions of psychosocial adversity.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), or conduct disorder (CD) in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha-2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity.

  5. Response of the water level in a well to Earth tides and atmospheric loading under unconfined conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.; Riley, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    The response to Earth tides is strongly governed by a dimensionless aquifer frequency Q???u. The response to atmospheric loading is strongly governed by two dimensionless vertical fluid flow parameters: a dimensionless unsaturated zone frequency, R, and a dimensionless aquifer frequency Qu. The differences between Q???u and Qu are generally small for aquifers which are highly sensitive to Earth tides. When Q???u and Qu are large, the response of the well to Earth tides and atmospheric loading approaches the static response of the aquifer under confined conditions. At small values of Q???u and Qu, well response to Earth tides and atmospheric loading is strongly influenced by water table drainage. When R is large relative to Qu, the response to atmospheric loading is strongly influenced by attenuation and phase shift of the pneumatic pressure signal in the unsaturated zone. The presence of partial penetration retards phase advance in well response to Earth tides and atmospheric loading. -from Authors

  6. Turbulence in wind turbine wakes under different atmospheric conditions from static and scanning Doppler LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, Valerie; Reuder, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Wake characteristics are of great importance for wind park performances and turbine loads. Wind tunnel experiments helped to validate wake model simulations under neutral atmospheric conditions. However, recent studies show strongest wake characteristics and power losses in stable atmospheric conditions. Considering all three occurring atmospheric conditions this study presents a turbulence analysis of wind turbine wake flows measured by static and scanning Doppler LiDARs at the coast of the Netherlands. We use data collected by three Windcubes v1, a scanning Windcube 100S and sonic anemometers during the Wind Turbine Wake Experiment - Wieringermeer (WINTWEX-W). Turbulence parameters such as Turbulence Intensity (TI) and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) are retrieved from the collected raw data. Results show highest turbulence on the flanks of the wake where strong wind shear dominates. On average the spatial turbulence distribution becomes more homogeneous with conical areas of enhanced TI. Highest turbulence and strongest wind deficits occur during stable weather conditions. Despite the ongoing research on the reliability of turbulence retrievals of Doppler LiDAR data, the results are consistent with sonic anemometer measurements and show promising opportunities for a qualitative study of wake characteristics such as wake strength and wake peak frequencies.

  7. Oceanographic and Atmospheric Conditions on the Continental Shelf North of the Monterey Bay During August 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-17

    the Alan Robinson Special Issue Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans September 17, 2010 ____________________________ 1Monterey Bay...JPL/ROMS) [Schepetkin and McWilliams , 2004], and the Navy Coastal Ocean Model / Innovative Coastal-Ocean Observing Network (NCOM/ICON) model [Shulman

  8. Approximate analytical solution to diurnal atmospheric boundary-layer growth under well-watered conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The system of governing equations of a simplified slab model of the uniformly-mixed, purely convective, diurnal atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is shown to allow immediate solutions for the potential temperature and specific humidity as functions of the ABL height and net radiation when expressed i...

  9. High Vertically Resolved Atmospheric State Revealed with IASI Single FOV Retrievals under All-weather Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, L. Peter; Strow, Larrybee; Mango, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite was launched on October 19, 2006. The Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx) was conducted during April 2007 mainly for validation of the IASI on the MetOp satellite. IASI possesses an ultra-spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(exp -1) and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm(exp -1). Ultra-spectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. An advanced retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. Preliminary retrievals of atmospheric soundings, surface properties, and cloud optical/microphysical properties with the IASI observations are obtained and presented. These retrievals are further inter-compared with those obtained from airborne FTS system, such as the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I), dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. The capabilities of satellite ultra-spectral sounder such as the IASI are investigated to benefit future NPOESS operation.

  10. The New Pelagic Operational Observatory of the Catalan Sea (OOCS) for the Multisensor Coordinated Measurement of Atmospheric and Oceanographic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bahamon, Nixon; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Bernardello, Raffaele; Ahumada-Sempoal, Miguel-Angel; Puigdefabregas, Joan; Cateura, Jordi; Muñoz, Eduardo; Velásquez, Zoila; Cruzado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The new pelagic Operational Observatory of the Catalan Sea (OOCS) for the coordinated multisensor measurement of atmospheric and oceanographic conditions has been recently installed (2009) in the Catalan Sea (41°39′N, 2°54′E; Western Mediterranean) and continuously operated (with minor maintenance gaps) until today. This multiparametric platform is moored at 192 m depth, 9.3 km off Blanes harbour (Girona, Spain). It is composed of a buoy holding atmospheric sensors and a set of oceanographic sensors measuring the water conditions over the upper 100 m depth. The station is located close to the head of the Blanes submarine canyon where an important multispecies pelagic and demersal fishery gives the station ecological and economic relevance. The OOCS provides important records on atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, the latter through the measurement of hydrological and biogeochemical parameters, at depths with a time resolution never attained before for this area of the Mediterranean. Twenty four moored sensors and probes operating in a coordinated fashion provide important data on Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs; UNESCO) such as temperature, salinity, pressure, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, and turbidity. In comparison with other pelagic observatories presently operating in other world areas, OOCS also measures photosynthetic available radiation (PAR) from above the sea surface and at different depths in the upper 50 m. Data are recorded each 30 min and transmitted in real-time to a ground station via GPRS. This time series is published and automatically updated at the frequency of data collection on the official OOCS website (http://www.ceab.csic.es/~oceans). Under development are embedded automated routines for the in situ data treatment and assimilation into numerical models, in order to provide a reliable local marine processing forecast. In this work, our goal is to detail the OOCS multisensor architecture in relation to the

  11. The new pelagic Operational Observatory of the Catalan Sea (OOCS) for the multisensor coordinated measurement of atmospheric and oceanographic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bahamon, Nixon; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Bernardello, Raffaele; Ahumada-Sempoal, Miguel-Angel; Puigdefabregas, Joan; Cateura, Jordi; Muñoz, Eduardo; Velásquez, Zoila; Cruzado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The new pelagic Operational Observatory of the Catalan Sea (OOCS) for the coordinated multisensor measurement of atmospheric and oceanographic conditions has been recently installed (2009) in the Catalan Sea (41°39'N, 2°54'E; Western Mediterranean) and continuously operated (with minor maintenance gaps) until today. This multiparametric platform is moored at 192 m depth, 9.3 km off Blanes harbour (Girona, Spain). It is composed of a buoy holding atmospheric sensors and a set of oceanographic sensors measuring the water conditions over the upper 100 m depth. The station is located close to the head of the Blanes submarine canyon where an important multispecies pelagic and demersal fishery gives the station ecological and economic relevance. The OOCS provides important records on atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, the latter through the measurement of hydrological and biogeochemical parameters, at depths with a time resolution never attained before for this area of the Mediterranean. Twenty four moored sensors and probes operating in a coordinated fashion provide important data on Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs; UNESCO) such as temperature, salinity, pressure, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, and turbidity. In comparison with other pelagic observatories presently operating in other world areas, OOCS also measures photosynthetic available radiation (PAR) from above the sea surface and at different depths in the upper 50 m. Data are recorded each 30 min and transmitted in real-time to a ground station via GPRS. This time series is published and automatically updated at the frequency of data collection on the official OOCS website (http://www.ceab.csic.es/~oceans). Under development are embedded automated routines for the in situ data treatment and assimilation into numerical models, in order to provide a reliable local marine processing forecast. In this work, our goal is to detail the OOCS multisensor architecture in relation to the coordinated

  12. Behavior of the Brightness Temperature of the Ocean-Atmosphere System Under Conditions of Midlatitude and Tropical Cyclone Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankov, A. G.; Milshin, A. A.; Novichikhin, E. P.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the behavior of the ocean-atmosphere system characteristics based on direct (contact) and satellite microwave radiometric measurements. Some common and distinctive features of their dynamics in the mid-latitudes of the North Atlantic (in its Norwegian, Newfoundland, and Gulf Stream energy-active zones), which significanty affect the weather conditions in Europe, and in the tropical latitudes of the Atlantic (the Gulf of Mexico and the Bahamas area), which are the sources of tropical cyclogenesis, are considered.

  13. Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

    2009-01-01

    The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first < or =150 million years, which is about 10(4) times greater than today and corresponds to a water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS.

  14. Visible spectroscopy as a tool for the assessment of storage conditions of fresh pork packaged in modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Christensen, Mette; Tørngren, Mari Ann; Baron, Caroline P

    2016-03-01

    The storage conditions of fresh meat are known to impact its colour and microbial shelf life. In the present study, visible spectroscopy was evaluated as a method to assess meat storage conditions and its optimisation. Fresh pork steaks (longissimus thoracis et lumborum and semimembranosus) were placed in modified atmosphere packaging using gas mixtures containing 0, 40, 50, and 80% oxygen, and stored with or without light for up to 9days. Principal component analysis of visible reflectance spectra (400-700nm) showed that the colour of the different meat cuts was affected by presence of oxygen, illumination, and storage time. Differences in the oxygen levels did not contribute to the observed variance. Predictive models based on partial least squares regression-discriminant analysis exhibited high potency in the classification of the storage parameters of meat cuts packaged in modified atmosphere. The study demonstrates the applicability of visible spectroscopy as a tool to assess the storage conditions of meat cuts packaged in modified atmosphere.

  15. Parameterization of gaseous dry deposition in atmospheric chemistry models: Sensitivity to aerodynamic resistance formulations under statically stable conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Kenjiro; Dastoor, Ashu P.; Ryzhkov, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    Turbulence controls the vertical transfer of momentum, heat and trace constituents in the atmospheric boundary layer. In the lowest 10% of this layer lies the surface boundary layer (SBL) where the vertical fluxes of transferred quantities have been successfully parameterized using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in weather forecast, climate and atmospheric chemistry models. However, there is a large degree of empiricism in the stability-correction parameterizations used to formulate eddy diffusivity and aerodynamic resistance particularly under strongly stable ambient conditions. Although the influence of uncertainties in stability-correction parameterizations on eddy diffusivity is actively studied in boundary-layer meteorological modeling, its impact on dry deposition in atmospheric chemistry modeling is not well characterized. In this study, we address this gap by providing the mathematical basis for the relationship between the formulations of vertical surface flux used in meteorological and atmospheric chemistry modeling communities, and by examining the sensitivity of the modeled dry deposition velocities in statically stable SBL to the choice of stability-correction parameterizations used in three operational and/or research environmental models (GEM/GEM-MACH, ECMWF IFS and CMAQ-MM5). Aerodynamic resistances (ra) calculated by the three sets of parameterizations are notably different from each other and are also different from those calculated by a "z-less" scaling formulation under strongly stable conditions (the bulk Richardson number > 0.2). Furthermore, we show that many atmospheric chemistry models calculate ra using formulations which are inconsistent with the derivation of micro-meteorological parameters. Finally, practical implications of the differences in stability-correction algorithms are discussed for the computations of dry deposition velocities of SO2, O3 and reactive bromine compounds for specific cases of stable SBL.

  16. Atmospheric conditions during the spring and fall transitions in the coastal ocean off western United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, P. Ted; James, Corinne

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric events which force the spring and fall oceanic transitions in the coastal ocean off the west coast of North America were examined by analyzing the records of adjusted sea level (ASL), coastal wind stress, sea level atmospheric pressure (SLP), and 500-mbar heights for the years 1971-1975 and 1980-1983. The records cover periods of 91 days, centered on the dates of the spring and fall transitions as determined from coastal ASL data. It was found that the dominant mode of the ASL and coastal wind stress are similar around the times of both the spring and fall transitions, and that the time series for these modes are highly correlated with one another. Principal estimator patterns show the spatial patterns of SLP which force the ASL and coastal wind stress during the transitions.

  17. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere. Absorbing boundary conditions for exterior problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Elliptic and hyperbolic problems in unbounded regions are considered. These problems, when one wants to solve them numerically, have the difficulty of prescribing boundary conditions at infinity. Computationally, one needs a finite region in which to solve these problems. The corresponding conditions at infinity imposed on the finite distance boundaries should dictate the boundary conditions at infinity and be accurate with respect to the interior numerical scheme. The treatment of these boundary conditions for wave-like equations is discussed.

  18. Replication of Atmospheric Conditions for the Purpose of Testing MAVs. MAV Flight Environment Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-23

    atmospheric measurements Wind data are traditionally obtained utilizing propeller, cup , dynes or ultrasonic anemometers that are placed either in...Information was obtained by wind engineers from relatively large anemometers on fixed masts at heights well removed from the ground (in order to...isolation or located on vertical masts with inter- anemometer spacing of several metres. This reflects the interest of the building or road vehicle

  19. Parameterization and scaling of Arctic ice conditions in the context of ice-atmosphere processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Heinrichs, J.; Steffen, K.; Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.; Serreze, M. C.; Weaver, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes achievements during year three of our project to investigate the use of ERS-1 SAR data to study Arctic ice and ice/atmosphere processes. The project was granted a one year extension, and goals for the final year are outlined. The specific objects of the project are to determine how the development and evolution of open water/thin ice areas within the interior ice pack vary under different atmospheric synoptic regimes; compare how open water/thin ice fractions estimated from large-area divergence measurements differ from fractions determined by summing localized openings in the pack; relate these questions of scale and process to methods of observation, modeling, and averaging over time and space; determine whether SAR data might be used to calibrate ice concentration estimates from medium and low-rate bit sensors (AVHRR and DMSP-OLS) and the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I); and investigate methods to integrate SAR data for turbulent heat flux parametrization at the atmosphere interface with other satellite data.

  20. Parameterization and scaling of arctic ice conditions in the context of ice-atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Steffen, K.; Heinrichs, J. F.; Key, J. R.; Maslanik, J. A.; Serreze, M. C.; Weaver, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this project are to observe how the open water/thin ice fraction in a high-concentration ice pack responds to different short-period atmospheric forcings, and how this response is represented in different scales of observation. The objectives can be summarized as follows: determine the feasibility and accuracy of ice concentration and ice typing by ERS-1 SAR backscatter data, and whether SAR data might be used to calibrate concentration estimates from optical and massive-microwave sensors; investigate methods to integrate SAR data with other satellite data for turbulent heat flux parameterization at the ocean/atmosphere interface; determine how the development and evolution of open water/thin ice areas within the interior ice pack vary under different atmospheric synoptic regimes; compare how open-water/thin ice fractions estimated from large-area divergence measurements differ from fractions determined by summing localized openings in the pack; relate these questions of scale and process to methods of observation, modeling, and averaging over time and space.

  1. Optimizing Leaf Stomatal Conductance for Maximum Carbon Gain Under Salt Stressed and Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how plants adapt to different stresses such as droughts, hypoxic or hyper-saline conditions is necessary to progress on the broader problem of how carbon and water exchange rates between the biosphere and atmosphere react to a changing climate. In this work, the effects of increased salinity on photosynthesis, stomatal and mesophyll conductances under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions are explored. A model based on stomatal optimization principles, according to which plants maximize carbon gain at a given water loss at the leaf scale, is generalized to include mesophyll conductance and its dependence on water salinity. The optimization problem is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function and both approaches are consistent with reported gas-exchange measurements in fresh water and in salt stressed conditions. It is shown here that an increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water (and reduced stomatal conductance) for the plant as it does under water stress conditions. However, these reductions in photosynthetic rates observed under increased salt stress conditions cannot be attributed to limitation of CO2 diffusion alone since salt stress did reduce the photosynthetic capacity of plants by 30-40%.

  2. Atmospheric conditions associated with heavy precipitation events in comparison to seasonal means in the western mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, Samiro; Kalthoff, Norbert; Kottmeier, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    The autumn atmospheric conditions associated with Heavy Precipitation Events (HPEs) in the western mediterranean region and differences with respect to the seasonal-mean conditions are investigated. Seasonal high-resolution simulations from the regional climate model COSMO-CLM covering the autumn periods of 2011 and 2012 are used. Atmospheric conditions at five different subdomains surrounding the western Mediterranean are considered, namely France, Italy (North and South), Spain, and North Africa. During HPEs, moisture and instability sources are located generally upstream of the target area over the sea, being transported by fast low-level winds towards the HPE areas. Concentration of high humidity over land and initiation of convection are highly related to the orography in the area. Stronger convective precipitation events occur at mid-level elevations rather than at higher altitudes. The significant increase in atmospheric moisture and instability, identified prior to HPEs, builds up in two different time lengths: atmospheric moisture increase could be traced back to at least 6-24 h before the initiation stage of the event, whereas an increase of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) is detected in the hours prior to the event during the mature stage. The most intense HPEs are in general associated with higher values of integrated water vapour, CAPE, and low-level and mid-tropospheric wind speed. During HPEs in all subdomains, the dominant precipitation peak occurs between 1200 and 1800 UTC suggesting that convective precipitation prevails in most HPEs. The diurnal cycle of integrated water vapour during the mature stage of HPEs shows that the atmosphere remains wetter than average for most of the period and that only a decrease is seen after the afternoon precipitation peak. Negligible CAPE characterizes mean-seasonal conditions while the classical diurnal cycle with the peak in the early afternoon and much higher mean values occur during HPE events

  3. Improvement in Simulation of Eurasian Winter Climate Variability with a Realistic Arctic Sea Ice Condition in an Atmospheric GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Ham, Yoo-Geun; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how much a realistic Arctic sea ice condition can contribute to improve simulation of the winter climate variation over the Eurasia region. Model experiments are set up using different sea ice boundary conditions over the past 24 years (i.e., 1988-2011). One is an atmospheric model inter-comparison (AMIP) type of run forced with observed sea-surface temperature (SST), sea ice, and greenhouse gases (referred to as Exp RSI), and the other is the same as Exp RSI except for the sea ice forcing, which is a repeating climatological annual cycle (referred to as Exp CSI). Results show that Exp RSI produces the observed dominant pattern of Eurasian winter temperatures and their interannual variation better than Exp CSI (correlation difference up to approx. 0.3). Exp RSI captures the observed strong relationship between the sea ice concentration near the Barents and Kara seas and the temperature anomaly across Eurasia, including northeastern Asia, which is not well captured in Exp CSI. Lagged atmospheric responses to sea ice retreat are examined using observations to understand atmospheric processes for the Eurasian cooling response including the Arctic temperature increase, sea-level pressure increase, upper-level jet weakening and cold air outbreak toward the mid-latitude. The reproducibility of these lagged responses by Exp RSI is also evaluated.

  4. Beam wandering statistics of twin thin laser beam propagation under generalized atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Darío G; Funes, Gustavo

    2012-12-03

    Under the Geometrics Optics approximation is possible to estimate the covariance between the displacements of two thin beams after they have propagated through a turbulent medium. Previous works have concentrated in long propagation distances to provide models for the wandering statistics. These models are useful when the separation between beams is smaller than the propagation path-regardless of the characteristics scales of the turbulence. In this work we give a complete model for these covariances, behavior introducing absolute limits to the validity of former approximations. Moreover, these generalizations are established for non-Kolmogorov atmospheric models.

  5. Effect of atmospheric pollution on Vitis vinifera L. pollen ultrastructure under natural conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stirban, M.; Craciun, C.; Bathory, D.; Cipleu, D.

    1984-06-01

    The ultrastructural modification of pollen grains in Vitis vinifera L. variety and hybrids in areas of SO atmospheric pollution (the main polluting SO2 usually reaches 2.72 mg/m3), nitrogen oxide, and other gases derived from noniron metal processing factories have been studied. Strains 1001 and 1002, resistant varieties, do not undergo ultrastructural modifications. Neuburger and Issabelle, medium resistant ones, have a heterogeneity in ultrastructural organization from normal forms to forms having both wall covers as well as the main organelles changed.

  6. Effect of Atmospheric Conditions on Coverage of Fogger Applications in a Desert Surface Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    305 -21.1 20.8 18.6 [a] SRm, U, Udir, H, θv, θg, and RH are 2 min averages of modified stability ratio (eq. 2), wind speed, wind direction, surface...R. T. H. 1968. Lidar observations of atmospheric motion in forest valleys. Bull. American Meteorol. Soc . 49(9): 918- 922. Farooq, M., W. C...theoretical distribution of airborne pollution from factory chimneys. Qtly. J. Royal Meteorol. Soc . 73(317-318): 426-436. USACHPPM. 2005. Diagnosis and

  7. Effect of Shadowing on Survival of Bacteria under Conditions Simulating the Martian Atmosphere and UV Radiation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Shariff; Peeters, Zan; La Duc, Myron T.; Mancinelli, Rocco; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft-associated spores and four non-spore-forming bacterial isolates were prepared in Atacama Desert soil suspensions and tested both in solution and in a desiccated state to elucidate the shadowing effect of soil particulates on bacterial survival under simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. All non-spore-forming cells that were prepared in nutrient-depleted, 0.2-μm-filtered desert soil (DSE) microcosms and desiccated for 75 days on aluminum died, whereas cells prepared similarly in 60-μm-filtered desert soil (DS) microcosms survived such conditions. Among the bacterial cells tested, Microbacterium schleiferi and Arthrobacter sp. exhibited elevated resistance to 254-nm UV irradiation (low-pressure Hg lamp), and their survival indices were comparable to those of DS- and DSE-associated Bacillus pumilus spores. Desiccated DSE-associated spores survived exposure to full Martian UV irradiation (200 to 400 nm) for 5 min and were only slightly affected by Martian atmospheric conditions in the absence of UV irradiation. Although prolonged UV irradiation (5 min to 12 h) killed substantial portions of the spores in DSE microcosms (∼5- to 6-log reduction with Martian UV irradiation), dramatic survival of spores was apparent in DS-spore microcosms. The survival of soil-associated wild-type spores under Martian conditions could have repercussions for forward contamination of extraterrestrial environments, especially Mars. PMID:18083857

  8. MPAS Atmospheric Boundary Layer Simulation under Selected Stability Conditions: Evaluation Using the SWIFT Datasen

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V. Rao; Feng, Yan

    2016-10-12

    Modeling the transition from mesoscale to microscale is necessary in order to model different processes that affect a wind farm and to develop forecasting tools that operate at the farm scale. The mesoscale-to-microscale coupling (MMC) project is an A2e (Atmosphere-toelectrons) coordinated activity for developing modeling capabilities at the wind farm scale. By moving the focus of the research from a single wind turbine to the collection of turbines that comprise a wind farm, A2e extends the range of spatial and timescales that need representation in a model from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers and timescales from a few seconds to days (Bokharaie et al. 2016). In the atmosphere, these scales are represented by mesoscale-tomicroscale models. The modeling available at these scales has differed in its representation of various physical processes. The MMC group is responsible for evaluating existing models at these scales and recommending a set of options for coupling the mesoscale and microscale with the best-performing models. The group was organized in 2015 and will explore options for coupling strategies with real-world test problems in fiscal year (FY) 2017. The model of choice for this exercise is WRF (Weather Research Forecasting) for mesoscale and WRF-LES (Large Eddy Simulation) for microscale simulations. The MPAS (Model Prediction Across Scales) variable mesh model that can be continuously refined; it has dynamic core and physics options adopted from WRF, which offer an alternative platform for modeling the mesoscale.

  9. Reexamination of atmospheric drag coefficients used in climate models for Arctic summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryanik, Vladimir M.; Lu"pkes, Christof; Hartmann, Jo"rg; Birnbaum, Gerit; Andreas, Edgar L.; Ro"sel, Anja; Kaleschke, Lars

    2013-04-01

    Results from polar climate models depend strongly on the quality of the parametrization of subgridscale physical processes such as processes related to clouds, radiation, and turbulence. Realistic modeling of polar sea ice dynamics and atmospheric processes over sea ice needs a detailed representation of the near-surface atmospheric fluxes of momentum. In this conference contribution parametrizations of neutral drag coefficients mostly used in general circulation models (e.g., ECHAM, CCSM, MITgcm) are reexamined by comparing them with a recently developed parametrization including the impact of sea ice morphology. The new parametrization, using the sea ice and melt pond fraction as governing parameters, accounts for the effect of form drag caused by edges at leads, melt ponds, and floes. Based on remote sensing data on ice and melt pond fraction, it is shown that during Arctic summer the traditionally used drag coefficients differ from the new ones by a factor 0.5-1.2. The geographic distribution of drag coefficients obtained from both parametrizations is very different. Differences are due to a nonlinear and non-monotonic dependence of drag coefficients on sea ice concentration in the new parametrization.

  10. Effect of atmospheric conditions on operation of terahertz systems for remote detection of ionizing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2014-01-15

    This study was motivated by a new concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials by using a high power terahertz (THz) wave beam, which can be focused in a small spot where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of seed electrons in such a volume, this focusing can initiate the avalanche breakdown. Typically, an ambient density of free electrons is assumed to be at the level of one particle per cubic centimeter. So, when a breakdown-prone volume is smaller than 1 cm{sup 3}, there should be significant difference between the breakdown rates in the case of presence of additional sources of ionization versus its absence. Since the flux density of gamma rays emitted by radioactive materials rapidly falls with the distance from the source, while the intensity of THz waves also decreases with the distance due to wave attenuation in the atmosphere, it is important to find an optimal location of the breakdown to be initiated for a given distance between a radioactive material and a THz antenna. This problem is analyzed in a given paper with the account for not only atmospheric attenuation of THz waves but also the air turbulence.

  11. Homogenous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water at close to atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, D.; Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Petäjä, T.; Vanhanen, J.; Sipilä, M.; Paasonen, P.; Kulmala, M.; Lihavainen, H.

    2011-06-01

    In this study the homogeneous nucleation rates in the system of sulfuric acid and water were measured by using a flow tube technique. The goal was to directly compare particle formation rates obtained from atmospheric measurements with nucleation rates of freshly nucleated particles measured with particle size magnifier (PSM) which has detection efficiency of unity for particles having mobility diameter of 1.5 nm. The gas phase sulfuric acid concentration in this study was measured with the chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), commonly used in field measurements. The wall losses of sulfuric acid were estimated from measured concentration profiles along the flow tube. The initial concentrations of sulfuric acid estimated from loss measurements ranged from 108 to 3 × 109 molecules cm-3. The nucleation rates obtained in this study cover about three orders of magnitude from 10-1 to 102 cm-3 s-1 for commercial ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) TSI model 3025A and from 101 to 104 cm-3 s-1 for PSM. The nucleation rates and the slopes (dlnJ/dln [H2SO4]) show satisfactory agreement when compared to empirical kinetic and activation models and the latest atmospheric nucleation data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental work providing temperature dependent nucleation rate measurements using a high efficiency particle counter with a cut-off-size of 1.5 nm together with direct measurements of gas phase sulfuric acid concentration.

  12. Comparison of toluene removal in air at atmospheric conditions by different corona discharges.

    PubMed

    Schiorlin, Milko; Marotta, Ester; Rea, Massimo; Paradisi, Cristina

    2009-12-15

    Different types of corona discharges, produced by DC of either polarity (+/-DC) and positive pulsed (+pulsed) high voltages, were applied to the removal of toluene via oxidation in air at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Mechanistic insight was obtained through comparison of the three different corona regimes with regard to process efficiency, products, response to the presence of humidity and, for DC coronas, current/voltage characteristics coupled with ion analysis. Process efficiency increases in the order +DC < -DC < +pulsed, with pulsed processing being remarkably efficient compared to recently reported data for related systems. With -DC, high toluene conversion and product selectivity were achieved, CO(2) and CO accounting for about 90% of all reacted carbon. Ion analysis, performed by APCI-MS (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry), provides a powerful rationale for interpreting current/voltage characteristics of DC coronas. All experimental findings are consistent with the proposal that in the case of +DC corona toluene oxidation is initiated by reactions with ions (O(2)(+*), H(3)O(+) and their hydrates, NO(+)) both in dry as well as in humid air. In contrast, with -DC no evidence is found for any significant reaction of toluene with negative ions. It is also concluded that in humid air OH radicals are involved in the initial stage of toluene oxidation induced both by -DC and +pulsed corona.

  13. Dielectric surface flashover at atmospheric conditions under high-power microwave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Neuber, Andreas A.; Krile, John T.; Edmiston, Greg F.; Krompholz, Hermann G.

    2007-05-15

    Due to recent advances in the peak output power densities and pulse widths of high-power microwave (HPM) devices, the ability to radiate this power into the atmosphere is limited by surface plasma formation at the vacuum-air interface. Very little is known about this window flashover under HPM excitation at 'air' side pressures from atmospheric down to approximately 90 Torr, and this paper reports one such study at 2.85 GHz and MW/cm{sup 2} pulsed power densities. Due to the high ({approx}600 GHz at standard temperature and pressure) elastic collision frequencies of the electrons with the neutral gas molecules and added energy-loss channels through molecule excitation, proven concepts of vacuum flashover, such as multipactoring electrons, have to be abandoned. The observed flashover field is roughly a factor 3 higher in SF{sub 6} compared to air, which is consistent with unipolar volume breakdown data. Quantitative comparisons of HPM flashover data with results from a recently developed computer code are given.

  14. Under What Conditions Can Equilibrium Gas-Particle Partitioning Be Expected to Hold in the Atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Mai, Huajun; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-10-06

    The prevailing treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models is based on the assumption of instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium for the condensing species, yet compelling experimental evidence indicates that organic aerosols can exhibit the properties of highly viscous, semisolid particles, for which gas-particle equilibrium may be achieved slowly. The approach to gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is controlled by gas-phase diffusion, interfacial transport, and particle-phase diffusion. Here we evaluate the controlling processes and the time scale to achieve gas-particle equilibrium as a function of the volatility of the condensing species, its surface accommodation coefficient, and its particle-phase diffusivity. For particles in the size range of typical atmospheric organic aerosols (∼50-500 nm), the time scale to establish gas-particle equilibrium is generally governed either by interfacial accommodation or particle-phase diffusion. The rate of approach to equilibrium varies, depending on whether the bulk vapor concentration is constant, typical of an open system, or decreasing as a result of condensation into the particles, typical of a closed system.

  15. Kinetics of the heterogeneous photo oxidation of the pesticide bupirimate by OH-radicals and ozone under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Bouya, H; Errami, M; Chakir, A; Roth, E

    2015-09-01

    This article is concerned with the study of the photochemical degradation of bupirimate adsorbed on a quartz surface by atmospheric oxidants, namely ozone and OH radicals. OH oxidation experiments were conducted relative to two reference compounds, terbuthylazine and (4-chlorophenyl)(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) methanone. Meanwhile, ozone oxidation experiments were performed in the absolute mode and were interpreted by both, the Surface Layer Reaction and the Gas Surface Reaction models of heterogeneous reactions. The obtained results show that the rate constants for the reactions between bupirimate and OH radicals and ozone are (cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1)): (1.06 ± 0.87) × 10(-12) and (5.4 ± 0.3) × 10(-20), respectively. As a consequence, for the experimental conditions used in this study, the lifetime of bupirimate at quartz like surface/atmosphere interfaces is several months against ozone and a tenth of days against OH-radical.

  16. Missing Data Imputation of Solar Radiation Data under Different Atmospheric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Turrado, Concepción Crespo; López, María del Carmen Meizoso; Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez; Gómez, Benigno Antonio Rodríguez; Rollé, José Luis Calvo; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Global solar broadband irradiance on a planar surface is measured at weather stations by pyranometers. In the case of the present research, solar radiation values from nine meteorological stations of the MeteoGalicia real-time observational network, captured and stored every ten minutes, are considered. In this kind of record, the lack of data and/or the presence of wrong values adversely affects any time series study. Consequently, when this occurs, a data imputation process must be performed in order to replace missing data with estimated values. This paper aims to evaluate the multivariate imputation of ten-minute scale data by means of the chained equations method (MICE). This method allows the network itself to impute the missing or wrong data of a solar radiation sensor, by using either all or just a group of the measurements of the remaining sensors. Very good results have been obtained with the MICE method in comparison with other methods employed in this field such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). The average RMSE value of the predictions for the MICE algorithm was 13.37% while that for the MLR it was 28.19%, and 31.68% for the IDW. PMID:25356644

  17. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-09-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  18. Approximate Analytical Solution to Diurnal Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Growth Under Well-Watered Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, J. R.; Yin, Jun; Albertson, John D.; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-07-01

    Simplified numerical models of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are useful both for understanding the underlying dynamics and potentially providing parsimonious modelling approaches for inclusion in larger models. Herein the governing equations of a simplified slab model of the uniformly mixed, purely convective, diurnal ABL are shown to allow immediate solutions for the potential temperature and specific humidity as functions of the ABL height and net radiation when expressed in integral form. By employing a linearized saturation vapour relation, the height of the mixed layer is shown to obey a non-linear ordinary differential equation with quadratic dependence on ABL height. A perturbation solution provides general analytical approximations, of which the leading term is shown to represent the contribution under equilibrium evaporation. These solutions allow the diurnal evolution of the height, potential temperature, and specific humidity (i.e., also vapour pressure deficit) of the mixed layer to be expressed analytically for arbitrary radiative forcing functions.

  19. Determination of the optimum conditions for lung cancer cells treatment using cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Morteza; Rajaei, Hajar; Mashayekh, Amir Shahriar; Shafiae, Mojtaba; Mahdikia, Hamed; Khani, Mohammadreza; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Shokri, Babak

    2016-10-01

    Cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) can affect live cells and organisms due to the production of different reactive species. In this paper, the effects of various parameters of the CAP such as the treatment time, gas mixture, gas flow rate, applied voltage, and distance from the nozzle on the LL/2 lung cancer cell line have been studied. The probable effect of UV radiation has also been investigated using an MgF2 filter. Besides the cancerous cells, the 3T3 fibroblast cell line as a normal cell has been treated with the CAP. The Methylthiazol Tetrazolium assay showed that all parameters except the gas flow rate could impress effectively on the cancer cell viability. The cell proliferation seemed to be stopped after plasma treatment. The flow cytometry assay revealed that apoptosis and necrosis were appreciable. It was also found that treating time up to 2 min will not exert any effect on the normal cells.

  20. Synthesis of highly luminescent mercaptosuccinic acid-coated CdSe nanocrystals under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Meiting; Xu, Jingyi; Liu, Shuxian; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Chaobiao

    2014-11-01

    Here we report a facile one-pot method for the preparation of high-quality CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) in aqueous solution under an air atmosphere. Compared with the traditional use of NaHSe or H2 Se, the more stable sodium selenite is utilized as the Se source for preparing highly luminescent CdSe nanocrystals. By using mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as the capping agent and borate-citrate acid as the buffering solution, CdSe nanocrystals with high quantum yield (up to 70%) have been synthesized conveniently. The influence of different experimental parameters, such as the pH of the precursor solution, the molar ratio of Cd(2+) to Na2 SeO3 and Cd(2+) to MSA on the CdSe nanocrystals, has been systematically investigated. The prepared CdSe NCs were spherical with a size of ~ 5 nm.

  1. Solubility and speciation of atmospheric iron in buffer systems simulating cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Majestic, Brian J.; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-04-01

    The solubility of iron (Fe) in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is important to understand its chemistry and potential bioavailability to ocean phytoplankton. However, current studies on Fe solubility and its speciation are highly uncertain partly due to inconsistencies in analytical protocols. In this study, cloud-processing of atmospheric PM was simulated in acetate, formate, and oxalate buffers (pH = 4.30 ± 0.05) at 0.5, 1, 5, and 20 mM. Colorimetric analysis of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex showed that Fe solubility increased by an order of magnitude when acetate and formate concentrations increased from 0.5 mM to 5 mM, with a higher fraction of soluble Fe in acetate than in formate at lower buffer concentration (0.5 mM). Measured pH of sample extracts revealed that weak buffers are unable to maintain pH, presumably due to acidic or alkaline components of PM, requiring an optimum concentration (5 mM in this study) of acetate and formate for Fe solubility measurements. Similar extraction procedures revealed that oxalate buffer inhibits the formation of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex, especially with Fe(III)-containing solutions, rendering it unsuitable for Fe solubility measurements by Ferrozine method. Application of the optimized analytical method to PM samples from different environments showed quite variable Fe solubility, with the lowest (<1%) in dust-impacted samples and the highest (5%) in urban samples. The highest solubility (6.8%) was observed in ambient PM2.5 samples influenced by anthropogenic sources (car emissions) with more than 90% of soluble Fe in the form of Fe(II). Results from this study highlight the importance of the type and strength of buffer at a given pH for Fe solubility and provide further evidence of a higher Fe solubility in urban PM samples compared to desert dust.

  2. Organic particulate material levels in the atmosphere: conditions favoring sensitivity to varying relative humidity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pankow, James F

    2010-04-13

    This study examines the sensitivity in predicted levels of atmospheric organic particulate matter (M(o), microg m(-3)) as those levels may potentially be affected by changes in relative humidity and temperature. In a given system, for each partitioning compound, f(g) and f(p) represent the gaseous and particulate fractions (f(g) + f(p) = 1). Sensitivity in the M(o) levels becomes dampened as the compounds contributing significantly to M(o) are increasingly found in the particle phase (f(p) --> 1). Thus, although local maxima in sensitivity can be encountered as M(o) levels increase, because as M(o) increases each f(p) --> 1, then increasing M(o) levels generally tend to reduce sensitivity in M(o) levels to changes in relative humidity and temperature. Experiments designed to elucidate the potential magnitudes of the effects of relative humidity and temperature on M(o) levels must be carried out at M(o) levels that are relevant for the ambient atmosphere: The f(p) values for the important partitioning compounds must not be elevated above ambient-relevant values. Systems in which M(o) levels are low (e.g., 1-2 microg m(-3)) and/or composed of unaged secondary organic aerosol are the ones most likely to show sensitivity to changing relative humidity and temperature. Results from two published chamber studies are examined in the above regard: [Warren B, et al. (2009) Atmos Environ 43:1789-1795] and [Prisle NL, et al. (2010) Geophys Res Lett 37:L01802].

  3. Formulation of non-reflecting boundary conditions in numerical models of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sajal Kumar

    To eliminate/minimize spurious reflections of small-scale gravity-inertia waves at the material-surface upper boundary of a numerical model of the atmosphere, an energy-absorbing sponge layer is formulated. The sponge layer is designed for forced internal gravity-inertia waves in a resting isothermal atmosphere on an f-plane. The sponge layer is introduced immediately below the material-surface upper boundary. The sponge terms appear as linear damping of the vorticity, divergence, and temperature perturbations inside the sponge layer. The damping coefficient (L) is same for all sponge terms. For small-scale gravity-inertia waves that are most effective in propagating vertical wave energy upwards, two approximate forms of L, namely L(sub 1) and L(sub 2) are derived, neither of which explicitly depend on the sign of frequency and equivalent depth, and as such either can be readily implemented into a time-dependent model. The sponge layer with the coefficient L(sub 1) is designed for a spectral model. The sponge layer with the coefficient L(sub 2), on the other hand, is designed for a finite-difference. The sponge layers in linear time-dependent models were implemented and tested. A lateral sponge layer is designed for linear one-dimensional shallow-water gravity waves. The damping terms inside the sponge layer can selectively damp the characteristic variable advected back (or reflected) into the model domain from the lateral boundary. The lateral sponge layer was implemented in a linear time-dependent model.

  4. Damage induced to DNA by low-energy (0-30 eV) electrons under vacuum and atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Brun, Emilie; Cloutier, Pierre; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile; Fromm, Michel; Sanche, Léon

    2009-07-23

    In this study, we show that it is possible to obtain data on DNA damage induced by low-energy (0-30 eV) electrons under atmospheric conditions. Five monolayer films of plasmid DNA (3197 base pairs) deposited on glass and gold substrates are irradiated with 1.5 keV X-rays in ultrahigh vacuum and under atmospheric conditions. The total damage is analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The damage produced on the glass substrate is attributed to energy absorption from X-rays, whereas that produced on the gold substrate arises from energy absorption from both the X-ray beam and secondary electrons emitted from the gold surface. By analysis of the energy of these secondary electrons, 96% are found to have energies below 30 eV with a distribution peaking at 1.4 eV. The differences in damage yields recorded with the gold and glass substrates is therefore essentially attributed to the interaction of low-energy electrons with DNA under vacuum and hydrated conditions. From these results, the G values for low-energy electrons are determined to be four and six strand breaks per 100 eV, respectively.

  5. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment condition on adhesion of ramie fibers to polypropylene for composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Manolache, Sorin; Qiu, Yiping; Sarmadi, Majid

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the interfacial adhesion between hydrophilic ramie fibers and hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) matrices, ramie fibers are modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with our continuous ethanol flow technique in helium environment. A central composite design of experiments with different plasma processing parameter combinations (treatment current, treatment time and ethanol flow rate) is applied to find the most influential parameter and to obtain the best modification effect. Field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows the roughened surfaces of ramie fibers from the treated groups due to plasma etching effect. Dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) demonstrates that the wettability of the treated fibers drastically decreases. Microbond pullout test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between treated ramie fibers and PP matrices increases significantly. Residual gas analysis (RGA) confirms the creation of ethyl groups during plasma treatment. This study shows that our continuous ethanol flow technique is effective in the plasma modification process, during which the ethanol flow rate is the most influential parameter but all parameters have simultaneous influence on plasma modification effect of ramie fibers.

  6. Internet-based monitoring and prediction system of coal stockpile behaviors under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Nihat; Ozdeniz, A Hadi

    2010-03-01

    Spontaneous combustion on industrial-scale stockpiles causes environmental problems and economic losses for the companies consuming large amounts of coal. In this study, an effective monitoring and prediction system based on internet was developed and implemented to prevent losses and environmental problems. The system was performed in a coal stockpile with 5 m width, 10 m length, 3 m height, and having 120 t of weight. The inner temperature data of the stockpile was recorded by 17 temperature sensors placed inside the stockpile at certain points. Additionally, the data relating to the air temperature, air humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, and wind direction that are the parameters affecting the coal stockpile were also recorded. The recorded values were analyzed with artificial neural network and Statistical modeling methods for prediction of spontaneous combustion. Real-time measurement values and model outputs were published with a web page on internet. The internet-based system can also provide real-time monitoring (combustion alarms, system status) and tele-controlling (Parameter adjusting, system control) through internet exclusively with a standard web browser without the need of any additional software.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of cinnamon and clove oils under modified atmosphere conditions.

    PubMed

    Matan, N; Rimkeeree, H; Mawson, A J; Chompreeda, P; Haruthaithanasan, V; Parker, M

    2006-03-15

    Mixtures of cinnamon and clove oils were tested for inhibitory activity against important spoilage microorganism of intermediate moisture foods. Four fungal species (Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium roqueforti, Mucor plumbeus and Eurotium sp.), four yeasts species (Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia membranaefaciens, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida lipolytica), and two bacteria species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pediococcus halophilus) inoculated separately on agar plates were sealed in a barrier pouch and exposed to essential oil volatiles under a modified atmosphere of low O2 (<0.05-10%) and high CO2 (20% or 40%), with the balance being N2. A. flavus and Eurotium sp. proved to be the most resistant microorganisms. Cinnamon and clove oils added between 1000 and 4000 microL at a ratio of 1:1 were tested for minimum inhibitory volume (MIV) against molds and yeasts. The gas phase above 1000 microL of the oil mixture inhibited growth of C. lipolytica and P. membranaefaciens; 2000 microL inhibited growth of A. flavus, P. roqueforti, M. plumbeus, Eurotium sp., D. hansenii, and Z. rouxii, while inhibition of A. flavus required the addition of 4000 microL. Higher ratios of cinnamon oil/clove oil were more effective for inhibiting the growth of A. flavus.

  8. Prolonged silicon carbide integrated circuit operation in Venus surface atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chen, Liangyu; Spry, David J.; Nakley, Leah M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2016-12-01

    The prolonged operation of semiconductor integrated circuits (ICs) needed for long-duration exploration of the surface of Venus has proven insurmountably challenging to date due to the ˜ 460 °C, ˜ 9.4 MPa caustic environment. Past and planned Venus landers have been limited to a few hours of surface operation, even when IC electronics needed for basic lander operation are protected with heavily cumbersome pressure vessels and cooling measures. Here we demonstrate vastly longer (weeks) electrical operation of two silicon carbide (4H-SiC) junction field effect transistor (JFET) ring oscillator ICs tested with chips directly exposed (no cooling and no protective chip packaging) to a high-fidelity physical and chemical reproduction of Venus' surface atmosphere. This represents more than 100-fold extension of demonstrated Venus environment electronics durability. With further technology maturation, such SiC IC electronics could drastically improve Venus lander designs and mission concepts, fundamentally enabling long-duration enhanced missions to the surface of Venus.

  9. Feasibility Study of PM Elimination by Silent Discharge Type of DPF under Room Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuubachi, Minoru; Nagasawa, Takeshi

    This Silent Discharge type of DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) has been studied for eliminating PM (Particulate Mater) we call it “SDeDPF”. Usually, exhaust gas temperature of diesel engines is under 200 or 250°C at normal city driving condition. Under that condition, generally PM is not bourn out in the normal ceramic DPF. This SDeDPF aims to remove PM electrically and chemically even at room temperature and atmospheric pressure continuously. Finally, in the basic lab test result, 95.6% reduction of PM has been verified by SDeDPF with a special MFS (Metal Fiber Sheet) for discharge electrode to reduce a back pressure, a special Turbulent Block for turbulent and slower velocity of exhaust gas, the 1mm gap between electrodes and an optimum total area of piled electrodes. Also, 98.1% reduction of PM could be designed by most suitable gap between electrodes.

  10. Land surface and atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves over the Chickasaw Nation in the South Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eungul; Bieda, Rahama; Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Basara Richter, Heather

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to extreme heat was reconstructed based on regional land-atmosphere processes from 1979 to 2010 in the South Central U.S. The study region surrounds the Chickasaw Nation (CN), a predominantly Native American population with a highly prevalent burden of climate-sensitive chronic diseases. Land surface and atmospheric conditions for summer heat waves were analyzed during spring (March-April-May, MAM) and summer (June-July-August, JJA) based on the Climate and Ocean: Variability, Predictability, and Change maximum temperature definition for heat wave frequency (HWF). The spatial-temporal pattern of HWF was determined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and the corresponding principle component time series of the first EOF of HWF. Statistically significant analyses of observed conditions indicated that sensible heat increased and latent heat fluxes decreased with high HWF in the South Central U.S. The largest positive correlations of sensible heat flux to HWF and the largest negative correlations of latent heat flux to HWF were specifically observed over the CN. This is a significantly different energy transfer regime due to less available soil moisture during the antecedent MAM and JJA. The higher sensible heat from dry soil could cause significant warming from the near surface (>2.0°C) to the lower troposphere (>1.5°C), and accumulated boundary layer heat could induce the significant patterns of higher geopotential height and enhance anticyclonic circulations (negative vorticity anomaly) at the midtroposphere. Results suggested a positive land-atmosphere feedback associated with heat waves and called attention to the need for region-specific climate adaptation planning.

  11. Paleoclimatic tracers: An investigation using an atmospheric general circulation model under ice age conditions. 2. Water isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Joussaume, S. ); Jouzel, J. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Grenoble )

    1993-02-20

    The linear relationship observed between the water isotopic contents of precipitation and surface air temperatures leads to the use of the water isotopes, H[sub 2][sup 18]O and HDO, in paleoclimatology. Applied to the measurements of the isotopic content of paleowaters, like groundwaters and deep ice cores, this relationship is used to infer paleotemperatures. However, this interpretation of paleo-isotopic contents is only valid if the isotope-temperature relationship is not affected by climate change. To address this problem, the authors have developed a water isotope modeling inside an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and performed simultations of both the present-day and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climatic conditions. AGCM are indeed the only appropriate tools able to account the whole complexity of the atmospheric circulation. For the present-day climate, preliminary results for January were presented by Joussaume et al. (1984) and are complemented by new simulations performed for both February and August climatic conditions with a higher-resolution version of the model. Model results are well corroborated by observations. They also exhibit some effects of the atmospheric circulation on the isotopic fields. For the simulated LGM climate, the model results compare well with paleoclimatic data of water isotopic contents, except for a higher than observed spatial variability. The overall patterns of the simulated [delta][sup 18]O-temperature relationship for the LGM climate are practically unchanged, which tends to comfort the use of water isotopes in paleoclimatology. However, concerning the deuterium excess, i.e., the relationship between oxyen 18 and deuterium, the model results are not sufficiently valid to allow a discussion of the use of deuterium excess in paleoclimatology. 46 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Fungal induced corrosion of wire rope exposed in humid atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.; Ray, R.; Hart, K.; Wagner, P.

    1995-03-01

    Localized corrosion of carbon steel wire rope stored in a humid environment on wooden spools was caused by organic acid and carbon dioxide production by fungi growing directly on the wood. Fungal growth was observed on the interiors of wooden spools and corrosion was most severe on the wrap of wire in direct contact with the wood. Laboratory experiments were designed to demonstrate a causal relationship between storage conditions, fungal growth, and localized corrosion.

  13. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  14. On the plasma-based growth of ‘flowing’ graphene sheets at atmospheric pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, D.; Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, A.; Henriques, J.; Rego, A.; Ferraria, A.; Abrashev, M. V.; Dias, F. M.; Luhrs, C. C.; Phillips, J.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study on atmospheric pressure microwave plasma-based assembly of free standing graphene sheets is presented. The synthesis method is based on introducing a carbon-containing precursor (C2H5OH) through a microwave (2.45 GHz) argon plasma environment, where decomposition of ethanol molecules takes place and carbon atoms and molecules are created and then converted into solid carbon nuclei in the ‘colder’ nucleation zones. A theoretical model previously developed has been further updated and refined to map the particle and thermal fluxes in the plasma reactor. Considering the nucleation process as a delicate interplay between thermodynamic and kinetic factors, the model is based on a set of non-linear differential equations describing plasma thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. The model predictions were validated by experimental results. Optical emission spectroscopy was applied to detect the plasma emission related to carbon species from the ‘hot’ plasma zone. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques have been applied to analyze the synthesized nanostructures. The microstructural features of the solid carbon nuclei collected from the colder zones of plasma reactor vary according to their location. A part of the solid carbon was deposited on the discharge tube wall. The solid assembled from the main stream, which was gradually withdrawn from the hot plasma region in the outlet plasma stream directed to a filter, was composed by ‘flowing’ graphene sheets. The influence of additional hydrogen, Ar flow rate and microwave power on the concentration of obtained stable species and carbon-dicarbon was evaluated. The ratio of sp3/sp2 carbons in graphene sheets is presented. A correlation between changes in C2 and C number densities and sp3/sp2 ratio was found.

  15. Phenotypic Plasticity Conditions the Response of Soybean Seed Yield to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration1

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Etsushi; Aoki, Naohiro; Masuya, Yusuke; Shimono, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Selection for cultivars with superior responsiveness to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is a powerful option for boosting crop productivity under future eCO2. However, neither criteria for eCO2 responsiveness nor prescreening methods have been established. The purpose of this study was to identify traits responsible for eCO2 responsiveness of soybean (Glycine max). We grew 12 Japanese and U.S. soybean cultivars that differed in their maturity group and determinacy under ambient CO2 and eCO2 for 2 years in temperature gradient chambers. CO2 elevation significantly increased seed yield per plant, and the magnitude varied widely among the cultivars (from 0% to 62%). The yield increase was best explained by increased aboveground biomass and pod number per plant. These results suggest that the plasticity of pod production under eCO2 results from biomass enhancement, and would therefore be a key factor in the yield response to eCO2, a resource-rich environment. To test this hypothesis, we grew the same cultivars at low planting density, a resource-rich environment that improved the light and nutrient supplies by minimizing competition. Low planting density significantly increased seed yield per plant, and the magnitude ranged from 5% to 105% among the cultivars owing to increased biomass and pod number per plant. The yield increase due to low-density planting was significantly positively correlated with the eCO2 response in both years. These results confirm our hypothesis and suggest that high plasticity of biomass and pod production at a low planting density reveals suitable parameters for breeding to maximize soybean yield under eCO2. PMID:26373658

  16. Modeling the impact of vapor thymol concentration, temperature, and modified atmosphere condition on growth behavior of Salmonella on raw shrimp.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siyuan; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Pang, Yu-Hsin; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella is a microorganism of concern on a global basis for raw shrimp. This research modeled the impact of vapor thymol concentration (0, 0.8, and 1.6 mg/liter), storage temperature (8, 12, and 16°C), and modified atmosphere condition (0.04 as in the natural atmosphere and 59.5% CO2) against the growth behavior of a Salmonella cocktail (six strains) on raw shrimp. Lag time (hour) and maximum growth rate (log CFU per gram per hour), chosen as two growth indicators, were obtained through DMFit software and then developed into polynomial as well as nonlinear modified secondary models (dimensional and/or dimensionless), consisting of two or even three impact factors in the equations. The models were validated, and results showed that the predictive values from both models demonstrated good matches to the observed experimental values, yet the prediction based on lag time was more accurate than maximum growth rate. The information will provide the food industry with insight into the potential safety risk of Salmonella growth on raw shrimp under stressed conditions.

  17. Kinetics of elementary steps in the reactions of atomic bromine with isoprene and 1,3-butadiene under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Laine, Patrick L; Sohn, Yoon S; Nicovich, J Michael; McKee, Michael L; Wine, Paul H

    2012-06-21

    Laser flash photolysis of CF(2)Br(2) has been coupled with time-resolved detection of atomic bromine by resonance fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the gas-phase kinetics of early elementary steps in the Br-initiated oxidations of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, Iso) and 1,3-butadiene (Bu) under atmospheric conditions. At T ≥ 526 K, measured rate coefficients for Br + isoprene are independent of pressure, suggesting that hydrogen transfer (1a) is the dominant reaction pathway. The following Arrhenius expression adequately describes all kinetic data at 526 K ≤ T ≤ 673 K: k(1a)(T) = (1.22 ± 0.57) × 10(-11) exp[(-2100 ± 280)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (uncertainties are 2σ and represent precision of the Arrhenius parameters). At 271 K ≤ T ≤ 357 K, kinetic evidence for the reversible addition reactions Br + Iso ↔ Br-Iso (k(1b), k(-1b)) and Br + Bu ↔ Br-Bu (k(3b), k(-3b)) is observed. Analysis of the approach to equilibrium data allows the temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficients k(1b), k(-1b), k(3b), and k(-3b) to be evaluated. At atmospheric pressure, addition of Br to each conjugated diene occurs with a near-gas-kinetic rate coefficient. Equilibrium constants for the addition/dissociation reactions are obtained from k(1b)/k(-1b) and k(3b)/k(-3b), respectively. Combining the experimental equilibrium data with electronic structure calculations allows both second- and third-law analyses of thermochemistry to be carried out. The following thermochemical parameters for the addition reactions 1b and 3b at 0 and 298 K are obtained (units are kJ mol(-1) for Δ(r)H and J mol(-1) K(-1) for Δ(r)S; uncertainties are accuracy estimates at the 95% confidence level): Δ(r)H(0)(1b) = -66.6 ± 7.1, Δ(r)H(298)(1b) = -67.5 ± 6.6, and Δ(r)S(298)(3b) = -93 ± 16; Δ(r)H(0)(3b) = -62.4 ± 9.0, Δ(r)H(298)(3b) = -64.5 ± 8.5, and Δ(r)S(298)(3b) = -94 ± 20. Examination of the effect of added O(2) on Br kinetics under conditions where reversible

  18. Migration, Neighborhoods, and Networks: Approaches to Understanding How Urban Environmental Conditions Affect Syndemic Adverse Health Outcomes Among Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Egan, James E.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  19. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  20. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

  1. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    scheme to extract kinetic information about the adduct reations with O2 and branching ratios for OH regeneration. A plausible mechanism for OH regeneration in (2) involves OH addition to the nitrogen atom followed by O2 addition to the cyano carbon atom, isomeriazation and decomposition to D2CO + DOCN + OH. Our results suggest that the OH + CH3CN reaction occurs via a complex mechanism involving both bimolecular and termolecular pathways, analogous to the mechanisms for the the important atmospheric reactions of OH with CO and HNO3.

  3. Spectroelectrochemistry and modeling of enargite (Cu3AsS4) reactivity under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gow, Robert Nicholas Verne

    Raman spectroscopy has been a useful technology for fundamental studies in the mining industry. Surface changes through oxidation and reduction reactions can be monitored in-situ, allowing the changes to be monitored in real time. In conjunction with cyclic voltammetry, to change the conditions at which a mineral surface is subjected to, reaction and reaction conditions can be identified. The results can then be plotted to create a map similar to that of an EH-pH diagram. In this study, the copper arsenic sulfide mineral, enargite (Cu 3AsS4) was subjected to a series of tests. Relatively pure samples were obtained from Butte, MT and Quirivilca, Peru and used to create mineral electrodes. The electrodes were cycled over an EH range of -1000 to +1000 mV (vs SHE) at pH values ranging from 1 to 13. Changes to the surface of the mineral were identified by comparing Raman spectra to a mineral Raman database. Plotted results were then compared against mass-balanced EH-pH diagrams for the Cu-As-S-H2O system, created using the STABCAL thermodynamic calculation program. Ultimately, the EH-pH diagram is modified based on the results, and an updated version was created. The mass-balanced methodology is applied, in conjunction with Gibbs' phase rule, to an aqueous quaternary system. Variations in EH-pH diagrams of the Cu-As-S-H2O system based on slight changes in concentrations of copper, arsenic and sulfur are examined. Finally, a novel nano-graphene material was tested for its ability to adsorb arsenic. Arsenic remediation, downstream of an enargite leach, remains an unsolved issue. The nano-graphene platelets were not able to successfully reduce arsenic levels in solution below the EPA-required limitation of 10 ppb. A thermodynamic evaluation of the adsorption characterized the process as physisorption, and likely unsuitable for long-term arsenic storage. A functionalized version of the nano-graphene may enhance results.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of fruit stored under cold conditions using controlled atmosphere in Prunus persica cv. "Red Pearl".

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Dayan; Vizoso, Paula; Balic, Iván; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Meneses, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cold storage (CS) can induce a physiological disorder known as chilling injury (CI) in nectarine fruits. The main symptom is mealiness that is perceived as non-juicy fruit by consumers. Postharvest treatments such as controlled atmosphere (CA; a high CO2 concentration and low O2) have been used under cold conditions to avoid this disorder. With the objective of exploring the mechanisms involved in the CA effect on mealiness prevention, we analyzed transcriptomic changes under six conditions of "Red Pearl" nectarines by RNA-Seq. Our analysis included just harvested nectarines, juicy non-stored fruits, fruits affected for CI after CS and fruits stored in a combination of CA plus CS without CI phenotype. Nectarines stored in cold conditions combined with CA treatment resulted in less mealiness; we obtained 21.6% of juice content compared with just CS fruits (7.7%; mealy flesh). RNA-Seq data analyses were carried out to study the gene expression for different conditions assayed. During ripening, we detected that nectarines exposed to CA treatment expressed a similar number of genes compared with fruits that were not exposed to cold conditions. Firm fruits have more differentially expressed genes than soft fruits, which suggest that most important changes occur during CS. On the other hand, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment mainly in metabolic and cellular processes. Differentially expressed genes analysis showed that low O2 concentrations combined with cold conditions slows the metabolic processes more than just the cold storage, resulting mainly in the suppression of primary metabolism and cold stress response. This is a significant step toward unraveling the molecular mechanism that explains the effectiveness of CA as a tool to prevent CI development on fruits.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of fruit stored under cold conditions using controlled atmosphere in Prunus persica cv. “Red Pearl”

    PubMed Central

    Sanhueza, Dayan; Vizoso, Paula; Balic, Iván; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Meneses, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cold storage (CS) can induce a physiological disorder known as chilling injury (CI) in nectarine fruits. The main symptom is mealiness that is perceived as non-juicy fruit by consumers. Postharvest treatments such as controlled atmosphere (CA; a high CO2 concentration and low O2) have been used under cold conditions to avoid this disorder. With the objective of exploring the mechanisms involved in the CA effect on mealiness prevention, we analyzed transcriptomic changes under six conditions of “Red Pearl” nectarines by RNA-Seq. Our analysis included just harvested nectarines, juicy non-stored fruits, fruits affected for CI after CS and fruits stored in a combination of CA plus CS without CI phenotype. Nectarines stored in cold conditions combined with CA treatment resulted in less mealiness; we obtained 21.6% of juice content compared with just CS fruits (7.7%; mealy flesh). RNA-Seq data analyses were carried out to study the gene expression for different conditions assayed. During ripening, we detected that nectarines exposed to CA treatment expressed a similar number of genes compared with fruits that were not exposed to cold conditions. Firm fruits have more differentially expressed genes than soft fruits, which suggest that most important changes occur during CS. On the other hand, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment mainly in metabolic and cellular processes. Differentially expressed genes analysis showed that low O2 concentrations combined with cold conditions slows the metabolic processes more than just the cold storage, resulting mainly in the suppression of primary metabolism and cold stress response. This is a significant step toward unraveling the molecular mechanism that explains the effectiveness of CA as a tool to prevent CI development on fruits. PMID:26483806

  6. UTSI atmospheric science program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1977-01-01

    Two areas of research were carried out concerned with meteorological and environmental inputs to aviation systems. One effort dealt with the investigation of wind fields about bluff geometries typical of buildings or other man made obstructions to the surface wind and the behavior of craft flying through these disturbed wind fields. The second effort was the definition and mathematical models of atmospheric wind shear associated with thunderstorms, stable boundary layers, and synoptic fronts. These mathematical models can be utilized in flight simulators to train pilots and flight crews and to develop instrumentation for landing in adverse wind shear conditions.

  7. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in Sliced Ready-to-Eat Meat Products Packaged under Vacuum or Modified Atmosphere Conditions.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Rosa Ana; Rendueles, Eugenia; Sanz, José Javier; Capita, Rosa; García-Fernández, Camino

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in three types of sliced ready-to-eat meat products packaged under vacuum or modified atmosphere conditions and stored at three temperatures. Slices of about 25 g of chorizo (a fermented dry pork sausage), jamón (cured ham), and cecina (a salted, dried beef product) were inoculated with L. monocytogenes NCTC 11994. Slices were packaged in a vacuum or in a modified atmosphere (20% CO2, 80% N2). After packaging, samples were stored for 6 months at three temperatures: 3, 11, or 20°C. Microbiological analyses were performed after 0, 1, 7, 15, 30, 45, 90, and 180 days of storage. The type of meat product, the type of packaging, the temperature, and the day of storage all influenced microbial levels (P < 0.001). L. monocytogenes counts decreased throughout the course of storage in samples of chorizo (quick decrease) and jamón (gradual decrease). In cecina samples, counts of L. monocytogenes increased from day 0 to day 1 of storage and then remained constant until day 90 of the study. These results may be of use for enhancing the safety of these ready-to-eat meat product types. Additional evaluation of the behavior of L. monocytogenes in cecina is needed.

  8. Middle atmosphere slant-path optical turbulence conditions derived from very high-frequency radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Frank D.; Nastrom, Gregory D.; Hansen, Anthony R.

    1999-02-01

    Slant path calculations are shown of the transverse coherence length (r0), the isoplanatic angle ((theta) 0), and the Rytov variance ((sigma) 2R), using a 6- yr data set of refractive index structure parameter (C2n) from 49.25-MHz radar observations at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The calculations are for a spherical wave condition; a wavelength ((lambda) ) of electromagnetic radiation of 1 micrometers ; four different elevation angles (3, 10, 30, and 60 deg), two path lengths (50 and 150 km); and a platform, such as an aircraft, at 12.5 km MSL (mean sea level). Over 281,000 radar-derived C2n profiles sampled at 3 min intervals with 150-m height resolution are used for the calculations. The approach, an `onion skin' model, assumes horizontal stationarity over each entire propagation path and is consistent with Taylor's hypothesis. The results show that refractivity turbulence effects are greatly reduced for the there propagation parameters (r0, (theta) 0, and (sigma) 2R) as the elevation angle increases from 3 to 60 deg. A pronounced seasonal effect is seen on the same parameters, which is consistent with climatological variables and gravity wave activity. Interactions with the enhanced turbulence in the vicinity of the tropopause with the range weighting functions of each propagation parameter is evaluated. Results of a two region model relating r0, (theta) 0, and (sigma) 2R to wind speed at 5.6 km MSL are shown. This statistical model can be understood in terms of upward propagating gravity waves that are launched by strong winds over complex terrain.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the organic oxygen content in anthracite coal under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Lei; Dou, Haipeng; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2008-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used to measure the organic oxygen content in pulverized anthracite coal under atmospheric conditions. Special spectral processing including the optimal O(I) emission-line selection by comparing the spectral correlation coefficients with the N(I) line, internal normalization with the N(I) line, and temperature correction are proposed and employed to satisfy the multi-line analysis method and yield the most accurate quantitative results. The calibration method for determining the organic oxygen content of coal is presented, with an accuracy of 1.15-1.37% and an average relative error of 19.39% being evaluated through an experiment performed on six anthracite coal samples. The relative measurement error distribution has also been studied.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the organic oxygen content in anthracite coal under atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Dong, L.; Dou, H.P.; Yin, W.B.; Jia, S.T.

    2008-04-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used to measure the organic oxygen content in pulverized anthracite coal under atmospheric conditions. Special spectral processing including the optimal O(I) emission-line selection by comparing the spectral correlation coefficients with the N(I) line, internal normalization with the N(I) line, and temperature correction are proposed and employed to satisfy the multi-line analysis method and yield the most accurate quantitative results. The calibration method for determining the organic oxygen content of coal is presented, with an accuracy of 1.15-1.37% and an average relative error of 19.39% being evaluated through an experiment performed on six anthracite coal samples. The relative measurement error distribution has also been studied.

  11. Impact of atmospheric and oceanic conditions on the frequency and genesis location of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific in 2004 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pan; Zhu, Jiang; Zhong, Zhong; Qi, Linlin; Wang, Xiaodan

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the impact of atmospheric and oceanic conditions during May-August of 2004 and 2010 on the frequency and genesis location of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific. Using the WRF model, four numerical experiments were carried out based on different atmospheric conditions and SST forcing. The numerical experiments indicated that changes in atmospheric and oceanic conditions greatly affect tropical cyclone activity, and the roles of atmospheric conditions are slightly greater than oceanic conditions. Specifically, the total number of tropical cyclones was found to be mostly affected by atmospheric conditions, while the distribution of tropical cyclone genesis locations was mainly related to oceanic conditions, especially the distribution of SST. In 2010, a warmer SST occurred west of 140°E, with a colder SST east of 140°E. On the one hand, the easterly flow was enhanced through the effect of the increase in the zonal SST gradient. The strengthened easterly flow led to an anomalous boundary layer divergence over the region to the east of 140°E, which suppressed the formation of tropical cyclones over this region. On the other hand, the colder SST over the region to the east of 140°E led to a colder low-level air temperature, which resulted in decreased CAPE and static instability energy. The decrease in thermodynamic energy restricted the generation of tropical cyclones over the same region.

  12. The characterization of coal liquefaction products obtained under an inert atmosphere and catalytic conditions. Part II: Soluble products

    SciTech Connect

    Karaca, H.

    2006-03-15

    Beypazari and Tuncbilek lignite were liquefied using two different catalyst methods physically mixing and impregnation. The liquefaction occurred under conditions of inert atmosphere and various process parameters. Solvent to coal ratio, pressure, catalyst type, catalyst concentration, temperature, and time were examined as process parameters. The most appropriate parameters for the total soluble products obtained by liquefaction of both lignites and for elemental analysis of preasphaltenes were determined as follows: 2/1 solvent to coal ratio; from 1.25 MPa to 2.50 MPa initial nitrogen pressure; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Mo(CO){sub 6} as catalyst types; 3% as catalyst concentration; 400{sup o}C as reaction temperature; and 60 min as reaction time. In general, fuel quality of both preasphaltene and total soluble products decreased as temperature increased above 400{sup o}C and reaction time exceeded 60 min. The fuel quality of the preasphaltenes and the total soluble products obtained under the catalytic conditions and in the state of impregnation of catalyst onto coal is higher than under the noncatalytic conditions and in the state of physically mixing of catalyst.

  13. 3-D laser confocal microscopy study of the oxidation of NdFeB magnets in atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, J. P.; Speight, J. D.; Sheridan, R. S.; Bradshaw, A.; Harris, I. R.; Williams, A. J.; Walton, A.

    2016-08-01

    Neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets are used in a number of important applications, such as generators in gearless wind turbines, motors in electric vehicles and electronic goods (e.g.- computer hard disk drives, HDD). Hydrogen can be used as a processing gas to separate and recycle scrap sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets from end-of-life products to form a powder suitable for recycling. However, the magnets are likely to have been exposed to atmospheric conditions prior to processing, and any oxidation could lead to activation problems for the hydrogen decrepitation reaction. Many previous studies on the oxidation of NdFeB magnets have been performed at elevated temperatures; however, few studies have been formed under atmospheric conditions. In this paper a combination of 3-D laser confocal microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assess the composition, morphology and rate of oxidation/corrosion on scrap sintered NdFeB magnets. Confocal microscopy has been employed to measure the growth of surface reaction products at room temperature, immediately after exposure to air. The results showed that there was a significant height increase at the triple junctions of the Nd-rich grain boundaries. Using Raman spectroscopy, the product was shown to consist of Nd2O3 and formed only on the Nd-rich triple junctions. The diffusion coefficient of the triple junction reaction product growth at 20 °C was determined to be approximately 4 × 10-13 cm2/sec. This value is several orders of magnitude larger than values derived from the diffusion controlled oxide growth observations at elevated temperatures in the literature. This indicates that the growth of the room temperature oxidation products are likely defect enhanced processes at the NdFeB triple junctions.

  14. Wear of surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings for hip prostheses under adverse conditions with the head loading on the rim of the cup.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2013-04-01

    Clinical studies have found high wear rates, elevated ion levels and high revision rates of large-diameter metal-on-metal surface replacement bearings in some patients, which have been associated with edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. We have simulated increased wear and ion levels in metal-on-metal bearings in vitro by introducing variations in translational and rotational positioning of the components, which reproduces stripe wear on the femoral head, cup rim wear and clinically relevant large as well as small wear particles. There is interest in technologies such as surface engineering, which might reduce metal wear and the release of wear particles and ions. Reduced wear with surface-engineered surface replacements compared to metal-on-metal controls has been reported under standard walking conditions with correctly aligned and concentric components. In this in vitro study, the wear of chromium nitride surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings under conditions of microseparation associated with translational and rotational malpositioning of the components was investigated and the results were compared with a previously reported study of metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. Simulations were conducted using our unique hip simulation microseparation methodologies, which reproduce accelerated wear in metal-on-metal bearings and have previously been clinically validated with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings had evidence of head contact on the rim of the cup, which produced stripe wear on the femoral head. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings (two without stripe and two with stripe wear) had lower wear than the previously reported high wearing metal-on-metal bearings. At 2 million cycles, two of the surface-engineered bearings had substantially increased wear rates, four times higher than the high wear rates previously reported for metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. There was

  15. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  16. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of 137Cs generated from Nuclear Spent Fuel under Hypothetic Accidental Condition in the BNPP Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongkuk; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yook, Daesik; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Byung Soo

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the results of atmosphere dispersion modeling using CALPUFF code that are based on computational simulation to evaluate the environmental characteristics of the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP) in west area of UAE. According to meteorological data analysis (2012~2013), the winds from the north(7.68%) and west(9.05%) including NNW(41.63%), NW(28.55%), and WNW(6.31%) winds accounted for more than 90% of the wind directions. East(0.2%) and south(0.6%) direction wind, including ESE(0.31%), SE(0.38%), and SSE(0.38%) were rarely distributed during the simulation period. Seasonal effects were not showed. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and night-time was observed. Approximately 87% of the wind speed was distributed below 5.4m/s (17%, 47% and 23% between the speeds of 0.5-1.8m/s 1.8-3.3m/s and 3.3-5.4m/s, respectively) during the annual period. Seasonal wind speed distribution results presented very similar pattern of annual distribution. Wind speed distribution of day and night, on the other hand, had a discrepancy with annual modeling results than seasonal distribution in some sections. The results for high wind speed (more than 10.8m/s) showed that this wind blew from the west. This high wind speed is known locally as the 'Shamal', which occurs rarely, lasting one or two days with the strongest winds experienced in association with gust fronts and thunderstorms. Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs) dispersion test were simulated under hypothetic severe accidental condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. From the test cases, east-south area of the BNPP site was mainly influenced by 137Cs dispersion. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. Surface roughness tests were performed for the analysis of topographic conditions. According to the surface condition, there are various surface roughness length. Four types

  17. The effect of particle acidity on secondary organic aerosol formation from α-pinene photooxidation under atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuemei; Stroud, Craig A.; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng

    2016-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from photooxidation of α-pinene has been investigated in a photochemical reaction chamber under varied inorganic seed particle acidity levels at moderate relative humidity. The effect of particle acidity on SOA yield and chemical composition was examined under high- and low-NOx conditions. The SOA yield (4.2-7.6 %) increased nearly linearly with the increase in particle acidity under high-NOx conditions. In contrast, the SOA yield (28.6-36.3 %) was substantially higher under low-NOx conditions, but its dependency on particle acidity was insignificant. A relatively strong increase in SOA yield (up to 220 %) was observed in the first hour of α-pinene photooxidation under high-NOx conditions, suggesting that SOA formation was more effective for early α-pinene oxidation products in the presence of fresh acidic particles. The SOA yield decreased gradually with the increase in organic mass in the initial stage (approximately 0-1 h) under high-NOx conditions, which is likely due to the inaccessibility to the acidity over time with the coating of α-pinene SOA, assuming a slow particle-phase diffusion of organic molecules into the inorganic seeds. The formation of later-generation SOA was enhanced by particle acidity even under low-NOx conditions when introducing acidic seed particles after α-pinene photooxidation, suggesting a different acidity effect exists for α-pinene SOA derived from later oxidation stages. This effect could be important in the atmosphere under conditions where α-pinene oxidation products in the gas-phase originating in forested areas (with low NOx and SOx) are transported to regions abundant in acidic aerosols such as power plant plumes or urban regions. The fraction of oxygen-containing organic fragments (CxHyO1+ 33-35 % and CxHyO2+ 16-17 %) in the total organics and the O / C ratio (0.52-0.56) of α-pinene SOA were lower under high-NOx conditions than those under low-NOx conditions (39-40, 17-19, and

  18. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Tan, Z.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Broch, S.; Dorn, H.-P.; Holland, F.; Künstler, C.; Gomm, S.; Rohrer, F.; Schrade, S.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2015-11-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was overflown by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  19. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Broch, Sebastian; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Holland, Frank; Künstler, Christopher; Gomm, Sebastian; Rohrer, Franz; Schrade, Stephanie; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low-pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was over flowed by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  20. Simulation of the zonal mean climatology of the middle atmosphere with a three-dimensional spectral model for solstice and equinox conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akmaev, R. A.; Fomichev, V. I.; Gavrilov, N. M.; Shved, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D spectral model was used to simulate the zonal mean state of the middle atmosphere for solstice and equinox conditions. The model incorporates realistic parameterizations of atmospheric infrared cooling and a gravity wave formulation based on a combination of Lindzen's (1981) and Matsuno's (1982) approaches. The temperature distributions for both seasons and the zonal wind distribution for solstice are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the empirical model of Fleming et al. (1988). Net vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum are in good agreement with systematic observations of gravity waves in the middle atmosphere.

  1. Optimized circulation and weather type classifications relating large-scale atmospheric conditions to local PM10 concentrations in Bavaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitnauer, C.; Beck, C.; Jacobeit, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the last decades the critical increase of the emission of air pollutants like nitrogen dioxide, sulfur oxides and particulate matter especially in urban areas has become a problem for the environment as well as human health. Several studies confirm a risk of high concentration episodes of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm (PM10) for the respiratory tract or cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore it is known that local meteorological and large scale atmospheric conditions are important influencing factors on local PM10 concentrations. With climate changing rapidly, these connections need to be better understood in order to provide estimates of climate change related consequences for air quality management purposes. For quantifying the link between large-scale atmospheric conditions and local PM10 concentrations circulation- and weather type classifications are used in a number of studies by using different statistical approaches. Thus far only few systematic attempts have been made to modify consisting or to develop new weather- and circulation type classifications in order to improve their ability to resolve local PM10 concentrations. In this contribution existing weather- and circulation type classifications, performed on daily 2.5 x 2.5 gridded parameters of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set, are optimized with regard to their discriminative power for local PM10 concentrations at 49 Bavarian measurement sites for the period 1980 to 2011. Most of the PM10 stations are situated in urban areas covering urban background, traffic and industry related pollution regimes. The range of regimes is extended by a few rural background stations. To characterize the correspondence between the PM10 measurements of the different stations by spatial patterns, a regionalization by an s-mode principal component analysis is realized on the high-pass filtered data. The optimization of the circulation- and weather types is implemented using two representative

  2. Mineral oxides change the atmospheric reactivity of soot: NO2 uptake under dark and UV irradiation conditions.

    PubMed

    Romanias, Manolis N; Bedjanian, Yuri; Zaras, Aristotelis M; Andrade-Eiroa, Aurea; Shahla, Roya; Dagaut, Philippe; Philippidis, Aggelos

    2013-12-05

    The heterogeneous reactions between trace gases and aerosol surfaces have been widely studied over the past decades, revealing the crucial role of these reactions in atmospheric chemistry. However, existing knowledge on the reactivity of mixed aerosols is limited, even though they have been observed in field measurements. In the current study, the heterogeneous interaction of NO2 with solid surfaces of Al2O3 covered with kerosene soot was investigated under dark conditions and in the presence of UV light. Experiments were performed at 293 K using a low-pressure flow-tube reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The steady-state uptake coefficient, γ(ss), and the distribution of the gas-phase products were determined as functions of the Al2O3 mass; soot mass; NO2 concentration, varied in the range of (0.2-10) × 10(12) molecules cm(-3); photon flux; and relative humidity, ranging from 0.0032% to 32%. On Al2O3/soot surfaces, the reaction rate was substantially increased, and the formation of HONO was favored compared with that on individual pure soot and pure Al2O3 surfaces. Uptake of NO2 was enhanced in the presence of H2O under both dark and UV irradiation conditions, and the following empirical expressions were obtained: γ(ss,BET,dark) = (7.3 ± 0.9) × 10(-7) + (3.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-8) × RH and γ(ss,BET,UV) = (1.4 ± 0.2) × 10(-6) + (4.0 ± 0.9) × 10(-8) × RH. Specific experiments, with solid sample preheating and doping with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), showed that UV-absorbing organic compounds significantly affect the chemical reactivity of the mixed mineral/soot surfaces. A mechanistic scheme is proposed, in which Al2O3 can either collect electrons, initiating a sequence of redox reactions, or prevent the charge-recombination process, extending the lifetime of the excited state and enhancing the reactivity of the organics. Finally, the atmospheric implications of the observed results are briefly discussed.

  3. Modification of the IR sky temperature under different atmospheric conditions in an arid region in central Saudi Arabia: Experimental and theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, A. H.

    2012-10-01

    Sky temperatures that were estimated from a single-channel IR detector over Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were analyzed from June 2008 to May 2011. The data were divided into three main categories: clear sky, cloudy sky, and dusty conditions. The observation and the research results were as follows. During periods of clear-sky conditions, it was found that the sky temperatures depend mainly on the atmospheric water content, the screen level temperature, and the suspended aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Under cloudy conditions, the sky temperature ranges between -37°C and 5°C. The mean sky temperatures in this case are higher than those of the clear-sky conditions by approximately 11°C to 18°C. The radiative properties of cloudy skies depend on the cloud characteristics and the intervening atmosphere between the ground and the cloud base. The sky temperature during dusty conditions ranged between -20°C and 8.5°C. The study showed that dusty conditions increase the atmospheric temperatures by approximately 17°C to 31°C. The sky temperatures during dusty periods are affected by several factors, such as the air mass properties, which bring the dust, and the dust particle characteristics, such as size, shape, and chemical composition, which are initially determined by the sources from which the dust originated. Theoretical simulations using MODTRAN software were used to investigate the atmospheric thermal radiation spectral distributions in the three categories. The results show that the major changes occurred within the atmospheric window (8-14μm).

  4. Intensive MHD-structures penetration in the middle atmosphere initiated in the ionospheric cusp under quiet geomagnetic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateev, L. N.; Nenovski, P. I.; Vellinov, P. I.

    1989-01-01

    In connection with the recently detected quasiperiodical magnetic disturbances in the ionospheric cusp, the penetration of compressional surface magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves through the middle atmosphere is modelled numerically. For the COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA) 72 model the respective energy density flux of the disturbances in the middle atmosphere is determined. On the basis of the developed model certain conclusions are reached about the height distribution of the structures (energy losses, currents, etc.) initiated by intensive magnetic cusp disturbances.

  5. Impact of packaging atmosphere, storage and processing conditions on the generation of phytoprostanes as quality processing compounds in almond kernels.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Del Amor, Ana María; Aguayo, Encarna; Collado-González, Jacinta; Guy, Alexandre; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2016-11-15

    The thermal processing of almond kernels implies the use of techniques that produce chemical changes such as oxidation. Phytoprostanes (PhytoPs) are considered biomarkers of the oxidative stress in plants. We studied the PhytoP profile in kernels of almond cultivars under different conditions, in relation to packaging, temperature and time of storage and processing. The most abundant PhytoP was the F1t series. The PhytoP levels increased significantly with the time of storage (3 and 6months) and the total PhytoP concentration was higher under air than in a vacuum packaging atmosphere. Storage at 24°C raised the concentrations of individual PhytoPs and the total sum of PhytoPs. The frying and roasting processes led to a strong reduction of the original concentration of most PhytoPs and promoted the synthesis of specific PhytoPs that were not detected in raw kernels and thus could be biomarkers of the degree of oxidative degradation of almonds.

  6. Control of blue mold (Penicillium expansum) by fludioxonil in apples (cv Empire) under controlled atmosphere and cold storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Errampalli, Deena; Northover, John; Skog, Lisa; Brubacher, Nichole R; Collucci, Cheryl A

    2005-06-01

    A reduced risk fungicide, fludioxonil, was tested for its efficacy against blue mold caused by thiabendazole-resistant and -sensitive Penicillium expansum (Link) Thom in apples under three storage conditions. In a co-treatment, fludioxonil and inoculum were applied together to test the protective activity of the fungicide on wounds that had been aged for 1 or 2 days. The fungicide was also tested for its curative activity in post-inoculation treatment on apples that had been inoculated for 1 or 2 days. Fludioxonil was very effective as co-treatment and as post-inoculation treatment. At a concentration of 300 mg litre(-1), fludioxonil gave complete control of post-harvest blue mold caused by the thiabendazole-resistant and -sensitive P expansum for 105 days in controlled atmosphere (CA) storage at 2 (+/-1) degrees C, for 42 days in common cold storage at 4 (+/-1) degrees C and also in a shelf-life study for 6 days at 20 (+/-1) degrees C. Comparison on the effect of fludioxonil in CA storage and common cold storage showed that higher concentrations of fungicide were needed in cold storage than in CA storage. Fludioxonil at a concentration of 450 mg litre(-1), gave 98 and 92% control of blue mold of apples in the simulated shelf-life studies after CA and common cold storages, respectively. Fludioxonil has a potential to be incorporated in the fungicide resistance management strategies for control of blue mold in apples stored for 105 days.

  7. Time-lag properties of corona streamer discharges between impulse sphere and dc needle electrodes under atmospheric air conditions.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    In this study of corona streamer discharges from an impulse generator using a dc power supply, the relationship of the discharge time-lag with the dc bias voltage between the sphere-to-needle electrodes under atmospheric conditions is investigated. Devices utilizing corona discharges have been used to purify air or water, destroy bacteria, and to remove undesirable substances, and in order to achieve fast response times and high power efficiencies in such devices, it is important to minimize the time-lag of the corona discharge. Our experimental results show that (a) the discharge path of a negatively biased needle electrode will be straighter than that of a positively biased needle and (b) the discharge threshold voltage in both the positive and the negative needle electrodes is nearly equal to 33 kV. By expressing the discharge voltage as a power function of time-lag, the extent of corona generation can be quantitatively specified using the exponent of this power function. The observed behavior of a corona streamer discharge between the negative spherical and the positive needle electrodes indicates that the largest power exponent is associated with the shortest time-lag, owing to the reduction in the statistical time-lag in the absence of a formative time-lag.

  8. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  9. Time-lag properties of corona streamer discharges between impulse sphere and dc needle electrodes under atmospheric air conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    In this study of corona streamer discharges from an impulse generator using a dc power supply, the relationship of the discharge time-lag with the dc bias voltage between the sphere-to-needle electrodes under atmospheric conditions is investigated. Devices utilizing corona discharges have been used to purify air or water, destroy bacteria, and to remove undesirable substances, and in order to achieve fast response times and high power efficiencies in such devices, it is important to minimize the time-lag of the corona discharge. Our experimental results show that (a) the discharge path of a negatively biased needle electrode will be straighter than that of a positively biased needle and (b) the discharge threshold voltage in both the positive and the negative needle electrodes is nearly equal to 33 kV. By expressing the discharge voltage as a power function of time-lag, the extent of corona generation can be quantitatively specified using the exponent of this power function. The observed behavior of a corona streamer discharge between the negative spherical and the positive needle electrodes indicates that the largest power exponent is associated with the shortest time-lag, owing to the reduction in the statistical time-lag in the absence of a formative time-lag.

  10. Linking atmospheric synoptic transport, cloud phase, surface energy fluxes, and sea-ice growth: observations of midwinter SHEBA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, P. Ola G.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Perovich, Don; Solomon, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project are used to describe a sequence of events linking midwinter long-range advection of atmospheric heat and moisture into the Arctic Basin, formation of supercooled liquid water clouds, enhancement of net surface energy fluxes through increased downwelling longwave radiation, and reduction in near-surface conductive heat flux loss due to a warming of the surface, thereby leading to a reduction in sea-ice bottom growth. The analyses provide details of two events during Jan. 1-12, 1998, one entering the Arctic through Fram Strait and the other from northeast Siberia; winter statistics extend the results. Both deep, precipitating frontal clouds and post-frontal stratocumulus clouds impact the surface radiation and energy budget. Cloud liquid water, occurring preferentially in stratocumulus clouds extending into the base of the inversion, provides the strongest impact on surface radiation and hence modulates the surface forcing, as found previously. The observations suggest a minimum water vapor threshold, likely case dependent, for producing liquid water clouds. Through responses to the radiative forcing and surface warming, this cloud liquid water also modulates the turbulent and conductive heat fluxes, and produces a thermal wave penetrating into the sea ice. About 20-33 % of the observed variations of bottom ice growth can be directly linked to variations in surface conductive heat flux, with retarded ice growth occurring several days after these moisture plumes reduce the surface conductive heat flux. This sequence of events modulate pack-ice wintertime environmental conditions and total ice growth, and has implications for the annual sea-ice evolution, especially for the current conditions of extensive thinner ice.

  11. Shelf life of air and modified atmosphere-packaged fresh tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fillets stored under chilled and superchilled conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cyprian, Odoli; Lauzon, Hélène L; Jóhannsson, Ragnar; Sveinsdóttir, Kolbrún; Arason, Sigurjón; Martinsdóttir, Emilía

    2013-01-01

    Optimal packaging and storage conditions for fresh tilapia fillets were established by evaluating sensory and microbiological changes, as well as monitoring physicochemical properties. Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) farmed in recirculation aquaculture system was filleted, deskinned, and packaged in air and 50% CO2/50% N2 prior to chilling and superchilling storage at 1°C and −1°C. Sensory analysis of cooked samples revealed a shelf life of 13–15 days for air-packaged fillets during storage at 1°C and 20 days at −1°C. At the end of shelf life in air-packaged fillets, total viable counts (TVC) and pseudomonads counts reached log 8 colony-forming units (CFU) g−1. In 50% CO2/50% N2-packaged fillets, the lag phase and generation time of bacteria were extended and recorded counts were below the limit for consumption (atmosphere (MA) packaging negatively affected color characteristics of the fillets soon after packaging (day 6). Color is an important indicator of tilapia fillets quality and a major factor in influencing retail purchase decisions. In view of that, air packaged at −1°C storage temperature was the optimal condition for fresh tilapia fillets. Total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) and trimethylamine (TMA) were not good indicators of spoilage of tilapia fillets in this study. PMID:24804022

  12. The marine atmospheric boundary layer under strong wind conditions: Organized turbulence structure and flux estimates by airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Durand, Pierre; Canut, Guylaine

    2017-02-01

    During winter, cold air outbreaks take place in the northwestern Mediterranean sea. They are characterized by local strong winds (Mistral and Tramontane) which transport cold and dry continental air across a warmer sea. In such conditions, high values of surface sensible and latent heat flux are observed, which favor deep oceanic convection. The HyMeX/ASICS-MED field campaign was devoted to the study of these processes. Airborne measurements, gathered in the Gulf of Lion during the winter of 2013, allowed for the exploration of the mean and turbulent structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). A spectral analysis based on an analytical model was conducted on 181 straight and level runs. Profiles of characteristic length scales and sharpness parameter of the vertical wind spectrum revealed larger eddies along the mean wind direction associated with an organization of the turbulence field into longitudinal rolls. These were highlighted by boundary layer cloud bands on high-resolution satellite images. A one-dimensional description of the vertical exchanges is then a tricky issue. Since the knowledge of the flux profile throughout the entire MABL is essential for the estimation of air-sea exchanges, a correction of eddy covariance turbulent fluxes was developed taking into account the systematic and random errors due to sampling and data processing. This allowed the improvement of surface fluxes estimates, computed from the extrapolation of the stacked levels. A comparison between those surface fluxes and bulk fluxes computed at a moored buoy revealed considerable differences, mainly regarding the latent heat flux under strong wind conditions.

  13. Laboratory measurements of the 3.7-20 cm wavelength opacity of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Shahan, Patrick; Christopher Barisich, G.; Bellotti, Amadeo

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, multiple observations of Venus have been made at X-Band (3.6 cm) using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and maps have been created of the 3.6 cm emission from Venus (see, e.g., Devaraj, K. [2011]. The Centimeter- and Millimeter-Wavelength Ammonia Absorption Spectra under Jovian Conditions. PhD Thesis, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA). Since the emission morphology is related both to surface features and to deep atmospheric absorption from CO2 and SO2 (see, e.g., Butler, B.J., Steffes, P.G., Suleiman, S.H., Kolodner, M.A., Jenkins, J.M. [2001]. Icarus 154, 226-238), knowledge of the microwave absorption properties of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus is required for proper interpretation. Except for a single measurement campaign conducted at a single wavelength (3.2 cm) over 40 years ago (Ho, W., Kaufman, I.A., Thaddeus, P. [1966]. J. Geophys. Res. 71, 5091-5108), no measurements of the centimeter-wavelength properties of any Venus atmospheric constituent have been conducted under conditions characteristic of the deep atmosphere (pressures from 10 to 92 bars and temperatures from 400 to 700 K). New measurements of the microwave properties of SO2 and CO2 at wavelengths from 3.7 to 20 cm have been conducted under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus, using a new high-pressure system. Results from this measurement campaign conducted at temperatures from 430 K to 560 K and at pressures up to 92 bars are presented. Results indicate that the model for the centimeter-wavelength opacity from pure CO2 (Ho, W., Kaufman, I.A., Thaddeus, P. [1966]. J. Geophys. Res. 71, 5091-5108), is valid over the entire centimeter-wavelength range under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus. Additionally, the laboratory results indicate that both of the models for the centimeter-wavelength opacity of SO2 in a CO2 atmosphere from Suleiman et al. (Suleiman, S

  14. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  15. Formation of Complex Amino Acid Precursors in Simulated Primitive Atmosphere and Their Alteration under Simulated Submarine Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kurihara, Hironari; Hirako, Tomoaki; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kaneko, Takeo; Takano, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    Since late 1970's a great number of submarine hydrothermal systems (SHSs) has been dis-covered, and they are considered possible sites of chemical evolution and generation of life on the Earth since their discovery in late 1970s. A number of experiments simulating the con-ditions of SHSs were conducted, and abiotic production and polymerization of amino acids were reported. Free amino acids were frequently used as starting materials to examine possible organic reactions in the simulation experiments. In our early studies, not free amino acids but complex amino acids precursors with large molecular weights were formed abiotically from simulated primitive Earth atmosphere (a mixture of CO, N2 and H2 O) (Takano et al., 2004). Such complex organics (hereafter referred as to CNWs) should have been delivered to SHSs in Primitive Ocean, where they were subjected to further alteration. We examined possible alteration of the complex organics in high-temperature high-pressure environments by the su-percritical water flow reactor (SCWFR) (Islam et al.. 2003) and an autoclave. CNWs were quite hydrophilic compounds whose molecular weights were ca. 3000. After heating 573 K for 2 min in the SCWFR, aggregates of organics were formed, which were separated from aque-ous solution with a Nucleopore filter (pore size: 200 nm). We propose the following scenario of chemical evolution: (1) Complex organics including amino acid precursors were formed in primitive atmosphere and/or extraterrestrial environments, (ii) they were delivered to primor-dial SHSs, (iii) hydrothermal alteration occurred in SHSs to give organic aggregates, (iv) quite primitive molecular systems with subtle biological functions were generated in the competition among such aggregates. References: Islam, Md. N., Kaneko, T., and Kobayashi, K (2003). Reactions of Amino Acids with a Newly ConstructedSupercritical Water Flow Reactor Simulating Submarine Hydrothermal Systems. Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn., 76, 1171. Takano, Y

  16. The Roles of Radiative Forcing, Sea Surface Temperatures, and Atmospheric and Land Initial Conditions in U.S. Summer Warming Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L.; Vecchi, G. A.; Yang, X.; Gudgel, R.; Delworth, T. L.; Stern, B.; Paffendorf, K.; Underwood, S.; Zeng, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the roles of radiative forcing, sea surface temperatures (SSTs), and atmospheric and land initial conditions in the summer warming episodes of the United States. The summer warming episodes are defined as the above normal (1983-2012) June-August 2-m temperature anomalies, and are referred to as heat waves in this study. Two contrasting cases, the summers of 2006 and 2012, are explored in detail to illustrate the distinct roles of SSTs, and atmospheric and land initial conditions in driving U.S. summer heat waves. For 2012, simulations with the GFDL atmospheric general circulation model reveal that SSTs play a critical role. Further sensitivity experiments reveal the contributions of global SST warming and SSTs in individual ocean basins to the geographic distribution and magnitudes of warm temperature anomalies. In contrast to 2012, for 2006, the atmospheric and land initial conditions are key drivers. The atmospheric (land) initial conditions play a key (minor) role in the central and northwestern (north and east) of U.S.. Due to changes in radiative forcing, the probability of areal averaged U.S. summer temperature anomalies exceeding the observed 2012 temperature anomaly increases with time over the early 21st century. La Nina (El Nino) events tend to increase (reduce) the occurrence of heat waves. The temperatures over the great central U.S. are mostly influenced by El Nino/La Nina. And, the central/western tropical Pacific plays a more important role than the eastern tropical Pacific. Thus, atmospheric and land initial conditions, SSTs and radiative forcing are all important drivers of, and sources of predictability for U.S. summer heat waves.

  17. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  18. Advanced Fast Curing Adhesives for Adverse Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    set of battle damage repair adhesives include Belzona 2311 elastomer , Belzona 1221 super metal, and Belzona metal plug, which are very fast curing...resin, and dinonylphenol (10). Marine use A-788 Splash Zone epoxy- polyamide mastic from Z Spar, Los Angeles, CA was used for testing (11). The

  19. Turbulence Characterization for Ground to Satellite MEMS Based Free Space Optical Communication System in Weak Atmospheric Turbulence Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Agnibesh; Kumar, Vivek; Kaushal, Hemani; Aennam, Harika; Jain, V. K.; Kar, Subrat; Joseph, Joby

    2011-10-01

    The performance of laser communication systems operating in the atmosphere is degraded by atmospheric turbulence effects, which causes irradiance fluctuations in the received signal and result in a random signal fades. We propose to simulate this effect in laboratory using an optical turbulence generator chamber and to measure the level of turbulence using CMOS array.

  20. Evidence for a Progressive Change of Interglacial Climate Conditions Forced by Different Ocean-Atmosphere Circulation Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, H. A.; Kandiano, E. S.; Helmke, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Most paleoclimatic interpretations directly hinge on observations drawn from studying present day processes. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the overall glacial-interglacial climate system, still little is known in detail about climate forcing and feedback mechanisms of the interglacial past. In order to better estimate the 'natural range' of climatically important mechanisms, it seems crucial to make detailed comparison of the present interglaciation (Holocene) with previous warm periods of the late Quaternary. As the impact of climate change is usually strongest in more extreme environments, the temperature-sensitive northern high latitudes are a suitable region for such comparative studies. There is ample evidence from terrestrial and marine archives that the major warm periods of the Quaternary differed significantly from each other. For instance, the last interglacial period (Eemian/125 ka) had climatic conditions indicating slightly higher temperatures at mid-northern latitudes than during the Holocene hypsithermal. Comparing Holocene with Eemian records using marine sediment cores from the polar-subpolar North Atlantic suggests two different circulation styles. During most of the Holocene surface water circulation was dominated by a polar-directed transport of relatively warm surface water from the Atlantic which entered the eastern Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait and across the western Eurasian shelf seas. This type of circulation forced oceanographic fronts into a meridional alignment, a situation which still exists today. For Eemian times, however, paleoproxies indicate a much steeper north-to-south temperature gradient than for the Holocene, suggesting a zonal configuration of the main water mass fronts. This situation led to a reduced water mass exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic seas. Reconstructions of surface conditions during stage 11 (Holsteinian/405 ka) indicate, despite overall boundary conditions were

  1. Modelling changes in nitrogen cycling to sustain increases in forest productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2 and contrasting site conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, R. F.

    2013-11-01

    If increases in net primary productivity (NPP) caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (Ca) are to be sustained, key N processes such as soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and nutrient conservation must also be increased. Simulating the response of these processes to elevated Ca is therefore vital for models used to project the effects of rising Ca on NPP. In this modelling study, hypotheses are proposed for changes in soil mineralization, biological fixation, root nutrient uptake and plant nutrient conservation with changes in Ca. Algorithms developed from these hypotheses were tested in the ecosystem model ecosys against changes in N and C cycling measured over several years under ambient vs. elevated Ca in Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments in the USA at the Duke Forest in North Carolina, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory forest in Tennessee, and the USDA research forest in Wisconsin. More rapid soil N mineralization was found to be vital for simulating sustained increases in NPP measured under elevated vs. ambient Ca at all three FACE sites. This simulation was accomplished by priming decomposition of N-rich humus from increases in microbial biomass generated by increased litterfall modelled under elevated Ca. Greater nonsymbiotic N2 fixation from increased litterfall, root N uptake from increased root growth, and plant N conservation from increased translocation under elevated Ca were found to make smaller contributions to simulated increases in NPP. However greater nutrient conservation enabled larger increases in NPP with Ca to be modelled with coniferous vs. deciduous plant functional types. The effects of these processes on productivity now need to be examined over longer periods under transient rises in Ca and a greater range of site conditions.

  2. Modelling changes in nitrogen cycling to sustain increases in forest productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2 and contrasting site conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, R. F.

    2013-04-01

    If increases in net primary productivity (NPP) caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (Ca) are to be sustained, key N processes such as soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and plant translocation must be hastened. Simulating the response of these processes to elevated Ca is therefore vital for models used to project the effects of rising Ca on NPP. In this modelling study, hypotheses are proposed for changes in soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and plant translocation with changes in Ca. Algorithms developed from these hypotheses were tested in the ecosystem model ecosys against changes in N and C cycling measured over several years under ambient vs. elevatedCa in Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments at the Duke Forest in North Carolina, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory forest in Tennessee, and the USDA research forest in Wisconsin, USA. Simulating more rapid soil N mineralization was found to be vital for modelling sustained increases in NPP measured under elevated vs. ambient Ca at all three FACE sites. This simulation was accomplished by priming decomposition of N-rich humus from increases in microbial biomass generated by increased litterfall modelled under elevated Ca. Simulating more rapid nonsymbiotic N2 fixation, root N uptake and plant N translocation under elevated Ca was found to make much smaller contributions to modelled increases in NPP, although such contributions might be greater over longer periods and under more N-limited conditions than those simulated here. Greater increases in NPP with Ca were also modelled with increased temperature and water stress, and with coniferous vs. deciduous plant functional types. These increases were also associated with changes in N cycling.

  3. E-O Propagation, Signature and System Performance Under Adverse Meteorological Conditions Considering Out-of-Area Operations (La Propagation, la Signature et les performances des Systemes optroniques dans des Conditions Meteorologiques Defavorables, compte Tenu des Operations hors Zone)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    la temnp~ature tinctes. 11 y a donc d~doublement ; on parle encore d’une thermodynamique T (en K) et A l’humidit6 sp~cifique q zone de mirage. (en kg...A4pour les conditions de stratification CHN =-10-3 et CEN =1,2-10-3 (13) instable. Les variables thermodynamiques utilis~es sont La determination de z

  4. A computer controlled mass spectrometer system for investigating the decomposition of non-metallic materials under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A PDP 11/23 quadrupole mass spectrometer system was coupled to a nondiscriminating gas inlet system permitting gases at atmospheric pressure to be admitted into a high vacuum chamber containing the ion source of the mass spectrometer without separation of the gaseous components. The resolution of related software problems has resulted in a convenient computer-mass spectrometer system capable of generating masses, relative intensities and related data on the gaseous products resulting from the atmospheric thermal decomposition of nonmetallic materials.

  5. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  6. Survival of lactic acid and chlorine dioxide treated Campylobacter jejuni under suboptimal conditions of pH, temperature and modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Smigic, Nada; Rajkovic, Andreja; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Arneborg, Nils; Siegumfeldt, Henrik; Devlieghere, Frank

    2010-07-31

    As mild decontamination treatments are gaining more and more interest due to increased consumer demands for fresh foods, it is of great importance to establish the influence of decontamination treatments on the subsequent bacterial behaviour under suboptimal storage conditions. For this purpose Campylobacter jejuni cells treated with lactic acid (LA, 3% lactic acid, pH 4.0, 2 min) or chlorine dioxide (ClO(2), 20 ppm, 2 min) were inoculated in Bolton broth (pH 6.0) and incubated under 80% O(2)/20% N(2), 80% CO(2)/20% N(2), air or micro-aerophilic (10% CO(2)/85% N(2)/5% O(2)) atmosphere, at 4 degrees C during 7 days. Treatment with water served as a control. The most suppressive atmosphere for the survival of C. jejuni was O(2)-rich atmosphere, followed by air, micro-aerophilic and CO(2)-rich atmosphere. The survival of C. jejuni was dependent on the type of initial decontamination treatment, with water treated cells showing the greatest survival followed by LA and ClO(2) treated cells. Intracellular pH (pH(i)) of individual C. jejuni cells was determined using Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Microscopy (FRIM). At all tested conditions, different subpopulation of the cells could be distinguished based on their pH(i) values. The pH(i) response was independent on the surrounding atmosphere since similar distribution of the subpopulations was observed for all tested atmospheres. However, the pH(i) response was dependent on the initial decontamination treatment. The investigation of intracellular parameters gave an insight into pathogen behaviour under stressful conditions at intracellular level. The results obtained in this study highlighted the importance of combining decontamination technologies with subsequent preservation techniques to the control survival and growth of foodborne pathogens.

  7. In-situ characterization of free-volume holes in polymer thin films under controlled humidity conditions with an atmospheric positron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Oshima, Nagayasu; O'Rourke, Brian E.; Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Chen Zhe; Ito, Kenji; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Takuro; Uedono, Akira; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu

    2012-07-02

    A pulsed, slow positron beam, with a diameter of 200 {mu}m, was extracted into air through a thin SiN window of an atmospheric positron probe microanalyzer (PPMA), and used to measure the ortho-positronium lifetimes {tau} in polyvinyl alcohol and polycaprolactam sub-{mu}m-thick films. By measuring the variation of {tau} as a function of relative humidity, the effect of water molecules on the hole sizes, deduced from {tau}, was examined for the films with consideration to the chain mobility. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the atmospheric PPMA to the in-situ characterization of nanoscopic holes in thin films under practical conditions.

  8. Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column in Cloudy Weather Conditions using An IM-CW Lidar at 1.57 Micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael; Harrison, F. Wallace; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Campbell, Joel; Dobler, Jeremy; Meadows, Bryon; Fan, Tai-Fang; Kooi, Susan; Ismail, Syed

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the capability of atmospheric CO2 column measurements under cloudy conditions using an airborne intensity-modulated continuous-wave integrated-path-differential-absorption lidar operating in the 1.57-m CO2 absorption band. The atmospheric CO2 column amounts from the aircraft to the tops of optically thick cumulus clouds and to the surface in the presence of optically thin clouds are retrieved from lidar data obtained during the summer 2011 and spring 2013 flight campaigns, respectively.

  9. Laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity and vapor pressure of sulfuric acid vapor under simulated conditions for the middle atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave absorption measurements at wavelengths of 13.4 and 3.6 cm were made in gaseous H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere under simulated conditions for the Venus middle atmosphere. The results suggest that abundances of gaseous H2SO4 on the order of 15-30 ppm could account for the absorption observed by radio occultation measurements at these wavelengths. They also imply that such abundances would correspond to saturation vapor pressure existing at or above the 46-48-km range, which correlates with the observed cloud base.

  10. Tracer studies to characterize the effects of roadside noise barriers on near-road pollutant dispersion under varying atmospheric stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Dennis; Clawson, Kirk L.; Carter, Roger G.; Rich, Jason D.; Eckman, Richard M.; Perry, Steven G.; Isakov, Vlad; Heist, David K.

    2010-01-01

    A roadway toxics dispersion study was conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to document the effects on concentrations of roadway emissions behind a roadside sound barrier in various conditions of atmospheric stability. The homogeneous fetch of the INL, controlled emission source, lack of other manmade or natural flow obstructions, and absence of vehicle-generated turbulence reduced the ambiguities in interpretation of the data. Roadway emissions were simulated by the release of an atmospheric tracer (SF 6) from two 54 m long line sources, one for an experiment with a 90 m long noise barrier and one for a control experiment without a barrier. Simultaneous near-surface tracer concentration measurements were made with bag samplers on identical sampling grids downwind from the line sources. An array of six 3-d sonic anemometers was employed to measure the barrier-induced turbulence. Key findings of the study are: (1) the areal extent of higher concentrations and the absolute magnitudes of the concentrations both increased as atmospheric stability increased; (2) a concentration deficit developed in the wake zone of the barrier with respect to concentrations at the same relative locations on the control experiment at all atmospheric stabilities; (3) lateral dispersion was significantly greater on the barrier grid than the non-barrier grid; and (4) the barrier tended to trap high concentrations near the "roadway" (i.e. upwind of the barrier) in low wind speed conditions, especially in stable conditions.

  11. Redox conditions in the atmosphere and shallow-marine environments during the first Huronian deglaciation: Insights from Os isotopes and redox-sensitive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kosuke T.; Sekine, Yasuhito; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Tajika, Eiichi; Senda, Ryoko; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Tada, Ryuji; Goto, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Shinji; Maruoka, Teruyuki; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Ogawa, Nanako O.

    2013-08-01

    The Paleoproterozoic (2.5-2.0 Ga) is one of the most important periods in Earth's history, and was characterized by a rise in atmospheric oxygen levels and repeated (at least three) severe glaciations (the Huronian glaciations). In this study, we investigate redox conditions in the atmosphere and in shallow-marine environments immediately after the first Huronian glaciation based on the isotopic composition of Os, and the abundance of redox-sensitive elements (Os, Re, and Mo) in sedimentary rocks from the Huronian Supergroup, Canada. We found no significant authigenic enrichment of Os in the sedimentary rocks deposited during the first Huronian deglaciation. The initial isotopic composition of Os in the sediments was close to that of chondrite at the time of deposition (Os187/188Os=∼0.11). These results suggest that atmospheric O2 levels were insufficient to mobilize radiogenic Os through continental weathering (pO2<10-5-10-3 present atmospheric level (PAL)). In contrast, we found enrichment of Re in the sedimentary rocks, which suggests the occurrence of oxidative weathering of Re under mildly oxidizing conditions (>10-8-10-5 PAL). Despite the Re enrichment, low abundances of Mo imply possible non-sulfidic conditions in shallow-marine environments at the time of deposition. Together with the results of organic carbon and sulfur analyses, we suggest that atmospheric O2 remained at relatively low levels of around 10-8-10-5 PAL after the first Huronian deglaciation, which contrasts with proposed dramatic increases in O2 after the second and third Huronian deglaciations. These results imply that the second and third Huronian glaciations may have been global events, associated with climatic jumps from severe glaciations to super-greenhouse conditions and the subsequent blooming of photosynthetic cyanobacteria in the glacial aftermath.

  12. Biomolecular characterization, identification, enzyme activities of molds and physiological changes in sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas) stored under controlled atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Oladoye, C. O.; Connerton, I. F.; Kayode, R. M. O.; Omojasola, P. F.; Kayode, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial attacks during storage are one of the primary causes of product deterioration, and can limit the process of prolonging the shelf-life of harvested food. In this study, sweet potatoes were stored at temperatures of 13, 21, and 29 °C for 4 weeks. Samples were collected during storage and plated on potato dextrose agar, from which axenic mold cultures were obtained and identified using 26S rRNA gene sequences. Physiological changes of potato tubers were assessed with respect to pathogenicity, enzyme activity, and atmospheric storage conditions. Six fungal species were identified, namely Penicillium chrysogenum (P. rubens), P. brevicompactum, Mucor circinelloides, Cladosporium cladosporiodes, P. expansum, and P. crustosum. The following fungal isolates, namely P. expansum, P. brevicompactum, and Rhizopus oryzae, were recovered from the re-infected samples and selected according to their levels of enzyme activity. This study revealed high levels of activity for cellulase and pectinase, which were most notable during the initial three days of testing, and were followed by a steady decrease (P<0.05). Polygalacturonase activity was prominent with values ranging from 12.64 to 56.79 U/mg (P. expansum) and 18.36 to 79.01 U/mg (P. brevicompactum). Spoilage was obvious in the control group, which had a 100% decay at the end of the experimental period compared with samples treated with iprodione and sodium hypochlorite, in which the decay rates were 5% and 55%, respectively. The data for the iprodione- and sodium hypochlorite-treated samples at the end of the 3-month storage period showed that they were significantly different (P=0.041), with the sodium hypochlorite-treated samples producing twice the rate of infection compared to the iprodione-treated samples. The comparative rate of the progression of decay in the treated samples can be expressed as iprodione

  13. Gas phase kinetics for the ozonolysis of n-butyl methacrylate, ethyl crotonate and vinyl propionate under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona Colmán, Elizabeth; Blanco, María B.; Barnes, Ian; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2013-07-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of ozone with n-butyl methacrylate, ethyl crotonate and vinyl propionate have been determined at 298 ± 1 K and atmospheric pressure. The following room temperature rate coefficients (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1 units) were obtained: k1(O3 + CH2dbnd C(CH3)C(O)OC4H9) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10-17, k2(O3 + CH3CHdbnd CHC(O)OCH2CH3) = (8.0 ± 1.8) × 10-18 and k3(O3 + CH3CH2C(O)OCHdbnd CH2) = (5.3 ± 1.3) × 10-18. This is the first kinetic study for these reactions at atmospheric pressure. The effect of substituent groups on the overall rate coefficients is analyzed. Free energy relationships are presented and atmospheric lifetimes are discussed.

  14. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  15. A study of the effect of molecular and aerosol conditions in the atmosphere on air fluorescence measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perform calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by cosmic rays of above 1018eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group of monitoring instruments to record atmospheric conditions across the detector site, an area exceeding 3000 km 2. The atmospheric data are used extensively in the reconstruction of air showers, and are particularly important for the correct determination of shower energies and the depths of shower maxima. This paper contains a summary of the molecular and aerosol conditions measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory since the start of regular operations in 2004, and includes a discussion of the impact of these measurements on air shower reconstructions. Between 1018 and 1020eV, the systematic uncertainties due to all atmospheric effects increase from 4% to 8% in measurements of shower energy, and 4gcm to 8gcm in measurements of the shower maximum.

  16. Vertical variations in the turbulent structure of the surface boundary layer over vineyards under unstable atmospheric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to their highly-structured canopy, turbulent characteristics within and above vineyards, may not conform to those typically exhibited by other agricultural and natural ecosystems. Using data collected as a part of the Grape Remote sensing and Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experime...

  17. Terrestrial atmospheric responses on Svalbard to the 20 March 2015 Arctic total solar eclipse under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Pasachoff, J M; Peñaloza-Murillo, M A; Carter, A L; Roman, M T

    2016-09-28

    This article reports on the near-surface atmospheric response at the High Arctic site of Svalbard, latitude 78° N, as a result of abrupt changes in solar insolation during the 20 March 2015 equinox total solar eclipse and notifies the atmospheric science community of the availability of a rare dataset. Svalbard was central in the path of totality, and had completely clear skies. Measurements of shaded air temperature and atmospheric pressure show only weak, if any, responses to the reduced insolation. A minimum in the air temperature at 1.5 m above the ground occurred starting 2 min following the end of totality, though this drop was only slightly beyond the observed variability for the midday period. Eclipse-produced variations in surface pressure, if present, were less than 0.3 hPa.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  18. A Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean modelling system to investigate the exceptional Winter 2012 conditions in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchi, Antonio; Marcello Miglietta, M.; Benetazzo, Alvise; Warner, John C.; Zambon, Joseph B.; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Bergamasco, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Carniel, Sandro

    2014-05-01

    During late January and early February 2012, a persistent cyclonic circulation associated with an exceptional cold anomaly dominated the Mediterranean region. Among the resulting effects, the northern Adriatic sea basin (NA) experienced a very large energy losses, mostly related to the intense and cold Bora winds blowing from north-east. Sea water temperature along the Italian coast dropped down to 6 °C, while part of the Venice lagoon got frozen. These series of exceptionally cold air outbreak episodes, as well as their effects on the NA circulation and dense water formation, are investigated by means of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System, where the oceanographic model ROMS, the atmospheric model WRF and the wave model SWAN are coupled via MCT. In this specific application to the NA sea configuration, lasting from January 23 to February 23, 2012, particular emphasis was devoted to the analysis of the atmosphere-ocean-waves interactions. First, we employ the "stand alone" WRF atmospheric model in 4 different modes ("zero mode", i.e. using the skin temperature from the global atmospheric model without updating in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST); "static mode", i.e. retaining the January 23 radiometer SST; "dynamic mode", updating every 6 hours the SST as derived from radiometer data at 0.83 deg resolution; "OML mode", as above, but using a simple Ocean Mixed Layer model available within WRF to predict the temperature evolution). Second, the WRF-ROMS one-way forced case is analyzed, where no feedbacks to the atmosphere are provided from the ocean model ROMS, but momentum and heat fluxes are determined by WRF model. Then, the WRF-ROMS two-way coupled case is implemented (where the atmosphere model exchanges momentum and heat, and the ocean model exchanges SST with the Atmospheric model). Finally, the WRF-ROMS-SWAN two-way coupled case for waves-ocean-atmosphere is performed, where common variables are exchanged every 1200

  19. Atmospheric Circulation Influence on the Winter Thermal Conditions in Poland in 2021-2050 Based on the RACMO2 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędruszkiewicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Thermal conditions are largely determined by atmospheric circulation. Therefore, projection of future temperature changes should be considered in relation to changes in circulation patterns. This paper assess to what extent changes in circulation correspond to spatial variability of the winter temperature increase in Poland in 2021-2050 period based on the RACMO2 model. The daily data of the mean temperature and sea level pressure (SLP) from selected regional climate model and observations were used. SLP data were used to determine the advection types and circulation character. Firstly, changes in frequency of circulation types between 2021-2050 and 1971-2000 periods were examined. Then changes in air temperature for specific circulation type in relation to reference period were studied. Finally, the influence of atmospheric circulation on spatial temperature variation was discussed. Considerably high increase in cyclonic situation of more than 18%, especially from the west and south-west direction, and decrease in anticyclonic situation mainly from the west and northwest in winter was noticed. Changes in frequency of circulation types result in temperature growth. For some types it is predicted that warming can reach even 3-4°C. The cyclonic (Ec, SEc, Sc) and anticylonic (SEa, Sa, Ea) types are likely to foster the highest warming in the scenario period. Polska charakteryzuje się znacznym zróżnicowaniem przestrzennym w rozkładzie temperatury powietrza w porze zimowej. W sezonie zimowym przeważa południkowy układ izoterm co świadczy o silnym oddziaływaniu z jednej strony ciepłych, wilgotnych mas powietrza napływających znad Atlantyku, a z drugiej chłodniejszych i bardziej suchych znad kontynentu azjatyckiego. Regionalne modele klimatu opracowane dla obszaru Europy wskazują jednoznacznie na wzrost temperatury w okresie zimy na obszarze całego kontynentu, szczególnie a wschodzie i północnym-wschodzie kontynentu, nawet o 3°C. Projekcje te s

  20. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  1. Temperature dependence of carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals under atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piansawan, Tammarat; Saccon, Marina; Laumer, Werner; Gensch, Iulia; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of the global distribution of atmospheric ethane sources and sinks by using the 13C isotopic composition requires accurate knowledge of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of its atmospheric removal reactions. The quantum mechanical prediction implies the necessity to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range by experiment. In this study, the KIE and its temperature dependence for ethane oxidation by OH radicals was investigated at ambient pressure in a temperature range of 243 K to 303 K. The chemical reactions were carried out in a 15 L PFE reaction chamber, suspended in a thermally controlled oven. The isotope ratios of the gas phase components during the course of the reactions were measured by Thermal Desorption -- Gas Chromatography -- Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). For each temperature, the KIE was derived from the temporal evolution of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of ethane using a method adapted from the relative reaction rate concept. The room temperature KIE of the ethane reaction with OH radicals was found to be 6.85 ± 0.32 ‰. This value is in agreement with the previously reported value of 8.57 ± 1.95 ‰ [Anderson et al. 2004] but has a substantially lower uncertainty. The experimental results will be discussed with the KIE temperature dependence predicted by quantum mechanical calculations. Reference: Rebecca S. Anderson, Lin Huang, Richard Iannone, Alexandra E. Thompson, and Jochen Rudolph (2004), Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase Reactions of Light Alkanes and Ethene with the OH Radical at 296 ± 4 K, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 11537--11544

  2. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  3. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  4. Effect of cadmium pollution of atmospheric origin on field-grown maize in two consecutive years with diverse weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Anda, Angéla; Illés, Bernadett; Soós, G

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of atmospheric cadmium (Cd) pollution of atmospheric origin in maize compared to a control without Cd pollution. The plant parameters investigated were the timing of phenological phases, leaf area index (LAI) and yield, while radiation and water regime parameters were represented by albedo (reflection grade) and evapotranspiration, respectively. In treatments with and without irrigation, Cd caused a significant reduction in LAI, accompanied by lower evapotranspiration. The mean annual albedo in the Cd-polluted treatment only rose to a moderate extent in 2011 (in 2010 there was hardly any change), but changes within the year were more pronounced in certain phases of development. Cd led to greater reflection of radiation by plants during the vegetative phase, so the radiation absorption of the canopy was reduced leading to a lower level of evapotranspiration. In the dry, hot year of 2011 maize plants in the non-irrigated treatments showed a substantial reduction in grain dry matter, but maize yield losses could be reduced by irrigation in areas exposed to Cd pollution.

  5. Ice nucleation by different types of soil dusts under mixed-phase cloud conditions: Laboratory studies and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobo, Y.; DeMott, P. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Swoboda-Colberg, N. G.; Franc, G. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that ice nucleation by desert soil dusts composed largely of minerals plays an important role in forming ice crystals in mixed-phase clouds and subsequent precipitation. More recently, several studies have suggested that soil dusts having higher contents of soil organic matter (SOM) may also contribute significantly to atmospheric ice nucleation. In this study, we examine the ice nucleation properties of soil dusts derived from different locations in the world. Our results show that the ice nucleating ability of agricultural soil dusts derived from the largest dust source regions in North America is almost comparable to that of desert soil dusts at temperatures colder than about -15°C. We also confirm that the agricultural soil dusts can serve as effective ice nuclei (IN) at much warmer temperatures. On the other hand, our results indicate that the ice nucleating ability of the agricultural soil dusts is significantly reduced after H2O2 digestion, while the reduction is not significant for the desert soil dusts. In this regard, based on single particle analysis, we demonstrate that such a significant reduction observed in the agricultural soil dusts is mainly attributable to the removal of organic-rich particles (namely, SOM particles), which have much higher ice nucleating ability than mineral particles. Moreover, we discuss the potential contributions of these soil dusts to atmospheric IN populations.

  6. The gas-phase degradation of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon towards OH radical under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Borrás, Esther; Vázquez, Mónica; Vera, Teresa

    2014-09-01

    The OH initiated oxidation of chlorpyrifos (a widely used insecticide) and its photooxidation product chlorpyrifos-oxon were investigated at the large outdoor European Photoreactor (EUPHORE). The rate constants for reaction of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon with OH radicals were measured using a conventional relative rate method. The value of the OH reaction rate constants with chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon were determined to be k=(9.1±2.1)×10(-11)cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1) and (1.7±0.9)×10(-11)cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1) at 303±5K and atmospheric pressure. They gave an atmospheric lifetime in relation to the reaction with OH of approximately 2h and 11h for chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon, respectively. Photolysis was found to be unimportant relative to reaction with OH. The main products detected in the gas phase from the reaction of OH with chlorpyrifos were SO2, chlorpyrifos-oxon, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol and diethylphosphate with molar yields of 17±5%, ∼10%, 8±4% and 30±9%, respectively.

  7. On the predominance of unstable atmospheric conditions in the marine boundary layer offshore of the U.S. northeastern coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cristina L.; Colle, Brian A.; Veron, Dana L.; Veron, Fabrice; Sienkiewicz, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    The marine boundary layer of the northeastern U.S. is studied with focus on wind speed, atmospheric stability, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), the three most relevant properties in the context of offshore wind power development. Two long-term observational data sets are analyzed. The first one consists of multilevel meteorological variables measured up to 60 m during 2003-2011 at the offshore Cape Wind tower, located near the center of the Nantucket Sound. The second data set comes from the 2013-2014 IMPOWR campaign (Improving the Modeling and Prediction of Offshore Wind Resources), in which wind and wave data were collected with new instruments on the Cape Wind platform, in addition to meteorological data measured during 19 flight missions offshore of New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. It is found that, in this region: (1) the offshore wind resource is remarkable, with monthly average wind speeds at 60 m exceeding 7 m s-1 all year round, highest winds in winter (10.1 m s-1) and lowest in summer (7.1 m s-1), and a distinct diurnal modulation, especially in summer; (2) the marine boundary layer is predominantly unstable (61% unstable vs. 21% neutral vs. 18% stable), meaning that mixing is strong, heat fluxes are positive, and the wind speed profile is often nonlogarithmic (~40% of the time); and (3) the shape of the wind speed profile (log versus nonlog) is an effective qualitative proxy for atmospheric stability, whereas TKE alone is not.

  8. A hail risk map for Europe based on overshooting top detections and atmospheric conditions associated to hail reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgen Punge, Heinz; Kunz, Michael; Bedka, Kristopher M.

    2015-04-01

    Severe hailstorms have caused widespread damage in many parts of Europe in the past. Besides orographic features, their frequency and intensity depend on the climatic properties of the atmosphere and are thus susceptible to change in an altered climate. In a first step, a continental scale climatology of hail risk is needed as a reference. We propose a hail hazard map based on the detection of cold overshooting cloud tops (OTs) from the MSG operational weather satellites, in combination with a hail-specific filter derived from the ERA-INTERIM reanalysis. This filter has been designed based on the atmospheric properties in the vicinity of hail reports registered in the European Severe Weather Database (ESWD). Selected properties include freezing level height, tropopause height, equivalent potential temperature, total column water and 2m dew point temperature, evaluated on the nearest time step and interpolated from the reanalysis grid to the location of the hail report. The major hail risk areas from most national scale climatologies are retained. The largest hail risk in Europe is found in Northern Italy, followed by Styria in Austria and Catalonia in Spain. Pronounced hail risk is also found in large parts of Eastern Europe, around the Alps, the Czech Republic, Southern Germany, Southern and Eastern France, in the Iberic and Apennine mountain ranges.

  9. The Martian atmospheric ion escape rate dependence on solar wind and solar EUV conditions: 1. Seven years of Mars Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, Robin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Nilsson, Hans; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Holmström, Mats

    2015-07-01

    More than 7 years of ion flux measurements in the energy range 10 eV-15 keV have allowed the ASPERA-3/IMA (Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Ions/Ion Mass Analyzer) instrument on Mars Express to collect a large database of ion measurements in the Mars environment, over a wide range of upstream solar wind (density and velocity) and radiation (solar EUV intensity) conditions. We investigate the influence of these parameters on the Martian atmospheric ion escape rate by integrating IMA heavy ion flux measurements taken in the Martian tail at similar (binned) solar wind density (nsw), velocity (vsw), and solar EUV intensity (IEUV) conditions. For the same solar wind velocity and EUV intensity ranges (vsw and Is constrained), we find a statistically significant decrease of up to a factor of 3 in the atmospheric ion escape rate with increased average solar wind density (5.6 × 1024s-1 to 1.9 × 1024s-1 for 0.4 cm-3 and 1.4 cm-3, respectively). For low solar wind density (0.1-0.5 cm-3) and low EUV intensity, the escape rate increases with increasing solar wind velocity from 2.4 × 1024s-1 to 5.6 × 1024s-1. During high solar EUV intensities the escape fluxes are highly variable, leading to large uncertainties in the estimated escape rates; however, a statistically significant increase in the escape rate is found between low/high EUV for similar solar wind conditions. Empirical-analytical models for atmospheric escape are developed by fitting calculated escape rates to all sufficiently sampled upstream conditions.

  10. Carbon dioxide, argon, nitrogen and methane clathrate hydrates: Thermodynamic modelling, investigation of their stability in Martian atmospheric conditions and variability of methane trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herri, Jean-Michel; Chassefière, Eric

    2012-12-01

    This paper deals with the stability of clahtrate hydrates at low temperature and low pressure in the conditions prevailing in the atmosphere and at the surface of Mars. We fit the classical van der Waals model to compare deviation from experimental results published in the literature. It appears to be acceptable and allows to simulating a Martian gas, CO2 dominated (95.3%) plus nitrogen (2.7%) and argon (2%). The hydrate is a CO2-based hydrate which is unstable during Mars’ summer and stable during Mars’ winter. The proportion of methane in the hydrate is estimated and is found to be from one tenth to one third of the composition of the gas phase. The proportion depends on the crystallographic structure which is assumed to be formed. In fact, both the structure I and II appear to be stable in the conditions of Mars’ winter. The consequences of these results on our understanding of the atmospheric cycle of Martian methane are drawn and analyzed. We propose upper limits on (i) the seasonal variation of methane due to a hypothesized alternate formation of CO2/N2/Ar/CH4 hydrates on the seasonal polar caps, and (ii) on the lifetime of atmospheric methane with respect to an hypothesized continuous trapping under hydrate form on the south polar cap. We show that these mechanisms have only small effects, and cannot play a significant role in the dynamics of methane in present Mars’ atmosphere. Hypothesized clathrate hydrates trapped in the permanent south polar cap could include methane in relative proportions between 0.1 and 0.4 times the average global atmospheric ratio. Searching for the spectral signatures of clathrate hydrates on the caps and, if detectable, of inhomogeneities of the CH4 mixing ratio in possible local atmospheric plumes forming during the sublimation of polar hydrate pockets in spectroscopic data from existing (Mars Express, MRO) and future (TGO-Exomars) missions is an interesting challenge of Mars science and astrobiology.

  11. Experimental investigation of laser transmission at 1.06μm in horizontal atmosphere under fine and haze-fog conditions of summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kaixin; Qiao, Chunhong; Feng, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Pengfei; Fan, Chengyu

    2016-09-01

    With two sets of experimental instruments, laser transmission was investigated through horizontal atmosphere at 1.06 μm under fine and haze-fog events. One set of the instruments is an indirect transmission meter used to measure visibility and the other one is a direct transmission meter used to measure the attenuation of laser power. Results show that the variation of transmittance got from laser power (Tp) and that obtained by visibility (Tvis) are highly correlated. For relative humidity (RH) below 85%, the curve of Tvis fits that of Tp very well. While the RH is above 85%, the Tvis is more likely smaller than Tp under fine meteorological condition, but under haze-fog condition Tvis is larger than Tp on the contrary. For different weather condition, the relation efficient between extinction coefficient and visibility is different. Even for similar visibility, the extinction coefficient of haze-fog event is larger than that of fine event.

  12. Near-field krypton-85 measurements in stable meteorological conditions around the AREVA NC La Hague reprocessing plant: estimation of atmospheric transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Connan, O; Solier, L; Hébert, D; Maro, D; Lamotte, M; Voiseux, C; Laguionie, P; Cazimajou, O; Le Cavelier, S; Godinot, C; Morillon, M; Thomas, L; Percot, S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the near-field dispersion of (85)Kr around the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague (AREVA NC La Hague - France) under stable meteorological conditions. Twenty-two (85)Kr night-time experimental campaigns were carried out at distances of up to 4 km from the release source. Although the operational Gaussian models predict for these meteorological conditions a distance to plume touchdown of several kilometers, we almost systematically observed a marked ground signal at distances of 0.5-4 km. The calculated atmospheric transfer coefficients (ATC) show values (1) higher than those observed under neutral conditions, (2) much higher than those proposed by the operational models, and (3) higher than those used in the impact assessments.

  13. Evaporation and condensation in soils: Experimental and modeling investigation to compare non-equilibrium-based approaches under different atmospheric boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation and condensation in bare soils govern water and energy fluxes between the land and atmosphere. Despite their importance to the hydrologic cycle, there is great uncertainty associated with our understanding of these complex multiphase phenomena. At the representative elementary volume scale, phase change (i.e. evaporation/condensation) between water vapor and liquid water is commonly evaluated in soil hydrology using the equilibrium assumption. The equilibrium-based approach assumes that within the soil pores, phase change occurs instantaneously. However, finite volatilization/condensation times have been observed experimentally under certain conditions calling into question the validity of using the equilibrium assumption for all possible land-atmospheric interaction scenarios. The use of non-equilibrium mass transfer relationships is based on the Hertz-Knudsen (HK) equation derived from the kinetic theory of gases. Multiple formulations have been posited to numerically represent phase change between water vapor and liquid water, many relying on empirical fitting parameters. The purpose of this investigation was to perform an unbiased comparison between the various non-equilibrium phase change formulations using a fully coupled heat and mass transfer model that simulates the processes of evaporation/condensation from soils using precision generated laboratory data. A non-isothermal solution was implemented in a numerical model to account for five different non-equilibrium phase change formulations reported in literature. A series of five experiments were performed using a unique laboratory system consisting of a soil tank with controlled airflow boundary conditions at the soil surface. The apparatus was equipped with a sensor network for continuous and autonomous collection of soil moisture, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, and wind velocity data. Soil surface conditions (e.g. temperature, diurnal variations and wind speed) and initial

  14. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  15. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  16. Interaction Between CO2-Rich Sulfate Solutions and Carbonate Reservoir Rocks from Atmospheric to Supercritical CO2 Conditions: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, J.; Garcia-Rios, M.; Luquot, L.; Soler Matamala, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    A test site for CO2 geological storage is situated in Hontomín (Spain) with a reservoir rock that is mainly composed of limestone. During and after CO2 injection, the resulting CO2-rich acid brine gives rise to the dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate since the reservoir brine contains sulfate. Experiments using columns filled with crushed limestone or dolostone were conducted under different P-pCO2 conditions (atmospheric: 1-10-3.5 bar; subcritical: 10-10 bar; and supercritical: 150-34 bar), T (25, 40 and 60 ºC) and input solution compositions (gypsum-undersaturated and gypsum-equilibrated solutions). We evaluated the effect of these parameters on the coupled reactions of calcite/dolomite dissolution and gypsum/anhydrite precipitation. The CrunchFlow and PhreeqC (v.3) numerical codes were used to perform reactive transport simulations of the experiments. Under the P-pCO2-T conditions, the volume of precipitated gypsum was smaller than the volume of dissolved carbonate minerals, yielding an increase in porosity (Δporosity up to ≈ 4%). A decrease in T favored limestone dissolution regardless of pCO2 owing to increasing undersaturation with decreasing temperature. However, gypsum precipitation was favored at high T and under atmospheric pCO2 conditions but not at high T and under 10 bar of pCO2 conditions. The increase in limestone dissolution with pCO2 was directly attributed to pH, which was more acidic at higher pCO2. Increasing pCO2, carbonate dissolution occurred along the column whereas it was localized in the very inlet under atmospheric conditions. This was due to the buffer capacity of the carbonic acid, which maintains pH at around 5 and keeps the solution undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite along the column. 1D reactive transport simulations reproduced the experimental data (carbonate dissolution and gypsum precipitation for different P-pCO2-T conditions). Drawing

  17. Aeolian deposition change in the Peruvian central continental shelf during the last millennium and its relationship with atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, F. J., Sr.; Sifeddine, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a record of laminated sediment cores retrieved in the Pisco region (14 °S) characterized by local aeolian inputs. This record covers the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to Little Ice Age (LIA) and the Current Warm Period (CWP) at centennial to sub-decadal resolution. The aim of the study is to reconstruct the patterns of aeolian sedimentation as well as the most important processes that control the input of this material to understand how these components reflect atmospheric climate variability during the last millennium. Assuming that the mineral fraction of the sediment is composed of several lognormally distributed particle populations, we applied an iterative least-square fitting routine to determine the number and the characteristics of the individual particles populations. This allows inferring the spatial and temporal variation of particles populations and thus transport mechanisms involved. Two components with grain size modes at 54±11 μm and 90±11 μm related with local aeolian erosion over the Pisco region were found. Our results showed active aeolian erosion during the second half of the MCA and rapid decrease from the MCA to the LIA. During the LIA the aeolian deposition exhibited a decreasing activity. During the CWP the aeolian deposition increased progressively. Comparison with others South American records indicates that those changes are linked to change in the meridional position of the Intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Subtropical High (SPSH) at the centennial time resolution. Finally the CWP period showed an increase in the aeolian deposition and thus in the wind intensity over the past two centuries. This likely represents the result of the modern position of the ITCZ-SPSH system and the associated intensification of the local and regional winds. Nevertheless, the aeolian deposition and in consequence the wind intensity and variability of the last 100 yr are stronger than during the second sequence of the MCA

  18. Direct and indirect effects of atmospheric conditions and soil moisture on surface energy partitioning revealed by a prolonged drought at a temperate forest site

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong; Meyers, T. P.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hanson, Paul J; Yang, Bai; Heuer, Mark; Hosman, K. P.; Riggs, Jeffery S; Sluss, Daniel Wayne; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the mechanism that controls the variation of surface energy partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes at a temperate deciduous forest site in central Missouri, USA. Taking advantage of multiple micrometeorological and ecophysiological measurements and a prolonged drought in the middle of the 2005 growing season at this site, we studied how soil moisture, atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and net radiation affected surface energy partitioning. We stratified these factors to minimize potential confounding effects of correlation among them. We found that all three factors had direct effects on surface energy partitioning, but more important, all three factors also had crucial indirect effects. The direct effect of soil moisture was characterized by a rapid decrease in Bowen ratio with increasing soil moisture when the soil was dry and by insensitivity of Bowen ratio to variations in soil moisture when the soil was wet. However, the rate of decrease in Bowen ratio when the soil was dry and the level of soil moisture above which Bowen ratio became insensitive to changes in soil moisture depended on atmospheric conditions. The direct effect of increased net radiation was to increase Bowen ratio. The direct effect of VPD was very nonlinear: Increased VPD decreased Bowen ratio at low VPD but increased Bowen ratio at high VPD. The indirect effects were much more complicated. Reduced soil moisture weakened the influence of VPD but enhanced the influence of net adiation on surface energy partitioning. Soil moisture also controlled how net radiation influenced the relationship between surface energy partitioning and VPD and how VPD affected the relationship between surface energy partitioning and net radiation. Furthermore, both increased VPD and increased net radiation enhanced the sensitivity of Bowen ratio to changes in soil moisture and the effect of drought on surface energy partitioning. The direct and indirect

  19. Sea-ice, clouds and atmospheric conditions in the arctic and their interactions as derived from a merged C3M data product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Bappaditya

    The polar regions of the world constitute an important sector in the global energy balance. Among other effects responsible for the change in the sea-ice cover like ocean circulation and ice-albedo feedback, the cloud-radiation feedback also plays a vital role in modulation of the Arctic environment. However the annual cycle of the clouds is very poorly represented in current global circulation models. This study aimed to explore the atmospheric conditions in the Arctic on an unprecedented spatial coverage spanning 70°N to 80°N through the use of a merged data product, C3MData (derived from NASA's A-Train Series). The following three topics provide outline on how this dataset can be used to accomplish a detailed analysis of the Arctic environment and provide the modelling community with first information to update their models aimed at better forecasts. (1)The three properties of the Arctic climate system to be studied using the C3MData are sea-ice, clouds, and the atmospheric conditions. The first topic is to document the present states of the three properties and also their time evolutions or their seasonal cycles. (2)The second topic is aimed at the interactions or the feedbacks processes among the three properties. For example, the immediate alteration in the fluxes and the feedbacks arising from the change in the sea-ice cover is investigated. Seasonal and regional variations are also studied. (3)The third topics is aimed at the processes in native spatial resolution that drive or accompany with sea ice melting and sea ice growth. Using a composite approach based on a classification due to surface type, it is found that limitation of the water vapour influx from the surface due to change in phase at the surface featuring open oceans or marginal sea-ice cover to complete sea-ice cover is a major determinant in the modulation of the atmospheric moisture. The impact of the cloud-radiative effects in the Arctic is found to vary with sea-ice cover and seasonally

  20. SCIENTIFIC UNCERTAINTIES IN ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS III: BOUNDARY AND INITIAL CONDITIONS, MODEL GRID RESOLUTION, AND HG(II) REDUCTION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we investigate the CMAQ model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary/initial conditions (BC/IC), model grid resolution (12- versus 36-km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms. The model response to the change of g...

  1. Responses of sap flow, leaf gas exchange and growth of hybrid aspen to elevated atmospheric humidity under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Niglas, Aigar; Kupper, Priit; Tullus, Arvo; Sellin, Arne

    2014-05-15

    An increase in average air temperature and frequency of rain events is predicted for higher latitudes by the end of the 21st century, accompanied by a probable rise in air humidity. We currently lack knowledge on how forest trees acclimate to rising air humidity in temperate climates. We analysed the leaf gas exchange, sap flow and growth characteristics of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) trees growing at ambient and artificially elevated air humidity in an experimental forest plantation situated in the hemiboreal vegetation zone. Humidification manipulation did not affect the photosynthetic capacity of plants, but did affect stomatal responses: trees growing at elevated air humidity had higher stomatal conductance at saturating photosynthetically active radiation (gs sat) and lower intrinsic water-use efficiency (IWUE). Reduced stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in trees grown at elevated air humidity allowed slightly higher net photosynthesis and relative current-year height increments than in trees at ambient air humidity. Tree responses suggest a mitigating effect of higher air humidity on trees under mild water stress. At the same time, trees at higher air humidity demonstrated a reduced sensitivity of IWUE to factors inducing stomatal closure and a steeper decline in canopy conductance in response to water deficit, implying higher dehydration risk. Despite the mitigating impact of increased air humidity under moderate drought, a future rise in atmospheric humidity at high latitudes may be disadvantageous for trees during weather extremes and represents a potential threat in hemiboreal forest ecosystems.

  2. Uptake rate behavior of tube-type passive samplers for volatile organic compounds under controlled atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgraeve, Christophe; Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Huffel, Katrijn; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2011-10-01

    A systematic laboratory research was performed to investigate the diffusive uptake of four target compounds (limonene, toluene, ethyl acetate, hexane) on axial-sampling sorbent tubes filled with Tenax TA. In a controlled atmosphere (temperature: 21.0 ± 1.8 °C; relative humidity set at different values between 5 and 80%), these passive samplers were exposed for 1, 3 and 7 days to a constant target compound concentration between 8 and 85 ppbv. Simultaneous active sampling and TD-GC-MS analysis was performed to determine VOCs concentrations. A power-law relationship between the sorbed mass on the sampler and exposure dose (11-179 ppmv min) was observed for all compounds. Compounds with a lower Tenax to air partitioning coefficient, i.e. with a lower affinity for Tenax showed a larger deviation from the expected linear relationship, assuming theoretical sampling rates on an ideal sorbent. Results showed that experimentally determined uptake rates (0.90-2.12 ng (ppmv min)-1) may be up to a factor of 2 lower than the theoretical ideal sampling rates, calculated from the molecular diffusion coefficients and the geometrical parameters of the sampler. The applicability of internal standard calibration for passive sampling was evaluated and a practical methodology is proposed with ethylbenzene-d10 as an internal standard.

  3. Quality of Meat (Longissimus dorsi) from Male Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Packaged and Stored under Vacuum and Modified Atmosphere Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piaskowska, N.; Daszkiewicz, T.; Kubiak, D.; Zapotoczny, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of vacuum and modified atmosphere (40% CO2+60% N2, MA) packaging on the chemical composition, physicochemical properties and sensory attributes of chill-stored meat from 10 fallow deer (Dama dama) bucks at 17 to 18 months of age. The animals were hunter-harvested in the forests of north-eastern Poland. During carcass dressing (48 to 54 h post mortem), both musculus longissimus muscles were cut out. Each muscle was divided into seven sections which were allocated to three groups: 0, A, and B. Samples 0 were immediately subjected to laboratory analyses. Samples A were vacuum-packaged, and samples B were packaged in MA. Packaged samples were stored for 7, 14, and 21 days at 2°C. The results of the present study showed that the evaluated packaging systems had no significant effect on the quality of fallow deer meat during chilled storage. However, vacuum-packaged meat samples were characterised by greater drip loss. Vacuum and MA packaging contributed to preserving the desired physicochemical properties and sensory attributes of meat during 21 days of storage. Regardless of the packaging method used, undesirable changes in the colour, water-holding capacity and juiciness of meat, accompanied by tenderness improvement, were observed during chilled storage. PMID:27165026

  4. Quality of Meat (Longissimus dorsi) from Male Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Packaged and Stored under Vacuum and Modified Atmosphere Conditions.

    PubMed

    Piaskowska, N; Daszkiewicz, T; Kubiak, D; Zapotoczny, P

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of vacuum and modified atmosphere (40% CO2+60% N2, MA) packaging on the chemical composition, physicochemical properties and sensory attributes of chill-stored meat from 10 fallow deer (Dama dama) bucks at 17 to 18 months of age. The animals were hunter-harvested in the forests of north-eastern Poland. During carcass dressing (48 to 54 h post mortem), both musculus longissimus muscles were cut out. Each muscle was divided into seven sections which were allocated to three groups: 0, A, and B. Samples 0 were immediately subjected to laboratory analyses. Samples A were vacuum-packaged, and samples B were packaged in MA. Packaged samples were stored for 7, 14, and 21 days at 2°C. The results of the present study showed that the evaluated packaging systems had no significant effect on the quality of fallow deer meat during chilled storage. However, vacuum-packaged meat samples were characterised by greater drip loss. Vacuum and MA packaging contributed to preserving the desired physicochemical properties and sensory attributes of meat during 21 days of storage. Regardless of the packaging method used, undesirable changes in the colour, water-holding capacity and juiciness of meat, accompanied by tenderness improvement, were observed during chilled storage.

  5. Interactive effects of hypobaria, low temperature, and CO 2 atmospheres inhibit the growth of mesophilic Bacillus spp. under simulated martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2006-11-01

    Robotic spacecraft are launched with finite levels of terrestrial microorganisms that are similar to the microbial communities within facilities in which spacecraft are assembled. In particular, spores of mesophilic aerobic Bacillus species are common spacecraft contaminants considered most likely to survive interplanetary transfer to Mars. During the cruise phase to Mars, and then again during surface operations, microbial bioloads are exposed to a diversity of biocidal factors that are likely to render the microbial species either dead or significantly inhibited from active metabolic activity and replication. We report here, for the first time, that interactive effects of low pressure, low temperature, and high CO 2 atmospheres approaching conditions likely to be encountered on the martian surface strongly inhibit the growth and replication of seven common Bacillus spp. isolated from spacecraft. Tests were conducted within a small glass bell-jar system maintained in a low-temperature microbial incubator. Atmospheric pressures were controlled at 1013 (Earth-normal), 100, 50, 35, 25, or 15 mb, and temperatures were maintained at 30, 20, 15, 10, or 5 °C. Experiments were carried out for 48 h or 7 days under either Earth-normal O 2/N 2 or pure CO 2 atmospheres. Results indicated that low pressure, low temperature, and high CO 2 atmospheres, applied separately or in combination, were capable of inhibiting the growth and replication of B. pumilus SAFR-032, B. pumilus FO-36B, B. subtilis HA-101, B. subtilis 42HS-1, B. megaterium KL-197, B. licheniformis KL-196, and B. nealsonii FO-092 under simulated martian conditions. Endospores of all seven Bacillus spp. strains failed to germinate and grow at 25 mb at 30 °C. Although, vegetative cells of these strains exhibited a slightly greater ability to replicate at lower pressures than did endospores, vegetative cells of these species failed to grow at pressures below 25 mb. Interactive effects of these environmental

  6. Pre-conditioned backward Monte Carlo solutions to radiative transport in planetary atmospheres. Fundamentals: Sampling of propagation directions in polarising media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Muñoz, A.; Mills, F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The interpretation of polarised radiation emerging from a planetary atmosphere must rely on solutions to the vector radiative transport equation (VRTE). Monte Carlo integration of the VRTE is a valuable approach for its flexible treatment of complex viewing and/or illumination geometries, and it can intuitively incorporate elaborate physics. Aims: We present a novel pre-conditioned backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm for solving the VRTE and apply it to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. As classical BMC methods, our PBMC algorithm builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. Methods: We show that the neglect of polarisation in the sampling of photon propagation directions in classical BMC algorithms leads to unstable and biased solutions for conservative, optically-thick, strongly polarising media such as Rayleigh atmospheres. The numerical difficulty is avoided by pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions. Pre-conditioning introduces a sense of history in the photon polarisation states through the simulated trajectories. Results: The PBMC algorithm is robust, and its accuracy is extensively demonstrated via comparisons with examples drawn from the literature for scattering in diverse media. Since the convergence rate for MC integration is independent of the integral's dimension, the scheme is a valuable option for estimating the disk-integrated signal of stellar radiation reflected from planets. Such a tool is relevant in the prospective investigation of exoplanetary phase curves. We lay out two frameworks for disk integration and, as an application, explore the impact of atmospheric stratification on planetary phase curves for large star-planet-observer phase angles. By construction, backward integration provides a better

  7. Variation of crack intensity factor in three compacted clay liners exposed to annual cycle of atmospheric conditions with and without geotextile cover.

    PubMed

    Safari, E; Jalili Ghazizade, M; Abduli, M A; Gatmiri, B

    2014-08-01

    Performance of compacted clay liners commonly used as landfill barrier systems can be subject to decline in terms of hydraulic conductivity if left exposed to atmospheric conditions for an extended period of time prior to placement of overlaying layers. The resulting desiccation cracking can lead to increased hydraulic conductivity. Desiccation crack intensity was studied for three clayey soils commonly used for construction of landfill barrier system in a relatively large scale test setup exposed to real time atmospheric conditions over a complete annual cycle. A white separator geotextile cover was presumed to be capable of reducing the intensity of desiccation cracking through absorbing and maintaining higher amounts of moisture and reducing the temperature of the soil surface in comparison to a directly exposed soil surface. Desiccation cracking was monitored using a digital imaging technique for three compacted clay liners in two sets, one open to air and the second covered with the white geotextile. Crack intensity factor approached a relatively stable phase after certain cycles corresponding to atmospheric dry wet cycles. The results indicated that the white separator geotextile was capable of reducing the crack intensity factor by 37.4-45.9% throughout the experiment including the cyclic phase of desiccation cracking. During the stable phase, the maximum reduction in crack intensity factor of 90.4% as a result of applying geotextile cover was observed for the soil with the lowest plastic index and clay content and therefore the lowest magnitude of crack intensity factor. The other two soils with similar clay content but different plastic index showed 23.6% and 52.2% reductions in crack intensity factor after cyclic phase when covered with geotextile.

  8. A comparative study on the varying exposure to atmospheric fine and coarse particles under urban and rural conditions.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Benning, Uta; Schultz, Eckart; Dietze, Volker; Kaminski, Uwe; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2012-11-01

    This paper is based on the results of three air quality studies conducted in Buenos Aires in Berlin, and in German spas between 2003 and 2007. A high comparability of results was ensured by using the same sampling techniques and analytical methods. Total particle sampling was achieved by active sampling of fine (PM2.5) and passive sampling of coarse particles > or = 2.5 microm and giant particles > or = 10 microm. The highly absorbing, black, predominantly carbonaceous particles (BC) of fine particle samples were determined by measuring the total light attenuation of filter samples and interpreting the extinction value as black carbon. The difference between the gravimetric total mass concentration of the PM2.5 samples and the BC is defined as the transparent, mostly mineral fine fraction. In coarse/giant particle samples the mean gray value was determined by means of automated light microscopy with subsequent single-particle analysis. "Opaque" particles were separated from the "transparent" particle fraction by applying a grey value threshold level. Microscopic measurement of individual particles was employed to establish the size distribution of the coarse and giant fraction. Due to different health effects, the separate detection of these components is suggested. Decline functions of particles are given, possibly providing useful information for a more detailed specification of the local particle distribution, and for a better estimate of the individual exposure. Atmospheric dispersal of particles was found effected mainly by source characteristics. An increased, spatially largely constant level of fine transparent particles in Berlin indicates a particle plume originating from photochemical processes. Buenos Aires, in contrast, is characterized by a lower background level of fine transparent particles but is considerably affected by fine black particles from diesel emissions and by a higher resuspension of coarse/giant transparent, mainly soil particles.

  9. Homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and ice nucleation rates of aqueous ammonium sulfate and aqueous levoglucosan particles for relevant atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel Alexander; Lopez, Miguel David

    2009-09-28

    Homogeneous ice nucleation from micrometre-sized aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and aqueous levoglucosan particles is studied employing the optical microscope technique. A new experimental method is introduced that allows us to control the initial water activity of the aqueous droplets. Homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and ice melting temperatures of these aqueous solution droplets, 10 to 80 microm in diameter, are determined. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous (NH4)2SO4 particles 5-39 wt% in concentration and aqueous levoglucosan particles with initial water activities of 0.85-0.99 yield upper limits of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients of up to 1x10(10) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and upper limits of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are compared with corresponding predictions of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory [T. Koop, B. P. Luo, A. Tsias and T. Peter, Nature, 2000, 406, 611]. It is found that the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory can capture the experimentally derived ice freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients of the aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and aqueous levoglucosan particles. However, the level of agreement between experimentally derived and predicted values, in particular for homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, crucially depends on the extrapolation method to obtain water activities at corresponding freezing temperatures. It is suggested that the combination of experimentally derived ice freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients can serve as a better validation of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory than when compared to the observation of homogeneous ice freezing temperatures alone. The atmospheric implications with regard to the application of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory and derivation of maximum ice particle production rates are briefly discussed.

  10. Atmospheric conditions of thunderstorms in the European part of the Arctic derived from sounding and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernecki, Bartosz; Taszarek, Mateusz; Kolendowicz, Leszek; Szyga-Pluta, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    While thunderstorms in equatorial and mid-latitudes are well documented, little is known about their presence in high latitudes. There are barely a few studies on this phenomenon analyzing their occurrence in the European Arctic region. In an attempt to rectify this situation authors aim to explain which conditions are conducive to their formation in Bjørnøya, Jan Mayen and Svalbard islands. A total of 41 thunderstorm days derived from SYNOP reports from the period of 1981-2010 were used to define thunderstorm-favorable synoptic conditions from NCEP/NCAR reanalyses and sounding data. In order to underline seasonal variation, anomalies were presented in the polar day and polar night timeframes. As it turned out polar night thunderstorms occur most often in situations with southern warm marine air advections intensified by the positive North Atlantic and Arctic Oscillations. Thunderstorms in this season are characterized by steep vertical lapse rates and occur most likely at the cold fronts. Polar day thunderstorms form when warm air masses move from the continental north-eastern Europe to the Arctic, and create unstable conditions. In this type, thunderstorms are generated by elevated convection and occur most likely in a cyclone's cool side of warm sector.

  11. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  12. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  13. Wood combustion particles induce adverse effects to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Manuel; Künzi, Lisa; Allenbach, Sandrine; Bruns, Emily A; Gavarini, Ilaria; El-Haddad, Imad; Slowik, Jay G; Prévôt, André S H; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Dümbgen, Lutz; Salathe, Matthias; Baumlin, Nathalie; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Dommen, Josef; Geiser, Marianne

    2017-02-27

    Residential wood burning is a major source of poorly characterized, deleterious particulate matter, whose composition and toxicity may vary with wood type, burning condition and photochemical age. The causative link between ambient wood particle constituents and observed adverse health effects is currently lacking. Here we investigate the relationship between chemical properties of primary and atmospherically aged wood combustion particles and acute toxicity in human airway epithelial cells. Emissions from a log wood burner were diluted and injected into a smog chamber for photochemical aging. After concentration-enrichment and removal of oxidizing gases, directly emitted and atmospherically aged particles were deposited on cell cultures at the air-liquid interface for 2 hours in an aerosol deposition chamber mimicking physiological conditions in lungs. Cell models were fully differentiated normal and diseased (cystic fibrosis and asthma) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) and the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Cell responses were assessed at 24 hours after aerosol exposure. Atmospherically relevant doses of wood combustion particles significantly increased cell death in all but the asthma cell model. Expression of oxidative stress markers increased in HBE from all donors. Increased cell death and inflammatory responses could not be assigned to a single chemical fraction of the particles. Exposure to primary and aged wood combustion particles caused adverse effects to airway epithelia, apparently induced by several interacting components.

  14. Atmospheric monitoring in MAGIC and data corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruck, Christian; Gaug, Markus

    2015-03-01

    A method for analyzing returns of a custom-made "micro"-LIDAR system, operated alongside the two MAGIC telescopes is presented. This method allows for calculating the transmission through the atmospheric boundary layer as well as thin cloud layers. This is achieved by applying exponential fits to regions of the back-scattering signal that are dominated by Rayleigh scattering. Making this real-time transmission information available for the MAGIC data stream allows to apply atmospheric corrections later on in the analysis. Such corrections allow for extending the effective observation time of MAGIC by including data taken under adverse atmospheric conditions. In the future they will help reducing the systematic uncertainties of energy and flux.

  15. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A.; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations. PMID:27091302

  16. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2016-04-19

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations.

  17. Handbook on the Climate of the USSR. Issue 14. Georgian SSR. Part 5. Cloud Conditions and Atmospheric Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-11

    GMO , Cand. of geographic sciences G. M. Loladze. Tables 8, 8a and 9 Sections I ("Cloud conditions") and Table 4, 5, 6 Sections 3 ("Snow storms") are...eK SrSO %0 So I I/ lI// o V WVolVol aI 9 LIU s Fig. 5. Annual variation of frequency of cloudy sky on total cloudiness. 1 - Tbilisi, GMO [hydro...lower cloudiness. 1 - Abastumani; 2 - Akhalkalaki, GMS; 3 - Tbilisi, GMO ; 4 - Telavi, agro; 5 - Shiraki; 6 - Gudauri; 7 - Sakara; 8 - Gagra; 9 - Chakva

  18. A spatial framework for assessing current conditions and monitoring future change in the chemistry of the Antarctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, D. A.; Mayewski, P. A.; Korotkikh, E.; Sneed, S. B.; Handley, M. J.; Introne, D. S.; Scambos, T. A.

    2011-03-01

    East and West Antarctica and for a significant fraction of the Cd in East Antarctica. Nonetheless, global volcanic outgassing cannot account for the enriched values of Pb or As. Local volcanic outgassing from Mount Erebus may account for a significant fraction of the As and Cd in West Antarctica and for a significant fraction in East Antarctic glaze/dune areas. However, despite potential contributions from local and global volcanic sources, significant concentrations of Pb, Cd, and As remain across much of Antarctica. Most importantly, this study provides a baseline from which changes in the chemistry of the atmosphere over Antarctica can be monitored under expected warming scenarios and continued intensification of industrial activities in the Southern Hemisphere.

  19. An Experimental and Modeling Study of Evaporation from Bare Soils Subjected to Natural Boundary Conditions at the Land-Atmospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Ngo, V. V.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.; kathleen m smits

    2011-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance in semiarid and arid regions. However, there is no agreement on the best methodology to determine evaporation under different boundary conditions. Because it is difficult to measure evaporation from soil,with the exception of using lysimeters, numerous formulations have been proposed to establish a relationship between the rate of evaporation and soil moisture and/or soil temperature and thermal properties. Different formulations vary in how they partition available energy and include, among others, a classical bulk aerodynamic formulation which requires knowledge of the relative humidity at the soil surface and a more non-traditional heat balance method which requires knowledge of soil temperature and soil thermal properties. A need exists to systematically compare existing methods to experimental data under highly controlled conditions not achievable in the field. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmospheric interface to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations for evaporation rate estimates and to develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. In this study, to better understand the coupled water-vapor-heat flow processes in the shallow subsurface near the land surface, we modified a previously developed theory that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for evaporation under dry soil conditions. This theory was used to compare estimates of evaporation based on different formulations of the bulk aerodynamic and heat balance methods. In order to experimentally validate the numerical formulations/code, we performed a series of two-dimensional physical model experiments under varying boundary conditions using test sand for which the

  20. Uptake Co-efficient Studies of HO2 Radicals with NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 Aerosols under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faloon, Kate H.; Bloss, William J.

    2010-05-01

    The atmospheric oxidising capacity determines the rate of removal of many atmospheric constituents, including pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane. For most compounds, tropospheric degradation is initiated through reaction with the hydroxyl radical. OH is rapidly interconverted with hydroperoxy radicals HO2 and organic peroxy radicals (e.g. CH3O2, referred to as RO2 in general) through reaction with volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides; consequently loss of peroxy species affects atmospheric oxidising capacity. Model analyses have shown that heterogeneous loss of hydro- and organic peroxy radicals may significantly affect OH levels and hence factors such as pollutant degradation, ozone production and SOA formation - however these processes are poorly understood. This work aims to increase our understanding of heterogeneous reactions between HO2 radicals and aerosol; specifically the rate at which HO2 is lost to aerosols particles. The rate and mechanism of this HO2 loss process is highly uncertain at present and reducing this uncertainty will allow improved simulation of this process within atmospheric models. We present new values of the mass accommodation co-efficient, αHO2, and the uptake co-efficient,γHO2, for NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aqueous aerosols. Sodium chloride is used as a substitute for marine aerosols and ammonium sulphate as a substitute for an urban aerosol. A laboratory flow-tube system, mimicking tropospheric conditions, is used for determination of these values. Hydroperoxy radicals are produced by the photolysis of water vapour and detected using a PEroxy Radical Chemical Amplification (PERCA) technique, while aerosols are generated using a constant output atomiser and detected using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The flow tube system allows variation of the radical aerosol contact distance, and hence time, allowing a rate of uptake, γ, to be determined. Mass accommodation, α, values are determined using aerosols

  1. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  2. Early Adverse Experiences and the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bick, Johanna; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Children exposed to various forms of adversity early in life are at increased risk for a broad range of developmental difficulties, affecting both cognitive and emotional adjustment. We review a growing body of evidence suggesting that exposure to adverse circumstances affects the developing brain in ways that increase risk for a myriad of problems. We focus on two forms of adversity, one in which children are exposed to childhood maltreatment in family environments, and another in which children are exposed to extreme psychosocial deprivation in contexts of institutional rearing. We discuss ways in which each of these experiences represent violations of species-expected caregiving conditions, thereby imposing challenges to the developing brain. We also review emerging data pointing to the effectiveness of early intervention in remediating neurodevelopmental consequences associated with maltreatment or institutional rearing. We conclude by discussing implications of this work for public health efforts and highlight important directions for the field. PMID:26334107

  3. Surface-rain interactions: differences in copper runoff for copper sheet of different inclination, orientation, and atmospheric exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Goidanich, Sara; Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of the diffuse dispersion of metals from outdoor constructions such as roofs and facades are necessary for environmental risk assessment and management. An existing predictive model has been compared with measured data of copper runoff from copper sheets exposed at four different inclinations facing four orientations at two different urban sites (Stockholm, Sweden, and Milan, Italy) during a 4-year period. Its applicability has also been investigated for copper sheet exposed at two marine sites(Cadiz, Spain, for 5 years, and Brest, France, for 9 years). Generally the model can be used for all given conditions. However, vertical surfaces should be considered as surfaces inclined 60-80 due to wind driven effects. The most important parameters that influence copper runoff, and not already included in the model, are the wind and rain characteristics that influence the actual rainfall volume impinging the surface of interest.

  4. Kinetic and products study of the gas-phase reaction of Lewisite with ozone under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Guo, Xiaodi; Shao, Yusheng; Gao, Runli; Liang, Dejian; Sun, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The rate constant for the gas-phase reaction of O3 and Lewisite was studied in air using the smog chamber technique. The experiments were carried out under pseudo-first-order reaction conditions with [O3]≪[Lewisite]. The observed rate constant of O3 with Lewisite was (7.83 ± 0.38) × 10(-19)cm(3)/(molecule·sec) at 298 ± 2K. Lewisite was discussed in terms of reactivity with O3 and its relationship with the ionization potential. Our results show that the rate constant for the gas-phase reaction of O3 with Lewisite is in line with the trend of the rate constants of O3 with haloalkenes.

  5. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  6. Polystyrene as a model system to probe the impact of ambient gas chemistry on polymer surface modifications using remote atmospheric pressure plasma under well-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Elliot A J; Luan, Pingshan; Knoll, Andrew J; Hart, Connor; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2015-06-30

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat polystyrene (PS) films under remote conditions where neither the plume nor visible afterglow interacts with the film surface. Carefully controlled conditions were achieved by mounting the APPJ inside a vacuum chamber interfaced to a UHV surface analysis system. PS was chosen as a model system as it contains neither oxygen nor nitrogen, has been extensively studied, and provides insight into how the aromatic structures widespread in biological systems are modified by atmospheric plasma. These remote treatments cause negligible etching and surface roughening, which is promising for treatment of sensitive materials. The surface chemistry was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate how ambient chemistry, feed gas chemistry, and plasma-ambient interaction impact the formation of specific moieties. A variety of oxidized carbon species and low concentrations of NOx species were measured after APPJ treatment. In the remote conditions used in this work, modifications are not attributed to short-lived species, e.g., O atoms. It was found that O3 does not correlate with modifications, suggesting that other long-lived species such as singlet delta oxygen or NOx are important. Indeed, surface-bound NO3 was observed after treatment, which must originate from gas phase NOx as neither N nor O are found in the pristine film. By varying the ambient and feed gas chemistry to produce O-rich and O-poor conditions, a possible correlation between the oxygen and nitrogen composition was established. When oxygen is present in the feed gas or ambient, high levels of oxidation with low concentrations of NO3 on the surface were observed. For O-poor conditions, NO and NO2 were measured, suggesting that these species contribute to the oxidation process, but are easily oxidized when oxygen is present. That is, surface oxidation limits and competes with surface nitridation. Overall, surface oxidation takes place easily

  7. Laboratory measurements of the 5-20 cm wavelength opacity of ammonia, water vapor, and methane under simulated conditions for the deep jovian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Amadeo; Steffes, Paul G.; Chinsomboom, Garrett

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, several extensive laboratory studies have been conducted of the microwave opacity of ammonia and water vapor in preparation for interpretation of the precise measurements of jovian microwave emission to be made with the Microwave Radiometer (MWR) instrument aboard the NASA Juno Mission. (See, e.g., Hanley et al. [2009] Icarus, 202, 316-335; Karpowicz and Steffes [2011a] Icarus 212, 210-223; Karpowicz and Steffes [2011b] Icarus 214, 783; Devaraj et al. [2014] Icarus, 241, 165-179) These works included models for the opacity of these constituents valid over the pressure and temperature ranges measured in the laboratory experiments (temperatures up to 500 K and pressures up to 100 bars). However, studies of the microwave emission made using these models indicate that significant contributions to the emission at the 24-cm and 50-cm wavelengths to be measured by the Juno MWR will be made by layers of the atmosphere with temperatures at or exceeding 600 K. While the ammonia opacity models described by Hanley et al. (2009) and Devraj et al. (2014) give consistent results at temperatures up to 500 K (within 6%), they diverge significantly at temperatures and pressures exceeding 550 K and 50 bars, respectively. Similarly, at temperatures above 500 K, the model for water vapor opacity developed by Karpowicz and Steffes (2011a,b) exhibits non-physical attributes. To resolve these ambiguities, we have conducted laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of ammonia at temperatures up to 600 K and that for water vapor at temperatures up to 600 K. Additionally, since the microwave opacity of ammonia is influenced by pressure-broadening from methane (a significant constituent in jovian atmospheres), measurements of the effects of methane on the ammonia absorption spectrum have also been conducted. These measurements have resulted in updated models for the opacities of ammonia and water vapor under conditions of the deep jovian atmosphere.

  8. Contrasting conditions of surface water balance in wet years and dry years as a possible land surface-atmosphere feedback mechanism in the West African Sahel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lare, A. R.; Nicholson, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    The climate of West Africa, in particular the Sahel, is characterized by multiyear persistence of anomalously wet or dry conditions. Its Southern Hemisphere counterpart, the Kalahari, lacks the persistence that is evident in the Sahel even though both regions are subject to similar large-scale forcing. It has been suggested that land surface-atmosphere feedback contributes to this persistence and to the severity of drought. In this study, surface energy and water balance are quantified for nine stations along a latitudinal transect that extends from the Sahara to the Guinea coast. In the wetter regions of West Africa, the difference between wet and dry years is primarily reflected in the magnitude of runoff. For the Sahel and drier locations, evapotranspiration and soil moisture are more sensitive to rainfall anomalies. The increase in evapotranspiration, and hence latent heating, over the Sahel in wet years alters the thermal structure and gradients of the overlying atmosphere and thus the strength of the African easterly jet (AEJ) at 700 mb. The difference between dry and wet Augusts corresponds to a decrease in magnitude of the AEJ at 15 deg N on the order of 2.6 m/s, which is consistent with previous studies of observed winds. Spatial patterns were also developed for surface water balance parameters for both West Africa and southern Africa. Over southern Africa, the patterns are not as spatially homogeneous as those over West Africa and are lower in magnitude, thus supporting the suggestion that the persistence of rainfall anomalies in the Sahel might be due, at least in part, to land-atmosphere feedback, and that the absence of such persistence in the Kalahari is a consequence of less significant changes in surface water and energy balance.

  9. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  10. Mitigating Aviation Communication and Satellite Orbit Operations Surprises from Adverse Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2008-01-01

    Adverse space weather affects operational activities in aviation and satellite systems. For example, large solar flares create highly variable enhanced neutral atmosphere and ionosphere electron density regions. These regions impact aviation communication frequencies as well as precision orbit determination. The natural space environment, with its dynamic space weather variability, is additionally changed by human activity. The increase in orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO), combined with lower atmosphere CO2 that rises into the lower thermosphere and causes increased cooling that results in increased debris lifetime, adds to the environmental hazards of navigating in near-Earth space. This is at a time when commercial space endeavors are posed to begin more missions to LEO during the rise of the solar activity cycle toward the next maximum (2012). For satellite and aviation operators, adverse space weather results in greater expenses for orbit management, more communication outages or aviation and ground-based high frequency radio used, and an inability to effectively plan missions or service customers with space-based communication, imagery, and data transferal during time-critical activities. Examples of some revenue-impacting conditions and solutions for mitigating adverse space weather are offered.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF 90SR AND 137CS PENETRATION INTO REINFORCED CONCRETE (EXTENT OF 'DEEPENING') UNDER NATURAL ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    When assessing the feasibility of remediation following the detonation of a radiological dispersion device or improvised nuclear device in a large city, several issues should be considered including the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of resources required for decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Currently, little is known about radionuclide penetration into construction materials in an urban environment. Knowledge in this area would be useful when considering costs of a thorough decontamination of buildings, artificial structures, and roads in an affected urban environment. Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in April 1986, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to assess the depth of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs penetration into reinforced concrete structures in a highly contaminated urban environment under natural weather conditions. Thirteen reinforced concrete core samples were obtained from external surfaces of a contaminated building in Pripyat. The concrete cores were drilled to obtain sample layers of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-30, 30-40, and 40-50 mm. Both {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were detected in the entire 0-50 mm profile of the reinforced cores sampled. In most of the cores, over 90% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory and 70% of the total {sup 90}Sr inventory was found in the first 0-5 mm layer of the reinforced concrete. {sup 90}Sr had penetrated markedly deeper into the reinforced concrete structures than {sup 137}Cs.

  12. Modeling soil evaporation efficiency in a range of soil and atmospheric conditions using a meta-analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, O.; Stefan, V. G.; Amazirh, A.; Chanzy, A.; Ceschia, E.; Er-Raki, S.; Gentine, P.; Tallec, T.; Ezzahar, J.; Bircher, S.; Beringer, J.; Khabba, S.

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis data-driven approach is developed to represent the soil evaporative efficiency (SEE) defined as the ratio of actual to potential soil evaporation. The new model is tested across a bare soil database composed of more than 30 sites around the world, a clay fraction range of 0.02-0.56, a sand fraction range of 0.05-0.92, and about 30,000 acquisition times. SEE is modeled using a soil resistance (rss) formulation based on surface soil moisture (θ) and two resistance parameters rss,ref and θefolding. The data-driven approach aims to express both parameters as a function of observable data including meteorological forcing, cut-off soil moisture value θ1/2 at which SEE=0.5, and first derivative of SEE at θ1/2, named Δθ1/2-1. An analytical relationship between >(rss,ref;θefolding) and >(θ1/2;Δθ1/2-1>) is first built by running a soil energy balance model for two extreme conditions with rss = 0 and rss˜∞ using meteorological forcing solely, and by approaching the middle point from the two (wet and dry) reference points. Two different methods are then investigated to estimate the pair >(θ1/2;Δθ1/2-1>) either from the time series of SEE and θ observations for a given site, or using the soil texture information for all sites. The first method is based on an algorithm specifically designed to accomodate for strongly nonlinear SEE>(θ>) relationships and potentially large random deviations of observed SEE from the mean observed SEE>(θ>). The second method parameterizes θ1/2 as a multi-linear regression of clay and sand percentages, and sets Δθ1/2-1 to a constant mean value for all sites. The new model significantly outperformed the evaporation modules of ISBA (Interaction Sol-Biosphère-Atmosphère), H-TESSEL (Hydrology-Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchange over Land), and CLM (Community Land Model). It has potential for integration in various land-surface schemes, and real calibration capabilities using combined thermal and microwave

  13. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  14. Atmospheric CO(2) column measurements in cloudy conditions using intensity-modulated continuous-wave lidar at 1.57 micron.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R; Harrison, F Wallace; Browell, Edward V; Ismail, Syed; Obland, Michael D; Campbell, Joel; Dobler, Jeremy; Meadows, Byron; Fan, Tai-Fang; Kooi, Susan

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates the capability of atmospheric CO2 column measurements under cloudy conditions using an airborne intensity-modulated continuous-wave integrated-path-differential-absorption lidar operating in the 1.57-μm CO2 absorption band. The atmospheric CO2 column amounts from the aircraft to the tops of optically thick cumulus clouds and to the surface in the presence of optically thin clouds are retrieved from lidar data obtained during the summer 2011 and spring 2013 flight campaigns, respectively. For the case of intervening thin cirrus clouds with an average cloud optical depth of about 0.16 over an arid/semi-arid area, the CO2 column measurements from 12.2 km altitude were found to be consistent with the cloud free conditions with a lower precision due to the additional optical attenuation of the thin clouds. The clear sky precision for this flight campaign case was about 0.72% for a 0.1-s integration, which was close to previously reported flight campaign results. For a vegetated area and lidar path lengths of 8 to 12 km, the precision of the measured differential absorption optical depths to the surface was 1.3 - 2.2% for 0.1-s integration. The precision of the CO2 column measurements to thick clouds with reflectance about 1/10 of that of the surface was about a factor of 2 to 3 lower than that to the surface owing to weaker lidar returns from clouds and a smaller CO2 differential absorption optical depth compared to that for the entire column.

  15. An experimental study on sub-cooled flow boiling CHF of R134a at low pressure condition with atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma assisted surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Jun; Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay G.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, sub-cooled flow boiling critical heat flux tests at low pressure were conducted in a rectangular flow channel with one uniformly heated surface, using simulant fluid R-134a as coolant. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: (1) inlet pressure (P) of 400-800 kPa, (2) mass flux (G) of 124-248 kg/m2s, (3) inlet sub-cooling enthalpy (ΔHi) of 12~ 26 kJ/kg. Parametric trends of macroscopic system parameters (G, P, Hi) were examined by changing inlet conditions. Those trends were found to be generally consistent with previous understandings of CHF behavior at low pressure condition (i.e. reduced pressure less than 0.2). A fluid-to-fluid scaling model was utilized to convert the test data obtained with the simulant fluid (R-134a) into the prototypical fluid (water). The comparison between the converted CHF of equivalent water and CHF look-up table with same operation conditions were conducted, which showed good agreement. Furthermore, the effect of surface wettability on CHF was also investigated by applying atmospheric pressure plasma (AP-Plasma) treatment to modify the surface characteristic. With AP-Plasma treatment, the change of microscopic surface characteristic was measured in terms of static contact angle. The static contact angle was reduced from 80° on original non-treated surface to 15° on treated surface. An enhancement of 18% on CHF values under flow boiling conditions were observed on AP-Plasma treated surfaces compared to those on non-treated heating surfaces.

  16. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  17. Warm water events in the southeast Atlantic and their impact on regional and large-scale atmospheric conditions in the CMIP5 model output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Irena; Lutz, Karin; Rathmann, Joachim; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2013-04-01

    Two types of El Niño-like events are described in the South Atlantic: the Atlantic Niño in the equatorial Atlantic and the Benguela Niño off the Namibian and Angolan coast. These warm water events are known to be associated with rainfall anomalies at the West and Southwest African coastal region and harm marine ecosystems and fish populations. The two phenomena are handled separately so far, but the identification of warm water events in our study - via similar variabilities of sea surface temperatures (SST) - based on observed SST data (HadISST1.1) as well as global climate model output from CMIP5, involved the definition of an area mean index that includes both Niño types from the Atlantic region. A multi-model ensemble of the CMIP5 output is used to investigate the impact of Atlantic Niño events on regional atmospheric conditions. Based on the Atlantic SST index, composite analyses give information about anomalous precipitation, air pressure, humidity, evaporation, horizontal wind and vertical air motion patterns over the African continent and the South Atlantic. The Atlantic variability mode is similar to the Pacific El Niño system, but more irregular and less intense. However, recent studies show that the Atlantic influences the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Pacific Ocean by the modification of the Walker and Hadley circulations and associated wind stress, thermocline and SST anomalies, further amplified by the Bjerknes positive feedback. As a result, an Atlantic Niño is followed by a La Niña-like phenomenon in the Pacific area with a lag of six months. In our study, the CMIP5 output is considered with respect to its ability of describing the complex connection between the Atlantic and Pacific variability modes. For that purpose, the inter-ocean teleconnection is studied with correlation analyses of the ensemble members of the CMIP5 output by means of the Atlantic index, the Southern Oscillation (SOI) and the Pacific El Niño indices (Ni

  18. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cha, Min Suk

    2016-10-01

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface.

  19. Adverse Environments and Children's Creativity Development: Transforming the Notion of "Success in Adversity" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications…

  20. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  1. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  2. Atmospheric conditions and transport patterns associated with high and low summer ozone levels in the lower troposphere and the boundary layer over the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalabokas, Pavlos; Cammas, Jean-Pierre; Thouret, Valerie; Volz-Thomas, Andreas; Boulanger, Damien; Repapis, Christos

    2016-04-01

    layer, there are extended regions of strong subsidence in the eastern Mediterranean but also in eastern and northern Europe and over these regions the atmosphere is dryer than average. The results of this study will be used within the framework of the MACC project. References Kalabokas, P. D., Cammas, J.-P., Thouret, V., Volz-Thomas, A., Boulanger, D. and Repapis C.C. 2013. Examination of the atmospheric conditions associated with high and low summer ozone levels in the lower troposphere over the eastern Mediterranean. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 13, 10339-10352. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acp-13-10339-2013 Kalabokas P. D., Thouret V., Cammas J.-P., Volz-thomas A., Boulanger D., Repapis C.C., 2015. The geographical distribution of meteorological parameters associated with high and low summer ozone levels in the lower troposphere and the boundary layer over the eastern Mediterranean (Cairo case), Tellus B, 67, 27853, http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/tellusb.v67.27853.

  3. Adverse environments and children's creativity development: transforming the notion of "success in adversity" in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications for China's future as it brings together one of China's core cultural values-"success in adversity"-the importance of creativity, and very real social and economic needs. "Success in adversity" reflects the strongly held belief that individuals who suffer adverse environments can rise to excellence and success through persistence, effort, and creativity. In this article, we briefly explore the historical sources of this belief and how it is closely related to the Chinese conception of creativity. We then present some studies on the creativity of some of China's migrant children. Findings show that while migrant children as a group may not generally exhibit higher creativity than their urban peers as hypothesized, indications of resilience and creative potential suggest that the notion of success in adversity may contribute to the positive development of China's migrant children more substantially when it is informed by research and augmented by research-supported policy.

  4. Atmospheric propagation effects on pattern recognition by neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giever, John C.; Hoock, Donald W., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    Smart electro-optical systems of the future will need to be adaptive and robust to function in different environments. In 1989 the authors reported how atmospheric losses in contrast, resolution, edge detail, and signal to noise adversely affect image-based classification using linear matched filters and how the atmosphere alters features such as gray-level moments. They also showed that the performance changes with atmospheric path radiance and transmittance are predictable, however, and that some effects can be mitigated automatically by including the atmosphere as a separate training class. This paper extends that analysis to atmospheric effects on pattern recognition by neural network classifiers. The neural net pattern recognition methods considered here are single- and multi-layer perceptron networks trained with back-propagation. Image classifier performance under different atmospheric propagation conditions is shown to be easily predicted for simple single-layer neural nets. This leads to a specific training strategy to minimize the impact of propagation losses by including the atmosphere as a separate training class. This same strategy also improves the performance of multi-layer neural networks. Examples are given of classification of a vehicle partly obscured by highly scattering white smoke and highly absorptive black smoke. Other methods are being investigated that affect the performance and training convergence properties of neural net pattern recognition in atmospheres.

  5. Analysis of observations and results of numerical modeling of meteorological parameters and atmospheric air pollution under weak wind conditions in the city of Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, Alexander V.; Bart, Andrey A.; Kizhner, Lyubov I.; Barashkova, Nadezhda K.; Volkova, Marina A.; Zhuravlev, Georgi G.; Kuzhevskaya, Irina V.; Terenteva, Maria V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of calculation of meteorological parameters using a meteorological model, TSU-NM3, as well as prediction of some indices of atmospheric air pollution in the city of Tomsk obtained from a mesoscale photochemical model are presented. The calculation results are compared with observational data on the atmosphere and pollutants.

  6. Airglow in the Visible and Infrared Spectral Ranges of the Disturbed Upper Atmosphere under Conditions of High-Velocity Plasma Jet Injection: I. Experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetzer, J. I.; Kozlov, S. I.; Rybakov, V. A.; Ponomarenko, A. V.; Smirnova, N. V.; Romanovsky, Yu. A.; Meng, C.-I.; Erlandson, R.; Stoyanov, B.

    2002-05-01

    The measurements of infrared emission from an artificial structure, which was generated during the Fluxus experiment with plasma jet injection into the atmosphere, are obtained and discussed for the first time. Additional experimental data on the airglow in the visible spectral band of the disturbed region of the atmosphere are presented. A generalized analysis of the data is given.

  7. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  8. Physiological and spectral characterization of the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone on wheat and soybean cultivars grown under well-watered and restricted moisture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Eric

    Vegetative responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) have been extensively characterized for many agricultural crops. Generally, positive effects of elevated CO 2 concentrations may be partially or completely counteracted by high O3 concentrations. The objectives of these studies were to investigate the single and combined effects of realistic, near-future, levels of above-ambient CO2 (+150 muL L-1) and O3 (+35 +/- 5 nL L-1) on wheat (Triticum aestivum) and soybean (Glycine max) cultivars grown under well-watered (WW) and restricted moisture (RM) conditions. Wheat was grown in open-top chambers during the spring of 1995 to 1997, while soybean was grown during summers from 1994 to 1997. In wheat, responses to air quality were generally similar under WW and RM conditions. Elevated CO2 enhanced photosynthesis (Pn) even with high O3 concentrations. Stomatal conductances (gs) were reduced by CO2 and O3, and even more when combined at high levels, which led to increases in leaf temperature (Tleaf), no changes in transpiration (E) rates, and increases in water-use efficiency (WUE). Intercellular CO2 concentrations (C i) increased much more from elevated CO2 than from O 3 from pre- to post-flowering. Damage to the photosynthetic apparatus from O3 was undetectable with chlorophyll fluorescence. Variations in chlorophyll a and b were not a sensitive indicator of air quality-induced stress. Leaf area index (LAI) was not significantly affected by the treatments; above ground biomass and yields were significantly reduced by high O3 conditions. Seed test weights, milling quality scores, and flour yields were reduced, while flour protein was increased by high O3 concentrations under WW conditions. In soybean, CO2 stimulated Pn regardless of the O3 level. Responses in gs, Tleaf, WUE, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll contents were similar to those observed in wheat. LAI, biomass, and yields were reduced by high O3 conditions. High

  9. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  10. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  11. Cyclic acyloxonium ions as diagnostic aids in the characterization of chloropropanol esters under electron impact (EI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) conditions.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Anja K K; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2013-06-26

    During mass spectrometric analysis of various lipids and lipid derivatives such as the chlorinated counterparts of triacylglycerols, the detailed structure of the characteristic and common ions formed under electron impact (EI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) conditions by the loss of a single fatty acid remains ambiguous. These ions are designated in the literature as "diacylglyceride ions" and are frequently depicted with a molecular formula without showing any structural features and sometimes represented as cyclic acyloxonium ions. Characterization of these ions is of considerable importance due to their utility in structural identification of lipid derivatives. This study provides complementary evidence on the cyclic nature of "diacylglyceride ions" through the use of the simplest 3-monochloropropanediol diester as a model and the use of isotope labeling technique. Tandem MS/MS studies have indicated that the ion at m/z 135.6 generated from 1,2-bis(acetoyl)-3-chloropropane through the loss of an acetyl group was identical to the ion at m/z 135.6 generated from 4-chloromethyl-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane, the latter being generated from a cyclic precursor through the loss of a methyl radical, keeping the dioxolane ring structure intact, thus confirming the cyclic nature of these ions. The corresponding cyclic oxonium ions generated from longer chain chloropropanol diesters, such as the ion at m/z 331.2 originating from 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) diesters containing palmitic acid(s), could serve as chemical markers for the presence chloropropanol esters.

  12. Effects of Hydrated Potato Starch on the Quality of Low-fat Ttoekgalbi (Korean Traditional Patty) Packaged in Modified Atmosphere Conditions during Storage.

    PubMed

    Muhlisin, S M Kang; Choi, W H; Lee, K T; Cheong, S H; Lee, S K

    2012-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of hydrated potato starch on the quality of low-fat ttoekgalbi (Korean traditional patty) packaged in modified atmosphere conditions during storage. The ttoekgalbi was prepared from 53.2% lean beef, 13.9% lean pork, 9.3% pork fat, and 23.6% other ingredients. Two low-fat ttoekgalbi treatments were prepared by substituting pork fat with hydrated potato starch; either by 50% fat replacement (50% FR) or 100% fat replacement (100% FR). Both 50% and 100% FR increased the moisture, crude protein, and decreased fat content, cooking loss, and hardness. For MAP studies, 200 g of ttoekgalbi were placed on the tray and filled with gas composed of 70% O2: 30% CO2 (70% O2-MAP) and 30% CO2: 70% N2 (70% N2-MAP), and were stored at 5°C for 12 d. During the storage time, both 50% and 100% FR showed higher protein deterioration, while no differences were found in CIE a*, CIE L*, lipid oxidation, and bacterial counts in comparison to control. The ttoekgalbi with 70% O2-MAP was more red, lighter in color, and showed higher TBARS values compared with 70% N2-MAP. The meat with 70% N2-MAP showed lower aerobic bacterial counts in control than those with 70% O2-MAP. The lower anaerobic bacterial counts were observed only in 50% FR and 100% FR packed with 70% N2-MAP in comparison with 70% O2-MAP. In conclusion, the fat replacement with hydrated potato starch showed no negative effects on the quality of low fat ttoekgalbi during storage and 70% N2-MAP was better than 70% O2-MAP for low-fat ttoekgalbi packaging.

  13. Adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Sarah J; McMillan, Katherine A; Wright, Kristi D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2014-03-01

    Childhood experiences are thought to predispose a person to the development of health anxiety later in life. However, there is a lack of research investigating the influence of specific adverse experiences (e.g., childhood abuse, household dysfunction) on this condition. The current study examined the cumulative influence of multiple types of childhood adversities on health anxiety in adulthood. Adults 18-59 years of age (N=264) completed a battery of measures to assess adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs (i.e., negative affect and trait anxiety). Significant associations were observed between adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that adverse childhood experiences were predictive of health anxiety in adulthood; however, the unique contribution of these experience were no longer significant following the inclusion of the other variables of interest. Subsequently, mediation analyses indicated that both negative affect and trait anxiety independently mediated the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood. Increased exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with higher levels of health anxiety in adulthood; this relationship is mediated through negative affect and trait anxiety. Findings support the long-term negative impact of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and emphasize the importance of addressing negative affect and trait anxiety in efforts to prevent and treat health anxiety.

  14. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  15. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  16. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  17. The neurobiological Correlates of Childhood Adversity and Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Burgers, Darcy E.; Philip, Noah S.; Price, Lawrence H.; Carpenter, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper provides an overview of research on the neurobiological correlates of childhood adversity and a selective review of treatment implications. Method Findings from a broad array of human and animal studies of early adversity were reviewed. Results Topics reviewed include neuroendocrine, neurotrophic, neuroimaging, and cognitive effects of adversity, as well as genetic and epigenetic influences. Effects of early life stress on treatment outcome are considered, and development of treatments designed to address the neurobiological abnormalities is discussed. Conclusion Early adversity is associated with abnormalities of several neurobiological systems that are implicated in the development of psychopathology and other medical conditions. Early life stress negatively impacts treatment outcome and individuals may require treatments that are specific to this condition. PMID:23662634

  18. A review of low-level air pollution and adverse effects on human health: implications for epidemiological studies and public policy

    PubMed Central

    Olmo, Neide Regina Simões; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilário; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira; Lin, Chin An; de Paula Santos, Ubiratan; Pereira, Luiz Alberto Amador

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review original scientific articles describing the relationship between atmospheric pollution and damage to human health. We also aimed to determine which of these studies mentioned public policy issues. Original articles relating to atmospheric pollution and human health published between 1995 and 2009 were retrieved from the PubMed database and analyzed. This study included only articles dealing with atmospheric pollutants resulting primarily from vehicle emissions. Three researchers were involved in the final selection of the studies, and the chosen articles were approved by at least two of the three researchers. Of the 84 non-Brazilian studies analyzed, 80 showed an association between atmospheric pollution and adverse effects on human health. Moreover, 66 showed evidence of adverse effects on human health, even at levels below the permitted emission standards. Three studies menti